WorldWideScience

Sample records for functionally overlapping mitochondria

  1. The dinoflagellates Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum retain functionally overlapping mitochondria from two evolutionarily distinct lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeling Patrick J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abtract Background The dinoflagellates Durinskia baltica and Kryptoperidinium foliaceum are distinguished by the presence of a tertiary plastid derived from a diatom endosymbiont. The diatom is fully integrated with the host cell cycle and is so altered in structure as to be difficult to recognize it as a diatom, and yet it retains a number of features normally lost in tertiary and secondary endosymbionts, most notably mitochondria. The dinoflagellate host is also reported to retain mitochondrion-like structures, making these cells unique in retaining two evolutionarily distinct mitochondria. This redundancy raises the question of whether the organelles share any functions in common or have distributed functions between them. Results We show that both host and endosymbiont mitochondrial genomes encode genes for electron transport proteins. We have characterized cytochrome c oxidase 1 (cox1, cytochrome oxidase 2 (cox2, cytochrome oxidase 3 (cox3, cytochrome b (cob, and large subunit of ribosomal RNA (LSUrRNA of endosymbiont mitochondrial ancestry, and cox1 and cob of host mitochondrial ancestry. We show that all genes are transcribed and that those ascribed to the host mitochondrial genome are extensively edited at the RNA level, as expected for a dinoflagellate mitochondrion-encoded gene. We also found evidence for extensive recombination in the host mitochondrial genes and that recombination products are also transcribed, as expected for a dinoflagellate. Conclusion Durinskia baltica and K. foliaceum retain two mitochondria from evolutionarily distinct lineages, and the functions of these organelles are at least partially overlapping, since both express genes for proteins in electron transport.

  2. Mitochondria: isolation, structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; Taivassalo, Tanja; Gouspillou, Gilles; Hepple, Russell T

    2011-09-15

    Mitochondria are complex organelles constantly undergoing processes of fusion and fission, processes that not only modulate their morphology, but also their function. Yet the assessment of mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle often involves mechanical isolation of the mitochondria, a process which disrupts their normally heterogeneous branching structure and yields relatively homogeneous spherical organelles. Alternatively, methods have been used where the sarcolemma is permeabilized and mitochondrial morphology is preserved, but both methods face the downside that they remove potential influences of the intracellular milieu on mitochondrial function. Importantly, recent evidence shows that the fragmented mitochondrial morphology resulting from routine mitochondrial isolation procedures used with skeletal muscle alters key indices of function in a manner qualitatively similar to mitochondria undergoing fission in vivo. Although these results warrant caution when interpreting data obtained with mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscle, they also suggest that isolated mitochondrial preparations might present a useful way of interrogating the stress resistance of mitochondria. More importantly, these new findings underscore the empirical value of studying mitochondrial function in minimally disruptive experimental preparations. In this review, we briefly discuss several considerations and hypotheses emerging from this work.

  3. Mitochondria and endocrine function of adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Gómez, Gema

    2012-12-01

    Excess of adipose tissue is accompanied by an increase in the risk of developing insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes (T2D) and other complications. Nevertheless, total or partial absence of fat or its accumulation in other tissues (lipotoxicity) is also associated to these complications. White adipose tissue (WAT) was traditionally considered a metabolically active storage tissue for lipids while brown adipose tissue (BAT) was considered as a thermogenic adipose tissue with higher oxidative capacity. Nowadays, WAT is also considered an endocrine organ that contributes to energy homeostasis. Experimental evidence tends to link the malfunction of adipose mitochondria with the development of obesity and T2D. This review discusses the importance of mitochondrial function in adipocyte biology and the increased evidences of mitochondria dysfunction in these epidemics. New strategies targeting adipocyte mitochondria from WAT and BAT are also discussed as therapies against obesity and its complications in the near future.

  4. Function approximation using adaptive and overlapping intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, R.B.

    1995-05-01

    A problem common to many disciplines is to approximate a function given only the values of the function at various points in input variable space. A method is proposed for approximating a function of several to one variable. The model takes the form of weighted averaging of overlapping basis functions defined over intervals. The number of such basis functions and their parameters (widths and centers) are automatically determined using given training data and a learning algorithm. The proposed algorithm can be seen as placing a nonuniform multidimensional grid in the input domain with overlapping cells. The non-uniformity and overlap of the cells is achieved by a learning algorithm to optimize a given objective function. This approach is motivated by the fuzzy modeling approach and a learning algorithms used for clustering and classification in pattern recognition. The basics of why and how the approach works are given. Few examples of nonlinear regression and classification are modeled. The relationship between the proposed technique, radial basis neural networks, kernel regression, probabilistic neural networks, and fuzzy modeling is explained. Finally advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  5. Cardiac mitochondria exhibit dynamic functional clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Tobias Kurz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential ΔΨm in self-organized cardiac mitochondrial networks can be triggered by metabolic or oxidative stress. Spatio-temporal analyses of cardiac mitochondrial networks have shown that mitochondria are heterogeneously organized in synchronously oscillating clusters in which the mean cluster frequency and size are inversely correlated, thus suggesting a modulation of cluster frequency through local inter-mitochondrial coupling. In this study, we propose a method to examine the mitochondrial network's topology through quantification of its dynamic local clustering coefficients. Individual mitochondrial ΔΨm oscillation signals were identified for each cardiac myocyte and cross-correlated with all network mitochondria using previously described methods (Kurz et al., 2010. Time-varying inter-mitochondrial connectivity, defined for mitochondria in the whole network whose signals are at least 90% correlated at any given time point, allowed considering functional local clustering coefficients. It is shown that mitochondrial clustering in isolated cardiac myocytes changes dynamically and is significantly higher than for random mitochondrial networks that are constructed using the Erdös-Rényi model based on the same sets of vertices. The network's time-averaged clustering coefficient for cardiac myocytes was found to be 0.500 ± 0.051 (N=9 versus 0.061 ± 0.020 for random networks, respectively. Our results demonstrate that cardiac mitochondria constitute a network with dynamically connected constituents whose topological organization is prone to clustering. Cluster partitioning in networks of coupled oscillators has been observed in scale-free and chaotic systems and is therefore in good agreement with previous models of cardiac mitochondrial networks (Aon et al., 2008.

  6. On the interpretation of wave function overlaps in quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Lodahl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    that the electron and the hole are located at the same point or region in space, i.e., they must coincide spatially to recombine. Here, we show that this interpretation is not correct even loosely speaking. By general mathematical considerations we compare the envelope wave function overlap, the exchange overlap......The spontaneous emission rate of excitons strongly confined in quantum dots (QDs) is proportional to the overlap integral of electron and hole envelope wave functions. A common and intuitive interpretation of this result is that the spontaneous emission rate is proportional to the probability...... compare our qualitative predictions with recent measurements of the wave function overlap and find good agreement....

  7. Do Neutrino Wave Functions Overlap and Does it Matter?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Cheng-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Studies of neutrinos commonly ignore anti-symmetrization of their wave functions. This implicitly assumes that either spatial wave functions for neutrinos with approximately the same momentum do not overlap or their overlapping has no measurable consequences. We examine these assumptions by considering the evolution of three-dimensional neutrino wave packets (WPs). We find that it is perfectly adequate to treat accelerator and reactor neutrinos as separate WPs for typical experimental setup. While solar and supernova neutrinos correspond to overlapping WPs, they can be treated effectively as non-overlapping for analyses of their detection.

  8. Mature Erythrocytes of Iguana iguana (Squamata, Iguanidae Possess Functional Mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Di Giacomo

    Full Text Available Electron microscopy analyses of Iguana iguana blood preparations revealed the presence of mitochondria within erythrocytes with well-structured cristae. Fluorescence microscopy analyses upon incubation with phalloidin-FITC, Hoechst 33342 and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm-sensitive probe MitoTracker Red indicated that mitochondria i widely occur in erythrocytes, ii are polarized, and iii seem to be preferentially confined at a "perinuclear" region, as confirmed by electron microscopy. The analysis of NADH-dependent oxygen consumption showed that red blood cells retain the capability to consume oxygen, thereby providing compelling evidence that mitochondria of Iguana erythrocytes are functional and capable to perform oxidative phosphorylation.

  9. Vertical overlap of probability density functions of cloud and precipitation hydrometeors: CLOUD AND PRECIPITATION PDF OVERLAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon Republic of Korea; Larson, Vincent E. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee Wisconsin USA; Wong, May [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA; National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Thayer-Calder, Katherine [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder Colorado USA; Ghan, Steven J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington USA

    2016-11-05

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. In CRM simulations that explicitly resolve cloud and precipitation structures, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher coherence in their vertical distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. These results suggest that to improve the overlap treatment in the sub-column generator, the PDF correlations need to depend on hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale.

  10. Internalization of isolated functional mitochondria: involvement of macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitani, Tomoya; Kami, Daisuke; Matoba, Satoaki; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a variety of human diseases. Delivery of exogenous functional mitochondria into damaged cells has been proposed as a mechanism of cell transplant and physiological repair for damaged tissue. We here demonstrated that isolated mitochondria can be transferred into homogeneic and xenogeneic cells by simple co-incubation using genetically labelled mitochondria, and elucidated the mechanism and the effect of direct mitochondrial transfer. Intracellular localization of exogenous mitochondria was confirmed by PCR, real-time PCR, live fluorescence imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction imaging, continuous time-lapse microscopic observation, flow cytometric analysis and immunoelectron microscopy. Isolated homogeneic mitochondria were transferred into human uterine endometrial gland-derived mesenchymal cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, mitochondrial transfer rescued the mitochondrial respiratory function and improved the cellular viability in mitochondrial DNA-depleted cells and these effects lasted several days. Finally, we discovered that mitochondrial internalization involves macropinocytosis. In conclusion, these data support direct transfer of exogenous mitochondria as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases. PMID:24912369

  11. Rejuvenating cellular respiration for optimizing respiratory function: targeting mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anurag; Mabalirajan, Ulaganathan

    2016-01-15

    Altered bioenergetics with increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and degradation of epithelial function are key aspects of pathogenesis in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This motif is not unique to obstructive airway disease, reported in related airway diseases such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia and parenchymal diseases such as pulmonary fibrosis. Similarly, mitochondrial dysfunction in vascular endothelium or skeletal muscles contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension and systemic manifestations of lung disease. In experimental models of COPD or asthma, the use of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ, has substantially improved mitochondrial health and restored respiratory function. Modulation of noncoding RNA or protein regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, or degradation has been found to be effective in models of fibrosis, emphysema, asthma, and pulmonary hypertension. Transfer of healthy mitochondria to epithelial cells has been associated with remarkable therapeutic efficacy in models of acute lung injury and asthma. Together, these form a 3R model--repair, reprogramming, and replacement--for mitochondria-targeted therapies in lung disease. This review highlights the key role of mitochondrial function in lung health and disease, with a focus on asthma and COPD, and provides an overview of mitochondria-targeted strategies for rejuvenating cellular respiration and optimizing respiratory function in lung diseases. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  12. Method for functional study of mitochondria in rat hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benani, Alexandre; Barquissau, Valentin; Carneiro, Lionel; Salin, Bénédicte; Colombani, Anne-Laure; Leloup, Corinne; Casteilla, Louis; Rigoulet, Michel; Pénicaud, Luc

    2009-04-15

    Different roles of mitochondria in brain function according to brain area are now clearly emerging. Unfortunately, no technique is yet described to investigate mitochondria function in specific brain area. In this article, we provide a complete description of a procedure to analyze the mitochondrial function in rat brain biopsies. Our two-step method consists in a saponin permeabilization of fresh brain tissues in combination with high-resolution respirometry to acquire the integrated respiratory rate of the biopsy. In the first part, we carefully checked the mitochondria integrity after permeabilization, defined experimental conditions to determine the respiratory control ratio (RCR), and tested the reproducibility of this technique. In the second part, we applied our method to test its sensitivity. As a result, this method was sensitive enough to reveal region specificity of mitochondrial respiration within the brain. Moreover, we detected physiopathological modulation of the mitochondrial function in the hypothalamus. Thus this new technique that takes all cell types into account, and does not discard or select any mitochondria sub-population is very suitable to analyze the integrated mitochondrial respiration of brain biopsies.

  13. Correlation functions at small quark masses with overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giusti, L. [CNRS Luminy, Marseille (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Hernandez, P. [Edificio Institutos Investigacion, Valencia (Spain). Dpto. Fisica Teorica and IFIC; Laine, M. [Bielefeld Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik; Pena, C.; Wennekers, J.; Wittig, H.; Weisz, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    We report on recent work on the determination of low-energy constants describing {delta}S = 1 weak transitions, in order to investigate the origins of the {delta}I = 1/2 rule. We focus on numerical techniques designed to enhance the statistical signal in three-point correlation functions computed with overlap fermions near the chiral limit. (orig.)

  14. Correlation functions at small quark masses with overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giusti, L. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS Luminy, F-13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France); Hernandez, P. [Dpto. Fisica Teorica and IFIC, Edificio Institutos Investigacion, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Laine, M. [Faculty of Physics, University of Bielefeld, D-33501 Bielefeld (Germany); Pena, C. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Weisz, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Munich (Germany); Wennekers, J. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Wittig, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany)

    2005-03-15

    We report on recent work on the determination of low-energy constants describing {delta}S=1 weak transitions, in order to investigate the origins of the {delta}I=1/2 rule. We focus on numerical techniques designed to enhance the statistical signal in three-point correlation functions computed with overlap fermions near the chiral limit.

  15. Correlation functions at small quark masses with overlap fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Giusti, Leonardo; Laine, Mikko; Peña, C; Weisz, P; Wennekers, J; Wittig, H

    2005-01-01

    We report on recent work on the determination of low-energy constants describing Delta{S}=1 weak transitions, in order to investigate the origins of the Delta{I}=1/2 rule. We focus on numerical techniques designed to enhance the statistical signal in three-point correlation functions computed with overlap fermions near the chiral limit.

  16. Molecular Mechanism of hTERT Function in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-20

    DNA metabolism REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8. PERFORMING...j.ajpath.2011.10.003 Donna Gordon, Janine Santos. The emerging role of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) in mitochondrial DNA metabolism ...lack of reagents to understand and isolate the mitochondrial versus nuclear function of the protein . Nevertheless, we now know that in the mitochondria

  17. Overlapping and non-overlapping functions of condensins I and II in neural stem cell divisions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nishide

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During development of the cerebral cortex, neural stem cells (NSCs divide symmetrically to proliferate and asymmetrically to generate neurons. Although faithful segregation of mitotic chromosomes is critical for NSC divisions, its fundamental mechanism remains unclear. A class of evolutionarily conserved protein complexes, known as condensins, is thought to be central to chromosome assembly and segregation among eukaryotes. Here we report the first comprehensive genetic study of mammalian condensins, demonstrating that two different types of condensin complexes (condensins I and II are both essential for NSC divisions and survival in mice. Simultaneous depletion of both condensins leads to severe defects in chromosome assembly and segregation, which in turn cause DNA damage and trigger p53-induced apoptosis. Individual depletions of condensins I and II lead to slower loss of NSCs compared to simultaneous depletion, but they display distinct mitotic defects: chromosome missegregation was observed more prominently in NSCs depleted of condensin II, whereas mitotic delays were detectable only in condensin I-depleted NSCs. Remarkably, NSCs depleted of condensin II display hyperclustering of pericentric heterochromatin and nucleoli, indicating that condensin II, but not condensin I, plays a critical role in establishing interphase nuclear architecture. Intriguingly, these defects are taken over to postmitotic neurons. Our results demonstrate that condensins I and II have overlapping and non-overlapping functions in NSCs, and also provide evolutionary insight into intricate balancing acts of the two condensin complexes.

  18. Hijacking mitochondria: bacterial toxins that modulate mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Tong, Janette; Gabriel, Kipros

    2012-05-01

    Bacterial infection has enormous global social and economic impacts stemming from effects on human health and agriculture. Although there are still many unanswered questions, decades of research has uncovered many of the pathogenic mechanisms at play. It is now clear that bacterial pathogens produce a plethora of proteins known as "toxins" and "effectors" that target a variety of physiological host processes during the course of infection. One of the targets of host targeted bacterial toxins and effectors are the mitochondria. The mitochondrial organelles are major players in many biological functions, including energy conversion to ATP and cell death pathways, which inherently makes them targets for bacterial proteins. We present a summary of the toxins targeted to mitochondria and for those that have been studied in finer detail, we also summarize what we know about the mechanisms of targeting and finally their action at the organelle.

  19. Functional overlap of the Arabidopsis leaf and root microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yang; Müller, Daniel B; Srinivas, Girish; Garrido-Oter, Ruben; Potthoff, Eva; Rott, Matthias; Dombrowski, Nina; Münch, Philipp C; Spaepen, Stijn; Remus-Emsermann, Mitja; Hüttel, Bruno; McHardy, Alice C; Vorholt, Julia A; Schulze-Lefert, Paul

    2015-12-17

    Roots and leaves of healthy plants host taxonomically structured bacterial assemblies, and members of these communities contribute to plant growth and health. We established Arabidopsis leaf- and root-derived microbiota culture collections representing the majority of bacterial species that are reproducibly detectable by culture-independent community sequencing. We found an extensive taxonomic overlap between the leaf and root microbiota. Genome drafts of 400 isolates revealed a large overlap of genome-encoded functional capabilities between leaf- and root-derived bacteria with few significant differences at the level of individual functional categories. Using defined bacterial communities and a gnotobiotic Arabidopsis plant system we show that the isolates form assemblies resembling natural microbiota on their cognate host organs, but are also capable of ectopic leaf or root colonization. While this raises the possibility of reciprocal relocation between root and leaf microbiota members, genome information and recolonization experiments also provide evidence for microbiota specialization to their respective niche.

  20. Isolation of functionally active and highly purified neuronal mitochondria from human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Yablonska, Svitlana; Baranov, Sergei V; Baranova, Oxana V; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Carlisle, Diane L; Richardson, R Mark; Friedlander, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Functional and structural properties of mitochondria are highly tissue and cell dependent, but isolation of highly purified human neuronal mitochondria is not currently available. We developed and validated a procedure to isolate purified neuronal mitochondria from brain tissue. The method combines Percoll gradient centrifugation to obtain synaptosomal fraction with nitrogen cavitation mediated synaptosome disruption and extraction of mitochondria using anti mitochondrial outer membrane protein antibodies conjugated to magnetic beads. The final products of isolation are non-synaptosomal mitochondria, which are a mixture of mitochondria isolated from different brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia) and synaptic mitochondria, which are of neuronal origin. This method is well suited for preparing functional mitochondria from human cortex tissue that is surgically extracted. The procedure produces mitochondria with minimal cytoplasmic contaminations that are functionally active based on measurements of mitochondrial respiration as well as mitochondrial protein import. The procedure requires approximately four hours for the isolation of human neuronal mitochondria and can also be used to isolate mitochondria from mouse/rat/monkey brains. This method will allow researchers to study highly enriched neuronal mitochondria without the confounding effect of cellular and organelle contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Strong genetic overlap between executive functions and intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Laura E; Mann, Frank D; Briley, Daniel A; Church, Jessica A; Harden, K Paige; Tucker-Drob, Elliot M

    2016-09-01

    Executive functions (EFs) are cognitive processes that control, monitor, and coordinate more basic cognitive processes. EFs play instrumental roles in models of complex reasoning, learning, and decision making, and individual differences in EFs have been consistently linked with individual differences in intelligence. By middle childhood, genetic factors account for a moderate proportion of the variance in intelligence, and these effects increase in magnitude through adolescence. Genetic influences on EFs are very high, even in middle childhood, but the extent to which these genetic influences overlap with those on intelligence is unclear. We examined genetic and environmental overlap between EFs and intelligence in a racially and socioeconomically diverse sample of 811 twins ages 7 to 15 years (M = 10.91, SD = 1.74) from the Texas Twin Project. A general EF factor representing variance common to inhibition, switching, working memory, and updating domains accounted for substantial proportions of variance in intelligence, primarily via a genetic pathway. General EF continued to have a strong, genetically mediated association with intelligence even after controlling for processing speed. Residual variation in general intelligence was influenced only by shared and nonshared environmental factors, and there remained no genetic variance in general intelligence that was unique of EF. Genetic variance independent of EF did remain, however, in a more specific perceptual reasoning ability. These results provide evidence that genetic influences on general intelligence are highly overlapping with those on EF. (PsycINFO Database Record

  2. Triphenyl Phosphine-Functionalized Chitosan Nanoparticles Enhanced Antitumor Efficiency Through Targeted Delivery of Doxorubicin to Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jiahui; Yu, Xiwei; Shen, Yaping; Shi, Yijie; Su, Chang; Zhao, Liang

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondria as an important organ in eukaryotic cells produced energy through oxidative phosphorylation and also played an important role in regulating the apoptotic signal transduction process. Importantly, mitochondria like nuclei also contained the functional DNA and were very sensitive to anticancer drugs which could effectively inhibit the synthesis of nucleic acid, especially the production of DNA. In this work, we designed novel triphenyl phosphine (TPP)-conjugated chitosan (CS) nanoparticles (NPs) for efficient drug delivery to cell mitochondria. The results showed that compared with free doxorubicin (Dox), Dox-loaded TPP-NPs were specifically distributed in mitochondria of tumor cells and interfered with the function of mitochondria, thus resulted in the higher cytotoxicity and induced the significant cell apoptosis effect. Taken together, triphenyl phosphine-conjugated chitosan nanoparticles may become a promising mitochondria-targeting nanocarrier candidate for enhancing antitumor effects.

  3. DNA Import into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinov, Yu M; Dietrich, A; Weber-Lotfi, F; Ibrahim, N; Klimenko, E S; Tarasenko, V I; Bolotova, T A; Koulintchenko, M V

    2016-10-01

    In recent decades, it has become evident that the condition for normal functioning of mitochondria in higher eukaryotes is the presence of membrane transport systems of macromolecules (proteins and nucleic acids). Natural competence of the mitochondria in plants, animals, and yeasts to actively uptake DNA may be directly related to horizontal gene transfer into these organelles occurring at much higher rate compared to the nuclear and chloroplast genomes. However, in contrast with import of proteins and tRNAs, little is known about the biological role and molecular mechanism underlying import of DNA into eukaryotic mitochondria. In this review, we discuss current state of investigations in this area, particularly specificity of DNA import into mitochondria and its features in plants, animals, and yeasts; a tentative mechanism of DNA import across the mitochondrial outer and inner membranes; experimental data evidencing several existing, but not yet fully understood mechanisms of DNA transfer into mitochondria. Currently available data regarding transport of informational macromolecules (DNA, RNA, and proteins) into the mitochondria do not rule out that the mechanism of protein and tRNA import as well as tRNA and DNA import into the mitochondria may partially overlap.

  4. Capulet and Slingshot share overlapping functions during Drosophila eye morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chiao-Ming

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background CAP/Capulet (Capt, Slingshot (Ssh and Cofilin/Twinstar (Tsr are actin-binding proteins that restrict actin polymerization. Previously, it was shown that low resolution analyses of loss-of-function mutations in capt, ssh and tsr all show ectopic F-actin accumulation in various Drosophila tissues. In contrast, RNAi depletion of capt, tsr and ssh in Drosophila S2 cells all affect actin-based lamella formation differently. Whether loss of these three related genes might cause the same effect in the same tissue remains unclear. Methods Loss-of-function mutant clones were generated using the MARCM or EGUF system whereas overexpression clones were generated using the Flip-out system. Immunostaining were then performed in eye imaginal discs with clones. FRAP was performed in cultured eye discs. Results Here, we compared their loss-of-function phenotype at single-cell resolution, using a sheet of epithelial cells in the Drosophila eye imaginal disc as a model system. Surprisingly, we found that capt and ssh, but not tsr, mutant cells within and posterior to the morphogenetic furrow (MF shared similar phenotypes. The capt/ssh mutant cells possessed: (1 hexagonal cell packing with discontinuous adherens junctions; and (2 largely complementary accumulation of excessive phosphorylated myosin light chain (p-MLC and F-actin rings at the apical cortex. We further showed that the capt/ssh mutant phenotypes depended on the inactivation of protein kinase A (PKA and activation of Rho. Conclusions Although Capt, Ssh and Tsr were reported to negatively regulate actin polymerization, we found that Capt and Ssh, but not Tsr, share overlapping functions during eye morphogenesis.

  5. Involvement of S6K1 in mitochondria function and structure in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Tran, Quangdon; Mun, Kisun; Masuda, Kouhei; Kwon, So Hee; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Thomas, George; Park, Jongsun

    2016-12-01

    The major biological function of mitochondria is to generate cellular energy through oxidative phosphorylation. Apart from cellular respiration, mitochondria also play a key role in signaling processes, including aging and cancer metabolism. It has been shown that S6K1-knockout mice are resistant to obesity due to enhanced beta-oxidation, with an increased number of large mitochondria. Therefore, in this report, the possible involvement of S6K1 in regulating mitochondria dynamics and function has been investigated in stable lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells. Interestingly, S6K1-stably depleted HeLa cells showed phenotypical changes in mitochondria morphology. This observation was further confirmed by detailed image analysis of mitochondria shape. Corresponding molecular changes were also observed in these cells, such as the induction of mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and Fis1). Oxygen consumption is elevated in S6K1-depeleted HeLa cells and FL5.12 cells. In addition, S6K1 depletion leads to enhancement of ATP production in cytoplasm and mitochondria. However, the relative ratio of mitochondrial ATP to cytoplasmic ATP is actually decreased in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells compared to control cells. Lastly, induction of mitophagy was found in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells with corresponding changes of mitochondria shape on electron microscope analysis. Taken together, our results indicate that S6K1 is involved in the regulation of mitochondria morphology and function in HeLa cells. This study will provide novel insights into S6K1 function in mitochondria-mediated cellular signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of the lamp mapping technique for overlap function for Raman lidar systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Monique; Venable, Demetrius; Whiteman, David N; Sakai, Tetsu

    2016-04-01

    Traditionally, the lidar water vapor mixing ratio (WVMR) is corrected for overlap using data from another instrument, such as a radiosonde. Here we introduce a new experimental method to determine the overlap function using the lamp mapping technique (LMT), which relies on the lidar optics and detection system. The LMT discussed here involves a standard halogen lamp being scanned over the aperture of a Raman lidar telescope in synchronization with the lidar detection system [Appl. Opt.50, 4622 (2011)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.50.004622, Appl. Opt.53, 8538 (2014)APOPAI0003-693510.1364/AO.53.008535]. In this paper, we show results for a LMT-determined overlap function for individual channels, as well as a WVMR overlap function. We found that the LMT-determined WVMR overlap functions deviate within 5% of the traditional radiosonde-determined overlap.

  7. Isolation and functional assessment of mitochondria from small amounts of mouse brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinopoulos, Christos; Zhang, Steven F; Thomas, Bobby; Ten, Vadim; Starkov, Anatoly A

    2011-01-01

    Recent discoveries have brought mitochondria functions in focus of the neuroscience research community and greatly stimulated the demand for approaches to study mitochondria dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases. Many mouse disease models have been generated, but studying mitochondria isolated from individual mouse brain regions is a challenge because of small amount of the available brain tissue. Conventional techniques for isolation and purification of mitochondria from mouse brain subregions, such as ventral midbrain, hippocampus, or striatum, require pooling brain tissue from six to nine animals for a single mitochondrial preparation. Working with pooled tissue significantly decreases the quality of data because of the time required to dissect several brains. It also greatly increases the labor intensity and the cost of experiments as several animals are required per single data point. We describe a method for isolation of brain mitochondria from mouse striata or other 7-12 mg brain samples. The method utilizes a refrigerated table-top microtube centrifuge, and produces research grade quality mitochondria in amounts sufficient for performing multiple enzymatic and functional assays, thereby eliminating the necessity for pooling mouse brain tissue. We also include a method of measuring ADP-ATP exchange rate as a function of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in small amounts of isolated mitochondria, adapted to a plate reader format.

  8. Aging synaptic mitochondria exhibit dynamic proteomic changes while maintaining bioenergetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-04-01

    Aging correlates with a progressive impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis and is an influential factor for several forms of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related alterations in synaptosomal mitochondria, a neuronal mitochondria population highly susceptible to insults and critical for brain function, remain incompletely understood. Therefore this study investigates the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic and bioenergetic alterations that occur with age. The utilization of a state of the art quantitative proteomics approach allowed for the comparison of protein expression levels in synaptic mitochondria isolated from 5 (mature), 12 (old), and 24 (aged) month old mice. During the process of aging we find that dynamic proteomic alterations occur in synaptic mitochondria. Despite direct (mitochondrial DNA deletions) and indirect (increased antioxidant protein levels) signs of mitochondrial damage in the aged mice, there was an overall maintenance of mitochondrial function. Therefore the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic changes that occur with aging correlate with preservation of synaptic mitochondrial function.

  9. Locating protein-coding sequences under selection for additional, overlapping functions in 29 mammalian genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lin, Michael F; Kheradpour, Pouya; Washietl, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    synonymous constraint in these regions reflects selection on overlapping functional elements including splicing regulatory elements, dual-coding genes, RNA secondary structures, microRNA target sites, and developmental enhancers. Our results show that overlapping functional elements are common in mammalian...

  10. Cumulative overlap distribution function in realistic spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billoire, A.; Maiorano, A.; Marinari, E.; Martin-Mayor, V.; Yllanes, D.

    2014-09-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick and 3D Edwards-Anderson models of Ising spin glasses. We find that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish between replica symmetry breaking-like and droplet-like behavior of the spin-glass phase. Our results are in agreement with a replica symmetry breaking-like behavior for the 3D Edwards-Anderson model.

  11. The antileishmanial agent licochalcone A interferes with the function of parasite mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhai, L; Blom, J; Chen, M

    1995-01-01

    the ultrastructure of Leishmania major promastigote and amastigote mitochondria in a concentration-dependent manner without damaging the organelles of macrophages or the phagocytic function of these cells. Studies on the function of the parasite mitochondria showed that licochalcone A inhibited the respiration....... Khrazmi, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1339-1344, 1994) and antimalarial (M. Chen, T.G. Theander, S.B. Christensen, L. Hviid, L. Zhai, and A. Kaharazmi, Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 38:1470-1475, 1994) activities. We have observed that licochalcone A alters the ultrastructure of the mitochondria...... of the parasite by the parasites. Moreover, licochalcone A inhibited the activity of the parasite mitochondrial dehydrogenase. The inhibition of the activity of the parasite mitochondrial enzyme correlated well with the changes in the ultrastructure of the mitochondria shown by electron microscopy. These findings...

  12. Parkin functionally interacts with PGC-1α to preserve mitochondria and protect dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lu; Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Moullan, Norman; D'Amico, Davide; Auwerx, Johan; Moore, Darren J; Knott, Graham; Aebischer, Patrick; Schneider, Bernard L

    2017-02-01

    To understand the cause of Parkinson's disease (PD), it is important to determine the functional interactions between factors linked to the disease. Parkin is associated with autosomal recessive early-onset PD, and controls the transcription of PGC-1α, a master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. These two factors functionally interact to regulate the turnover and quality of mitochondria, by increasing both mitophagic activity and mitochondria biogenesis. In cortical neurons, co-expressing PGC-1α and Parkin increases the number of mitochondria, enhances maximal respiration, and accelerates the recovery of the mitochondrial membrane potential following mitochondrial uncoupling. PGC-1α enhances Mfn2 transcription, but also leads to increased degradation of the Mfn2 protein, a key ubiquitylation target of Parkin on mitochondria. In vivo, Parkin has significant protective effects on the survival and function of nigral dopaminergic neurons in which the chronic expression of PGC-1α is induced. Ultrastructural analysis shows that these two factors together control the density of mitochondria and their interaction with the endoplasmic reticulum. These results highlight the combined effects of Parkin and PGC-1α in the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis in dopaminergic neurons. These two factors synergistically control the quality and function of mitochondria, which is important for the survival of neurons in Parkinson's disease. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Aprataxin localizes to mitochondria and preserves mitochondrial function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sykora, Peter; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2011-01-01

    aborted ligation reactions. We report herein that aprataxin localizes to mitochondria in human cells and we identify an N-terminal amino acid sequence that targets certain isoforms of the protein to this intracellular compartment. We also show that transcripts encoding this unique N-terminal stretch...... are expressed in the human brain, with highest production in the cerebellum. Depletion of aprataxin in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and primary skeletal muscle myoblasts results in mitochondrial dysfunction, which is revealed by reduced citrate synthase activity and mtDNA copy number. Moreover, mt...

  14. Macrophages and Mitochondria: A Critical Interplay Between Metabolism, Signaling, and the Functional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, J; Vico, T; Lloberas, J; Zorzano, A; Celada, A

    2017-01-01

    Macrophages are phagocytic cells that participate in a broad range of cellular functions and they are key regulators of innate immune responses and inflammation. Mitochondria are highly dynamic endosymbiotic organelles that play key roles in cellular metabolism and apoptosis. Mounting evidence suggests that mitochondria are involved in the interplay between metabolism and innate immune responses. The ability of these organelles to alter the metabolic profile of a cell, thereby allowing an appropriate response to each situation, is crucial for the correct establishment of immune responses. Furthermore, mitochondria act as scaffolds for many proteins involved in immune signaling pathways and as such they are able to modulate the function of these proteins. Finally, mitochondria release molecules, such as reactive oxygen species, which directly regulate the immune response. In summary, mitochondria can be considered as core components in the regulation of innate immune signaling. Here we discuss the intricate relationship between mitochondria, metabolism, intracellular signaling, and innate immune responses in macrophages. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Large gene overlaps in prokaryotic genomes: result of functional constraints or mispredictions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harrington Eoghan D

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Across the fully sequenced microbial genomes there are thousands of examples of overlapping genes. Many of these are only a few nucleotides long and are thought to function by permitting the coordinated regulation of gene expression. However, there should also be selective pressure against long overlaps, as the existence of overlapping reading frames increases the risk of deleterious mutations. Here we examine the longest overlaps and assess whether they are the product of special functional constraints or of erroneous annotation. Results We analysed the genes that overlap by 60 bps or more among 338 fully-sequenced prokaryotic genomes. The likely functional significance of an overlap was determined by comparing each of the genes to its respective orthologs. If a gene showed a significantly different length from its orthologs it was considered unlikely to be functional and therefore the result of an error either in sequencing or gene prediction. Focusing on 715 co-directional overlaps longer than 60 bps, we classified the erroneous ones into five categories: i 5'-end extension of the downstream gene due to either a mispredicted start codon or a frameshift at 5'-end of the gene (409 overlaps, ii fragmentation of a gene caused by a frameshift (163, iii 3'-end extension of the upstream gene due to either a frameshift at 3'-end of a gene or point mutation at the stop codon (68, iv Redundant gene predictions (4, v 5' & 3'-end extension which is a combination of i and iii (71. We also studied 75 divergent overlaps that could be classified as misannotations of group i. Nevertheless we found some convergent long overlaps (54 that might be true overlaps, although an important part of convergent overlaps could be classified as group iii (124. Conclusion Among the 968 overlaps larger than 60 bps which we analysed, we did not find a single real one among the co-directional and divergent orientations and concluded that there had been an

  16. UCP1 in Brite/Beige Adipose Tissue Mitochondria Is Functionally Thermogenic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina G. Shabalina

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of white fat “browning,” in which certain white adipose tissue depots significantly increase gene expression for the uncoupling protein UCP1 and thus supposedly acquire thermogenic, fat-burning properties, has attracted considerable attention. Because the mRNA increases are from very low initial levels, the metabolic relevance of the change is unclear: is the UCP1 protein thermogenically competent in these brite/beige-fat mitochondria? We found that, in mitochondria isolated from the inguinal “white” adipose depot of cold-acclimated mice, UCP1 protein levels almost reached those in brown-fat mitochondria. The UCP1 was thermogenically functional, in that these mitochondria exhibited UCP1-dependent thermogenesis with lipid or carbohydrate substrates with canonical guanosine diphosphate (GDP sensitivity and loss of thermogenesis in UCP1 knockout (KO mice. Obesogenic mouse strains had a lower thermogenic potential than obesity-resistant strains. The thermogenic density (UCP1-dependent oxygen consumption per g tissue of inguinal white adipose tissue was maximally one-fifth of interscapular brown adipose tissue, and the total quantitative contribution of all inguinal mitochondria was maximally one-third of all interscapular brown-fat mitochondria, indicating that the classical brown adipose tissue depots would still predominate in thermogenesis.

  17. The E2F family: specific functions and overlapping interests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Attwooll, Claire; Lazzerini Denchi, Eros; Helin, Kristian

    2004-01-01

    The E2F transcription factors are key regulators of cell cycle progression and the E2F field has made rapid advances since its advent in 1986. Yet, while our understanding of the roles and functions of the E2F family has made enormous progress, with each discovery new questions arise. In this rev...

  18. Isolation of functional mitochondria from rat kidney and skeletal muscle without manual homogenization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Vera S; Greenberg, Heather K; Baranov, Sergei V; Carlson, Greta M; Stavrovskaya, Irina G; Lazarev, Alexander V; Kristal, Bruce S

    2011-11-15

    Isolation of functional and intact mitochondria from solid tissue is crucial for studies that focus on the elucidation of normal mitochondrial physiology and/or mitochondrial dysfunction in conditions such as aging, diabetes, and cancer. There is growing recognition of the importance of mitochondria both as targets for drug development and as off-target mediators of drug side effects. Unfortunately, mitochondrial isolation from tissue is generally carried out using homogenizer-based methods that require extensive operator experience to obtain reproducible high-quality preparations. These methods limit dissemination, impede scale-up, and contribute to difficulties in reproducing experimental results over time and across laboratories. Here we describe semiautomated methods to disrupt tissue using kidney and muscle mitochondria preparations as exemplars. These methods use the Barocycler, the PCT Shredder, or both. The PCT Shredder is a mechanical grinder that quickly breaks up tissue without significant risk of overhomogenization. Mitochondria isolated using the PCT Shredder are shown to be comparable to controls. The Barocycler generates controlled pressure pulses that can be adjusted to lyse cells and release organelles. The mitochondria subjected to pressure cycling-mediated tissue disruption are shown to retain functionality, enabling combinations of the PCT Shredder and the Barocycler to be used to purify mitochondrial preparations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An Essential Role for COPI in mRNA Localization to Mitochondria and Mitochondrial Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabezhinsky, Dmitry; Slobodin, Boris; Rapaport, Doron; Gerst, Jeffrey E

    2016-04-19

    Nuclear-encoded mRNAs encoding mitochondrial proteins (mMPs) can localize directly to the mitochondrial surface, yet how mMPs target mitochondria and whether RNA targeting contributes to protein import into mitochondria and cellular metabolism are unknown. Here, we show that the COPI vesicle coat complex is necessary for mMP localization to mitochondria and mitochondrial function. COPI inactivation leads to reduced mMP binding to COPI itself, resulting in the dissociation of mMPs from mitochondria, a reduction in mitochondrial membrane potential, a decrease in protein import in vivo and in vitro, and severe deficiencies in mitochondrial respiration. Using a model mMP (OXA1), we observed that COPI inactivation (or mutation of the potential COPI-interaction site) led to altered mRNA localization and impaired cellular respiration. Overall, COPI-mediated mMP targeting is critical for mitochondrial protein import and function, and transcript delivery to the mitochondria or endoplasmic reticulum is regulated by cis-acting RNA sequences and trans-acting proteins.

  20. Actin in Mung Bean Mitochondria and Implications for Its Function[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Yih-Shan; Cheng, Ning; Hsiao, Lin-June; Annamalai, Arunachalam; Jauh, Guang-Yuh; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Dai, Hwa; Chiang, Kwen-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Here, a large fraction of plant mitochondrial actin was found to be resistant to protease and high-salt treatments, suggesting it was protected by mitochondrial membranes. A portion of this actin became sensitive to protease or high-salt treatment after removal of the mitochondrial outer membrane, indicating that some actin is located inside the mitochondrial outer membrane. The import of an actin–green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein into the mitochondria in a transgenic plant, actin:GFP, was visualized in living cells and demonstrated by flow cytometry and immunoblot analyses. Polymerized actin was found in mitochondria of actin:GFP plants and in mung bean (Vigna radiata). Notably, actin associated with mitochondria purified from early-developing cotyledons during seed germination was sensitive to high-salt and protease treatments. With cotyledon ageing, mitochondrial actin became more resistant to both treatments. The progressive import of actin into cotyledon mitochondria appeared to occur in concert with the conversion of quiescent mitochondria into active forms during seed germination. The binding of actin to mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) was demonstrated by liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry analysis. Porin and ADP/ATP carrier proteins were also found in mtDNA-protein complexes. Treatment with an actin depolymerization reagent reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and triggered the release of cytochrome C. The potential function of mitochondrial actin and a possible actin import pathway are discussed. PMID:21984697

  1. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Beekman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is r

  2. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aanen, D.K.; Spelbrink, J.N.; Beekman, M.

    2014-01-01

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is

  3. The clinical overlap between functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome based on Rome III criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU SiChun

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Epidemiological studies suggest considerable overlap between functional dyspepsia (FD and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. To date, no surveys have been performed to investigate the clinical overlap between these two disorders using Rome III criteria. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for the overlap of FD and IBS based on Rome III criteria in a large clinical sample. Methods Consecutive patients at the general gastroenterology outpatient clinic were requested to complete a self-report questionnaire. FD and IBS were defined by Rome III criteria. Results Questionnaires were returned by 3014 patients (52.8% female, 89% response rate. FD-IBS overlap was observed in 5.0% of the patients, while 15.2% and 10.9% of the patients were classified as FD alone and IBS alone, respectively. Compared with non-IBS patients, the odds ratio of having FD among IBS patients was 2.09 (95% CI: 1.68–2.59. Patients with FD-IBS overlap had higher severity scores for the postprandial fullness symptom (2.35 ± 1.49 vs. 1.72 ± 1.59, P Conclusion Clinical overlap of FD and IBS according to Rome III criteria is very common. One risk factor for FD-IBS overlap is the presence of postprandial fullness symptom. This study provides clues for future pathophysiological studies of FD and IBS.

  4. Blood-feeding induces reversible functional changes in flight muscle mitochondria of Aedes aegypti mosquito.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata L S Gonçalves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hematophagy poses a challenge to blood-feeding organisms since products of blood digestion can exert cellular deleterious effects. Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways, and also an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, modulating redox metabolism. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial function should be relevant for hematophagous arthropods. Here, we investigated the effects of blood-feeding on flight muscle (FM mitochondria from the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of dengue and yellow fever. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood-feeding caused a reversible reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, an event that was parallel to blood digestion. These changes were most intense at 24 h after blood meal (ABM, the peak of blood digestion, when oxygen consumption was inhibited by 68%. Cytochromes c and a+a(3 levels and cytochrome c oxidase activity of the electron transport chain were all reduced at 24 h ABM. Ultrastructural and molecular analyses of FM revealed that mitochondria fuse upon blood meal, a condition related to reduced ROS generation. Consistently, BF induced a reversible decrease in mitochondrial H(2O(2 formation during blood digestion, reaching their lowest values at 24 h ABM where a reduction of 51% was observed. CONCLUSION: Blood-feeding triggers functional and structural changes in hematophagous insect mitochondria, which may represent an important adaptation to blood feeding.

  5. Blood-Feeding Induces Reversible Functional Changes in Flight Muscle Mitochondria of Aedes aegypti Mosquito

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Renata L. S.; Machado, Ana Carolina L.; Paiva-Silva, Gabriela O.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Momoli, Marisa M.; Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Vannier-Santos, Marcos A.; Galina, Antonio; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Hematophagy poses a challenge to blood-feeding organisms since products of blood digestion can exert cellular deleterious effects. Mitochondria perform multiple roles in cell biology acting as the site of aerobic energy-transducing pathways, and also an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), modulating redox metabolism. Therefore, regulation of mitochondrial function should be relevant for hematophagous arthropods. Here, we investigated the effects of blood-feeding on flight muscle (FM) mitochondria from the mosquito Aedes aegypti, a vector of dengue and yellow fever. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood-feeding caused a reversible reduction in mitochondrial oxygen consumption, an event that was parallel to blood digestion. These changes were most intense at 24 h after blood meal (ABM), the peak of blood digestion, when oxygen consumption was inhibited by 68%. Cytochromes c and a+a3 levels and cytochrome c oxidase activity of the electron transport chain were all reduced at 24 h ABM. Ultrastructural and molecular analyses of FM revealed that mitochondria fuse upon blood meal, a condition related to reduced ROS generation. Consistently, BF induced a reversible decrease in mitochondrial H2O2 formation during blood digestion, reaching their lowest values at 24 h ABM where a reduction of 51% was observed. Conclusion Blood-feeding triggers functional and structural changes in hematophagous insect mitochondria, which may represent an important adaptation to blood feeding. PMID:19924237

  6. Mechanisms by Which Different Functional States of Mitochondria Define Yeast Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Adam; Leonov, Anna; Arlia-Ciommo, Anthony; Svistkova, Veronika; Lutchman, Vicky; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial functionality is vital to organismal physiology. A body of evidence supports the notion that an age-related progressive decline in mitochondrial function is a hallmark of cellular and organismal aging in evolutionarily distant eukaryotes. Studies of the baker’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a unicellular eukaryote, have led to discoveries of genes, signaling pathways and chemical compounds that modulate longevity-defining cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms across phyla. These studies have provided deep insights into mechanistic links that exist between different traits of mitochondrial functionality and cellular aging. The molecular mechanisms underlying the essential role of mitochondria as signaling organelles in yeast aging have begun to emerge. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding mechanisms by which different functional states of mitochondria define yeast longevity, outline the most important unanswered questions and suggest directions for future research. PMID:25768339

  7. The clinical overlap between functional dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome based on Rome III criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Anjiang; Liao, XianHua; Xiong, LiShou; Peng, Sui; Xiao, YingLian; Liu, SiChun; Hu, PinJin; Chen, MinHu

    2008-09-23

    Epidemiological studies suggest considerable overlap between functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). To date, no surveys have been performed to investigate the clinical overlap between these two disorders using Rome III criteria. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors for the overlap of FD and IBS based on Rome III criteria in a large clinical sample. Consecutive patients at the general gastroenterology outpatient clinic were requested to complete a self-report questionnaire. FD and IBS were defined by Rome III criteria. Questionnaires were returned by 3014 patients (52.8% female, 89% response rate). FD-IBS overlap was observed in 5.0% of the patients, while 15.2% and 10.9% of the patients were classified as FD alone and IBS alone, respectively. Compared with non-IBS patients, the odds ratio of having FD among IBS patients was 2.09 (95% CI: 1.68-2.59). Patients with FD-IBS overlap had higher severity scores for the postprandial fullness symptom (2.35 +/- 1.49 vs. 1.72 +/- 1.59, P Rome III criteria is very common. One risk factor for FD-IBS overlap is the presence of postprandial fullness symptom. This study provides clues for future pathophysiological studies of FD and IBS.

  8. Vertical Overlap of Probability Density Functions of Cloud and Precipitation Hydrometeors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, M.; Lim, K. S. S.; Larson, V. E.; Wong, M.; Thayer-Calder, K.; Ghan, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    Coarse-resolution climate models increasingly rely on probability density functions (PDFs) to represent subgrid-scale variability of prognostic variables. While PDFs characterize the horizontal variability, a separate treatment is needed to account for the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. When sub-columns are drawn from these PDFs for microphysics or radiation parameterizations, appropriate vertical correlations must be enforced via PDF overlap specifications. This study evaluates the representation of PDF overlap in the Subgrid Importance Latin Hypercube Sampler (SILHS) employed in the assumed PDF turbulence and cloud scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB). PDF overlap in CLUBB-SILHS simulations of continental and tropical oceanic deep convection is compared with overlap of PDF of various microphysics variables in cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of the same cases that explicitly predict the 3D structure of cloud and precipitation fields. CRM results show that PDF overlap varies significantly between different hydrometeor types, as well as between PDFs of mass and number mixing ratios for each species, - a distinction that the current SILHS implementation does not make. Specifically, faster falling species, such as rain and graupel, exhibit significantly higher vertical coherence in their distributions than slow falling cloud liquid and ice. Development of a PDF overlap treatment linked to hydrometeor properties, such as fall speeds, in addition to the currently implemented dependency on the turbulent convective length scale will be discussed.

  9. PyMut: a web tool for overlapping gene loss-of-function mutation design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Hou, Sha; Dai, Junbiao; Sun, Zhirong

    2015-12-03

    Loss-of-function study is an effective approach to research gene functions. However, currently most of such studies have ignored an important problem (in this paper, we call it "off-target" problem), that is, if the target gene is an overlapping gene (A gene whose expressible nucleotides overlaps with that of another one), loss-of-function muta-tion by deleting the complete open reading frame (ORF) may also cause the gene it overlaps lose function, resulting a phenotype which may be rather different from that of single gene deletion. Therefore, when doing such studies, the loss-of-function mutations should be carefully designed to guarantee only the function of the target gene will be abolished. In this paper, we present PyMut, an easy-to-use web tool for biologists to design such mutations. To the best of our knowledge, PyMut is the first tool that aims to solve the "off-target" problem regarding the overlapping genes. Our web server is freely available at http://www.bioinfo.tsinghua.edu.cn/~liuke/PyMut/index.html.

  10. Physical and functional association of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) with skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elustondo, Pia A; White, Adrienne E; Hughes, Meghan E; Brebner, Karen; Pavlov, Evgeny; Kane, Daniel A

    2013-08-30

    The intracellular lactate shuttle hypothesis posits that lactate generated in the cytosol is oxidized by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of the same cell. To examine whether skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidize lactate, mitochondrial respiratory oxygen flux (JO2) was measured during the sequential addition of various substrates and cofactors onto permeabilized rat gastrocnemius muscle fibers, as well as isolated mitochondrial subpopulations. Addition of lactate did not alter JO2. However, subsequent addition of NAD(+) significantly increased JO2, and was abolished by the inhibitor of mitochondrial pyruvate transport, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate. In experiments with isolated subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondrial subpopulations, only subsarcolemmal exhibited NAD(+)-dependent lactate oxidation. To further investigate the details of the physical association of LDH with mitochondria in muscle, immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and immunoblotting approaches were used. LDH clearly colocalized with mitochondria in intact, as well as permeabilized fibers. LDH is likely localized inside the outer mitochondrial membrane, but not in the mitochondrial matrix. Collectively, these results suggest that extra-matrix LDH is strategically positioned within skeletal muscle fibers to functionally interact with mitochondria.

  11. Physical and Functional Association of Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) with Skeletal Muscle Mitochondria*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elustondo, Pia A.; White, Adrienne E.; Hughes, Meghan E.; Brebner, Karen; Pavlov, Evgeny; Kane, Daniel A.

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular lactate shuttle hypothesis posits that lactate generated in the cytosol is oxidized by mitochondrial lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) of the same cell. To examine whether skeletal muscle mitochondria oxidize lactate, mitochondrial respiratory oxygen flux (JO2) was measured during the sequential addition of various substrates and cofactors onto permeabilized rat gastrocnemius muscle fibers, as well as isolated mitochondrial subpopulations. Addition of lactate did not alter JO2. However, subsequent addition of NAD+ significantly increased JO2, and was abolished by the inhibitor of mitochondrial pyruvate transport, α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate. In experiments with isolated subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondrial subpopulations, only subsarcolemmal exhibited NAD+-dependent lactate oxidation. To further investigate the details of the physical association of LDH with mitochondria in muscle, immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and immunoblotting approaches were used. LDH clearly colocalized with mitochondria in intact, as well as permeabilized fibers. LDH is likely localized inside the outer mitochondrial membrane, but not in the mitochondrial matrix. Collectively, these results suggest that extra-matrix LDH is strategically positioned within skeletal muscle fibers to functionally interact with mitochondria. PMID:23873936

  12. Proteomic analysis and functional characterization of mouse brain mitochondria during aging reveal alterations in energy metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Villeneuve, Lance M; Fox, Howard S

    2015-05-01

    Mitochondria are the main cellular source of reactive oxygen species and are recognized as key players in several age-associated disorders and neurodegeneration. Their dysfunction has also been linked to cellular aging. Additionally, mechanisms leading to the preservation of mitochondrial function promote longevity. In this study we investigated the proteomic and functional alterations in brain mitochondria isolated from mature (5 months old), old (12 months old), and aged (24 months old) mice as determinants of normal "healthy" aging. Here the global changes concomitant with aging in the mitochondrial proteome of mouse brain analyzed by quantitative mass-spectrometry based super-SILAC identified differentially expressed proteins involved in several metabolic pathways including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Despite these changes, the bioenergetic function of these mitochondria was preserved. Overall, this data indicates that proteomic changes during aging may compensate for functional defects aiding in preservation of mitochondrial function. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001370 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001370).

  13. THE ENERGETIC FUNCTIONS OF PLANT MITOCHONDRIA UNDER STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabelnych O.I.

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the involvement of the mitochondrial systems, which maintain the balance of cell energy at different stress conditions. It is shown the functioning of the alternative oxidase, free fatty acids, uncoupling proteins, the rotenone-insensitive NAD(PH dehydrogenases, the ADP/ATP-antiporter, the permeability transition pore and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (К+ATP. It is discussed data about physiological role of these systems in plant cell.

  14. Ultrastructure and function of mitochondria in gametocytic stage of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krungkrai J.

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Morphological properties of the mitochondrial organelles in the asexual and sexual gametocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum have been analyzed and found to be markedly different. From in vitro cultures of both stages in human erythrocytes, it has been demonstrated that the asexual stages contained a defined double-membrane organelle having a few tubular-like cristae. The numbers of mitochondria in the gametocytes were found to be ~ 6 organelles per parasite, and they showed a greater density of the cristae than that of the asexual stage parasite. The organelles of the gametocytes were successfully purified by differential centrifugation following Percoll density gradient separation with the results of ~ 7 % yields and ~ 5 folds. The gametocytic organelles contained much more activities of mitochondrial electron transporting enzymes (i.e., cytochrome c reductase, cytochrome c oxidase than the asexual stage organelles. Mitochondrial function as measured by oxygen consumption were found to be different between these two stages organelles. Their rates of oxygen consumption were relatively low, as compared to those of human leukocyte and mouse liver mitochondria. In contrast to the coupled mammalian mitochondria, the gametocytic organelles were in the uncoupling state between oxidation and phosphorylation reactions during their respiration. However, they were sensitive to inhibitors of the electron transport system, e.g., antimycin A, cyanide. Our results suggest that the mitochondria of the gametocytic stages are metabolically active and still underdeveloped, although their inner membranes are extensively folded. The biochemical significance of the unique structure of the mitochondria in these developing stages in host erythrocytes remains to be elucidated.

  15. Fish oil prevents colon cancer by modulation of structure and function of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Navneet; Sharma, Gayatri; Rani, Isha; Renuka; Bhatnagar, Archana

    2016-08-01

    Cancer cells are more susceptible to metabolic perturbations due to impaired electron transport chain (ETC) that promote uncontrolled proliferation. Mitochondria play a pivotal role in bioenergetics and apoptosis, hence are considered as a promising target in tumor cell eradication. Therefore, the present study is designed to elucidate chemopreventive action of fish oil (FO) in combination with corn oil (CO) on mitochondria in colorectal cancer (CRC). Male Wistar rats were divided into groups depending on dietary regimen-Control group, FO+CO(1:1) and FO+CO(2.5:1). These groups were further subdivided depending on whether these received a weekly intraperitoneal injection of ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) or N,N-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH) for a period of 4 weeks. The animals sacrificed 48h and 16 weeks after EDTA/DMH treatment constituted initiation and post-initiation phase respectively. The structural and functional alterations in mitochondria were evaluated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and by assaying electron transport chain (ETC) enzymes. Mitochondrial lipid composition and cholesterol levels were also assessed. DMH treatment led to mitochondrial degeneration, disrupted cristae and a significant decrease in ETC complexes suggestive of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, an increase in cholesterol and cardiolipin (CL) levels in post-initiation phase led to evasion of apoptosis. FO in both the ratios resulted in stabilization and increase in number of mitochondria, however, FO+CO(2.5:1)+DMH group also exhibited mitophagy and crystolysis alongwith altered dynamics in ETC which facilitated apoptosis. It also decreased cholesterol and CL levels to increase apoptosis. Fish oil targets mitochondria in a dose dependent manner that augments apoptosis and hence attenuates carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Bounds, resulting from unitarity and analyticity on forward slopes of overlap functions

    CERN Document Server

    Ajduk, Z

    1973-01-01

    Lower and upper bounds on forward slopes of overlap functions are obtained with the help of unitarity conditions, the polynomial boundedness and analyticity of elastic amplitudes. The results are compared with values of slopes obtained in Regge-pole models. (13 refs).

  17. Rad52 and Rad59 exhibit both overlapping and distinct functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Qi; Düring, Louis; Antúnez de Mayolo, Adriana

    2007-01-01

    annealing of complementary single-stranded DNA in vitro, but only Rad52 interacts with replication protein A and the Rad51 recombinase. We have studied the functional overlap between Rad52 and Rad59 in living cells using chimeras of the two proteins and site-directed mutagenesis. We find that Rad52 and Rad...

  18. Modular matrices from universal wave-function overlaps in Gutzwiller-projected parton wave functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jia-Wei; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-03-01

    We implement the universal wave-function overlap (UWFO) method to extract modular S and T matrices for topological orders in Gutzwiller-projected parton wave functions (GPWFs). The modular S and T matrices generate a projective representation of S L (2 ,Z ) on the degenerate-ground-state Hilbert space on a torus and may fully characterize the 2+1D topological orders, i.e., the quasiparticle statistics and chiral central charge (up to E8 bosonic quantum Hall states). We use the variational Monte Carlo method to computed the S and T matrices of the chiral spin liquid (CSL) constructed by the GPWF on the square lattice, and we confirm that the CSL carries the same topological order as the ν =1/2 bosonic Laughlin state. We find that the nonuniversal exponents in the UWFO can be small, and direct numerical computation can be applied on relatively large systems. The UWFO may be a powerful method to calculate the topological order in GPWFs.

  19. Evaluation of overlap integrals with integer and noninteger n Slater-type orbitals using auxiliary functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guseinov, Israfil; Mamedov, Bahtiyar

    2002-09-01

    The series expansion formulae are derived for the overlap integrals with arbitrary integer n and noninteger n* Slater-type orbitals (ISTOs and NISTOs) in terms of a product of well-known auxiliary functions A(sigma) and B (k). The series becomes an ordinary closed expression when both principal quantum numbers n* and n'* of orbitals are integer n*= n and n'*= n'. These formulae are especially useful for the calculation of overlap integrals for large quantum numbers. Accuracy of the results is satisfactory for values of integer and noninteger quantum numbers up to n= n'=60, n*= n'*orbitals and internuclear distances.

  20. Automatic correction scheme for the temperature dependent overlap function of CHM15k ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefele, Alexander; Poltera, Yann; Hervo, Maxime

    2016-04-01

    Imperfections in a lidar's overlap function lead to artefacts in the background, range and overlap corrected lidar signals. These artefacts can erroneously be interpreted as aerosol gradient or, in extreme cases, as cloud base leading to false cloud detection. A correct specification of the overlap function is hence crucial to use automatic elastic lidars (ceilometers) for the detection of the planetary boundary layer or low clouds. In this study an algorithm is presented to correct such artefacts. It is based on the assumption of a homogeneous boundary layer and a correct specification of the overlap function down to a minimum range, which must be situated within the boundary layer. The strength of the algorithm lies in a sophisticated quality check scheme which allows to reliably identify favorable atmospheric conditions. The algorithm has been applied to 2 years of data from a CHM15k ceilometer from Lufft. Backscatter signals corrected for background, range and overlap have been compared using the overlap function provided by the manufacturer and the one corrected with the presented algorithm. Differences between corrected and uncorrected signals reach up to 45% in the first 300m above ground. The amplitude of the correction turned out to be temperature dependent being larger for higher temperatures. A linear model of the correction as a function of the instrument's internal temperature has been derived from the experimental data. Case studies and a statistical analysis of the strongest gradient derived from corrected signals reveal that the temperature model is capable to correct overlap artefacts with high quality, in particular such due to diurnal variations. The presented correction method has the potential to significantly improve the detection of the boundary layer with gradient based methods because it removes false candidates and hence simplifies the attribution of the detected gradients to the planetary boundary layer. A particularly high benefit can be

  1. Mitochondria Synthesize Melatonin to Ameliorate Its Function and Improve Mice Oocyte's Quality under in Vitro Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Changjiu; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Yang, Minghui; Li, Yu; Tian, Xiuzhi; Ma, Teng; Tao, Jingli; Zhu, Kuanfeng; Song, Yukun; Ji, Pengyun; Liu, Guoshi

    2016-06-14

    The physiology of oocyte in vitro maturation remains elusive. Generally, the oocytes have a very low maturation rate under in vitro conditions. In the current study, we found that melatonin promotes the maturation of oocytes in which mitochondria play a pivotal role. It was identified that; (1) mitochondria are the major sites for melatonin synthesis in oocytes and they synthesize large amounts of melatonin during their maturation; (2) melatonin improves mitochondrial function by increased mtDNA copy, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and mitochondrial distribution and ATP production in oocytes; (3) the meiotic spindle assembly is enhanced; (4) melatonin reduces ROS production and inhibits 8-oxodG formation, thereby protecting potential DNA mutation from oxidative damage. As a result, melatonin improves the quality of oocytes, significantly accelerates the developmental ability of IVF embryo. The results provide novel knowledge on the physiology of oocyte's maturation, especially under in vitro conditions.

  2. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant preserves contractile properties and mitochondrial function of skeletal muscle in aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javadov, Sabzali; Jang, Sehwan; Rodriguez-Reyes, Natividad; Rodriguez-Zayas, Ana E; Soto Hernandez, Jessica; Krainz, Tanja; Wipf, Peter; Frontera, Walter

    2015-11-24

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in the pathogenesis of sarcopenia associated with a loss of mass and activity of skeletal muscle. In addition to energy deprivation, increased mitochondrial ROS damage proteins and lipids in aged skeletal muscle. Therefore, prevention of mitochondrial ROS is important for potential therapeutic strategies to delay sarcopenia. This study elucidates the pharmacological efficiency of the new developed mitochondria-targeted ROS and electron scavenger, XJB-5-131 (XJB) to restore muscle contractility and mitochondrial function in aged skeletal muscle. Male adult (5-month old) and aged (29-month old) Fischer Brown Norway (F344/BN) rats were treated with XJB for four weeks and contractile properties of single skeletal muscle fibres and activity of mitochondrial ETC complexes were determined at the end of the treatment period. XJB-treated old rats showed higher muscle contractility associated with prevention of protein oxidation in both muscle homogenate and mitochondria compared with untreated counterparts. XJB-treated animals demonstrated a high activity of the respiratory complexes I, III, and IV with no changes in citrate synthase activity. These data demonstrate that mitochondrial ROS play a causal role in muscle weakness, and that a ROS scavenger specifically targeted to mitochondria can reverse age-related alterations of mitochondrial function and improve contractile properties in skeletal muscle.

  3. Toxic effects of microbial phenolic acids on the functions of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedotcheva, N I; Kazakov, R E; Kondrashova, M N; Beloborodova, N V

    2008-08-28

    Low-molecular-weight phenolic acids (PhAs) phenylacetate, phenyllactate, phenylpropionate, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate are essentially the products of the degradation of aromatic amino acids and polyphenols by the intestinal microflora. In sepsis, the concentrations of some of these acids in the blood increase tens of times. Assuming that these compounds can cause the mitochondrial dysfunction in sepsis, we examined their effects on respiration, the induction of pore opening, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in mitochondria. It was found that phenylpropionate and phenylacetate produce a more toxic effect on mitochondria than the other phenolic acids. At concentrations 0.01-0.1 mM they decreased the rate of oxidation of NAD-dependent substrates and activated the Ca2+- and menadione-induced opening of the cyclosporin A-sensitive pore and the production of ROS. The disturbances caused by these PhAs are similar to those observed in mitochondria in sepsis, and hence the rise in their level may be one of the causes of mitochondrial dysfunctions. Phenyllactate, p-hydroxyphenyllactate, and p-hydroxyphenylacetate inhibited the production of ROS and pore opening, acting as antioxidants. Thus, the ability of PhAs to affect the mitochondrial functions, as well as an increase in their concentrations in sepsis (the total concentration of these PhAs in the blood is close to 0.1 mM), suggests that PhAs can be directly involved in the development of mitochondrial failure.

  4. Universal Wave Function Overlap and Universal Topological Data from Generic Gapped Ground States

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We propose a way -- universal wave function overlap -- to extract universal topological data from generic ground states of gapped systems in any dimensions. Those extracted topological data should fully characterize the topological orders with gapped or gapless boundary. For non-chiral topological orders in 2+1D, this universal topological data consist of two matrices, $S$ and $T$, which generate a projective representation of $SL(2,\\mathbb Z)$ on the degenerate ground state Hilbert space on ...

  5. Rome III functional dyspepsia subdivision in PDS and EPS: recognizing postprandial symptoms reduces overlap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, F; Holvoet, L; Tack, J

    2015-08-01

    The Rome III consensus proposed to subdivide functional dyspepsia (FD) into two groups: meal-related dyspepsia or postprandial distress syndrome (PDS), and meal-unrelated dyspepsia or epigastric pain syndrome (EPS). However, in clinical practice, overlap between both has been reported to be as high as 50%, thereby hampering clinical applicability. Although EPS is referred to as meal-unrelated dyspepsia, relationship of symptoms to meal ingestion in this category is not formally addressed in the Rome III criteria. The aim of our study was to investigate whether taking into account the relationship of epigastric pain and nausea to meal ingestion may help to improve separation between EPS and PDS. Consecutive ambulatory tertiary-care patients with epigastric symptoms filled out Rome III gastro-duodenal questionnaires with supplementary questions. Those fulfilling Rome III FD criteria and a negative endoscopy were identified and subdivided into 'pure' PDS patients (i.e., meeting criteria for PDS without EPS symptoms), 'pure' EPS (i.e., meeting criteria for EPS without PDS symptoms), and overlapping PDS-EPS (i.e., symptoms of both PDS and EPS). Out of 1029 patients coming to endoscopy, 199 patients (73% females, 45.9 ± 1.0 years, BMI: 23.7 ± 0.35) fulfilled Rome III FD diagnostic criteria, and could be subdivided into pure PDS (69% females, 49 ± 2 years, BMI: 24.2 ± 0.61), pure EPS (59% females, 47.4 ± 2 years, BMI: 23.2 ± 0.97) and overlapping PDS-EPS (64% females, age 43 ± 5 years, BMI: 26 ± 0.46). Compared with pure EPS patients, the overlap PDS-EPS patients were characterized by a higher occurrence of postprandial epigastric pain (70% vs 31%, p < 0.0001), while the occurrence of epigastric pain in between meals was borderline (48% vs 38%, p = 0.05). In addition, the overlap PDS-EPS patients reported a higher occurrence of postprandial nausea (23% vs 0%, p < 0.0001), and bloating (79% vs 28%, p = 0.0001). When postprandial epigastric pain and postprandial

  6. Loss of forebrain MTCH2 decreases mitochondria motility and calcium handling and impairs hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Antonella; Aloni, Etay; Korkotian, Eduard; Zaltsman, Yehudit; Oni-Biton, Efrat; Kuperman, Yael; Tsoory, Michael; Shachnai, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Brenner, Ori; Segal, Menahem; Gross, Atan

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial Carrier Homolog 2 (MTCH2) is a novel regulator of mitochondria metabolism, which was recently associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Here we demonstrate that deletion of forebrain MTCH2 increases mitochondria and whole-body energy metabolism, increases locomotor activity, but impairs motor coordination and balance. Importantly, mice deficient in forebrain MTCH2 display a deficit in hippocampus-dependent cognitive functions, including spatial memory, long term potentiation (LTP) and rates of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents. Moreover, MTCH2-deficient hippocampal neurons display a deficit in mitochondria motility and calcium handling. Thus, MTCH2 is a critical player in neuronal cell biology, controlling mitochondria metabolism, motility and calcium buffering to regulate hippocampal-dependent cognitive functions. PMID:28276496

  7. The Changes of Energy Interactions between Nucleus Function and Mitochondria Functions Causing Transmutation of Chronic Inflammation into Cancer Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponizovskiy, Michail R

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions induce the mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy according to the first law of thermodynamics in able-bodied cells and changes the mechanisms of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy creating a transition stationary state of ablebodied cells into quasi-stationary pathologic states of acute inflammation transiting then into chronic inflammation and then transmuting into cancer metabolism. The mechanisms' influences of intruding etiologic pathologic agents (microbe, virus, etc.) lead to these changes of energy interactions between nucleus and mitochondria functions causing general acute inflammation, then passing into local chronic inflammation, and reversing into cancer metabolism transmutation. Interactions between biochemical processes and biophysical processes of cellular capacitors' operations create a supplementary mechanism of maintenance stability of cellular internal energy in the norm and in pathology. Discussion of some scientific works eliminates doubts of the authors of these works.

  8. Novel localisation and possible function of LIN7 and IRSp53 in mitochondria of HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Ilaria; Crespi, Arianna; Fornasari, Diego; Pietrini, Grazia

    2016-08-01

    By means of immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation experiments, we here demonstrate mitochondrial distribution of LIN7 and IRSp53 in HeLa cells. These peripheral proteins displayed a tight association with mitochondria and coimmunoprecipitated from mitochondrial fractions. In line with a role for LIN7 in the regulation of IRSp53 activity on actin dynamics, the morphology of mitochondria was similarly altered by changing the expression levels of either each protein or both, whereas mitochondrial morphology was preserved in cells overexpressing IRSp53 deleted of its binding domains for LIN7 (IRSp53Δ5) or for actin polymerisation modulators (IRSp53ΔSH3). In particular, the overexpression of full length LIN7 and/or IRSp53 increased the percentage of cells with short mitochondria, while downregulation of the endogenous proteins by shRNAs increased the amount of cells with elongated and perinuclear clustered mitochondria. These mitochondria were only partially resistant to fragmentation induced by dissipation of the mitochondrial membrane potential (i.e. treatment with sodium azide), whereas mitochondria were fully protected by the fission defective mutant Drp1 K38A. Overexpression of LIN7 or IRSp53 did not prevent the formation of hyperfused mitochondria in cells coexpressing the Drp1 K38A mutant, thus suggesting that LIN7-IRSp53 complex requires functional Drp1 to regulate mitochondrial morphology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Functional dyspepsia (FD) and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD): overlapping or discrete entities?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    As the incidence of both gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease have declined, that of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) and non-ulcer, or functional dyspepsia (FD) have reached virtually epidemic proportions. As we come to appreciate the expression of these disorders in the community, the real spectrum of each disease has become evident. FD and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD), the most prevalent manifestation of GORD, frequently overlap. Where then does GORD end and FD begin? Is it realistic, or even clinically relevant, to attempt a clear separation between these entities? These are more than issues of mere semantics; therapeutic options may be dictated by the classification of the patient as one or the other. Recent work indicates clearly that NERD is a heterogeneous disorder incorporating some patients who may well harbour subtle manifestations of oesophagitis and others who have entirely normal 24-hour pH studies. These differences may be crucial to the concept of NERD\\/FD overlap. While evidence in support of this concept is far from complete, it would appear that this overlap is most relevant to those NERD patients who do not exhibit abnormal esophageal acid exposure. These patients truly belong in the spectrum of functional gastrointestinal disorders rather than in GORD; attempts to shoe-horn these individuals into the spectrum of GORD will result in therapeutic disappointment and surgical disaster.

  10. Universal Wave-Function Overlap and Universal Topological Data from Generic Gapped Ground States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Heidar; Wen, Xiao-Gang

    2015-07-17

    We propose a way-universal wave-function overlap-to extract universal topological data from generic ground states of gapped systems in any dimensions. Those extracted topological data might fully characterize the topological orders with a gapped or gapless boundary. For nonchiral topological orders in (2+1)D, these universal topological data consist of two matrices S and T, which generate a projective representation of SL(2,Z) on the degenerate ground state Hilbert space on a torus. For topological orders with a gapped boundary in higher dimensions, these data constitute a projective representation of the mapping class group MCG(M^{d}) of closed spatial manifold M^{d}. For a set of simple models and perturbations in two dimensions, we show that these quantities are protected to all orders in perturbation theory. These overlaps provide a much more powerful alternative to the topological entanglement entropy and allow for more efficient numerical implementations.

  11. What cost mitochondria? The maintenance of functional mitochondrial DNA within and across generations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanen, Duur K; Spelbrink, Johannes N; Beekman, Madeleine

    2014-07-05

    The peculiar biology of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) potentially has detrimental consequences for organismal health and lifespan. Typically, eukaryotic cells contain multiple mitochondria, each with multiple mtDNA genomes. The high copy number of mtDNA implies that selection on mtDNA functionality is relaxed. Furthermore, because mtDNA replication is not strictly regulated, within-cell selection may favour mtDNA variants with a replication advantage, but a deleterious effect on cell fitness. The opportunities for selfish mtDNA mutations to spread are restricted by various organism-level adaptations, such as uniparental transmission, germline mtDNA bottlenecks, germline selection and, during somatic growth, regular alternation between fusion and fission of mitochondria. These mechanisms are all hypothesized to maintain functional mtDNA. However, the strength of selection for maintenance of functional mtDNA progressively declines with age, resulting in age-related diseases. Furthermore, organismal adaptations that most probably evolved to restrict the opportunities for selfish mtDNA create secondary problems. Owing to predominantly maternal mtDNA transmission, recombination among mtDNA from different individuals is highly restricted or absent, reducing the scope for repair. Moreover, maternal inheritance precludes selection against mtDNA variants with male-specific effects. We finish by discussing the consequences of life-history differences among taxa with respect to mtDNA evolution and make a case for the use of microorganisms to experimentally manipulate levels of selection.

  12. Semantic integration to identify overlapping functional modules in protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramanathan Murali

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions can enable a better understanding of cellular organization, processes and functions. Functional modules can be identified from the protein interaction networks derived from experimental data sets. However, these analyses are challenging because of the presence of unreliable interactions and the complex connectivity of the network. The integration of protein-protein interactions with the data from other sources can be leveraged for improving the effectiveness of functional module detection algorithms. Results We have developed novel metrics, called semantic similarity and semantic interactivity, which use Gene Ontology (GO annotations to measure the reliability of protein-protein interactions. The protein interaction networks can be converted into a weighted graph representation by assigning the reliability values to each interaction as a weight. We presented a flow-based modularization algorithm to efficiently identify overlapping modules in the weighted interaction networks. The experimental results show that the semantic similarity and semantic interactivity of interacting pairs were positively correlated with functional co-occurrence. The effectiveness of the algorithm for identifying modules was evaluated using functional categories from the MIPS database. We demonstrated that our algorithm had higher accuracy compared to other competing approaches. Conclusion The integration of protein interaction networks with GO annotation data and the capability of detecting overlapping modules substantially improve the accuracy of module identification.

  13. Caffeine increases mitochondrial function and blocks melatonin signaling to mitochondria in Alzheimer's mice and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragicevic, Natasa; Delic, Vedad; Cao, Chuanhai; Copes, Neil; Lin, Xiaoyang; Mamcarz, Maggie; Wang, Li; Arendash, Gary W; Bradshaw, Patrick C

    2012-12-01

    Caffeine and melatonin have been shown to protect the Swedish mutant amyloid precursor protein (APP(sw)) transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease from cognitive dysfunction. But their mechanisms of action remain incompletely understood. These Alzheimer's mice have extensive mitochondrial dysfunction, which likely contributes to their cognitive decline. To further explore the mechanism through which caffeine and melatonin protect cognitive function in these mice, we monitored the function of isolated mitochondria from APP(sw) mice treated with caffeine, melatonin, or both in their drinking water for one month. Melatonin treatment yielded a near complete restoration of mitochondrial function in assays of respiratory rate, membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and ATP levels. Caffeine treatment by itself yielded a small increase in mitochondrial function. However, caffeine largely blocked the large enhancement of mitochondrial function provided by melatonin. Studies with N2a neuroblastoma cells stably expressing APP(sw) showed that specific inhibition of cAMP-dependent phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4 or cGMP-dependent PDE5 also blocked melatonin protection of mitochondrial function, but A(2a) and A₁ adenosine receptor antagonists were without effect. Melatonin or caffeine at the concentrations used to modulate mitochondrial function in the cells had no effect on cAMP-dependent PDE activity or cellular cAMP or cGMP levels. Therefore, caffeine and increased cyclic nucleotide levels likely block melatonin signaling to mitochondria by independent mechanisms that do not involve adenosine receptor antagonism. The results of this study indicate that melatonin restores mitochondrial function much more potently than caffeine in APP(sw) transgenic mouse and cell models of Alzheimer's disease.

  14. Sparse reconstructions of overlapping three-dimensional point spread functions using overcomplete dictionaries

    CERN Document Server

    Barsic, Anthony; Piestun, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    When a single molecule is detected in a wide-field microscope, the image approximates the point spread function of the system. However, as the distribution of molecules becomes denser and their images begin to coincide, existing solutions to determine the number of molecules present and their precise three-dimensional locations can tolerate little to no overlap. A solution to this problem involving matched optical and digital techniques, as here proposed, is critical to increase the allowable labeling density and to accelerate single-molecule localization microscopy.

  15. The role of population size, pleiotropy and fitness effects of mutations in the evolution of overlapping gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, A

    2000-03-01

    Sheltered from deleterious mutations, genes with overlapping or partially redundant functions may be important sources of novel gene functions. While most partially redundant genes originated in gene duplications, it is much less clear why genes with overlapping functions have been retained, in some cases for hundreds of millions of years. A case in point is the many partially redundant genes in vertebrates, the result of ancient gene duplications in primitive chordates. Their persistence and ubiquity become surprising when it is considered that duplicate and original genes often diversify very rapidly, especially if the action of natural selection is involved. Are overlapping gene functions perhaps maintained because of their protective role against otherwise deleterious mutations? There are two principal objections against this hypothesis, which are the main subject of this article. First, because overlapping gene functions are maintained in populations by a slow process of "second order" selection, population sizes need to be very high for this process to be effective. It is shown that even in small populations, pleiotropic mutations that affect more than one of a gene's functions simultaneously can slow the mutational decay of functional overlap after a gene duplication by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, brief and transient increases in population size may be sufficient to maintain functional overlap. The second objection regards the fact that most naturally occurring mutations may have much weaker fitness effects than the rather drastic "knock-out" mutations that lead to detection of partially redundant functions. Given weak fitness effects of most mutations, is selection for the buffering effect of functional overlap strong enough to compensate for the diversifying force exerted by mutations? It is shown that the extent of functional overlap maintained in a population is not only independent of the mutation rate, but also independent of the average fitness

  16. Biguanides inhibit complex I, II and IV of rat liver mitochondria and modify their functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drahota, Z; Palenickova, E; Endlicher, R; Milerova, M; Brejchova, J; Vosahlikova, M; Svoboda, P; Kazdova, L; Kalous, M; Cervinkova, Z; Cahova, M

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we focused on an analysis of biguanides effects on mitochondrial enzyme activities, mitochondrial membrane potential and membrane permeability transition pore function. We used phenformin, which is more efficient than metformin, and evaluated its effect on rat liver mitochondria and isolated hepatocytes. In contrast to previously published data, we found that phenformin, after a 5 min pre-incubation, dose-dependently inhibits not only mitochondrial complex I but also complex II and IV activity in isolated mitochondria. The enzymes complexes inhibition is paralleled by the decreased respiratory control index and mitochondrial membrane potential. Direct measurements of mitochondrial swelling revealed that phenformin increases the resistance of the permeability transition pore to Ca(2+) ions. Our data might be in agreement with the hypothesis of Schäfer (1976) that binding of biguanides to membrane phospholipids alters membrane properties in a non-specific manner and, subsequently, different enzyme activities are modified via lipid phase. However, our measurements of anisotropy of fluorescence of hydrophobic membrane probe diphenylhexatriene have not shown a measurable effect of membrane fluidity with the 1 mM concentration of phenformin that strongly inhibited complex I activity. Our data therefore suggest that biguanides could be considered as agents with high efficacy but low specifity.

  17. Activity and functional interaction of alternative oxidase and uncoupling protein in mitochondria from tomato fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.E. Sluse

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase (AOX is not limited to plant mitochondria and is widespread among several types of protists. The uncoupling protein (UCP is much more widespread than previously believed, not only in tissues of higher animals but also in plants and in an amoeboid protozoan. The redox energy-dissipating pathway (AOX and the proton electrochemical gradient energy-dissipating pathway (UCP lead to the same final effect, i.e., a decrease in ATP synthesis and an increase in heat production. Studies with green tomato fruit mitochondria show that both proteins are present simultaneously in the membrane. This raises the question of a specific physiological role for each energy-dissipating system and of a possible functional connection between them (shared regulation. Linoleic acid, an abundant free fatty acid in plants which activates UCP, strongly inhibits cyanide-resistant respiration mediated by AOX. Moreover, studies of the evolution of AOX and UCP protein expression and of their activities during post-harvest ripening of tomato fruit show that AOX and plant UCP work sequentially: AOX activity decreases in early post-growing stages and UCP activity is decreased in late ripening stages. Electron partitioning between the alternative oxidase and the cytochrome pathway as well as H+ gradient partitioning between ATP synthase and UCP can be evaluated by the ADP/O method. This method facilitates description of the kinetics of energy-dissipating pathways and of ATP synthase when state 3 respiration is decreased by limitation of oxidizable substrate.

  18. QCD with overlap fermions: Running coupling and the 3-loop beta-function

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, M

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the relation between the bare coupling constant g_0 and the MSbar-renormalized coupling g_MS: g_0 = Z_g(g_0,a \\mu) g_MS, to 2 loops in perturbation theory. We employ the standard Wilson action for gluons and the overlap action for fermions. For convenience, we have worked with the background field technique, which only requires evaluation of 2-point Green's function for the problem at hand. Our results depend explicitly on the number of fermion flavors (N_f) and colors (N). Since the dependence of Z_g on the overlap parameter rho cannot be extracted analytically, we tabulate our results for different values in the allowed range of rho (0 < rho < 2), focusing on values which are being used most frequently in simulations. Knowledge of Z_g allows us to derive the 3-loop coefficient of the bare beta-function (beta_L(g_0)) which, unlike the 1- and 2-loop coefficients, is regularization-dependent. The nontrivial dependence of Z_g and of beta_L(g_0) on rho is plotted for various choices of N, N_f.

  19. Dynamical Quantum Phase Transitions: Role of Topological Nodes in Wave Function Overlaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhoushen; Balatsky, Alexander V.

    2016-08-01

    A sudden quantum quench of a Bloch band from one topological phase toward another has been shown to exhibit an intimate connection with the notion of a dynamical quantum phase transition (DQPT), where the returning probability of the quenched state to the initial state—i.e., the Loschmidt echo—vanishes at critical times {t*}. Analytical results to date are limited to two-band models, leaving the exact relation between topology and DQPT unclear. In this Letter, we show that, for a general multiband system, a robust DQPT relies on the existence of nodes (i.e., zeros) in the wave function overlap between the initial band and the postquench energy eigenstates. These nodes are topologically protected if the two participating wave functions have distinctive topological indices. We demonstrate these ideas in detail for both one and two spatial dimensions using a three-band generalized Hofstadter model. We also discuss possible experimental observations.

  20. ORP5/ORP8 localize to endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts and are involved in mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galmes, Romain; Houcine, Audrey; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia; Jackson, Catherine L; Giordano, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    The oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP)-related proteins ORP5 and ORP8 have been shown recently to transport phosphatidylserine (PS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the plasma membrane (PM) at ER-PM contact sites. PS is also transferred from the ER to mitochondria where it acts as precursor for mitochondrial PE synthesis. Here, we show that, in addition to ER-PM contact sites, ORP5 and ORP8 are also localized to ER-mitochondria contacts and interact with the outer mitochondrial membrane protein PTPIP51. A functional lipid transfer (ORD) domain was required for this localization. Interestingly, ORP5 and ORP8 depletion leads to defects in mitochondria morphology and respiratory function. © 2016 The Authors.

  1. An Isolation Method for Assessment of Brain Mitochondria Function in Neonatal Mice with Hypoxic-Ischemic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersen, Casper S.; Sosunov, Alexander; Utkina-Sosunova, Irina; Ratner, Veniamin I.; Starkov, Anatoly A.; Ten, Vadim S.

    2010-01-01

    This work was undertaken to develop a method for the isolation of mitochondria from a single cerebral hemisphere in neonatal mice. Mitochondria from the normal mouse brain hemisphere isolated by the proposed method exhibited a good respiratory control ratio of 6.39 ± 0.53 during glutamate-malate-induced phosphorylating respiration. Electron microscopy showed intact mitochondria. The applicability of this method was tested on mitochondria isolated from naïve mice and their littermates subjected to hypoxic-ischemic insult. Hypoxic-ischemic insult prior to reperfusion resulted in a significant (p < 0.01) inhibition of phosphorylating respiration compared to naïve littermates. This was associated with a profound depletion of the ATP content in the ischemic hemisphere. The expression for Mn superoxide dismutase and cytochrome C (markers for the integrity of the mitochondrial matrix and outer membrane) was determined by Western blot to control for mitochondrial integrity and quantity in the compared samples. Thus, we have developed a method for the isolation of the cerebral mitochondria from a single hemisphere adapted to neonatal mice. This method may serve as a valuable tool to study mitochondrial function in a mouse model of immature brain injury. In addition, the suggested method enables us to examine the mitochondrial functional phenotype in immature mice with a targeted genetic alteration. PMID:18349523

  2. Physiological Reduction in Left Ventricular Contractile Function in Healthy Postpartum Women: Potential Overlap with Peripartum Cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara G Khan

    Full Text Available Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a potentially life-threatening cause of heart failure, commoner in Afro-Caribbean than Caucasian women. Its diagnosis can be challenging due to physiological changes in cardiac function that also occur in healthy women during the early postpartum period. This study aimed to (i establish the overlap between normal cardiac physiology in the immediate postpartum period and pathological changes in peripartum cardiomyopathy ii identify any ethnicity-specific changes in cardiac function and cardiac biomarkers in healthy postpartum women.We conducted a cross-sectional study of 58 healthy postpartum women within 48 hours of delivery and 18 matched non-pregnant controls. Participants underwent cardiac assessment by echocardiography and strain analysis, including 3D echocardiography in 40 postpartum women. Results were compared with 12 retrospectively studied peripartum cardiomyopathy patients. Healthy postpartum women had significantly higher left ventricular volumes and mass, and lower ejection fraction and global longitudinal strain than non-pregnant controls. These parameters were significantly more impaired in peripartum cardiomyopathy patients but with overlapping ranges of values. Healthy postpartum women had higher levels of adrenomedullin, placental growth factor (PlGF and soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlt1 compared to controls. The postpartum state, adrenomedullin, sFlt1 and the sFlt1:PlGF ratio were independent predictors of LV remodelling and function in healthy postpartum women.Healthy postpartum women demonstrate several echocardiographic indicators of left ventricular remodelling and reduced function, which are associated with altered levels of angiogenic and cardiac biomarkers.

  3. Intermittent hypoxia leads to functional reorganization of mitochondria and affects cellular bioenergetics in marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanina, Anna V; Nesmelova, Irina; Leamy, Larry; Sokolov, Eugene P; Sokolova, Inna M

    2016-06-01

    Fluctuations in oxygen (O2) concentrations represent a major challenge to aerobic organisms and can be extremely damaging to their mitochondria. Marine intertidal molluscs are well-adapted to frequent O2 fluctuations, yet it remains unknown how their mitochondrial functions are regulated to sustain energy metabolism and prevent cellular damage during hypoxia and reoxygenation (H/R). We used metabolic control analysis to investigate the mechanisms of mitochondrial responses to H/R stress (18 h at <0.1% O2 followed by 1 h of reoxygenation) using hypoxia-tolerant intertidal clams Mercenaria mercenaria and hypoxia-sensitive subtidal scallops Argopecten irradians as models. We also assessed H/R-induced changes in cellular energy balance, oxidative damage and unfolded protein response to determine the potential links between mitochondrial dysfunction and cellular injury. Mitochondrial responses to H/R in scallops strongly resembled those in other hypoxia-sensitive organisms. Exposure to hypoxia followed by reoxygenation led to a strong decrease in the substrate oxidation (SOX) and phosphorylation (PHOS) capacities as well as partial depolarization of mitochondria of scallops. Elevated mRNA expression of a reactive oxygen species-sensitive enzyme aconitase and Lon protease (responsible for degradation of oxidized mitochondrial proteins) during H/R stress was consistent with elevated levels of oxidative stress in mitochondria of scallops. In hypoxia-tolerant clams, mitochondrial SOX capacity was enhanced during hypoxia and continued rising during the first hour of reoxygenation. In both species, the mitochondrial PHOS capacity was suppressed during hypoxia, likely to prevent ATP wastage by the reverse action of FO,F1-ATPase. The PHOS capacity recovered after 1 h of reoxygenation in clams but not in scallops. Compared with scallops, clams showed a greater suppression of energy-consuming processes (such as protein turnover and ion transport) during hypoxia, indicated

  4. Cancer Cell Mitochondria Targeting by Pancratistatin Analogs is Dependent on Functional Complex II and III

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Dennis; Pignanelli, Christopher; Tarade, Daniel; Gilbert, Tyler; Noel, Megan; Mansour, Fadi; Adams, Scott; Dowhayko, Alexander; Stokes, Kyle; Vshyvenko, Sergey; Hudlicky, Tomas; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2017-01-01

    Enhanced mitochondrial stability and decreased dependence on oxidative phosphorylation confer an acquired resistance to apoptosis in cancer cells, but may present opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The compound pancratistatin (PST) has been shown to selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells. However, its low availability in nature has hindered its clinical advancement. We synthesized PST analogs and a medium-throughput screen was completed. Analogs SVTH-7, -6, and -5 demonstrated potent anti-cancer activity greater than PST and several standard chemotherapeutics. They disrupted mitochondrial function, activated the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, and reduced growth of tumor xenografts in vivo. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effects of SVTH-7 on cancer cells and mitochondria were abrogated with the inhibition of mitochondrial complex II and III, suggesting mitochondrial or metabolic vulnerabilities may be exploited by this analog. This work provides a scaffold for characterizing distinct mitochondrial and metabolic features of cancer cells and reveals several lead compounds with high therapeutic potential. PMID:28220885

  5. Mitochondria: mitochondrial OXPHOS (dys) function ex vivo--the use of primary fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saada, Ann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are intracellular organelles present in all nucleated cells. They perform a number of vital metabolic processes but their main function is to generate energy in the form of ATP by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), performed by the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Mitochondrial diseases affecting oxidative phosphorylation are a common group of inherited disorders with variable clinical manifestations. They are caused by mutations either in the mitochondrial or the nuclear genome. In order to study this group of heterogeneous diseases, they are often modeled in animal and microbial systems. However, these are complex, time consuming and unavailable for each specific mutation. Conversely, skin fibroblasts derived from patients provide a feasible alternative. The usefulness of fibroblasts in culture to verify and study the pathomechanism of new mitochondrial diseases and to evaluate the efficacy of individual treatment options is summarized in this review.

  6. The editing sites in transcripts of functional genes of rice mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    RNA editing exists extensively in the higher plant mitochondria, and is a required step for forming functional proteins. There may be some relationship between RNA editing and cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), a kind of phenomenon that is attributed to mitochondrial genome mutations. The research materials used are the gametophytic male sterility line (A), maintainer line (B) and F1 hybrid (F1) of HL-type CMS rice. cDNAs and DNAs of atp6 and coxII have been obtained from A, B and F1 by PCR and RT-PCR. Comparing sequences of cDNAs and DNAs, 18 and 15 editing sites were found respectively in the transcripts of atp6 and coxII. A, B and F1 shared the same editing sites. RNA editing improves hydrophobicity and conservation of the predicted protein as compared with other organisms.

  7. Centrifugation-Free Magnetic Isolation of Functional Mitochondria Using Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banik, Bhabatosh; Dhar, Shanta

    2017-09-01

    Subcellular fractionation techniques are essential for cell biology and drug development studies. The emergence of organelle-targeted nanoparticle (NP) platforms necessitates the isolation of target organelles to study drug delivery and activity. Mitochondria-targeted NPs have attracted the attention of researchers around the globe, since mitochondrial dysfunctions can cause a wide range of diseases. Conventional mitochondria isolation methods involve high-speed centrifugation. The problem with high-speed centrifugation-based isolation of NP-loaded mitochondria is that NPs can pellet even if they are not bound to mitochondria. We report development of a mitochondria-targeted paramagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle, Mito-magneto, that enables isolation of mitochondria under the influence of a magnetic field. Isolation of mitochondria using Mito-magneto eliminates artifacts typically associated with centrifugation-based isolation of NP-loaded mitochondria, thus producing intact, pure, and respiration-active mitochondria. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Role of Mitochondria in Cerebral Vascular Function: Energy Production, Cellular Protection, and Regulation of Vascular Tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busija, David W; Rutkai, Ibolya; Dutta, Somhrita; Katakam, Prasad V

    2016-06-13

    Mitochondria not only produce energy in the form of ATP to support the activities of cells comprising the neurovascular unit, but mitochondrial events, such as depolarization and/or ROS release, also initiate signaling events which protect the endothelium and neurons against lethal stresses via pre-/postconditioning as well as promote changes in cerebral vascular tone. Mitochondrial depolarization in vascular smooth muscle (VSM), via pharmacological activation of the ATP-dependent potassium channels on the inner mitochondrial membrane (mitoKATP channels), leads to vasorelaxation through generation of calcium sparks by the sarcoplasmic reticulum and subsequent downstream signaling mechanisms. Increased release of ROS by mitochondria has similar effects. Relaxation of VSM can also be indirectly achieved via actions of nitric oxide (NO) and other vasoactive agents produced by endothelium, perivascular and parenchymal nerves, and astroglia following mitochondrial activation. Additionally, NO production following mitochondrial activation is involved in neuronal preconditioning. Cerebral arteries from female rats have greater mitochondrial mass and respiration and enhanced cerebral arterial dilation to mitochondrial activators. Preexisting chronic conditions such as insulin resistance and/or diabetes impair mitoKATP channel relaxation of cerebral arteries and preconditioning. Surprisingly, mitoKATP channel function after transient ischemia appears to be retained in the endothelium of large cerebral arteries despite generalized cerebral vascular dysfunction. Thus, mitochondrial mechanisms may represent the elusive signaling link between metabolic rate and blood flow as well as mediators of vascular change according to physiological status. Mitochondrial mechanisms are an important, but underutilized target for improving vascular function and decreasing brain injury in stroke patients. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:1529-1548, 2016.

  9. Two-neutron overlap functions for {sup 6}He from a microscopic structure model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brida, I.; Nunes, F. M. (Physics); (Michigan State Univ.)

    2010-12-01

    A fully antisymmetrized microscopic model is developed for light two-neutron halo nuclei using a hyper-spherical basis to describe halo regions. The many-body wavefunction is optimized variationally. The model is applied to {sup 6}He bound by semi realistic Minnesota nucleon-nucleon forces. The two-neutron separation energy and the radius of the halo are reproduced in agreement with experiment. Antisymmetrization effects between {sup 4}He and halo neutrons are found to be crucial for binding of {sup 6}He. We also properly extract two-neutron overlap functions and find that there is a significant increase of 30%-70% in their normalization due to microscopic effects as compared to the results of three-body models.

  10. Two-neutron overlap functions for {sup 6}He from a microscopic structure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brida, I., E-mail: brida@anl.go [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Nunes, F.M. [NSCL and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2010-12-01

    A fully antisymmetrized microscopic model is developed for light two-neutron halo nuclei using a hyper-spherical basis to describe halo regions. The many-body wavefunction is optimized variationally. The model is applied to {sup 6}He bound by semi realistic Minnesota nucleon-nucleon forces. The two-neutron separation energy and the radius of the halo are reproduced in agreement with experiment. Antisymmetrization effects between {sup 4}He and halo neutrons are found to be crucial for binding of {sup 6}He. We also properly extract two-neutron overlap functions and find that there is a significant increase of 30%-70% in their normalization due to microscopic effects as compared to the results of three-body models.

  11. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  12. Morphological and functional abnormalities in mitochondria associated with synaptic degeneration in prion disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisková, Zuzana; Mahad, Don Joseph; Pudney, Carianne; Campbell, Graham; Cadogan, Mark; Asuni, Ayodeji; O'Connor, Vincent; Perry, Victor Hugh

    2010-09-01

    Synaptic and dendritic pathology is a well-documented component of prion disease. In common with other neurodegenerative diseases that contain an element of protein misfolding, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of synaptic degeneration. In particular, in prion disease the relationship between synaptic malfunction, degeneration, and mitochondria has been neglected. We investigated a wide range of mitochondrial parameters, including changes in mitochondrial density, inner membrane ultrastructure, functional properties and nature of mitochondrial DNA from hippocampal tissue of mice with prion disease, which have ongoing synaptic pathology. Our results indicate that despite a lack of detectable changes in either mitochondrial density or expression of the mitochondrial proteins, mitochondrial function was impaired when compared with age-matched control animals. We observed changes in mitochondrial inner membrane morphology and a reduction in the cytochrome c oxidase activity relative to a sustained level of mitochondrial proteins such as porin and individual, functionally important subunits of complex II and complex IV. These data support the idea that mitochondrial dysfunction appears to occur due to inhibition or modification of respiratory complex rather than deletions of mitochondrial DNA. Indeed, these changes were seen in the stratum radiatum where synaptic pathology is readily detected, indicating that mitochondrial function is impaired and could potentially contribute to or even initiate the synaptic pathology in prion disease.

  13. Essential and overlapping functions for mammalian Argonautes in microRNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Hong; Trombly, Melanie I; Chen, Jian; Wang, Xiaozhong

    2009-02-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) silencing fine-tunes protein output and regulates diverse biological processes. Argonaute (Ago) proteins are the core effectors of the miRNA pathway. In lower organisms, multiple Agos have evolved specialized functions for distinct RNA silencing pathways. However, the roles of mammalian Agos have not been well characterized. Here we show that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient for Ago1-4 are completely defective in miRNA silencing and undergo apoptosis. In miRNA silencing-defective ES cells, the proapoptotic protein Bim, a miRNA target, is increased, and up-regulation of Bim is sufficient to induce ES cell apoptosis. Expression of activated Akt inhibits Bim expression and partially rescues the growth defect in Ago-deficient ES cells. Furthermore, reintroduction of any single Ago into Ago-deficient cells is able to rescue the endogenous miRNA silencing defect and apoptosis. Consistent with this, each Ago is functionally equivalent with bulged miRNA duplexes for translational repression, whereas Ago1 and Ago2 appear to be more effective at utilizing perfectly matched siRNAs. Thus, our results demonstrate that mammalian Agos all contribute to miRNA silencing, and individual Agos have largely overlapping functions in this process.

  14. Telomere-independent functions of telomerase in nuclei, cytoplasm, and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    Telomerase canonical activity at telomeres prevents telomere shortening, allowing chromosome stability and cellular proliferation. To perform this task, the catalytic subunit (telomerase reverse transcriptase, TERT) of the enzyme works as a reverse transcriptase together with the telomerase RNA component (TERC), adding telomeric repeats to DNA molecule ends. Growing evidence indicates that, besides the telomeric-DNA synthesis activity, TERT has additional functions in tumor development and is involved in many different biological processes, among which cellular proliferation, gene expression regulation, and mitochondrial functionality. TERT has been shown to act independently of TERC in the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway, regulating the expression of Wnt target genes, which play a role in development and tumorigenesis. Moreover, TERT RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity has been found, leading to the genesis of double-stranded RNAs that act as precursor of silencing RNAs. In mitochondria, a TERT TERC-independent reverse transcriptase activity has been described that could play a role in the protection of mitochondrial integrity. In this review, we will discuss some of the extra-telomeric functions of telomerase.

  15. Phosphoproteome analysis of functional mitochondria isolated from resting human muscle reveals extensive phosphorylation of inner membrane protein complexes and enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Xiaolu; Leon, Ileana R; Bak, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in energy metabolism and cellular survival, and consequently mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a number of human pathologies. Reversible protein phosphorylation emerges as a central mechanism in the regulation of several mitochondrial processes. In skel......Mitochondria play a central role in energy metabolism and cellular survival, and consequently mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a number of human pathologies. Reversible protein phosphorylation emerges as a central mechanism in the regulation of several mitochondrial processes....... In skeletal muscle, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to insulin resistance in humans with obesity and type 2 diabetes. We performed a phosphoproteomic study of functional mitochondria isolated from human muscle biopsies with the aim to obtain a comprehensive overview of mitochondrial phosphoproteins...... for protein kinase A, protein kinase C, casein kinase II and DNA-dependent protein kinase. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of performing phosphoproteome analysis of organelles isolated from human tissue and provide novel targets for functional studies of reversible phosphorylation in mitochondria...

  16. RAP80 binds p32 to preserve the functional integrity of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hee Jin; Korm, Sovannarith; Lee, Se-In; Phorl, Sophors; Noh, Solhee; Han, Miae; Naskar, Rema; Kim, Hongtae; Lee, Joo-Yong

    2017-10-21

    RAP80, a member of the BRCA1-A complex, is a well-known crucial regulator of cell cycle checkpoint and DNA damage repair in the nucleus. However, it is still unclear whether Rap80 localizes to another region outside the nucleus and plays different roles with its partners. Here, we found mitochondrial p32 as a novel binding partner of RAP80 by using yeast two-hybrid screening. RAP80 directly binds the internal region of p32 through its arginine rich C-terminal domain. Based on the interaction, we showed that a subset of RAP80 localizes to mitochondria where p32 exists. Loss of function study revealed that RAP80 deficiency reduces the protein level of p32 and p32 dependent mitochondrial translating proteins such as Rieske and COX1. As a result, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxygen consumption are reduced in RAP80 knockdown cells, indicating mitochondrial dysfunction. Our study identifies a novel interaction between RAP80 and p32, which is important for preserving intact mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Severe Burn Injury Induces Thermogenically Functional Mitochondria in Murine White Adipose Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Craig; Herndon, David N; Bhattarai, Nisha; Ogunbileje, John O; Szczesny, Bartosz; Szabo, Csaba; Toliver-Kinsky, Tracy; Sidossis, Labros S

    2015-09-01

    Chronic cold exposure induces functionally thermogenic mitochondria in the inguinal white adipose tissue (iWAT) of mice. Whether this response occurs in pathophysiological states remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of severe burn trauma on iWAT mitochondrial function in mice. Male BALB/c mice (10-12 weeks) received full-thickness scald burns to ∼30% of the body surface area. Inguinal white adipose tissue was harvested from mice at 1, 4, 10, 20, and 40 days postinjury. Total and uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)-dependent mitochondrial thermogenesis were determined in iWAT. Citrate synthase activity was determined as a proxy of mitochondrial abundance. Immunohistochemistry was performed to assess iWAT morphology and UCP1 expression. Uncoupling protein 1-dependent respiration was significantly greater at 4 and 10 days after burn compared with sham, peaking at 20 days after burn (P white adipose tissue in vivo and may offer a mechanistic explanation for the chronic hypermetabolism observed in burn victims.

  18. Density functional theory of liquid crystals and surface anchoring: hard Gaussian overlap-sphere and hard Gaussian overlap-surface potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazpour, A; Avazpour, L

    2010-12-28

    This article applies the density functional theory to confined liquid crystals, comprised of ellipsoidal shaped particles interacting through the hard Gaussian overlap (HGO) potential. The extended restricted orientation model proposed by Moradi and co-workers [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 17, 5625 (2005)] is used to study the surface anchoring. The excess free energy is calculated as a functional expansion of density around a reference homogeneous fluid. The pair direct correlation function (DCF) of a homogeneous HGO fluid is approximated, based on the optimized sum of Percus-Yevick and Roth DCF for hard spheres; the anisotropy introduced by means of the closest approach parameter, the expression proposed by Marko [Physica B 392, 242 (2007)] for DCF of HGO, and hard ellipsoids were used. In this study we extend an our previous work [Phys. Rev. E 72, 061706 (2005)] on the anchoring behavior of hard particle liquid crystal model, by studying the effect of changing the particle-substrate contact function instead of hard needle-wall potentials. We use the two particle-surface potentials: the HGO-sphere and the HGO-surface potentials. The average number density and order parameter profiles of a confined HGO fluid are obtained using the two particle-wall potentials. For bulk isotropic liquid, the results are in agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation of Barmes and Cleaver [Phys. Rev. E 71, 021705 (2005)]. Also, for the bulk nematic phase, the theory gives the correct density profile and order parameter between the walls.

  19. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Sousa

    Full Text Available Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  20. Not all sperm are equal: functional mitochondria characterize a subpopulation of human sperm with better fertilization potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Amaral, Alexandra; Baptista, Marta; Tavares, Renata; Caballero Campo, Pedro; Caballero Peregrín, Pedro; Freitas, Albertina; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2011-03-23

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality.

  1. Functional Associations by Response Overlap (FARO), a functional genomics approach matching gene expression phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Mundy, J.; Willenbrock, Hanni

    2007-01-01

    The systematic comparison of transcriptional responses of organisms is a powerful tool in functional genomics. For example, mutants may be characterized by comparing their transcript profiles to those obtained in other experiments querying the effects on gene expression of many experimental factors...... including treatments, mutations and pathogen infections. Similarly, drugs may be discovered by the relationship between the transcript profiles effectuated or impacted by a candidate drug and by the target disease. The integration of such data enables systems biology to predict the interplay between...

  2. Identification of mouse liver mitochondria-associated miRNAs and their potential biological functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Bian; Li-Min Li; Rui Tang; Dong-Xia Hou; Xi Chen; Chen-Yu Zhang; Ke Zen

    2010-01-01

    @@ Dear Editor, By analyzing the genome-wide microRNA(miRNA)expression profile using microRNA microarray and stemloop miRNA qPCR assay,we report that unique miRNAs are enriched in mitochondria and these mitochondriaassociated miRNAs may be involved in the regulation of gene expression of mitochondria and other general cellular processes such as apoptosis,proliferation and differentiation.

  3. Role of altered mitochondria functions in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leishangthem, B D; Sharma, A; Bhatnagar, A

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria, main producers of reactive-oxygen species (ROS), were studied to examine their role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PBMCs and mitochondria were isolated from SLE patients and healthy volunteers for various parameters. Mitochondrial ROS, swelling, hyperpolarization and levels of cytochrome c, caspase3 in the cells were assessed by flow cytometry. ROS was significantly increased in SLE patients (SLE vs controls: 1.83 ± 1.03 vs 1.10 ± 0.35; p mitochondria was greater in patients (SLE vs controls: 7.10 ± 5.50% vs 2.5 ± 1.8%; p Mitochondria swelling was found to be significantly altered in patients (SLE vs controls: 112.65 ± 36.56 vs 60.49 ± 20.69; p mitochondria. A significant decrease in activity of Complex I (SLE vs controls: 11.79 ± 3.18 vs 15.10 ± 6.38 nmol NADH oxidized/min/mg protein, p mitochondria in the pathogenesis of lupus. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Does Cryopreservation of Ovarian Tissue Affect the Distribution and Function of Germinal Vesicle Oocytes Mitochondria?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojdeh Salehnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate mitochondrial alteration and ATP content of germinal vesicle (GV oocytes isolated from fresh and vitrified ovaries. After superovulation, the ovaries from adult mice were collected and divided into control and vitrified groups. GV oocytes were isolated mechanically from each group. Half were cultured for 24 hours and their maturation was assessed. Metaphase II oocytes were collected and submitted to in vitro fertilization and their fertilization rates and development to the blastocyst stage were evaluated. In the remaining GV oocytes, ATP levels were quantified, and mitochondrial distribution, mitochondrial membrane potential, and intracellular free calcium were detected with rhodamine 123, JC-1 and Flou-4 AM staining, using laser-scanning confocal microscopy. Maturation and fertilization rates of GV oocytes and the developmental rates of subsequent embryos were significantly lower in vitrified samples (P<0.05. The ATP content and Ca2+ levels differed significantly in fresh and vitrified GV oocytes (P<0.05. Most mitochondria were seen as large and homogenous aggregates (66.6% in fresh GV oocytes compared to vitrified oocytes (50%. No significant differences in mitochondrial membrane potential were found between the groups. The lower maturation and fertilization rates of GV oocytes from vitrified ovaries may be due to changes in their mitochondrial function and distribution.

  5. Preservation of mitochondrial functional integrity in mitochondria isolated from small cryopreserved mouse brain areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, Daniela; de Bari, Lidia; De Filippis, Bianca; Ricceri, Laura; Vacca, Rosa Anna

    2014-01-01

    Studies of mitochondrial bioenergetics in brain pathophysiology are often precluded by the need to isolate mitochondria immediately after tissue dissection from a large number of brain biopsies for comparative studies. Here we present a procedure of cryopreservation of small brain areas from which mitochondrial enriched fractions (crude mitochondria) with high oxidative phosphorylation efficiency can be isolated. Small mouse brain areas were frozen and stored in a solution containing glycerol as cryoprotectant. Crude mitochondria were isolated by differential centrifugation from both cryopreserved and freshly explanted brain samples and were compared with respect to their ability to generate membrane potential and produce ATP. Intactness of outer and inner mitochondrial membranes was verified by polarographic ascorbate and cytochrome c tests and spectrophotometric assay of citrate synthase activity. Preservation of structural integrity and oxidative phosphorylation efficiency was successfully obtained in crude mitochondria isolated from different areas of cryopreserved mouse brain samples. Long-term cryopreservation of small brain areas from which intact and phosphorylating mitochondria can be isolated for the study of mitochondrial bioenergetics will significantly expand the study of mitochondrial defects in neurological pathologies, allowing large comparative studies and favoring interlaboratory and interdisciplinary analyses.

  6. Functional evidence for nitric oxide production by skeletal-muscle mitochondria from lipopolysaccharide-treated mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Enara; López-Bernardo, Elia; Cadenas, Susana

    2012-01-01

    The possible existence of a mitochondrially localized nitric oxide (NO) synthase (mtNOS) is controversial. To clarify this, we studied the ability of intact mitochondria to generate NO and the effect of mitochondrial NO on respiration. Respiratory rates and oxygen kinetics (P(50) values) were determined by high-resolution respirometry in skeletal-muscle mitochondria from control mice and mice injected with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). In the presence of the NOS substrate L-arginine, mitochondria from LPS-treated mice had lower respiration rates and higher P(50) values than control animals. These effects were prevented by the NOS inhibitor L-NMMA. Our results suggest that mitochondrially derived NO is generated by an LPS-inducible NOS protein other than iNOS and modulates oxygen consumption in mouse skeletal muscle.

  7. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Bin [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Department of Urology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Department of Urology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro [Department of Urology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Wu, Bin [Department of Urology, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang (China); Tanimoto, Akihide [Department of Pathology, Kagoshima University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Science, Kagoshima (Japan); Sasaguri, Yasuyuki [Pathology and Cell Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan); Kohno, Kimitoshi, E-mail: k-kohno@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Biology, School of Medicine, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu (Japan)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. {yields} mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. {yields} Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). {yields} Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  8. An empirical method to correct for temperature-dependent variations in the overlap function of CHM15k ceilometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervo, Maxime; Poltera, Yann; Haefele, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Imperfections in a lidar's overlap function lead to artefacts in the background, range and overlap-corrected lidar signals. These artefacts can erroneously be interpreted as an aerosol gradient or, in extreme cases, as a cloud base leading to false cloud detection. A correct specification of the overlap function is hence crucial in the use of automatic elastic lidars (ceilometers) for the detection of the planetary boundary layer or of low cloud. In this study, an algorithm is presented to correct such artefacts. It is based on the assumption of a homogeneous boundary layer and a correct specification of the overlap function down to a minimum range, which must be situated within the boundary layer. The strength of the algorithm lies in a sophisticated quality-check scheme which allows the reliable identification of favourable atmospheric conditions. The algorithm was applied to 2 years of data from a CHM15k ceilometer from the company Lufft. Backscatter signals corrected for background, range and overlap were compared using the overlap function provided by the manufacturer and the one corrected with the presented algorithm. Differences between corrected and uncorrected signals reached up to 45 % in the first 300 m above ground. The amplitude of the correction turned out to be temperature dependent and was larger for higher temperatures. A linear model of the correction as a function of the instrument's internal temperature was derived from the experimental data. Case studies and a statistical analysis of the strongest gradient derived from corrected signals reveal that the temperature model is capable of a high-quality correction of overlap artefacts, in particular those due to diurnal variations. The presented correction method has the potential to significantly improve the detection of the boundary layer with gradient-based methods because it removes false candidates and hence simplifies the attribution of the detected gradients to the planetary boundary layer. A

  9. Interactions between mitochondria and the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) regulate neuronal structural and functional plasticity and metaplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusco, Janaina; Haas, Kurt

    2015-08-15

    The classical view of mitochondria as housekeeping organelles acting in the background to simply maintain cellular energy demands has been challenged by mounting evidence of their direct and active participation in synaptic plasticity in neurons. Time-lapse imaging has revealed that mitochondria are motile in dendrites, with their localization and fusion and fission events regulated by synaptic activity. The positioning of mitochondria directly influences function of nearby synapses through multiple pathways including control over local concentrations of ATP, Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species. Recent studies have also shown that mitochondrial protein cascades, classically associated with apoptosis, are involved in neural plasticity in healthy cells. These findings link mitochondria to the plasticity- and metaplasticity-associated activity-dependent transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2), further repositioning mitochondria as potential command centres for regulation of synaptic plasticity. Intriguingly, MEF2 and mitochondrial functions appear to be intricately intertwined, as MEF2 is a target of mitochondrial apoptotic caspases and, in turn, MEF2 regulates mitochondrial genome transcription essential for production of superoxidase and hydrogen peroxidase. Here, we review evidence supporting mitochondria as central organelles controlling the spatiotemporal expression of neuronal plasticity, and attempt to disentangle the MEF2-mitochondria relationship mediating these functions. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  10. Autism and Schizophrenia in High Functioning Adults: Behavioral Differences and Overlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Annelies A.; Wouters, Saskia G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated a genetical overlap between autism and schizophrenia. However, at a behavioral level it remains unclear which features can validly distinguish adults with autism from an adult schizophrenia group. To this end, the present study compared 21 individuals with the autistic disorder and 21 individuals with…

  11. Autism and Schizophrenia in High Functioning Adults: Behavioral Differences and Overlap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spek, Annelies A.; Wouters, Saskia G. M.

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated a genetical overlap between autism and schizophrenia. However, at a behavioral level it remains unclear which features can validly distinguish adults with autism from an adult schizophrenia group. To this end, the present study compared 21 individuals with the autistic disorder and 21 individuals with…

  12. Learning preferences and attitudes by multi-criteria overlap dominance and relevance functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco de los Ríos, Camilo; Hougaard, Jens Leth; Nielsen, Kurt

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an interval-valued multi-criteria method for learning preferences and attitudes, identifying priorities with maximal robustness for decision support. The method is based on the notion of weighted overlap dominance, formalized by means of aggregation operators and interval-valu...

  13. Autism and Schizophrenia in high functioning adults: Behavioral differences and overlap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spek, Annelies A; Wouters, Saskia G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated a genetical overlap between autism and schizophrenia. However, at a behavioral level it remains unclear which features can validly distinguish adults with autism from an adult schizophrenia group. To this end, the present study compared 21 individuals with th

  14. Differences in endolymphatic sac mitochondria-rich cells indicate specific functions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, T.A.; Tonnaer, E.L.G.M.; Kuijpers, W.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Curfs, J.H.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: The purpose of the study was to examine the specific involvement of endolymphatic sac mitochondria-rich cells in endolymph homeostasis. STUDY DESIGN: Transmission electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry were performed on the endolymphatic sac of young adult rats, and two

  15. Functional co-operation between the nuclei of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and mitochondria from other yeast species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spirek, M.; Horvath, A.; Piskur, Jure

    2000-01-01

    We elaborated a simple method that allows the transfer of mitochondria from collection yeasts to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Protoplasts prepared from different yeasts were fused to the protoplasts of the ade2-1, ura3-52, kar1-1, rho (0) strain of S. cerevisiae and were selected for respiring cybrids...

  16. Heat stress impairs mitochondria functions and induces oxidative injury in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C; Jiao, H; Song, Z; Zhao, J; Wang, X; Lin, H

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the linkage of oxidative stress occurring in mitochondria, skeletal muscles, and plasma in heat stress-challenged broilers. At d 35, 24 broilers were randomly assigned to 2 treatments: rearing at high temperature (32 ± 1°C; heat stress group) or normal temperature (21 ± 1.2°C; control) for 7 d. The oxidative damage of lipid, DNA, and protein and the activities of antioxidative enzymes were measured, respectively, in plasma, skeletal muscles (breast and thigh muscles), and skeletal muscle mitochondria. The result showed that heat exposure increased (P stress in breast and thigh muscles. In skeletal muscle mitochondria, heat stress increased (P stress (P 0.05). Heat stress increased SOD (P stressed broilers, indicating that urate could serve as an antioxidant to enhance the antioxidative capacity during stress in a concentration-dependent manner. The activities of respiratory chain complexes I and III were estimated in skeletal muscle mitochondria. Mitochondrial complex I activity was suppressed (P stressed broiler. The fatty acid composition in skeletal muscle was not influenced by heat stress. In conclusion, suppressed mitochondrial complex I activity is associated with oxidative stress induced by heat exposure, which, in turn, is linked with the oxidative damages in muscle tissues and plasma.

  17. SIRT1 positively regulates autophagy and mitochondria function in embryonic stem cells under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Xuan; Lee, Man Ryul; Huang, Xinxin; Messina-Graham, Steven; Broxmeyer, Hal E

    2014-05-01

    SIRT1, an NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays a role in regulation of autophagy. SIRT1 increases mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative stress, and has been linked to age-related reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, which is highly dependent on mitochondrial metabolism. H2O2 induces oxidative stress and autophagic cell death through interference with Beclin 1 and the mTOR signaling pathways. We evaluated connections between SIRT1 activity and induction of autophagy in murine (m) and human (h) embryonic stem cells (ESCs) upon ROS challenge. Exogenous H2 O2 (1 mM) induced apoptosis and autophagy in wild-type (WT) and Sirt1-/- mESCs. High concentrations of H2O2 (1 mM) induced more apoptosis in Sirt1-/-, than in WT mESCs. However, addition of 3-methyladenine, a widely used autophagy inhibitor, in combination with H2O2 induced more cell death in WT than in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Decreased induction of autophagy in Sirt1-/- mESCs was demonstrated by decreased conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, lowered expression of Beclin-1, and decreased LC3 punctae and LysoTracker staining. H2O2 induced autophagy with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and disruption of mitochondrial dynamics in Sirt1-/- mESCs. Increased phosphorylation of P70/85-S6 kinase and ribosomal S6 was noted in Sirt1-/- mESCs, suggesting that SIRT1 regulates the mTOR pathway. Consistent with effects in mESCs, inhibition of SIRT1 using Lentivirus-mediated SIRT1 shRNA in hESCs demonstrated that knockdown of SIRT1 decreased H2O2-induced autophagy. This suggests a role for SIRT1 in regulating autophagy and mitochondria function in ESCs upon oxidative stress, effects mediated at least in part by the class III PI3K/Beclin 1 and mTOR pathways.

  18. Mitochondria and Organismal Longevity

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential for various biological processes including cellular energy production. The oxidative stress theory of aging proposes that mitochondria play key roles in aging by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), which indiscriminately damage macromolecules and lead to an age-dependent decline in biological function. However, recent studies show that increased levels of ROS or inhibition of mitochondrial function can actually delay aging and increase lifespan. The aim of thi...

  19. Effects of chloramphenicol preconditioning on oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈丽峰; 柳君泽; 党永明; 宋熔

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the roles of chloramphenicol (CAP) preconditioning in the oxidative respiratory function of cerebral mitochondria in rats exposed to acute hypoxia during acute hypoxia by observing the changes of mitochondrial oxidative respiratory function and cytochrome C oxidase (COX) activity. Methods: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control (C), medication (M), hypoxia (H), and medication plus hypoxia (MH). Rats in groups M and MH were administered by peritoneal injection of CAP (50 mg/kg) every 12 h for 7 d before decapitation, but those in groups H and MH were exposed to a hypobaric chamber simulating 5 000 m high altitude for 24 h. The rat cerebral cortex was removed and mitochondria were isolated by centrifugation. Mitochondrial respiratory function and COX activity were measured by Clark oxygen electrode. Results: Compared with Group C, Group H showed significantly elevated state 4respiration (ST4), decreased state 3 respiration (ST3), and respiratory control rate (RCR) in mitochondrial respiration during acute hypoxic exposure. ST3 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in Group C, but was not significantly different from that in Groups H and M, while ST4 in Group MH was significantly lower than that in groups C and H. RCR in Group MH was higher than that in Group H, but lower than that in Group C. COX activity in Group H was significantly lower than that in Group C. In Group MH, COX activity increased and was higher than that in Group H, but was still lower than that in Group C. Conclusion: Acute hypoxic exposure could lead to mitochondrial respiratory dysfunction, suggesting that CAP preconditioning might be beneficial to the recovery of rat respiratory finction. The change of COX activity is consistent with that of mitochondrial respiratory function during acute hypoxic exposure and CAP-administration, indicating that COX plays an important role in oxidative phosphorylation function of mitochondria from

  20. Mutations in chromatin regulators functionally link Cornelia de Lange syndrome and clinically overlapping phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, Ilaria; Teresa-Rodrigo, María E; Pozojevic, Jelena; Ruiz Gil, Sara; Bader, Ingrid; Braunholz, Diana; Bramswig, Nuria C; Gervasini, Cristina; Larizza, Lidia; Pfeiffer, Lutz; Ozkinay, Ferda; Ramos, Feliciano; Reiz, Benedikt; Rittinger, Olaf; Strom, Tim M; Watrin, Erwan; Wendt, Kerstin; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Wollnik, Bernd; Baquero-Montoya, Carolina; Pié, Juan; Deardorff, Matthew A; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Kaiser, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    The coordinated tissue-specific regulation of gene expression is essential for the proper development of all organisms. Mutations in multiple transcriptional regulators cause a group of neurodevelopmental disorders termed "transcriptomopathies" that share core phenotypical features including growth retardation, developmental delay, intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism. Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) belongs to this class of disorders and is caused by mutations in different subunits or regulators of the cohesin complex. Herein, we report on the clinical and molecular characterization of seven patients with features overlapping with CdLS who were found to carry mutations in chromatin regulators previously associated to other neurodevelopmental disorders that are frequently considered in the differential diagnosis of CdLS. The identified mutations affect the methyltransferase-encoding genes KMT2A and SETD5 and different subunits of the SWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex. Complementary to this, a patient with Coffin-Siris syndrome was found to carry a missense substitution in NIPBL. Our findings indicate that mutations in a variety of chromatin-associated factors result in overlapping clinical phenotypes, underscoring the genetic heterogeneity that should be considered when assessing the clinical and molecular diagnosis of neurodevelopmental syndromes. It is clear that emerging molecular mechanisms of chromatin dysregulation are central to understanding the pathogenesis of these clinically overlapping genetic disorders.

  1. Regulation of Mitochondria Function by TRAF3 in B Lymphocytes and B Cell Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Aim 2. To identify novel TRAF3- interacting proteins in mitochondria of B lymphocytes 1 PI: Ping Xie, PhD Considering that TRAF3 does not...mitochondrial proteins. To test this, we propose to identify novel mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins using biochemical affinity purification...mitochondrial TRAF3- interacting proteins : 100% completed. 2c. Mass spectrometry-based sequencing of purified proteins: 100% completed. 2d. Proteomic

  2. CD38 enhances the proliferation and inhibits the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Shan; Xiao, Songshu; Chen, Hongxiang; Zhang, Manying; Chen, Zhifang; Long, Yuehua; Gao, Lu; Zhu, Guangchao; He, Junyu; Peng, Shuping; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Ming; Li, Xiaoling; Ma, Jian; Wu, Minghua; Xiang, Juanjuan; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in women all over the world. The exact mechanism of occurrence and development of cervical cancer has not been fully elucidated. CD38 is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, which was found to mediate diverse activities, including signal transduction, cell adhesion, and cyclic ADP-ribose synthesis. Here, we reported that CD38 promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions. We established stable cervical cancer cell lines with CD38 over-expressed. CCK8 assay and colony formation assay indicated that CD38 promoted cervical cancer cell proliferation. Nude mouse tumorigenicity assay showed that CD38 significantly promotes tumor growth in vivo. CD38 also induced S phase accumulation in cell cycle analysis and suppressed cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Meanwhile, flow cytometry analysis of mitochondria functions suggested that CD38 decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in cervical cancer cells and CD38 was involved in down-regulation of ROS levels and prevented mitochondrial apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The percentage of cells with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in CD38-overexpressed cervical cancer cells was less than control groups. Furthermore, we found an up-regulation of MDM2, cyclinA1, CDK4, cyclinD1, NF-kB P65, c-rel, and a downregulation of P53, P21, and P38 by Western blot analysis. These results indicated that CD38 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The cumulative overlap distribution function in spin glasses: mean field vs. three dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yllanes, David; Billoire, Alain; Maiorano, Andrea; Marinari, Enzo; Martin-Mayor, Victor

    2015-03-01

    We use a sample-dependent analysis, based on medians and quantiles, to analyze the behavior of the overlap probability distribution in spin glasses. Using analytical and numerical mean-field results for the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, as well as data from toy models, we show that this approach is an effective tool to distinguish the low-temperature behavior of replica symmmetry breaking systems from that expected in the droplet picture. An application of the method to the three-dimensional Edwards-Anderson models shows agreement with the replica symmetry breaking predictions. Supported by ERC Grant No. 247328 and from MINECO (Spain), Contract No. FIS2012-35719-C02.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of PDZ domain binding reveals inherent functional overlap within the PDZ interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aartjan J W te Velthuis

    Full Text Available Binding selectivity and cross-reactivity within one of the largest and most abundant interaction domain families, the PDZ family, has long been enigmatic. The complete human PDZ domain complement (the PDZome consists of 267 domains and we applied here a Bayesian selectivity model to predict hundreds of human PDZ domain interactions, using target sequences of 22,997 non-redundant proteins. Subsequent analysis of these binding scores shows that PDZs can be divided into two genome-wide clusters that coincide well with the division between canonical class 1 and 2 PDZs. Within the class 1 PDZs we observed binding overlap at unprecedented levels, mediated by two residues at positions 1 and 5 of the second α-helix of the binding pocket. Eight PDZ domains were subsequently selected for experimental binding studies and to verify the basics of our predictions. Overall, the PDZ domain class 1 cross-reactivity identified here implies that auxiliary mechanisms must be in place to overcome this inherent functional overlap and to minimize cross-selectivity within the living cell. Indeed, when we superimpose PDZ domain binding affinities with gene ontologies, network topology data and the domain position within a PDZ superfamily protein, functional overlap is minimized and PDZ domains position optimally in the binding space. We therefore propose that PDZ domain selectivity is achieved through cellular context rather than inherent binding specificity.

  5. The three-loop $\\beta$-function of SU(N) lattice gauge theories with overlap fermions

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, M

    2007-01-01

    We briefly report our calculation of the 2-loop coefficient of the coupling constant renormalization function Z_g in lattice perturbation theory. The quantity under study is defined through g_0 = Z_g g, where g_0 (g) is the bare (renormalized) coupling constant. The 2-loop expression for Z_g can be directly related to the 3-loop bare beta-function beta_L(g_0). Our calculation is performed using overlap fermions and Wilson gluons, and the background field technique has been chosen for convenience. Our results depend explicitly on the number of fermion flavors (N_f) and colors (N). Since the dependence of Z_g on the overlap parameter rho cannot be extracted analytically, we tabulate our results for different values of rho in the allowed range (0overlap parameter. A longer write-up of this work may be found in 0709.4368.

  6. Mitochondrial transfer from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells to mitochondria-defective cells recaptures impaired mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conducted mitochondrial transfer has been recently shown to rescue cellular bioenergetics and prevent cell death caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJMSCs) harvested from postpartum umbilical cords are an accessible and abundant source of stem cells. This study aimed to determine the capability of WJMSCs to transfer their own mitochondria and rescue impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and bioenergetics caused by mitochondrial DNA defects. To do this, WJMSCs were co-cultured with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted ρ(0) cells and the recapture of mitochondrial function was evaluated. WJMSCs were shown to be capable of transferring their own mitochondria into ρ(0) cells and underwent interorganellar mixture within these cells. Permissive culture media (BrdU-containing and pyruvate- and uridine-free) sieved out a survival cell population from the co-cultured WJMSCs (BrdU-sensitive) and ρ(0) cells (pyruvate/uridine-free). The survival cells had mtDNA identical to that of WJMSCs, whereas they expressed cellular markers identical to that of ρ(0) cells. Importantly, these ρ(0)-plus -WJMSC-mtDNA (ρ(+W)) cells recovered the expression of mtDNA-encoded proteins and exhibited functional oxygen consumption and respiratory control, as well as the activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, III and IV. In addition, ETC complex V-inhibitor-sensitive ATP production and metabolic shifting were also recovered. Furthermore, cellular behaviors including attachment-free proliferation, aerobic viability and OXPHOS-reliant cellular motility were also regained after mitochondrial transfer by WJMSCs. The therapeutic effect of WJMSCs-derived mitochondrial transfer was able to stably sustain for at least 45 passages. In conclusion, this study suggests that WJMSCs may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunction through the donation of healthy

  7. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitotempo protects mitochondrial function against amyloid beta toxicity in primary cultured mouse neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hongtao; Li, Mo

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondrial defects including excess reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and compromised ATP generation are featured pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid beta (Aβ)-mediated mitochondrial ROS overproduction disrupts intra-neuronal Redox balance, in turn exacerbating mitochondrial dysfunction leading to neuronal injury. Previous studies have found the beneficial effects of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants in preventing mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal injury in AD animal and cell models, suggesting that mitochondrial ROS scavengers hold promise for the treatment of this neurological disorder. In this study, we have determined that mitotempo, a novel mitochondria-targeted antioxidant protects mitochondrial function from the toxicity of Aβ in primary cultured neurons. Our results showed that Aβ-promoted mitochondrial superoxide production and neuronal lipid oxidation were significantly suppressed by the application of mitotempo. Moreover, mitotempo also demonstrated protective effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics evidenced by preserved mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c oxidase activity as well as ATP production. In addition, the Aβ-induced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and decreased expression levels of mtDNA replication-related DNA polymerase gamma (DNA pol γ) and Twinkle were substantially mitigated by mitotempo. Therefore, our study suggests that elimination of excess mitochondrial ROS rescues mitochondrial function in Aβ-insulted neruons; and mitotempo has the potential to be a promising therapeutic agent to protect mitochondrial and neuronal function in AD.

  8. A role for Mfb1p in region-specific anchorage of high-functioning mitochondria and lifespan in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernice, Wolfgang M; Vevea, Jason D; Pon, Liza A

    2016-02-03

    Previous studies indicate that replicative lifespan in daughter cells of Sacchraromyces cerevisiae depends on the preferential inheritance of young, high-functioning mitochondria. We report here that mitochondria are functionally segregated even within single mother cells in S. cerevisiae. A high-functioning population of mitochondria accumulates at the tip of the mother cell distal to the bud. We find that the mitochondrial F-box protein (Mfb1p) localizes to mitochondria in the mother tip and is required for mitochondrial anchorage at that site, independent of the previously identified anchorage protein Num1p. Deletion of MFB1 results in loss of the mother-tip-localized mitochondrial population, defects in mitochondrial function and premature replicative ageing. Inhibiting mitochondrial inheritance to buds, by deletion of MMR1, in mfb1Δ cells restores mitochondrial distribution, promotes mitochondrial function and extends replicative lifespan. Our results identify a mechanism that retains a reservoir of high-functioning mitochondria in mother cells and thereby preserves maternal reproductive capacity.

  9. Bax function in the absence of mitochondria in the primitive protozoan Giardia lamblia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian B Hehl

    Full Text Available Bax-induced permeabilization of the mitochondrial outer membrane and release of cytochrome c are key events in apoptosis. Although Bax can compromise mitochondria in primitive unicellular organisms that lack a classical apoptotic machinery, it is still unclear if Bax alone is sufficient for this, or whether additional mitochondrial components are required. The protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia is one of the earliest branching eukaryotes and harbors highly degenerated mitochondrial remnant organelles (mitosomes that lack a genome. Here we tested whether human Bax expressed in Giardia can be used to ablate mitosomes. We demonstrate that these organelles are neither targeted, nor compromised, by Bax. However, specialized compartments of the regulated secretory pathway are completely ablated by Bax. As a consequence, maturing cyst wall proteins that are sorted into these organelles are released into the cytoplasm, causing a developmental arrest and cell death. Interestingly, this ectopic cargo release is dependent on the carboxy-terminal 22 amino acids of Bax, and can be prevented by the Bax-inhibiting peptide Ku70. A C-terminally truncated Bax variant still localizes to secretory organelles, but is unable to permeabilize these membranes, uncoupling membrane targeting and cargo release. Even though mitosomes are too diverged to be recognized by Bax, off-target membrane permeabilization appears to be conserved and leads to cell death completely independently of mitochondria.

  10. Unified treatment of complex and real rotation-angular functions for two-center overlap integrals over arbitrary atomic orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Guseinov, I I

    2010-01-01

    The new combined formulas have been established for the complex and real rotation-angular functions arising in the evaluation of two-center overlap integrals over arbitrary atomic orbitals in molecular coordinate system. These formulas can be useful in the study of different quantum mechanical problems in both the theory and practice of calculations dealing with atoms, molecules, nuclei and solids when the integer and noninteger n complex and real atomic orbitals basis sets are emploed. This work presented the development of our previous paper (I.I. Guseinov, Phys. Rev. A, 32 (1985) 1864).

  11. Effect of antihypertensive agents - captopril and nifedipine - on the functional properties of rat heart mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Kancirová

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Investigation of acute effect on cellular bioenergetics provides the opportunity to characterize the possible adverse effects of drugs more comprehensively. This study aimed to investigate the changes in biochemical and biophysical properties of heart mitochondria induced by captopril and nifedipine antihypertensive treatment. Materials and Methods: Male, 12-week-old Wistar rats in two experimental models (in vivo and in vitro were used. In four groups, the effects of escalating doses of captopril, nifedipine and combination of captopril + nifedipine added to the incubation medium (in vitro or administered per os to rat (in vivo on mitochondrial ATP synthase activity and membrane fluidity were monitored. Results: In the in vitro model we observed a significant inhibitory effect of treatment on the ATP synthase activity (P

  12. An alternative membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides in mitochondria and its possible function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1978-10-01

    This paper describes the properties and a possible biological role of a transport process across the inner membrane of rat liver mitochondria resulting in the exchange of ATP(4-) (out) for ADP(3-) (in) + 0.5 phosphate(2-) (in). This transmembrane exchange reaction, designated as the ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange, is specific for the ligands shown, electroneutral, insensitive to N-ethylmaleimide or mersalyl, inhibited by atractyloside, and appears to occur only in the direction as written. It is thus distinct from the well-known phosphate-hydroxide and phosphate-dicarboxylate exchange systems, which are inhibited by mersalyl, and from the ATP-ADP exchanger, which does not transport phosphate. During ATP hydrolysis by mitochondria, half of the phosphate formed from ATP passes from the matrix to the medium by the mersalyl-insensitive ATP-ADP-phosphate exchange and the other half by the well-known mersalyl-sensitive phosphate-hydroxide exchange. These and other considerations have led to a hypothesis for the pathway and stoichiometry of ATP-dependent reverse electron transport, characterized by a requirement of 1.33 molecules of ATP per pair of electrons reversed and by the utilization of a different membrane transport pathway for phosphate and adenine nucleotides than is taken in forward electron flow and oxidative phosphorylation. The possible occurrence of independent pathways for ATP-forming forward electron flow and ATP-consuming reverse electron flow is consonant with the fact that the opposing degradative and synthetic pathways in the central routes of cell metabolism generally have different pathways that are independently regulated.

  13. Isolation of rat adrenocortical mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solinas, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Fujioka, Hisashi [Electron Microscopy Facility, Department of Pharmacology, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Tandler, Bernard [Department of Biological Sciences, School of Dental Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Hoppel, Charles L., E-mail: charles.hoppel@case.edu [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Department of Medicine, Center for Mitochondrial Disease, School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2012-10-12

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for isolation of adrenocortical mitochondria from the adrenal gland of rats is described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The purified isolated mitochondria show excellent morphological integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of oxidative phosphorylation are excellent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The method increases the opportunity of direct analysis of adrenal mitochondria from small animals. -- Abstract: This report describes a relatively simple and reliable method for isolating adrenocortical mitochondria from rats in good, reasonably pure yield. These organelles, which heretofore have been unobtainable in isolated form from small laboratory animals, are now readily accessible. A high degree of mitochondrial purity is shown by the electron micrographs, as well as the structural integrity of each mitochondrion. That these organelles have retained their functional integrity is shown by their high respiratory control ratios. In general, the biochemical performance of these adrenal cortical mitochondria closely mirrors that of typical hepatic or cardiac mitochondria.

  14. Gauge theories with overlap fermions in an arbitrary representation: Evaluation of the 3-loop beta-function

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinou, M

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the calculation of the relation between the bare coupling constant g_0 and the MSbar-renormalized coupling g_MS, g_0 = Z_g(g_0,a\\mu) g_MS, to 2 loops in perturbation theory, with fermions in an arbitrary representation of the gauge group SU(N). Our calculation is performed using overlap fermions and Wilson gluons, and the background field technique has been chosen for convenience. The corresponding results in the fundamental representation appear in our longer publication [arXiv:0709.4368]. The 3-loop coefficient of the bare beta-function, b_2^L, is extracted using the 2-loop expression for Z_g, and it is presented as a function of the overlap parameter rho, the number of fermion flavors (N_f) and the number of colors (N). We also provide the expression for the ratio Lambda_L/Lambda_MS, in an arbitrary representation. A plot of Lambda_L/Lambda_MS is given in the adjoint representation.

  15. Roles of sirtuins in the regulation of antioxidant defense and bioenergetic function of mitochondria under oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y-T; Wu, S-B; Wei, Y-H

    2014-09-01

    In addition to serving as the power house of mammalian cells, mitochondria are crucial for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis in response to physiological or environmental changes. Several lines of evidence suggest that posttranslational modification (PTM) of proteins plays a pivotal role in the regulation of the bioenergetic function of mitochondria. Among them, reversible lysine acetylation of mitochondrial proteins has been established as one of the key mechanisms in cellular response to energy demand by modulating the flux of a number of key metabolic pathways. In this article, we focus on the role of Sirt3-mediated deacetylation in: (1) flexibility of energy metabolism, (2) activation of antioxidant defense, and (3) maintenance of cellular redox status in response to dietary challenge and oxidative stress. We suggest that oxidative stress-elicited down-regulation of Sirt3 plays a role in the pathophysiology of diabetes, cardiac hypotrophy, mitochondrial diseases, and age-related diseases. Besides, the physiological role of newly identified lysine acylation mediated by Sirt5 and its biochemical effects on oxidative metabolism are also discussed. Moreover, we have integrated the regulatory function of several protein kinases that are involved in the phosphorylation of mitochondrial enzymes during oxidative stress. Finally, the functional consequence of the synergistic regulation through diverse protein modifications is emphasized on the maintenance of the bioenergetic homeostasis and metabolic adaptation of the animal and human cells. Together, we have provided an updated review of PTM in mitochondrial biology and their implications in aging and human diseases through an intricate regulation of energy metabolism under oxidative stress.

  16. OTX2 and CRX rescue overlapping and photoreceptor‐specific functions in the Drosophila eye

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Terrell, David; Xie, Baotong; Workman, Michael; Mahato, Simpla; Zelhof, Andrew; Gebelein, Brian; Cook, Tiffany

    2012-01-01

    .... Drosophila encodes a single Otd factor that has multiple functions during eye development. Using the Drosophila eye as a model, we tested the ability of the human OTX1, OTX2, and CRX genes, as well as several disease...

  17. Overlapping functions of argonaute proteins in patterning and morphogenesis of Drosophila embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wibke J Meyer

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Argonaute proteins are essential components of the molecular machinery that drives RNA silencing. In Drosophila, different members of the Argonaute family of proteins have been assigned to distinct RNA silencing pathways. While Ago1 is required for microRNA function, Ago2 is a crucial component of the RNA-induced silencing complex in siRNA-triggered RNA interference. Drosophila Ago2 contains an unusual amino-terminus with two types of imperfect glutamine-rich repeats (GRRs of unknown function. Here we show that the GRRs of Ago2 are essential for the normal function of the protein. Alleles with reduced numbers of GRRs cause specific disruptions in two morphogenetic processes associated with the midblastula transition: membrane growth and microtubule-based organelle transport. These defects do not appear to result from disruption of siRNA-dependent processes but rather suggest an interference of the mutant Ago2 proteins in an Ago1-dependent pathway. Using loss-of-function alleles, we further demonstrate that Ago1 and Ago2 act in a partially redundant manner to control the expression of the segment-polarity gene wingless in the early embryo. Our findings argue against a strict separation of Ago1 and Ago2 functions and suggest that these proteins act in concert to control key steps of the midblastula transition and of segmental patterning.

  18. Optimization of ATP synthase function in mitochondria and chloroplasts via the adenylate kinase equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abir U Igamberdiev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The bulk of ATP synthesis in plants is performed by ATP synthase, the main bioenergetics engine of cells, operating both in mitochondria and in chloroplasts. The reaction mechanism of ATP synthase has been studied in detail for over half a century; however, its optimal performance depends also on the steady delivery of ATP synthase substrates and the removal of its products. For mitochondrial ATP synthase, we analyze here the provision of stable conditions for (i the supply of ADP and Mg2+, supported by adenylate kinase (AK equilibrium in the intermembrane space, (ii the supply of phosphate via membrane transporter in symport with H+, and (iii the conditions of outflow of ATP by adenylate transporter carrying out the exchange of free adenylates. We also show that, in chloroplasts, AK equilibrates adenylates and governs Mg2+ contents in the stroma, optimizing ATP synthase and Calvin cycle operation, and affecting the import of inorganic phosphate in exchange with triose phosphates. It is argued that chemiosmosis is not the sole component of ATP synthase performance, which also depends on AK-mediated equilibrium of adenylates and Mg2+, adenylate transport and phosphate release and supply.

  19. Bax targets mitochondria by distinct mechanisms before or during apoptotic cell death: a requirement for VDAC2 or Bak for efficient Bax apoptotic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, S B; Nguyen, T N; Tan, I; Ninnis, R; Iyer, S; Stroud, D A; Menard, M; Kluck, R M; Ryan, M T; Dewson, G

    2014-01-01

    In non-apoptotic cells, Bak constitutively resides in the mitochondrial outer membrane. In contrast, Bax is in a dynamic equilibrium between the cytosol and mitochondria, and is commonly predominant in the cytosol. In response to an apoptotic stimulus, Bax and Bak change conformation, leading to Bax accumulation at mitochondria and Bak/Bax oligomerization to form a pore in the mitochondrial outer membrane that is responsible for cell death. Using blue native-PAGE to investigate how Bax oligomerizes in the mitochondrial outer membrane, we observed that, like Bak, a proportion of Bax that constitutively resides at mitochondria associates with voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)2 prior to an apoptotic stimulus. During apoptosis, Bax dissociates from VDAC2 and homo-oligomerizes to form high molecular weight oligomers. In cells that lack VDAC2, constitutive mitochondrial localization of Bax and Bak was impaired, suggesting that VDAC2 has a role in Bax and Bak import to, or stability at, the mitochondrial outer membrane. However, following an apoptotic stimulus, Bak and Bax retained the ability to accumulate at VDAC2-deficient mitochondria and to mediate cell death. Silencing of Bak in VDAC2-deficient cells indicated that Bax required either VDAC2 or Bak in order to translocate to and oligomerize at the mitochondrial outer membrane to efficiently mediate apoptosis. In contrast, efficient Bak homo-oligomerization at the mitochondrial outer membrane and its pro-apoptotic function required neither VDAC2 nor Bax. Even a C-terminal mutant of Bax (S184L) that localizes to mitochondria did not constitutively target mitochondria deficient in VDAC2, but was recruited to mitochondria following an apoptotic stimulus dependent on Bak or upon over-expression of Bcl-xL. Together, our data suggest that Bax localizes to the mitochondrial outer membrane via alternate mechanisms, either constitutively via an interaction with VDAC2 or after activation via interaction with Bcl-2 family

  20. Class I myosins have overlapping and specialized functions in left-right asymmetric development in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Takashi; Sasamura, Takeshi; Inatomi, Momoko; Hozumi, Shunya; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Hatori, Ryo; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Nakazawa, Naotaka; Suzuki, Emiko; Maeda, Reo; Yamakawa, Tomoko; Matsuno, Kenji

    2015-04-01

    The class I myosin genes are conserved in diverse organisms, and their gene products are involved in actin dynamics, endocytosis, and signal transduction. Drosophila melanogaster has three class I myosin genes, Myosin 31DF (Myo31DF), Myosin 61F (Myo61F), and Myosin 95E (Myo95E). Myo31DF, Myo61F, and Myo95E belong to the Myosin ID, Myosin IC, and Myosin IB families, respectively. Previous loss-of-function analyses of Myo31DF and Myo61F revealed important roles in left-right (LR) asymmetric development and enterocyte maintenance, respectively. However, it was difficult to elucidate their roles in vivo, because of potential redundant activities. Here we generated class I myosin double and triple mutants to address this issue. We found that the triple mutant was viable and fertile, indicating that all three class I myosins were dispensable for survival. A loss-of-function analysis revealed further that Myo31DF and Myo61F, but not Myo95E, had redundant functions in promoting the dextral LR asymmetric development of the male genitalia. Myo61F overexpression is known to antagonize the dextral activity of Myo31DF in various Drosophila organs. Thus, the LR-reversing activity of overexpressed Myo61F may not reflect its physiological function. The endogenous activity of Myo61F in promoting dextral LR asymmetric development was observed in the male genitalia, but not the embryonic gut, another LR asymmetric organ. Thus, Myo61F and Myo31DF, but not Myo95E, play tissue-specific, redundant roles in LR asymmetric development. Our studies also revealed differential colocalization of the class I myosins with filamentous (F)-actin in the brush border of intestinal enterocytes. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  1. Overlap between Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease in ABCA7 functional variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuytemans, Karen; Maldonado, Lizmarie; Ali, Aleena; John-Williams, Krista; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden; Scott, William K; Vance, Jeffery M

    2016-02-01

    Given their reported function in phagocytosis and clearance of protein aggregates in Alzheimer disease (AD), we hypothesized that variants in ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) might be involved in Parkinson disease (PD). ABCA7 variants were identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 396 unrelated patients with PD and 222 healthy controls. In addition, we used the publicly available WES data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (444 patients and 153 healthy controls) as a second, independent data set. We observed a higher frequency of loss-of-function (LOF) variants and rare putative highly functional variants (Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion [CADD] >20) in clinically diagnosed patients with PD than in healthy controls in both data sets. Overall, we identified LOF variants in 11 patients and 1 healthy control (odds ratio [OR] 4.94, Fisher exact p = 0.07). Four of these variants have been previously implicated in AD risk (p.E709AfsX86, p.W1214X, p.L1403RfsX7, and rs113809142). In addition, rare variants with CADD >20 were observed in 19 patients vs 3 healthy controls (OR 2.85, Fisher exact p = 0.06). The presence of ABCA7 LOF variants in clinically defined PD suggests that they might be risk factors for neurodegeneration in general, especially those variants hallmarked by protein aggregation. More studies will be needed to evaluate the overall impact of this transporter in neurodegenerative disease.

  2. Overlapping functions of the starch synthases SSII and SSIII in amylopectin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Hulst Christophe

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biochemical mechanisms that determine the molecular architecture of amylopectin are central in plant biology because they allow long-term storage of reduced carbon. Amylopectin structure imparts the ability to form semi-crystalline starch granules, which in turn provides its glucose storage function. The enzymatic steps of amylopectin biosynthesis resemble those of the soluble polymer glycogen, however, the reasons for amylopectin's architectural distinctions are not clearly understood. The multiplicity of starch biosynthetic enzymes conserved in plants likely is involved. For example, amylopectin chain elongation in plants involves five conserved classes of starch synthase (SS, whereas glycogen biosynthesis typically requires only one class of glycogen synthase. Results Null mutations were characterized in AtSS2, which codes for SSII, and mutant lines were compared to lines lacking SSIII and to an Atss2, Atss3 double mutant. Loss of SSII did not affect growth rate or starch quantity, but caused increased amylose/amylopectin ratio, increased total amylose, and deficiency in amylopectin chains with degree of polymerization (DP 12 to DP28. In contrast, loss of both SSII and SSIII caused slower plant growth and dramatically reduced starch content. Extreme deficiency in DP12 to DP28 chains occurred in the double mutant, far more severe than the summed changes in SSII- or SSIII-deficient plants lacking only one of the two enzymes. Conclusion SSII and SSIII have partially redundant functions in determination of amylopectin structure, and these roles cannot be substituted by any other conserved SS, specifically SSI, GBSSI, or SSIV. Even though SSIII is not required for the normal abundance of glucan chains of DP12 to DP18, the enzyme clearly is capable of functioning in production such chains. The role of SSIII in producing these chains cannot be detected simply by analysis of an individual mutation. Competition between

  3. Overlap between Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease in ABCA7 functional variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuytemans, Karen; Maldonado, Lizmarie; Ali, Aleena; John-Williams, Krista; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden; Scott, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Given their reported function in phagocytosis and clearance of protein aggregates in Alzheimer disease (AD), we hypothesized that variants in ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) might be involved in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: ABCA7 variants were identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 396 unrelated patients with PD and 222 healthy controls. In addition, we used the publicly available WES data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (444 patients and 153 healthy controls) as a second, independent data set. Results: We observed a higher frequency of loss-of-function (LOF) variants and rare putative highly functional variants (Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion [CADD] >20) in clinically diagnosed patients with PD than in healthy controls in both data sets. Overall, we identified LOF variants in 11 patients and 1 healthy control (odds ratio [OR] 4.94, Fisher exact p = 0.07). Four of these variants have been previously implicated in AD risk (p.E709AfsX86, p.W1214X, p.L1403RfsX7, and rs113809142). In addition, rare variants with CADD >20 were observed in 19 patients vs 3 healthy controls (OR 2.85, Fisher exact p = 0.06). Conclusion: The presence of ABCA7 LOF variants in clinically defined PD suggests that they might be risk factors for neurodegeneration in general, especially those variants hallmarked by protein aggregation. More studies will be needed to evaluate the overall impact of this transporter in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27066581

  4. Essential and overlapping functions for mammalian Argonautes in microRNA silencing

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA) silencing fine-tunes protein output and regulates diverse biological processes. Argonaute (Ago) proteins are the core effectors of the miRNA pathway. In lower organisms, multiple Agos have evolved specialized functions for distinct RNA silencing pathways. However, the roles of mammalian Agos have not been well characterized. Here we show that mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells deficient for Ago1–4 are completely defective in miRNA silencing and undergo apoptosis. In miRNA silenc...

  5. Ptch2 shares overlapping functions with Ptch1 in Smo regulation and limb development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhulyn, Olena; Nieuwenhuis, Erica; Liu, Yulu Cherry; Angers, Stephane; Hui, Chi-chung

    2015-01-15

    Ptch1 and Ptch2 are highly conserved vertebrate homologs of Drosophila ptc, the receptor of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway. The vertebrate Ptch1 gene encodes a potent tumor suppressor and is well established for its role in embryonic development. In contrast, Ptch2 is poorly characterized and dispensable for embryogenesis. In flies and mice, ptc/Ptch1 controls Hh signaling through the regulation of Smoothened (Smo). In addition, Hh pathway activation also up-regulates ptc/Ptch1 expression to restrict the diffusion of the ligand. Recent studies have implicated Ptch2 in this ligand dependent antagonism, however whether Ptch2 encodes a functional Shh receptor remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that Ptch2 is a functional Shh receptor, which regulates Smo localization and activity in vitro. We also show that Ptch1 and Ptch2 are co-expressed in the developing mouse limb bud and loss of Ptch2 exacerbates the outgrowth defect in the limb-specific Ptch1 knockout mutants, demonstrating that Ptch1 and Ptch2 co-operate in regulating cellular responses to Shh in vivo.

  6. SPARK: Sparsity-based analysis of reliable k-hubness and overlapping network structure in brain functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kangjoo; Lina, Jean-Marc; Gotman, Jean; Grova, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    Functional hubs are defined as the specific brain regions with dense connections to other regions in a functional brain network. Among them, connector hubs are of great interests, as they are assumed to promote global and hierarchical communications between functionally specialized networks. Damage to connector hubs may have a more crucial effect on the system than does damage to other hubs. Hubs in graph theory are often identified from a correlation matrix, and classified as connector hubs when the hubs are more connected to regions in other networks than within the networks to which they belong. However, the identification of hubs from functional data is more complex than that from structural data, notably because of the inherent problem of multicollinearity between temporal dynamics within a functional network. In this context, we developed and validated a method to reliably identify connectors and corresponding overlapping network structure from resting-state fMRI. This new method is actually handling the multicollinearity issue, since it does not rely on counting the number of connections from a thresholded correlation matrix. The novelty of the proposed method is that besides counting the number of networks involved in each voxel, it allows us to identify which networks are actually involved in each voxel, using a data-driven sparse general linear model in order to identify brain regions involved in more than one network. Moreover, we added a bootstrap resampling strategy to assess statistically the reproducibility of our results at the single subject level. The unified framework is called SPARK, i.e. SParsity-based Analysis of Reliable k-hubness, where k-hubness denotes the number of networks overlapping in each voxel. The accuracy and robustness of SPARK were evaluated using two dimensional box simulations and realistic simulations that examined detection of artificial hubs generated on real data. Then, test/retest reliability of the method was assessed

  7. Molecular identification and functional characterisation of uncoupling protein 4 in larva and pupa fat body mitochondria from the beetle Zophobas atratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2012-08-01

    Uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) is a member of the UCP subfamily that mediates mitochondrial uncoupling, and sequence alignment predicts the existence of UCP4 in several insects. The present study demonstrates the first molecular identification of a partial Zophobas atratus UCP4-coding sequence and the functional characterisation of ZaUCP4 in the mitochondria of larval and pupal fat bodies of the beetle. ZaUCP4 shows a high similarity to predicted insect UCP4 isoforms and known mammalian UCP4s, both at the nucleotide and amino acid sequence levels. Bioenergetic studies clearly demonstrate UCP function in mitochondria from larval and pupal fat bodies. In non-phosphorylating mitochondria, ZaUCP activity was stimulated by palmitic acid and inhibited by the purine nucleotide GTP. In phosphorylating mitochondria, ZaUCP4 activity decreased the yield of oxidative phosphorylation. ZaUCP4 was immunodetected with antibodies raised against human UCP4 as a single 36-kDa band. A lower expression of ZaUCP4 at the level of mRNA and protein and a decreased ZaUCP4 activity were observed in the Z. atratus pupal fat body compared with the larval fat body. The different expression patterns and activity of ZaUCP4 during the larval-pupal transformation indicates an important physiological role for UCP4 in insect fat body development and function during insect metamorphosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Overlapping effector interfaces define the multiple functions of the HIV-1 Nef polyproline helix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Lillian S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 Nef is a multifunctional protein required for full pathogenicity of the virus. As Nef has no known enzymatic activity, it necessarily functions through protein-protein interaction interfaces. A critical Nef protein interaction interface is centered on its polyproline segment (P69VRPQVPLRP78 which contains the helical SH3 domain binding protein motif, PXXPXR. We hypothesized that any Nef-SH3 domain interactions would be lost upon mutation of the prolines or arginine of PXXPXR. Further, mutation of the non-motif “X” residues, (Q73, V74, and L75 would give altered patterns of inhibition for different Nef/SH3 domain protein interactions. Results We found that mutations of either of the prolines or the arginine of PXXPXR are defective for Nef-Hck binding, Nef/activated PAK2 complex formation and enhancement of virion infectivity (EVI. Mutation of the non-motif “X” residues (Q, V and L gave similar patterns of inhibition for Nef/activated PAK2 complex formation and EVI which were distinct from the pattern for Hck binding. These results implicate an SH3 domain containing protein other than Hck for Nef/activated PAK2 complex formation and EVI. We have also mutated Nef residues at the N-and C-terminal ends of the polyproline segment to explore interactions outside of PXXPXR. We discovered a new locus GFP/F (G67, F68, P69 and F90 that is required for Nef/activated PAK2 complex formation and EVI. MHC Class I (MHCI downregulation was only partially inhibited by mutating the PXXPXR motif residues, but was fully inhibited by mutating the C-terminal P78. Further, we observed that MHCI downregulation strictly requires G67 and F68. Our mutational analysis confirms the recently reported structure of the complex between Nef, AP-1 μ1 and the cytoplasmic tail of MHCI, but does not support involvement of an SH3 domain protein in MHCI downregulation. Conclusion Nef has evolved to be dependent on interactions with multiple SH3 domain

  9. Functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria in rats with paclitaxel- and oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Huaien; Xiao, Wen Hua; Bennett, Gary J

    2011-12-01

    Cancer chemotherapeutics like paclitaxel and oxaliplatin produce a dose-limiting chronic sensory peripheral neuropathy that is often accompanied by neuropathic pain. The cause of the neuropathy and pain is unknown. In animal models, paclitaxel-evoked and oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathies are accompanied by an increase in the incidence of swollen and vacuolated mitochondria in peripheral nerve axons. It has been proposed that mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation are indicative of a functional impairment and that this results in a chronic axonal energy deficiency that is the cause of the neuropathy's symptoms. However, the significance of mitochondrial swelling and vacuolation is ambiguous and a test of the hypothesis requires a direct assessment of the effects of chemotherapy on mitochondrial function. The results of such an assessment are reported here. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production were measured in rat sciatic nerve samples taken 1-2 days after and 3-4 weeks after induction of painful peripheral neuropathy with paclitaxel and oxaliplatin. Significant deficits in Complex I-mediated and Complex II-mediated respiration and significant deficits in ATP production were found for both drugs at both time points. In addition, prophylactic treatment with acetyl-l-carnitine, which inhibited the development of paclitaxel-evoked and oxaliplatin-evoked neuropathy, prevented the deficits in mitochondrial function. These results implicate mitotoxicity as a possible cause of chemotherapy-evoked chronic sensory peripheral neuropathy.

  10. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuerschner, Lars; Richter, Doris; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian

    2012-01-01

    Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high......, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria...

  11. Degenerate mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    van der Giezen, Mark; Tovar, Jorge

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are the main sites of biological energy generation in eukaryotes. These organelles are remnants of a bacterial endosymbiont that took up residence inside a host cell over 1,500 million years ago. Comparative genomics studies suggest that the mitochondrion is monophyletic in origin. Thus, the original mitochondrial endosymbiont has evolved independently in anaerobic and aerobic environments that are inhabited by diverse eukaryotic lineages. This process has resulted in a collectio...

  12. Huntington's Disease and Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodeiri Farshbaf, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran

    2017-06-21

    Huntington's disease (HD) as an inherited neurodegenerative disorder leads to neuronal loss in striatum. Progressive motor dysfunction, cognitive decline, and psychiatric disturbance are the main clinical symptoms of the HD. This disease is caused by expansion of the CAG repeats in exon 1 of the huntingtin which encodes Huntingtin protein (Htt). Various cellular and molecular events play role in the pathology of HD. Mitochondria as important organelles play crucial roles in the most of neurodegenerative disorders like HD. Critical roles of the mitochondria in neurons are ATP generation, Ca(2+) buffering, ROS generation, and antioxidant activity. Neurons as high-demand energy cells closely related to function, maintenance, and dynamic of mitochondria. In the most neurological disorders, mitochondrial activities and dynamic are disrupted which associate with high ROS level, low ATP generation, and apoptosis. Accumulation of mutant huntingtin (mHtt) during this disease may evoke mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we review recent findings to support this hypothesis that mHtt could cause mitochondrial defects. In addition, by focusing normal huntingtin functions in neurons, we purpose mitochondria and Huntingtin association in normal condition. Moreover, mHtt affects various cellular signaling which ends up to mitochondrial biogenesis. So, it could be a potential candidate to decline ATP level in HD. We conclude how mitochondrial biogenesis plays a central role in the neuronal survival and activity and how mHtt affects mitochondrial trafficking, maintenance, integrity, function, dynamics, and hemostasis and makes neurons vulnerable to degeneration in HD.

  13. Tissue specific structural variations of mitochondria of fish ectoparasite Argulus bengalensis Ramakrishna, 1951 (Crustacea: Branchiura: Functional implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirban Banerjee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the fine structure of some classical and six variant mitochondria from different tissues viz. proboscis gland, spinal gland, ovary, testis, and muscle of a fish ectoparasite, Argulus bengalensis. In the proboscis gland and spinal gland, mitochondria are protected within vesicle to preserve their structure and activity from exposure to glandular synthesis for its parasitic mode of feeding. In the oocytes, mitochondria are larger and cylindrical in appearance. Oocyte mitochondria are highly dynamic and exhibit frequent fission and fusion. Those are clustered in the cytoplasm of previtellogenic oocytes which prepare for different synthetic activities for successful reproductive investment. In contrast, mitochondrial abundance is less in the male gametic lineage. The spermatocytes and the nurse cells in the testis have an unusual type of mitochondria, nebenkern which is formed by the fusions of number of mitochondria. A completely different type of mitochondrion is discovered in the flagellum of the spermatozoa. It is provided with fifteen numbers of singlet microtubules at its outer periphery which is a salient feature of the flagellum of this Branchiuran genus. This unique mitochondrion uses the microtubule tract for its movement to distribute energy efficiently along the axoneme. Such mitochondrion and microtubular association provide evidence in favor of phylogenetic relationship between Argulus and pentastomid Raillietiella. In striated muscle of thoracic appendages, mitochondria maintain tight junctions with the endoplasmic reticulum and remain in close apposition of the myofibrils which helps in Ca2+ uptake for stimulating continuous muscular activity required for ventilation of respiratory structures of the parasites.

  14. Overlapping genes of Aedes aegypti: evolutionary implications from comparison with orthologs of Anopheles gambiae and other insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, Susanta K; Severson, David W

    2013-06-18

    Although gene overlapping is a common feature of prokaryote and mitochondria genomes, such genes have also been identified in many eukaryotes. The overlapping genes in eukaryotes are extensively rearranged even between closely related species. In this study, we investigated retention and rearrangement of positionally overlapping genes between the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti (dengue virus vector) and Anopheles gambiae (malaria vector). The overlapping gene pairs of A. aegypti were further compared with orthologs of other selected insects to conduct several hypothesis driven investigations relating to the evolution and rearrangement of overlapping genes. The results show that as much as ~10% of the predicted genes of A. aegypti and A. gambiae are localized in positional overlapping manner. Furthermore, the study shows that differential abundance of introns and simple sequence repeats have significant association with positional rearrangement of overlapping genes between the two species. Gene expression analysis further suggests that antisense transcripts generated from the oppositely oriented overlapping genes are differentially regulated and may have important regulatory functions in these mosquitoes. Our data further shows that synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have differential but non-significant effect on overlapping localization of orthologous genes in other insect genomes. Gene overlapping in insects may be a species-specific evolutionary process as evident from non-dependency of gene overlapping with species phylogeny. Based on the results, our study suggests that overlapping genes may have played an important role in genome evolution of insects.

  15. Wnt3a protects SH-SY5Y cells against 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity by restoration of mitochondria function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lei; Ding, Li; Mo, Ming-Shu; Lei, Ming; Zhang, Limin; Chen, Kang; Xu, Pingyi

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signal has been reported to exert cytoprotective effects in cellular models of several diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). This study aimed to investigate the neuroprotective effects of actived Wnt/β-catenin signal by Wnt3a on SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Wnt3a-conditioned medium (Wnt3a-CM) was used to intervene dopaminegic SH-SY5Y cells treated with 6-OHDA. Cell toxicity was determined by cell viability and lactate dehydrogenase leakage (LDH) assay. The mitochondria function was measured by the mitochondrial membrane potential, while oxidative stress was monitored with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of GSK3β, β-catenin as well as Akt. Our results showed that 100 μM 6-OHDA treated for 24 h significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial transmembrane potential, reduced the level of β-catenin and p-Akt, increased LDH leakage, ROS production and the ratio of p-GSK3β (Tyr216) to p-GSK3β (Ser9). However, Wnt3a-conditioned medium reversing SH-SY5Y cells against 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity by reversing these changes. Activating of Wnt/β-catenin pathway by Wnt3a-CM attenuated 6-OHDA-induced neurotoxicity significantly, which related to the inhibition of oxidative stress and maintenance of normal mitochondrial function.

  16. Nuclear overlap functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eskola, K.J. [Univ. of Helsinki (Finland); Vogt, R.; Wang, X.N. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A three parameter Wood-Saxon shape is used to describe the nuclear density distribution, which R{sub A} is the nuclear radius, {approx} is the surface thickness, and {omega} allows for central irregularities. The electron scattering data is used where available for R{sub A}, z, and {omega}. When data is unavailable, the parameters {omega} = O, z = 0.54 fm and R{sub A} = 1.19 A{sup 1/3} - 1.61 A{sup -1/3} fm are used. The central density {rho}{sub 0} is found from the normalization {infinity} d{sup 3}r{rho}{sub A}(r) = A.

  17. Childhood Lung Function Predicts Adult Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Dinh S; Burgess, John A; Lowe, Adrian J; Perret, Jennifer L; Lodge, Caroline J; Bui, Minh; Morrison, Stephen; Thompson, Bruce R; Thomas, Paul S; Giles, Graham G; Garcia-Aymerich, Judith; Jarvis, Debbie; Abramson, Michael J; Walters, E Haydn; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2017-07-01

    The burden of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is increasing, yet there are limited data on early life risk factors. To investigate the role of childhood lung function in adult COPD phenotypes. Prebronchodilator spirometry was performed for a cohort of 7-year-old Tasmanian children (n = 8,583) in 1968 who were resurveyed at 45 years, and a selected subsample (n = 1,389) underwent prebronchodilator and post-bronchodilator spirometry. For this analysis, COPD was spirometrically defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC less than the lower limit of normal. Asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS) was defined as the coexistence of both COPD and current asthma. Associations between childhood lung function and asthma/COPD/ACOS were examined using multinomial regression. At 45 years, 959 participants had neither current asthma nor COPD (unaffected), 269 had current asthma alone, 59 had COPD alone, and 68 had ACOS. The reweighted prevalence of asthma alone was 13.5%, COPD alone 4.1%, and ACOS 2.9%. The lowest quartile of FEV1 at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-6.52), but not COPD or asthma alone. The lowest quartile of FEV1/FVC ratio at 7 years was associated with ACOS (odds ratio, 16.3; 95% confidence interval, 4.7-55.9) and COPD (odds ratio, 5.76; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-17.4), but not asthma alone. Being in the lowest quartile for lung function at age 7 may have long-term consequences for the development of COPD and ACOS by middle age. Screening of lung function in school age children may identify a high-risk group that could be targeted for intervention. Further research is needed to understand possible modifiers of these associations and develop interventions for children with impaired lung function.

  18. Distinct and overlapping functions of the cullin E3 ligase scaffolding proteins CUL4A and CUL4B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    The cullin 4 subfamily of genes includes CUL4A and CUL4B, which share a mostly identical amino acid sequence aside from the elongated N-terminal region in CUL4B. Both act as scaffolding proteins for modular cullin RING ligase 4 (CRL4) complexes which promote the ubiquitination of a variety of substrates. CRL4 function is vital to cells as loss of both genes or their shared substrate adaptor protein DDB1 halts proliferation and eventually leads to cell death. Due to their high structural similarity, CUL4A and CUL4B share a substantial overlap in function. However, in some cases, differences in subcellular localization, spatiotemporal expression patterns and stress-inducibility preclude functional compensation. In this review, we highlight the most essential functions of the CUL4 genes in: DNA repair and replication, chromatin-remodeling, cell cycle regulation, embryogenesis, hematopoiesis and spermatogenesis. CUL4 genes are also clinically relevant as dysregulation can contribute to the onset of cancer and CRL4 complexes are often hijacked by certain viruses to promote viral replication and survival. Also, mutations in CUL4B have been implicated in a subset of patients suffering from syndromic X-linked intellectual disability (AKA mental retardation). Interestingly, the antitumor effects of immunomodulatory drugs are caused by their binding to the CRL4CRBN complex and re-directing the E3 ligase towards the Ikaros transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3. Because of their influence over key cellular functions and relevance to human disease, CRL4s are considered promising targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26344709

  19. The peroxisome-mitochondria connection : identification and characterization of novel membrane proteins shared by both organelles

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Inês Gomes de Oliveira e

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Biologia Celular e Molecular apresentada ao Departamento Ciências da Vida da Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra. Peroxisomes and mitochondria are known to act in concert, sharing a growing number of proteins and cellular functions. This connection includes metabolic cooperations and cross-talk (e.g. in fatty acid β-oxidation), a novel putative vesicular trafficking pathway from mitochondria to peroxisomes, an overlap in key components o...

  20. Mitochondria in lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloonan, Suzanne M; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-03-01

    Mitochondria are a distinguishing feature of eukaryotic cells. Best known for their critical function in energy production via oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), mitochondria are essential for nutrient and oxygen sensing and for the regulation of critical cellular processes, including cell death and inflammation. Such diverse functional roles for organelles that were once thought to be simple may be attributed to their distinct heteroplasmic genome, exclusive maternal lineage of inheritance, and ability to generate signals to communicate with other cellular organelles. Mitochondria are now thought of as one of the cell's most sophisticated and dynamic responsive sensing systems. Specific signatures of mitochondrial dysfunction that are associated with disease pathogenesis and/or progression are becoming increasingly important. In particular, the centrality of mitochondria in the pathological processes and clinical phenotypes associated with a range of lung diseases is emerging. Understanding the molecular mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial processes of lung cells will help to better define phenotypes and clinical manifestations associated with respiratory disease and to identify potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets.

  1. Inelastic cross sections, overlap functions and {C}_{q} moments from ISR to LHC energies in proton interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggio, P. C.

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the energy dependence of the parton-parton inelastic cross sections, parton-parton inelastic overlap functions and the C q moments in proton interactions from \\sqrt{s}=10 to 14000 GeV. The approach we used is based on a phenomenological procedure where elastic and inelastic proton observables are described in a connected way by exploring the unitarity of the S-matrix. Applying a quantum-chromodynamics-inspired eikonal model, that contains contributions of the quark-quark, quark-gluon and gluon-gluon interactions, theoretical predictions on inelastic cross sections and C q moments are compared with measurements and show a successful description of the experimental data. The Koba-Nielson-Olesen hypothesis violation is discussed as a consequence of the semihard contribution to the multiparticle production in the interactions, in accordance with several experimental and theoretical previous results. A prediction of the ratio {σ }{{el}}/{σ }{{tot}} as a function of the collision energy is presented and also compared with the experimental information.

  2. A Coordinate-Based Meta-Analysis of Overlaps in Regional Specialization and Functional Connectivity across Subjective Value and Default Mode Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikalin, M. Yavuz; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has provided qualitative evidence for overlap in a number of brain regions across the subjective value network (SVN) and the default mode network (DMN). In order to quantitatively assess this overlap, we conducted a series of coordinate-based meta-analyses (CBMA) of results from 466 functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments on task-negative or subjective value-related activations in the human brain. In these analyses, we first identified significant overlaps and dissociations across activation foci related to SVN and DMN. Second, we investigated whether these overlapping subregions also showed similar patterns of functional connectivity, suggesting a shared functional subnetwork. We find considerable overlap between SVN and DMN in subregions of central ventromedial prefrontal cortex (cVMPFC) and dorsal posterior cingulate cortex (dPCC). Further, our findings show that similar patterns of bidirectional functional connectivity between cVMPFC and dPCC are present in both networks. We discuss ways in which our understanding of how subjective value (SV) is computed and represented in the brain can be synthesized with what we know about the DMN, mind-wandering, and self-referential processing in light of our findings. PMID:28154520

  3. Macromitophagy is a longevity assurance process that in chronologically aging yeast limited in calorie supply sustains functional mitochondria and maintains cellular lipid homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Michelle T.; Koupaki, Olivia; Gomez-Perez, Alejandra; Levy, Sean; Pluska, Lukas; Mattie, Sevan; Rafeh, Rami; Iouk, Tatiana; Sheibani, Sara; Greenwood, Michael; Vali, Hojatollah; Titorenko, Vladimir I.

    2013-01-01

    Macromitophagy controls mitochondrial quality and quantity. It involves the sequestration of dysfunctional or excessive mitochondria within double-membrane autophagosomes, which then fuse with the vacuole/lysosome to deliver these mitochondria for degradation. To investigate a physiological role of macromitophagy in yeast, we examined how the atg32Δ-dependent mutational block of this process influences the chronological lifespan of cells grown in a nutrient-rich medium containing low (0.2%) concentration of glucose. Under these longevity-extending conditions of caloric restriction (CR) yeast cells are not starving. We also assessed a role of macromitophagy in lifespan extension by lithocholic acid (LCA), a bile acid that prolongs yeast longevity under CR conditions. Our findings imply that macromitophagy is a longevity assurance process underlying the synergistic beneficial effects of CR and LCA on yeast lifespan. Our analysis of how the atg32Δ mutation influences mitochondrial morphology, composition and function revealed that macromitophagy is required to maintain a network of healthy mitochondria. Our comparative analysis of the membrane lipidomes of organelles purified from wild-type and atg32Δ cells revealed that macromitophagy is required for maintaining cellular lipid homeostasis. We concluded that macromitophagy defines yeast longevity by modulating vital cellular processes inside and outside of mitochondria. PMID:23553280

  4. Diabetes and the impairment of reproductive function: possible role of mitochondria and reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Sandra; Oliveira, Paulo J; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2008-02-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM), a state of chronic hyperglycemia, is a major cause of serious micro and macrovascular diseases, affecting, therefore, nearly every system in the body. Growing evidence indicates that oxidative stress is increased in diabetes due to overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreased efficiency of antioxidant defences, a process that starts very early and worsens over the course of the disease. During the development of diabetes, oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA increase with time. Mitochondrial DNA mutations have also been reported in diabetic tissues, suggesting oxidative stress-related mitochondrial damage. Diabetes-related oxidative stress may also be the trigger for many alterations on sexual function, which can also include decreased testicular mitochondrial function. Although sexual disorders have been extensively studied in diabetic men, possible changes in the sexual function of diabetic women have only recently received attention. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in diabetic men approaches 50%, whereas in diabetic women it seems to be slightly lower. Testicular dysfunction, impotence, decreased fertility potential and retrograde ejaculations are conditions that have been described in diabetic males. Diabetes is also the most common cause of erectile dysfunction in men. Poor semen quality has also been reported in diabetic men, including decreased sperm motility and concentration, abnormal morphology and increased seminal plasma abnormalities. In addition, diabetic men may have decreased serum testosterone due to impaired Leydig cell function. Among diabetic women neuropathy, vascular impairment and psychological complaints have been implicated in the pathogenesis of decreased libido, low arousability, decreased vaginal lubrication, orgasmic dysfunction, and dyspareunia. An association between the production of excess radical oxygen species and disturbed embryogenesis in diabetic pregnancies has also been suggested

  5. [Activity of oil isolated from Amaranth seeds on energetic functions of rat liver mitochondria after adrenaline introduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, T V; Eliseeva, O P; Khunderiakova, N V; Kaminskiĭ, D V; Makhotina, O A; Kondrashova, M N

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that a three-week feeding of rats with oil derived from seeds of amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.) leads to a moderate activation of respiration of coupled and uncoupled rat liver mitochondria (MCh) that oxidize succinate and succinate + glutamate, as well as alpha-ketoglutarate and alpha-ketoglutarate + malonate. In animals receiving the amaranth oil, the injection of adrenaline did not affect the oil-activated respiration of MCh during succinate oxidation; i. e., animals prepared by an oil-enriched diet were resistant to the action of adrenaline, which prevented from possible hyperactivation of mitochondrial functions. In the group of control animals, which received no oil, the injection of adrenaline activated the rate of phosphorylating respiration of MCh during oxidation of succinate or succinate + glutamate: the rate of oxygen uptake in state 3 respiration (by Chance) increased, and the phosphorylation time decreased. The injection of adrenaline did not affect the parameters of respiration of MCh that oxidize a-ketoglutarate; however, in the presence of malonate, the oxidation of alpha-ketoglutarate in state 3 and uncoupled respiration have shown mild but significant increase in response to adrenaline. In animals receiving the amaranth oil, the oil-induced activation of respiration of MCh in response to adrenaline retained but did not increase; however, the phosphorylation time significantly decreased. Thus, concentrated oil of seeds activates the respiration of MCh. In addition, it enhances an energetic function of MCh, which prevents from the hyper-activation of mitochondrial respiration by adrenaline. Therefore an activation of energetic function of MCh by amaranth oil could explain its adaptogenic effect on rats.

  6. The overlapped radial basis function-finite difference (RBF-FD) method: A generalization of RBF-FD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shankar, Varun

    2017-08-01

    We present a generalization of the RBF-FD method that computes RBF-FD weights in finite-sized neighborhoods around the centers of RBF-FD stencils by introducing an overlap parameter δ ∈ (0 , 1 ] such that δ = 1 recovers the standard RBF-FD method and δ = 0 results in a full decoupling of stencils. We provide experimental evidence to support this generalization, and develop an automatic stabilization procedure based on local Lebesgue functions for the stable selection of stencil weights over a wide range of δ values. We provide an a priori estimate for the speedup of our method over RBF-FD that serves as a good predictor for the true speedup. We apply our method to parabolic partial differential equations with time-dependent inhomogeneous boundary conditions - Neumann in 2D, and Dirichlet in 3D. Our results show that our method can achieve as high as a 60× speedup in 3D over existing RBF-FD methods in the task of forming differentiation matrices.

  7. PAXX Is an Accessory c-NHEJ Factor that Associates with Ku70 and Has Overlapping Functions with XLF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish K. Tadi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian cells, classical non-homologous end joining (c-NHEJ is critical for DNA double-strand break repair induced by ionizing radiation and during V(DJ recombination in developing B and T lymphocytes. Recently, PAXX was identified as a c-NHEJ core component. We report here that PAXX-deficient cells exhibit a cellular phenotype uncharacteristic of a deficiency in c-NHEJ core components. PAXX-deficient cells display normal sensitivity to radiomimetic drugs, are proficient in transient V(DJ recombination assays, and do not shift toward higher micro-homology usage in plasmid repair assays. Although PAXX-deficient cells lack c-NHEJ phenotypes, PAXX forms a stable ternary complex with Ku bound to DNA. Formation of this complex involves an interaction with Ku70 and requires a bare DNA extension for stability. Moreover, the relatively weak Ku-dependent stimulation of LIG4/XRCC4 activity by PAXX is unmasked by XLF ablation. Thus, PAXX plays an accessory role during c-NHEJ that is largely overlapped by XLF’s function.

  8. Cu-pyruvaldehyde-bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazone)(Cu-PTSM), a metal complex with selective NADH-dependent reduction by complex I in brain mitochondria. A potential radiopharmaceutical for mitochondria-functional imaging with positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Yokoyama, Akira [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science; Okazawa, Hidehiko; Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Konishi, Junji

    1995-08-01

    The reductive retention mechanism of copper(II)-Pyruvaldehyde-bis (N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-PTSM), a generator-produced positron-emitting {sup 62}Cu-labeled radiopharmaceutical, was studied with non-radioactive and radioactive copper. Changes in the chemical form of Cu-PTSM were detected by electron spin resonance spectrometry (ESR) with cold copper. The effects of electron transport chain inhibitors on the reduction of Cu-PTSM were also examined. Rotenone and antimycin A activated the reduction of Cu-PTSM in the brain mitochondria by 1.6 and 1.4-fold, respectively, compared with untreated controls, while thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA) had no effect on the reduction. These results were confirmed with radioactive copper. Furthermore, this reduction of Cu-PTSM was dependent on the protein concentration of mouse brain submitochondrial particle (SMP) with 1 mM NADH2.S%, 8mg-protein/ml: 69.0{+-}5.5%, each value was % of reduced Cu. Similarly, this reduction depended on NADH concentration at a fixed concentration of SMP (8mg-protein/ml). These results indicated that the electron transport chain, especially complex I, participate in the reduction mitochondria, and this suggested that Cu-PTSM has the potential to act as a functional imaging agent for diagnosis of the electron transport chain. (author).

  9. Mitochondria in health and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durhuus, Jon Ambæk; Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2015-01-01

    The primary role of mitochondria was long considered to be production of cellular energy. However, as the understanding of mitochondria in disease is ever expanding, so is their additional function for a healthy organism. Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to a range of pathologies, including...... (SMRM) was titled "Mitochondria in Health and Disease". The conference was organized by Gayathri N, K Thangaraj, and KK Singh and was held at the National Institute of Mental Health & Neuro Sciences (NIMHANS) in Bangalore, India, from the 19th to 20th of December 2013. The meeting featured...

  10. Expression analysis of Arabidopsis XH/XS-domain proteins indicates overlapping and distinct functions for members of this gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Haroon; Graner, Sonja; Luschnig, Christian

    2014-03-01

    RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) is essential for de novo DNA methylation in higher plants, and recent reports established novel elements of this silencing pathway in the model organism Arabidopsis thaliana. Involved in de novo DNA methylation 2 (IDN2) and the closely related factor of DNA methylation (FDM) are members of a plant-specific family of dsRNA-binding proteins characterized by conserved XH/XS domains and implicated in the regulation of RdDM at chromatin targets. Genetic analyses have suggested redundant as well as non-overlapping activities for different members of the gene family. However, detailed insights into the function of XH/XS-domain proteins are still elusive. By the generation and analysis of higher-order mutant combinations affected in IDN2 and further members of the gene family, we have provided additional evidence for their redundant activity. Distinct roles for members of the XH/XS-domain gene family were indicated by differences in their expression and subcellular localization. Fluorescent protein-tagged FDM genes were expressed either in nuclei or in the cytoplasm, suggestive of activities of XH/XS-domain proteins in association with chromatin as well as outside the nuclear compartment. In addition, we observed altered location of a functional FDM1-VENUS reporter from the nucleus into the cytoplasm under conditions when availability of further FDM proteins was limited. This is suggestive of a mechanism by which redistribution of XH/XS-domain proteins could compensate for the loss of closely related proteins.

  11. Proteomic analysis reveals a novel function of the kinase Sat4p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Gey

    Full Text Available The Saccharomyces cerevisiae kinase Sat4p has been originally identified as a protein involved in salt tolerance and stabilization of plasma membrane transporters, implicating a cytoplasmic localization. Our study revealed an additional mitochondrial (mt localization, suggesting a dual function for Sat4p. While no mt related phenotype was observed in the absence of Sat4p, its overexpression resulted in significant changes of a specific mitochondrial subproteome. As shown by a comparative two dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE approach combined with mass spectrometry, particularly two groups of proteins were affected: the iron-sulfur containing aconitase-type proteins (Aco1p, Lys4p and the lipoamide-containing subproteome (Lat1p, Kgd2p and Gcv3p. The lipoylation sites of all three proteins could be assigned by nanoLC-MS/MS to Lys75 (Lat1p, Lys114 (Kgd2p and Lys102 (Gcv3p, respectively. Sat4p overexpression resulted in accumulation of the delipoylated protein variants and in reduced levels of aconitase-type proteins, accompanied by a decrease in the activities of the respective enzyme complexes. We propose a regulatory role of Sat4p in the late steps of the maturation of a specific subset of mitochondrial iron-sulfur cluster proteins, including Aco1p and lipoate synthase Lip5p. Impairment of the latter enzyme may account for the observed lipoylation defects.

  12. Glutathione and mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Vicent eRibas; Carmen eGarcia-Ruiz; Jose C eFernandez-Checa

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the e...

  13. Mitochondria and Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Wei-Xing; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; White, Eileen

    2016-01-01

    Decades ago Otto Warburg observed that cancers ferment glucose in the presence of oxygen, suggesting that defects in mitochondrial respiration may be the underlying cause of cancer. We now know that the genetic events, which drive aberrant cancer cell proliferation, also alter biochemical metabolism including promoting aerobic glycolysis, but do not typically impair mitochondrial function. Mitochondria supply energy, provide building blocks for new cells, and control redox homeostasis, oncoge...

  14. [Role of functional state of neuronal mitochondria of cerebral cortex in mechanisms of nootropic activity of neuroprotectors in rats with alloxan hyperglycemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiliuk, V I; Mamchur, V I; Pavlov, S V

    2015-01-01

    The influence of citicoline, phenylpiracetam, pentoxifylline and N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine on cognitive processes and functional state of mitochondria in the neocortex of alloxan-diabetic rats has been studied. The drug effects on cognitive processes were assessed using passive avoidance tests in the dark-light camera. Latent period and the number of animals with amnesia skill on 6th and 20th days of drug administration were recorded. Functional status of mitochondria was assessed by mitochondrial pore opening and mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Y) on 20th day. It has been established that course administration of phenylpiracetam, citicoline and to a lesser extent N-phenylacetyl-L-prolylglycine, but not pentoxifylline, improves the processes of learning and storing conditional skill. At the same time, the nootropic activity of studied drugs was comparable to their effect on the functional state of mitochondria in neocortical neurons in rats with chronic hyperglycemia. According to mitoprotective activity (prevention of opening of mitochondrial cyclosporin-A-sensitive pores and restoration of mitochondrial transmembrane potential), the maximum potential was observed for citicoline and phenylpiracetam, and the minimum--for pentoxifylline. The results point out the importance of mitoprotective properties in nootropic effects of studied drugs.

  15. Measuring Environmental Factors: Unique and Overlapping International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health Coverage of 5 Instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Allen W; Miskovic, Ana; Semik, Patrick; Wong, Alex; Dashner, Jessica; Baum, Carolyn; Magasi, Susan; Hammel, Joy; Tulsky, David S; Garcia, Sofia F; Jerousek, Sara; Lai, Jin-Shei; Carlozzi, Noelle E; Gray, David B

    2016-12-01

    To describe the unique and overlapping content of the newly developed Environmental Factors Item Banks (EFIB) and 7 legacy environmental factor instruments, and to evaluate the EFIB's construct validity by examining associations with legacy instruments. Cross-sectional, observational cohort. Community. A sample of community-dwelling adults with stroke, spinal cord injury, and traumatic brain injury (N=568). None. EFIB covering domains of the built and natural environment; systems, services, and policies; social environment; and access to information and technology; the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors (CHIEF) short form; the Facilitators and Barriers Survey/Mobility (FABS/M) short form; the Home and Community Environment Instrument (HACE); the Measure of the Quality of the Environment (MQE) short form; and 3 of the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System's (PROMIS) Quality of Social Support measures. The EFIB and legacy instruments assess most of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) environmental factors chapters, including chapter 1 (products and technology; 75 items corresponding to 11 codes), chapter 2 (natural environment and human-made changes; 31 items corresponding to 7 codes), chapter 3 (support and relationships; 74 items corresponding to 7 codes), chapter 4 (attitudes; 83 items corresponding to 8 codes), and chapter 5 (services, systems, and policies; 72 items corresponding to 16 codes). Construct validity is provided by moderate correlations between EFIB measures and the CHIEF, MQE barriers, HACE technology mobility, FABS/M community built features, and PROMIS item banks and by small correlations with other legacy instruments. Only 5 of the 66 legacy instrument correlation coefficients are moderate, suggesting they measure unique aspects of the environment, whereas all intra-EFIB correlations were at least moderate. The EFIB measures provide a brief and focused assessment of ICF

  16. Peptide-mediated delivery of donor mitochondria improves mitochondrial function and cell viability in human cybrid cells with the MELAS A3243G mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jui-Chih; Hoel, Fredrik; Liu, Ko-Hung; Wei, Yau-Huei; Cheng, Fu-Chou; Kuo, Shou-Jen; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Liu, Chin-San

    2017-09-06

    The cell penetrating peptide, Pep-1, has been shown to facilitate cellular uptake of foreign mitochondria but further research is required to evaluate the use of Pep-1-mediated mitochondrial delivery (PMD) in treating mitochondrial defects. Presently, we sought to determine whether mitochondrial transplantation rescue mitochondrial function in a cybrid cell model of mitochondrial myopathy, encephalopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) disease. Following PMD, recipient cells had internalized donor mitochondria after 1 h, and expressed higher levels of normal mitochondrial DNA, particularly at the end of the treatment and 11 days later. After 4 days, mitochondrial respiratory function had recovered and biogenesis was evident in the Pep-1 and PMD groups, compared to the untreated MELAS group. However, only PMD was able to reverse the fusion-to-fission ratio of mitochondrial morphology, and mitochondria shaping proteins resembled the normal pattern seen in the control group. Cell survival following hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was also improved in the PMD group. Finally, we observed that PMD partially normalized cytokine expression, including that of interleukin (IL)-7, granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in the MELAS cells. Presently, our data further confirm the protective effects of PMD as well in MELAS disease.

  17. Mitochondria and Cardiovascular Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Dao-Fu; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2013-01-01

    Old age is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Several lines of evidence in experimental animal models have indicated the central role of mitochondria both in lifespan determination and cardiovascular aging. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and biogenesis as well as the crosstalk between mitochondria and cellular signaling in cardiac and vascular aging. Intrinsic cardiac aging in the murine model closely recapitulates age-related cardiac changes in humans (left ventricular hypertrophy, fibrosis and diastolic dysfunction), while the phenotype of vascular aging include endothelial dysfunction, reduced vascular elasticity and chronic vascular inflammation. Both cardiac and vascular aging involve neurohormonal signaling (e.g. renin-angiotensin, adrenergic, insulin-IGF1 signaling) and cell-autonomous mechanisms. The potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and cardiovascular diseases are also discussed, with a focus on mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants, calorie restriction, calorie restriction mimetics and exercise training. PMID:22499901

  18. METABOLIC ENERGY GENERATION IN HYDROGENOSOMES OF THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX - EVIDENCE FOR A FUNCTIONAL-RELATIONSHIP WITH MITOCHONDRIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; DRIESSEN, AJM; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    Anaerobic eukaryotes are often devoid of mitochondria but contain special organelles separated from the cytosol by a single (in fungi) or a double (in protozoa) membrane. Hydrogenosomes from the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. L2 are thought to catalyse the enzymic steps in the ATP-yielding

  19. METABOLIC ENERGY GENERATION IN HYDROGENOSOMES OF THE ANAEROBIC FUNGUS NEOCALLIMASTIX - EVIDENCE FOR A FUNCTIONAL-RELATIONSHIP WITH MITOCHONDRIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MARVINSIKKEMA, FD; DRIESSEN, AJM; GOTTSCHAL, JC; PRINS, RA

    1994-01-01

    Anaerobic eukaryotes are often devoid of mitochondria but contain special organelles separated from the cytosol by a single (in fungi) or a double (in protozoa) membrane. Hydrogenosomes from the anaerobic fungus Neocallimastix sp. L2 are thought to catalyse the enzymic steps in the ATP-yielding meta

  20. Eye-Hand Coordination in Children with High Functioning Autism and Asperger's Disorder Using a Gap-Overlap Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crippa, Alessandro; Forti, Sara; Perego, Paolo; Molteni, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    We investigated eye-hand coordination in children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in comparison with age-matched normally developing peers. The eye-hand correlation was measured by putting fixation latencies in relation with pointing and key pressing responses in visual detection tasks where a gap-overlap paradigm was used and compared to…

  1. The restoration of kidney mitochondria function by inhibition of angiotensin-II production in rats with acute adriamycin-induced nephrotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskin, Eylem; Ozdogan, Kalender; Kunduz Kindap, Elvan; Dursun, Nurcan

    2014-05-01

    Adriamycin (ADR) is commonly used for many solid tumor treatments. Its clinical utility is, however, largely limited by the adverse reactions, are known to be nephrotoxic. The mechanism by which it induces kidney damage is still not completely understood, but its nephrotoxicity might relate to increase reactive oxidant status (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction. Until now, neurohormonal activation of it is unclear. ADR might activate the renin angiotensin system. Angiotensin-II also induced ROS and mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of this study was to investigate whether angiotensin-II production inhibition has the protective effect on attenuation of mitochondrial function in rats with acute ADR-nephrotoxicity or not. Rats were divided into five groups as a control, ADR, co-treated ADR with captopril (CAP), co-treated ADR with Aliskren, co-treated ADR with both CAP and Aliskren groups. Creatinine kinase (CK) levels were measured at the end of treatment period. The kidneys were homogenized and biochemical measurements were made in mitochondria, cytosol. Mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) and ATP levels were determined. ADR increased CK levels and oxidative stress in mitochondria too (pinduced nephrotoxicity via the restoration of MMP and ATP production and prevention of mitochondrial damage in vivo.

  2. Comparison of pulmonary function in patients with COPD, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, and asthma with airflow limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitaguchi Y

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Kitaguchi, Masanori Yasuo, Masayuki Hanaoka First Department of Internal Medicine, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan Background: This study was conducted in order to investigate the differences in the respiratory physiology of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS, and asthma with airflow limitation (asthma FL+. Methods: The medical records for a series of all stable patients with persistent airflow limitation due to COPD, ACOS, or asthma were retrospectively reviewed and divided into the COPD group (n=118, the ACOS group (n=32, and the asthma FL+ group (n=27. All the patients underwent chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT and pulmonary function tests, including respiratory impedance. Results: The low attenuation area score on chest HRCT was significantly higher in the COPD group than in the ACOS group (9.52±0.76 vs 5.09±1.16, P<0.01. The prevalence of bronchial wall thickening on chest HRCT was significantly higher in the asthma FL+ group than in the COPD group (55.6% vs 25.0%, P<0.01. In pulmonary function, forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 and peak expiratory flow rate were significantly higher in the asthma FL+ group than in the ACOS group (76.28%±2.54% predicted vs 63.43%±3.22% predicted, P<0.05 and 74.40%±3.16% predicted vs 61.08%±3.54% predicted, P<0.05, respectively. Although residual volume was significantly lower in the asthma FL+ group than in the COPD group (112.05%±4.34% predicted vs 137.38%±3.43% predicted, P<0.01 and the ACOS group (112.05%±4.34% predicted vs148.46%±6.25% predicted, P<0.01, there were no significant differences in functional residual capacity or total lung capacity. The increase in FEV1 in response to short-acting ß2-agonists was significantly greater in the ACOS group than in the COPD group (229±29 mL vs 72±10 mL, P<0.01 and the asthma FL+ group (229±29 mL vs 153±21 mL, P<0.05. Regarding

  3. Fuzheng Qingjie Granules Inhibit Growth of Hepatoma Cells via Inducing Mitochondria-Mediated Apoptosis and Enhancing Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuzheng; Cao, Zhiyun; Zhang, Youquan; Li, Jinnong; Wang, Suqing; Du, Jian; Liao, Lianming

    2017-09-01

    Fuzheng Qingjie (FZQJ) granules, a compound Chinese medicine, have been used as an adjuvant therapy for alimentary tract cancers. However, the underlying anticancer mechanisms are still not well understood. In the present study, HepG2 cells were treated with FZQJ-containing serum. Cell proliferation was evaluated using MTT assay. Apoptosis was analyzed using a flow cytometer. Cell ultrastructure was observed under a transmission electron microscope. The mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) was examined with JC-1 dye. In H22 tumor-bearing mice, CD4(+) T cells, CD8(+) T cells, CD3(+) T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood were evaluated cytometrically. Interleukin (IL)-2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α levels were measured using radioimmunoassay.The mRNA levels of Bax and Bcl-2 were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of Bax, Bcl-2, cytochrome C, caspase 3 and 9, PARP, and CD69 were examined by Western blotting. The apoptotic cells in tissues were observed using TUNEL method. Alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), and creatinine (CRE) were detected by an automatic biochemical analyzer. The results showed that FZQJ-containing serum remarkably inhibited proliferation of HepG2 cells in dose- and time-dependent manners, induced HepG2 cell apoptosis and caused a decrease of Δψ. Analysis of tumor tissue showed that FZQJ-induced apoptosis was accompanied by downregulation of Bcl-2 and upregulation of Bax, release of cytochrome c, activation of caspase 3 and 9, and cleavage of PARP. In addition, FZQJ increased the percentages of CD4(+) T and NK cells, the ratio of CD4(+)/CD8(+) T cells as well as the levels of serum TNF-α. FZQJ also increased CD69 expression in tumor tissue. No hepatorenal toxicity was observed in H22 tumor-bearing mice. These results indicated that FZQJ could inhibit the growth of hepatoma cells via regulating immune function and inducing

  4. Aconitase is the main functional target of aging in the citric acid cycle of kidney mitochondria from mice

    OpenAIRE

    Yarian, Connie S.; Toroser, Dikran; Sohal, Rajindar S.

    2005-01-01

    The activities of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of relatively young, middle age, and old mice. Aconitase exhibited the most significant decrease in activity with age. The activity of α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase exhibited a modest decrease in activity, while NADP+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-ICD) activity increased moderately with age. Activities of citrate synthase, NAD+-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD+-ICD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (S...

  5. Use of a field lens for improving the overlap function of a lidar system employing an optical fiber in the receiver assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeron, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Kumar, Dhiraj; Rocadenbosch, Francesc

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a method to compute the overlap function of a lidar system in which a step-index optical fiber (or a bundle of such fibers) is used to carry the light collected by the telescope to the photoreceiver and a field lens is placed between the telescope and the optical fiber to increase the receiver field of view (FOV). The use of field lenses is a classical way to increase the FOV of radiometric systems (such as the receiving part of a lidar) when there is no numerical aperture (NA) limitation after the lens. However, when such a limitation exists, as in the case studied here, it will place a limit on the maximum attainable FOV. In the case of lidars, which have range-resolution capabilities, the limited FOV has an effect on the fraction of power coming from scattering volumes at different ranges that actually reaches the photodetector. This fraction is a function (the so-called overlap function) of the range of the scattering volume and its behavior has an impact on the accuracy of the retrievals. The application of the method developed in this paper shows that, in spite of the fiber NA limit, in practical situations the goal is attained of making the overlap function steeper and reaching higher values by using a field lens.

  6. Mesenchymal stem cells transfer mitochondria to the cells with virtually no mitochondrial function but not with pathogenic mtDNA mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Young Min; Kim, Ju Han; Kim, Mingoo; Park, Su Jin; Koh, Sang Hyeok; Ahn, Hyo Seop; Kang, Gyeong Hoon; Lee, Jung-Bin; Park, Kyong Soo; Lee, Hong Kyu

    2012-01-01

    It has been reported that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can transfer mitochondria to the cells with severely compromised mitochondrial function. We tested whether the reported intercellular mitochondrial transfer could be replicated in different types of cells or under different experimental conditions, and tried to elucidate possible mechanism. Using biochemical selection methods, we found exponentially growing cells in restrictive media (uridine(-) and bromodeoxyuridine [BrdU](+)) during the coculture of MSCs (uridine-independent and BrdU-sensitive) and 143B-derived cells with severe mitochondrial dysfunction induced by either long-term ethidium bromide treatment or short-term rhodamine 6G (R6G) treatment (uridine-dependent but BrdU-resistant). The exponentially growing cells had nuclear DNA fingerprint patterns identical to 143B, and a sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) identical to the MSCs. Since R6G causes rapid and irreversible damage to mitochondria without the removal of mtDNA, the mitochondrial function appears to be restored through a direct transfer of mitochondria rather than mtDNA alone. Conditioned media, which were prepared by treating mtDNA-less 143B ρ(0) cells under uridine-free condition, induced increased chemotaxis in MSC, which was also supported by transcriptome analysis. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of chemotaxis and cytoskeletal assembly, blocked mitochondrial transfer phenomenon in the above condition. However, we could not find any evidence of mitochondrial transfer to the cells harboring human pathogenic mtDNA mutations (A3243G mutation or 4,977 bp deletion). Thus, the mitochondrial transfer is limited to the condition of a near total absence of mitochondrial function. Elucidation of the mechanism of mitochondrial transfer will help us create a potential cell therapy-based mitochondrial restoration or mitochondrial gene therapy for human diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells transfer mitochondria to the cells with virtually no mitochondrial function but not with pathogenic mtDNA mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Cho

    Full Text Available It has been reported that human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs can transfer mitochondria to the cells with severely compromised mitochondrial function. We tested whether the reported intercellular mitochondrial transfer could be replicated in different types of cells or under different experimental conditions, and tried to elucidate possible mechanism. Using biochemical selection methods, we found exponentially growing cells in restrictive media (uridine(- and bromodeoxyuridine [BrdU](+ during the coculture of MSCs (uridine-independent and BrdU-sensitive and 143B-derived cells with severe mitochondrial dysfunction induced by either long-term ethidium bromide treatment or short-term rhodamine 6G (R6G treatment (uridine-dependent but BrdU-resistant. The exponentially growing cells had nuclear DNA fingerprint patterns identical to 143B, and a sequence of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA identical to the MSCs. Since R6G causes rapid and irreversible damage to mitochondria without the removal of mtDNA, the mitochondrial function appears to be restored through a direct transfer of mitochondria rather than mtDNA alone. Conditioned media, which were prepared by treating mtDNA-less 143B ρ(0 cells under uridine-free condition, induced increased chemotaxis in MSC, which was also supported by transcriptome analysis. Cytochalasin B, an inhibitor of chemotaxis and cytoskeletal assembly, blocked mitochondrial transfer phenomenon in the above condition. However, we could not find any evidence of mitochondrial transfer to the cells harboring human pathogenic mtDNA mutations (A3243G mutation or 4,977 bp deletion. Thus, the mitochondrial transfer is limited to the condition of a near total absence of mitochondrial function. Elucidation of the mechanism of mitochondrial transfer will help us create a potential cell therapy-based mitochondrial restoration or mitochondrial gene therapy for human diseases caused by mitochondrial dysfunction.

  8. Mitochondria Damage and Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Pu; Lin, Pei-Hui

    2017-01-01

    The kidney is a vital organ that demands an extraordinary amount of energy to actively maintain the body's metabolism, plasma hemodynamics, electrolytes and water homeostasis, nutrients reabsorption, and hormone secretion. Kidney is only second to the heart in mitochondrial count and oxygen consumption. As such, the health and status of the energy power house, the mitochondria, is pivotal to the health and proper function of the kidney. Mitochondria are heterogeneous and highly dynamic organelles and their functions are subject to complex regulations through modulation of its biogenesis, bioenergetics, dynamics and clearance within cell. Kidney diseases, either acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD), are important clinical issues and global public health concerns with high mortality rate and socioeconomic burden due to lack of effective therapeutic strategies to cure or retard the progression of the diseases. Mitochondria-targeted therapeutics has become a major focus for modern research with the belief that maintaining mitochondria homeostasis can prevent kidney pathogenesis and disease progression. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular events that govern mitochondria functions in health and disease will potentially lead to improved therapeutics development.

  9. Dynamic survey of mitochondria by ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Henriques, Mafalda; Langer, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    Ubiquitin is a post-translational modifier with proteolytic and non-proteolytic roles in many biological processes. At mitochondria, it performs regulatory homeostatic functions and contributes to mitochondrial quality control. Ubiquitin is essential for mitochondrial fusion, regulates mitochondria-ER contacts, and participates in maternal mtDNA inheritance. Under stress, mitochondrial dysfunction induces ubiquitin-dependent responses that involve mitochondrial proteome remodeling and culminate in organelle removal by mitophagy. In addition, many ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms have been shown to regulate innate immune responses and xenophagy. Here, we review the emerging roles of ubiquitin at mitochondria.

  10. Functional changes of mitochondria after acute spinal cord injury%急性脊髓损伤后线粒体的功能变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程刚

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria is one of the most vulnerable organelles. Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation provides most of the energy required by cell activity. Post-traumatic changes of mitochondrial function directly affect the function and survival of nerve cells. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism behind the functional changes of mitochondria in secondary spinal cord injury is important for the treatment and prognosis of spinal cord injury. This article presents an overview on the mechanisms of mitochondrial injury, in such aspects as energy metabolism, reactive oxygen species generation, calcium overload.%线粒体是对各种损伤最为敏感的细胞器之一;细胞活动所需绝大多数的能量都是由线粒体氧化磷酸化提供.外伤后线粒体功能的改变直接影响到神经细胞的功能和存活.因此,了解继发性脊髓损伤中线粒体的功能变化的分子机制,对于脊髓损伤的治疗和预后具有重要意义.文中从线粒体能量代谢、活性氧生成、钙超载等角度对线粒体损伤机制进行综述.

  11. Crosstalk between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jean; Demarquoy; Fran?oise; Le; Borgne

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria and peroxisomes are small ubiquitous organelles. They both play major roles in cell metabolism,especially in terms of fatty acid metabolism,reactive oxygen species(ROS) production,and ROS scavenging,and it is now clear that they metabolically interact with each other. These two organelles share some properties,such as great plasticity and high potency to adapt their form and number according to cell requirements. Their functions are connected,and any alteration in the function of mitochondria may induce changes inperoxisomal physiology. The objective of this paper was to highlight the interconnection and the crosstalk existing between mitochondria and peroxisomes. Special emphasis was placed on the best known connections between these organelles:origin,structure,and metabolic interconnections.

  12. Cross-adaptation combined with TMS reveals a functional overlap between vision and imagery in the early visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Bona, Silvia; Silvanto, Juha

    2012-02-01

    The extent to which the generation of mental images draws on the neuronal representations involved in visual perception has been the subject of much debate. To investigate this overlap, we assessed whether adaptation to visual stimuli affects the ability to generate visual mental images; such cross-adaptation would indicate shared neural representations between visual perception and imagery. Mental imagery was tested using a modified version of the clock task, in which subjects are presented with a digital time (e.g. "2.15") and are asked to generate a mental image of the clock hands displaying this time on an empty clock face. Participants were adapted to oriented lines either on the upper or lower side of the clock face prior to the mental image generation. The results showed that mental imagery was impaired when the mental image had to be generated in the adapted region of visual space (Experiment 1). In Experiment 2, we used TMS to determine whether this adaptation effect occurs in the early visual cortex (EVC; V1/V2). Relative to control conditions (No TMS and Vertex TMS), EVC TMS facilitated mental imagery generation when the mental image spatially overlapped with the adapter. Our results thus show that neuronal representations in the EVC which encode (and are suppressed by) visual input play a causal role in visual mental imagery.

  13. CD161(+) Tconv and CD161(+) Treg Share a Transcriptional and Functional Phenotype despite Limited Overlap in TCRβ Repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duurland, Chantal L; Brown, Chrysothemis C; O'Shaughnessy, Ryan F L; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2017-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (Treg) are important in immune regulation, but can also show plasticity in specific settings. CD161 is a lectin-like receptor and its expression identifies an effector-like Treg population. Here, we determined how CD161(+) Treg relate to CD161(+) conventional T cells (Tconv). Transcriptional profiling identified a shared transcriptional signature between CD161(+) Tconv and CD161(+) Treg, which is associated with T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells, and tissue homing, including high expression of gut-homing receptors. Upon retinoic acid (RA) exposure, CD161(+) T cells were more enriched for CCR9(+) and integrin α4(+)β7(+) cells than CD161(-) T cells. In addition, CD161(+) Tconv and CD161(+) Treg were enriched at the inflamed site in autoimmune arthritis, and both CD161(+) and CD161(-) Treg from the inflamed site were suppressive in vitro. CD161(+) T cells from the site of autoimmune arthritis showed a diminished gut-homing phenotype and blunted response to RA suggesting prior imprinting by RA in the gut or at peripheral sites rather than during synovial inflammation. TCRβ repertoires of CD161(+) and CD161(-) Tconv and Treg from blood showed limited overlap whereas there was clear overlap between CD161(+) and CD161(-) Tconv, and CD161(+) and CD161(-) Treg from the inflamed site suggesting that the inflamed environment may alter CD161 levels, potentially contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  14. CD161+ Tconv and CD161+ Treg Share a Transcriptional and Functional Phenotype despite Limited Overlap in TCRβ Repertoire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duurland, Chantal L.; Brown, Chrysothemis C.; O’Shaughnessy, Ryan F. L.; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2017-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (Treg) are important in immune regulation, but can also show plasticity in specific settings. CD161 is a lectin-like receptor and its expression identifies an effector-like Treg population. Here, we determined how CD161+ Treg relate to CD161+ conventional T cells (Tconv). Transcriptional profiling identified a shared transcriptional signature between CD161+ Tconv and CD161+ Treg, which is associated with T helper (Th)1 and Th17 cells, and tissue homing, including high expression of gut-homing receptors. Upon retinoic acid (RA) exposure, CD161+ T cells were more enriched for CCR9+ and integrin α4+β7+ cells than CD161− T cells. In addition, CD161+ Tconv and CD161+ Treg were enriched at the inflamed site in autoimmune arthritis, and both CD161+ and CD161− Treg from the inflamed site were suppressive in vitro. CD161+ T cells from the site of autoimmune arthritis showed a diminished gut-homing phenotype and blunted response to RA suggesting prior imprinting by RA in the gut or at peripheral sites rather than during synovial inflammation. TCRβ repertoires of CD161+ and CD161− Tconv and Treg from blood showed limited overlap whereas there was clear overlap between CD161+ and CD161− Tconv, and CD161+ and CD161− Treg from the inflamed site suggesting that the inflamed environment may alter CD161 levels, potentially contributing to disease pathogenesis.

  15. A numerical method to compute derivatives of functions of large complex matrices and its application to the overlap Dirac operator at finite chemical potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhr, Matthias; Buividovich, Pavel

    2016-11-01

    We present a method for the numerical calculation of derivatives of functions of general complex matrices. The method can be used in combination with any algorithm that evaluates or approximates the desired matrix function, in particular with implicit Krylov-Ritz-type approximations. An important use case for the method is the evaluation of the overlap Dirac operator in lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at finite chemical potential, which requires the application of the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix to some source vector. While the sign function of non-Hermitian matrices in practice cannot be efficiently approximated with source-independent polynomials or rational functions, sufficiently good approximating polynomials can still be constructed for each particular source vector. Our method allows for an efficient calculation of the derivatives of such implicit approximations with respect to the gauge field or other external parameters, which is necessary for the calculation of conserved lattice currents or the fermionic force in Hybrid Monte-Carlo or Langevin simulations. We also give an explicit deflation prescription for the case when one knows several eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the matrix being the argument of the differentiated function. We test the method for the two-sided Lanczos approximation of the finite-density overlap Dirac operator on realistic SU(3) gauge field configurations on lattices with sizes as large as 14 ×143 and 6 ×183.

  16. Creatine Prevents the Structural and Functional Damage to Mitochondria in Myogenic, Oxidatively Stressed C2C12 Cells and Restores Their Differentiation Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Barbieri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Creatine (Cr is a nutritional supplement promoting a number of health benefits. Indeed Cr has been shown to be beneficial in disease-induced muscle atrophy, improve rehabilitation, and afford mild antioxidant activity. The beneficial effects are likely to derive from pleiotropic interactions. In accord with this notion, we previously demonstrated that multiple pleiotropic effects, including preservation of mitochondrial damage, account for the capacity of Cr to prevent the differentiation arrest caused by oxidative stress in C2C12 myoblasts. Given the importance of mitochondria in supporting the myogenic process, here we further explored the protective effects of Cr on the structure, function, and networking of these organelles in C2C12 cells differentiating under oxidative stressing conditions; the effects on the energy sensor AMPK, on PGC-1α, which is involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and its downstream effector Tfam were also investigated. Our results indicate that damage to mitochondria is crucial in the differentiation imbalance caused by oxidative stress and that the Cr-prevention of these injuries is invariably associated with the recovery of the normal myogenic capacity. We also found that Cr activates AMPK and induces an upregulation of PGC-1α expression, two events which are likely to contribute to the protection of mitochondrial quality and function.

  17. Mmb1p binds mitochondria to dynamic microtubules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chuanhai; Jain, Deeptee; Costa, Judite; Velve-Casquillas, Guilhem; Tran, Phong T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Mitochondria form a dynamics tubular network within the cell. Proper mitochondria movement and distribution are critical for their localized function in cell metabolism, growth, and survival. In mammalian cells, mechanisms of mitochondria positioning appear dependent on the microtubule cytoskeleton, with kinesin or dynein motors carrying mitochondria as cargos and distributing them throughout the microtubule network. Interestingly, the timescale of microtubule dynamics occurs in seconds, and the timescale of mitochondria distribution occurs in minutes. How does the cell couple these two time constants? Results Fission yeast also relies on microtubules for mitochondria distribution. We report here a new microtubule-dependent but motor-independent mechanism for proper mitochondria positioning in fission yeast. We identify the protein mmb1p, which binds to mitochondria and microtubules. Mmb1p attaches the tubular mitochondria to the microtubule lattice at multiple discrete interaction sites. Mmb1 deletion causes mitochondria to aggregate, with the long-term consequence of defective mitochondria distribution and cell death. Mmb1p decreases microtubule dynamicity. Conclusion Mmb1p is a new microtubule-mitochondria binding protein. We propose that mmb1p act to couple long-term mitochondria distribution to short-term microtubule dynamics by attenuating microtubule dynamics, thus enhancing the mitochondria-microtubule interaction time. PMID:21856157

  18. Functional phosphatome requirement for protein homeostasis, networked mitochondria, and sarcomere structure in C. elegans muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Susann; Bass, Joseph J; Barratt, Thomas F; Ali, Mohammed Z; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J

    2017-08-01

    Skeletal muscle is central to locomotion and metabolic homeostasis. The laboratory worm Caenorhabditis elegans has been developed into a genomic model for assessing the genes and signals that regulate muscle development and protein degradation. Past work has identified a receptor tyrosine kinase signalling network that combinatorially controls autophagy, nerve signal to muscle to oppose proteasome-based degradation, and extracellular matrix-based signals that control calpain and caspase activation. The last two discoveries were enabled by following up results from a functional genomic screen of known regulators of muscle. Recently, a screen of the kinome requirement for muscle homeostasis identified roughly 40% of kinases as required for C. elegans muscle health; 80 have identified human orthologues and 53 are known to be expressed in skeletal muscle. To complement this kinome screen, here, we screen most of the phosphatases in C. elegans. RNA interference was used to knockdown phosphatase-encoding genes. Knockdown was first conducted during development with positive results also knocked down only in fully developed adult muscle. Protein homeostasis, mitochondrial structure, and sarcomere structure were assessed using transgenic reporter proteins. Genes identified as being required to prevent protein degradation were also knocked down in conditions that blocked proteasome or autophagic degradation. Genes identified as being required to prevent autophagic degradation were also assessed for autophagic vesicle accumulation using another transgenic reporter. Lastly, bioinformatics were used to look for overlap between kinases and phosphatases required for muscle homeostasis, and the prediction that one phosphatase was required to prevent mitogen-activated protein kinase activation was assessed by western blot. A little over half of all phosphatases are each required to prevent abnormal development or maintenance of muscle. Eighty-six of these phosphatases have known

  19. A numerical method to compute derivatives of functions of large complex matrices and its application to the overlap Dirac operator at finite chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Puhr, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    We present a method for the numerical calculation of derivatives of functions of general complex matrices. The method can be used in combination with any algorithm that evaluates or approximates the desired matrix function, in particular with implicit Krylov-Ritz-type approximations. An important use case for the method is the evaluation of the overlap Dirac operator in lattice Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) at finite chemical potential, which requires the application of the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix to some source vector. While the sign function of non-Hermitian matrices in practice can not be efficiently approximated with source-independent polynomials or rational functions, sufficiently good approximating polynomials can still be constructed for each particular source vector. Our method allows for an efficient calculation of the derivatives of such implicit approximations with respect to the gauge field or other external parameters, which is necessary for the calculation of conserved lattice cu...

  20. Do mitochondria limit hot fish hearts? Understanding the role of mitochondrial function with heat stress in Notolabrus celidotus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iftikar, Fathima I; Hickey, Anthony J R

    2013-01-01

    Hearts are the first organs to fail in animals exposed to heat stress. Predictions of climate change mediated increases in ocean temperatures suggest that the ectothermic heart may place tight constraints on the diversity and distribution of marine species with cardiovascular systems. For many such species, their upper temperature limits (Tmax) and respective heart failure (HF) temperature (T(HF)) are only a few degrees from current environmental temperatures. While the ectothermic cardiovascular system acts as an "ecological thermometer," the exact mechanism that mediates HF remains unresolved. We propose that heat-stressed cardiac mitochondria drive HF. Using a common New Zealand fish, Notolabrus celidotus, we determined the THF (27.5°C). Haemoglobin oxygen saturation appeared to be unaltered in the blood surrounding and within heat stressed hearts. Using high resolution respirometry coupled to fluorimeters, we explored temperature-mediated changes in respiration, ROS and ATP production, and overlaid these changes with T(HF). Even at saturating oxygen levels several mitochondrial components were compromised before T(HF). Importantly, the capacity to efficiently produce ATP in the heart is limited at 25°C, and this is prior to the acute T(HF) for N. celidotus. Membrane leakiness increased significantly at 25°C, as did cytochrome c release and permeability to NADH. Maximal flux rates and the capacity for the electron transport system to uncouple were also altered at 25°C. These data indicate that mitochondrial membrane integrity is lost, depressing ATP synthesis capacity and promoting cytochrome c release, prior to T(HF). Mitochondria can mediate HF in heat stressed hearts in fish and play a significant role in thermal stress tolerance, and perhaps limit species distributions by contributing to HF.

  1. Functional overlap between regions involved in speech perception and in monitoring one's own voice during speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zane Z; Munhall, Kevin G; Johnsrude, Ingrid S

    2010-08-01

    The fluency and the reliability of speech production suggest a mechanism that links motor commands and sensory feedback. Here, we examined the neural organization supporting such links by using fMRI to identify regions in which activity during speech production is modulated according to whether auditory feedback matches the predicted outcome or not and by examining the overlap with the network recruited during passive listening to speech sounds. We used real-time signal processing to compare brain activity when participants whispered a consonant-vowel-consonant word ("Ted") and either heard this clearly or heard voice-gated masking noise. We compared this to when they listened to yoked stimuli (identical recordings of "Ted" or noise) without speaking. Activity along the STS and superior temporal gyrus bilaterally was significantly greater if the auditory stimulus was (a) processed as the auditory concomitant of speaking and (b) did not match the predicted outcome (noise). The network exhibiting this Feedback Type x Production/Perception interaction includes a superior temporal gyrus/middle temporal gyrus region that is activated more when listening to speech than to noise. This is consistent with speech production and speech perception being linked in a control system that predicts the sensory outcome of speech acts and that processes an error signal in speech-sensitive regions when this and the sensory data do not match.

  2. Glutathione and Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent eRibas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione (GSH is the main nonprotein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes. While synthesized exclusively in the cytosol from its constituent amino acids, GSH is distributed in different compartments, including mitochondria where its concentration in the matrix equals that of the cytosol. This feature and its negative charge at physiological pH imply the existence of specific carriers to import GSH from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, where it plays a key role in defense against respiration-induced reactive oxygen species and in the detoxification of lipid hydroperoxides and electrophiles. Moreover, as mitochondria play a central strategic role in the activation and mode of cell death, mitochondrial GSH has been shown to critically regulate the level of sensitization to secondary hits that induce mitochondrial membrane permeabilization and release of proteins confined in the intermembrane space that once in the cytosol engage the molecular machinery of cell death. In this review, we summarize recent data on the regulation of mitochondrial GSH and its role in cell death and prevalent human diseases, such as cancer, fatty liver disease and Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. Use of a field lens for improving the overlap function of a lidar system employing an optical fiber in the receiver assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Comerón Tejero, Adolfo; Sicard, Michaël; Kumar, Dhiraj; Rocadenbosch Burillo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method to compute the overlap function of a lidar system in which a step-index optical fiber (or a bundle of such fibers) is used to carry the light collected by the telescope to the photoreceiver and a field lens is placed between the telescope and the optical fiber to increase the receiver field of view (FOV). The use of field lenses is a classical way to increase the FOV of radiometric systems (such as the receiving part of a lidar) when there is no numerical aperture...

  4. OVERLAPPING VIRTUAL CADASTRAL DOCUMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madalina - Cristina Marian

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two cadastrale plans of buildings, can overlap virtual. Overlap is highlighted when digital reception. According to Law no. 7/1996 as amended and supplemented, to solve these problems is by updating the database graphs, the repositioning. This paper addresses the issue of overlapping virtual cadastre in the history of the period 1999-2012.

  5. Postmortem studies on mitochondria in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Rosalinda C

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide a brief review of mitochondrial structure as it relates to function and then present abnormalities in mitochondria in postmortem schizophrenia with a focus on ultrastructure. Function, morphology, fusion, fission, motility, ΔΨmem, ATP production, mitochondrial derived vesicles, and mitochondria-associated ER membranes will be briefly covered. Pathology in mitochondria has long been implicated in schizophrenia, as shown by genetic, proteomic, enzymatic and anatomical abnormalities. The cortex and basal ganglia will be reviewed. In the anterior cingulate cortex, the number of mitochondria per neuronal somata in layers 5/6 in schizophrenia is decreased by 43%. There are also fewer mitochondria in terminals forming axospinous synapses. In the caudate and putamen the number of mitochondria is abnormal in both glial cells and neurons in schizophrenia subjects, the extent of which depends on treatment, response and predominant lifetime symptoms. Treatment-responsive schizophrenia subjects had about a 40% decrease in the number of mitochondria per synapse in the caudate nucleus and putamen, while treatment resistant cases had normal values. A decrease in mitochondrial density in the neuropil distinguishes paranoid from undifferentiated schizophrenia. The appearance, size and density of mitochondria were normal in the nucleus accumbens. In the substantia nigra, COX subunits were affected in rostral regions. Mitochondrial hyperplasia occurs within axon terminals that synapse onto dopamine neurons, but mitochondria in dopamine neuronal somata are similar in size and number. In schizophrenia, mitochondria are differentially affected depending on the brain region, cell type, subcellular location, treatment status, treatment response and symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. H sup + -ATP synthase from rat liver mitochondria. A simple, rapid purification method of the functional complex and its characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshihara, Yutaka; Nagase, Hideki; Yamane, Takeshi; Oka, Hideki; Tani, Isamu; Higuti, Tomihiko (Univ. of Tokushima (Japan))

    1991-07-16

    A novel, simple, and rapid preparative method for purification of rat liver H{sup +}-ATP synthase by anion-exchange HPLC was developed. The H{sup +}-ATP synthase purified had higher ATPase activity in the absence of added phospholipids than any preparation reported previously, and this activity was completely inhibited by oligomycin. When reconstituted into proteoliposomes, the H{sup +}-ATP synthase showed an ATP-dependent 8-anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonate response and ATP-P{sub i} exchange activity, both of which were also completely inhibited by oligomycin and an uncoupler, indicating the intactness of the H{sup +}-ATP synthase. An immunochemical study and a labeling experiment with N,N{prime}-({sup 14}C)dicyclohexylcarbondiimide (({sup 14}C)DCCD) demonstrated the presence of chargerin II (a product of mitochondrial A6L DNA) and DCCD-binding protein (subunit c) in the complex. The subunits of the complex were separated into 11 main fractions by reverse-phase HPLC, and 3 of them and the {sigma} subunit in F{sub 1} were partially sequenced. A search for sequence homologies indicated that these components were subunit b, coupling factor 6, subunit {sigma}, and subunit e. This is the first report of the existence of subunit b, factor 6, and chargerin II in K{sup +}-ATP synthase purified from rat liver mitochondria.

  7. Increased mitochondrial mass in cells with functionally compromised mitochondria after exposure to both direct gamma radiation and bystander factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Sharon M E

    2007-07-01

    The bystander effect describes radiation-like damage in unirradiated cells either in the vicinity of irradiated cells or exposed to medium from irradiated cells. This study aimed to further characterize the poorly understood mitochondrial response to both direct irradiation and bystander factor(s) in human keratinocytes (HPV-G) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO-K1). Oxygen consumption rates were determined during periods of state 4, state 3 and uncoupled respiration. Mitochondrial mass was determined using MitoTracker FM. CHO-K1 cells showed significantly reduced oxygen consumption rates 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and an apparent recovery 12-24 h later. The apparent recovery was likely due to the substantial increase in mitochondrial mass observed in these cells as soon as 4 h after exposure. HPV-G cells, on the other hand, showed a sustained increase in oxygen consumption rates after ICCM exposure and a transient increase 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation. A significant increase in mitochondrial mass per HPV-G cell was observed after exposure to both direct radiation and ICCM. These findings are indicative of a stress response to mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the number of mitochondria per cell.

  8. Aconitase is the main functional target of aging in the citric acid cycle of kidney mitochondria from mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarian, Connie S; Toroser, Dikran; Sohal, Rajindar S

    2006-01-01

    The activities of the citric acid cycle enzymes were determined in mitochondria isolated from kidneys of relatively young, middle age, and old mice. Aconitase exhibited the most significant decrease in activity with age. The activity of alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase exhibited a modest decrease in activity, while NADP(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP(+)-ICD) activity increased moderately with age. Activities of citrate synthase, NAD(+)-isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD(+)-ICD), succinyl-CoA synthetase (SCS), succinate dehydrogenase (SD), fumarase (FUM), and malate dehydrogenase (MD) were not affected. The molar ratio of the intra-mitochondrial redox indicator, NADPH:NADP(+), was higher in young compared to old animals, while the NADH:NAD(+) molar ratio remained unchanged. It is suggested that an age-related decrease in aconitase activity along with relatively subtle alterations in activities of some other citric acid cycle enzymes are likely to contribute to a decline in the overall efficiency of mitochondrial bioenergetics. The biological consequences of such alterations include age-related fluctuations in the citric acid cycle intermediates, which are precursors of protein synthesis, activators of fatty acid synthesis, and can also act as ligands for orphan G-protein coupled receptors.

  9. Functional Network Overlap as Revealed by fMRI Using sICA and Its Potential Relationships with Functional Heterogeneity, Balanced Excitation and Inhibition, and Sparseness of Neuron Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D.; Worhunsky, Patrick D.; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation. PMID:25714362

  10. Functional network overlap as revealed by fMRI using sICA and its potential relationships with functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and sparseness of neuron activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiansong; Calhoun, Vince D; Worhunsky, Patrick D; Xiang, Hui; Li, Jian; Wall, John T; Pearlson, Godfrey D; Potenza, Marc N

    2015-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies traditionally use general linear model-based analysis (GLM-BA) and regularly report task-related activation, deactivation, or no change in activation in separate brain regions. However, several recent fMRI studies using spatial independent component analysis (sICA) find extensive overlap of functional networks (FNs), each exhibiting different task-related modulation (e.g., activation vs. deactivation), different from the dominant findings of GLM-BA. This study used sICA to assess overlap of FNs extracted from four datasets, each related to a different cognitive task. FNs extracted from each dataset overlapped with each other extensively across most or all brain regions and showed task-related concurrent increases, decreases, or no changes in activity. These findings indicate that neural substrates showing task-related concurrent but different modulations in activity intermix with each other and distribute across most of the brain. Furthermore, spatial correlation analyses found that most FNs were highly consistent in spatial patterns across different datasets. This finding indicates that these FNs probably reflect large-scale patterns of task-related brain activity. We hypothesize that FN overlaps as revealed by sICA might relate to functional heterogeneity, balanced excitation and inhibition, and population sparseness of neuron activity, three fundamental properties of the brain. These possibilities deserve further investigation.

  11. Reversible blockade of complex I or inhibition of PKCβ reduces activation and mitochondria translocation of p66Shc to preserve cardiac function after ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meiying Yang

    Full Text Available AIM: Excess mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS play a vital role in cardiac ischemia reperfusion (IR injury. P66Shc, a splice variant of the ShcA adaptor protein family, enhances mROS production by oxidizing reduced cytochrome c to yield H2O2. Ablation of p66Shc protects against IR injury, but it is unknown if and when p66Shc is activated during cardiac ischemia and/or reperfusion and if attenuating complex I electron transfer or deactivating PKCβ alters p66Shc activation during IR is associated with cardioprotection. METHODS: Isolated guinea pig hearts were perfused and subjected to increasing periods of ischemia and reperfusion with or without amobarbital, a complex I blocker, or hispidin, a PKCβ inhibitor. Phosphorylation of p66Shc at serine 36 and levels of p66Shc in mitochondria and cytosol were measured. Cardiac functional variables and redox states were monitored online before, during and after ischemia. Infarct size was assessed in some hearts after 120 min reperfusion. RESULTS: Phosphorylation of p66Shc and its translocation into mitochondria increased during reperfusion after 20 and 30 min ischemia, but not during ischemia only, or during 5 or 10 min ischemia followed by 20 min reperfusion. Correspondingly, cytosolic p66Shc levels decreased during these ischemia and reperfusion periods. Amobarbital or hispidin reduced phosphorylation of p66Shc and its mitochondrial translocation induced by 30 min ischemia and 20 min reperfusion. Decreased phosphorylation of p66Shc by amobarbital or hispidin led to better functional recovery and less infarction during reperfusion. CONCLUSION: Our results show that IR activates p66Shc and that reversible blockade of electron transfer from complex I, or inhibition of PKCβ activation, decreases p66Shc activation and translocation and reduces IR damage. These observations support a novel potential therapeutic intervention against cardiac IR injury.

  12. Role of Mitochondria in Parvovirus Pathology

    OpenAIRE

    Jonna Nykky; Matti Vuento; Leona Gilbert

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV) associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. ...

  13. Fast Overlapping Group Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The group Lasso is an extension of the Lasso for feature selection on (predefined) non-overlapping groups of features. The non-overlapping group structure limits its applicability in practice. There have been several recent attempts to study a more general formulation, where groups of features are given, potentially with overlaps between the groups. The resulting optimization is, however, much more challenging to solve due to the group overlaps. In this paper, we consider the efficient optimization of the overlapping group Lasso penalized problem. We reveal several key properties of the proximal operator associated with the overlapping group Lasso, and compute the proximal operator by solving the smooth and convex dual problem, which allows the use of the gradient descent type of algorithms for the optimization. We have performed empirical evaluations using the breast cancer gene expression data set, which consists of 8,141 genes organized into (overlapping) gene sets. Experimental results demonstrate the eff...

  14. Vps13-Mcp1 interact at vacuole-mitochondria interfaces and bypass ER-mitochondria contact sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Peter, Arun T; Herrmann, Beatrice; Antunes, Diana; Rapaport, Doron; Dimmer, Kai Stefan; Kornmann, Benoît

    2017-10-02

    Membrane contact sites between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria, mediated by the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) complex, are critical for mitochondrial homeostasis and cell growth. Defects in ERMES can, however, be bypassed by point mutations in the endosomal protein Vps13 or by overexpression of the mitochondrial protein Mcp1. How this bypass operates remains unclear. Here we show that the mitochondrial outer membrane protein Mcp1 functions in the same pathway as Vps13 by recruiting it to mitochondria and promoting its association to vacuole-mitochondria contacts. Our findings support a model in which Mcp1 and Vps13 work as functional effectors of vacuole-mitochondria contact sites, while tethering is mediated by other factors, including Vps39. Tethered and functionally active vacuole-mitochondria interfaces then compensate for the loss of ERMES-mediated ER-mitochondria contact sites. © 2017 John Peter et al.

  15. Coenzyme Q10 remarkably improves the bio-energetic function of rat liver mitochondria treated with statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi-Bardbori, Afshin; Najibi, Asma; Amirzadegan, Najmeh; Gharibi, Raziyeh; Dashti, Ayat; Omidi, Mahmoud; Saeedi, Arastoo; Ghafarian-Bahreman, Ali; Niknahad, Hossein

    2015-09-05

    CoQ10 shares a biosynthetic pathway with cholesterol therefore it can be a potential target of the widely available lipid-lowering agents such as statins. Statins are the most widely prescribed cholesterol-lowering drugs with the ability to inhibit HMG-CoA (3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A) reductase. Preclinical and clinical safety data have shown that statins do not cause serious adverse effects in humans. However, their long-term administration is associated with a variety of myopatic complaints. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CoQ10 supplementation of animals under high fat diet (HFD) treated with statins is able to bypass the mitochondrial metabolic defects or not? Animals were divided into 7 groups and fed with either regular (RD) or HFD during experiments. The first group considered as regular control and fed with a RD. Groups 2-7 including HFD control, CoQ10 (10mg/kg), simvastatin (30mg/kg), atorvastatin (30mg/kg), simvastatin+CoQ10 or atorvastatin+CoQ10 treated orally for 30 days and fed with HFD. At the end of treatments, the animals were killed and blood samples were collected for biochemical examinations. The rat liver mitochondria were isolated and several mitochondrial indices including succinate dehydrogenase activity (SDA), ATP levels, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPP) were determined. We found that triglyceride (Tg), cholesterol (Chol) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) were augmented with HFD compared to RD and treatment with statins remarkably lowered the Tg, Chol and LDL levels. Mitochondrial parameters including, SDA, ATP levels, MMP and MPP were reduced with statin treatment and improved by co-administration with CoQ10.

  16. Isolation of Mitochondria from Potato Tubers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper F.; Salvato, Fernanda; Chen, Mingjie

    2014-01-01

    the in vivo properties of the organelle inside the plant cell. Here, we describe a method to isolate mitochondria from a relatively homogeneous plant tissue, the dormant potato tuber. The homogenization is done using a juice extractor, which is a relatively gentle homogenization procedure where......One way to study the function of plant mitochondria is to extract them from plant tissues in an uncontaminated, intact and functional form. The reductionist assumption is that the components present in such a preparation and the in vitro measurable functions or activities reliably reflect...... the mitochondria are only exposed to strong shearing forces once. After removal of starch and large tissue pieces by filtration, differential centrifugation is used to remove residual starch as well as larger organelles. The crude mitochondria are then first purified by using a step Percoll gradient...

  17. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thalia Salinas-Giegé

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation.

  18. tRNA Biology in Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas-Giegé, Thalia; Giegé, Richard; Giegé, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells. They are considered as semi-autonomous because they have retained genomes inherited from their prokaryotic ancestor and host fully functional gene expression machineries. These organelles have attracted considerable attention because they combine bacterial-like traits with novel features that evolved in the host cell. Among them, mitochondria use many specific pathways to obtain complete and functional sets of tRNAs as required for translation. In some instances, tRNA genes have been partially or entirely transferred to the nucleus and mitochondria require precise import systems to attain their pool of tRNAs. Still, tRNA genes have also often been maintained in mitochondria. Their genetic arrangement is more diverse than previously envisaged. The expression and maturation of mitochondrial tRNAs often use specific enzymes that evolved during eukaryote history. For instance many mitochondria use a eukaryote-specific RNase P enzyme devoid of RNA. The structure itself of mitochondrial encoded tRNAs is also very diverse, as e.g., in Metazoan, where tRNAs often show non canonical or truncated structures. As a result, the translational machinery in mitochondria evolved adapted strategies to accommodate the peculiarities of these tRNAs, in particular simplified identity rules for their aminoacylation. Here, we review the specific features of tRNA biology in mitochondria from model species representing the major eukaryotic groups, with an emphasis on recent research on tRNA import, maturation and aminoacylation. PMID:25734984

  19. High-lard and high-fish-oil diets differ in their effects on function and dynamic behaviour of rat hepatic mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillà Lionetti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that frequently undergo fission and fusion processes, and imbalances in these processes may be involved in obesity and insulin resistance. AIMS: The present work had the following aims: (a to evaluate whether the mitochondrial dysfunction present in the hepatic steatosis induced by a high-fat diet is associated with changes in mitochondrial dynamics and morphology; (b to evaluate whether effects on the above parameters differ between high-lard and high-fish-oil diets, as it has been suggested that fish oil may have anti-obesity and anti-steatotic effects by stimulating fatty acids utilisation. METHODS: The development of hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance was monitored in rats fed a high-lard or high-fish-oil diet. Immunohistochemical and electronic microscopic observations were performed on liver sections. In isolated liver mitochondria, assessments of fatty acids oxidation rate, proton conductance and oxidative stress (by measuring H2O2 release and aconitase activity were performed. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses were performed to evaluate the presence of proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics (i.e., fusion and fission processes. To investigate the fusion process, mitofusin 2 and autosomal dominant optic atrophy-1 (OPA1 were analysed. To investigate the fission process, the presence of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1 and fission 1 protein (Fis1 was assessed. RESULTS: High-lard feeding elicited greater hepatic lipid accumulation, insulin resistance with associated mitochondrial dysfunction, greater oxidative stress and a shift towards mitochondrial fission processes (versus high-fish-oil feeding, which had an anti-steatotic effect associated with increased mitochondrial fusion processes. CONCLUSIONS: Different types of high-fat diets differ in their effect on mitochondrial function and dynamic behaviour, leading to different cellular adaptations to over-feeding.

  20. A functional interplay between the small GTPase Rab11a and mitochondria-shaping proteins regulates mitochondrial positioning and polarization of the actin cytoskeleton downstream of Src family kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Marie-Claude; Champagne, Claudia; Boulanger, Marie-Chloé; Jetté, Alexandra; Fuchs, Margit; Dziengelewski, Claire; Lavoie, Josée N

    2014-01-24

    It is believed that mitochondrial dynamics is coordinated with endosomal traffic rates during cytoskeletal remodeling, but the mechanisms involved are largely unknown. The adenovirus early region 4 ORF4 protein (E4orf4) subverts signaling by Src family kinases (SFK) to perturb cellular morphology, membrane traffic, and organellar dynamics and to trigger cell death. Using E4orf4 as a model, we uncovered a functional connection between mitochondria-shaping proteins and the small GTPase Rab11a, a key regulator of polarized transport via recycling endosomes. We found that E4orf4 induced dramatic changes in the morphology of mitochondria along with their mobilization at the vicinity of a polarized actin network typifying E4orf4 action, in a manner controlled by SFK and Rab11a. Mitochondrial remodeling was associated with increased proximity between Rab11a and mitochondrial membranes, changes in fusion-fission dynamics, and mitochondrial relocalization of the fission factor dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which was regulated by the Rab11a effector protein FIP1/RCP. Knockdown of FIP1/RCP or inhibition of Drp1 markedly impaired mitochondrial remodeling and actin assembly, involving Rab11a-mediated mitochondrial dynamics in E4orf4-induced signaling. A similar mobilization of mitochondria near actin-rich structures was mediated by Rab11 and Drp1 in viral Src-transformed cells and contributed to the biogenesis of podosome rosettes. These findings suggest a role for Rab11a in the trafficking of Drp1 to mitochondria upon SFK activation and unravel a novel functional interplay between Rab11a and mitochondria during reshaping of the cell cytoskeleton, which would facilitate mitochondria redistribution near energy-requiring actin-rich structures.

  1. An iterative method to compute the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix and its application to the overlap Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential

    CERN Document Server

    Bloch, J; Lang, B; Wettig, T

    2007-01-01

    The overlap Dirac operator in lattice QCD requires the computation of the sign function of a matrix. While this matrix is usually Hermitian, it becomes non-Hermitian in the presence of a quark chemical potential. We show how the action of the sign function of a non-Hermitian matrix on an arbitrary vector can be computed efficiently on large lattices by an iterative method. A Krylov subspace approximation based on the Arnoldi algorithm is described for the evaluation of a generic matrix function. The efficiency of the method is spoiled when the matrix has eigenvalues close to a function discontinuity. This is cured by adding a small number of critical eigenvectors to the Krylov subspace, for which we propose two different deflation schemes. The ensuing modified Arnoldi method is then applied to the sign function, which has a discontinuity along the imaginary axis. The numerical results clearly show the improved efficiency of the method. Our modification is particularly effective when the action of the sign fun...

  2. Alternative splicing of Arabidopsis IBR5 pre-mRNA generates two IBR5 isoforms with distinct and overlapping functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thilanka Jayaweera

    Full Text Available The INDOLE-3-BUTYRIC ACID RESPONSE5 (IBR5 gene encodes a dual specificity phosphatase that regulates plant auxin responses. IBR5 has been predicted to generate two transcripts through alternative splicing, but alternative splicing of IBR5 has not been confirmed experimentally. The previously characterized ibr5-1 null mutant exhibits many auxin related defects such as auxin insensitive primary root growth, defective vascular development, short stature and reduced lateral root development. However, whether all these defects are caused by the lack of phosphatase activity is not clear. Here we describe two new auxin insensitive IBR5 alleles, ibr5-4, a catalytic site mutant, and ibr5-5, a splice site mutant. Characterization of these new mutants indicates that IBR5 is post-transcriptionally regulated to generate two transcripts, AT2G04550.1 and AT2G04550.3, and consequently two IBR5 isoforms, IBR5.1 and IBR5.3. The IBR5.1 isoform exhibits phosphatase catalytic activity that is required for both proper degradation of Aux/IAA proteins and auxin-induced gene expression. These two processes are independently regulated by IBR5.1. Comparison of new mutant alleles with ibr5-1 indicates that all three mutant alleles share many phenotypes. However, each allele also confers distinct defects implicating IBR5 isoform specific functions. Some of these functions are independent of IBR5.1 catalytic activity. Additionally, analysis of these new mutant alleles suggests that IBR5 may link ABP1 and SCF(TIR1/AFBs auxin signaling pathways.

  3. Cyclosporin and mitochondria: a neuroprotective approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok Singh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyclosporin A (CsA an immunophilin, discovered in 1969 and approved in 1983 to be used as immunosuppressant agent and is widely used in organ transplantation and auto-immune disorders. Its ability to alter mitochondria and apoptotic pathways makes it attractive agent to be employed in variety of diseases including age related neurodegenerative diseases. Mitochondria play pivotal role in cell energetics and reactive oxygen species production and are known to be key regulator of apoptosis hence it is important in a wide range of diseases. The structural and functional properties of mitochondria enable the targeting of drugs supposed to modulate the function of organelle for therapeutic advantage. By targeting mitochondria we can prevent oxidative damage associated with neurodegenerative diseases and ischemia and reperfusion tissue injury. Similarly targeting Bcl-2 can be helpful in cancer by triggering apoptosis. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(3.000: 339-340

  4. hsp70 genes in the human genome: Conservation and differentiation patterns predict a wide array of overlapping and specialized functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macario Alberto JL

    2008-01-01

    seven evolutionary Groups, with divergent C-terminal domains likely defining their distinctive functions. These functions may also be further defined by the observed differences in the N-terminal domain.

  5. Mutations in paralogous Hox genes result in overlapping homeotic transformations of the axial skeleton: evidence for unique and redundant function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, G S; Kovàcs, E N; Behringer, R R; Featherstone, M S

    1995-05-01

    Hoxd-4 (previously known as Hox-4.2 and -5.1) is a mouse homeobox-containing gene homologous to the Drosophila homeotic gene Deformed. During embryogenesis, Hoxd-4 is expressed in the presumptive hindbrain and spinal cord, prevertebrae, and other tissues. In the adult, Hoxd-4 transcripts are expressed predominantly in the testis and kidney, and to a lesser extent in intestine and heart. To understand the role of Hoxd-4 during mouse embryogenesis, we generated Hoxd-4 mutant mice. Mice heterozygous or homozygous for the Hoxd-4 mutation exhibit homeotic transformations of the second cervical vertebrae (C2) to the first cervical vertebrae (C1) and malformations of the neural arches of C1 to C3 and of the basioccipital bone. The phenotype was incompletely penetrant and showed variable expressivity on both an F2 hybrid and 129 inbred genetic background. The mutant phenotype was detected in the cartilaginous skeleton of 14.5-day (E14.5) mutant embryos but no apparent differences were detected in the somites of E9.5 mutant embryos, suggesting that the abnormalities develop after E9.5 perhaps during or after resegmentation of the somites to form the prevertebrae. These results suggest that Hoxd-4 plays a role in conferring position information along the anteroposterior axis in the skeleton. The phenotypic similarities and differences between Hoxd-4 and previously reported Hoxa-4 and Hoxb-4 mutant mice suggest that Hox gene paralogs have both redundant and unique functions.

  6. MitoCeption as a new tool to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell mitochondria on cancer cell metabolism and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Andrés; Fritz, Vanessa; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Ayala, Mickaël; Dennemont, Indira; Abdellaoui, Naoill; de Fraipont, Florence; Moisan, Anaïck; Prouteau, Claire Angebault; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Jorgensen, Christian; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2015-03-13

    Mitochondrial activity is central to tissue homeostasis. Mitochondria dysfunction constitutes a hallmark of many genetic diseases and plays a key role in tumor progression. The essential role of mitochondria, added to their recently documented capacity to transfer from cell to cell, obviously contributes to their current interest. However, determining the proper role of mitochondria in defined biological contexts was hampered by the lack of suitable experimental tools. We designed a protocol (MitoCeption) to directly and quantitatively transfer mitochondria, isolated from cell type A, to recipient cell type B. We validated and quantified the effective mitochondria transfer by imaging, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mitochondrial DNA analysis. We show that the transfer of minute amounts of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) mitochondria to cancer cells, a process otherwise occurring naturally in coculture, results in cancer cell enhanced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity and favors cancer cell proliferation and invasion. The MitoCeption technique, which can be applied to different cell systems, will therefore be a method of choice to analyze the metabolic modifications induced by exogenous mitochondria in host cells.

  7. MitoCeption as a new tool to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell mitochondria on cancer cell metabolism and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Andrés; Fritz, Vanessa; Brondello, Jean-Marc; Ayala, Mickaël; Dennemont, Indira; Abdellaoui, Naoill; de Fraipont, Florence; Moisan, Anaïck; Prouteau, Claire Angebault; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Jorgensen, Christian; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial activity is central to tissue homeostasis. Mitochondria dysfunction constitutes a hallmark of many genetic diseases and plays a key role in tumor progression. The essential role of mitochondria, added to their recently documented capacity to transfer from cell to cell, obviously contributes to their current interest. However, determining the proper role of mitochondria in defined biological contexts was hampered by the lack of suitable experimental tools. We designed a protocol (MitoCeption) to directly and quantitatively transfer mitochondria, isolated from cell type A, to recipient cell type B. We validated and quantified the effective mitochondria transfer by imaging, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and mitochondrial DNA analysis. We show that the transfer of minute amounts of mesenchymal stem/stromal cell (MSC) mitochondria to cancer cells, a process otherwise occurring naturally in coculture, results in cancer cell enhanced oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity and favors cancer cell proliferation and invasion. The MitoCeption technique, which can be applied to different cell systems, will therefore be a method of choice to analyze the metabolic modifications induced by exogenous mitochondria in host cells. PMID:25766410

  8. Mitochondria and mitochondria-induced signalling molecules as longevity determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Giuseppina; Santoro, Aurelia; Salvioli, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    An intense cross talk between mitochondria and nucleus continuously informs the cell about the functional state of these crucial organelles and elicits an effective stress response that strenghtens the cell, promoting its survival. Interestingly, this effect can spread also in a non-cell autonomous fashion to distal tissues by means of soluble factors. This stress response is responsible of a consistent lifespan increase in many animal models, while in humans there is still a lack of knowledge. This review summarises the available data on the involvement of mitochondria in longevity focusing in particular on this signalling activity and the consequent stress response that is elicited, and proposes the idea that, similarly to animal models, humans may benefit from this response in terms of delayed aging and longevity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Not All Sperm Are Equal: Functional Mitochondria Characterize a Subpopulation of Human Sperm with Better Fertilization Potential

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Paula Sousa; Alexandra Amaral; Marta Baptista; Renata Tavares; Pedro Caballero Campo; Pedro Caballero Peregrín; Albertina Freitas; Artur Paiva; Teresa Almeida-Santos; João Ramalho-Santos

    2011-01-01

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrialsensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined th...

  10. The new research on mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI Yu-bin; ZHANG He; JI Chen-feng; LIU Hong-juan

    2008-01-01

    Apoptosis, also known as programmed cell death, is the removal of damaged body organizations,aging or redundant cells in a suicide, has to maintain the health of the body, the normal development of the nervous system, the immune system to maintain the normal function of such areas is of great significance. The morphological characteristics of apoptosis are the cytoplasm concentrated, condensed nuclear chromatin, DNA fragments of a large-scale, the cell membrane invagination and foam formation of apoptotic bodies. There are two classic apoptosis ways which are generally accepted by majority of the scholars currently: Mitochondrial pathway and Death receptor pathway. Mitochondrial membrane is a two-tier structure surrounded the cystic, between the external cavity and internal cavity which is called the Room, surrounded by the internal cavity known as the mitochondria internal room or mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondria with the functions of control cell survival and death: mitochondria play an important role in physiological such as oxidative phosphorylation, electronic transfer, storage Ca2+, energy metabolism, anti-oxidation activity and so on, to provide the basic energy to the various activities of cell life. Study found that mitochondria contain some of the material is closely related to apoptosis, such as Cyt-C, Smac/Diablo, AIF, Ca2+, ROS and so on. In the signal to stimulate apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane permeability, resulting in a series of key changes, including Cyt-C, Smac/Diablo release, decline of the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm), the state of the redox within cells, the intervention of Bcl gene family and so on. Different signal transduction ultimately focuses on the mitochondria to activate or inhibit these incidents, then the corresponding signal transduction to control apoptosis. Therefore, the mitochondria in the incidence of apoptosis play an important role. In recent years, the study confirmed that apoptosis imbalance can cause a

  11. The NK-2 class homeodomain factor CEH-51 and the T-box factor TBX-35 have overlapping function in C. elegans mesoderm development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broitman-Maduro, Gina; Owraghi, Melissa; Hung, Wendy W K; Kuntz, Steven; Sternberg, Paul W; Maduro, Morris F

    2009-08-01

    The C. elegans MS blastomere, born at the 7-cell stage of embryogenesis, generates primarily mesodermal cell types, including pharynx cells, body muscles and coelomocytes. A presumptive null mutation in the T-box factor gene tbx-35, a target of the MED-1 and MED-2 divergent GATA factors, was previously found to result in a profound decrease in the production of MS-derived tissues, although the tbx-35(-) embryonic arrest phenotype was variable. We report here that the NK-2 class homeobox gene ceh-51 is a direct target of TBX-35 and at least one other factor, and that CEH-51 and TBX-35 share functions. Embryos homozygous for a ceh-51 null mutation arrest as larvae with pharynx and muscle defects, although these tissues appear to be specified correctly. Loss of tbx-35 and ceh-51 together results in a synergistic phenotype resembling loss of med-1 and med-2. Overexpression of ceh-51 causes embryonic arrest and generation of ectopic body muscle and coelomocytes. Our data show that TBX-35 and CEH-51 have overlapping function in MS lineage development. As T-box regulators and NK-2 homeodomain factors are both important for heart development in Drosophila and vertebrates, our results suggest that these regulators function in a similar manner in C. elegans to specify a major precursor of mesoderm.

  12. Overlapping prefrontal systems involved in cognitive and emotional processing in euthymic bipolar disorder and following sleep deprivation: A review of functional neuroimaging studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Benjamin S; Eyler, Lisa T

    2013-01-01

    Prefrontal cortex (PFC) mediated cognitive and emotional processing deficits in bipolar disorder lead to functional limitations even during periods of mood stability. Alterations of sleep and circadian functioning are well-documented in bipolar disorder, but there is little research directly examining the mechanistic role of sleep and/or circadian rhythms in the observed cognitive and emotional processing deficits. We systematically review the cognitive and emotional processing deficits reliant upon PFC functioning of euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and in healthy individuals deprived of sleep. The evidence from two parallel lines of investigation suggests that sleep and circadian rhythms may be involved in the cognitive and emotional processing deficits seen in bipolar disorder through overlapping neurobiological systems. We discuss current models of bipolar highlighting the PFC-limbic connections and discuss inclusion of sleep-related mechanisms. Sleep and circadian dysfunction is a core feature of bipolar disorder and models of neurobiological abnormalities should incorporate chronobiological measures. Further research into the role of sleep and circadian rhythms in cognition and emotional processing in bipolar disorder is warranted. PMID:22926687

  13. Functional electrical stimulation as a safe and effective treatment for equine epaxial muscle spasms: Clinical evaluations and histochemical morphometry of mitochondria in muscle biopsies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ravara

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES has been used extensively over several decades to reverse muscle atrophy during rehabilitation for spinal cord injury patients. The benefits of the technology are being expanded into other areas, and FES has been recently utilized for injury rehabilitation and performance enhancement in horses. Six retired horses (age from 10 to 17 yrs that had been previously used mainly for dressage riding were selected for this study. Clinical evaluation found epaxial muscle spasms in all horses with minimal to no pelvic extension when manually palpated. FES treatments were performed on the sacral/lumbar region 3 times per week for a period of 8 weeks, obtaining a total of 22 treatments per horse. The Modified Ashworth Scale for grading muscle spasms found a one grade improvement after approximately four FES treatments, indicating improved functional movement of the sacral/lumbar region, supporting the evidence by clinical palpations that a reduction in epaxial muscle spasms occurred. Skeletal muscle biopsies Pre and Post FES treatments were obtained from the longissimus lumborum muscle. Cryosections were stained with a Hemotoxylin-Eosin (H-E, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide tetrazolium reductase reaction (NADH-TR. The eventual size change of the muscle fibers were evaluated by morphometry in the H-E and NADH-TR stained cryosections, while in the NADH-TR slides the histochemical density and distribution of mitochondria were also determined. The main results of the morphometric analyses were: 1 As expected for the type of FES treatment used in this study, only a couple of horses showed significant increases in mean muscle fiber size when Pre- vs Post-FES biopsies were compared; 2 In the older horses, there were sparse (or many in one horse very atrophic and angulated muscle fibers in both Pre- and Post-FES samples, whose attributes and distribution suggests that they were denervated due to a distal neuropathy; 3 The

  14. Calpains, mitochondria, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew A; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2012-10-01

    Mitochondrial activity is critical for efficient function of the cardiovascular system. In response to cardiovascular injury, mitochondrial dysfunction occurs and can lead to apoptosis and necrosis. Calpains are a 15-member family of Ca(2+)-activated cysteine proteases localized to the cytosol and mitochondria, and several have been shown to regulate apoptosis and necrosis. For example, in endothelial cells, Ca(2+) overload causes mitochondrial calpain 1 cleavage of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger leading to mitochondrial Ca(2+) accumulation. Also, activated calpain 1 cleaves Bid, inducing cytochrome c release and apoptosis. In renal cells, calpains 1 and 2 promote apoptosis and necrosis by cleaving cytoskeletal proteins, which increases plasma membrane permeability and cleavage of caspases. Calpain 10 cleaves electron transport chain proteins, causing decreased mitochondrial respiration and excessive activation, or inhibition of calpain 10 activity induces mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis. In cardiomyocytes, calpain 1 activates caspase 3 and poly-ADP ribose polymerase during tumour necrosis factor-α-induced apoptosis, and calpain 1 cleaves apoptosis-inducing factor after Ca(2+) overload. Many of these observations have been elucidated with calpain inhibitors, but most calpain inhibitors are not specific for calpains or a specific calpain family member, creating more questions. The following review will discuss how calpains affect mitochondrial function and apoptosis within the cardiovascular system.

  15. Exogenous ether lipids predominantly target mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kuerschner

    Full Text Available Ether lipids are ubiquitous constituents of cellular membranes with no discrete cell biological function assigned yet. Using fluorescent polyene-ether lipids we analyzed their intracellular distribution in living cells by microscopy. Mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum accumulated high amounts of ether-phosphatidylcholine and ether-phosphatidylethanolamine. Both lipids were specifically labeled using the corresponding lyso-ether lipids, which we established as supreme precursors for lipid tagging. Polyfosine, a fluorescent analogue of the anti-neoplastic ether lipid edelfosine, accumulated to mitochondria and induced morphological changes and cellular apoptosis. These data indicate that edelfosine could exert its pro-apoptotic power by targeting and damaging mitochondria and thereby inducing cellular apoptosis. In general, this study implies an important role of mitochondria in ether lipid metabolism and intracellular ether lipid trafficking.

  16. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambold, Angelika S; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-12-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuronal loss in Parkinson's disease. In addition to autophagy's significance in mitochondrial integrity, several lines of evidence suggest that mitochondria can also substantially influence the autophagic process. The mitochondria's ability to influence and be influenced by autophagy places both elements (mitochondria and autophagy) in a unique position where defects in one or the other system could increase the risk to various metabolic and autophagic related diseases.

  17. Do we age because we have mitochondria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereiter-Hahn, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The process of aging remains a great riddle. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria is an inevitable by-product of respiration, which has led to a hypothesis proposing the oxidative impairment of mitochondrial components (e.g., mtDNA, proteins, lipids) that initiates a vicious cycle of dysfunctional respiratory complexes producing more ROS, which again impairs function. This does not exclude other processes acting in parallel or targets for ROS action in other organelles than mitochondria. Given that aging is defined as the process leading to death, the role of mitochondria-based impairments in those organ systems responsible for human death (e.g., the cardiovascular system, cerebral dysfunction, and cancer) is described within the context of "garbage" accumulation and increasing insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, and glycation of proteins. Mitochondrial mass, fusion, and fission are important factors in coping with impaired function. Both biogenesis of mitochondria and their degradation are important regulatory mechanisms stimulated by physical exercise and contribute to healthy aging. The hypothesis of mitochondria-related aging should be revised to account for the limitations of the degradative capacity of the lysosomal system. The processes involved in mitochondria-based impairments are very similar across a large range of organisms. Therefore, studies on model organisms from yeast, fungi, nematodes, flies to vertebrates, and from cells to organisms also add considerably to the understanding of human aging.

  18. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  19. Proteomic analysis of mitochondria in respiratory epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus and functional implications for virus and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, Diane C; Howell, Gareth; Barr, John N; Hiscox, Julian A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantitatively characterise the mitochondrial proteome of airway epithelial cells infected with human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), a major cause of paediatric illness. Quantitative proteomics, underpinned by stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture, coupled to LC-MS/MS, was applied to mitochondrial fractions prepared from HRSV-infected and mock-infected cells 12 and 24 h post-infection. Datasets were analysed using ingenuity pathway analysis, and the results were validated and characterised using bioimaging, targeted inhibition and gene depletion. The data quantitatively indicated that antiviral signalling proteins converged on mitochondria during HRSV infection. The mitochondrial receptor protein Tom70 was found to act in an antiviral manner, while its chaperone, Hsp90, was confirmed to be a positive viral factor. Proteins associated with different organelles were also co-enriched in the mitochondrial fractions from HRSV-infected cells, suggesting that alterations in organelle dynamics and membrane associations occur during virus infection. Protein and pathway-specific alterations occur to the mitochondrial proteome in a spatial and temporal manner during HRSV infection, suggesting that this organelle may have altered functions. These could be targeted as part of potential therapeutic strategies to disrupt virus biology. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. Protective effects of garlic extract on cardiac function, heart rate variability, and cardiac mitochondria in obese insulin-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supakul, Luerat; Pintana, Hiranya; Apaijai, Nattayaporn; Chattipakorn, Siriporn; Shinlapawittayatorn, Krekwit; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2014-04-01

    Garlic has been shown to exhibit antioxidant effects and cardioprotective properties. However, the effects of garlic extract on the heart in insulin resistance induced by long-term high-fat-diet consumption are not well defined. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of garlic extract in the obese insulin-resistant rats. Male Wistar rats (180-200 g) were divided into two groups: normal-diet or high-fat-diet (n = 24/group) fed for 12 weeks. Rats in each groups were divided into three subgroups (n = 8 each): vehicle or garlic extract (250 or 500 mg/kg/day, respectively) treated for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), cardiac function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. Rats that received a high-fat-diet for 12 weeks had increased body weight, visceral fat, plasma insulin levels, total cholesterol, oxidative stress levels, depressed HRV, and cardiac mitochondrial dysfunction. Garlic extract at both concentrations significantly decreased the plasma insulin, total cholesterol, homeostasis model assessment index, and oxidative stress levels. Furthermore, garlic extract at both doses restored the HRV, cardiac function, and cardiac mitochondrial function. We concluded that garlic extract at both concentrations exerted cardioprotective effects against cardiac dysfunction and mitochondrial dysfunction in obese insulin-resistant rats.

  1. Lipids of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Susanne E; Daum, Günther

    2013-10-01

    A unique organelle for studying membrane biochemistry is the mitochondrion whose functionality depends on a coordinated supply of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria are capable of synthesizing several lipids autonomously such as phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin and in part phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidic acid and CDP-diacylglycerol. Other mitochondrial membrane lipids such as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sterols and sphingolipids have to be imported. The mitochondrial lipid composition, the biosynthesis and the import of mitochondrial lipids as well as the regulation of these processes will be main issues of this review article. Furthermore, interactions of lipids and mitochondrial proteins which are highly important for various mitochondrial processes will be discussed. Malfunction or loss of enzymes involved in mitochondrial phospholipid biosynthesis lead to dysfunction of cell respiration, affect the assembly and stability of the mitochondrial protein import machinery and cause abnormal mitochondrial morphology or even lethality. Molecular aspects of these processes as well as diseases related to defects in the formation of mitochondrial membranes will be described. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes in mitochondrial function and mitochondria associated protein expression in response to 2-weeks of high intensity interval training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace eVincent

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: High-intensity short-duration interval training (HIT stimulates functional and metabolic adaptation in skeletal muscle, but the influence of HIT on mitochondrial function remains poorly studied in humans. Mitochondrial metabolism, as well as mitochondrial-associated protein expression were tested in untrained participants performing HIT over a two-week period. Methods: Eight males performed a single-leg cycling protocol (12 x 1 min intervals at 120% peak power output, 90 s recovery, 4 days/week. Muscle biopsies (vastus lateralis were taken pre- and post-HIT. Mitochondrial respiration in permeabilized fibres, citrate synthase (CS activity and protein expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator (PGC-1α and respiratory complex components were measured. Results: HIT training improved peak power and time to fatigue. Increases in absolute oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS capacities and CS activity were observed, but not in the ratio of CCO to the electron transport system (CCO/ETS, the respiratory control ratios (RCR-1 and RCR-2 or mitochondrial-associated protein expression. Specific increases in OXPHOS flux were not apparent after normalization to CS, indicating that gross changes mainly resulted from increased mitochondrial mass. Conclusion: Over only 2 weeks HIT significantly increased mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle independently of detectable changes in mitochondrial-associated and mitogenic protein expression.

  3. Arabidopsis CER8 encodes LONG-CHAIN ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE 1 (LACS1) that has overlapping functions with LACS2 in plant wax and cutin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Shiyou; Song, Tao; Kosma, Dylan K; Parsons, Eugene P; Rowland, Owen; Jenks, Matthew A

    2009-08-01

    Plant cuticle is an extracellular lipid-based matrix of cutin and waxes, which covers aerial organs and protects them from many forms of environmental stress. We report here the characterization of CER8/LACS1, one of nine Arabidopsis long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases thought to activate acyl chains. Mutations in LACS1 reduced the amount of wax in all chemical classes on the stem and leaf, except in the very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA) class wherein acids longer than 24 carbons (C(24)) were elevated more than 155%. The C(16) cutin monomers on lacs1 were reduced by 37% and 22%, whereas the C(18) monomers were increased by 28% and 20% on stem and leaf, respectively. Amounts of wax and cutin on a lacs1-1 lacs2-3 double mutant were much lower than on either parent, and lacs1-1 lacs2-3 had much higher cuticular permeability than either parent. These additive effects indicate that LACS1 and LACS2 have overlapping functions in both wax and cutin synthesis. We demonstrated that LACS1 has synthetase activity for VLCFAs C(20)-C(30), with highest activity for C(30) acids. LACS1 thus appears to function as a very long-chain acyl-CoA synthetase in wax metabolism. Since C(16) but not C(18) cutin monomers are reduced in lacs1, and C(16) acids are the next most preferred acid (behind C(30)) by LACS1 in our assays, LACS1 also appears to be important for the incorporation of C(16) monomers into cutin polyester. As such, LACS1 defines a functionally novel acyl-CoA synthetase that preferentially modifies both VLCFAs for wax synthesis and long-chain (C(16)) fatty acids for cutin synthesis.

  4. Atypical Cristae Morphology of Human Syncytiotrophoblast Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Los Rios Castillo, Daniela; Zarco-Zavala, Mariel; Olvera-Sanchez, Sofia; Pardo, Juan Pablo; Juarez, Oscar; Martinez, Federico; Mendoza-Hernandez, Guillermo; García-Trejo, José J.; Flores-Herrera, Oscar

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial complexes I, III2, and IV from human cytotrophoblast and syncytiotrophoblast associate to form supercomplexes or respirasomes, with the following stoichiometries: I1:(III2)1 and I1:(III2)1–2:IV1–4. The content of respirasomes was similar in both cell types after isolating mitochondria. However, syncytiotrophoblast mitochondria possess low levels of dimeric complex V and do not have orthodox cristae morphology. In contrast, cytotrophoblast mitochondria show normal cristae morphology and a higher content of ATP synthase dimer. Consistent with the dimerizing role of the ATPase inhibitory protein (IF1) (García, J. J., Morales-Ríos, E., Cortés-Hernandez, P., and Rodríguez-Zavala, J. S. (2006) Biochemistry 45, 12695–12703), higher relative amounts of IF1 were observed in cytotrophoblast when compared with syncytiotrophoblast mitochondria. Therefore, there is a correlation between dimerization of complex V, IF1 expression, and the morphology of mitochondrial cristae in human placental mitochondria. The possible relationship between cristae architecture and the physiological function of the syncytiotrophoblast mitochondria is discussed. PMID:21572045

  5. Astrocytes and mitochondria from adrenoleukodystrophy protein (ABCD1)-deficient mice reveal that the adrenoleukodystrophy-associated very long-chain fatty acids target several cellular energy-dependent functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruska, Nicol; Schönfeld, Peter; Pujol, Aurora; Reiser, Georg

    2015-05-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a severe neurodegenerative disorder resulting from defective ABCD1 transport protein. ABCD1 mediates peroxisomal uptake of free very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFA) as well as their CoA-esters. Consequently, VLCFA accumulate in patients' plasma and tissues, which is considered as pathogenic X-ALD triggering factor. Clinical symptoms are mostly manifested in neural tissues and adrenal gland. Here, we investigate astrocytes from wild-type control and a genetic X-ALD mouse model (Abcd1-knockout), exposed to supraphysiological VLCFA (C22:0, C24:0 and C26:0) concentrations. They exhibit multiple impairments of energy metabolism. Furthermore, brain mitochondria from Abcd1(-/-) mice and wild-type control respond similarly to VLCFA with increased ROS generation, impaired oxidative ATP synthesis and diminished Ca(2+) uptake capacity, suggesting that a defective ABCD1 exerts no adaptive pressure on mitochondria. In contrast, astrocytes from Abcd1(-/-) mice respond more sensitively to VLCFA than wild-type control astrocytes. Moreover, long-term application of VLCFA induces high ROS generation, and strong in situ depolarization of mitochondria, and, in Abcd1(-/-) astrocytes, severely diminishes the capability to revert oxidized pyridine nucleotides to NAD(P)H. In addition, observed differences in responses of mitochondria and astrocytes to the hydrocarbon chain length of VLCFA suggest that detrimental VLCFA activities in astrocytes involve defective cellular functions other than mitochondria. In summary, we clearly demonstrate that VLCFA increase the vulnerability of Abcd1(-/-) astrocytes.

  6. Finite-Layer Thickness Stabilizes the Pfaffian State for the 5/2 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect: Wave Function Overlap and Topological Degeneracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Michael

    2009-03-01

    The fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) in the second orbital Landau level at even-denominator filling factor 5/2 remains mysterious and is currently motivating many scientists not only because of its connection to a possible implementation of a fault tolerant topological quantum computer (Das Sarma et al., PRL 94, 166802(2005)). In this work, we theoretically consider the effect of the quasi-two-dimensional nature of the experimental fractional quantum Hall systems on a number of FQHE states in the lowest three orbital Landau levels. Our primary result is that the finite width of the quasi-two-dimensional systems produce a physical environment sufficient to stabilize the Moore-Read Pfaffian state thought to describe the FQHE at filling factor 5/2. This conclusion is based on exact calculations performed in the spherical and torus geometries, studying wave function overlap and ground state degeneracy. Furthermore, our results open the possibility of creating optimal experimental systems where the 5/2 FQHE state would more likely be described by the Moore-Read Pfaffian. We also discuss the role of the three-body interaction Hamiltonian that produces the Moore-Read Pfaffian as an exact ground state and particle-hole symmetry in the FQHE at 5/2. We acknowledge support from Microsoft Project Q. Work done in collaboration with Sankar Das Sarma, Thierry Jolicoeur, and Kwon Park.

  7. Protective effects of dietary avocado oil on impaired electron transport chain function and exacerbated oxidative stress in liver mitochondria from diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Avila, Omar; Gallegos-Corona, Marco Alonso; Sánchez-Briones, Luis Alberto; Calderón-Cortés, Elizabeth; Montoya-Pérez, Rocío; Rodriguez-Orozco, Alain R; Campos-García, Jesús; Saavedra-Molina, Alfredo; Mejía-Zepeda, Ricardo; Cortés-Rojo, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Electron transport chain (ETC) dysfunction, excessive ROS generation and lipid peroxidation are hallmarks of mitochondrial injury in the diabetic liver, with these alterations also playing a role in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Enhanced mitochondrial sensitivity to lipid peroxidation during diabetes has been also associated to augmented content of C22:6 in membrane phospholipids. Thus, we aimed to test whether avocado oil, a rich source of C18:1 and antioxidants, attenuates the deleterious effects of diabetes on oxidative status of liver mitochondria by decreasing unsaturation of acyl chains of membrane lipids and/or by improving ETC functionality and decreasing ROS generation. Streptozocin-induced diabetes elicited a noticeable increase in the content of C22:6, leading to augmented mitochondrial peroxidizability index and higher levels of lipid peroxidation. Mitochondrial respiration and complex I activity were impaired in diabetic rats with a concomitant increase in ROS generation using a complex I substrate. This was associated to a more oxidized state of glutathione, All these alterations were prevented by avocado oil except by the changes in mitochondrial fatty acid composition. Avocado oil did not prevented hyperglycemia and polyphagia although did normalized hyperlipidemia. Neither diabetes nor avocado oil induced steatosis. These results suggest that avocado oil improves mitochondrial ETC function by attenuating the deleterious effects of oxidative stress in the liver of diabetic rats independently of a hypoglycemic effect or by modifying the fatty acid composition of mitochondrial membranes. These findings might have also significant implications in the progression of NAFLD in experimental models of steatosis.

  8. Effects of doxorubicin on cardiac muscle subsarcolemmal and intermyofibrillar mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavazis, Andreas N.; Morton, Aaron B.; Hall, Stephanie E.; Smuder, Ashley J.

    2017-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly effective chemotherapeutic used in the treatment of a broad spectrum of malignancies. However, clinical use of DOX is highly limited by cumulative and irreversible cardiomyopathy that occurs following DOX treatment. The pathogenesis of DOX-induced cardiac muscle dysfunction is complex. However, it has been proposed that the etiology of this myopathy is related to mitochondrial dysfunction, as a result of the dose-dependent increase in the mitochondrial accumulation of DOX. In this regard, cardiac muscle possesses two morphologically distinct populations of mitochondria. Subsarcolemmal (SS) mitochondria are localized just below the sarcolemma, whereas intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria are found between myofibrils. Mitochondria in both regions exhibit subtle differences in biochemical properties, giving rise to differences in respiration, lipid composition, enzyme activities and protein synthesis rates. Based on the heterogeneity of SS and IMF mitochondria, we hypothesized that acute DOX administration would have distinct effects on each cardiac mitochondrial subfraction. Therefore, we isolated SS and IMF mitochondria from the hearts of female Sprague-Dawley rats 48 h after administration of DOX. Our results demonstrate that while SS mitochondria appear to accumulate greater amounts of DOX, IMF mitochondria demonstrate a greater apoptotic and autophagic response to DOX exposure. Thus, the divergent protein composition and function of the SS and IMF cardiac mitochondria result in differential responses to DOX, with IMF mitochondria appearing more susceptible to damage after DOX treatment. PMID:27832997

  9. Binding of FUNDC1 with Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Receptor in Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Membranes Maintains Mitochondrial Dynamics and Function in Hearts In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shengnan; Lu, Qiulun; Wang, Qilong; Ding, Ye; Ma, Zejun; Mao, Xiaoxiang; Huang, Kai; Xie, Zhonglin; Zou, Ming-Hui

    2017-09-23

    Background -FUN14 domain containing 1 (FUNDC1) is a highly conserved outer mitochondrial membrane protein. The aim of this study is to examine if FUNDC1 modulates the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes (MAMs), mitochondrial morphology, and function in cardiomyocytes and in intact hearts. Methods -The impacts of FUNDC1 on MAMs formation and cardiac functions were studied in mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes, in mice with cardiomyocyte-specific Fundc1 gene knockout (Fundc1(f/Y)/Cre(αMyHC+/-) ), and in the cardiac tissues of the patients with heart failure. Results -In mouse neonatal cardiomyocytes and intact hearts, FUNDC1 was localized in MAMs by binding to ER-resided inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate type 2 receptor (IP3R2). Fundc1 ablation disrupted MAMs, reduced the levels of IP3R2 and Ca(2+) in both mitochondria and cytosol whereas overexpression of Fundc1 increased the levels of IP3R2 and Ca(2+) in both mitochondria and cytosol. Consistently, Fundc1 ablation increased Ca(2+) levels in ER whereas Fundc1 overexpression lowered ER Ca(2+) levels. Further, Fundc1 ablation in cardiomyocytes elongated mitochondria, and compromised mitochondrial functions. Mechanistically, we found that Fundc1 ablation-induced reduction of intracellular Ca(2+) levels suppressed mitochondrial fission 1 protein (Fis1) expression and mitochondrial fission by reducing the binding of the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) in the Fis1 promoter. Fundc1(f/Y)/Cre(αMyHC+/-) mice but not their littermate control mice (Fundc1(wt/Y)/Cre(αMyHC+/-)) exhibited cardiac dysfunction. The ligation of the left ventricle artery of Fundc1(f/Y)/Cre(αMyHC+/-) mice caused more severe cardiac dysfunction than those in sham-treated Fundc1(f/Y)/Cre(αMyHC+/-) mice. Finally, we found that the FUNDC1/MAMs/CREB/Fis1 signaling axis was significantly suppressed in the patients with heart failure. Conclusions -We conclude that FUNDC1 binds to IP3R2 to modulate ER Ca(2+) release into

  10. Ambient fine particulate matters induce cell death and inflammatory response by influencing mitochondria function in human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Jung; Chae, Jae-Byoung; Lyu, Jungmook; Yoon, Cheolho; Kim, Sanghwa; Yeom, Changjoo; Kim, Younghun; Chang, Jaerak

    2017-11-01

    Ambient fine particulate matter (AFP) is a main risk factor for the cornea as ultraviolet light. However, the mechanism of corneal damage following exposure to AFP has been poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed that AFP can penetrate the cornea of mice, considering that two-dimensional cell culture systems are limited in reflecting the situation in vivo. Then, we investigated the toxic mechanism using human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells. At 24h after exposure, AFP located within the autophagosome-like vacuoles, and cell proliferation was clearly inhibited in all the tested concentration. Production of ROS and NO and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines were elevated in a dose-dependent manner. Additionally, conversion of LC3B from I-type to II-type and activation of caspase cascade which show autophagic- and apoptotic cell death, respectively, were observed in cells exposed to AFP. Furthermore, AFP decreased mitochondrial volume, inhibited ATP production, and altered the expression of metabolism-related genes. Taken together, we suggest that AFP induces cell death and inflammatory response by influencing mitochondrial function in HCET cells. In addition, we recommend that stringent air quality regulations are needed for eye health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Carvedilol prevents functional deficits in peripheral nerve mitochondria of rats with oxaliplatin-evoked painful peripheral neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areti, Aparna; Komirishetty, Prashanth; Kumar, Ashutosh

    2017-03-09

    Oxaliplatin use as chemotherapeutic agent is frequently limited by cumulative neurotoxicity which may compromise quality of life. Reports relate this neurotoxic effect to oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in peripheral nerves and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Carvedilol is an antihypertensive drug, has also been appreciated for its antioxidant and mitoprotective properties. Carvedilol co-treatment did not reduce the anti-tumor effects of oxaliplatin in human colon cancer cells (HT-29), but exhibited free radical scavenging activity against oxaliplatin-induced oxidative stress in neuronal cells (Neuro-2a). Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of carvedilol in the experimental model of oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy (OIPN) in Sprague-Dawley rats. Oxaliplatin reduced the sensory nerve conduction velocity and produced the thermal and mechanical nociception. Carvedilol significantly (Pmitochondrial superoxide dismutase expression in both sciatic nerve and DRG tissues. It improved the mitochondrial function and prevented the oxaliplatin-induced alteration in mitochondrial membrane potential in sciatic nerve thus prevented loss of intra epidermal nerve fiber density in the foot pads. Together the results prompt the use of carvedilol along with chemotherapy with oxaliplatin to prevent the peripheral neuropathy.

  12. [Overlap of irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia based on Rome III criteria in medical students from a private university in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Matos, Iván; Ng-Sueng, Luis Fernando; Flores-Arriaga, Joel; Beltrán-Flores, Santiago; Lema-Correa, Mauricio; Piscoya, Alejandro; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and functional dyspepsia in medical students from a private university in Lima, Peru. Furthermore, to determine the associated factors with these diseases. Observational descriptive and retrospective cross sectional study. Medical students from a private university in Lima were surveyed using a Rome III questionnaire for functional disorders and the STEPwise auto survey for defining the variables of alcohol and tobacco. For data analysis the Stata 11.0 program was used. Of the 608 students, 543 answered the questionnaire. The prevalence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome was 12.4%, 16.9% of dyspepsia, and of both diseases simultaneously, a prevalence of 7.1% was found. Alcohol consumption in the total population was 89.4% and 29.0% of tobacco. Association between both disorders was found (OR 10.47, 95% CI 5.08 to 21.55; p < 0.001), dyspepsia was associated with sex (OR: 0.16, 95% CI 0.07 to 0.36 p < 0.001), with alcohol consumption (OR: 5.22, 95% CI 23.99 1,13- p = 0.034) and with irritable bowel syndrome (OR: 9.88, 95% CI 4.78 to 20.46 p <0.001). Both conditions together were associated with sex (OR: 0.20, 95% CI from 0.06 to 0.60 p = 0.004) and daily consumption of tobacco (OR: 3.23, 95% CI 1.17 to 8.89 p = 0.023). A prevalence of 12.4% of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and 16.9% of dyspepsia was determined. An overlap of 7.1% of these diseases was reported.

  13. Mitochondria-driven assembly of a cortical anchor for mitochondria and dynein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Lauren M; Lackner, Laura L

    2017-10-02

    Interorganelle contacts facilitate communication between organelles and impact fundamental cellular functions. In this study, we examine the assembly of the MECA (mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum [ER]-cortex anchor), which tethers mitochondria to the ER and plasma membrane. We find that the assembly of Num1, the core component of MECA, requires mitochondria. Once assembled, Num1 clusters persistently anchor mitochondria to the cell cortex. Num1 clusters also function to anchor dynein to the plasma membrane, where dynein captures and walks along astral microtubules to help orient the mitotic spindle. We find that dynein is anchored by Num1 clusters that have been assembled by mitochondria. When mitochondrial inheritance is inhibited, Num1 clusters are not assembled in the bud, and defects in dynein-mediated spindle positioning are observed. The mitochondria-dependent assembly of a dual-function cortical anchor provides a mechanism to integrate the positioning and inheritance of the two essential organelles and expands the function of organelle contact sites. © 2017 Kraft and Lackner.

  14. Mitochondria and Mitochondrial ROS in Cancer: Novel Targets for Anticancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhui; Karakhanova, Svetlana; Hartwig, Werner; D'Haese, Jan G; Philippov, Pavel P; Werner, Jens; Bazhin, Alexandr V

    2016-12-01

    Mitochondria are indispensable for energy metabolism, apoptosis regulation, and cell signaling. Mitochondria in malignant cells differ structurally and functionally from those in normal cells and participate actively in metabolic reprogramming. Mitochondria in cancer cells are characterized by reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction, which promotes cancer development by inducing genomic instability, modifying gene expression, and participating in signaling pathways. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA mutations caused by oxidative damage that impair the oxidative phosphorylation process will result in further mitochondrial ROS production, completing the "vicious cycle" between mitochondria, ROS, genomic instability, and cancer development. The multiple essential roles of mitochondria have been utilized for designing novel mitochondria-targeted anticancer agents. Selective drug delivery to mitochondria helps to increase specificity and reduce toxicity of these agents. In order to reduce mitochondrial ROS production, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants can specifically accumulate in mitochondria by affiliating to a lipophilic penetrating cation and prevent mitochondria from oxidative damage. In consistence with the oncogenic role of ROS, mitochondria-targeted antioxidants are found to be effective in cancer prevention and anticancer therapy. A better understanding of the role played by mitochondria in cancer development will help to reveal more therapeutic targets, and will help to increase the activity and selectivity of mitochondria-targeted anticancer drugs. In this review we summarized the impact of mitochondria on cancer and gave summary about the possibilities to target mitochondria for anticancer therapies. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2570-2581, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Illusion induced overlapped optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, XiaoFei; Shi, Cheng; Li, Zhou; Chen, Lin; Cai, Bin; Zhu, YiMing; Zhu, HaiBin

    2014-01-13

    The traditional transformation-based cloak seems like it can only hide objects by bending the incident electromagnetic waves around the hidden region. In this paper, we prove that invisible cloaks can be applied to realize the overlapped optics. No matter how many in-phase point sources are located in the hidden region, all of them can overlap each other (this can be considered as illusion effect), leading to the perfect optical interference effect. In addition, a singular parameter-independent cloak is also designed to obtain quasi-overlapped optics. Even more amazing of overlapped optics is that if N identical separated in-phase point sources covered with the illusion media, the total power outside the transformation region is N2I0 (not NI0) (I0 is the power of just one point source, and N is the number point sources), which seems violating the law of conservation of energy. A theoretical model based on interference effect is proposed to interpret the total power of these two kinds of overlapped optics effects. Our investigation may have wide applications in high power coherent laser beams, and multiple laser diodes, and so on.

  16. Jurassic PARK2: You eat your mitochondria, and you are what your mitochondria eat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorn, Gerald W

    2016-01-01

    Park2/Parkin is a central mediator of selective mitochondrial autophagy for mitochondrial quality control. We showed in mouse hearts that PINK1/Mfn2/Park2 mediated generalized mitophagy is essential to the normal perinatal transition from fetal mitochondria that prefer carbohydrates as metabolic substrates to adult fatty-acid metabolizing mitochondria. Our findings demonstrate how functional interactions between mitophagic mitochondrial removal and biogenic mitochondrial replacement facilitate metabolic maturation of the heart.

  17. Transfer of mitochondria from astrocytes to neurons after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Kazuhide; Esposito, Elga; Wang, Xiaohua; Terasaki, Yasukazu; Liu, Yi; Xing, Changhong; Ji, Xunming; Lo, Eng H.

    2016-01-01

    Recently, it was suggested that neurons can release and transfer damaged mitochondria to astrocytes for disposal and recycling 1. This ability to exchange mitochondria may represent a potential mode of cell-cell signaling in the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that astrocytes can also release functional mitochondria that enter into neurons. Astrocytic release of extracellular mitochondria particles was mediated by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving CD38/cyclic ADP ribose signaling. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in mice induced astrocytic mitochondria entry to adjacent neurons that amplified cell survival signals. Suppression of CD38 signaling with siRNA reduced extracellular mitochondria transfer and worsened neurological outcomes. These findings suggest a new mitochondrial mechanism of neuroglial crosstalk that may contribute to endogenous neuroprotective and neurorecovery mechanisms after stroke. PMID:27466127

  18. Mitochondria: a target for bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobet, Elodie; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Arnould, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Eukaryotic cells developed strategies to detect and eradicate infections. The innate immune system, which is the first line of defence against invading pathogens, relies on the recognition of molecular patterns conserved among pathogens. Pathogen associated molecular pattern binding to pattern recognition receptor triggers the activation of several signalling pathways leading to the establishment of a pro-inflammatory state required to control the infection. In addition, pathogens evolved to subvert those responses (with passive and active strategies) allowing their entry and persistence in the host cells and tissues. Indeed, several bacteria actively manipulate immune system or interfere with the cell fate for their own benefit. One can imagine that bacterial effectors can potentially manipulate every single organelle in the cell. However, the multiple functions fulfilled by mitochondria especially their involvement in the regulation of innate immune response, make mitochondria a target of choice for bacterial pathogens as they are not only a key component of the central metabolism through ATP production and synthesis of various biomolecules but they also take part to cell signalling through ROS production and control of calcium homeostasis as well as the control of cell survival/programmed cell death. Furthermore, considering that mitochondria derived from an ancestral bacterial endosymbiosis, it is not surprising that a special connection does exist between this organelle and bacteria. In this review, we will discuss different mitochondrial functions that are affected during bacterial infection as well as different strategies developed by bacterial pathogens to subvert functions related to calcium homeostasis, maintenance of redox status and mitochondrial morphology.

  19. Differences in the effects of Asian dust on pulmonary function between adult patients with asthma and those with asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Sano, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Yasuto; Mikami, Masaaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Kato, Kazuhiro; Konishi, Tatsuya; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Eiji; Kitano, Hiroya

    2016-01-01

    Background Asian dust (AD) exposure exacerbates pulmonary dysfunction in patients with asthma. Asthma–chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS), characterized by coexisting symptoms of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, is considered a separate disease entity. Previously, we investigated the effects of AD on pulmonary function in adult patients with asthma. Here, we present the findings of our further research on the differences in the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function between patients with asthma alone and those with ACOS. Methods Between March and May 2012, we conducted a panel study wherein we monitored daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) values in 231 adult patients with asthma. These patients were divided into 190 patients with asthma alone and 41 patients with ACOS in this study. Daily AD particle levels were measured using light detection and ranging systems. Two heavy AD days (April 23 and 24) were determined according to the Japan Meteorological Agency definition. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the association between PEF and AD exposure. Results Increments in the interquartile range of AD particles (0.018 km−1) led to PEF changes of −0.50 L/min (95% confidence interval, −0.98 to −0.02) in patients with asthma alone and −0.11 L/min (−0.11 to 0.85) in patients with ACOS. The PEF changes after exposure to heavy AD were −2.21 L/min (−4.28 to −0.15) in patients with asthma alone and −2.76 L/min (−6.86 to 1.35) in patients with ACOS. In patients with asthma alone, the highest decrease in PEF values was observed on the heavy AD day, with a subsequent gradual increase over time. Conclusion Our results suggest that the effects of AD exposure on pulmonary function differ between patients with asthma alone and ACOS, with the former exhibiting a greater likelihood of decreased pulmonary function after AD exposure. PMID:26869784

  20. On Cellular Darwinism: Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    The significant role of mitochondria within cells is becoming increasingly clear. This letter uses the NKCS model of coupled fitness landscapes to explore aspects of organelle-nucleus coevolution. The phenomenon of mitochondrial diversity is allowed to emerge under a simple intracellular evolutionary process, including varying the relative rate of evolution by the organelle. It is shown how the conditions for the maintenance of more than one genetic variant of mitochondria are similar to those previously suggested as needed for the original symbiotic origins of the relationship using the NKCS model.

  1. Protein trafficking at the crossroads to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasilewski, Michal; Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Chacinska, Agnieszka

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are central power stations in the cell, which additionally serve as metabolic hubs for a plethora of anabolic and catabolic processes. The sustained function of mitochondria requires the precisely controlled biogenesis and expression coordination of proteins that originate from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Accuracy of targeting, transport and assembly of mitochondrial proteins is also needed to avoid deleterious effects on protein homeostasis in the cell. Checkpoints of mitochondrial protein transport can serve as signals that provide information about the functional status of the organelles. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of mitochondrial protein transport and discuss examples that involve communication with the nucleus and cytosol.

  2. Intracoronary Delivery of Mitochondria to the Ischemic Heart for Cardioprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, Douglas B; Yao, Rouan; Akurathi, Vamsidhar; Snay, Erin R; Thedsanamoorthy, Jerusha K; Zurakowski, David; Ericsson, Maria; Friehs, Ingeborg; Wu, Yaotang; Levitsky, Sidney; Del Nido, Pedro J; Packard, Alan B; McCully, James D

    2016-01-01

    We have previously shown that transplantation of autologously derived, respiration-competent mitochondria by direct injection into the heart following transient ischemia and reperfusion enhances cell viability and contractile function. To increase the therapeutic potential of this approach, we investigated whether exogenous mitochondria can be effectively delivered through the coronary vasculature to protect the ischemic myocardium and studied the fate of these transplanted organelles in the heart. Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and then reperfused for 10 minutes. Mitochondria were labeled with 18F-rhodamine 6G and iron oxide nanoparticles. The labeled mitochondria were either directly injected into the ischemic region or delivered by vascular perfusion through the coronary arteries at the onset of reperfusion. These hearts were used for positron emission tomography, microcomputed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging with subsequent microscopic analyses of tissue sections to confirm the uptake and distribution of exogenous mitochondria. Injected mitochondria were localized near the site of delivery; while, vascular perfusion of mitochondria resulted in rapid and extensive dispersal throughout the heart. Both injected and perfused mitochondria were observed in interstitial spaces and were associated with blood vessels and cardiomyocytes. To determine the efficacy of vascular perfusion of mitochondria, an additional group of rabbit hearts were subjected to 30 minutes of regional ischemia and reperfused for 120 minutes. Immediately following regional ischemia, the hearts received unlabeled, autologous mitochondria delivered through the coronary arteries. Autologous mitochondria perfused through the coronary vasculature significantly decreased infarct size and significantly enhanced post-ischemic myocardial function. In conclusion, the delivery of mitochondria through the coronary arteries resulted in their rapid

  3. Mitochondria as target of Quantum dots toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiahan; Zhang, Yue; Xiao, Qi; Tian, Fangfang; Liu, Xiaorong; Li, Ran; Zhao, Guangyuan; Jiang, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: yiliuchem@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The present work investigated the toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers. {yields} These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level. {yields} QDs toxicity on mitochondria indicates that the QDs require to be further improved before they can be safely used in clinic. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) hold great promise in many biological applications, with the persistence of safety concerns about the environment and human health. The present work investigated the potential toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers by examining mitochondrial respiration, swelling, and lipid peroxidation. We observed that QDs can significantly affect the mitochondrial membrane properties, bioenergetics and induce mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level.

  4. Melatonin protects lung mitochondria from aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío; Carretero, Miguel; Doerrier, Carolina; López, Luis C; García-Corzo, Laura; Tresguerres, Jesús A; Escames, Germaine

    2012-06-01

    We assessed whether melatonin administration would prevent the hyperoxidative status that occurs in lung mitochondria with age. Mitochondria from lungs of male and female senescent prone mice at 5 and 10 months of age were studied. Age-dependent mitochondrial oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring the levels of lipid peroxidation and nitrite, glutathione/glutathione disulfide ratio, and glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. Mitochondrial respiratory chain and oxidative phosphorylation capability were also measured. Age induces a significant oxidative/nitrosative status in lung mitochondria, which exhibited a significantly reduced activity of the respiratory chain and ATP production. These manifestations of age were more pronounced in males than in females. After 9 months of melatonin administration in the drinking water, the hyperoxidative status and functional deficiency of aged lung mitochondria were totally counteracted, and had increased ATP production. The beneficial effects of melatonin were generally similar in both mice genders. Thus, melatonin administration, as a single therapy, maintained fully functioning lung mitochondria during aging, a finding with important consequences in the pathophysiology of lung aging. In view of these data melatonin, the production of which decreases with age, should be considered a preventive therapy against the hyperoxidative status of the aged lungs, and its use may lead to the avoidance of respiratory complications in the elderly.

  5. Overlap among Environmental Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Betty

    1981-01-01

    Describes the methodology and results of a study comparing the overlap of Enviroline, Pollution, and the Environmental Periodicals Bibliography files through searches on acid rain, asbestos and water, diesel, glass recycling, Lake Erie, Concorde, reverse osmosis wastewater treatment cost, and Calspan. Nine tables are provided. (RBF)

  6. Mitochondria in White, Brown, and Beige Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Cedikova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a key role in energy metabolism in many tissues, including cardiac and skeletal muscle, brain, liver, and adipose tissue. Three types of adipose depots can be identified in mammals, commonly classified according to their colour appearance: the white (WAT, the brown (BAT, and the beige/brite/brown-like (bAT adipose tissues. WAT is mainly involved in the storage and mobilization of energy and BAT is predominantly responsible for nonshivering thermogenesis. Recent data suggest that adipocyte mitochondria might play an important role in the development of obesity through defects in mitochondrial lipogenesis and lipolysis, regulation of adipocyte differentiation, apoptosis, production of oxygen radicals, efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation, and regulation of conversion of white adipocytes into brown-like adipocytes. This review summarizes the main characteristics of each adipose tissue subtype and describes morphological and functional modifications focusing on mitochondria and their activity in healthy and unhealthy adipocytes.

  7. A closer look at the main actors of Neotropical floodplain food webs: functional classification and niche overlap of dominant benthic invertebrates in a floodplain lake of Paraná River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Saigo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Functional classification of animals is necessary to enhance the predictive power of food web models. However, while there is a large database for functional classification of benthic invertebrates (Functional Feeding Groups, FFG in the temperate zone, the attribution of individual species of riverine invertebrates is still in its infancies in the Neotropical Region. Different authors hypothesized that diet breadth was larger in the Tropics, however detailed analysis are scarce. In the present study we aimed at classifying dominant benthic taxa of the Middle Paraná River floodplain (Argentina into trophic guilds by diet and niche overlap analyses. We sampled twelve taxa of benthic invertebrates from a floodplain lake during low water season and performed a gut content analysis as a baseline for FFG classification. We also used available diet information of other common taxa for statistical analysis. Then, we compared the variance of niche overlap, using Pianka's index, with that of simulated null model. After that we grouped taxa using Morisita similarity index with a threshold of 0.6 and compared niche overlap with null models within and between FFGs. Observed variance of niche overlap was greater than expected by chance, confirming the presence of FFGs among analyzed taxa. Considering trophic similarity of species, we identified four FFGs: collectors, omnivores, herbivores and predators. Niche overlap was greater than expected by stochastic null models within FFGs, and smaller between FFGs. Nearly one third of analyzed taxa were classified in a different FFG than their congeners of the Holarctic region. This result indicates that classifications performed in the Holarctic region should be used with care in the Neotropical region, even in subtropical systems

  8. Transcellular degradation of axonal mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Chung-ha O; Kim, Keun-Young; Bushong, Eric A; Mills, Elizabeth A; Boassa, Daniela; Shih, Tiffany; Kinebuchi, Mira; Phan, Sebastien; Zhou, Yi; Bihlmeyer, Nathan A; Nguyen, Judy V; Jin, Yunju; Ellisman, Mark H; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas

    2014-07-01

    It is generally accepted that healthy cells degrade their own mitochondria. Here, we report that retinal ganglion cell axons of WT mice shed mitochondria at the optic nerve head (ONH), and that these mitochondria are internalized and degraded by adjacent astrocytes. EM demonstrates that mitochondria are shed through formation of large protrusions that originate from otherwise healthy axons. A virally introduced tandem fluorophore protein reporter of acidified mitochondria reveals that acidified axonal mitochondria originating from the retinal ganglion cell are associated with lysosomes within columns of astrocytes in the ONH. According to this reporter, a greater proportion of retinal ganglion cell mitochondria are degraded at the ONH than in the ganglion cell soma. Consistently, analyses of degrading DNA reveal extensive mtDNA degradation within the optic nerve astrocytes, some of which comes from retinal ganglion cell axons. Together, these results demonstrate that surprisingly large proportions of retinal ganglion cell axonal mitochondria are normally degraded by the astrocytes of the ONH. This transcellular degradation of mitochondria, or transmitophagy, likely occurs elsewhere in the CNS, because structurally similar accumulations of degrading mitochondria are also found along neurites in superficial layers of the cerebral cortex. Thus, the general assumption that neurons or other cells necessarily degrade their own mitochondria should be reconsidered.

  9. Offshoring and Firm Overlap

    OpenAIRE

    Schmerer, Hans-Jörg; Capuano, Stella; Egger, Hartmut; Koch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We set up a model of offshoring with heterogeneous producers that captures two empirical regularities on offshoring firms: larger, more productive firms are more likely to make use of the offshoring opportunity; the fraction of firms that engages in offshoring is positive and smaller than one in any size or revenue category. These patterns generate an overlap of offshoring and non-offshoring firms, which is non-monotonic in the costs of offshoring. In an empirical exercise, we employ firm-lev...

  10. HUNTing the Overlap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iancu, Costin; Parry, Husbands; Hargrove, Paul

    2005-07-08

    Hiding communication latency is an important optimization for parallel programs. Programmers or compilers achieve this by using non-blocking communication primitives and overlapping communication with computation or other communication operations. Using non-blocking communication raises two issues: performance and programmability. In terms of performance, optimizers need to find a good communication schedule and are sometimes constrained by lack of full application knowledge. In terms of programmability, efficiently managing non-blocking communication can prove cumbersome for complex applications. In this paper we present the design principles of HUNT, a runtime system designed to search and exploit some of the available overlap present at execution time in UPC programs. Using virtual memory support, our runtime implements demand-driven synchronization for data involved in communication operations. It also employs message decomposition and scheduling heuristics to transparently improve the non-blocking behavior of applications. We provide a user level implementation of HUNT on a variety of modern high performance computing systems. Results indicate that our approach is successful in finding some of the overlap available at execution time. While system and application characteristics influence performance, perhaps the determining factor is the time taken by the CPU to execute a signal handler. Demand driven synchronization at execution time eliminates the need for the explicit management of non-blocking communication. Besides increasing programmer productivity, this feature also simplifies compiler analysis for communication optimizations.

  11. Redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celien eLismont

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Reduction-oxidation or ‘redox’ reactions are an integral part of a broad range of cellular processes such as gene expression, energy metabolism, protein import and folding, and autophagy. As many of these processes are intimately linked with cell fate decisions, transient or chronic changes in cellular redox equilibrium are likely to contribute to the initiation and progression of a plethora of human diseases. Since a long time, it is known that mitochondria are major players in redox regulation and signaling. More recently, it has become clear that also peroxisomes have the capacity to impact redox-linked physiological processes. To serve this function, peroxisomes cooperate with other organelles, including mitochondria. This review provides a comprehensive picture of what is currently known about the redox interplay between mitochondria and peroxisomes in mammals. We first outline the pro- and antioxidant systems of both organelles and how they may function as redox signaling nodes. Next, we critically review and discuss emerging evidence that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. Key issues include possible physiological roles, messengers, and mechanisms. We also provide examples of how data mining of publicly-available datasets from ‘omics’ technologies can be a powerful means to gain additional insights into potential redox signaling pathways between peroxisomes and mitochondria. Finally, we highlight the need for more studies that seek to clarify the mechanisms of how mitochondria may act as dynamic receivers, integrators, and transmitters of peroxisome-derived mediators of oxidative stress. The outcome of such studies may open up exciting new avenues for the community of researchers working on cellular responses to organelle-derived oxidative stress, a research field in which the role of peroxisomes is currently highly underestimated and an issue of

  12. Mitochondria and Neuroplasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Aiwu Cheng; Yan Hou; Mattson, Mark P.

    2010-01-01

    The production of neurons from neural progenitor cells, the growth of axons and dendrites and the formation and reorganization of synapses are examples of neuroplasticity. These processes are regulated by cell-autonomous and intercellular (paracrine and endocrine) programs that mediate responses of neural cells to environmental input. Mitochondria are highly mobile and move within and between subcellular compartments involved in neuroplasticity (synaptic terminals, dendrites, cell body and th...

  13. Mitochondria and neuroplasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Aiwu; Hou, Yan; Mark P. Mattson

    2010-01-01

    The production of neurons from neural progenitor cells, the growth of axons and dendrites and the formation and reorganization of synapses are examples of neuroplasticity. These processes are regulated by cell-autonomous and intercellular (paracrine and endocrine) programs that mediate responses of neural cells to environmental input. Mitochondria are highly mobile and move within and between subcellular compartments involved in neuroplasticity (synaptic terminals, dendrites, cell body and th...

  14. Differential production of superoxide by neuronal mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levin Leonard A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutations, which are present in all mitochondria-containing cells, paradoxically cause tissue-specific disease. For example, Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON results from one of three point mutations mtDNA coding for complex I components, but is only manifested in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, a central neuron contained within the retina. Given that RGCs use superoxide for intracellular signaling after axotomy, and that LHON mutations increase superoxide levels in non-RGC transmitochondrial cybrids, we hypothesized that RGCs regulate superoxide levels differently than other neuronal cells. To study this, we compared superoxide production and mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC components in isolated RGC mitochondria to mitochondria isolated from cerebral cortex and neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cells. Results In the presence of the complex I substrate glutamate/malate or the complex II substrate succinate, the rate of superoxide production in RGC-5 cells was significantly lower than cerebral or neuroblastoma cells. Cerebral but not RGC-5 or neuroblastoma cells increased superoxide production in response to the complex I inhibitor rotenone, while neuroblastoma but not cerebral or RGC-5 cells dramatically decreased superoxide production in response to the complex III inhibitor antimycin A. Immunoblotting and real-time quantitative PCR of METC components demonstrated different patterns of expression among the three different sources of neuronal mitochondria. Conclusion RGC-5 mitochondria produce superoxide at significantly lower rates than cerebral and neuroblastoma mitochondria, most likely as a result of differential expression of complex I components. Diversity in METC component expression and function could explain tissue specificity in diseases associated with inherited mtDNA abnormalities.

  15. Packing ellipsoids with overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Uhler, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The problem of packing ellipsoids of different sizes and shapes into an ellipsoidal container so as to minimize a measure of overlap between ellipsoids is considered. A bilevel optimization formulation is given, together with an algorithm for the general case and a simpler algorithm for the special case in which all ellipsoids are in fact spheres. Convergence results are proved and computational experience is described and illustrated. The motivating application - chromosome organization in the human cell nucleus - is discussed briefly, and some illustrative results are presented.

  16. Lipid droplets interact with mitochondria using SNAP23

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jägerström, Sara; Polesie, Sam; Wickström, Ylva

    2009-01-01

    factors are involved. Moreover, the presence of LD markers in mitochondria isolated by subcellular fractionations is demonstrated. Finally, ablation of SNAP23 using siRNA reduced complex formation and beta oxidation, which suggests that the LD-mitochondria complex is functional in the cell.......Triglyceride-containing lipid droplets (LD) are dynamic organelles stored on demand in all cells. These droplets grow through a fusion process mediated by SNARE proteins, including SNAP23. The droplets have also been shown to be highly motile and interact with other cell organelles, including...... peroxisomes and the endoplasmic reticulum. We have used electron and confocal microscopy to demonstrate that LD form complexes with mitochondria in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. Using an in vitro system of purified LD and mitochondria, we also show the formation of the LD-mitochondria complex, in which cytosolic...

  17. Mitochondrial endonuclease G mediates breakdown of paternal mitochondria upon fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Li, Haimin; Li, Hanzeng; Nakagawa, Akihisa; Lin, Jason L J; Lee, Eui-Seung; Harry, Brian L; Skeen-Gaar, Riley Robert; Suehiro, Yuji; William, Donna; Mitani, Shohei; Yuan, Hanna S; Kang, Byung-Ho; Xue, Ding

    2016-07-22

    Mitochondria are inherited maternally in most animals, but the mechanisms of selective paternal mitochondrial elimination (PME) are unknown. While examining fertilization in Caenorhabditis elegans, we observed that paternal mitochondria rapidly lose their inner membrane integrity. CPS-6, a mitochondrial endonuclease G, serves as a paternal mitochondrial factor that is critical for PME. We found that CPS-6 relocates from the intermembrane space of paternal mitochondria to the matrix after fertilization to degrade mitochondrial DNA. It acts with maternal autophagy and proteasome machineries to promote PME. Loss of cps-6 delays breakdown of mitochondrial inner membranes, autophagosome enclosure of paternal mitochondria, and PME. Delayed removal of paternal mitochondria causes increased embryonic lethality, demonstrating that PME is important for normal animal development. Thus, CPS-6 functions as a paternal mitochondrial degradation factor during animal development.

  18. Mitochondria in biology and medicine--2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desler, Claus; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2014-05-01

    As the understanding of mitochondria and their importance for the cell and organism is developing, increasing evidence is demonstrating the organelle to be intricately involved in an extensive range of pathologies. This range of pathologies include general signs of premature aging, neuro-muscular dysfunctions, cancer, diabetes, various heart diseases, inflammation and other conditions not previously known to be related to mitochondrial function. A better understanding of mitochondria therefore allows a better understanding of related pathologies. It enables the usage of mitochondrial function as biomarkers for the diseases and most important, it opens the possibility of a treatment or a cure for a disease. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title of the second annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine-India. The conference was organized by Rana P. Singh, Keshav Singh and Kumarasamy Thangaraj, and was held at the newly opened School of Life Sciences, Central University of Gujarat (CUG), Gandhinagar, India, during 2-3 November 2012. The conference featured talks from internationally renowned scientists within the field of mitochondrial research and offered both students and fellow researchers a comprehensive update to the newest research within the field. This paper summarizes key outcomes of the presentations. Copyright © 2013 © Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Hyperoxia decreases glycolytic capacity, glycolytic reserve and oxidative phosphorylation in MLE-12 cells and inhibits complex I and II function, but not complex IV in isolated mouse lung mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumuda C Das

    Full Text Available High levels of oxygen (hyperoxia are frequently used in critical care units and in conditions of respiratory insufficiencies in adults, as well as in infants. However, hyperoxia has been implicated in a number of pulmonary disorders including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. Hyperoxia increases the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the mitochondria that could impair the function of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We analyzed lung mitochondrial function in hyperoxia using the XF24 analyzer (extracellular flux and optimized the assay for lung epithelial cells and mitochondria isolated from lungs of mice. Our data show that hyperoxia decreases basal oxygen consumption rate (OCR, spare respiratory capacity, maximal respiration and ATP turnover in MLE-12 cells. There was significant decrease in glycolytic capacity and glycolytic reserve in MLE-12 cells exposed to hyperoxia. Using mitochondria isolated from lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia or normoxia we have shown that hyperoxia decreased the basal, state 3 and state3 μ (respiration in an uncoupled state respirations. Further, using substrate or inhibitor of a specific complex we show that the OCR via complex I and II, but not complex IV was decreased, demonstrating that complexes I and II are specific targets of hyperoxia. Further, the activities of complex I (NADH dehydrogenase, NADH-DH and complex II (succinate dehydrogenase, SDH were decreased in hyperoxia, but the activity of complex IV (cytochrome oxidase, COX remains unchanged. Taken together, our study show that hyperoxia impairs glycolytic and mitochondrial energy metabolism in in tact cells, as well as in lungs of mice by selectively inactivating components of electron transport system.

  20. Mitochondrial aging and age-related dysfunction of mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Sobenin, Igor A; Revin, Victor V; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2014-01-01

    Age-related changes in mitochondria are associated with decline in mitochondrial function. With advanced age, mitochondrial DNA volume, integrity and functionality decrease due to accumulation of mutations and oxidative damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aged subjects, mitochondria are characterized by impaired function such as lowered oxidative capacity, reduced oxidative phosphorylation, decreased ATP production, significant increase in ROS generation, and diminished antioxidant defense. Mitochondrial biogenesis declines with age due to alterations in mitochondrial dynamics and inhibition of mitophagy, an autophagy process that removes dysfunctional mitochondria. Age-dependent abnormalities in mitochondrial quality control further weaken and impair mitochondrial function. In aged tissues, enhanced mitochondria-mediated apoptosis contributes to an increase in the percentage of apoptotic cells. However, implementation of strategies such as caloric restriction and regular physical training may delay mitochondrial aging and attenuate the age-related phenotype in humans.

  1. Current status of Dynamical Overlap project

    CERN Document Server

    Cundy, N

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the adaptation of the Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm to overlap fermions. We derive a method which can be used to account for the delta function in the fermionic force caused by the differential of the sign function. We discuss the algoritmic difficulties that have been overcome, and mention those that still need to be solved.

  2. Mitochondria targeting nano agents in cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Pei-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria have emerged as noteworthy therapeutic targets as their physiological functions are often altered in pathological conditions such as cancer. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE and PubMed were searched for recent studies reporting the importance of mitochondria targeting nanoagents in cancer therapeutics. The concluding remarks of the above papers mostly confirmed the growing potential of these novel nanoagents in the area of anticancer research. Furthermore, numerous studies demonstrated the immense potential of nanocarriers in delivering mitochondria-acting compounds to their target site. Among the assemblage of nanomaterials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are becoming more prominent for drug delivery due to favorable attributes including their unique shape, which promotes cellular uptake, and large aspect ratio that facilitates conjugation of bioactive molecules on their surface. The present review focused on the current view of variable options available in mitochondria-targeting anticancer therapeutics. It may be concluded that improvements are essential for its establishment as a gold standard therapeutic option especially in the clinical setting. PMID:28105197

  3. Noninvasive radiofrequency treatment effect on mitochondria in pancreatic cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Steven A; Palalon, Flavio; Lu, Xiaolin; Koshkina, Nadezhda V

    2014-11-01

    The development of novel therapeutic approaches for cancer therapy is important, especially for tumors that have poor response or develop resistance to standard chemotherapy and radiation. We discovered that noninvasive radiofrequency (RF) fields can affect cancer cells but not normal cells, inhibit progression of tumors in mice, and enhance the anticancer effects of chemotherapy. However, it remains unclear what physiological and molecular mechanisms this treatment induces inside cells. Here, we studied the effect of RF treatment on mitochondria in human pancreatic cancer cells. The morphology of mitochondria in cells was studied via electron microscopy. The alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψ) was accessed using a Mitotracker probe. The respiratory activity of mitochondria was evaluated by analyzing changes in oxygen consumption rates determined with a Mito Stress Test Kit. The production of intracellular reactive oxygen species was performed using flow cytometry. The colocalization of mitochondria and autophagosome markers in cells was performed using fluorescence immunostaining and confocal microscopy analysis. RF fields treatment changed the morphology of mitochondria in cancer cells, altered polarization of the mitochondrial membrane, substantially impaired mitochondrial respiration, and increased reactive oxygen species production, indicating RF-induced stress on the mitochondria. We also observed frequent colocalization of the autophagosome marker LC3B with the mitochondrial marker Tom20 inside cancer cells after RF exposure, indicating the presence of mitochondria in the autophagosomes. This suggests that RF-induced stress can damage mitochondria and induce elimination of damaged organelles via autophagy. RF treatment impaired the function of mitochondria in cancer cells. Therefore, mitochondria can represent one of the targets of the RF treatment. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  4. Mitochondria localize to the cleavage furrow in mammalian cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Elizabeth J; Mandato, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles with multiple cellular functions, including ATP production, calcium buffering, and lipid biosynthesis. Several studies have shown that mitochondrial positioning is regulated by the cytoskeleton during cell division in several eukaryotic systems. However, the distribution of mitochondria during mammalian cytokinesis and whether the distribution is regulated by the cytoskeleton has not been examined. Using live spinning disk confocal microscopy and quantitative analysis of mitochondrial fluorescence intensity, we demonstrate that mitochondria are recruited to the cleavage furrow during cytokinesis in HeLa cells. After anaphase onset, the mitochondria are recruited towards the site of cleavage furrow formation, where they remain enriched as the furrow ingresses and until cytokinesis completion. Furthermore, we show that recruitment of mitochondria to the furrow occurs in multiple mammalian cells lines as well as in monopolar, bipolar, and multipolar divisions, suggesting that the mechanism of recruitment is conserved and robust. Using inhibitors of cytoskeleton dynamics, we show that the microtubule cytoskeleton, but not actin, is required to transport mitochondria to the cleavage furrow. Thus, mitochondria are specifically recruited to the cleavage furrow in a microtubule-dependent manner during mammalian cytokinesis. Two possible reasons for this could be to localize mitochondrial function to the furrow to facilitate cytokinesis and / or ensure accurate mitochondrial inheritance.

  5. Stable Isotope Tracer Analysis in Isolated Mitochondria from Mammalian Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon-Pierre Gravel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are a focal point in metabolism, given that they play fundamental roles in catabolic, as well as anabolic reactions. Alterations in mitochondrial functions are often studied in whole cells, and metabolomics experiments using 13C-labeled substrates, coupled with mass isotopomer distribution analyses, represent a powerful approach to study global changes in cellular metabolic activities. However, little is known regarding the assessment of metabolic activities in isolated mitochondria using this technology. Studies on isolated mitochondria permit the evaluation of whether changes in cellular metabolic activities are due to modifications in the intrinsic properties of the mitochondria. Here, we present a streamlined approach to accurately determine 13C, as well as 12C enrichments in isolated mitochondria from mammalian tissues or cultured cells by GC/MS. We demonstrate the relevance of this experimental approach by assessing the effects of drugs perturbing mitochondrial functions on the mass isotopomer enrichment of metabolic intermediates. Furthermore, we investigate 13C and 12C enrichments in mitochondria isolated from cancer cells given the emerging role of metabolic alterations in supporting tumor growth. This original method will provide a very sensitive tool to perform metabolomics studies on isolated mitochondria.

  6. Detecting overlapping coding sequences in virus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Chris M

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting new coding sequences (CDSs in viral genomes can be difficult for several reasons. The typically compact genomes often contain a number of overlapping coding and non-coding functional elements, which can result in unusual patterns of codon usage; conservation between related sequences can be difficult to interpret – especially within overlapping genes; and viruses often employ non-canonical translational mechanisms – e.g. frameshifting, stop codon read-through, leaky-scanning and internal ribosome entry sites – which can conceal potentially coding open reading frames (ORFs. Results In a previous paper we introduced a new statistic – MLOGD (Maximum Likelihood Overlapping Gene Detector – for detecting and analysing overlapping CDSs. Here we present (a an improved MLOGD statistic, (b a greatly extended suite of software using MLOGD, (c a database of results for 640 virus sequence alignments, and (d a web-interface to the software and database. Tests show that, from an alignment with just 20 mutations, MLOGD can discriminate non-overlapping CDSs from non-coding ORFs with a typical accuracy of up to 98%, and can detect CDSs overlapping known CDSs with a typical accuracy of 90%. In addition, the software produces a variety of statistics and graphics, useful for analysing an input multiple sequence alignment. Conclusion MLOGD is an easy-to-use tool for virus genome annotation, detecting new CDSs – in particular overlapping or short CDSs – and for analysing overlapping CDSs following frameshift sites. The software, web-server, database and supplementary material are available at http://guinevere.otago.ac.nz/mlogd.html.

  7. Mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum choreography: structure and signaling dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2007-10-01

    Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have different roles in living cells but they interact both physically and functionally. A key aspect of the mitochondria-ER relationship is the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling during cell activation, which thus affects a variety of physiological processes. We focus here on the molecular aspects that control the dynamics of the organelle-organelle interaction and their relationship with Ca(2+) signals, also discussing the consequences that these phenomena have, not only for cell physiology but also in the control of cell death.

  8. Intermembrane space proteome of yeast mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vögtle, F-Nora; Burkhart, Julia M; Rao, Sanjana; Gerbeth, Carolin; Hinrichs, Jens; Martinou, Jean-Claude; Chacinska, Agnieszka; Sickmann, Albert; Zahedi, René P; Meisinger, Chris

    2012-12-01

    The intermembrane space (IMS) represents the smallest subcompartment of mitochondria. Nevertheless, it plays important roles in the transport and modification of proteins, lipids, and metal ions and in the regulation and assembly of the respiratory chain complexes. Moreover, it is involved in many redox processes and coordinates key steps in programmed cell death. A comprehensive profiling of IMS proteins has not been performed so far. We have established a method that uses the proapoptotic protein Bax to release IMS proteins from isolated mitochondria, and we profiled the protein composition of this compartment. Using stable isotope-labeled mitochondria from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we were able to measure specific Bax-dependent protein release and distinguish between quantitatively released IMS proteins and the background efflux of matrix proteins. From the known 31 soluble IMS proteins, 29 proteins were reproducibly identified, corresponding to a coverage of >90%. In addition, we found 20 novel intermembrane space proteins, out of which 10 had not been localized to mitochondria before. Many of these novel IMS proteins have unknown functions or have been reported to play a role in redox regulation. We confirmed IMS localization for 15 proteins using in organello import, protease accessibility upon osmotic swelling, and Bax-release assays. Moreover, we identified two novel mitochondrial proteins, Ymr244c-a (Coa6) and Ybl107c (Mic23), as substrates of the MIA import pathway that have unusual cysteine motifs and found the protein phosphatase Ptc5 to be a novel substrate of the inner membrane protease (IMP). For Coa6 we discovered a role as a novel assembly factor of the cytochrome c oxidase complex. We present here the first and comprehensive proteome of IMS proteins of yeast mitochondria with 51 proteins in total. The IMS proteome will serve as a valuable source for further studies on the role of the IMS in cell life and death.

  9. Cardiovascular Disease, Mitochondria, and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated that mitochondria play an important role in the cardiovascular system and mutations of mitochondrial DNA affect coronary artery disease, resulting in hypertension, atherosclerosis, and cardiomyopathy. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been used for thousands of years to treat cardiovascular disease, but it is not yet clear how TCM affects mitochondrial function. By reviewing the interactions between the cardiovascular system, mitochondrial DNA, and TCM, we show that cardiovascular disease is negatively affected by mutations in mitochondrial DNA and that TCM can be used to treat cardiovascular disease by regulating the structure and function of mitochondria via increases in mitochondrial electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, modulation of mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis, and decreases in mitochondrial ROS. However further research is still required to identify the mechanism by which TCM affects CVD and modifies mitochondrial DNA.

  10. Insulin signaling meets mitochondria in metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhiyong; Tseng, Yolanda; White, Morris F

    2010-10-01

    Insulin controls nutrient and metabolic homeostasis via the IRS-PI3K-AKT signaling cascade that targets FOXO1 and mTOR. Mitochondria, as the prime metabolic platform, malfunction during insulin resistance in metabolic diseases. However, the molecular link between insulin resistance and mitochondrial dysfunction remains undefined. Here we review recent studies on insulin action and the mechanistic association with mitochondrial metabolism. These studies suggest that insulin signaling underpins mitochondrial electron transport chain integrity and activity by suppressing FOXO1/HMOX1 and maintaining the NAD(+)/NADH ratio, the mediator of the SIRT1/PGC1α pathway for mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Mitochondria generate moderately reactive oxygen species (ROS) and enhance insulin sensitivity upon redox regulation of protein tyrosine phosphatase and insulin receptor. However, chronic exposure to high ROS levels could alter mitochondrial function and thereby cause insulin resistance.

  11. Mitochondria in Alzheimer's Disease and Diabetes-Associated Neurodegeneration: License to Heal!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Susana M; Correia, Sónia C; Carvalho, Cristina; Moreira, Paula I

    2017-03-02

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a difficult puzzle to solve, in part because the etiology of this devastating neurodegenerative disorder remains murky. However, diabetes has been pinpointed as a major risk factor for the sporadic forms of AD. Several overlapping neurodegenerative mechanisms have been identified between AD and diabetes, including mitochondrial malfunction. This is not surprising taking into account that neurons are cells with a complex morphology, long lifespan, and high energetic requirements which make them particularly reliant on a properly organized and dynamic mitochondrial network to sustain neuronal function and integrity. In this sense, this chapter provides an overview on the role of mitochondrial bioenergetics and dynamics to the neurodegenerative events that occur in AD and diabetes, and how these organelles may represent a mechanistic link between these two pathologies. From a therapeutic perspective, it will be discussed how mitochondria can be targeted in order to efficaciously counteract neurodegeneration associated with AD and diabetes.

  12. Long-term administration of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate fails to attenuate age-related oxidative damage or rescue the loss of muscle mass and function associated with aging of skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Giorgos K; Pearson, Timothy; Lightfoot, Adam P; Nye, Gareth A; Wells, Nicola; Giakoumaki, Ifigeneia I; Griffiths, Richard D; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2016-11-01

    Age-related skeletal muscle dysfunction is the underlying cause of morbidity that affects up to half the population aged 80 and over. Considerable evidence indicates that oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction contribute to the sarcopenic phenotype that occurs with aging. To examine this, we administered the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant mitoquinone mesylate {[10-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-methyl-3,6-dioxo-1,4-cyclohexadien-1-yl)decyl] triphenylphosphonium; 100 μM} to wild-type C57BL/6 mice for 15 wk (from 24 to 28 mo of age) and investigated the effects on age-related loss of muscle mass and function, changes in redox homeostasis, and mitochondrial organelle integrity and function. We found that mitoquinone mesylate treatment failed to prevent age-dependent loss of skeletal muscle mass associated with myofiber atrophy or alter a variety of in situ and ex vivo muscle function analyses, including maximum isometric tetanic force, decline in force after a tetanic fatiguing protocol, and single-fiber-specific force. We also found evidence that long-term mitoquinone mesylate administration did not reduce mitochondrial reactive oxygen species or induce significant changes in muscle redox homeostasis, as assessed by changes in 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts, protein carbonyl content, protein nitration, and DNA damage determined by the content of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine. Mitochondrial membrane potential, abundance, and respiration assessed in permeabilized myofibers were not significantly altered in response to mitoquinone mesylate treatment. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that long-term mitochondria-targeted mitoquinone mesylate administration failed to attenuate age-related oxidative damage in skeletal muscle of old mice or provide any protective effect in the context of muscle aging.-Sakellariou, G. K., Pearson, T., Lightfoot, A. P., Nye, G. A., Wells, N., Giakoumaki, I. I., Griffiths, R. D., McArdle, A., Jackson, M. J. Long-term administration of the

  13. Biochemistry of Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Koc

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are energy source of cells. They have external and internal membranes, cristas and matrix. External membranes consist of specialized transport proteins. They have monoamine oxidase and citokrome-c reductase which both play role in KREBS cycle as catalyst and many enzymes which are necessary for phospholipid and phosphoric acid synthesis. Enzymes of electron transport chain and oxidative phosphorylation are located in the internal membranes. Also, here, there are transport systems for specific substances, such as ATP, ADP, P1, pyruvate, succinate, malate, citrate, and -ketoglutarate . Matrix; having gel-like consistency, contains a large number of enzymes. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(0.100: 1-13

  14. Enhanced oxidative capacity of ground squirrel brain mitochondria during hibernation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballinger, Mallory A; Schwartz, Christine; Andrews, Matthew T

    2017-03-01

    During hibernation, thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus) regularly cycle between bouts of torpor and interbout arousal (IBA). Most of the brain is electrically quiescent during torpor but regains activity quickly upon arousal to IBA, resulting in extreme oscillations in energy demand during hibernation. We predicted increased functional capacity of brain mitochondria during hibernation compared with spring to accommodate the variable energy demands of hibernation. To address this hypothesis, we examined mitochondrial bioenergetics in the ground squirrel brain across three time points: spring (SP), torpor (TOR), and IBA. Respiration rates of isolated brain mitochondria through complex I of the electron transport chain were more than twofold higher in TOR and IBA than in SP (P mitochondria compared with TOR and IBA (P mitochondria function more effectively during the hibernation season, allowing for rapid production of energy to meet demand when extreme physiological changes are occurring. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis Aj; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Mechanisms of mitochondria and autophagy crosstalk

    OpenAIRE

    Rambold, Angelika S; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular survival pathway that recycles intracellular components to compensate for nutrient depletion and ensures the appropriate degradation of organelles. Mitochondrial number and health are regulated by mitophagy, a process by which excessive or damaged mitochondria are subjected to autophagic degradation. Autophagy is thus a key determinant for mitochondrial health and proper cell function. Mitophagic malfunction has been recently proposed to contribute to progressive neuro...

  17. The FLIC Overlap Quark Propagator

    CERN Document Server

    Kamleh, W; Leinweber, D B; Williams, A G; Zhang, J; Kamleh, Waseem; Bowman, Patrick O.; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.; Zhang, Jianbo

    2004-01-01

    FLIC overlap fermions are a variant of the standard (Wilson) overlap action, with the FLIC (Fat Link Irrelevant Clover) action as the overlap kernel rather than the Wilson action. The structure of the FLIC overlap fermion propagator in momentum space is studied, and a comparison against previous studies of the Wilson overlap propagator in quenched QCD is performed. To explore the scaling properties of the propagator for the two actions, numerical calculations are performed in Landau Gauge across three lattices with different lattice spacing $a$ and similar physical volumes. We find that at light quark masses the acti ons agree in both the infrared and the ultraviolet, but at heavier masses some disagreement in the ultraviolet appears. This is attributed to the two action s having different discretisation errors with the FLIC overlap providing superior performance in this regime. Both actions scale reasonably, but some scaling violations are observed.

  18. A functional SNP catalog of overlapping miRNA-binding sites in genes implicated in prion disease and other neurodegenerative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, Reuben; Medina, Sarah J; Booth, Stephanie A

    2014-10-01

    The involvement of SNPs in miRNA target sites remains poorly investigated in neurodegenerative disease. In addition to associations with disease risk, such genetic variations can also provide novel insight into mechanistic pathways that may be responsible for disease etiology and/or pathobiology. To identify SNPs associated specifically with degenerating neurons, we restricted our analysis to genes that are dysregulated in CA1 hippocampal neurons of mice during early, preclinical phase of Prion disease. The 125 genes chosen are also implicated in other numerous degenerative and neurological diseases and disorders and are therefore likely to be of fundamental importance. We predicted those SNPs that could increase, decrease, or have neutral effects on miRNA binding. This group of genes was more likely to possess DNA variants than were genes chosen at random. Furthermore, many of the SNPs are common within the human population, and could contribute to the growing awareness that miRNAs and associated SNPs could account for detrimental neurological states. Interestingly, SNPs that overlapped miRNA-binding sites in the 3'-UTR of GABA-receptor subunit coding genes were particularly enriched. Moreover, we demonstrated that SNP rs9291296 would strengthen miR-26a-5p binding to a highly conserved site in the 3'-UTR of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor subunit alpha-4.

  19. The Role of Mitochondria in the Activation/Maintenance of SOCE: Store-Operated Ca(2+) Entry and Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spät, András; Szanda, Gergö

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria extensively modify virtually all cellular Ca(2+) transport processes, and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is no exception to this rule. The interaction between SOCE and mitochondria is complex and reciprocal, substantially altering and, ultimately, fine-tuning both capacitative Ca(2+) influx and mitochondrial function. Mitochondria, owing to their considerable Ca(2+) accumulation ability, extensively buffer the cytosolic Ca(2+) in their vicinity. In turn, the accumulated ion is released back into the neighboring cytosol during net Ca(2+) efflux. Since store depletion itself and the successive SOCE are both Ca(2+)-regulated phenomena, mitochondrial Ca(2+) handling may have wide-ranging effects on capacitative Ca(2+) influx at any given time. In addition, mitochondria may also produce or consume soluble factors known to affect store-operated channels. On the other hand, Ca(2+) entering the cell during SOCE is sensed by mitochondria, and the ensuing mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake boosts mitochondrial energy metabolism and, if Ca(2+) overload occurs, may even lead to apoptosis or cell death. In several cell types, mitochondria seem to be sterically excluded from the confined space that forms between the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) during SOCE. This implies that high-Ca(2+) microdomains comparable to those observed between the ER and mitochondria do not form here. In the following chapter, the above aspects of the many-sided SOCE-mitochondrion interplay will be discussed in greater detail.

  20. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondria Maintain Distinct Ca(2+) Pools in Cone Photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giarmarco, Michelle M; Cleghorn, Whitney M; Sloat, Stephanie R; Hurley, James B; Brockerhoff, Susan E

    2017-02-22

    Ca(2+) ions have distinct roles in the outer segment, cell body, and synaptic terminal of photoreceptors. We tested the hypothesis that distinct Ca(2+) domains are maintained by Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria. Serial block face scanning electron microscopy of zebrafish cones revealed that nearly 100 mitochondria cluster at the apical side of the inner segment, directly below the outer segment. The endoplasmic reticulum surrounds the basal and lateral surfaces of this cluster, but does not reach the apical surface or penetrate into the cluster. Using genetically encoded Ca(2+) sensors, we found that mitochondria take up Ca(2+) when it accumulates either in the cone cell body or outer segment. Blocking mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter activity compromises the ability of mitochondria to maintain distinct Ca(2+) domains. Together, our findings indicate that mitochondria can modulate subcellular functional specialization in photoreceptors.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Ca(2+) homeostasis is essential for the survival and function of retinal photoreceptors. Separate pools of Ca(2+) regulate phototransduction in the outer segment, metabolism in the cell body, and neurotransmitter release at the synaptic terminal. We investigated the role of mitochondria in compartmentalization of Ca(2+) We found that mitochondria form a dense cluster that acts as a diffusion barrier between the outer segment and cell body. The cluster is surprisingly only partially surrounded by the endoplasmic reticulum, a key mediator of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Blocking the uptake of Ca(2+) by mitochondria causes redistribution of Ca(2+) throughout the cell. Our results show that mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in photoreceptors is complex and plays an essential role in normal function. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/372061-12$15.00/0.

  2. A systems biology approach identifies a R2R3 MYB gene subfamily with distinct and overlapping functions in regulation of aliphatic glucosinolates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Elken Sønderby

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glucosinolates are natural metabolites in the order Brassicales that defend plants against both herbivores and pathogens and can attract specialized insects. Knowledge about the genes controlling glucosinolate regulation is limited. Here, we identify three R2R3 MYB transcription factors regulating aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis in Arabidopsis by combining several systems biology tools. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MYB28 was identified as a candidate regulator of aliphatic glucosinolates based on its co-localization within a genomic region controlling variation both in aliphatic glucosinolate content (metabolite QTL and in transcript level for genes involved in the biosynthesis of aliphatic glucosinolates (expression QTL, as well as its co-expression with genes in aliphatic glucosinolate biosynthesis. A phylogenetic analysis with the R2R3 motif of MYB28 showed that it and two homologues, MYB29 and MYB76, were members of an Arabidopsis-specific clade that included three characterized regulators of indole glucosinolates. Over-expression of the individual MYB genes showed that they all had the capacity to increase the production of aliphatic glucosinolates in leaves and seeds and induce gene expression of aliphatic biosynthetic genes within leaves. Analysis of leaves and seeds of single knockout mutants showed that mutants of MYB29 and MYB76 have reductions in only short-chained aliphatic glucosinolates whereas a mutant in MYB28 has reductions in both short- and long-chained aliphatic glucosinolates. Furthermore, analysis of a double knockout in MYB28 and MYB29 identified an emergent property of the system since the absence of aliphatic glucosinolates in these plants could not be predicted by the chemotype of the single knockouts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It seems that these cruciferous-specific MYB regulatory genes have evolved both overlapping and specific regulatory capacities. This provides a unique system within which to

  3. Pig Brain Mitochondria as a Biological Model for Study of Mitochondrial Respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišar, Z; Hroudová, J

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative phosphorylation is a key process of intracellular energy transfer by which mitochondria produce ATP. Isolated mitochondria serve as a biological model for understanding the mitochondrial respiration control, effects of various biologically active substances, and pathophysiology of mitochondrial diseases. The aim of our study was to evaluate pig brain mitochondria as a proper biological model for investigation of activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Oxygen consumption rates of isolated pig brain mitochondria were measured using high-resolution respirometry. Mitochondrial respiration of crude mitochondrial fraction, mitochondria purified in sucrose gradient, and mitochondria purified in Percoll gradient were assayed as a function of storage time. Oxygen flux and various mitochondrial respiratory control ratios were not changed within two days of mitochondria storage on ice. Leak respiration was found higher and Complex I-linked respiration lower in purified mitochondria compared to the crude mitochondrial fraction. Damage to both outer and inner mitochondrial membrane caused by the isolation procedure was the greatest after purification in a sucrose gradient. We confirmed that pig brain mitochondria can serve as a biological model for investigation of mitochondrial respiration. The advantage of this biological model is the stability of respiratory parameters for more than 48 h and the possibility to isolate large amounts of mitochondria from specific brain areas without the need to kill laboratory animals. We suggest the use of high-resolution respirometry of pig brain mitochondria for research of the neuroprotective effects and/or mitochondrial toxicity of new medical drugs.

  4. Tyrosine phosphatases epsilon and alpha perform specific and overlapping functions in regulation of voltage-gated potassium channels in Schwann cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiran, Zohar; Peretz, Asher; Sines, Tal

    2006-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs) epsilon and alpha are closely related and share several molecular functions, such as regulation of Src family kinases and voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channels. Functional interrelationships between PTPepsilon and PTPalpha and the mechanisms by which they regulate K...... but are not fully redundant. We conclude that PTPepsilon and PTPalpha differ significantly in their regulation of Kv channels and Src in the system examined and that similarity between PTPs does not necessarily result in full functional redundancy in vivo....

  5. The curious case of vanishing mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Karnkowska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to their involvement in the energy metabolism, mitochondria are essential for most eukaryotic cells. Microbial eukaryotes living in low oxygen environments possess reduced forms of mitochondria, namely mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs. These do not produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation on their membranes and some do not produce ATP at all. Still, they are indispensable because of other essential functions such as iron-sulphur (Fe-S cluster assembly. Recently, the first microbial eukaryote with neither mitochondrion nor MRO was characterized – Monocercomonoides sp. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of Monocercomonoides revealed that it lacks all hallmark mitochondrial proteins. Crucially, the essential mitochondrial pathway for the Fe-S cluster assembly (ISC was replaced by a bacterial sulphur mobilization (SUF system. The discovery of such bona fide amitochondriate eukaryote broadens our knowledge about the diversity and plasticity of eukaryotic cells and provides a substantial contribution to our understanding of eukaryotic cell evolution.

  6. The curious case of vanishing mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnkowska, Anna; Hampl, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Due to their involvement in the energy metabolism, mitochondria are essential for most eukaryotic cells. Microbial eukaryotes living in low oxygen environments possess reduced forms of mitochondria, namely mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs). These do not produce ATP by oxidative phosphorylation on their membranes and some do not produce ATP at all. Still, they are indispensable because of other essential functions such as iron-sulphur (Fe-S) cluster assembly. Recently, the first microbial eukaryote with neither mitochondrion nor MRO was characterized - Monocercomonoides sp. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of Monocercomonoides revealed that it lacks all hallmark mitochondrial proteins. Crucially, the essential mitochondrial pathway for the Fe-S cluster assembly (ISC) was replaced by a bacterial sulphur mobilization (SUF) system. The discovery of such bona fide amitochondriate eukaryote broadens our knowledge about the diversity and plasticity of eukaryotic cells and provides a substantial contribution to our understanding of eukaryotic cell evolution. PMID:28357316

  7. Role of mitochondria in parvovirus pathology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonna Nykky

    Full Text Available Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. During viral entry a transient depolarization of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increase in ROS level was detected. Subsequently, mitochondrial homeostasis was normalized shortly, as detected by repolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and decrease of ROS. Indeed, activation of cell survival signalling through ERK1/2 cascade was observed early in CPV infected cells. At 12 hours post infection, concurrent with the expression of viral non-structural protein 1, damage to the mitochondrial structure and depolarization of its membrane were apparent. Results of this study provide additional insight of parvovirus pathology and also more general information of virus-mitochondria association.

  8. Respiratory chain supercomplexes in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eubel, Holger; Heinemeyer, Jesco; Sunderhaus, Stephanie; Braun, Hans-Peter

    2004-12-01

    Supercomplexes are defined associations of protein complexes, which are important for several cellular functions. This "quintenary" organization level of protein structure recently was also described for the respiratory chain of plant mitochondria. Except succinate dehydrogenase (complex II), all complexes of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPOS) system (complexes I, III, IV and V) were found to form part of supercomplexes. Compositions of these supramolecular structures were systematically investigated using digitonin solubilizations of mitochondrial fractions and two-dimensional Blue-native (BN) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The most abundant supercomplex of plant mitochondria includes complexes I and III at a 1:2 ratio (I1 + III2 supercomplex). Furthermore, some supercomplexes of lower abundance could be described, which have I2 + III4, V2, III2 + IV(1-2), and I1 + III2 + IV(1-4) compositions. Supercomplexes consisting of complexes I plus III plus IV were proposed to be called "respirasome", because they autonomously can carry out respiration in the presence of ubiquinone and cytochrome c. Plant specific alternative oxidoreductases of the respiratory chain were not associated with supercomplexes under all experimental conditions tested. However, formation of supercomplexes possibly indirectly regulates alternative respiratory pathways in plant mitochondria on the basis of electron channeling. In this review, procedures to characterize the supermolecular organization of the plant respiratory chain and results concerning supercomplex structure and function are summarized and discussed.

  9. A cannabinoid link between mitochondria and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert-Chatelain, Etienne; Desprez, Tifany; Serrat, Román; Bellocchio, Luigi; Soria-Gomez, Edgar; Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Pagano Zottola, Antonio Christian; Delamarre, Anna; Cannich, Astrid; Vincent, Peggy; Varilh, Marjorie; Robin, Laurie M; Terral, Geoffrey; García-Fernández, M Dolores; Colavita, Michelangelo; Mazier, Wilfrid; Drago, Filippo; Puente, Nagore; Reguero, Leire; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Dupuy, Jean-William; Cota, Daniela; Lopez-Rodriguez, Maria-Luz; Barreda-Gómez, Gabriel; Massa, Federico; Grandes, Pedro; Bénard, Giovanni; Marsicano, Giovanni

    2016-11-24

    Cellular activity in the brain depends on the high energetic support provided by mitochondria, the cell organelles which use energy sources to generate ATP. Acute cannabinoid intoxication induces amnesia in humans and animals, and the activation of type-1 cannabinoid receptors present at brain mitochondria membranes (mtCB1) can directly alter mitochondrial energetic activity. Although the pathological impact of chronic mitochondrial dysfunctions in the brain is well established, the involvement of acute modulation of mitochondrial activity in high brain functions, including learning and memory, is unknown. Here, we show that acute cannabinoid-induced memory impairment in mice requires activation of hippocampal mtCB1 receptors. Genetic exclusion of CB1 receptors from hippocampal mitochondria prevents cannabinoid-induced reduction of mitochondrial mobility, synaptic transmission and memory formation. mtCB1 receptors signal through intra-mitochondrial Gαi protein activation and consequent inhibition of soluble-adenylyl cyclase (sAC). The resulting inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent phosphorylation of specific subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport system eventually leads to decreased cellular respiration. Hippocampal inhibition of sAC activity or manipulation of intra-mitochondrial PKA signalling or phosphorylation of the Complex I subunit NDUFS2 inhibit bioenergetic and amnesic effects of cannabinoids. Thus, the G protein-coupled mtCB1 receptors regulate memory processes via modulation of mitochondrial energy metabolism. By directly linking mitochondrial activity to memory formation, these data reveal that bioenergetic processes are primary acute regulators of cognitive functions.

  10. Role of mitochondria in parvovirus pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nykky, Jonna; Vuento, Matti; Gilbert, Leona

    2014-01-01

    Proper functioning of the mitochondria is crucial for the survival of the cell. Viruses are able to interfere with mitochondrial functions as they infect the host cell. Parvoviruses are known to induce apoptosis in infected cells, but the role of the mitochondria in parvovirus induced cytopathy is only partially known. Here we demonstrate with confocal and electron microscopy that canine parvovirus (CPV) associated with the mitochondrial outer membrane from the onset of infection. During viral entry a transient depolarization of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and increase in ROS level was detected. Subsequently, mitochondrial homeostasis was normalized shortly, as detected by repolarization of the mitochondrial membrane and decrease of ROS. Indeed, activation of cell survival signalling through ERK1/2 cascade was observed early in CPV infected cells. At 12 hours post infection, concurrent with the expression of viral non-structural protein 1, damage to the mitochondrial structure and depolarization of its membrane were apparent. Results of this study provide additional insight of parvovirus pathology and also more general information of virus-mitochondria association.

  11. Topological susceptibility from overlap fermion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    应和平; 张剑波

    2003-01-01

    We numerically calculate the topological charge of the gauge configurations on a finite lattice by the fermionic method with overlap fermions. By using the lattice index theorem, we identify the index of the massless overlap fermion operator to the topological charge of the background gauge configuration. The resulting topological susceptibility X is in good agreement with the anticipation made by Witten and Veneziano.

  12. The functional transfer of genes from the mitochondria to the nucleus: the effects of selection, mutation, population size and rate of self-fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandvain, Yaniv; Wade, Michael J

    2009-08-01

    The transfer of mitochondrial genes to the nucleus is a recurrent and consistent feature of eukaryotic genome evolution. Although many theories have been proposed to explain such transfers, little relevant data exist. The observation that clonal and self-fertilizing plants transfer more mitochondrial genes to their nuclei than do outcrossing plants contradicts predictions of major theories based on nuclear recombination and leaves a gap in our conceptual understanding how the observed pattern of gene transfer could arise. Here, with a series of deterministic and stochastic simulations, we show how epistatic selection and relative mutation rates of mitochondrial and nuclear genes influence mitochondrial-to-nuclear gene transfer. Specifically, we show that when there is a benefit to having a mitochondrial gene present in the nucleus, but absent in the mitochondria, self-fertilization dramatically increases both the rate and the probability of gene transfer. However, absent such a benefit, when mitochondrial mutation rates exceed those of the nucleus, self-fertilization decreases the rate and probability of transfer. This latter effect, however, is much weaker than the former. Our results are relevant to understanding the probabilities of fixation when loci in different genomes interact.

  13. Lipid Transport between the Endoplasmic Reticulum and Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flis, Vid V.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are partially autonomous organelles that depend on the import of certain proteins and lipids to maintain cell survival and membrane formation. Although phosphatidylglycerol, cardiolipin, and phosphatidylethanolamine are synthesized by mitochondrial enzymes, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and sterols need to be imported from other organelles. The origin of most lipids imported into mitochondria is the endoplasmic reticulum, which requires interaction of these two subcellular compartments. Recently, protein complexes that are involved in membrane contact between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria were identified, but their role in lipid transport is still unclear. In the present review, we describe components involved in lipid translocation between the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria and discuss functional as well as regulatory aspects that are important for lipid homeostasis. PMID:23732475

  14. "Respirasome"-like supercomplexes in green leaf mitochondria of spinach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Frank; Reifschneider, Nicole H; Vocke, Dirk; Seelert, Holger; Rexroth, Sascha; Dencher, Norbert A

    2004-11-12

    Higher plant mitochondria have many unique features compared with their animal and fungal counterparts. This is to a large extent related to the close functional interdependence of mitochondria and chloroplasts, in which the two ATP-generating processes of oxidative phosphorylation and photosynthesis, respectively, take place. We show that digitonin treatment of mitochondria contaminated with chloroplasts from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) green leaves at two different buffer conditions, performed to solubilize oxidative phosphorylation supercomplexes, selectively extracts the mitochondrial membrane protein complexes and only low amounts of stroma thylakoid membrane proteins. By analysis of digitonin extracts from partially purified mitochondria of green leaves from spinach using blue and colorless native electrophoresis, we demonstrate for the first time that in green plant tissue a substantial proportion of the respiratory complex IV is assembled with complexes I and III into "respirasome"-like supercomplexes, previously observed in mammalian, fungal, and non-green plant mitochondria only. Thus, fundamental features of the supramolecular organization of the standard respiratory complexes I, III, and IV as a respirasome are conserved in all higher eukaryotes. Because the plant respiratory chain is highly branched possessing additional alternative enzymes, the functional implications of the occurrence of respiratory supercomplexes in plant mitochondria are discussed.

  15. Mitochondria are not captive bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harish, Ajith; Kurland, Charles G

    2017-12-07

    Lynn Sagan's conjecture (1967) that three of the fundamental organelles observed in eukaryote cells, specifically mitochondria, plastids and flagella were once free-living primitive (prokaryotic) cells was accepted after considerable opposition. Even though the idea was swiftly refuted for the specific case of origins of flagella in eukaryotes, the symbiosis model in general was accepted for decades as a realistic hypothesis to describe the endosymbiotic origins of eukaryotes. However, a systematic analysis of the origins of the mitochondrial proteome based on empirical genome evolution models now indicates that 97% of modern mitochondrial protein domains as well their homologues in bacteria and archaea were present in the universal common ancestor (UCA) of the modern tree of life (ToL). These protein domains are universal modular building blocks of modern genes and genomes, each of which is identified by a unique tertiary structure and a specific biochemical function as well as a characteristic sequence profile. Further, phylogeny reconstructed from genome-scale evolution models reveals that Eukaryotes and Akaryotes (archaea and bacteria) descend independently from UCA. That is to say, Eukaryotes and Akaryotes are both primordial lineages that evolved in parallel. Finally, there is no indication of massive inter-lineage exchange of coding sequences during the descent of the two lineages. Accordingly, we suggest that the evolution of the mitochondrial proteome was autogenic (endogenic) and not endosymbiotic (exogenic). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Connecting Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Stem Cell Fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanet, Anaïs; Arnould, Thierry; Najimi, Mustapha; Renard, Patricia

    2015-09-01

    As sites of cellular respiration and energy production, mitochondria play a central role in cell metabolism. Cell differentiation is associated with an increase in mitochondrial content and activity and with a metabolic shift toward increased oxidative phosphorylation activity. The opposite occurs during reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells. Studies have provided evidence of mitochondrial and metabolic changes during the differentiation of both embryonic and somatic (or adult) stem cells (SSCs), such as hematopoietic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and tissue-specific progenitor cells. We thus propose to consider those mitochondrial and metabolic changes as hallmarks of differentiation processes. We review how mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and function are directly involved in embryonic and SSC differentiation and how metabolic and sensing pathways connect mitochondria and metabolism with cell fate and pluripotency. Understanding the basis of the crosstalk between mitochondria and cell fate is of critical importance, given the promising application of stem cells in regenerative medicine. In addition to the development of novel strategies to improve the in vitro lineage-directed differentiation of stem cells, understanding the molecular basis of this interplay could lead to the identification of novel targets to improve the treatment of degenerative diseases.

  17. Biology of Mitochondria in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Lee J.

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) are the most common human adult-onset neurodegenerative diseases. They are characterized by prominent age-related neurodegeneration in selectively vulnerable neural systems. Some forms of AD, PD, and ALS are inherited, and genes causing these diseases have been identified. Nevertheless, the mechanisms of the neuronal degeneration in these familial diseases, and in the more common idiopathic (sporadic) diseases, are unresolved. Genetic, biochemical, and morphological analyses of human AD, PD, and ALS, as well as their cell and animal models, reveal that mitochondria could have roles in this neurodegeneration. The varied functions and properties of mitochondria might render subsets of selectively vulnerable neurons intrinsically susceptible to cellular aging and stress and the overlying genetic variations. In AD, alterations in enzymes involved in oxidative phosphorylation, oxidative damage, and mitochondrial binding of Aβ and amyloid precursor protein have been reported. In PD, mutations in mitochondrial proteins have been identified and mitochondrial DNA mutations have been found in neurons in the substantia nigra. In ALS, changes occur in mitochondrial respiratory chain enzymes and mitochondrial programmed cell death proteins. Transgenic mouse models of human neurodegenerative disease are beginning to reveal possible principles governing the biology of selective neuronal vulnerability that implicate mitochondria and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore. This chapter reviews several aspects of mitochondrial biology and how mitochondrial pathobiology might contribute to the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in AD, PD, and ALS. PMID:22482456

  18. Assuming the role of mitochondria in mycobacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Rikesh K

    2016-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the leading causes of death by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) affecting millions of people worldwide. Mycobacterium species enter host macrophages during infection and target various cellular organelles and their function for their own benefit. Mitochondria appear to be among the important targets for bacterial pathogens. Mtb and other pathogenic bacteria secrete various proteins that initiate structural changes in mitochondria to modulate its function. Additionally, virulent mycobacteria interfere with the balance between pro- and anti-apoptotic factors to inhibit apoptosis and, in later stages, promote necrosis. Furthermore, mitochondria perform multiple biological functions in the cell, and the inhibition of these functions by bacterial proteins promotes Mtb survival, growth, and successful infection. Copyright © 2016 Asian-African Society for Mycobacteriology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arabidopsis mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases MKK1 and MKK2 have overlapping functions in defense signaling mediated by MEKK1, MPK4, and MKS1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiu, Jin-Long; Zhou, Lu; Yun, Byung-Wook

    2008-01-01

    The Arabidopsis thaliana MKK1 and MKK2 MAP kinase kinases have been implicated in biotic and abiotic stress responses as part of a signalling cascade including MEKK1 and MPK4. Here, the double loss-of-function mutant (mkk1/2) of MKK1 and MKK2 is shown to have marked phenotypes in development...

  20. Mitochondria localization and dimerization are required for CIDE-B to induce apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z; Guo, K; Toh, S Y; Zhou, Z; Li, P

    2000-07-28

    Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE)-B is a member of the novel family of apoptosis-inducing factors that share homology with the N-terminal region of DFF, the DNA fragmentation factor. The molecular mechanism of CIDE-B-induced apoptosis is unclear. We have shown here that CIDE-B protein is localized in mitochondria and forms homodimers and heterodimers with other family members. Serial deletion analyses suggest that the mitochondria localization signal and dimerization interface are overlapped and localized to the 30 amino acid residues at the C-terminal region of CIDE-B. Mitochondria localization and dimerization are both required for CIDE-B-induced apoptosis. Our study has thus revealed a mechanism for CIDE-B-induced apoptosis by localization to mitochondria and the formation of a high affinity homo- or heterodimeric complex.

  1. Depletion of mitochondria in mammalian cells through enforced mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Melo, Clara; Ichim, Gabriel; Tait, Stephen W G; Passos, João F

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are not only the 'powerhouse' of the cell; they are also involved in a multitude of processes that include calcium storage, the cell cycle and cell death. Traditional means of investigating mitochondrial importance in a given cellular process have centered upon depletion of mtDNA through chemical or genetic means. Although these methods severely disrupt the mitochondrial electron transport chain, mtDNA-depleted cells still maintain mitochondria and many mitochondrial functions. Here we describe a straightforward protocol to generate mammalian cell populations with low to nondetectable levels of mitochondria. Ectopic expression of the ubiquitin E3 ligase Parkin, combined with short-term mitochondrial uncoupler treatment, stimulates widespread mitophagy and effectively eliminates mitochondria. In this protocol, we explain how to generate Parkin-expressing, mitochondria-depleted cells from scratch in 23 d, as well as offer a variety of methods for confirming mitochondrial clearance. Furthermore, we describe culture conditions to maintain mitochondrial-depleted cells for up to 30 d with minimal loss of viability, for longitudinal studies. This method should prove useful for investigating the importance of mitochondria in a variety of biological processes.

  2. On the Neuberger overlap operator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriçi, Artan

    1999-04-01

    We compute Neuberger's overlap operator by the Lanczos algorithm applied to the Wilson-Dirac operator. Locality of the operator for quenched QCD data and its eigenvalue spectrum in an instanton background are studied.

  3. Overlaps of Partial Neel States and Bethe States

    CERN Document Server

    Foda, O

    2015-01-01

    Partial Neel states are generalizations of the ordinary Neel (classical anti-ferromagnet) state that can have arbitrary integer spin. We study overlaps of these states with Bethe states. We first identify this overlap with a partial version of reflecting-boundary domain-wall partition function, and then derive various determinant representations for off-shell and on-shell Bethe states.

  4. Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans negatively regulate the positioning of mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum to distal axons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainath, Rajiv; Armijo-Weingart, Lorena; Ketscheck, Andrea; Xu, Zhuxuan; Li, Shuxin; Gallo, Gianluca

    2017-09-13

    Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are components of the extracellular matrix that inhibit the extension and regeneration of axons. However, the underlying mechanism of action remains poorly understood. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are functionally inter-linked organelles important to axon development and maintenance. We report that CSPGs impair the targeting of mitochondria and ER to the growth cones of chicken embryonic sensory axons. The effect of CSPGs on the targeting of mitochondria is blocked by inhibition of the LAR receptor for CSPGs. The regulation of the targeting of mitochondria and ER to the growth cone by CSPGs is due to attenuation of PI3K signaling, which is known to be downstream of LAR receptor activation. Dynactin is a required component of the dynein motor complex that drives the normally occurring retrograde evacuation of mitochondria from growth cones. CSPGs elevate the levels of p150(Glu) dynactin found in distal axons, and inhibition of the interaction of dynactin with dynein increased axon lengths on CSPGs. CSPGs decreased the membrane potential of mitochondria, and pharmacological inhibition of mitochondria respiration at the growth cone independent of manipulation of mitochondria positioning impaired axon extension. Combined inhibition of dynactin and potentiation of mitochondria respiration further increased axon lengths on CSPGs relative to inhibition of dynactin alone. These data reveal that the regulation of the localization of mitochondria and ER to growth cones is a previously unappreciated aspect of the effects of CSPGs on embryonic axons. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantitative Proteomics of Synaptic and Nonsynaptic Mitochondria: Insights for Synaptic Mitochondrial Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage. PMID:24708184

  6. Sulfide detoxification in plant mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke, Hannah; Hildebrandt, Tatjana M; Wirtz, Markus; Hell, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to animals, which release the signal molecule sulfide in small amounts from cysteine and its derivates, phototrophic eukaryotes generate sulfide as an essential intermediate of the sulfur assimilation pathway. Additionally, iron-sulfur cluster turnover and cyanide detoxification might contribute to the release of sulfide in mitochondria. However, sulfide is a potent inhibitor of cytochrome c oxidase in mitochondria. Thus, efficient sulfide detoxification mechanisms are required in mitochondria to ensure adequate energy production and consequently survival of the plant cell. Two enzymes have been recently described to catalyze sulfide detoxification in mitochondria of Arabidopsis thaliana, O-acetylserine(thiol)lyase C (OAS-TL C), and the sulfur dioxygenase (SDO) ethylmalonic encephalopathy protein 1 (ETHE1). Biochemical characterization of sulfide producing and consuming enzymes in mitochondria of plants is fundamental to understand the regulatory network that enables mitochondrial sulfide homeostasis under nonstressed and stressed conditions. In this chapter, we provide established protocols to determine the activity of the sulfide releasing enzyme β-cyanoalanine synthase as well as sulfide-consuming enzymes OAS-TL and SDO. Additionally, we describe a reliable and efficient method to purify OAS-TL proteins from plant material.

  7. Movement and structure of mitochondria in oligodendrocytes and their myelin sheaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinholm, Johanne E; Vervaeke, Koen; Tadross, Michael R; Tkachuk, Ariana N; Kopek, Benjamin G; Brown, Timothy A; Bergersen, Linda H; Clayton, David A

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondria play several crucial roles in the life of oligodendrocytes. During development of the myelin sheath they are essential providers of carbon skeletons and energy for lipid synthesis. During normal brain function their consumption of pyruvate will be a key determinant of how much lactate is available for oligodendrocytes to export to power axonal function. Finally, during calcium-overload induced pathology, as occurs in ischemia, mitochondria may buffer calcium or induce apoptosis. Despite their important functions, very little is known of the properties of oligodendrocyte mitochondria, and mitochondria have never been observed in the myelin sheaths. We have now used targeted expression of fluorescent mitochondrial markers to characterize the location and movement of mitochondria within oligodendrocytes. We show for the first time that mitochondria are able to enter and move within the myelin sheath. Within the myelin sheath the highest number of mitochondria was in the cytoplasmic ridges along the sheath. Mitochondria moved more slowly than in neurons and, in contrast to their behavior in neurons and astrocytes, their movement was increased rather than inhibited by glutamate activating NMDA receptors. By electron microscopy we show that myelin sheath mitochondria have a low surface area of cristae, which suggests a low ATP production. These data specify fundamental properties of the oxidative phosphorylation system in oligodendrocytes, the glial cells that enhance cognition by speeding action potential propagation and provide metabolic support to axons. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Plasma Inflammatory Cytokine IL-4, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-α Levels Correlate with Pulmonary Function in Patients with Asthma-Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Overlap Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ai-Xia; Lu, Li-Wen; Liu, Wen-Juan; Huang, Mao

    2016-08-09

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to investigate the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and their correlations with pulmonary function in patients with asthma-chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap syndrome (ACOS). MATERIAL AND METHODS Between January 2013 and December 2014, a total of 96 patients with asthma, acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD), or ACOS were enrolled, and 35 healthy people were included as a control group. Fasting plasma interleukin (IL)-4, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Correlations between the plasma inflammatory cytokine levels and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/predicted value ratio (FEV1%pred), and FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) were analyzed. RESULTS IL-4 and IL-8 levels showed statistically significant differences among the 3 groups of patients (both PCOPD, and ACOS.

  9. SWR1 Chromatin-Remodeling Complex Subunits and H2A.Z Have Non-overlapping Functions in Immunity and Gene Regulation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berriri, Souha; Gangappa, Sreeramaiah N; Kumar, S Vinod

    2016-07-06

    Incorporation of the histone variant H2A.Z into nucleosomes by the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex is a critical step in eukaryotic gene regulation. In Arabidopsis, SWR1c and H2A.Z have been shown to control gene expression underlying development and environmental responses. Although they have been implicated in defense, the specific roles of the complex subunits and H2A.Z in immunity are not well understood. In this study, we analyzed the roles of the SWR1c subunits, PHOTOPERIOD-INDEPENDENT EARLY FLOWERING1 (PIE1), ACTIN-RELATED PROTEIN6 (ARP6), and SWR1 COMPLEX 6 (SWC6), as well as H2A.Z, in defense and gene regulation. We found that SWR1c components play different roles in resistance to different pathogens. Loss of PIE1 and SWC6 function as well as depletion of H2A.Z led to reduced basal resistance, while loss of ARP6 fucntion resulted in enhanced resistance. We found that mutations in PIE1 and SWC6 resulted in impaired effector-triggered immunity. Mutation in SWR1c components and H2A.Z also resulted in compromised jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated immunity. Genome-wide expression analyses similarly reveal distinct roles for H2A.Z and SWR1c components in gene regulation, and suggest a potential role for PIE1 in the regulation of the cross talk between defense signaling pathways. Our data show that although they are part of the same complex, Arabidopsis SWR1c components could have non-redundant functions in plant immunity and gene regulation.

  10. Ground control to major TOM: mitochondria-nucleus communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg-Bord, Michal; Schuldiner, Maya

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria have crucial functions in the cell, including ATP generation, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, nucleotide biosynthesis, and amino acid metabolism. All of these functions require tight regulation on mitochondrial activity and homeostasis. As mitochondria biogenesis is controlled by the nucleus and almost all mitochondrial proteins are encoded by nuclear genes, a tight communication network between mitochondria and the nucleus has evolved, which includes signaling cascades, proteins which are dual-localized to the two compartments, and sensing of mitochondrial products by nuclear proteins. All of these enable a crosstalk between mitochondria and the nucleus that allows the 'ground control' to get information on mitochondria's status. Such information facilitates the creation of a cellular balance of mitochondrial status with energetic needs. This communication also allows a transcriptional response in case mitochondrial function is impaired aimed to restore mitochondrial homeostasis. As mitochondrial dysfunction is related to a growing number of genetic diseases as well as neurodegenerative conditions and aging, elucidating the mechanisms governing the mitochondrial/nuclear communication should progress a better understanding of mitochondrial dysfunctions. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. Multiple deletions in the polyketide synthase gene repertoire of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveal functional overlap of cell envelope lipids in host-pathogen interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passemar, Charlotte; Arbués, Ainhoa; Malaga, Wladimir; Mercier, Ingrid; Moreau, Flavie; Lepourry, Laurence; Neyrolles, Olivier; Guilhot, Christophe; Astarie-Dequeker, Catherine

    2014-02-01

    Several specific lipids of the cell envelope are implicated in the pathogenesis of M. tuberculosis (Mtb), including phthiocerol dimycocerosates (DIM) that have clearly been identified as virulence factors. Others, such as trehalose-derived lipids, sulfolipids (SL), diacyltrehaloses (DAT) and polyacyltrehaloses (PAT), are believed to be essential for Mtb virulence, but the details of their role remain unclear. We therefore investigated the respective contribution of DIM, DAT/PAT and SL to tuberculosis by studying a collection of mutants, each with impaired production of one or several lipids. We confirmed that among those with a single lipid deficiency, only strains lacking DIM were affected in their replication in lungs and spleen of mice in comparison to the WT Mtb strain. We found also that the additional loss of DAT/PAT, and to a lesser extent of SL, increased the attenuated phenotype of the DIM-less mutant. Importantly, the loss of DAT/PAT and SL in a DIM-less background also affected Mtb growth in human monocyte-derived macrophages (hMDMs). Fluorescence microscopy revealed that mutants lacking DIM or DAT/PAT were localized in an acid compartment and that bafilomycin A1, an inhibitor of phagosome acidification, rescued the growth defect of these mutants. These findings provide evidence for DIM being dominant virulence factors that mask the functions of lipids of other families, notably DAT/PAT and to a lesser extent of SL, which we showed for the first time to contribute to Mtb virulence.

  12. Inflorescence meristem identity in rice is specified by overlapping functions of three AP1/FUL-like MADS box genes and PAP2, a SEPALLATA MADS box gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kaoru; Yasuno, Naoko; Sato, Yutaka; Yoda, Masahiro; Yamazaki, Ryo; Kimizu, Mayumi; Yoshida, Hitoshi; Nagamura, Yoshiaki; Kyozuka, Junko

    2012-05-01

    In plants, the transition to reproductive growth is of particular importance for successful seed production. Transformation of the shoot apical meristem (SAM) to the inflorescence meristem (IM) is the crucial first step in this transition. Using laser microdissection and microarrays, we found that expression of PANICLE PHYTOMER2 (PAP2) and three APETALA1 (AP1)/FRUITFULL (FUL)-like genes (MADS14, MADS15, and MADS18) is induced in the SAM during meristem phase transition in rice (Oryza sativa). PAP2 is a MADS box gene belonging to a grass-specific subclade of the SEPALLATA subfamily. Suppression of these three AP1/FUL-like genes by RNA interference caused a slight delay in reproductive transition. Further depletion of PAP2 function from these triple knockdown plants inhibited the transition of the meristem to the IM. In the quadruple knockdown lines, the meristem continued to generate leaves, rather than becoming an IM. Consequently, multiple shoots were formed instead of an inflorescence. PAP2 physically interacts with MAD14 and MADS15 in vivo. Furthermore, the precocious flowering phenotype caused by the overexpression of Hd3a, a rice florigen gene, was weakened in pap2-1 mutants. Based on these results, we propose that PAP2 and the three AP1/FUL-like genes coordinately act in the meristem to specify the identity of the IM downstream of the florigen signal.

  13. MITOCHONDRIA QUALITY CONTROL AND MUSCLE MASS MAINTENANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina eRomanello

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Loss of muscle mass and force occurs in many diseases such as disuse/inactivity, diabetes, cancer, renal and cardiac failure and in aging-sarcopenia. In these catabolic conditions the mitochondrial content, morphology and function are greatly affected. The changes of mitochondrial network influence the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS that play an important role in muscle function. Moreover, dysfunctional mitochondria trigger catabolic signaling pathways which feed-forward to the nucleus to promote the activation of muscle atrophy. Exercise, on the other hand, improves mitochondrial function by activating mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy, possibly playing an important part in the beneficial effects of physical activity in several diseases. Optimised mitochondrial function is strictly maintained by the coordinated activation of different mitochondrial quality control pathways. In this review we outline the current knowledge linking mitochondria-dependent signaling pathways to muscle homeostasis in aging and disease and the resulting implications for the development of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent muscle loss.

  14. Overlap Quark Propagator in Coulomb Gauge QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Mercado, Ydalia Delgado; Schröck, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The chirally symmetric Overlap quark propagator is explored in Coulomb gauge. This gauge is well suited for studying the relation between confinement and chiral symmetry breaking, since confinement can be attributed to the infrared divergent Lorentz-vector dressing function. Using quenched gauge field configurations on a $20^4$ lattice, the quark propagator dressing functions are evaluated, the dynamical quark mass is extracted and the chiral limit of these quantities is discussed. By removing the low-lying modes of the Dirac operator, chiral symmetry is artificially restored. Its effect on the dressing functions is discussed.

  15. Paragonimus westermani possesses aerobic and anaerobic mitochondria in different tissues, adapting to fluctuating oxygen tension in microaerobic habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamiya, Shinzaburo; Fukuda, Koich; Nakamura, Takeshi; Aoki, Takashi; Sugiyama, Hiromu

    2010-12-01

    We previously showed that adult Paragonimus westermani, the causative agent of paragonimiasis and whose habitat is the host lung, possesses both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chains, i.e., cyanide-sensitive succinate oxidase and NADH-fumarate reductase systems, in isolated mitochondria (Takamiya et al., 1994). This finding raises the intriguing question as to whether adult Paragonimus worms possess two different populations of mitochondria, one having an aerobic succinate oxidase system and the other an anaerobic fumarate reductase system, or whether the worms possess a single population of mitochondria possessing both respiratory chains (i.e., mixed-functional mitochondria). Staining of trematode tissues for cytochrome c oxidase activity showed three types of mitochondrial populations: small, strongly stained mitochondria with many cristae, localised in the tegument and tegumental cells; and two larger parenchymal cell mitochondria, one with developed cristae and the other with few cristae. The tegumental and parenchymal mitochondria could be separated by isopycnic density-gradient centrifugation and showed different morphological characteristics and respiratory activities, with low-density tegumental mitochondria having cytochrome c oxidase activity and high-density parenchymal mitochondria having fumarate reductase activity. These results indicate that Paragonimus worms possess three different populations of mitochondria, which are distributed throughout trematode tissues and function facultatively, rather than having mixed-functional mitochondria.

  16. New nanocomposites for SERS studies of living cells and mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarycheva, A. S.; Brazhe, N. A.; Baizhumanov, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    molecules. The SERS spectra of functional mitochondria are sensitive to the activity of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, thus making the method a novel label-free approach to monitor the redox state and conformation of cytochromes in their natural cell environment. The developed nanocomposites......A great enhancement in Raman scattering (SERS) from heme-containing submembrane biomolecules inside intact erythrocytes and functional mitochondria is demonstrated for the first time using silver–silica beads prepared using a new method involving aerosol pyrolysis with aqueous diamminesilver...

  17. A conserved endoplasmic reticulum membrane protein complex (EMC) facilitates phospholipid transfer from the ER to mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sujoy; Chao, Jesse T; Tavassoli, Shabnam; Wong, Andrew K O; Choudhary, Vineet; Young, Barry P; Loewen, Christopher J R; Prinz, William A

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS) transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER-mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER-mitochondria encounter structure) are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER-mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth.

  18. A Conserved Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Protein Complex (EMC) Facilitates Phospholipid Transfer from the ER to Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Shabnam; Wong, Andrew K. O.; Choudhary, Vineet; Young, Barry P.; Loewen, Christopher J. R.; Prinz, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial membrane biogenesis and lipid metabolism require phospholipid transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Transfer is thought to occur at regions of close contact of these organelles and to be nonvesicular, but the mechanism is not known. Here we used a novel genetic screen in S. cerevisiae to identify mutants with defects in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria. We show that a strain missing multiple components of the conserved ER membrane protein complex (EMC) has decreased phosphatidylserine (PS) transfer from the ER to mitochondria. Mitochondria from this strain have significantly reduced levels of PS and its derivative phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Cells lacking EMC proteins and the ER–mitochondria tethering complex called ERMES (the ER–mitochondria encounter structure) are inviable, suggesting that the EMC also functions as a tether. These defects are corrected by expression of an engineered ER–mitochondrial tethering protein that artificially tethers the ER to mitochondria. EMC mutants have a significant reduction in the amount of ER tethered to mitochondria even though ERMES remained intact in these mutants, suggesting that the EMC performs an additional tethering function to ERMES. We find that all Emc proteins interact with the mitochondrial translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) complex protein Tom5 and this interaction is important for PS transfer and cell growth, suggesting that the EMC forms a tether by associating with the TOM complex. Together, our findings support that the EMC tethers ER to mitochondria, which is required for phospholipid synthesis and cell growth. PMID:25313861

  19. Mitochondria in response to nutrients and nutrient-sensitive pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltzer, Claudia; Tiefenböck, Stefanie K; Frei, Christian

    2010-11-01

    Mitochondria are abundant cellular organelles, and are required for the generation of energy through oxidative catabolism. Equally important, mitochondria also provide substrates for de novo synthesis of fatty acids and multiple amino acids. Mitochondrial functions must therefore be tightly linked to cellular nutrient availability. This review focuses on the current knowledge of how nutrients affect mitochondria. In particular, we describe how the transcriptional profile of the nucleus is altered to mediate this control, and the transcription factors that are involved. In addition, we summarize recent progress in our understanding of how transcription-independent mechanisms, most notably through the cellular energy sensor mTOR, are used to adapt mitochondrial functions in respect to cellular metabolic needs.

  20. Statins lower calcium-induced oxidative stress in isolated mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parihar, A; Parihar, M S; Zenebe, W J; Ghafourifar, P

    2012-04-01

    Statins are widely used cholesterol-lowering agents that exert cholesterol-independent effects including antioxidative. The present study delineates the effects of statins, atorvastatin, and simvastatin on oxidative stress and functions of mitochondria that are the primary cellular sources of oxidative stress. In isolated rat liver mitochondria, both the statins prevented calcium-induced cytochrome c release, lipid peroxidation, and opening of the mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT). Both the statins decreased the activity of mitochondrial nitric oxide synthase (mtNOS), lowered the intramitochondrial ionized calcium, and increased the mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Our findings suggest that statins lower intramitochondrial ionized calcium that decreases mtNOS activity, lowers oxidative stress, prevents MPT opening, and prevents the release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria. These results provide a novel framework for understanding the antioxidative properties of statins and their effects on mitochondrial functions.

  1. Exploiting mitochondria as targets for the development of new antifungals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Calderone, Richard

    2017-02-17

    Mitochondria are essential for cell growth and survival of most fungal pathogens. Energy (ATP) produced during oxidation/reduction reactions of the electron transport chain (ETC) Complexes I, III and IV (CI, CIII, CIV) fuel cell synthesis. The mitochondria of fungal pathogens are understudied even though more recent published data suggest critical functional assignments to fungal-specific proteins. Proteins of mammalian mitochondria are grouped into 16 functional categories. In this review, we focus upon 11 proteins from 5 of these categories in fungal pathogens, OXPHOS, protein import, stress response, carbon source metabolism, and fission/fusion morphology. As these proteins also are fungal-specific, we hypothesize that they may be exploited as targets in antifungal drug discovery. We also discuss published transcriptional profiling data of mitochondrial CI subunit protein mutants, in which we advance a novel concept those CI subunit proteins have both shared as well as specific responsibilities for providing ATP to cell processes.

  2. Effects of melatonin on mitochondria after cerebral isehemic reperfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Hongyu

    2000-01-01

    Melatonin has been regarded as a free radical scavenger and antioxidant. In both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Melatonin was found to protect cells, tissues and organs against oxidative damage induced by a variety of free radical generating agents and processes, e.g., ischemic reperfusion. The mechanisms underlying these interactions have not been defined. The goal of the present study was to observe the effects of melatonin on rnitochondria after cerebral ischemic reperfusion and the mechanisms of neuroprotection of melatonin by gerbil ischemic model. Male Mongolian gerbils were subjected to 10 min of forebrain ischemia by occlusion of both common carotid arteries under anesthesia. Melatonin(0.8 mg/kg) was administrated intraperitoneum 30 min befbre arteries occlusion. We measured the respiratory function of mitochondria, the activities of ATPase, the free mitochondrial calcium contents and the GSH level of mitochondria. The results show that oxidative phosphorylation function of mitochondria was damaged after cerebral ischemic reperfusion. And mitochondrial calcium was overloaded after cerebral ischemic reperfusion. And the level of GSH in mitochondria decreased after cerebral ischemic reperfision. It is concluded that melatonin have neuroprotection effects after cerebral ischemic repertusion and this effects probably related to the protection mitochondria.

  3. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Del Debbio, L; Debbio, Luigi Del; Pica, Claudio

    2004-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge. Therefore, the overlap formalism appears as an appealing candidate to study the continuum limit of the topological susceptibility while keeping the systematic errors under theoretical control. We present results for the SU(3) pure gauge theory using the index of the overlap Dirac operator to study the topology of the gauge configurations. The topological charge is obtained from the zero modes of the overlap and using a new algorithm for the spectral flow analysis. A detailed comparison with cooling techniques is presented. Particular care is taken in assessing the systematic errors. Relatively high statistics (500 to 1000 independent configurations) yield an extrapolated continuum limit with errors that are comparable with ...

  4. Topological susceptibility from the overlap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Pica, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    The chiral symmetry at finite lattice spacing of Ginsparg-Wilson fermionic actions constrains the renormalization of the lattice operators; in particular, the topological susceptibility does not require any renormalization, when using a fermionic estimator to define the topological charge....... Therefore, the overlap formalism appears as an appealing candidate to study the continuum limit of the topological susceptibility while keeping the systematic errors under theoretical control. We present results for the SU(3) pure gauge theory using the index of the overlap Dirac operator to study...... the topology of the gauge configurations. The topological charge is obtained from the zero modes of the overlap and using a new algorithm for the spectral flow analysis. A detailed comparison with cooling techniques is presented. Particular care is taken in assessing the systematic errors. Relatively high...

  5. Cytosolic signaling protein Ecsit also localizes to mitochondria where it interacts with chaperone NDUFAF1 and functions in complex I assembly.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogel, R.O.; Janssen, R.J.R.J.; Brand, M.A.M. van den; Dieteren, C.E.J.; Verkaart, S.A.J.; Koopman, W.J.H.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Pluk, W.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.; Nijtmans, L.G.J.

    2007-01-01

    Ecsit is a cytosolic adaptor protein essential for inflammatory response and embryonic development via the Toll-like and BMP (bone morphogenetic protein) signal transduction pathways, respectively. Here, we demonstrate a mitochondrial function for Ecsit (an evolutionary conserved signaling

  6. Targeted delivery of doxorubicin to mitochondria using mesoporous silica nanoparticle nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Qiuyu; Ma, Xing; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-10-01

    A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis in isolated mitochondria. In addition, enhanced cancer cell killing efficacy was achieved when using DOX-loaded and TPP-functionalized MSNPs for mitochondria-targeted delivery. Lowered adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential were observed, demonstrating the mitochondria dysfunction caused by delivered DOX. The positive results indicate promising application potential of MSNPs in targeted subcellular drug delivery.A lot of investigations have been conducted using mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) functionalized with different targeting ligands in order to deliver various hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs to targeted cancer cells. However, the utilization of MSNPs to deliver drug molecules to targeted subcellular organelles has been rarely reported. In this work, we applied targeting ligand-conjugated MSNPs with an average diameter of 80 nm to deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) to mitochondria. Triphenoylphosphonium (TPP) was functionalized on MSNPs as a mitochondria targeting ligand. Mitochondria targeting efficiency was demonstrated in HeLa cells by a co-localization study of mitochondria and functionalized MSNPs as well as by fluorescence analysis

  7. EST analysis on pig mitochondria reveal novel expression differences between developmental and adult tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheibye-Alsing, Karsten; Cirera, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The mitochondria are involved in many basic functions in cells of vertebrates, and can be considered the power generator of the cell. Though the mitochondria have been extensively studied there appear to be only few expression studies of mitochondrial genes involving a large number...

  8. Mitochondria-Associated Membranes (MAMs): Overview and Its Role in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodríguez-Arribas, M; Yakhine-Diop, S M S; Pedro, J M Bravo-San; Gómez-Suaga, P; Gómez-Sánchez, R; Martínez-Chacón, G; Fuentes, J M; González-Polo, R A; Niso-Santano, M

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are structures that regulate physiological functions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria in order to maintain calcium signaling and mitochondrial biogenesis. Several proteins located in MAMs, including those encoded by PARK genes and some of n

  9. Mitotherapy for Fatty Liver by Intravenous Administration of Exogenous Mitochondria in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Ailing; Shi, Xianxun; Zhang, Huajing; Fu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is a major and common mechanism in developing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Replacement of dysfunctional mitochondria by functional exogenous mitochondria may attenuate intrahepatic excessive lipid and recover hepatocyte function. However, no data shows that mitochondria can be systemically administrated to animals to date. Here we suggest that mitochondria isolated from hepatoma cells are used as a mitotherapy agent to treat mouse fatty liver induced by high-fat diets. When the mitochondria were intravenously injected into the mice, serum aminotransferase activity and cholesterol level decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Also, the mitotherapy reduced lipid accumulation and oxidation injury of the fatty liver mice, improved energy production, and consequently restored hepatocyte function. The mitotherapy strategy offers a new potential therapeutic approach for treating NAFLD.

  10. Glutathione and mitochondria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ribas, Vicent; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, José C

    2014-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is the main non-protein thiol in cells whose functions are dependent on the redox-active thiol of its cysteine moiety that serves as a cofactor for a number of antioxidant and detoxifying enzymes...

  11. Overlapping constraint for variational surface reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aanæs, Henrik; Solem, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper a counter example, illustrating a shortcoming in most variational formulations for 3D surface estimation, is presented. The nature of this shortcoming is a lack of an overlapping constraint. A remedy for this shortcoming is presented in the form of a penalty function with an analysis...... of the effects of this function on surface motion. For practical purposes, this will only have minor influence on current methods. However, the insight provided in the analysis is likely to influence future developments in the field of variational surface reconstruction....

  12. BioMEMS for mitochondria medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmaraj, Divya

    A BioMEMS device to study cell-mitochondrial physiological functionalities was developed. The pathogenesis of many diseases including obesity, diabetes and heart failure as well as aging has been linked to functional defects of mitochondria. The synthesis of Adenosine Tri Phosphate (ATP) is determined by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. Therefore, electrical characterization by E-fields with complementary chemical testing was used here. The BioMEMS device was fabricated as an SU-8 based microfluidic system with gold electrodes on SiO2/Si wafers for electromagnetic interrogation. Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistors (ISFETs) were incorporated for proton studies important in the electron transport chain, together with monitoring Na+, K+ and Ca++ ions for ion channel studies. ISFETs are chemically sensitive Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET) devices and their threshold voltage is directly proportional to the electrolytic H+ ion variation. These ISFETs (sensitivity ˜55 mV/pH for H+) were further realized as specific ion sensitive Chemical Field Effect Transistors (CHEMFETs) by depositing a specific ion sensitive membrane on the gate. Electrodes for dielectric spectroscopy studies of mitochondria were designed as 2- and 4-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range. In addition, to limit polarization effects, a 4-electrode set-up with unique meshed pickup electrodes (7.5x7.5 mum2 loops with 4 mum wires) was fabricated. Sensitivity of impedance spectroscopy to membrane potential changes was confirmed by studying the influence of uncouplers and glucose on mitochondria. An electrical model was developed for the mitochondrial sample, and its frequency response correlated with impedance spectroscopy experiments of sarcolemmal mitochondria. Using the mesh electrode structure, we obtained a reduction of 83.28% in impedance at 200 Hz. COMSOL

  13. Proteome profile of functional mitochondria from human skeletal muscle using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lefort, Natalie; Yi, Zhengping; Bowen, Benjamin

    2009-01-01

    were functional as evidenced by their response to carbohydrate and fat-derived fuels. Using one-dimensional gel electrophoresis and HPLC-ESI-MS/MS, 823 unique proteins were detected, and 487 of these were assigned to the mitochondrion, including the newly characterized SIRT5, MitoNEET and RDH13...

  14. The cellular energy crisis: mitochondria and cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, Nigel J

    2003-01-01

    Exploding nuclear reactors, environmental destruction, and global warming; the danger of energy production is clear. It is quite remarkable that in this modern age, where power usage is at a premium, we find that even on a cellular level, generation of large quantities of power comes at a cost. Mitochondria, which produce the majority of cellular energy in the form of ATP, have recently been shown to play an essential role in the death of a cell by a process known as apoptosis. During apoptosis, the integrity of mitochondria is compromised and various pro-apoptotic proteins are released into the cytoplasm. This results in activation of caspases, proteases that orchestrate the death of the cell. Cells in which apoptosis is inhibited upstream of mitochondria generally maintain the potential to proliferate, whereas inhibition of caspases downstream of mitochondria generally only delays cell death. Although breaches of the mitochondrial outer membrane result in the release of proteins that are important for respiration, mitochondria appear capable of maintaining at least some of their functions, including ATP production, even after this event. This has important implications both for the mechanism of outer-membrane permeabilization and the mechanism by which the cells eventually die in the absence of caspase activity. The events surrounding the breach of the mitochondrial outer membrane during apoptosis have therefore received much interest over the past few years.

  15. Mitochondria Localize to Injured Axons to Support Regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Sung Min; Baig, Huma S; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-12-21

    Axon regeneration is essential to restore the nervous system after axon injury. However, the neuronal cell biology that underlies axon regeneration is incompletely understood. Here we use in vivo, single-neuron analysis to investigate the relationship between nerve injury, mitochondrial localization, and axon regeneration. Mitochondria translocate into injured axons so that average mitochondria density increases after injury. Moreover, single-neuron analysis reveals that axons that fail to increase mitochondria have poor regeneration. Experimental alterations to axonal mitochondrial distribution or mitochondrial respiratory chain function result in corresponding changes to regeneration outcomes. Axonal mitochondria are specifically required for growth-cone migration, identifying a key energy challenge for injured neurons. Finally, mitochondrial localization to the axon after injury is regulated in part by dual-leucine zipper kinase 1 (DLK-1), a conserved regulator of axon regeneration. These data identify regulation of axonal mitochondria as a new cell-biological mechanism that helps determine the regenerative response of injured neurons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluoxetine and the mitochondria: A review of the toxicological aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Marcos Roberto

    2016-09-06

    Fluoxetine (a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)) is used as an antidepressant by modulating the levels of serotonin in the synaptic cleft. Nevertheless, fluoxetine also induces undesirable effects, such as anxiety, sexual dysfunction, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal impairments. Fluoxetine has been viewed as an agent that may interfere with cell fate by triggering apoptosis. On the other hand, fluoxetine intake has been associated with increased cancer risk. Nonetheless, data remain contradictory and no conclusions were taken. Several studies demonstrated that fluoxetine interacts with mitochondria triggering apoptosis and/or altering mitochondrial function by modulating the activity of respiratory chain components and enzymes of the Krebs cycle. Furthermore, fluoxetine affects mitochondria-related redox parameters in different experimental models. In this review, data demonstrating the effects of fluoxetine upon mammalian mitochondria are described and discussed, as well as several unsolved questions in this field of research are addressed. A separate section deals with future needs regarding the research involving the impact of fluoxetine treatment upon mitochondria and mitochondria-related signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Enzyme activities in mitochondria isolated from ripening tomato fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, D; Goodenough, P W; Weitzman, P D

    1986-09-01

    Mitochondria were isolated from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L.) fruit at the mature green, orange-green and red stages and from fruit artificially suspended in their ripening stage. The specific activities of citrate synthase (EC 4.1.3.7), malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.37), NAD-linked isocitrate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.41) and NAD-linked malic enzyme (EC 1.1.1.38) were determined. The specific activities of all these enzymes fell during ipening, although the mitochondria were fully functional as demonstrated by the uptake of oxygen. The fall in activity of mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase was accompanied by a similar fall in the activity of the cytosolic isoenzyme. Percoll-purified mitochondria isolated from mature green fruit remained intact for more than one week and at least one enzyme, citrate synthase, did not exhibit the fall in specific activity found in normal ripening fruit.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    The aging eye appears to be at considerable risk from oxidative stress. A great deal of research indicates that dysfunctional mitochondria are the primary site of reactive oxygen species (ROS). More than 95% of O2 produced during normal metabolism is generated by the electron transport chain in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Mitochondria are also the major target of ROS. Cataract formation, the opacification of the eye lens, is one of the leading causes of human blindness worldwide, accounting for 47.8% of all causes of blindness. Cataracts result from the deposition of aggregated proteins in the eye lens and lens fiber cell plasma membrane damage, which causes clouding of the lens, light scattering, and obstruction of vision. ROS-induced damage in the lens cell may consist of oxidation of proteins, DNA damage, and/or lipid peroxidation, all of which have been implicated in cataractogenesis. This article is an attempt to integrate how mitochondrial ROS are altered in the aging eye along with those protective and repair therapeutic systems believed to regulate ROS levels in ocular tissues and how damage to these systems contributes to age-onset eye disease and cataract formation. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo. As a result of the combination of weak metal chelating, OH and lipid peroxyl radicals scavenging, reducing activities to liberated fatty acid, and phospholipid hydroperoxides, carnosine and carcinine appear to be physiological antioxidants able to efficiently protect the lipid phase of biologic membranes and aqueous environments and act as the antiapoptotic natural drug compounds The authors developed and patented the new ophthalmic compositions, including N-acetylcarnosine, acting as a prodrug of naturally targeted to mitochondria L-carnosine endowed with pluripotent antioxidant activities combined with mitochondria

  19. Dissecting the metabolic role of mitochondria during developmental leaf senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chrobok, Daria; Law, Simon R.; Brouwer, Bas; Lindén, Pernilla; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Liebsch, Daniela; Narsai, Reena; Szal, Bozena; Moritz, Thomas; Rouhier, Nicolas; Whelan, James; Gardeström, Per; Keech, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The functions of mitochondria during leaf senescence, a type of programmed cell death aimed at the massive retrieval of nutrients from the senescing organ to the rest of the plant, remain elusive. Here, combining experimental and analytical approaches, we showed that mitochondrial integrity in

  20. Effects of Shark Hepatic Stimulator Substance on the Function and Antioxidant Capacity of Liver Mitochondria in an Animal Model of Acute Liver Injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-Ling FAN; Cai-Guo HUANG; Yan JIN; Bo FENG; Hui-Nan MIAO; Wen-Jie LI; Bing-Hua JIAO; Qin-Sheng YUAN

    2005-01-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether shark hepatic stimulator substance (HSS) can prevent acute liver injury and affect mitochondrial function and antioxidant defenses in a rat model of thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver injury. The acute liver injury was induced by two intraperitoneal injections of TAA (400 mg/kg) in a 24 h interval. In the TAA plus shark HSS group, rats were treated with shark HSS (80 mg/kg) 1 h prior to each TAA injection. In this group, serum liver enzyme activities were significantly lower than those in the TAA group. The mitochondrial respiratory control ratio was improved, and the mitochondrial respiratory enzyme activities were increased in the TAA plus shark HSS group. The mitochondrial antioxidant enzyme activities and glutathione level were higher in the TAA plus shark HSS group than in the TAA group. These results suggest that the protective effect of shark HSS against TAA-induced acute liver injury may be a result of the restoration of the mitochondrial respiratory function and antioxidant defenses and decreased oxygen stress.

  1. 中医“脾主肌肉”与线粒体功能的相关性探析%Correlation Between Spleen Governing Muscles and the Functions of Mitochondria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙莹; 宋雅芳; 胡齐

    2014-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine points out that spleen governs muscles ,and a whole body muscle is de-pendent on the nourishment of cereal essence and semen transported by the spleen and stomach ;western medi-cine considers that mitochondrial energy metabolism is closely related to spleen .Therefore, based on related clinical and experimental studies , this paper expounds the relationship of spleen governing muscles in TCM and the functions of mitochondria and the functional relation between them from the aspects of physiology , pathology and therapy .The paper is in order to reveal the mechanism of treatment in neuromuscular disorders , such as myasthenia gravis ,from the spleen differentiation .%中医学认为“脾主肌肉”,人体一身的肌肉都依赖于脾胃运化的水谷精微和津液的濡养,现代医学中线粒体的能量代谢与脾密切相关。现结合有关神经肌肉病与线粒体功能相关性的临床与实验研究结果,从生理、病理及治疗三方面,探讨中医“脾主肌肉”与线粒体功能的相关性,从而揭示中医药从脾论治重症肌无力等神经肌肉病的作用机制。

  2. Protective Effects of Melatonin and Mitochondria-targeted Antioxidants Against Oxidative Stress: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, M R; Esteban, S; Miralles, A; Tan, Dun-Xian; Reiter, R J

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative damage is related to aging and a wide range of human disorders. Mitochondria are in large part responsible for free radical production and they are also main targets of the attack of these toxic molecules. The resulting deleterious effects of the damage to mitochondria can be prevented by antioxidants. Melatonin is an endogenously-produced indoleamine that modulates numerous functions, including mitochondria-related functions; this result from its capacity to penetrate all morphophysiological barriers and to enter all subcellular compartments due to its amphiphilic nature. Furthermore, this indoleamine and its metabolites are powerful antioxidants and scavengers of free radicals, protecting cellular membranes, the electron transport chain and mitochondrial DNA from oxidative damage. These properties may make melatonin a potent protector against a variety of free radical-related diseases. By comparison, other conventional antioxidants have less efficacy due to their limited access to the mitochondria. In recent years, research has focused on the advancement of mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, such as MitoQ (composed by the lipophilic triphenylphosphonium cation conjugated to the endogenous antioxidant coenzyme Q10) and MitoE (composed by the triphenylphosphonium cation attached to the antioxidant α-tocopherol). Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants accumulate in several hundred-fold greater concentrations within mitochondria and protect these critical organelles from oxidative damage. Melatonin also seems to be a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant and has similar protective actions as the synthetic antioxidants. Further work is required to determine the therapeutic properties of these antioxidants in ameliorating diseases related to mitochondrial dysfunction.

  3. Endosome-mitochondria interactions are modulated by iron release from transferrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Anupam; Nag, Sagarika; Mason, Anne B; Barroso, Margarida M

    2016-09-26

    Transient "kiss and run" interactions between endosomes containing iron-bound transferrin (Tf) and mitochondria have been shown to facilitate direct iron transfer in erythroid cells. In this study, we used superresolution three-dimensional (3D) direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy to show that Tf-containing endosomes directly interact with mitochondria in epithelial cells. We used live-cell time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, followed by 3D rendering, object tracking, and a distance transformation algorithm, to track Tf-endosomes and characterize the dynamics of their interactions with mitochondria. Quenching of iron sensor RDA-labeled mitochondria confirmed functional iron transfer by an interacting Tf-endosome. The motility of Tf-endosomes is significantly reduced upon interaction with mitochondria. To further assess the functional role of iron in the ability of Tf-endosomes to interact with mitochondria, we blocked endosomal iron release by using a Tf K206E/K534A mutant. Blocking intraendosomal iron release led to significantly increased motility of Tf-endosomes and increased duration of endosome-mitochondria interactions. Thus, intraendosomal iron regulates the kinetics of the interactions between Tf-containing endosomes and mitochondria in epithelial cells. © 2016 Das et al.

  4. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria protects the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, Akihiro; Black, Kendra M.; Pacak, Christina A.; Ericsson, Maria; Barnett, Reanne J.; Drumm, Ciara; Seth, Pankaj; Bloch, Donald B.; Levitsky, Sidney; Cowan, Douglas B.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction occur during ischemia and modulate cardiac function and cell survival significantly during reperfusion. We hypothesized that transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria immediately prior to reperfusion would ameliorate these effects. New Zealand White rabbits were used for regional ischemia (RI), which was achieved by temporarily snaring the left anterior descending artery for 30 min. Following 29 min of RI, autologously derived mitochondria (RI-mitochondria; 9.7 ± 1.7 × 106/ml) or vehicle alone (RI-vehicle) were injected directly into the RI zone, and the hearts were allowed to recover for 4 wk. Mitochondrial transplantation decreased (P mitochondria (7.9 ± 2.9%) compared with RI-vehicle (34.2 ± 3.3%, P mitochondria hearts returned to normal contraction within 10 min after reperfusion was started; however, RI-vehicle hearts showed persistent hypokinesia in the RI zone at 4 wk of recovery. Electrocardiogram and optical mapping studies showed that no arrhythmia was associated with autologously derived mitochondrial transplantation. In vivo and in vitro studies show that the transplanted mitochondria are evident in the interstitial spaces and are internalized by cardiomyocytes 2–8 h after transplantation. The transplanted mitochondria enhanced oxygen consumption, high-energy phosphate synthesis, and the induction of cytokine mediators and proteomic pathways that are important in preserving myocardial energetics, cell viability, and enhanced post-infarct cardiac function. Transplantation of autologously derived mitochondria provides a novel technique to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:23355340

  5. Clique graphs and overlapping communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, T. S.

    2010-12-01

    It is shown how to construct a clique graph in which properties of cliques of a fixed order in a given graph are represented by vertices in a weighted graph. Various definitions and motivations for these weights are given. The detection of communities or clusters is used to illustrate how a clique graph may be exploited. In particular a benchmark network is shown where clique graphs find the overlapping communities accurately while vertex partition methods fail.

  6. Getting mitochondria to center stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schatz, Gottfried, E-mail: gottfried.schatz@unibas.ch

    2013-05-10

    The question of how eukaryotic cells assemble their mitochondria was long considered to be inaccessible to biochemical investigation. This attitude changed about fifty years ago when the powerful tools of yeast genetics, electron microscopy and molecular biology were brought to bear on this problem. The rising interest in mitochondrial biogenesis thus paralleled and assisted in the birth of modern biology. This brief recollection recounts the days when research on mitochondrial biogenesis was an exotic effort limited to a small group of outsiders.

  7. Relationship between function recovery and the changes of mitochondria after facial muscles denervation%面肌失神经支配后线粒体变化与功能康复的关系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于何; 魏宏权; 白伟良; 任重

    2003-01-01

    目的:探讨不同程度面神经失神经支配后口轮匝肌线粒体结构、琥珀酸脱氢酶( SDH)的变化与面肌功能恢复的关系. 方法:制造颞骨内面神经麻痹模型,分为面神经压榨 5 s组( 11例)、 15 s组( 10例)、 30 s组( 10例),应用神经电图测试 3组的平均阈值差值, SDH染色后,透射电镜观察面神经损伤 15, 30 d后口轮匝肌线粒体结构和 SDH阳性反应产物的变化. 结果:压榨持续时间越长,反应阈值差值越大, 5 s组、 15 s组、 30 s组的反应阈值差值分别为 0.443± 0.024, 12.174± 1.532, 15.720± 1.536,组间比较差异有显著性意义( F=461.560, P< 0.0001).面神经压榨 5 s组的平均神经兴奋传导抑制时间为( 35± 17) min; 15 s组瞬目反射恢复正常需( 47± 15) d; 30 s组半年内未恢复. 15 s组面神经损伤 15 d后 ,线粒体嵴断裂, SDH阳性反应颗粒减少,损伤 30 d基本恢复正常. 30 s组面神经损伤 15 d后 ,线粒体空泡变性, SDH颗粒明显减少,损伤 30 d后的线粒体结构和 SDH颗粒有轻度恢复. 结论:面神经受损伤时间越长,失神经支配程度越重,线粒体病变也越重,面肌功能恢复越难,应早期行面神经减压术.%AIM:To explore the relationship between the functional recovery of facial muscles and the changes of the structure of mitochondria and succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) of oris muscles after different degree of denervation. METHODS:Models of facial paralysis were obtained, all 72 guinea pigs were divided into 5 s-pinching group,15 s-pinching group and 30 s-pinching group respectively.Eletroneurogram (ENoG) was used to measure the average threshold differences of the facial nerves of the guinea pigs in each group.The mitochondria structures of oris muscle and positive products of SDH were observed with transmitting electron microscope after facial nerve injuries for 15,30 s respectively. RESULTS:The longer of pinching, the more of threshold difference, 5 s-pinching group (11

  8. Mitochondria, synaptic plasticity, and schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shachar, Dorit; Laifenfeld, Daphna

    2004-01-01

    The conceptualization of schizophrenia as a disorder of connectivity, i.e., of neuronal?synaptic plasticity, suggests abnormal synaptic modeling and neuronal signaling, possibly as a consequence of flawed interactions with the environment, as at least a secondary mechanism underlying the pathophysiology of this disorder. Indeed, deficits in episodic memory and malfunction of hippocampal circuitry, as well as anomalies of axonal sprouting and synapse formation, are all suggestive of diminished neuronal plasticity in schizophrenia. Evidence supports a dysfunction of mitochondria in schizophrenia, including mitochondrial hypoplasia, and a dysfunction of the oxidative phosphorylation system, as well as altered mitochondrial-related gene expression. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to alterations in ATP production and cytoplasmatic calcium concentrations, as well as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production. All of the latter processes have been well established as leading to altered synaptic strength or plasticity. Moreover, mitochondria have been shown to play a role in plasticity of neuronal polarity, and studies in the visual cortex show an association between mitochondria and synaptogenesis. Finally, mitochondrial gene upregulation has been observed following synaptic and neuronal activity. This review proposes that mitochondrial dysfunction in schizophrenia could cause, or arise from, anomalies in processes of plasticity in this disorder.

  9. Stem cell mitochondria during aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Wen, Jason Chua; Jun-Hao, Elwin Tan; Shyh-Chang, Ng

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria are the central hubs of cellular metabolism, equipped with their own mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) blueprints to direct part of the programming of mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and thus reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. In stem cells, many stem cell factors governing the intricate balance between self-renewal and differentiation have been found to directly regulate mitochondrial processes to control stem cell behaviors during tissue regeneration and aging. Moreover, numerous nutrient-sensitive signaling pathways controlling organismal longevity in an evolutionarily conserved fashion also influence stem cell-mediated tissue homeostasis during aging via regulation of stem cell mitochondria. At the genomic level, it has been demonstrated that heritable mtDNA mutations and variants affect mammalian stem cell homeostasis and influence the risk for human degenerative diseases during aging. Because such a multitude of stem cell factors and signaling pathways ultimately converge on the mitochondria as the primary mechanism to modulate cellular and organismal longevity, it would be most efficacious to develop technologies to therapeutically target and direct mitochondrial repair in stem cells, as a unified strategy to combat aging-related degenerative diseases in the future.

  10. Computation of overlap integrals over STOs with mathematica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yükçü, S. A.; Yükçü, N.

    2017-02-01

    Overlap integrals which encountered in molecular structure calculations are the most basic of molecular integrals. Also, other molecular integrals can be expressed in terms of these integrals. Overlap integrals can be calculated by using Slater Type Orbitals (STOs). In this work, we develop algorithms for two-center overlap integrals which are calculated over the STOs in ellipsoidal coordinates and some auxiliary functions by S. M. Mekelleche's group. During the computation of this paper, Mathematica programming language has been used to produce algorithms. Numerical results for some quantum numbers are presented in the tables. Finally, our numerical results and others are compared, then some details of evaluation method are discussed.

  11. Aluminum modulates effects of beta amyloid(1-42) on neuronal calcium homeostasis and mitochondria functioning and is altered in a triple transgenic mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drago, Denise; Cavaliere, Alessandra; Mascetra, Nicola; Ciavardelli, Domenico; di Ilio, Carmine; Zatta, Paolo; Sensi, Stefano L

    2008-10-01

    Recent findings suggest that beta-amyloid (A beta) is more neurotoxic when present in its oligomeric configuration rather than as monomers or fibrils. Previous work from our laboratories has shown that A beta aggregation is strongly influenced by the conjugation of the peptide with metal ions (aluminum A, copper [Cu], zinc [Zn], and iron [Fe]) that are found in high concentrations in the core of senile plaques. Disruption of Ca++ signaling and mitochondrial dysfunction are potent triggers of neuronal death and have been implicated in the neuronal loss that is associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we explored whether A beta-metal complexes can have detrimental effects on intraneuronal Ca++ ([Ca++]i) homeostasis and mitochondrial function in vitro. Results from our experiments indicate that, when conjugated with Al, A beta perturbs neuronal [Ca++]i homeostasis and inhibits mitochondrial respiration. Finally, we analyzed the content of the four metals in the brain of a triple transgenic animal model of AD and found that Al is the only one to be increased in the cortex of these mice.

  12. Mitochondria: the cellular hub of the dynamic coordinated network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Cadenas, Enrique

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of the eukaryotic cell. After billions of years of evolution, mitochondria have adaptively integrated into the symbiont. Such integration is not only evidenced by the consolidation of genetic information, that is, the transfer of most mitochondrial genes into the nucleus, but also manifested by the functional recombination by which mitochondria participate seamlessly in various cellular processes. In the past decade, the field of mitochondria biology has been focused on the dynamic and interactive features of these semiautonomous organelles. Aspects of a complex multilayer quality control system coordinating mitochondrial function and environmental changes are being uncovered and refined. This Forum summarizes the recent progress of these critical topics, with a focus on the dynamic quality control of mitochondrial reticulum, including their biogenesis, dynamic remodeling, and degradation, as well as the homeostasis of the mitochondrial proteome. These diverse but interconnected mechanisms are found to be critical in the maintenance of a functional, efficient, and responsive mitochondrial population and could therefore become therapeutic targets in numerous mitochondrion-implicated disorders.

  13. Connection of Protein Transport and Organelle Contact Sites in Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenrieder, Lars; Rampelt, Heike; Becker, Thomas

    2017-07-07

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function depend on the intensive exchange of molecules with other cellular compartments. The mitochondrial outer membrane plays a central role in this communication process. It is equipped with a number of specific protein machineries that enable the transport of proteins and metabolites. Furthermore, the outer membrane forms molecular contact sites with other cell organelles like the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), thus integrating mitochondrial function in cellular physiology. The best-studied mitochondrial organelle contact site, the ER-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) has been linked to many vital processes including mitochondrial division, inheritance, mitophagy, and phospholipid transport. Strikingly, ER-mitochondria contact sites are closely connected to outer membrane protein translocases. The translocase of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) represents the general mitochondrial entry gate for precursor proteins that are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes. The outer membrane also harbors the sorting and assembly machinery (SAM) that mediates membrane insertion of β-barrel proteins. Both of these essential protein translocases are functionally linked to ER-mitochondria contact sites. First, the SAM complex associates with an ERMES core component to promote assembly of the TOM complex. Second, several TOM components have been co-opted as ER-mitochondria tethers. We propose that protein import and organelle contact sites are linked to coordinate processes important for mitochondrial biogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Three Toxic Gases Meet in the Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Decreau

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The rationale of the study was two-fold : (i develop a functional synthetic model of the Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO active site, (ii use it as a convenient tool to understand or predict the outcome of the reaction of CcO with ligands (physiologically relevant gases and other ligands. At physiological pH and potential, the model catalyzes the 4-electron reduction of oxygen. This model was immobilized on self-assembled-monolayer (SAM modified electrode. During catalytic oxygen reduction, electron delivery through SAMs is rate limiting, similar to the situation in CcO. This model contains all three redox-active components in CcO’s active site, which are required to minimize the production of partially-reduced-oxygen-species (PROS: Fe¬-heme (heme a3 in a myoglobin-like model fitted with a proximal imidazole ligand, and a distal tris-imidazole Copper (CuB complex, where one imidazole is cross-linked to a phenol (mimicking Tyr244. This functional CcO model demonstrates how CcO itself might tolerate the hormone NO (which diffuses through the mitochondria. It is proposed that CuB delivers superoxide to NO bound to Fe-heme forming peroxynitrite, then nitrate that diffuses away. Another toxic gas, H2S, has exceptional biological effects: at ~80 ppm, H2S induces a state similar to hibernation in mice, lowering the animal's temperature and slowing respiration. Using our functional CcO model, we have demonstrated that at the same concentration range H2S can reversibly inhibit catalytic oxygen reduction. Such a reversible catalytic process on the model was also demonstrated with an organic compound, tetrazole (TZ. Following studies showed that TZ reversibly inhibits respiration in isolated mitochondria, and induces deactivation of platelets, a mitochondria-rich key component of blood coagulation. Hence, this program is a rare example illustrating the use of a functional model to understand and predict physiologically important reactions at the active site

  15. THE PHASE-OFFSET OVERLAPPED WAVE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Dequn; Liang Weihua; Sun Changnian

    2003-01-01

    A new digital communication technology based on the Phase-Offset Overlapped Waves (POOW) has been introduced in this letter. The waves can be considered as a special multicarrier different from traditional ones. The sub-waves in a coded word's period of the POOW are sine waves and have the same frequencies, but different starting phases. The most important characteristic is that these sub-waves are the piecewise functions and not orthogonal in a code word period. The decoding can be implemented by solving a linear equation group.This code has very high efficiency and thus the data transmission rate is increased greatly.

  16. Metabolic Pathways in Anopheles stephensi mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulivi, Cecilia; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Horton, Ashley A.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2017-01-01

    No studies have been performed on mitochondria of malaria vector mosquitoes. This information would be valuable in understanding mosquito aging and detoxification of insecticides, two parameters that significantly impact malaria parasite transmission in endemic regions. Here, we report the analyses of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of cultured cells (ASE line) from Anopheles stephensi, a major vector of malaria in India, Southeast Asia and parts of the Middle East. ASE cell mitochondria shared many features in common with mammalian muscle mitochondria, despite the fact that these cells have a larval origin. However, two major differences with mammalian mitochondria were apparent. One, the glycerol-phosphate shuttle plays a major role in NADH oxidation in ASE cell mitochondria as it does in insect muscle mitochondria. In contrast, mammalian white muscle mitochondria depend primarily on lactate dehydrogenase, whereas red muscle mitochondria depend on the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle. Two, ASE mitochondria were able to oxidize Pro at a rate comparable with that of α-glycerophosphate. However, the Pro pathway appeared to differ from the currently accepted pathway, in that ketoglutarate could be catabolyzed completely by the Krebs cycle or via transamination depending on the ATP need. PMID:18588503

  17. Metabolic pathways in Anopheles stephensi mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulivi, Cecilia; Ross-Inta, Catherine; Horton, Ashley A; Luckhart, Shirley

    2008-10-15

    No studies have been performed on the mitochondria of malaria vector mosquitoes. This information would be valuable in understanding mosquito aging and detoxification of insecticides, two parameters that have a significant impact on malaria parasite transmission in endemic regions. In the present study, we report the analyses of respiration and oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria of cultured cells [ASE (Anopheles stephensi Mos. 43) cell line] from A. stephensi, a major vector of malaria in India, South-East Asia and parts of the Middle East. ASE cell mitochondria share many features in common with mammalian muscle mitochondria, despite the fact that these cells are of larval origin. However, two major differences with mammalian mitochondria were apparent. One, the glycerol-phosphate shuttle plays as major a role in NADH oxidation in ASE cell mitochondria as it does in insect muscle mitochondria. In contrast, mammalian white muscle mitochondria depend primarily on lactate dehydrogenase, whereas red muscle mitochondria depend on the malate-oxaloacetate shuttle. Two, ASE mitochondria were able to oxidize proline at a rate comparable with that of alpha-glycerophosphate. However, the proline pathway appeared to differ from the currently accepted pathway, in that oxoglutarate could be catabolized completely by the tricarboxylic acid cycle or via transamination, depending on the ATP need.

  18. Crosstalk from non-cancerous mitochondria can inhibit tumor properties of metastatic cells by suppressing oncogenic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Ma, Yewei; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Zhang, Yiqun; Yotnda, Patricia; Creighton, Chad J; Chan, Wai-Yee; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nucleus cross talks and mitochondrial retrograde regulation can play a significant role in cellular properties. Transmitochondrial cybrid systems (cybrids) are an excellent tool to study specific effects of altered mitochondria under a defined nuclear background. The majority of the studies using the cybrid model focused on the significance of specific mitochondrial DNA variations in mitochondrial function or tumor properties. However, most of these variants are benign polymorphisms without known functional significance. From an objective of rectifying mitochondrial defects in cancer cells and to establish mitochondria as a potential anticancer drug target, understanding the role of functional mitochondria in reversing oncogenic properties under a cancer nuclear background is very important. Here we analyzed the potential reversal of oncogenic properties of a highly metastatic cell line with the introduction of non-cancerous mitochondria. Cybrids were established by fusing the mitochondria DNA depleted 143B TK- ρ0 cells from an aggressive osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria from benign breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, moderately metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and 143B cells. In spite of the uniform cancerous nuclear background, as observed with the mitochondria donor cells, cybrids with benign mitochondria showed high mitochondrial functional properties including increased ATP synthesis, oxygen consumption and respiratory chain activities compared to cybrids with cancerous mitochondria. Interestingly, benign mitochondria could reverse different oncogenic characteristics of 143B TK(-) cell including cell proliferation, viability under hypoxic condition, anti-apoptotic properties, resistance to anti-cancer drug, invasion, and colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumor growth in nude mice. Microarray analysis suggested that several oncogenic pathways observed in cybrids with cancer mitochondria are inhibited in cybrids with

  19. Uncoupling and oxidative stress in liver mitochondria isolated from rats with acute iron overload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo Andreu, G.L. [Centro de Quimica Farmaceutica, Departamento de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Inada, N.M.; Vercesi, A.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Patologia Clinica, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Curti, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    One hypothesis for the etiology of cell damage arising from iron overload is that its excess selectively affects mitochondria. Here we tested the effects of acute iron overload on liver mitochondria isolated from rats subjected to a single dose of i.p. 500 mg/kg iron-dextran. The treatment increased the levels of iron in mitochondria (from 21{+-}4 to 130{+-}7 nmol/mg protein) and caused both lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidation. The mitochondria of iron-treated rats showed lower respiratory control ratio in association with higher resting respiration. The mitochondrial uncoupling elicited by iron-treatment did not affect the phosphorylation efficiency or the ATP levels, suggesting that uncoupling is a mitochondrial protective mechanism against acute iron overload. Therefore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/H{sup +} leak couple, functioning as a mitochondrial redox homeostatic mechanism could play a protective role in the acutely iron-loaded mitochondria. (orig.)

  20. Presenilin 2 Modulates Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondria Coupling by Tuning the Antagonistic Effect of Mitofusin 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Filadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Communication between organelles plays key roles in cell biology. In particular, physical and functional coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and mitochondria is crucial for regulation of various physiological and pathophysiological processes. Here, we demonstrate that Presenilin 2 (PS2, mutations in which underlie familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD, promotes ER-mitochondria coupling only in the presence of mitofusin 2 (Mfn2. PS2 is not necessary for the antagonistic effect of Mfn2 on organelle coupling, although its abundance can tune it. The two proteins physically interact, whereas their homologues Mfn1 and PS1 are dispensable for this interplay. Moreover, PS2 mutants associated with FAD are more effective than the wild-type form in modulating ER-mitochondria tethering because their binding to Mfn2 in mitochondria-associated membranes is favored. We propose a revised model for ER-mitochondria interaction to account for these findings and discuss possible implications for FAD pathogenesis.

  1. Defects in skeletal muscle subsarcolemmal mitochondria in a non-obese model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Nicola; Kummitha, China; Hoppel, Charles

    2017-01-01

    Skeletal muscle resistance to insulin is related to accumulation of lipid-derived products, but it is not clear whether this accumulation is caused by skeletal muscle mitochondrial dysfunction. Diabetes and obesity are reported to have a selective effect on the function of subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle. The current study investigated the role of the subpopulations of mitochondria in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance in the absence of obesity. A non-obese spontaneous rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, (Goto-Kakizaki), was used to evaluate function and biochemical properties in both populations of skeletal muscle mitochondria. In subsarcolemmal mitochondria, minor defects are observed whereas in interfibrillar mitochondria function is preserved. Subsarcolemmal mitochondria defects characterized by a mild decline of oxidative phosphorylation efficiency are related to ATP synthase and structural alterations of inner mitochondria membrane but are considered unimportant because of the absence of defects upstream as shown with polarographic and spectrophometric assays. Fatty acid transport and oxidation is preserved in both population of mitochondria, whereas palmitoyl-CoA increased 25% in interfibrillar mitochondria of diabetic rats. Contrary to popular belief, these data provide compelling evidence that mitochondrial function is unaffected in insulin-resistant skeletal muscle from T2DM non-obese rats.

  2. A Highly Photostable Hyperbranched Polyglycerol-Based NIR Fluorescence Nanoplatform for Mitochondria-Specific Cell Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Chunhong; Liu, Zhongyun; Liu, Junqing; Wu, Changzhu; Neumann, Falko; Wang, Hanjie; Schäfer-Korting, Monika; Kleuser, Burkhard; Chang, Jin; Li, Wenzhong; Ma, Nan; Haag, Rainer

    2016-09-01

    Considering the critical role of mitochondria in the life and death of cells, non-invasive long-term tracking of mitochondria has attracted considerable interest. However, a high-performance mitochondria-specific labeling probe with high photostability is still lacking. Herein a highly photostable hyperbranched polyglycerol (hPG)-based near-infrared (NIR) quantum dots (QDs) nanoplatform is reported for mitochondria-specific cell imaging. Comprising NIR Zn-Cu-In-S/ZnS QDs as extremely photostable fluorescent labels and alkyl chain (C12 )/triphenylphosphonium (TPP)-functionalized hPG derivatives as protective shell, the tailored QDs@hPG-C12 /TPP nanoprobe with a hydrodynamic diameter of about 65 nm exhibits NIR fluorescence, excellent biocompatibility, good stability, and mitochondria-targeted ability. Cell uptake experiments demonstrate that QDs@hPG-C12 /TPP displays a significantly enhanced uptake in HeLa cells compared to nontargeted QDs@hPG-C12 . Further co-localization study indicates that the probe selectively targets mitochondria. Importantly, compared with commercial deep-red mitochondria dyes, QDs@hPG-C12 /TPP possesses superior photostability under continuous laser irradiation, indicating great potential for long-term mitochondria labeling and tracking. Moreover, drug-loaded QDs@hPG-C12 /TPP display an enhanced tumor cell killing efficacy compared to nontargeted drugs. This work could open the door to the construction of organelle-targeted multifunctional nanoplatforms for precise diagnosis and high-efficient tumor therapy.

  3. Mitochondria-Targeted Triphenylphosphonium-Based Compounds: Syntheses, Mechanisms of Action, and Therapeutic and Diagnostic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielonka, Jacek; Joseph, Joy; Sikora, Adam; Hardy, Micael; Ouari, Olivier; Vasquez-Vivar, Jeannette; Cheng, Gang; Lopez, Marcos; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2017-08-09

    Mitochondria are recognized as one of the most important targets for new drug design in cancer, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases. Currently, the most effective way to deliver drugs specifically to mitochondria is by covalent linking a lipophilic cation such as an alkyltriphenylphosphonium moiety to a pharmacophore of interest. Other delocalized lipophilic cations, such as rhodamine, natural and synthetic mitochondria-targeting peptides, and nanoparticle vehicles, have also been used for mitochondrial delivery of small molecules. Depending on the approach used, and the cell and mitochondrial membrane potentials, more than 1000-fold higher mitochondrial concentration can be achieved. Mitochondrial targeting has been developed to study mitochondrial physiology and dysfunction and the interaction between mitochondria and other subcellular organelles and for treatment of a variety of diseases such as neurodegeneration and cancer. In this Review, we discuss efforts to target small-molecule compounds to mitochondria for probing mitochondria function, as diagnostic tools and potential therapeutics. We describe the physicochemical basis for mitochondrial accumulation of lipophilic cations, synthetic chemistry strategies to target compounds to mitochondria, mitochondrial probes, and sensors, and examples of mitochondrial targeting of bioactive compounds. Finally, we review published attempts to apply mitochondria-targeted agents for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. PINK1 Is Selectively Stabilized on Impaired Mitochondria to Activate Parkin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, Derek P.; Jin, Seok Min; Tanaka, Atsushi; Suen, Der-Fen; Gautier, Clement A.; Shen, Jie; Cookson, Mark R.; Youle, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PINK1 and Parkin cause parkinsonism in humans and mitochondrial dysfunction in model organisms. Parkin is selectively recruited from the cytosol to damaged mitochondria to trigger their autophagy. How Parkin recognizes damaged mitochondria, however, is unknown. Here, we show that expression of PINK1 on individual mitochondria is regulated by voltage-dependent proteolysis to maintain low levels of PINK1 on healthy, polarized mitochondria, while facilitating the rapid accumulation of PINK1 on mitochondria that sustain damage. PINK1 accumulation on mitochondria is both necessary and sufficient for Parkin recruitment to mitochondria, and disease-causing mutations in PINK1 and Parkin disrupt Parkin recruitment and Parkin-induced mitophagy at distinct steps. These findings provide a biochemical explanation for the genetic epistasis between PINK1 and Parkin in Drosophila melanogaster. In addition, they support a novel model for the negative selection of damaged mitochondria, in which PINK1 signals mitochondrial dysfunction to Parkin, and Parkin promotes their elimination. PMID:20126261

  5. Role of mitochondria in the pathogenesis and treatment of glaucoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xue-jiao; GE Jian; ZHUO Ye-hong

    2013-01-01

    Objective To gain insight into the potential mechanism of mitochondria dysfunction in pathogenesis,progression and therapeutic management of glaucoma.Data sources The data used in this review were mainly published in English from 2000 to present obtained from PubMed.The search terms were "mitochondria","glaucoma" and 'trabecular meshwork" or "retinal ganglion cells".Study selection Articles studying the mitochondria-related pathologic mechanism and treatment of glaucoma were selected and reviewed.Results Mitochondrial dysfunction or injury was demonstrated in different eye tissue of glaucoma.A variety of potential injuries (light,toxic materials,oxidative injury,mechanical stress,aging,etc.) and the inherent DNA defects are deemed to cause mitochondrial structural and functional destruction in trabecular meshwork cells,retinal ganglion cells,etc.of glaucoma.In addition,various new experimental and therapeutic interventions were used to preserve mitochondrial function,which may be useful for protecting against optic nerve degeneration or reducing the death of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma.Conclusions Mitochondria play an important role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma,various strategies targeting mitochondrial protection might provide a promising way to delay the onset of glaucoma or protect RGCs against glaucomatous damage.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria junction is required for iron homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yong; Schmollinger, Stefan; Attar, Narsis; Campos, Oscar A; Vogelauer, Maria; Carey, Michael F; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Kurdistani, Siavash K

    2017-08-11

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that physically tethers the two organelles to each other and creates the physical basis for communication between them. ERMES functions in lipid exchange between the ER and mitochondria, protein import into mitochondria, and maintenance of mitochondrial morphology and genome. Here, we report that ERMES is also required for iron homeostasis. Loss of ERMES components activates an Aft1-dependent iron deficiency response even in iron-replete conditions, leading to accumulation of excess iron inside the cell. This function is independent of known ERMES roles in calcium regulation, phospholipid biosynthesis, or effects on mitochondrial morphology. A mutation in the vacuolar protein sorting 13 (VPS13) gene that rescues the glycolytic phenotype of ERMES mutants suppresses the iron deficiency response and iron accumulation. Our findings reveal that proper communication between the ER and mitochondria is required for appropriate maintenance of cellular iron levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Morphological and biochemical characterization of mitochondria in Torpedo red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, A; Scacco, S; Papa, F; De Nitto, E; Papa, S

    2001-02-01

    A study is presented on the morphology and respiratory functions of mitochondria from Torpedo marmorata red blood cells. In vivo staining of red blood cells and transmission electron microscopy showed the existence of a considerable number of vital and orthodox mitochondria which decreased from young erythroblasts to mature erythrocytes from 60-50 to 30-20 per cell. In erythrocytes mitochondria exhibited a canonical, functional respiratory chain. The content and activity of cytochromes in erythrocytes were, however, significantly lower as compared to mammalian tissues.

  8. Scavenging of H2O2 by mouse brain mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Anatoly A; Andreyev, Alexander Yu; Zhang, Steven F; Starkova, Natalia N; Korneeva, Maria; Syromyatnikov, Mikhail; Popov, Vasily N

    2014-12-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism is unique in that mitochondria both generate and scavenge ROS. Recent estimates of ROS scavenging capacity of brain mitochondria are surprisingly high, ca. 9-12 nmol H2O2/min/mg, which is ~100 times higher than the rate of ROS generation. This raises a question whether brain mitochondria are a source or a sink of ROS. We studied the interaction between ROS generation and scavenging in mouse brain mitochondria by measuring the rate of removal of H2O2 added at a concentration of 0.4 μM, which is close to the reported physiological H2O2 concentrations in tissues, under conditions of low and high levels of mitochondrial H2O2 generation. With NAD-linked substrates, the rate of H2O2 generation by mitochondria was ~50-70 pmol/min/mg. The H2O2 scavenging dynamics was best approximated by the first order reaction equation. H2O2 scavenging was not affected by the uncoupling of mitochondria, phosphorylation of added ADP, or the genetic ablation of glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased in the absence of respiratory substrates, in the presence of thioredoxin reductase inhibitor auranofin, or in partially disrupted mitochondria. With succinate, the rate of H2O2 generation was ~2,200-2,900 pmol/min/mg; the scavenging of added H2O2 was masked by a significant accumulation of generated H2O2 in the assay medium. The obtained data were fitted into a simple model that reasonably well described the interaction between H2O2 scavenging and production. It showed that mitochondria are neither a sink nor a source of H2O2, but can function as both at the same time, efficiently stabilizing exogenous H2O2 concentration at a level directly proportional to the ratio of the H2O2 generation rate to the rate constant of the first order scavenging reaction.

  9. Obesity-exposed oocytes accumulate and transmit damaged mitochondria due to an inability to activate mitophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudoures, Anna L; Saben, Jessica; Drury, Andrea; Scheaffer, Suzanne; Modi, Zeel; Zhang, Wendy; Moley, Kelle H

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondria are the most prominent organelle in the oocyte. Somatic cells maintain a healthy population of mitochondria by degrading damaged mitochondria via mitophagy, a specialized autophagy pathway. However, evidence from previous work investigating the more general macroautophagy pathway in oocytes suggests that mitophagy may not be active in the oocyte. This would leave the vast numbers of mitochondria - poised to be inherited by the offspring - vulnerable to damage. Here we test the hypothesis that inactive mitophagy in the oocyte underlies maternal transmission of dysfunctional mitochondria. To determine whether oocytes can complete mitophagy, we used either CCCP or AntimycinA to depolarize mitochondria and trigger mitophagy. After depolarization, we did not detect co-localization of mitochondria with autophagosomes and mitochondrial DNA copy number remained unchanged, indicating the non-functional mitochondrial population was not removed. To investigate the impact of an absence of mitophagy in oocytes with damaged mitochondria on offspring mitochondrial function, we utilized in vitro fertilization of high fat high sugar (HF/HS)-exposed oocytes, which have lower mitochondrial membrane potential and damaged mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate that blastocysts generated from HF/HS oocytes have decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, lower metabolites involved in ATP generation, and accumulation of PINK1, a mitophagy marker protein. This mitochondrial phenotype in the blastocyst mirrors the phenotype we show in HF/HS exposed oocytes. Taken together, these data suggest that the mechanisms governing oocyte mitophagy are fundamentally distinct from those governing somatic cell mitophagy and that the absence of mitophagy in the setting of HF/HS exposure contributes to the oocyte-to-blastocyst transmission of dysfunctional mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Origins of prokaryotes, eukaryotes, mitochondria, and chloroplasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, R. M.; Dayhoff, M. O.

    1978-01-01

    A computer branching model is used to analyze cellular evolution. Attention is given to certain key amino acids and nucleotide residues (ferredoxin, 5s ribosomal RNA, and c-type cytochromes) because of their commonality over a wide variety of cell types. Each amino acid or nucleotide residue is a sequence in an inherited biological trait; and the branching method is employed to align sequences so that changes reflect substitution of one residue for another. Based on the computer analysis, the symbiotic theory of cellular evolution is considered the most probable. This theory holds that organelles, e.g., mitochondria and chloroplasts invaded larger bodies, e.g., bacteria, and combined functions to form eucaryotic cells.

  11. Mitochondria in biology and medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Claus Desler; Rasmussen, Lene Juel

    2012-01-01

    pathologies (Luft, 1994). Since 1959, the understanding of mitochondrial cytopathies has evolved immensely and mitochondrial cytopathies are now known to be the largest group of metabolic diseases and to be resulting in a wide variety of pathologies. "Mitochondria in Biology and Medicine" was the title...... of the first annual conference of Society of Mitochondrial Research and Medicine - India. The conference was organized by A. S. Sreedhar, Keshav Singh and Kumarasamy Thangaraj, and was held at The Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology (CCMB) Hyderabad, India, during 9-10 December 2011. The conference...

  12. Overlapping Communities Detection Based on Link Partition in Directed Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingyu Zou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Many complex systems can be described as networks to comprehend both the structure and the function. Community structure is one of the most important properties of complex networks. Detecting overlapping communities in networks have been more attention in recent years, but the most of approaches to this problem have been applied to the undirected networks. This paper presents a novel approach based on link partition to detect overlapping communities structure in directed networks. In contrast to previous researches focused on grouping nodes, our algorithm defines communities as groups of directed links rather than nodes with the purpose of nodes naturally belong to more than one community. This approach can identify a suitable number of overlapping communities without any prior knowledge about the community in directed networks. We evaluate our algorithm on a simple artificial network and several real-networks. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm proposed is efficient for detecting overlapping communities in directed networks.  

  13. Identification and characterization of uncoupling protein 4 in fat body and muscle mitochondria from the cockroach Gromphadorhina cocquereliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Rosinski, Grzegorz; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2011-12-01

    We have identified and characterized an uncoupling protein in mitochondria isolated from leg muscle and from fat body, an insect analogue tissue of mammalian liver and adipose tissue, of the cockroach Gromphadorhina coquereliana (GcUCP). This is the first functional characterization of UCP activity in isolated insect mitochondria. Bioenergetic studies clearly indicate UCP function in both insect tissues. In resting (non-phosphorylating) mitochondria, cockroach GcUCP activity was stimulated by the addition of micromolar concentrations of palmitic acid and inhibited by the purine nucleotide GTP. Moreover, in phosphorylating mitochondria, GcUCP activity was able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation. Functional studies indicate a higher activity of GcUCP-mediated uncoupling in cockroach muscle mitochondria compared to fat body mitochondria. GcUCP activation by palmitic acid resulted in a decrease in superoxide anion production, suggesting that protection against mitochondrial oxidative stress may be a physiological role of UCPs in insects. GcUCP protein was immunodetected using antibodies raised against human UCP4 as a single band of around 36 kDa. GcUCP protein expression in cockroach muscle mitochondria was significantly higher compared to mitochondria isolated from fat body. LC-MS/MS analyses revealed 100% sequence identities for peptides obtained from GcUCP to UCP4 isoforms from D. melanogaster (the highest homology), human, rat or other insect mitochondria. Therefore, it can be proposed that cockroach GcUCP corresponds to the UCP4 isoforms of other animals.

  14. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptors Are Localized in Striated Muscle Mitochondria and Regulate Mitochondrial Respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Mendizabal-Zubiaga, Juan; Melser, Su; Bénard, Giovanni; Ramos, Almudena; Reguero, Leire; Arrabal, Sergio; Elezgarai, Izaskun; Gerrikagoitia, Inmaculada; Suarez, Juan; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Puente, Nagore; Marsicano, Giovanni; Grandes, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    The cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor is widely distributed in the brain and peripheral organs where it regulates cellular functions and metabolism. In the brain, CB1 is mainly localized on presynaptic axon terminals but is also found on mitochondria (mtCB1), where it regulates cellular respiration and energy production. Likewise, CB1 is localized on muscle mitochondria, but very little is known about it. The aim of this study was to further investigate in detail the distribution and function...

  15. Overlap in Facebook Profiles Reflects Relationship Closeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Araceli M; Wendel, Markie L; Crockett, Erin E

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the association between self-reported Inclusion of Other in the Self (IOS) and Facebook overlap. Ninety-two participants completed online measures of IOS and investment model constructs. Researchers then recorded Facebook data from participants' profile pages. Results from multilevel models revealed that IOS predicted Facebook overlap. Furthermore, Facebook overlap was associated with commitment and investment in ways comparable to self-reported IOS. These findings suggest that overlap in Facebook profiles can be used to measure relationship closeness.

  16. Peptide-Mediated Delivery of Chemical Probes and Therapeutics to Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Sae Rin; Ahmed, Marya; Lei, Eric K; Wisnovsky, Simon P; Kelley, Shana O

    2016-09-20

    Mitochondria are organelles with critical roles in key processes within eukaryotic cells, and their dysfunction is linked with numerous diseases including neurodegenerative disorders and cancer. Pharmacological manipulation of mitochondrial function is therefore important both for basic science research and eventually, clinical medicine. However, in comparison to other organelles, mitochondria are difficult to access due to their hydrophobic and dense double membrane system as well as their negative membrane potential. To tackle the challenge of targeting these important subcellular compartments, significant effort has been put forward to develop mitochondria-targeted systems capable of transporting bioactive cargo into the mitochondrial interior. Systems now exist that utilize small molecule, peptide, liposome, and nanoparticle-based transport. The vectors available vary in size and structure and can facilitate transport of a variety of compounds for mitochondrial delivery. Notably, peptide-based delivery scaffolds offer attractive features such as ease of synthesis, tunability, biocompatibility, and high uptake both in cellulo and in vivo. Owing to their simple and modular synthesis, these peptides are highly adaptable for delivering chemically diverse cargo. Key design features of mitochondria-targeted peptides include cationic charge, which allows them to harness the negative membrane potential of mitochondria, and lipophilicity, which permits favorable interaction with hydrophobic membranes of mitochondria. These peptides have been covalently tethered to target therapeutic agents, including anticancer drugs, to enhance their drug properties, and to provide probes for mitochondrial biology. Interestingly, mitochondria-targeted DNA damaging agents demonstrate high potency and the ability to evade resistance mechanisms and off-target effects. Moreover, a combination of mitochondria-targeted DNA damaging agents was applied to an siRNA screen for the elucidation of

  17. Gene network interconnectedness and the generalized topological overlap measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horvath Steve

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network methods are increasingly used to represent the interactions of genes and/or proteins. Genes or proteins that are directly linked may have a similar biological function or may be part of the same biological pathway. Since the information on the connection (adjacency between 2 nodes may be noisy or incomplete, it can be desirable to consider alternative measures of pairwise interconnectedness. Here we study a class of measures that are proportional to the number of neighbors that a pair of nodes share in common. For example, the topological overlap measure by Ravasz et al. 1 can be interpreted as a measure of agreement between the m = 1 step neighborhoods of 2 nodes. Several studies have shown that two proteins having a higher topological overlap are more likely to belong to the same functional class than proteins having a lower topological overlap. Here we address the question whether a measure of topological overlap based on higher-order neighborhoods could give rise to a more robust and sensitive measure of interconnectedness. Results We generalize the topological overlap measure from m = 1 step neighborhoods to m ≥ 2 step neighborhoods. This allows us to define the m-th order generalized topological overlap measure (GTOM by (i counting the number of m-step neighbors that a pair of nodes share and (ii normalizing it to take a value between 0 and 1. Using theoretical arguments, a yeast co-expression network application, and a fly protein network application, we illustrate the usefulness of the proposed measure for module detection and gene neighborhood analysis. Conclusion Topological overlap can serve as an important filter to counter the effects of spurious or missing connections between network nodes. The m-th order topological overlap measure allows one to trade-off sensitivity versus specificity when it comes to defining pairwise interconnectedness and network modules.

  18. Generation of non-overlapping fiber architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapelle, Lucie; Lévesque, M.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2015-01-01

    of overlapping sphero-cylinders. At the end of the first step, a system of overlapping fibers is obtained. In order to obtain a hard-core configuration where fibers cannot overlap other fibers, we use an iterative method called the force-biased algorithm. It applies virtual forces on each point of the fiber...

  19. Non-random retention of protein-coding overlapping genes in Metazoa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bork Peer

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the overlap of transcriptional units occurs frequently in eukaryotic genomes, its evolutionary and biological significance remains largely unclear. Here we report a comparative analysis of overlaps between genes coding for well-annotated proteins in five metazoan genomes (human, mouse, zebrafish, fruit fly and worm. Results For all analyzed species the observed number of overlapping genes is always lower than expected assuming functional neutrality, suggesting that gene overlap is negatively selected. The comparison to the random distribution also shows that retained overlaps do not exhibit random features: antiparallel overlaps are significantly enriched, while overlaps lying on the same strand and those involving coding sequences are highly underrepresented. We confirm that overlap is mostly species-specific and provide evidence that it frequently originates through the acquisition of terminal, non-coding exons. Finally, we show that overlapping genes tend to be significantly co-expressed in a breast cancer cDNA library obtained by 454 deep sequencing, and that different overlap types display different patterns of reciprocal expression. Conclusion Our data suggest that overlap between protein-coding genes is selected against in Metazoa. However, when retained it may be used as a species-specific mechanism for the reciprocal regulation of neighboring genes. The tendency of overlaps to involve non-coding regions of the genes leads to the speculation that the advantages achieved by an overlapping arrangement may be optimized by evolving regulatory non-coding transcripts.

  20. Photostimulation of mitochondria as a treatment for retinal neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beirne, Kathy; Rozanowska, Malgorzata; Votruba, Marcela

    2017-09-01

    Absorption of photon energy by neuronal mitochondria leads to numerous downstream neuroprotective effects. Red and near infrared (NIR) light are associated with significantly less safety concerns than light of shorter wavelengths and they are therefore, the optimal choice for irradiating the retina. Potent neuroprotective effects have been demonstrated in various models of retinal damage, by red/NIR light, with limited data from human studies showing its ability to improve visual function. Improved neuronal mitochondrial function, increased blood flow to neural tissue, upregulation of cell survival mediators and restoration of normal microglial function have all been proposed as potential underlying mechanisms of red/NIR light. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  1. External NAD(P)H dehydrogenases in Acanthamoeba castellanii mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antos-Krzeminska, Nina; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-09-01

    The mitochondrial respiratory chain of plants and some fungi contains multiple rotenone-insensitive NAD(P)H dehydrogenases, of which at least two are located on the outer surface of the inner membrane (i.e., external NADH and external NADPH dehydrogenases). Annotated sequences of the putative alternative NAD(P)H dehydrogenases of the protozoan Acanthamoeba castellanii demonstrated similarity to plant and fungal sequences. We also studied activity of these dehydrogenases in isolated A. castellanii mitochondria. External NADPH oxidation was observed for the first time in protist mitochondria. The coupling parameters were similar for external NADH oxidation and external NADPH oxidation, indicating similar efficiencies of ATP synthesis. Both external NADH oxidation and external NADPH oxidation had an optimal pH of 6.8 independent of relevant ubiquinol-oxidizing pathways, the cytochrome pathway or a GMP-stimulated alternative oxidase. The maximal oxidizing activity with external NADH was almost double that with external NADPH. However, a lower Michaelis constant (K(M)) value for external NADPH oxidation was observed compared to that for external NADH oxidation. Stimulation by Ca(2+) was approximately 10 times higher for external NADPH oxidation, while NADH dehydrogenase(s) appeared to be slightly dependent on Ca(2+). Our results indicate that external NAD(P)H dehydrogenases similar to those in plant and fungal mitochondria function in mitochondria of A. castellanii.

  2. RNA Editing in Plant Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiesel, Rudolf; Wissinger, Bernd; Schuster, Wolfgang; Brennicke, Axel

    1989-12-01

    Comparative sequence analysis of genomic and complementary DNA clones from several mitochondrial genes in the higher plant Oenothera revealed nucleotide sequence divergences between the genomic and the messenger RNA-derived sequences. These sequence alterations could be most easily explained by specific post-transcriptional nucleotide modifications. Most of the nucleotide exchanges in coding regions lead to altered codons in the mRNA that specify amino acids better conserved in evolution than those encoded by the genomic DNA. Several instances show that the genomic arginine codon CGG is edited in the mRNA to the tryptophan codon TGG in amino acid positions that are highly conserved as tryptophan in the homologous proteins of other species. This editing suggests that the standard genetic code is used in plant mitochondria and resolves the frequent coincidence of CGG codons and tryptophan in different plant species. The apparently frequent and non-species-specific equivalency of CGG and TGG codons in particular suggests that RNA editing is a common feature of all higher plant mitochondria.

  3. Mitochondria-specific accumulation of amyloid β induces mitochondrial dysfunction leading to apoptotic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Moon-Yong; Han, Sun-Ho; Son, Sung Min; Hong, Hyun-Seok; Choi, Young-Ju; Byun, Jayoung; Mook-Jung, Inhee

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are best known as the essential intracellular organelles that host the homeostasis required for cellular survival, but they also have relevance in diverse disease-related conditions, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide is the key molecule in AD pathogenesis, and has been highlighted in the implication of mitochondrial abnormality during the disease progress. Neuronal exposure to Aβ impairs mitochondrial dynamics and function. Furthermore, mitochondrial Aβ accumulation has been detected in the AD brain. However, the underlying mechanism of how Aβ affects mitochondrial function remains uncertain, and it is questionable whether mitochondrial Aβ accumulation followed by mitochondrial dysfunction leads directly to neuronal toxicity. This study demonstrated that an exogenous Aβ(1-42) treatment, when applied to the hippocampal cell line of mice (specifically HT22 cells), caused a deleterious alteration in mitochondria in both morphology and function. A clathrin-mediated endocytosis blocker rescued the exogenous Aβ(1-42)-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction. Furthermore, the mitochondria-targeted accumulation of Aβ(1-42) in HT22 cells using Aβ(1-42) with a mitochondria-targeting sequence induced the identical morphological alteration of mitochondria as that observed in the APP/PS AD mouse model and exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. In addition, subsequent mitochondrial dysfunctions were demonstrated in the mitochondria-specific Aβ(1-42) accumulation model, which proved indistinguishable from the mitochondrial impairment induced by exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Finally, cellular toxicity was directly induced by mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation, which mimics the apoptosis process in exogenous Aβ(1-42)-treated HT22 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that mitochondria-targeted Aβ(1-42) accumulation is the necessary and sufficient condition for Aβ-mediated mitochondria impairments, and leads

  4. On Multigrid for Overlapping Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshaw, W

    2004-01-13

    The solution of elliptic partial differential equations on composite overlapping grids using multigrid is discussed. An approach is described that provides a fast and memory efficient scheme for the solution of boundary value problems in complex geometries. The key aspects of the new scheme are an automatic coarse grid generation algorithm, an adaptive smoothing technique for adjusting residuals on different component grids, and the use of local smoothing near interpolation boundaries. Other important features include optimizations for Cartesian component grids, the use of over-relaxed Red-Black smoothers and the generation of coarse grid operators through Galerkin averaging. Numerical results in two and three dimensions show that very good multigrid convergence rates can be obtained for both Dirichlet and Neumann/mixed boundary conditions. A comparison to Krylov based solvers shows that the multigrid solver can be much faster and require significantly less memory.

  5. The eigSUMR inverter for overlap fermion

    CERN Document Server

    Cundy, Nigel

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the usage and applicability of deflation methods for the overlap lattice Dirac operator, focussing on calculating the eigenvalues using a method similar to the eigCG algorithm used for other Dirac operators. The overlap operator, which contains several theoretical advantages over other formulations of lattice Quantum Chromodynamics, is more computationally expensive because it requires the computation of the matrix sign function. The principle change made compared to deflation methods for other formulations of lattice QCD is that it is necessary for best performance to tune or relax the accuracy of the matrix sign function as the computation proceeds. We adapt the eigCG algorithm for two inversion algorithms for overlap fermions, GMRESR(relCG) and GMRESR(relSUMR). Before deflation, the rate of convergence of these routines in terms of iterations is similar, but, since the Shifted Unitary Minimal Residual (SUMR) algorithm only requires one call to the matrix sign function compared to the two calls r...

  6. Systematic Analysis of Small RNAs Associated with Human Mitochondria by Deep Sequencing: Detailed Analysis of Mitochondrial Associated miRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Tomar, Dhanendra; Prajapati, Paresh; Singh, Rochika; Singh, Arun Kumar; Singh, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria are one of the central regulators of many cellular processes beyond its well established role in energy metabolism. The inter-organellar crosstalk is critical for the optimal function of mitochondria. Many nuclear encoded proteins and RNA are imported to mitochondria. The translocation of small RNA (sRNA) including miRNA to mitochondria and other sub-cellular organelle is still not clear. We characterized here sRNA including miRNA associated with human mitochondria by cellular fractionation and deep sequencing approach. Mitochondria were purified from HEK293 and HeLa cells for RNA isolation. The sRNA library was generated and sequenced using Illumina system. The analysis showed the presence of unique population of sRNA associated with mitochondria including miRNA. Putative novel miRNAs were characterized from unannotated sRNA sequences. The study showed the association of 428 known, 196 putative novel miRNAs to mitochondria of HEK293 and 327 known, 13 putative novel miRNAs to mitochondria of HeLa cells. The alignment of sRNA to mitochondrial genome was also studied. The targets were analyzed using DAVID to classify them in unique networks using GO and KEGG tools. Analysis of identified targets showed that miRNA associated with mitochondria regulates critical cellular processes like RNA turnover, apoptosis, cell cycle and nucleotide metabolism. The six miRNAs (counts >1000) associated with mitochondria of both HEK293 and HeLa were validated by RT-qPCR. To our knowledge, this is the first systematic study demonstrating the associations of sRNA including miRNA with mitochondria that may regulate site-specific turnover of target mRNA important for mitochondrial related functions. PMID:22984580

  7. How to split up: lessons from mitochondria

    OpenAIRE

    Dikov, Daniel; Reichert, Andreas S.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondria underlie a continuous cycle of fission and fusion. Recent studies published in The EMBO Journal, EMBO Reports and The Journal of Cell Biology identified factors that recruit the fission factor Drp1 to mitochondria and inhibit or activate Drp1 activity.

  8. Mitochondria and Energetic Depression in Cell Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Zierz

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of almost all diseases. Acquired or inherited mutations of the mitochondrial genome DNA may give rise to mitochondrial diseases. Another class of disorders, in which mitochondrial impairments are initiated by extramitochondrial factors, includes neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes resulting from typical pathological processes, such as hypoxia/ischemia, inflammation, intoxications, and carcinogenesis. Both classes of diseases lead to cellular energetic depression (CED, which is characterized by decreased cytosolic phosphorylation potential that suppresses the cell’s ability to do work and control the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis and its redox state. If progressing, CED leads to cell death, whose type is linked to the functional status of the mitochondria. In the case of limited deterioration, when some amounts of ATP can still be generated due to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, mitochondria launch the apoptotic cell death program by release of cytochrome c. Following pronounced CED, cytoplasmic ATP levels fall below the thresholds required for processing the ATP-dependent apoptotic cascade and the cell dies from necrosis. Both types of death can be grouped together as a mitochondrial cell death (MCD. However, there exist multiple adaptive reactions aimed at protecting cells against CED. In this context, a metabolic shift characterized by suppression of OXPHOS combined with activation of aerobic glycolysis as the main pathway for ATP synthesis (Warburg effect is of central importance. Whereas this type of adaptation is sufficiently effective to avoid CED and to control the cellular redox state, thereby ensuring the cell survival, it also favors the avoidance of apoptotic cell death. This scenario may underlie uncontrolled cellular proliferation and growth, eventually resulting in carcinogenesis.

  9. Overlapping Structures in Sensory-Motor Mappings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earland, Kevin; Lee, Mark; Shaw, Patricia; Law, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines a biologically-inspired representation technique designed for the support of sensory-motor learning in developmental robotics. An interesting feature of the many topographic neural sheets in the brain is that closely packed receptive fields must overlap in order to fully cover a spatial region. This raises interesting scientific questions with engineering implications: e.g. is overlap detrimental? does it have any benefits? This paper examines the effects and properties of overlap between elements arranged in arrays or maps. In particular we investigate how overlap affects the representation and transmission of spatial location information on and between topographic maps. Through a series of experiments we determine the conditions under which overlap offers advantages and identify useful ranges of overlap for building mappings in cognitive robotic systems. Our motivation is to understand the phenomena of overlap in order to provide guidance for application in sensory-motor learning robots. PMID:24392118

  10. Mitochondria during androgenesis in Hordeum vulgare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Idzikowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Different number of mitochondria of varying structure was observed in particular stages of the development of barley (Hordeum vulgare microspores, stimulated by the in vitro culture to form embryoids. This variability was reflected in different shape of sections, different ratio between total area of mitochondria profiles and area of cytoplasm sections, varying number of cristae, and different density of the matrix. Within the cristae of some mitochondria crystalline inclusions were observed. Mitochondria divided by a contraction. In the matrix of some mitochondria spheric bodies were formed. They were surrounded by one or two membranes. It is suggested that the bi-membrane forms constituted promitochandria, whereas unimembrane forms could constitute promicrobodies.

  11. Impact of mitochondria on nitrite metabolism in HL-1 cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDungel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Apart from ATP synthesis mitochondria have many other functions, one being nitrite reductase activity. NO released from nitrite has been shown to protect the heart from ischemia/reperfusion injury in a cGMP-dependent manner. However, the exact impact of mitochondria on the release of NO from nitrite in cardiomyocytes is not completely understood. Besides mitochondria, a number of non-mitochondrial metalloproteins have been suggested to facilitate this process. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of mitochondria on the bioactivation of nitrite in HL-1 cardiomyocytes.The levels of nitrosyl complexes of hemoglobin (NO-Hb and cGMP levels were measured by electron spin resonance spectroscopy and enzyme immunoassay. In addition the formation of free NO was determined by confocal microscopy as well as intracellular nitrite and S-nitrosothiols by chemoluminescence analysis. NO was released from nitrite in cell culture in an oxygen dependent manner. Application of specific inhibitors of the respiratory chain, p450, NO synthases and xanthine oxidoreductase showed that all four enzymatic systems are involved in the release of NO, but more than 50% of NO is released via the mitochondrial pathway. Only NO released by mitochondria activated cGMP synthesis. Cardiomyocytes co-cultured with red blood cells (RBC competed with RBC for nitrite, but free NO was detected only in HL-1 cells suggesting that RBC are not a source of NO in this model. Apart from activation of cGMP synthesis, NO formed in HL-1 cells diffused out of the cells and formed NO-Hb complexes. In addition nitrite was converted by HL-1 cells to S-nitrosyl complexes. In HL-1 cardiomyocytes, several enzymatic systems are involved in nitrite reduction to NO but only the mitochondrial pathway of NO release activates cGMP synthesis. Our data suggest that this pathway may be a key regulator of myocardial contractility especially under hypoxic conditions.

  12. ABCB10 depletion reduces unfolded protein response in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Masato

    2017-04-29

    Mitochondria have many functions, including ATP generation. The electron transport chain (ETC) and the coupled ATP synthase generate ATP by consuming oxygen. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also produced by ETC, and ROS damage deoxyribonucleic acids, membrane lipids and proteins. Recent analysis indicate that mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)), which enhances expression of mitochondrial chaperones and proteases to remove damaged proteins, is activated when damaged proteins accumulate in the mitochondria. In Caenorhabditis elegans, HAF-1, a putative ortholog of human ABCB10, plays an essential role in signal transduction from mitochondria to nuclei to enhance UPR(mt). Therefore, it is possible that ABCB10 has a role similar to that of HAF-1. However, it has not been reported whether ABCB10 is a factor in the signal transduction pathway to enhance UPR(mt). In this study, ABCB10 was depleted in HepG2 cells using small interfering RNA (siRNA), and the effect was examined. ABCB10 depletion upregulated ROS and the expression of ROS-detoxifying enzymes (SOD2, GSTA1, and GSTA2), and SESN3, a protein induced by ROS to protect the cell from oxidative stress. In addition, ABCB10 depletion significantly decreased expression of UPR(mt)-related mitochondrial chaperones (HSPD1 and DNAJA3), and a mitochondrial protease (LONP1). However, the putative activity of ABCB10 to export peptides from mitochondria was not lost by ABCB10 depletion. Altogether, these data suggest that ABCB10 is involved in UPR(mt) signaling pathway similar to that of HAF-1, although ABCB10 probably does not participate in peptide export from mitochondria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Melatonin as a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant: one of evolution's best ideas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Russel J; Rosales-Corral, Sergio; Tan, Dun Xian; Jou, Mei Jie; Galano, Annia; Xu, Bing

    2017-09-01

    Melatonin is an ancient antioxidant. After its initial development in bacteria, it has been retained throughout evolution such that it may be or may have been present in every species that have existed. Even though it has been maintained throughout evolution during the diversification of species, melatonin's chemical structure has never changed; thus, the melatonin present in currently living humans is identical to that present in cyanobacteria that have existed on Earth for billions of years. Melatonin in the systemic circulation of mammals quickly disappears from the blood presumably due to its uptake by cells, particularly when they are under high oxidative stress conditions. The measurement of the subcellular distribution of melatonin has shown that the concentration of this indole in the mitochondria greatly exceeds that in the blood. Melatonin presumably enters mitochondria through oligopeptide transporters, PEPT1, and PEPT2. Thus, melatonin is specifically targeted to the mitochondria where it seems to function as an apex antioxidant. In addition to being taken up from the circulation, melatonin may be produced in the mitochondria as well. During evolution, mitochondria likely originated when melatonin-forming bacteria were engulfed as food by ancestral prokaryotes. Over time, engulfed bacteria evolved into mitochondria; this is known as the endosymbiotic theory of the origin of mitochondria. When they did so, the mitochondria retained the ability to synthesize melatonin. Thus, melatonin is not only taken up by mitochondria but these organelles, in addition to many other functions, also probably produce melatonin as well. Melatonin's high concentrations and multiple actions as an antioxidant provide potent antioxidant protection to these organelles which are exposed to abundant free radicals.

  14. Hausdorff dimension of self-similar sets with overlaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    We provide a simple formula to compute the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of an overlapping iterated function system of contractive similarities satisfying a certain collection of assumptions. This formula is obtained by associating a non-overlapping infinite iterated function system to an iterated function system satisfying our assumptions and using the results of Moran to compute the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of this infinite iterated function system, thus showing that the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of this infinite iterated function system agrees with that of the attractor of the original iterated function system. Our methods are applicable to some iterated function systems that do not satisfy the finite type condition recently introduced by Ngai and Wang.

  15. Hausdorff dimension of self-similar sets with overlaps

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG QiRong; John HARDING; HU TianYou

    2009-01-01

    We provide a simple formula to compute the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of an overlapping iterated function system of contractive similarities satisfying a certain collection of assumptions. This formula is obtained by associating a non-overlapping infinite iterated function system to an iterated function system satisfying our assumptions and using the results of Moran to compute the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of this infinite iterated function system,thus showing that the Hausdorff dimension of the attractor of this infinite iterated function system agrees with that of the attractor of the original iterated function system.Our methods are applicable to some iterated function systems that do not satisfy the finite type condition recently introduced by Ngai and Wang.

  16. Gene-specific mitochondria dysfunctions in human TARDBP and C9ORF72 fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesto, Elisa; Colombrita, Claudia; Gumina, Valentina; Borghi, Maria Orietta; Dusi, Sabrina; Doretti, Alberto; Fagiolari, Gigliola; Invernizzi, Federica; Moggio, Maurizio; Tiranti, Valeria; Silani, Vincenzo; Ratti, Antonia

    2016-05-05

    Dysregulation of RNA metabolism represents an important pathogenetic mechanism in both amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) due to the involvement of the DNA/RNA-binding proteins TDP-43 and FUS and, more recently, of C9ORF72. A potential link between dysregulation of RNA metabolism and mitochondrial dysfunction is recently emerged in TDP-43 disease models. To further investigate the possible relationship between these two pathogenetic mechanisms in ALS/FTD, we studied mitochondria functionality in human mutant TARDBP(p.A382T) and C9ORF72 fibroblasts grown in galactose medium to induce a switch from a glycolytic to an oxidative metabolism. In this condition we observed significant changes in mitochondria morphology and ultrastructure in both mutant cells with a fragmented mitochondria network particularly evident in TARDBP(p.A382T) fibroblasts. From analysis of the mitochondrial functionality, a decrease of mitochondria membrane potential with no alterations in oxygen consumption rate emerged in TARDBP fibroblasts. Conversely, an increased oxygen consumption and mitochondria hyperpolarization were observed in C9ORF72 fibroblasts in association to increased ROS and ATP content. We found evidence of autophagy/mitophagy in dynamic equilibrium with the biogenesis of novel mitochondria, particularly in mutant C9ORF72 fibroblasts where an increase of mitochondrial DNA content and mass, and of PGC1-α protein was observed. Our imaging and biochemical data show that wild-type and mutant TDP-43 proteins do not localize at mitochondria so that the molecular mechanisms responsible for such mitochondria impairment remain to be further elucidated. For the first time our findings assess a link between C9ORF72 and mitochondria dysfunction and indicate that mitochondria functionality is affected in TARDBP and C9ORF72 fibroblasts with gene-specific features in oxidative conditions. As in neuronal metabolism mitochondria are actively used for ATP

  17. Energetic performance is improved by specific activation of K+ fluxes through K(Ca) channels in heart mitochondria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aon, Miguel A; Cortassa, Sonia; Wei, An-Chi

    2009-01-01

    K(Ca) in regulating mitochondrial function by measuring K+ flux, membrane potential (DeltaPsi(m)), light scattering, and respiration in guinea pig heart mitochondria. K+ uptake and the influence of anions were assessed in mitochondria loaded with the K+ sensor PBFI by adding either the chloride (KCl), acetate (KAc...

  18. Biochemistry, proteomics, and phosphoproteomics of plant mitochondria from non-photosynthetic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jesper; Thelen, Jay J.; Møller, Ian Max

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria fulfill some basic roles in all plant cells. They supply the cell with energy in the form of ATP and reducing equivalents (NAD(P)H) and they provide the cell with intermediates for a range of biosynthetic pathways. In addition to this, mitochondria contribute to a number of specialized...... functions depending on the tissue and cell type, as well as environmental conditions. We will here review the biochemistry and proteomics of mitochondria from non-green cells and organs, which differ from those of photosynthetic organs in a number of respects. We will briefly cover purification...... of mitochondria and general biochemical properties such as oxidative phosphorylation. We will then mention a few adaptive properties in response to water stress, seed maturation and germination and the ability to function under hypoxic conditions. The discussion will mainly focus on Arabidopsis cell cultures...

  19. Recombining overlapping BACs into single large BACs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzamanis, George; Kotsinas, Athanassios

    2015-01-01

    BAC clones containing the entire genomic region of a gene including the long-range regulatory elements are very useful for gene functional analysis. However, large genes often span more than the insert of a BAC clone, and single BACs covering the entire region of interest are not available. Here, we describe a general system for linking two or more overlapping BACs into a single clone. Two rounds of homologous recombination are used. In the first, the BAC inserts are subcloned into the pBACLink vectors. In the second, the two BACs are combined together. Multiple BACs in a contig can be combined by alternating use of the pBACLInk vectors, resulting in several BAC clones containing as much of the genomic region of a gene as required. Such BACs can then be used in gene expression studies and/or gene therapy applications.

  20. Redox homeostasis protects mitochondria through accelerating ROS conversion to enhance hypoxia resistance in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengying; Zhang, Dongyang; Shen, Lingxiao; Dong, Kelei; Wu, Meiling; Ou, Zhouluo; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-03-09

    Mitochondria are the powerhouses of eukaryotic cells and the main source of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hypoxic cells, participating in regulating redox homeostasis. The mechanism of tumor hypoxia tolerance, especially the role of mitochondria in tumor hypoxia resistance remains largely unknown. This study aimed to explore the role of mitochondria in tumor hypoxia resistance. We observed that glycolysis in hypoxic cancer cells was up-regulated more rapidly, with far lesser attenuation in aerobic oxidation, thus contributing to a more stable ATP/ADP ratio. In hypoxia, cancer cells rapidly convert hypoxia-induced O(2˙)(-) into H2O2. H2O2 is further decomposed by a relatively stronger antioxidant system, causing ROS levels to increase lesser compared to normal cells. The moderate ROS leads to an appropriate degree of autophagy, eliminating the damaged mitochondria and offering nutrients to promote mitochondria fusion, thus protects mitochondria and improves hypoxia tolerance in cancer. The functional mitochondria could enable tumor cells to flexibly switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation to meet the different physiological requirements during the hypoxia/re-oxygenation cycling of tumor growth.

  1. Human REV3 DNA Polymerase Zeta Localizes to Mitochondria and Protects the Mitochondrial Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhupendra; Li, Xiurong; Owens, Kjerstin M; Vanniarajan, Ayyasamy; Liang, Ping; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    To date, mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (POLG) is the only polymerase known to be present in mammalian mitochondria. A dogma in the mitochondria field is that there is no other polymerase present in the mitochondria of mammalian cells. Here we demonstrate localization of REV3 DNA polymerase in the mammalian mitochondria. We demonstrate localization of REV3 in the mitochondria of mammalian tissue as well as cell lines. REV3 associates with POLG and mitochondrial DNA and protects the mitochondrial genome from DNA damage. Inactivation of Rev3 leads to reduced mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced OXPHOS activity, and increased glucose consumption. Conversely, inhibition of the OXPHOS increases expression of Rev3. Rev3 expression is increased in human primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. Inactivation of Rev3 decreases cell migration and invasion, and localization of Rev3 in mitochondria increases survival and the invasive potential of cancer cells. Taken together, we demonstrate that REV3 functions in mammalian mitochondria and that mitochondrial REV3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cells.

  2. 重叠综合征患者肺动脉压力与血管内皮功能的研究%Pulmonary arterial pressure and vascular endothelial function in patients with overlap syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈文晖; 郝晴虹; 张海

    2012-01-01

    目的:探讨重叠综合征(OS)患者肺功能、睡眠呼吸参数和肺动脉压力的变化以及肺动脉压力与血管内皮功能的相关性.方法:收集2009年2月至2012年1月我院呼吸科诊断的慢性阻塞性肺疾病(COPD)、阻塞性睡眠呼吸暂停低通气综合征(OSAHS)和OS患者各60例,分别测定患者肺功能、睡眠呼吸参数、平均肺动脉压力(mPAP)、血清内皮素1(ET-1)、一氧化氮(NO)和血管内皮生长因子(VEGF)水平.结果:OS组与单纯COPD组和OSAHS组相比,第1秒用力呼气容积(FEV1)(%预测值)、FEV1/用力肺活量(FVC)和快速眼动相睡眠(REM)占总睡眠时间百分比(%)均明显降低(P<0.05);而睡眠呼吸暂停低通气指数(AHI、Epworth嗜睡量表(ESS)评分和mPAP明显增高(P<0.05); OS患者血清中ET-1和VEGF浓度明显高于单纯COPD和单纯OSAHS患者(P<0.05),并与其mPAP呈正相关,而NO浓度显著降低,与mPAP呈负相关.结论:OS患者较单纯的COPD和OSAHS患者更易合并肺动脉高压,外周血ET-1、VEGF和NO的浓度与肺动脉压力有一定的相关性.%Objective To explore the changes of pulmonary function and sleep respiratory parameters, and to analyze the correlation between mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) and vascular endothelial function in patients with overlap syndrome (OS). Methods Sixty OS patients, 60 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 60 obstructive sleep apnea and hyperpnoea syndrome (OSAHS) patients from Feb 2009 to Jan 2012 were enrolled in this study. Pulmonary function, sleep respiratory parameter, mPAP, endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitric oxide (NO) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VECF) were assessed and analyzed. Results Forced expiaratory volume in 1 s (FEV,)(% predicted value), FEW forced vital capacity (FVC) and rapid eye movement sleep (REM) % were significantly lower in OS patients than those in COPD and OSAHS patients(P<0.05) .while apnea hypopnea index (AM), Epworth sleepiness scale

  3. Detecting highly overlapping community structure by greedy clique expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Conrad; McDaid, Aaron; Hurley, Neil

    2010-01-01

    In complex networks it is common for each node to belong to several communities, implying a highly overlapping community structure. Recent advances in benchmarking indicate that existing community assignment algorithms, capable of detecting overlapping communities, perform well only when the extent of community overlap is kept to modest levels. To overcome this limitation, we introduce a new community assignment algorithm called Greedy Clique Expansion (GCE). The algorithm identifies distinct cliques as seeds and expands these seeds by greedily optimizing a local fitness function. We perform extensive benchmarks on synthetic data to demonstrate that GCE's good performance is robust across diverse graph topologies. Significantly, GCE is the only algorithm to perform well on these synthetic graphs, in which every node belongs to multiple communities. Furthermore, when put to the task of identifying functional modules in protein interaction data, and college dorm assignments in Facebook friendship data, we find ...

  4. Frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related β-amyloid accumulation by chronic sleep restriction in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongyi; Wu, Huijuan; He, Jialin; Zhuang, Jianhua; Liu, Zhenyu; Yang, Yang; Huang, Liuqing; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-08-17

    Mitochondrial dysfunction induced by mitochondria-related β-amyloid (Aβ) accumulation is increasingly being considered a novel risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer's disease pathophysiology. The close relationship between chronic sleep restriction (CSR) and cortical Aβ elevation was confirmed recently. By assessing frontal cortical mitochondrial function (electron microscopy manifestation, cytochrome C oxidase concentration, ATP level, and mitochondrial membrane potential) and the levels of mitochondria-related Aβ in 9-month-old adult male C57BL/6J mice subjected to CSR and as an environmental control (CO) group, we aimed to evaluate the association of CSR with mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation. In this study, frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was significantly more severe in CSR mice compared with CO animals. Furthermore, CSR mice showed higher mitochondria-associated Aβ, total Aβ, and mitochondria-related β-amyloid protein precursor (AβPP) levels compared with CO mice. In the CSR model, mouse frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction was correlated with mitochondria-associated Aβ and mitochondria-related AβPP levels. However, frontal cortical mitochondria-associated Aβ levels showed no significant association with cortical total Aβ and mitochondrial AβPP concentrations. These findings indicated that CSR-induced frontal cortical mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondria-related Aβ accumulation, which was closely related to mitochondrial dysfunction under CSR.

  5. Calcium Transport by Corn Mitochondria 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Marco Aurelio P.; Carnieri, Eva G. S.; Vercesi, Anibal E.

    1992-01-01

    Mitochondria from some plant tissues possess the ability to take up Ca2+ by a phosphate-dependent mechanism associated with a decrease in membrane potential, H+ extrusion, and increase in the rate of respiration (AE Vercesi, L Pereira da Silva, IS Martins, CF Bernardes, EGS Carnieri, MM Fagian [1989] In G Fiskum, ed, Cell Calcium Metabolism. Plenum Press, New York, pp 103-111). The present study reexamined the nature of the phosphate requirement in this process. The main observations are: (a) Respiration-coupled Ca2+ uptake by isolated corn (Zea mays var Maya Normal) mitochondria or carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-induced efflux of the cation from such mitochondria are sensitive to mersalyl and cannot be dissociated from the silmultaneous movement of phosphate in the same direction. (b) Ruthenium red-induced efflux is not affected by mersalyl and can occur in the absence of phosphate movement. (c) In Ca2+-loaded corn mitochondria, mersalyl causes net Ca2+ release unrelated to a decrease in membrane potential, probably due to an inhibition of Ca2+ cycling at the level of the influx pathway. It is concluded that corn mitochondria (and probably other plant mitochondria) do possess an electrophoretic influx pathway that appears to be a mersalyl-sensitive Ca2+/inorganic phosphate-symporter and a phosphate-independent efflux pathway possibly similar to the Na2+-independent Ca2+ efflux mechanism of vertebrate mitochondria, because it is not stimulated by Na+. PMID:16668661

  6. Solving Partial Differential Equations on Overlapping Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henshaw, W D

    2008-09-22

    We discuss the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs) on overlapping grids. This is a powerful technique for efficiently solving problems in complex, possibly moving, geometry. An overlapping grid consists of a set of structured grids that overlap and cover the computational domain. By allowing the grids to overlap, grids for complex geometries can be more easily constructed. The overlapping grid approach can also be used to remove coordinate singularities by, for example, covering a sphere with two or more patches. We describe the application of the overlapping grid approach to a variety of different problems. These include the solution of incompressible fluid flows with moving and deforming geometry, the solution of high-speed compressible reactive flow with rigid bodies using adaptive mesh refinement (AMR), and the solution of the time-domain Maxwell's equations of electromagnetism.

  7. Overlapped frequency-time division multiplexing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Hui; LI Dao-ben

    2009-01-01

    A technique named overlapped frequency-time division multiplexing (OVFTDM)) is proposed in this article. The technique is derived from Nyquist system and frequency-time division multiplexing system. When the signals are compactly overlapped without the orthogonality in time domain, the technique is named overlapped time division multiplexing (OVTDM), whereas when signals are compactly overlapped without the orthogonality in frequency domain, the technique is called overlapped frequency division multiplexing (OVFDM). To further improve spectral efficiency, the OVFTDM in which signals are overlapped both in frequency domain and in time domain is explored. OVFTDM does not depend on orthogonality whatever in time domain or in frequency domain like Nyquist system or OFDM system, but on the convolutional constraint relationship among signals. Therefore, not only the spectral efficiency but also the reliability is improved. The simulations verify the validity of this theory.

  8. Automatic detection of mitochondria from electron microscope tomography images: a curve fitting approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasel, Serdar F.; Hassanpour, Reza; Mumcuoglu, Erkan U.; Perkins, Guy C.; Martone, Maryann

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondria are sub-cellular components which are mainly responsible for synthesis of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) and involved in the regulation of several cellular activities such as apoptosis. The relation between some common diseases of aging and morphological structure of mitochondria is gaining strength by an increasing number of studies. Electron microscope tomography (EMT) provides high-resolution images of the 3D structure and internal arrangement of mitochondria. Studies that aim to reveal the correlation between mitochondrial structure and its function require the aid of special software tools for manual segmentation of mitochondria from EMT images. Automated detection and segmentation of mitochondria is a challenging problem due to the variety of mitochondrial structures, the presence of noise, artifacts and other sub-cellular structures. Segmentation methods reported in the literature require human interaction to initialize the algorithms. In our previous study, we focused on 2D detection and segmentation of mitochondria using an ellipse detection method. In this study, we propose a new approach for automatic detection of mitochondria from EMT images. First, a preprocessing step was applied in order to reduce the effect of nonmitochondrial sub-cellular structures. Then, a curve fitting approach was presented using a Hessian-based ridge detector to extract membrane-like structures and a curve-growing scheme. Finally, an automatic algorithm was employed to detect mitochondria which are represented by a subset of the detected curves. The results show that the proposed method is more robust in detection of mitochondria in consecutive EMT slices as compared with our previous automatic method.

  9. Correlated Edge Overlaps in Multiplex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Baxter, Gareth J; da Costa, Rui A; Dorogovtsev, Sergey N; Mendes, José F F

    2016-01-01

    We develop the theory of sparse multiplex networks with partially overlapping links based on their local tree-likeness. This theory enables us to find the giant mutually connected component in a two-layer multiplex network with arbitrary correlations between connections of different types. We find that correlations between the overlapping and non-overlapping links markedly change the phase diagram of the system, leading to multiple hybrid phase transitions. For assortative correlations we observe recurrent hybrid phase transitions.

  10. The mitochondria-plasma membrane contact site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Benedikt

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondria are dynamic organelles that are highly motile and frequently fuse and divide. It has recently become clear that their complex behavior is governed to a large extent by interactions with other cellular structures. This review will focus on a mitochondria-plasma membrane tethering complex that was recently discovered and molecularly analyzed in budding yeast, the Num1/Mdm36 complex. This complex attaches mitochondria to the cell cortex and ensures that a portion of the organelles is retained in mother cells during cell division. At the same time, it supports mitochondrial division and integrates mitochondrial dynamics into cellular architecture. Recent evidence suggests that similar mechanisms might exist also in mammalian cells.

  11. Isolation of mitochondria from tissue culture cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, David A; Shadel, Gerald S

    2014-10-01

    The number of mitochondria per cell varies substantially from cell line to cell line. For example, human HeLa cells contain at least twice as many mitochondria as smaller mouse L cells. This protocol starts with a washed cell pellet of 1-2 mL derived from ∼10⁹ cells grown in culture. The cells are swollen in a hypotonic buffer and ruptured with a Dounce or Potter-Elvehjem homogenizer using a tight-fitting pestle, and mitochondria are isolated by differential centrifugation. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Finding overlapping communities using seed set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-Xuan; Zhang, Xiao-Dong

    2017-02-01

    The local optimization algorithm using seed set to find overlapping communities has become more and more a significant method, but it is a great challenge how to choose a good seed set. In this paper, a new method is proposed to achieve the choice of candidate seed sets, and yields a new algorithm to find overlapping communities in complex networks. By testing in real world networks and synthetic networks, this method can successfully detect overlapping communities and outperform other state-of-the-art overlapping community detection methods.

  13. Overlap syndromes among autoimmune liver diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christian Rust; Ulrich Beuers

    2008-01-01

    The three major immune disorders of the liver are autoimmune hepatitis (AIH),primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC).Variant forms of these diseases are generally called overlap syndromes,although there has been no standardised definition.Patients with overlap syndromes present with both hepatitic and cholestatic serum liver tests and have histological features of AIH and PBC or PSC.The AIH-PBC overlap syndrome is the most common form,affecting almost 10% of adults with AIH or PBC.Single cases of AIH and autoimmune cholangitis (AMA-negative PBC) overlap syndrome have also been reported.The AIH-PSC overlap syndrome is predominantly found in children,adolescents and young adults with AIH or PSC.Interestingly,transitions from one autoimmune to another have also been reported in a minority of patients,especially transitions from PBC to AIH-PBC overlap syndrome.Overlap syndromes show a progressive course towards liver cirrhosis and liver failure without treatment.Therapy for overlap syndromes is empiric,since controlled trials are not available in these rare disorders.Anticholestatic therapy with ursodeoxycholic acid is usually combined with immunosuppressive therapy with corticosteroids and/or azathioprine in both AIH-PBC and AIH-PSC overlap syndromes.In end-stage disease,liver transplantation is the treatment of choice.

  14. Mitochondria and the insect steroid hormone receptor (EcR): A complex relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafopoulou, Xanthe; Steel, Colin G H

    2016-10-01

    The actions of the insect steroid molting hormones, ecdysteroids, on the genome of target cells has been well studied, but little is known of their extranuclear actions. We previously showed in Rhodnius prolixus that much of the ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) resides in the cytoplasm of various cell types and undergoes shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm with circadian periodicity, possibly using microtubules as tracks for translocation to the nucleus. Here we report that cytoplasmic EcR appears to be also involved in extranuclear actions of ecdysteroids by association with the mitochondria. Western blots of subcellular fractions of brain lysates revealed that EcR is localized in the mitochondrial fraction, indicating an intimate association of EcR with mitochondria. Confocal laser microscopy and immunohistochemistry using anti-EcR revealed abundant co-localization of EcR with mitochondria in brain neurons and their axons, especially intense in the subplasmalemmal region, raising the possibility of EcR involvement in mitochondrial functions in subplasmalemmal microdomains. When mitochondria are dispersed by disruption of microtubules with colchicine, EcR remains associated with mitochondria showing strong receptor association with mitochondria. Treatment in vitro with ecdysteroids of brains of developmentally arrested R. prolixus (containing neither ecdysteroids nor EcR) induces EcR and abundant co-localization with mitochondria in neurons, concurrently with a sharp increase of the mitochondrial protein COX 1, suggesting involvement of EcR in mitochondrial function. These findings align EcR with various vertebrate steroid receptors, where actions of steroid receptors on mitochondria are widely known and suggest that steroid receptors across distant phyla share similar functional attributes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Parkin elimination of mitochondria is important for maintenance of lens epithelial cell ROS levels and survival upon oxidative stress exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Lisa; Khoury, Josef; Kantorow, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Age-related cataract is associated with oxidative stress and death of lens epithelial cells (LECs) whose survival is dependent on functional mitochondrial populations. Oxidative stress-induced depolarization/damage of LEC mitochondria results in increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and cell death suggesting the need for a LEC mechanism to remove mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure to prevent ROS release and LEC death. To date, a mechanism(s) for removal of depolarized/damaged LEC mitochondria has yet to be identified and the importance of eliminating oxidative stress-damaged mitochondria to prevent LEC ROS release and death has not been established. Here, we demonstrate that Parkin levels increase in LECs exposed to H2O2-oxidative stress. We establish that Parkin translocates to LEC mitochondria depolarized upon oxidative stress exposure and that Parkin recruits p62/SQSTM1 to depolarized LEC mitochondria. We demonstrate that translocation of Parkin results in the elimination of depolarized/damaged mitochondria and that Parkin clearance of LEC mitochondria is dependent on its ubiquitin ligase activity. Importantly, we demonstrate that Parkin elimination of damaged LEC mitochondria results in reduced ROS levels and increased survival upon oxidative stress exposure. These results establish that Parkin functions to eliminate LEC mitochondria depolarized/damaged upon oxidative stress exposure and that elimination of damaged mitochondria by Parkin is important for LEC homeostasis and survival. The data also suggest that mitochondrial quality control by Parkin could play a role in lens transparency. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Presentation of dynamically overlapping auditory messages in user interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papp, III, Albert Louis [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    1997-09-01

    This dissertation describes a methodology and example implementation for the dynamic regulation of temporally overlapping auditory messages in computer-user interfaces. The regulation mechanism exists to schedule numerous overlapping auditory messages in such a way that each individual message remains perceptually distinct from all others. The method is based on the research conducted in the area of auditory scene analysis. While numerous applications have been engineered to present the user with temporally overlapped auditory output, they have generally been designed without any structured method of controlling the perceptual aspects of the sound. The method of scheduling temporally overlapping sounds has been extended to function in an environment where numerous applications can present sound independently of each other. The Centralized Audio Presentation System is a global regulation mechanism that controls all audio output requests made from all currently running applications. The notion of multimodal objects is explored in this system as well. Each audio request that represents a particular message can include numerous auditory representations, such as musical motives and voice. The Presentation System scheduling algorithm selects the best representation according to the current global auditory system state, and presents it to the user within the request constraints of priority and maximum acceptable latency. The perceptual conflicts between temporally overlapping audio messages are examined in depth through the Computational Auditory Scene Synthesizer. At the heart of this system is a heuristic-based auditory scene synthesis scheduling method. Different schedules of overlapped sounds are evaluated and assigned penalty scores. High scores represent presentations that include perceptual conflicts between over-lapping sounds. Low scores indicate fewer and less serious conflicts. A user study was conducted to validate that the perceptual difficulties predicted by

  17. Transition metal catalysis in the mitochondria of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás-Gamasa, María; Martínez-Calvo, Miguel; Couceiro, José R.; Mascareñas, José L.

    2016-09-01

    The development of transition metal catalysts capable of promoting non-natural transformations within living cells can open significant new avenues in chemical and cell biology. Unfortunately, the complexity of the cell makes it extremely difficult to translate standard organometallic chemistry to living environments. Therefore, progress in this field has been very slow, and many challenges, including the possibility of localizing active metal catalysts into specific subcellular sites or organelles, remain to be addressed. Herein, we report a designed ruthenium complex that accumulates preferentially inside the mitochondria of mammalian cells, while keeping its ability to react with exogenous substrates in a bioorthogonal way. Importantly, we show that the subcellular catalytic activity can be used for the confined release of fluorophores, and even allows selective functional alterations in the mitochondria by the localized transformation of inert precursors into uncouplers of the membrane potential.

  18. Natural selection of mitochondria during somatic lifetime promotes healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodell, Anders; Rasmussen, Lene J; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis during life-time challenges both eliminates disadvantageous properties and drives adaptive selection of advantageous phenotypic variations. Intermittent fission and fusion of mitochondria provide specific targets for health promotion by brief temporal...... stressors, interspersed with periods of recovery and biogenesis. For mitochondria, the mechanisms of selection, variability, and heritability, are complicated by interaction of two independent genomes, including the multiple copies of DNA in each mitochondrion, as well as the shared nuclear genome of each...... cell. The mechanisms of stress-induced fission, followed by recovery-induced fusion and biogenesis, drive the improvement of mitochondrial functions, not only as directed by genotypic variations, but also as enabled by phenotypic diversity. Selective adaptation may explain unresolved aspects of aging...

  19. Water permeability of rat liver mitochondria: A biophysical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Gena, Patrizia; Meleleo, Daniela; Ferri, Domenico; Svelto, Maria

    2006-08-01

    The movement of water accompanying solutes between the cytoplasm and the mitochondrial spaces is central for mitochondrial volume homeostasis, an important function for mitochondrial activities and for preventing the deleterious effects of excess matrix swelling or contraction. While the discovery of aquaporin water channels in the inner mitochondrial membrane provided valuable insights into the basis of mitochondrial plasticity, questions regarding the identity of mitochondrial water permeability and its regulatory mechanism remain open. Here, we use a stopped flow light scattering approach to define the water permeability and Arrhenius activation energy of the rat liver whole intact mitochondrion and its membrane subcompartments. The water permeabilities of whole brain and testis mitochondria as well as liposome models of the lipid bilayer composing the liver inner mitochondrial membrane are also characterized. Besides finding remarkably high water permeabilities for both mitochondria and their membrane subcompartments, the existence of additional pathways of water movement other than aquaporins are suggested.

  20. Natural selection of mitochondria during somatic lifetime promotes healthy aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodell, Anders; Rasmussen, Lene J; Bergersen, Linda H

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of mitochondrial biogenesis during life-time challenges both eliminates disadvantageous properties and drives adaptive selection of advantageous phenotypic variations. Intermittent fission and fusion of mitochondria provide specific targets for health promotion by brief temporal...... stressors, interspersed with periods of recovery and biogenesis. For mitochondria, the mechanisms of selection, variability, and heritability, are complicated by interaction of two independent genomes, including the multiple copies of DNA in each mitochondrion, as well as the shared nuclear genome of each...... cell. The mechanisms of stress-induced fission, followed by recovery-induced fusion and biogenesis, drive the improvement of mitochondrial functions, not only as directed by genotypic variations, but also as enabled by phenotypic diversity. Selective adaptation may explain unresolved aspects of aging...

  1. Subsarcolemmal and interfibrillar mitochondria display distinct superoxide production profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crochemore, C; Mekki, M; Corbière, C; Karoui, A; Noël, R; Vendeville, C; Vaugeois, J-M; Monteil, C

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) and interfibrillar mitochondria (IFM) subpopulations display distinct biochemical, morphological, and functional characteristics. Moreover, they appear to be differently influenced during cardiac pathologies or toxic injuries. Although mitochondrial reactive oxygen species seem to play a critical role in cardiac function and diseases, limited information exists about the superoxide production characteristics of these mitochondrial subpopulations. In this work, using direct measurement of superoxide by electron paramagnetic resonance, we showed that differences in superoxide production profiles were present between cardiac IFM and SSM, in terms of intensity and major sites of superoxide generation. In SSM incubated with glutamate plus malate as substrates, the total observed superoxide levels were significantly higher than those observed with IFM, with an important contribution of the NADH-oxidizing site of complex I (site If) and the quinol-oxidizing site of complex III (site IIIQ0). In both IFM and SSM, succinate leads to similar rates of total superoxide levels with a substantial role for contribution of reverse electron transfer. Finally, using two spin probes with different membrane permeabilities, our data on complex III showed direct intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide release whereas complex I- and II-dependent superoxide were exclusively released inside the mitochondria, confirming previous studies. Feasibility of this approach to measure intra- and extra-mitochondrial superoxide levels and to characterize distinct superoxide production profiles of cardiac IFM and SSM has been demonstrated.

  2. Ageing and hypoxia cause protein aggregation in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Daniel M; Wu, Xia; Scott, Barbara A; Itani, Omar A; Van Gilst, Marc R; Bruce, James E; Michael Crowder, C

    2017-10-01

    Aggregation of cytosolic proteins is a pathological finding in disease states, including ageing and neurodegenerative diseases. We have previously reported that hypoxia induces protein misfolding in Caenorhabditis elegans mitochondria, and electron micrographs suggested protein aggregates. Here, we seek to determine whether mitochondrial proteins actually aggregate after hypoxia and other cellular stresses. To enrich for mitochondrial proteins that might aggregate, we performed a proteomics analysis on purified C. elegans mitochondria to identify relatively insoluble proteins under normal conditions (110 proteins identified) or after sublethal hypoxia (65 proteins). A GFP-tagged mitochondrial protein (UCR-11 - a complex III electron transport chain protein) in the normally insoluble set was found to form widespread aggregates in mitochondria after hypoxia. Five other GFP-tagged mitochondrial proteins in the normally insoluble set similarly form hypoxia-induced aggregates. Two GFP-tagged mitochondrial proteins from the soluble set as well as a mitochondrial-targeted GFP did not form aggregates. Ageing also resulted in aggregates. The number of hypoxia-induced aggregates was regulated by the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) master transcriptional regulator ATFS-1, which has been shown to be hypoxia protective. An atfs-1(loss-of-function) mutant and RNAi construct reduced the number of aggregates while an atfs-1(gain-of-function) mutant increased aggregates. Our work demonstrates that mitochondrial protein aggregation occurs with hypoxic injury and ageing in C. elegans. The UPRmt regulates aggregation and may protect from hypoxia by promoting aggregation of misfolded proteins.

  3. Intracellular zinc distribution in mitochondria, ER and the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiping; Haragopal, Hariprakash; Slepchenko, Kira G; Stork, Christian; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Zinc (Zn(2+)) is required for numerous cellular functions. As such, the homeostasis and distribution of intracellular zinc can influence cellular metabolism and signaling. However, the exact distribution of free zinc within live cells remains elusive. Previously we showed the release of zinc from thapsigargin/IP3-sensitive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) storage in cortical neurons. In the present study, we investigated if other cellular organelles also contain free chelatable zinc and function as organelle storage for zinc. To identify free zinc within the organelles, live cells were co-stained with Zinpyr-1, a zinc fluorescent dye, and organelle-specific fluorescent dyes (MitoFluor Red 589: mitochondria; ER Tracker Red: endoplasmic reticulum; BODIPY TR ceramide: Golgi apparatus; Syto Red 64: nucleus). We examined organelles that represent potential storing sites for intracellular zinc. We showed that zinc fluorescence staining was co-localized with MitoFluor Red 589, ER Tracker Red, and BODIPY TR ceramide respectively, suggesting the presence of free zinc in mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and the Golgi apparatus. On the other hand, cytosol and nucleus had nearly no detectable zinc fluorescence. It is known that nucleus contains high amount of zinc binding proteins that have high zinc binding affinity. The absence of zinc fluorescence suggests that there is little free zinc in these two regions. It also indicates that the zinc fluorescence detected in mitochondria, ER and Golgi apparatus represents free chelatable zinc. Taken together, our results support that these organelles are potential zinc storing organelles during cellular zinc homeostasis.

  4. Mitochondria: a central target for sex differences in pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura-Clapier, Renée; Moulin, Maryline; Piquereau, Jérôme; Lemaire, Christophe; Mericskay, Mathias; Veksler, Vladimir; Garnier, Anne

    2017-05-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that a sex and gender specificity affects the occurrence, development, and consequence of a plethora of pathologies. Mitochondria are considered as the powerhouse of the cell because they produce the majority of energy-rich phosphate bonds in the form of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) but they also participate in many other functions like steroid hormone synthesis, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, ionic regulation, and cell death. Adequate cellular energy supply and survival depend on mitochondrial life cycle, a process involving mitochondrial biogenesis, dynamics, and quality control via mitophagy. It appears that mitochondria are the place of marked sexual dimorphism involving mainly oxidative capacities, calcium handling, and resistance to oxidative stress. In turn, sex hormones regulate mitochondrial function and biogenesis. Mutations in genes encoding mitochondrial proteins are the origin of serious mitochondrial genetic diseases. Mitochondrial dysfunction is also an important parameter for a large panel of pathologies including neuromuscular disorders, encephalopathies, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), metabolic disorders, neuropathies, renal dysfunction etc. Many of these pathologies present sex/gender specificity. Here we review the sexual dimorphism of mitochondria from different tissues and how this dimorphism takes part in the sex specificity of important pathologies mainly CVDs and neurological disorders. © 2017 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Molecular Strategies for Targeting Antioxidants to Mitochondria: Therapeutic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mitochondrial function and specifically its implication in cellular redox/oxidative balance is fundamental in controlling the life and death of cells, and has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies. In this context, mitochondrial therapeutics, particularly those involving mitochondria-targeted antioxidants, have attracted increasing interest as potentially effective therapies for several human diseases. For the past 10 years, great progress has been made in the development and functional testing of molecules that specifically target mitochondria, and there has been special focus on compounds with antioxidant properties. In this review, we will discuss several such strategies, including molecules conjugated with lipophilic cations (e.g., triphenylphosphonium) or rhodamine, conjugates of plant alkaloids, amino-acid- and peptide-based compounds, and liposomes. This area has several major challenges that need to be confronted. Apart from antioxidants and other redox active molecules, current research aims at developing compounds that are capable of modulating other mitochondria-controlled processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Multiple chemically different molecular strategies have been developed as delivery tools that offer broad opportunities for mitochondrial manipulation. Additional studies, and particularly in vivo approaches under physiologically relevant conditions, are necessary to confirm the clinical usefulness of these molecules. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 686–729. PMID:25546574

  6. Fluctuations in Overlapping Generations Economies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvede, Mich

    . The approach to existence of endogenous fluctuations is basic in the sense that the prime ingredients are the implicit function theorem and linear algebra. Moreover the approach is applied to show that for an open and dense set of utility functions there exist endowment vectors such that sunspot equilibria...

  7. Detect overlapping and hierarchical community structure in networks

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Huawei; Cai, Kai; Hu, Mao-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Clustering and community structure is crucial for many network systems and the related dynamic processes. It has been shown that communities are usually overlapping and hierarchical. However, previous methods investigate these two properties of community structure separately. This paper propose an algorithm (EAGLE) to detect both the overlapping and hierarchical properties of complex community structure together. This algorithm deals with the set of maximal cliques and adopts an agglomerative framework. The quality function of modularity is extended to evaluate the goodness of a cover. The examples of application to real world networks give excellent results.

  8. The Influence of Sex and Season on Conspecific Spatial Overlap in a Large, Actively-Foraging Colubrid Snake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauder, Javan M.; Breininger, David R.; Bolt, M. Rebecca; Legare, Michael L.; Jenkins, Christopher L.; Rothermel, Betsie B.; McGarigal, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the factors influencing the degree of spatial overlap among conspecifics is important for understanding multiple ecological processes. Compared to terrestrial carnivores, relatively little is known about the factors influencing conspecific spatial overlap in snakes, although across snake taxa there appears to be substantial variation in conspecific spatial overlap. In this study, we described conspecific spatial overlap of eastern indigo snakes (Drymarchon couperi) in peninsular Florida and examined how conspecific spatial overlap varied by sex and season (breeding season vs. non-breeding season). We calculated multiple indices of spatial overlap using 6- and 3-month utilization distributions (UD) of dyads of simultaneously adjacent telemetered snakes. We also measured conspecific UD density values at each telemetry fix and modeled the distribution of those values as a function of overlap type, sex, and season using generalized Pareto distributions. Home range overlap between males and females was significantly greater than overlap between individuals of the same sex and male home ranges often completely contained female home ranges. Male home ranges overlapped little during both seasons, whereas females had higher levels of overlap during the non-breeding season. The spatial patterns observed in our study are consistent with those seen in many mammalian carnivores, in which low male-male overlap and high inter-sexual overlap provides males with greater access to females. We encourage additional research on the influence of prey availability on conspecific spatial overlap in snakes as well as the behavioral mechanisms responsible for maintaining the low levels of overlap we observed. PMID:27490346

  9. Elimination of paternal mitochondria through the lysosomal degradation pathway in C.elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qinghua Zhou; Haimin Li; Ding Xue

    2011-01-01

    In mammals,the inheritance of mitochondrion and its DNA (mtDNA) is strictly maternal,despite the fact that a sperm can inject up to 100 functional mitochondria into the oocyte during fertilization.The mechanisms responsible for the elimination of the paternal mitochondria remain largely unknown.We report here that this paternal mitochondrial elimination process is conserved in Caenorhabditis elegans,and that the lysosomal pathway actively participates in this process.Molecular and cell biological analyses indicate that in wild-type animals paternal mitoehondria and mtDNA are destroyed within two hours after fertilization.In animals with compromised lysosomes,paternal mitochondria persist until late embryonic stages.Therefore,the lysosomal pathway plays an important role in degrading paternal mitochondria introduced into the oocyte during fertilization.Our study indicates that C.elegans is an excellent animal model for understanding and dissecting this conserved biological process critical for animal development and reproduction.

  10. A deficiency of apoptosis inducing factor (AIF in Harlequin mouse heart mitochondria paradoxically reduces ROS generation during ischemia-reperfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun eChen

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: AIF (apoptosis inducing factor is a flavin and NADH containing protein located within mitochondria required for optimal function of the respiratory chain. AIF may function as an antioxidant within mitochondria, yet when released from mitochondria it activates caspase-independent cell death. The Harlequin (Hq mouse has a markedly reduced content of AIF, providing an experimental model to query if the main role of AIF in the exacerbation of cell death is enhanced mitochondrial generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS or the activation of cell death programs. We asked if the ROS generation is altered in Hq heart mitochondria at baseline or following ischemia-reperfusion (IR.Methods: Buffer perfused mouse hearts underwent 30 min ischemia and 30 min reperfusion. Mitochondrial function including oxidative phosphorylation and H2O2 generation was measured. Immunoblotting was used to determine the contents of AIF and PAR [poly(ADP-ribose] in cell fractions.Results: There were no differences in the release of H2O2 between wild type (WT and Hq heart mitochondria at baseline. IR increased H2O2 generation from WT but not from Hq mitochondria compared to corresponding time controls. The complex I activity was decreased in WT but not in Hq mice following IR. The relocation of AIF from mitochondria to nucleus was increased in WT but not in Hq mice. IR activated PARP-1 only in WT mice. Cell injury was decreased in Hq mouse heart following in vitro IR.Conclusion: A deficiency of AIF within mitochondria does not increase ROS production during IR, indicating that AIF functions less as an antioxidant within mitochondria. The decreased cardiac injury in Hq mouse heart accompanied by less AIF translocation to the nucleus suggests that AIF relocation, rather than the AIF content within mitochondria, contributes to cardiac injury during IR.

  11. Hydrogen Sulfide as an Endogenous Modulator in Mitochondria and Mitochondria Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has historically been considered to be a toxic gas, an environmental and occupational hazard. However, with the discovery of its presence and enzymatic production through precursors of L-cysteine and homocysteine in mammalian tissues, H2S has recently received much interest as a physiological signaling molecule. H2S is a gaseous messenger molecule that has been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes in mammals, including vascular relaxation, angiogenesis, and the function of ion channels, ischemia/reperfusion (I/R, and heart injury. H2S is an endogenous neuromodulator and present studies show that physiological concentrations of H2S enhance NMDA receptor-mediated responses and aid in the induction of hippocampal long-term potentiation. Moreover, in the field of neuronal protection, physiological concentrations of H2S in mitochondria have many favorable effects on cytoprotection.

  12. Endosome–mitochondria juxtaposition during apoptosis induced by H. pylori VacA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calore, F; Genisset, C; Casellato, A; Rossato, M; Codolo, G; Esposti, MD; Scorrano, L; de Bernard, M

    2011-01-01

    The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) is an important virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori with pleiotropic effects on mammalian cells, including the ability to trigger mitochondria-dependent apoptosis. However, the mechanism by which VacA exerts its apoptotic function is unclear. Using a genetic approach, in this study we show that killing by VacA requires the proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members BAX and BAK at the mitochondrial level, but not adequate endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels, similarly controlled by BAX and BAK. A combination of subcellular fractionation and imaging shows that wild-type VacA, but not mutants in its channel-forming region, induces the accumulation of BAX on endosomes and endosome–mitochondria juxtaposition that precedes the retrieval of active BAX on mitochondria. It is noteworthy that in Bax- and Bak-deficient cells, VacA is unable to cause endosome–mitochondria juxtaposition and is not retrieved in mitochondria. Thus, VacA causes BAX/BAK-dependent juxtaposition of endosomes and mitochondria early in the process of cell death, revealing a new function for these proapoptotic proteins in the regulation of relative position of organelles. PMID:20431599

  13. Spaceflight and clinorotation cause cytoskeleton and mitochondria changes and increases in apoptosis in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, H.; Lewis, M. L.; Chakrabarti, A.

    2001-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex network of fibers that is sensitive to environmental factors including microgravity and altered gravitational forces. Cellular functions such as transport of cell organelles depend on cytoskeletal integrity; regulation of cytoskeletal activity plays a role in cell maintenance, cell division, and apoptosis. Here we report cytoskeletal and mitochondria alterations in cultured human lymphocyte (Jurkat) cells after exposure to spaceflight and in insect cells of Drosophila melanogaster (Schneider S-1) after exposure to conditions created by clinostat rotation. Jurkat cells were flown on the space shuttle in Biorack cassettes while Schneider S-1 cells were exposed to altered gravity forces as produced by clinostat rotation. The effects of both treatments were similar in the different cell types. Fifty percent of cells displayed effects on the microtubule network in both cell lines. Under these experimental conditions mitochondria clustering and morphological alterations of mitochondrial cristae was observed to various degrees after 4 and 48 hours of culture. Jurkat cells underwent cell divisions during exposure to spaceflight but a large number of apoptotic cells was also observed. Similar results were obtained in Schneider S-1 cells cultured under clinostat rotation. Both cell lines displayed mitochondria abnormalities and mitochondria clustering toward one side of the cells which is interpreted to be the result of microtubule disruption and failure of mitochondria transport along microtubules. The number of mitochondria was increased in cells exposed to altered gravity while cristae morphology was severely affected indicating altered mitochondria function. These results show that spaceflight as well as altered gravity produced by clinostat rotation affects microtubule and mitochondria organization and results in increases in apoptosis. Grant numbers: NAG 10-0224, NAG2-985. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spaceflight and clinorotation cause cytoskeleton and mitochondria changes and increases in apoptosis in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatten, Heide; Lewis, Marian L.; Chakrabarti, Amitabha

    2001-08-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex network of fibers that is sensitive to environmental factors including microgravity and altered gravitational forces. Cellular functions such as transport of cell organelles depend on cytoskeletal integrity; regulation of cytoskeletal activity plays a role in cell maintenance, cell division, and apoptosis. Here we report cytoskeletal and mitochondria alterations in cultured human lymphocyte (Jurkat) cells after exposure to spaceflight and in insect cells of Drosophila melanogaster (Schneider S-1) after exposure to conditions created by clinostat rotation. Jurkat cells were flown on the space shuttle in Biorack cassettes while Schneider S-1 cells were exposed to altered gravity forces as produced by clinostat rotation. The effects of both treatments were similar in the different cell types. Fifty percent of cells displayed effects on the microtubule network in both cell lines. Under these experimental conditions mitochondria clustering and morphological alterations of mitochondrial cristae was observed to various degrees after 4 and 48 hours of culture. Jurkat cells underwent cell divisions during exposure to spaceflight but a large number of apoptotic cells was also observed. Similar results were obtained in Schneider S-1 cells cultured under clinostat rotation. Both cell lines displayed mitochondria abnormalities and mitochondria clustering toward one side of the cells which is interpreted to be the result of microtubule disruption and failure of mitochondria transport along microtubules. The number of mitochondria was increased in cells exposed to altered gravity while cristae morphology was severely affected indicating altered mitochondria function. These results show that spaceflight as well as altered gravity produced by clinostat rotation affects microtubule and mitochondria organization and results in increases in apoptosis.

  15. Detection of PIWI and piRNAs in the mitochondria of mammalian cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, ChangHyuk, E-mail: netbuyer@hanmail.net [Cancer Genomics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Tak, Hyosun, E-mail: chuberry@naver.com [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rho, Mina, E-mail: minarho@hanyang.ac.kr [Department of Computer Science, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hae Ryung, E-mail: heyhae@ncc.re.kr [New Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yon Hui, E-mail: yhkim@ncc.re.kr [New Experimental Therapeutics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyung Tae, E-mail: bioktkim@ncc.re.kr [Molecular Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Balch, Curt, E-mail: curt.balch@gmail.com [Medical Sciences Program, Department of Cellular and Integrative Physiology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States); Lee, Eun Kyung, E-mail: leeek@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Seungyoon, E-mail: seungyoon.nam@ncc.re.kr [Cancer Genomics Branch, National Cancer Center, Goyang 410-769 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-28

    Highlights: • piRNA sequences were mapped to human mitochondrial (mt) genome. • We inspected small RNA-Seq datasets from somatic cell mt subcellular fractions. • Piwi and piRNA transcripts are present in mammalian somatic cancer cell mt fractions. - Abstract: Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) are 26–31 nt small noncoding RNAs that are processed from their longer precursor transcripts by Piwi proteins. Localization of Piwi and piRNA has been reported mostly in nucleus and cytoplasm of higher eukaryotes germ-line cells, where it is believed that known piRNA sequences are located in repeat regions of nuclear genome in germ-line cells. However, localization of PIWI and piRNA in mammalian somatic cell mitochondria yet remains largely unknown. We identified 29 piRNA sequence alignments from various regions of the human mitochondrial genome. Twelve out 29 piRNA sequences matched stem-loop fragment sequences of seven distinct tRNAs. We observed their actual expression in mitochondria subcellular fractions by inspecting mitochondrial-specific small RNA-Seq datasets. Of interest, the majority of the 29 piRNAs overlapped with multiple longer transcripts (expressed sequence tags) that are unique to the human mitochondrial genome. The presence of mature piRNAs in mitochondria was detected by qRT-PCR of mitochondrial subcellular RNAs. Further validation showed detection of Piwi by colocalization using anti-Piwil1 and mitochondria organelle-specific protein antibodies.

  16. Overlapping Community Detection by Online Cluster Aggregation

    CERN Document Server

    Kozdoba, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We present a new online algorithm for detecting overlapping communities. The main ingredients are a modification of an online k-means algorithm and a new approach to modelling overlap in communities. An evaluation on large benchmark graphs shows that the quality of discovered communities compares favorably to several methods in the recent literature, while the running time is significantly improved.

  17. DIMENSIONS OF SELF-AFFINESETS WITH OVERLAPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    华苏

    2003-01-01

    The authors develop an algorithm to show that a class of self-affine sets with overlaps canbe viewed as sofic affine-invariant sets without overlaps, thus by using the results of [11] and[10], the Hausdorff and Minkowski dimensions are determined.

  18. Bayesian Overlapping Community Detection in Dynamic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ghorbani, Mahsa; Khodadadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Detecting community structures in social networks has gained considerable attention in recent years. However, lack of prior knowledge about the number of communities, and their overlapping nature have made community detection a challenging problem. Moreover, many of the existing methods only consider static networks, while most of real world networks are dynamic and evolve over time. Hence, finding consistent overlapping communities in dynamic networks without any prior knowledge about the number of communities is still an interesting open research problem. In this paper, we present an overlapping community detection method for dynamic networks called Dynamic Bayesian Overlapping Community Detector (DBOCD). DBOCD assumes that in every snapshot of network, overlapping parts of communities are dense areas and utilizes link communities instead of common node communities. Using Recurrent Chinese Restaurant Process and community structure of the network in the last snapshot, DBOCD simultaneously extracts the numbe...

  19. Neural overlap in processing music and speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L

    2015-03-19

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing.

  20. Neural overlap in processing music and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peretz, Isabelle; Vuvan, Dominique; Lagrois, Marie-Élaine; Armony, Jorge L.

    2015-01-01

    Neural overlap in processing music and speech, as measured by the co-activation of brain regions in neuroimaging studies, may suggest that parts of the neural circuitries established for language may have been recycled during evolution for musicality, or vice versa that musicality served as a springboard for language emergence. Such a perspective has important implications for several topics of general interest besides evolutionary origins. For instance, neural overlap is an important premise for the possibility of music training to influence language acquisition and literacy. However, neural overlap in processing music and speech does not entail sharing neural circuitries. Neural separability between music and speech may occur in overlapping brain regions. In this paper, we review the evidence and outline the issues faced in interpreting such neural data, and argue that converging evidence from several methodologies is needed before neural overlap is taken as evidence of sharing. PMID:25646513

  1. Ca(2+-dependent regulation of the Ca(2+ concentration in the myometrium mitochondria. II. Ca(2+ effects on mitochondria membranes polarization and [Ca(2+](m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Babich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Ca2+ accumulation in the mitochondria undergoes complex regulation by Ca2+ itself. But the mechanisms of such regulation are still discussed. In this paper we have shown that Ca ions directly or indirectly regulate the level of myometrium mitochondria membranes polarization. The additions of 100 µM Ca2+ were accompanied by depolarization of the mitochondria membranes. The following experiments were designed to study the impact of Ca2+ on the myometrium mitochondria [Ca2+]m. Isolated myometrium mitochondria were preincubated without or with 10 μM Са2+ followed by 100 μM Са2+ addition. Experiments were conducted in three mediums: without ATP and Mg2+ (0-medium, in the presence of 3 mM Mg2+ (Mg-medium and 3 mM Mg2+ + 3 mM ATP (Mg,ATP-medium. It was shown that the effects of 10 μM Са2+ addition were different in different mediums, namely in 0- and Mg-medium the [Ca2+]m values increased, whereas in Mg,ATP-medium statistically reliable changes were not registered. Preincubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ did not affect the [Ca2+]m value after the addition of 100 μM Са2+. The [Ca2+]m values after 100 μM Са2+ addition were the same in 0- and Mg,ATP-mediums and somewhat lower in Mg-medium. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ in 0- and Mg-mediums reduced changes of Fluo 4 normalized fluorescence values that were induced by 100 μM Са2+ additions, but in Mg,ATP-medium such differences were not recorded. It is concluded that Са2+ exchange in myometrium mitochondria is regulated by the concentration of Ca ions as in the external medium, so in the matrix of mitochondria. The medium composition had a significant impact on the [Са2+]m values in the absence of exogenous cation. It is suggested that light increase of [Са2+]m before the addition of 100 μM Са2+ may have a positive effect on the functional activity of the mitochondria.

  2. Spectroscopic (FT-IR, (1)H, (13)C NMR, UV), DOS and orbital overlap population analysis of copper complex of (E)-4-(2-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl)-N, N bis ((pyridin-2-yl) methyl) benzamine by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwaker

    2015-02-05

    The geometric parameters, chemical shifts, FTIR, NMR and orbital overlap population along with DOS (density of states) to know different kinds of interactions for binding of copper atom with (E)-4-(2-(4-nitrophenyl) diazenyl)-N, N bis ((pyridin-2-yl) methyl) benzamine to form its copper complex has been reported by DFT methods. The theoretically predicted values for structural parameters are in agreement with the experimentally reported values. NMR chemical shifts calculated using B3LYP/DFT/GIAO level of theory gives information about binding of copper atom with three nitrogen atoms namely N (3, 8 and 11). Orbital overlap population analysis using DFT/B3LYP/SDD level of theory is used to study the kind of interactions involved in binding of copper with the three nitrogen atoms. DOS studies are done to know about the contribution of alpha, beta electrons to the valence and conduction band. IR spectroscopy investigations gave the absorption bands for the formation of title compound. Electronic spectrum along with HOMO-LUMO energies of the title compound has been investigated using Time-dependent (TD-DFT) approach.

  3. Direct evaluation of overlap integrals between Slater-type-orbitals

    CERN Document Server

    Caola, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    We derive direct single-stage numerical evaluation of the electronic overlap integral between arbitrary atomic orbitals (including STOs). Integration is over cartesian co-ordinates, and replaces previous sums over 'special' functions. The results, in Mathematica 10 and Maple 18, agree with the literature to 8 digits. We briefly discuss possible use in quantum chemistry, including accuracy, algorithmic suitability and operating-system machine-implementation as an intrinsic function.

  4. New Insights in the Amyloid-Beta Interaction with Mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria may play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Particularly, mitochondrial dysfunction is a hallmark of amyloid-beta-induced neuronal toxicity in Alzheimer’s disease. The recent emphasis on the intracellular biology of amyloid-beta and its precursor protein (APP has led researchers to consider the possibility that mitochondria-associated and mitochondrial amyloid-beta may directly cause neurotoxicity. Both proteins are known to localize to mitochondrial membranes, block the transport of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to mitochondria, interact with mitochondrial proteins, disrupt the electron transport chain, increase reactive oxygen species production, cause mitochondrial damage, and prevent neurons from functioning normally. In this paper, we will outline current knowledge of the intracellular localization of amyloid-beta. Moreover, we summarize evidence from AD postmortem brain as well as animal AD models showing that amyloid-beta triggers mitochondrial dysfunction through a number of pathways such as impairment of oxidative phosphorylation, elevation of reactive oxygen species production, alteration of mitochondrial dynamics, and interaction with mitochondrial proteins. Thus, this paper supports the Alzheimer cascade mitochondrial hypothesis such as the most important early events in this disease, and probably one of the future strategies on the therapy of this neurodegenerative disease.

  5. Spontaneous NA+ transients in individual mitochondria of intact astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarias, Guillaume; Van de Ville, Dimitri; Unser, Michael; Chatton, Jean-Yves

    2008-02-01

    Mitochondria in intact cells maintain low Na(+) levels despite the large electrochemical gradient favoring cation influx into the matrix. In addition, they display individual spontaneous transient depolarizations. The authors report here that individual mitochondria in living astrocytes exhibit spontaneous increases in their Na(+) concentration (Na(mit)(+) spiking), as measured using the mitochondrial probe CoroNa Red. In a field of view with approximately 30 astrocytes, up to 1,400 transients per minute were typically detected under resting conditions. Na(mit)(+) spiking was also observed in neurons, but was scarce in two nonneural cell types tested. Astrocytic Na(mit)(+) spikes averaged 12.2 +/- 0.8 s in duration and 35.5 +/- 3.2 mM in amplitude and coincided with brief mitochondrial depolarizations; they were impaired by mitochondrial depolarization and ruthenium red pointing to the involvement of a cation uniporter. Na(mit)(+) spiking activity was significantly inhibited by mitochondrial Na(+)/H(+) exchanger inhibition and sensitive to cellular pH and Na(+) concentration. Ca(2+) played a permissive role on Na(mit)(+) spiking activity. Finally, the authors present evidence suggesting that Na(mit)(+) spiking frequency was correlated with cellular ATP levels. This study shows that, under physiological conditions, individual mitochondria in living astrocytes exhibit fast Na(+) exchange across their inner membrane, which reveals a new form of highly dynamic and localized functional regulation.

  6. Metformin directly acts on mitochondria to alter cellular bioenergetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Metformin is widely used in the treatment of diabetes, and there is interest in ‘repurposing’ the drug for cancer prevention or treatment. However, the mechanism underlying the metabolic effects of metformin remains poorly understood. Methods We performed respirometry and stable isotope tracer analyses on cells and isolated mitochondria to investigate the impact of metformin on mitochondrial functions. Results We show that metformin decreases mitochondrial respiration, causing an increase in the fraction of mitochondrial respiration devoted to uncoupling reactions. Thus, cells treated with metformin become energetically inefficient, and display increased aerobic glycolysis and reduced glucose metabolism through the citric acid cycle. Conflicting prior studies proposed mitochondrial complex I or various cytosolic targets for metformin action, but we show that the compound limits respiration and citric acid cycle activity in isolated mitochondria, indicating that at least for these effects, the mitochondrion is the primary target. Finally, we demonstrate that cancer cells exposed to metformin display a greater compensatory increase in aerobic glycolysis than nontransformed cells, highlighting their metabolic vulnerability. Prevention of this compensatory metabolic event in cancer cells significantly impairs survival. Conclusions Together, these results demonstrate that metformin directly acts on mitochondria to limit respiration and that the sensitivity of cells to metformin is dependent on their ability to cope with energetic stress. PMID:25184038

  7. Potential Therapeutic Benefits of Strategies Directed to Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnefsky, Edward J.; Stowe, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The mitochondrion is the most important organelle in determining continued cell survival and cell death. Mitochondrial dysfunction leads to many human maladies, including cardiovascular diseases, neurodegenerative disease, and cancer. These mitochondria-related pathologies range from early infancy to senescence. The central premise of this review is that if mitochondrial abnormalities contribute to the pathological state, alleviating the mitochondrial dysfunction would contribute to attenuating the severity or progression of the disease. Therefore, this review will examine the role of mitochondria in the etiology and progression of several diseases and explore potential therapeutic benefits of targeting mitochondria in mitigating the disease processes. Indeed, recent advances in mitochondrial biology have led to selective targeting of drugs designed to modulate and manipulate mitochondrial function and genomics for therapeutic benefit. These approaches to treat mitochondrial dysfunction rationally could lead to selective protection of cells in different tissues and various disease states. However, most of these approaches are in their infancy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 13, 279–347. PMID:20001744

  8. The amyloid beta-peptide is imported into mitochondria via the TOM import machinery and localized to mitochondrial cristae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson Petersen, Camilla A; Alikhani, Nyosha; Behbahani, Homira

    2008-01-01

    The amyloid beta-peptide (Abeta) has been suggested to exert its toxicity intracellularly. Mitochondrial functions can be negatively affected by Abeta and accumulation of Abeta has been detected in mitochondria. Because Abeta is not likely to be produced locally in mitochondria, we decided...... to investigate the mechanisms for mitochondrial Abeta uptake. Our results from rat mitochondria show that Abeta is transported into mitochondria via the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM) machinery. The import was insensitive to valinomycin, indicating that it is independent of the mitochondrial membrane...... potential. Subfractionation studies following the import experiments revealed Abeta association with the inner membrane fraction, and immunoelectron microscopy after import showed localization of Abeta to mitochondrial cristae. A similar distribution pattern of Abeta in mitochondria was shown...

  9. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and the mitochondria theory of aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yahui; Trabucco, Sally E; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-associated diseases and death. One potential cause of aging is the progressive accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and oxidative damage with age. Considerable efforts have been made in our understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging and age-associated diseases. This chapter outlines the interplay between oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and discusses their impact on senescence, cell death, stem cell function, age-associated diseases and longevity.

  10. Mitochondria-meditated pathways of organ failure upon inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey V. Kozlov

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Liver failure induced by systemic inflammatory response (SIRS is often associated with mitochondrial dysfunction but the mechanism linking SIRS and mitochondria-mediated liver failure is still a matter of discussion. Current hypotheses suggest that causative events could be a drop in ATP synthesis, opening of mitochondrial permeability transition pore, specific changes in mitochondrial morphology, impaired Ca2+ uptake, generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS, turnover of mitochondria and imbalance in electron supply to the respiratory chain. The aim of this review is to critically analyze existing hypotheses, in order to highlight the most promising research lines helping to prevent liver failure induced by SIRS. Evaluation of the literature shows that there is no consistent support that impaired Ca++ metabolism, electron transport chain function and ultrastructure of mitochondria substantially contribute to liver failure. Moreover, our analysis suggests that the drop in ATP levels has protective rather than a deleterious character. Recent data suggest that the most critical mitochondrial event occurring upon SIRS is the release of mtROS in cytoplasm, which can activate two specific intracellular signaling cascades. The first is the mtROS-mediated activation of NADPH-oxidase in liver macrophages and endothelial cells; the second is the acceleration of the expression of inflammatory genes in hepatocytes. The signaling action of mtROS is strictly controlled in mitochondria at three points, (i at the site of ROS generation at complex I, (ii the site of mtROS release in cytoplasm via permeability transition pore, and (iii interaction with specific kinases in cytoplasm. The systems controlling mtROS-signaling include pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, nitric oxide, Ca2+ and NADPH-oxidase. Analysis of the literature suggests that further research should be focused on the impact of mtROS on organ failure induced by inflammation

  11. Characteristics and self-rated health of overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung JW

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Jung Wha Chung,1 Kyoung Ae Kong,2 Jin Hwa Lee,1 Seok Jeong Lee,1 Yon Ju Ryu,1 Jung Hyun Chang11Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Ewha Womans University, 2Clinical Trial Center, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul, Korea Background and objective: Overlap syndrome shares features of both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The aim of this study was to investigate characteristics of overlap syndrome and their effect on self-rated health (SRH. Methods: We analyzed data from the Fourth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey of 2007–2009. Subjects with acceptable spirometry and available wheezing history were included. Subjects were classified into four groups based on forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC results and the presence or absence of self-reported wheezing for the previous 12 months: 1 COPD group, defined as having FEV1/FVC <0.7 without self-reported wheezing history; 2 asthma group, defined as having self-reported wheezing history without FEV1/FVC <0.7; 3 overlap syndrome group, having both FEV1/FVC <0.7 and wheezing history; and 4 non-obstructive disease (NOD group, having neither FEV1/FVC <0.7 nor self-reported wheezing. SRH was categorized as better or lower based on responses to a questionnaire. Results: From a total 9,104 subjects, 700 were assigned to the COPD group, 560 to the asthma group, 210 to the overlap syndrome group, and 7,634 to the NOD group. Compared to the other groups, subjects in the overlap syndrome group were more likely to have low lung function, a high proportion of smokers, low socioeconomic status, short education duration, lower SRH, and past diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis or bronchiectasis. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that both overlap syndrome and asthma groups were independently associated with lower SRH after adjustment for age, sex

  12. 低浓度二甲双胍对肝癌细胞线粒体形态结构及功能的影响%Effects of low concentration of metformin on morphology and function of mitochondria of HepG2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈纪涛; 陈良才; 贾小婷; 梁敏; 石波云; 刘季芳

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential impact of low concentration of metformin on the morphology and function of mitochondria of HepG2 cells. Methods HepG2 cells in experimental group and control group were treated with or without low concentration of metformin (1mM/L), respectively. The cells were incubated for 12h in the incubator with constant temperature and humidity as well as 1% oxygen. Orange Mitoview was used to stain the mitochondria to detect the effects of the drug on its morphology and quantity. Transmission electron microscope was utilized to observe the effect of metformin on the ultrastructure of mitochondria. The mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I activity in HepG2 cell was detected by Complex I Enzyme Activity Dipstick Assay Kit (DAK). Results Orange Mitoview staining showed that low concentration of metformin had little effect on the morphology and number of mitochondria of cells in experimental group , and the difference between control and experimental group was not statistically significant (P > 0.05). In addition, the result was further determined by transmission electron microscopy. However, DAK analysis showed that complex I activity of cells in experimental group was significantly lower than that in control group. Conclusion Under Hypoxia conditions, low concentration of metformin had no significant effect on the morphology and number of mitochondria of HepG2 cells, but it significantly reduces the activity of mitochondria of HepG2 cells.%目的:研究低浓度二甲双胍对人肝癌HepG2细胞线粒体形态结构及功能的影响.方法:选用人肝癌细胞株HepG2作为研究对象,分别用0 mmol/L(对照组)、1 mmol/L(实验组)的二甲双胍对其进行处理,在低氧(1%)的恒温恒湿箱中孵育12 h后.采用Mitoview Orange染色及透射电镜,检测二甲双胍对HepG2细胞线粒体形态结构及数目的影响;采用复合物Ⅰ活性检测试剂盒检测线粒体呼吸链复合物Ⅰ的活性.结果:Mitoview Orange

  13. A receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, Tyrphostin A9 induces cancer cell death through Drp1 dependent mitochondria fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, So Jung; Park, Young Jun; Shin, Ji Hyun; Kim, Eun Sung [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Jung Jin; Jin, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Jin Cheon [Institute for Innovative Cancer Research, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 138-736 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Dong-Hyung, E-mail: dhcho@khu.ac.kr [Graduate School of East-West Medical Science, Kyung Hee University, Gyeoggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} We screened and identified Tyrphostin A9, a receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor as a strong mitochondria fission inducer. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 treatment promotes mitochondria dysfunction and contributes to cytotoxicity in cancer cells. {yields} Tyrphostin A9 induces apoptotic cell death through a Drp1-mediated pathway. {yields} Our studies suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces mitochondria fragmentation and apoptotic cell death via Drp1 dependently. -- Abstract: Mitochondria dynamics controls not only their morphology but also functions of mitochondria. Therefore, an imbalance of the dynamics eventually leads to mitochondria disruption and cell death. To identify specific regulators of mitochondria dynamics, we screened a bioactive chemical compound library and selected Tyrphostin A9, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, as a potent inducer of mitochondrial fission. Tyrphostin A9 treatment resulted in the formation of fragmented mitochondria filament. In addition, cellular ATP level was decreased and the mitochondrial membrane potential was collapsed in Tyr A9-treated cells. Suppression of Drp1 activity by siRNA or over-expression of a dominant negative mutant of Drp1 inhibited both mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death induced by Tyrpohotin A9. Moreover, treatment of Tyrphostin A9 also evoked mitochondrial fragmentation in other cells including the neuroblastomas. Taken together, these results suggest that Tyrphostin A9 induces Drp1-mediated mitochondrial fission and apoptotic cell death.

  14. Injury of Mouse Brain Mitochondria Induced by Cigarette Smoke Extract and Effect of Vitamin C on It in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU-MEI YANG; GENG-TAO LIU

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the toxicity of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and nicotine on mouse brain mitochondria as well as the protective effect of vitamin C in vitro. Method Mouse brain mitochondria in vitro was incubated with CSE or nicotine in the absence or presence of vitamin C for 60 minutes, and the changes of mitochondrial function and structure were measured. Results CSE inhibited mitochondrial ATPase and cytochrome C oxidase activities in a dose-dependent manner.However, no significant changes in the peroxidation indices were observed when mitochondrial respiratory enzymes activity was inhibited, and protection of mitochondria from CSE-induced injury by vitamin C was not displayed in vitro. The effect of CSE on mouse brain mitochondria swelling response to calcium stimulation was dependent on calcium concentrations. CSE inhibited swelling of mitochondria at 6.5 μmol/L Ca2+, but promoted swelling response at 250 μmol/L Ca2+. Nicotine, the major component of cigarette smoke, showed no significant damage in mouse brain mitochondria in vitro. The CSE treatment induced mitochondrial inner membrane damage and vacuolization of the matrix, whereas the outer mitochondrial membrane appeared to be preserved. Conclusion The toxic effect of CSE on brain mitochondria may be due to its direct action on enzymatic activity rather than through oxygen free radical injury. Nicotine is not the responsible component for the toxicity of CSE to brain mitochondria.

  15. Endothelin Receptors, Mitochondria and Neurogenesis in Cerebral Ischemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Background: Neurogenesis is most active during pre-natal development, however, it persists throughout the human lifespan. The putative role of mitochondria in neurogenesis and angiogenesis is gaining importance. Since, ETB receptor mediated neurogenesis and angiogenesis has been identified, the role of these receptors with relevance to mitochondrial functions is of interest. Methods: In addition to work from our laboratory, we undertook an extensive search of bibliographic databases for peer-reviewed research literature. Specific technical terms such as endothelin, mitochondria and neurogenesis were used to seek out and critically evaluate literature that was relevant. Results: The ET family consists of three isopeptides (ET-1, ET-2 and ET-3) that produce biological actions by acting on two types of receptors (ETA and ETB). In the central nervous system (CNS) ETA receptors are potent constrictors of the cerebral vasculature and appear to contribute in the causation of cerebral ischemia. ETA receptor antagonists have been found to be effective in animal model of cerebral ischemia; however, clinical studies have shown no efficacy. Mitochondrial functions are critically important for several neural development processes such as neurogenesis, axonal and dendritic growth, and synaptic formation. ET appears to impair mitochondrial functions through activation of ETA receptors. On the other hand, blocking ETB receptors has been shown to trigger apoptotic processes by activating intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Mitochondria are important for their role in molecular regulation of neurogenesis and angiogenesis. Stimulation of ETB receptors in the adult ischemic brain has been found to promote angiogenesis and neurogenesis mediated through vascular endothelial growth factor and nerve growth factor. It will be interesting to investigate the effect of ETB receptor stimulation on mitochondrial functions in the CNS following cerebral ischemia. Conclusion: The findings of this

  16. Plant mitochondria synthesize melatonin and enhance the tolerance of plants to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Feng, Chao; Zheng, Xiaodong; Guo, Yan; Zhou, Fangfang; Shan, Dongqian; Liu, Xuan; Kong, Jin

    2017-10-01

    Synthesis of melatonin in mitochondria was reported in animals. However, there is no report on whether plant mitochondria also produce melatonin. Herein, we show that plant mitochondria are a major site for melatonin synthesis. In an in vitro study, isolated apple mitochondria had the capacity to generate melatonin. Subcellular localization analysis documented that an apple SNAT isoform, MzSNAT5, was localized in the mitochondria of both Arabidopsis protoplasts and apple callus cells. The kinetic analysis revealed that the recombinant MzSNAT5 protein exhibited high enzymatic activity to catalyze serotonin to N-acetylserotonin with the Km and Vmax of 55 μmol/L and 0.909 pmol/min/mg protein at 35°C, respectively; this pathway functioned over a wide range of temperatures from 5 to 75°C. In an in vivo study, MzSNAT5 was drought inducible. The transgenic Arabidopsis ectopically expressing MzSNAT5 elevated the melatonin level and, hence, enhanced drought tolerance. The mechanistic study indicated that the ectopically expressing MzSNAT5 allows plant mitochondria to increase melatonin synthesis. As a potent free radical scavenger, melatonin reduces the oxidative stress caused by the elevated reactive oxygen species which are generated under drought stress in plants. Our findings provide evidence that engineered melatonin-enriched plants exhibit enhanced oxidative tolerance. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Evidence that dendritic mitochondria negatively regulate dendritic branching in pyramidal neurons in the neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Toshiya; Murakami, Fujio

    2014-05-14

    The precise branching patterns of dendritic arbors have a profound impact on information processing in individual neurons and the brain. These patterns are established by positive and negative regulation of the dendritic branching. Although the mechanisms for positive regulation have been extensively investigated, little is known about those for negative regulation. Here, we present evidence that mitochondria located in developing dendrites are involved in the negative regulation of dendritic branching. We visualized mitochondria in pyramidal neurons of the mouse neocortex during dendritic morphogenesis using in utero electroporation of a mitochondria-targeted fluorescent construct. We altered the mitochondrial distribution in vivo by overexpressing Mfn1, a mitochondrial shaping protein, or the Miro-binding domain of TRAK2 (TRAK2-MBD), a truncated form of a motor-adaptor protein. We found that dendritic mitochondria were preferentially targeted to the proximal portion of dendrites only during dendritic morphogenesis. Overexpression of Mfn1 or TRAK2-MBD depleted mitochondria from the dendrites, an effect that was accompanied by increased branching of the proximal portion of the dendrites. This dendritic abnormality cannot be accounted for by changes in the distribution of membrane trafficking organelles since the overexpression of Mfn1 did not alter the distributions of the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi, or endosomes. Additionally, neither did these constructs impair neuronal viability or mitochondrial function. Therefore, our results suggest that dendritic mitochondria play a critical role in the establishment of the precise branching pattern of dendritic arbors by negatively affecting dendritic branching.

  18. Mouse Stbd1 is N-myristoylated and affects ER-mitochondria association and mitochondrial morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demetriadou, Anthi; Morales-Sanfrutos, Julia; Nearchou, Marianna; Baba, Otto; Kyriacou, Kyriacos; Tate, Edward W; Drousiotou, Anthi; Petrou, Petros P

    2017-03-01

    Starch binding domain-containing protein 1 (Stbd1) is a carbohydrate-binding protein that has been proposed to be a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen. Here, we show that mouse Stbd1 is a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident protein with the capacity to induce the formation of organized ER structures in HeLa cells. In addition to bulk ER, Stbd1 was found to localize to mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), which represent regions of close apposition between the ER and mitochondria. We demonstrate that N-myristoylation and binding of Stbd1 to glycogen act as major determinants of its subcellular targeting. Moreover, overexpression of non-myristoylated Stbd1 enhanced the association between ER and mitochondria, and further induced prominent mitochondrial fragmentation and clustering. Conversely, shRNA-mediated Stbd1 silencing resulted in an increase in the spacing between ER and mitochondria, and an altered morphology of the mitochondrial network, suggesting elevated fusion and interconnectivity of mitochondria. Our data unravel the molecular mechanism underlying Stbd1 subcellular targeting, support and expand its proposed function as a selective autophagy receptor for glycogen and uncover a new role for the protein in the physical association between ER and mitochondria. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Generation of stable overlaps between antiparallel filaments

    CERN Document Server

    Johann, D; Kruse, K

    2015-01-01

    During cell division, sister chromatids are segregated by the mitotic spindle, a bipolar assembly of interdigitating antiparallel polar filaments called microtubules. Establishing a stable overlap region is essential for maintenance of bipolarity, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a particle-based stochastic model, we find that the interplay of motors and passive cross linkers can robustly generate partial overlaps between antiparallel filaments. Our analysis shows that motors reduce the overlap in a length-dependent manner, whereas passive cross linkers increase it independently of the length. In addition to maintaining structural integrity, passive cross linkers can thus also have a dynamic role for size regulation.

  20. Overlap maximum matching ratio (OMMR):a new measure to evaluate overlaps of essential modules

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-xia ZHANG; Qiang-hua XIAO; Bin LI; Sai HU; Hui-jun XIONG; Bi-hai ZHAO

    2015-01-01

    Protein complexes are the basic units of macro-molecular organizations and help us to understand the cell’s mechanism. The development of the yeast two-hybrid, tandem affinity purification, and mass spectrometry high-throughput proteomic techniques supplies a large amount of protein-protein interaction data, which make it possible to predict overlapping complexes through computational methods. Research shows that overlapping complexes can contribute to identifying essential proteins, which are necessary for the organism to survive and reproduce, and for life’s activities. Scholars pay more attention to the evaluation of protein complexes. However, few of them focus on predicted overlaps. In this paper, an evaluation criterion called overlap maximum matching ratio (OMMR) is proposed to analyze the similarity between the identified overlaps and the benchmark overlap modules. Comparison of essential proteins and gene ontology (GO) analysis are also used to assess the quality of overlaps. We perform a comprehensive comparison of serveral overlapping complexes prediction approaches, using three yeast protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. We focus on the analysis of overlaps identified by these algorithms. Experimental results indicate the important of overlaps and reveal the relationship between overlaps and identification of essential proteins.

  1. Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes allow adaptation of mitochondrial metabolism to glucose availability in the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theurey, Pierre; Tubbs, Emily; Vial, Guillaume; Jacquemetton, Julien; Bendridi, Nadia; Chauvin, Marie-Agnès; Alam, Muhammad Rizwan; Le Romancer, Muriel; Vidal, Hubert; Rieusset, Jennifer

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAM) play a key role in mitochondrial dynamics and function and in hepatic insulin action. Whereas mitochondria are important regulators of energy metabolism, the nutritional regulation of MAM in the liver and its role in the adaptation of mitochondria physiology to nutrient availability are unknown. In this study, we found that the fasted to postprandial transition reduced the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contact points in mouse liver. Screening of potential hormonal/metabolic signals revealed glucose as the main nutritional regulator of hepatic MAM integrity both in vitro and in vivo Glucose reduced organelle interactions through the pentose phosphate-protein phosphatase 2