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Sample records for functional variants involved

  1. Functional analysis of human cytochrome P450 21A2 variants involved in congenital adrenal hyperplasia

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    Wang, Chunxue; Pallan, Pradeep S.; Zhang, Wei; Lei, Li; Yoshimoto, Francis K.; Waterman, Michael R.; Egli, Martin; Guengerich, F. Peter (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2017-05-24

    Cytochrome P450 (P450, CYP) 21A2 is the major steroid 21-hydroxylase, converting progesterone to 11-deoxycorticosterone and 17α-hydroxyprogesterone (17α-OH-progesterone) to 11-deoxycortisol. More than 100 CYP21A2 variants give rise to congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). We previously reported a structure of WT human P450 21A2 with bound progesterone and now present a structure bound to the other substrate (17α-OH-progesterone). We found that the 17α-OH-progesterone- and progesterone-bound complex structures are highly similar, with only some minor differences in surface loop regions. Twelve P450 21A2 variants associated with either salt-wasting or nonclassical forms of CAH were expressed, purified, and analyzed. The catalytic activities of these 12 variants ranged from 0.00009% to 30% of WT P450 21A2 and the extent of heme incorporation from 10% to 95% of the WT. Substrate dissociation constants (Ks) for four variants were 37–13,000-fold higher than for WT P450 21A2. Cytochrome b5, which augments several P450 activities, inhibited P450 21A2 activity. Similar to the WT enzyme, high noncompetitive intermolecular kinetic deuterium isotope effects (≥ 5.5) were observed for all six P450 21A2 variants examined for 21-hydroxylation of 21-d3-progesterone, indicating that C–H bond breaking is a rate-limiting step over a 104-fold range of catalytic efficiency. Using UV-visible and CD spectroscopy, we found that P450 21A2 thermal stability assessed in bacterial cells and with purified enzymes differed among salt-wasting- and nonclassical-associated variants, but these differences did not correlate with catalytic activity. Our in-depth investigation of CAH-associated P450 21A2 variants reveals critical insight into the effects of disease-causing mutations on this important enzyme.

  2. Histones in functional diversification. Core histone variants.

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    Pusarla, Rama-Haritha; Bhargava, Purnima

    2005-10-01

    Recent research suggests that minor changes in the primary sequence of the conserved histones may become major determinants for the chromatin structure regulating gene expression and other DNA-related processes. An analysis of the involvement of different core histone variants in different nuclear processes and the structure of different variant nucleosome cores shows that this may indeed be so. Histone variants may also be involved in demarcating functional regions of the chromatin. We discuss in this review why two of the four core histones show higher variation. A comparison of the status of variants in yeast with those from higher eukaryotes suggests that histone variants have evolved in synchrony with functional requirement of the cell.

  3. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  4. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

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    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J; Eloranta, Jyrki J; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D; Goodship, Judith A

    2014-01-01

    Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  5. Convergence rate of Bézier variant of an operator involving Laguerre polynomials of degree n

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    Öksüzer, Özlem; Karslı, Harun; Yeşildal, Fatma Taşdelen

    2013-10-01

    In this work, we consider the Bézier variant of an operator (Pn,αf) which is involving Laguerre polynomial of degree n and estimate the rate of convergence of (Pn,αf)(x,t) to bounded variation functions To prove our main result, we have used some methods and techniques of probability theory.

  6. Functional variants in NFKBIE and RTKN2 involved in activation of the NF-κB pathway are associated with rheumatoid arthritis in Japanese.

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    Keiko Myouzen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease with a complex etiology, leading to inflammation of synovial tissue and joint destruction. Through a genome-wide association study (GWAS and two replication studies in the Japanese population (7,907 cases and 35,362 controls, we identified two gene loci associated with rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility (NFKBIE at 6p21.1, rs2233434, odds ratio (OR = 1.20, P = 1.3 × 10(-15; RTKN2 at 10q21.2, rs3125734, OR = 1.20, P = 4.6 × 10(-9. In addition to two functional non-synonymous SNPs in NFKBIE, we identified candidate causal SNPs with regulatory potential in NFKBIE and RTKN2 gene regions by integrating in silico analysis using public genome databases and subsequent in vitro analysis. Both of these genes are known to regulate the NF-κB pathway, and the risk alleles of the genes were implicated in the enhancement of NF-κB activity in our analyses. These results suggest that the NF-κB pathway plays a role in pathogenesis and would be a rational target for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

  7. The power of multiplexed functional analysis of genetic variants.

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    Gasperini, Molly; Starita, Lea; Shendure, Jay

    2016-10-01

    New technologies have recently enabled saturation mutagenesis and functional analysis of nearly all possible variants of regulatory elements or proteins of interest in single experiments. Here we discuss the past, present, and future of such multiplexed (functional) assays for variant effects (MAVEs). MAVEs provide detailed insight into sequence-function relationships, and they may prove critical for the prospective clinical interpretation of genetic variants.

  8. Genetic variants associated with lung function

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    Thyagarajan, Bharat; Wojczynski, Mary; Minster, Ryan L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the ratio of FEV1 to forced vital capacity (FVC) are strong predictors of mortality and lung function is higher among individuals with exceptional longevity. However, genetic factors associated with lung function in individuals...... with exceptional longevity have not been identified. METHOD: We conducted a genome wide association study (GWAS) to identify novel genetic variants associated with lung function in the Long Life Family Study (LLFS) (n = 3,899). Replication was performed using data from the CHARGE/SpiroMeta consortia...... used the residuals of the FEV1 and FEV1/FVC, adjusted for age, sex, height, ancestry principal components (PCs), smoking status, pack-years, and field center. RESULTS: We identified nine SNPs in strong linkage disequilibrium in the CYP2U1 gene to be associated with FEV1 and a novel SNP (rs889574...

  9. Two insular regions are differentially involved in behavioral variant FTD and nonfluent/agrammatic variant PPA.

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    Mandelli, Maria Luisa; Vitali, Paolo; Santos, Miguel; Henry, Maya; Gola, Kelly; Rosenberg, Lynne; Dronkers, Nina; Miller, Bruce; Seeley, William W; Gorno-Tempini, Maria Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The non-fluent/agrammatic variant of primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA) and the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are focal neurodegenerative disorders belonging to the FTD-spectrum clinical syndromes. NfvPPA is characterized by effortful speech and/or agrammatism and left frontal atrophy, while bvFTD is characterized by social-emotional dysfunction often accompanied by right-lateralized frontal damage. Despite their contrasting clinical presentations, both disorders show prominent left anterior insula atrophy. We investigated differential patterns of insular sub-region atrophy in nfvPPA and bvFTD. Based on knowledge of insular connectivity and physiology, we hypothesized that the left superior precentral region of the dorsal anterior insula (SPGI) would be more atrophic in nvfPPA due to its critical role in motor speech, whereas the ventral anterior region would be more atrophied in bvFTD reflecting its known role in social-emotional-autonomic functions. Early stage nfvPPA and bvFTD patients matched for disease severity, age, gender and education and healthy controls participated in the study. Detailed clinical history, neurological examination, neuropsychological screening evaluation, and high-resolution T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were collected. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was applied to perform group comparisons across the whole brain and in bilateral insula region of interest (ROI). Correlation analyses between insular sub-region atrophy and relevant clinical features were performed. Whole brain group comparisons between nfvPPA and bvFTD showed the expected predominantly left or right anterior insular atrophy pattern. ROI analysis of bilateral insula showed that the left SPGI was significantly more atrophied in nfvPPA compared to bvFTD, while the bilateral ventral anterior and right dorsal anterior insula sub-regions were more atrophied in bvFTD than nfvPPA. Only left SPGI volume correlated with speech production

  10. Overlap between Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease in ABCA7 functional variants.

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    Nuytemans, Karen; Maldonado, Lizmarie; Ali, Aleena; John-Williams, Krista; Beecham, Gary W; Martin, Eden; Scott, William K; Vance, Jeffery M

    2016-02-01

    Given their reported function in phagocytosis and clearance of protein aggregates in Alzheimer disease (AD), we hypothesized that variants in ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) might be involved in Parkinson disease (PD). ABCA7 variants were identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 396 unrelated patients with PD and 222 healthy controls. In addition, we used the publicly available WES data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (444 patients and 153 healthy controls) as a second, independent data set. We observed a higher frequency of loss-of-function (LOF) variants and rare putative highly functional variants (Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion [CADD] >20) in clinically diagnosed patients with PD than in healthy controls in both data sets. Overall, we identified LOF variants in 11 patients and 1 healthy control (odds ratio [OR] 4.94, Fisher exact p = 0.07). Four of these variants have been previously implicated in AD risk (p.E709AfsX86, p.W1214X, p.L1403RfsX7, and rs113809142). In addition, rare variants with CADD >20 were observed in 19 patients vs 3 healthy controls (OR 2.85, Fisher exact p = 0.06). The presence of ABCA7 LOF variants in clinically defined PD suggests that they might be risk factors for neurodegeneration in general, especially those variants hallmarked by protein aggregation. More studies will be needed to evaluate the overall impact of this transporter in neurodegenerative disease.

  11. Assessment of Functional Effects of Unclassified Genetic Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couch, Fergus J.; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Hofstra, Robert; Monteiro, Alvaro N. A.; Greenblatt, Marc S.; de Wind, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Inherited predisposition to disease is often linked to reduced activity of a disease associated gene product. Thus, quantitation of the influence of inherited variants on gene function can potentially be used to predict the disease relevance of these variants. While many disease genes have been exte

  12. Genes that affect brain structure and function identified by rare variant analyses of Mendelian neurologic disease

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    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N.; Gambin, Tomasz; Akdemir, Zeynep Coban; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M.; Hunter, Jill V.; Atik, Mehmed M.; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O.; Bozdogan, Sevcan Tug; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C.; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B. Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Gulec, Elif Yilmaz; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D.; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M.; Adams, David R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Lupski, James R

    2015-01-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions between fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families, and homozygous loss of function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. PMID:26539891

  13. Functional assays for analysis of variants of uncertain significance in BRCA2

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    Guidugli, Lucia; Carreira, Aura; Caputo, Sandrine M;

    2014-01-01

    Missense variants in the BRCA2 gene are routinely detected during clinical screening for pathogenic mutations in patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. These subtle changes frequently remain of unknown clinical significance because of the lack of genetic information that may...... help establish a direct correlation with cancer predisposition. Therefore, alternative ways of predicting the pathogenicity of these variants are urgently needed. Since BRCA2 is a protein involved in important cellular mechanisms such as DNA repair, replication, and cell cycle control, functional...... assays have been developed that exploit these cellular activities to explore the impact of the variants on protein function. In this review, we summarize assays developed and currently utilized for studying missense variants in BRCA2. We specifically depict details of each assay, including variants...

  14. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

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    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  15. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants

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    Gala, Manish; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bezieau, Stephane; Brenner, Hermann; Butterbach, Katja; Caan, Bette J.; Carlson, Christopher S.; Casey, Graham; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Conti, David V.; Curtis, Keith R.; Duggan, David; Gallinger, Steven; Haile, Robert W.; Harrison, Tabitha A.; Hayes, Richard B.; Hoffmeister, Michael; Hopper, John L.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Jenkins, Mark A.; Küry, Sébastien; Le Marchand, Loic; Leal, Suzanne M.; Newcomb, Polly A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Potter, John D.; Schoen, Robert E.; Schumacher, Fredrick R.; Seminara, Daniela; Slattery, Martha L.; Hsu, Li; Chan, Andrew T.; White, Emily; Berndt, Sonja I.; Peters, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs). We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33). We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s). PMID:27379672

  16. Are genetic variants for tobacco smoking associated with cannabis involvement?

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    Agrawal, Arpana; Lynskey, Michael T; Kapoor, Manav; Bucholz, Kathleen K; Edenberg, Howard J; Schuckit, Marc; Brooks, Andrew; Hesselbrock, Victor; Kramer, John; Saccone, Nancy; Tischfield, Jay; Bierut, Laura J

    2015-05-01

    Cannabis users are highly likely to also be tobacco cigarette smokers and a proportion of this comorbidity is attributable to shared genetic influences. Three large meta-analyses of genomewide association studies (GWAS) of tobacco smoking have identified multiple genomewide significant (psmoking and with cannabis involvement in an independent sample. Eleven SNPs associated with cigarettes per day (CPD), ever versus never smoking and current smoking/smoking cessation at psmoking measures in 2716 European-American subjects from the Study of Addictions Genes and Environment (SAGE) and with lifetime and current cannabis use and DSM-IV cannabis abuse/dependence. Cannabis use and tobacco smoking correlated at 0.54. Rs16969968 in CHRNA5 (and its proxy, rs1051730 in CHRNA3) and rs1451240, a proxy for rs13280604 in CHRNB3, were associated with CPD after Bonferroni correction (psmoking initiation, as in the original meta-analysis and also with lifetime cannabis use. Associations with cannabis involvement were no longer significant upon adjustment for the tobacco smoking measures. The modest associations between cannabis involvement and SNPs for tobacco smoking were not independent of the comorbidity between tobacco and cannabis involvement. Larger samples of individuals might be required to articulate the specific genetic architecture of cannabis involvement. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

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    Anamika Krishanpal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

  18. Overlap between Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease in ABCA7 functional variants

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    Nuytemans, Karen; Maldonado, Lizmarie; Ali, Aleena; John-Williams, Krista; Beecham, Gary W.; Martin, Eden; Scott, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Given their reported function in phagocytosis and clearance of protein aggregates in Alzheimer disease (AD), we hypothesized that variants in ATP-binding cassette transporter A7 (ABCA7) might be involved in Parkinson disease (PD). Methods: ABCA7 variants were identified using whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 396 unrelated patients with PD and 222 healthy controls. In addition, we used the publicly available WES data from the Parkinson's Progression Markers Initiative (444 patients and 153 healthy controls) as a second, independent data set. Results: We observed a higher frequency of loss-of-function (LOF) variants and rare putative highly functional variants (Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion [CADD] >20) in clinically diagnosed patients with PD than in healthy controls in both data sets. Overall, we identified LOF variants in 11 patients and 1 healthy control (odds ratio [OR] 4.94, Fisher exact p = 0.07). Four of these variants have been previously implicated in AD risk (p.E709AfsX86, p.W1214X, p.L1403RfsX7, and rs113809142). In addition, rare variants with CADD >20 were observed in 19 patients vs 3 healthy controls (OR 2.85, Fisher exact p = 0.06). Conclusion: The presence of ABCA7 LOF variants in clinically defined PD suggests that they might be risk factors for neurodegeneration in general, especially those variants hallmarked by protein aggregation. More studies will be needed to evaluate the overall impact of this transporter in neurodegenerative disease. PMID:27066581

  19. Epidemiological and functional implications of molecular variants of human papillomavirus

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    Sichero L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus genomes are classified into molecular variants when they present more than 98% of similarity to the prototype sequence within the L1 gene. Comparative nucleotide sequence analyses of these viruses have elucidated some features of their phylogenetic relationship. In addition, human papillomavirus intratype variability has also been used as an important tool in epidemiological studies of viral transmission, persistence and progression to clinically relevant cervical lesions. Until the present, little has been published concerning the functional significance of molecular variants. It has been shown that nucleotide variability within the long control region leads to differences in the binding affinity of some cellular transcriptional factors and to the enhancement of the expression of E6 and E7 oncogenes. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro studies revealed differences in E6 and E7 biochemical and biological properties among molecular variants. Nevertheless, further correlation with additional functional information is needed to evaluate the significance of genome intratypic variability. These results are also important for the development of vaccines and to determine the extent to which immunization with L1 virus-like particles of one variant could induce antibodies that cross-neutralize other variants.

  20. Functional assays for analysis of variants of uncertain significance in BRCA2

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    Guidugli, Lucia; Carreira, Aura; Caputo, Sandrine M.; Ehlen, Asa; Galli, Alvaro; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Hansen, Thomas V.O.; Couch, Fergus J.; Vreeswijk, Maaike P.G.

    2014-01-01

    Missense variants in the BRCA2 gene are routinely detected during clinical screening for pathogenic mutations in patients with a family history of breast and ovarian cancer. These subtle changes frequently remain of unknown clinical significance because of the lack of genetic information that may help establish a direct correlation with cancer predisposition. Therefore alternative ways of predicting the pathogenicity of these variants are urgently needed. Since BRCA2 is a protein involved in important cellular mechanisms such as DNA repair, replication and cell cycle control, functional assays have been developed that exploit these cellular activities to explore the impact of the variants on protein function. In this review we summarize assays developed and currently utilized for studying missense variants in BRCA2. We specifically depict details of each assay, including VUS analyzed, and describe a validation set of (genetically) proven pathogenic and neutral missense variants to serve as a golden standard for the validation of each assay. Guidelines are proposed to enable implementation of laboratory-based methods to assess the impact of the variant on cancer risk. PMID:24323938

  1. Structural and Functional Analysis of the ApolipoproteinA-I A164S Variant.

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    Jonathan Dalla-Riva

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I is the main protein involved in the formation of high-density lipoprotein (HDL, it is the principal mediator of the reverse cholesterol transfer (RCT pathway and provides cardio-protection. In addition to functional wild-type apoA-I, several variants have been shown to associate with hereditary amyloidosis. In this study we have performed biophysical and biochemical analyses of the structure and functional properties of the A164S variant of apoA-I (1:500 in the Danish general population, which is the first known mutation of apoA-I that leads to an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease (IHD, myocardial infarction and mortality without associated low HDL cholesterol levels. Despite the fact that epidemiologically IHD is associated with low plasma levels of HDL, the A164S mutation is linked to normal plasma levels of lipids, HDL and apoA-I, suggesting impaired functionality of this variant. Using biophysical techniques (e.g., circular dichroism spectroscopy and electron microscopy to determine secondary structure, stability and pro-amyloidogenic property of the lipid free A164S apoA-I variant, our observations suggest similarity in structural properties between apoA-I WT and apoA-I A164S. However, the A164S apoA-I variant exhibits lower binding affinity to lipids but forms similar sized HDL particles to those produced by WT.

  2. Functional relevance for associations between osteoporosis and genetic variants

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    Tan, Li-Jun; Wang, Peng; Chen, Xiang-Ding; Zhu, Li-Hua; Zeng, Qin; Hu, Yuan; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterized by increased bone loss and deterioration of bone microarchitecture, which will lead to reduced bone strength and increased risk of fragility fractures. Previous studies have identified many genetic loci associated with osteoporosis, but functional mechanisms underlying the associations have rarely been explored. In order to explore the potential molecular functional mechanisms underlying the associations for osteoporosis, we performed integrative analyses by using the publically available datasets and resources. We searched 128 identified osteoporosis associated SNPs (Posteoporosis. This study may provide novel insights into the functional mechanisms underlying the osteoporosis associated genetic variants, which will help us to comprehend the potential mechanisms underlying the genetic association for osteoporosis. PMID:28369098

  3. VEGFA variants are associated with pre-school lung function, but not neonatal lung function

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    Kreiner-Møller, E; Chawes, B L K; Vissing, N H;

    2013-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is implicated in airway remodelling and asthma development. We studied VEGFA gene variants and plasma levels and the development of lung function, bronchial hyperresponsiveness and asthma in childhood....

  4. A radial basis function network approach for the computation of inverse continuous time variant functions.

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    Mayorga, René V; Carrera, Jonathan

    2007-06-01

    This Paper presents an efficient approach for the fast computation of inverse continuous time variant functions with the proper use of Radial Basis Function Networks (RBFNs). The approach is based on implementing RBFNs for computing inverse continuous time variant functions via an overall damped least squares solution that includes a novel null space vector for singularities prevention. The singularities avoidance null space vector is derived from developing a sufficiency condition for singularities prevention that conduces to establish some characterizing matrices and an associated performance index.

  5. Molecular prioritization strategies to identify functional genetic variants in the cardiovascular disease-associated expression QTL Vanin-1

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    Kaskow, Belinda J; Diepeveen, Luke A; Michael Proffitt, J; Rea, Alexander J; Ulgiati, Daniela; Blangero, John; Moses, Eric K; Abraham, Lawrence J

    2014-01-01

    There is now good evidence that non-coding sequence variants are involved in the heritability of many common complex traits. The current ‘gold standard' approach for assessing functionality is the in vitro reporter gene assay to assess allelic differences in transcriptional activity, usually followed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays to assess allelic differences in transcription factor binding. Although widely used, these assays have inherent limitations, including the lack of endogenous chromatin context. Here we present a more contemporary approach to assessing functionality of non-coding sequence variation within the Vanin-1 (VNN1) promoter. By combining ‘gold standard' assays with in vivo assessments of chromatin accessibility, we greatly increase our confidence in the statistically assigned functional relevance. The standard assays revealed the −137 single nucleotide variant to be functional but the −587 variant to have no functional relevance. However, our in vivo tests show an allelic difference in chromatin accessibility surrounding the −587 variant supporting strong functional potential at both sites. Our approach advances the identification of functional variants by providing strong in vivo biological evidence for function. PMID:24045843

  6. Comparison of Various PSO Variants with Different Mathematical Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Kumar Saharan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The optimality of solutions is based on one or several criteria that are usually problem and user dependent. User or problem may pose some constraints on it. So, we have to find the optimal solution of constrained, complex and unpredictable problems. Various Metaheuristics can be used to solve these kinds of problems with more or less certainty. But reproducibility (or refinement of result can be assured by quality and problem specific algorithm and efficient programming. We have tried to compare results of two variants of PSO (Neighbourhood varying inertia weight (nVIW and Neighbourhood varying inertia weight with constriction factor (CnVIW on two mathematical functions (Goldstein Price function and Rosenbrock Function. These functions have shown some interesting behaviours and convergence pattern by varying different parameters. Constriction factor has proved efficacious in some cases as swarm approaches towards gbest but it was not as significant as inertia factor was in case of standard PSO. We have used Java for programming purpose which proved to be a very strong tool in dealing with complex calculations.

  7. Influence of functional variant of neuronal nitric oxide synthase on impulsive behaviors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Andreas; Jacob, Christian P; Rujescu, Dan; Herterich, Sabine; Lang, Sebastian; Gutknecht, Lise; Baehne, Christina G; Strobel, Alexander; Freitag, Christine M; Giegling, Ina; Romanos, Marcel; Hartmann, Annette; Rösler, Michael; Renner, Tobias J; Fallgatter, Andreas J; Retz, Wolfgang; Ehlis, Ann-Christine; Lesch, Klaus-Peter

    2009-01-01

    Human personality is characterized by substantial heritability but few functional gene variants have been identified. Although rodent data suggest that the neuronal isoform of nitric oxide synthase (NOS-I) modifies diverse behaviors including aggression, this has not been translated to human studies. To investigate the functionality of an NOS1 promoter repeat length variation (NOS1 Ex1f variable number tandem repeat [VNTR]) and to test whether it is associated with phenotypes relevant to impulsivity. Molecular biological studies assessed the cellular consequences of NOS1 Ex1f VNTR; association studies were conducted to investigate the impact of this genetic variant on impulsivity; imaging genetics was applied to determine whether the polymorphism is functional on a neurobiological level. Three psychiatric university clinics in Germany. More than 3200 subjects were included in the association study: 1954 controls, 403 patients with personality disorder, 383 patients with adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), 151 with familial ADHD, 189 suicide attempters, and 182 criminal offenders. For the association studies, the major outcome criteria were phenotypes relevant to impulsivity, namely, the dimensional phenotype conscientiousness and the categorical phenotypes adult ADHD, aggression, and cluster B personality disorder. A novel functional promoter polymorphism in NOS1 was associated with traits related to impulsivity, including hyperactive and aggressive behaviors. Specifically, the short repeat variant was more frequent in adult ADHD, cluster B personality disorder, and autoaggressive and heteroaggressive behavior. This short variant came along with decreased transcriptional activity of the NOS1 exon 1f promoter and alterations in the neuronal transcriptome including RGS4 and GRIN1. On a systems level, it was associated with hypoactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex, which is involved in the processing of emotion and reward in behavioral

  8. Association between age at diagnosis of Graves' disease and variants in genes involved in immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Jurecka-Lubieniecka

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Graves' disease (GD is a complex disease in which genetic predisposition is modified by environmental factors. The aim of the study was to examine the association between genetic variants in genes encoding proteins involved in immune response and the age at diagnosis of GD. METHODS: 735 GD patients and 1216 healthy controls from Poland were included into the study. Eight genetic variants in the HLA-DRB1, TNF, CTLA4, CD40, NFKb, PTPN22, IL4 and IL10 genes were genotyped. Patients were stratified by the age at diagnosis of GD and the association with genotype was analysed. RESULTS: Polymorphism in the HLA-DRB1, TNF and CTLA4 genes were associated with GD. The carriers of the HLA DRB1*03 allele were more frequent in patients with age at GD diagnosis ≤30 years than in patients with older age at GD diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: HLADRB1*03 allele is associated with young age at diagnosis of Graves' disease in Polish population.

  9. Interpreting functional effects of coding variants: challenges in proteome-scale prediction, annotation and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shameer, Khader; Tripathi, Lokesh P; Kalari, Krishna R; Dudley, Joel T; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2016-09-01

    Accurate assessment of genetic variation in human DNA sequencing studies remains a nontrivial challenge in clinical genomics and genome informatics. Ascribing functional roles and/or clinical significances to single nucleotide variants identified from a next-generation sequencing study is an important step in genome interpretation. Experimental characterization of all the observed functional variants is yet impractical; thus, the prediction of functional and/or regulatory impacts of the various mutations using in silico approaches is an important step toward the identification of functionally significant or clinically actionable variants. The relationships between genotypes and the expressed phenotypes are multilayered and biologically complex; such relationships present numerous challenges and at the same time offer various opportunities for the design of in silico variant assessment strategies. Over the past decade, many bioinformatics algorithms have been developed to predict functional consequences of single nucleotide variants in the protein coding regions. In this review, we provide an overview of the bioinformatics resources for the prediction, annotation and visualization of coding single nucleotide variants. We discuss the currently available approaches and major challenges from the perspective of protein sequence, structure, function and interactions that require consideration when interpreting the impact of putatively functional variants. We also discuss the relevance of incorporating integrated workflows for predicting the biomedical impact of the functionally important variations encoded in a genome, exome or transcriptome. Finally, we propose a framework to classify variant assessment approaches and strategies for incorporation of variant assessment within electronic health records.

  10. Expression of P. falciparum var genes involves exchange of the histone variant H2A.Z at the promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Petter

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var

  11. [Muscular Dystrophies Involving the Retinal Function].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jägle, H

    2016-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are rare disorders, with an incidence of approx. 20 in 100 000. Some dystrophies also affect retinal or optic nerve function. In such cases, the ophthalmological findings may be critical for differential diagnosis or patient counseling. For example in Duchenne muscular dystrophy, where the alteration in retinal function seems to reflect cerebral involvement. Other important forms are mitochondrial and metabolic disorders, such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome and the Refsum syndrome. Molecular genetic analysis has become a major tool for differential diagnosis, but may be complex and demanding. This article gives an overview of major muscular dystrophies involving retinal function and their genetic origin, in order to guide differential diagnosis.

  12. Local identities involving Jacobi elliptic functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash Khare; Arul Lakshminarayan; Uday Sukhatme

    2004-06-01

    We derive a number of local identities involving Jacobi elliptic functions and use them to obtain several new results. First, we present an alternative, simpler derivation of the cyclic identities discovered by us recently, along with an extension to several new cyclic identities. Second, we obtain a generalization to cyclic identities in which successive terms have a multiplicative phase factor exp$(2i=s)$, where $s$ is any integer. Third, we systematize the local identities by deriving four local `master identities' analogous to the master identities for the cyclic sums discussed by us previously. Fourth, we point out that many of the local identities can be thought of as exact discretizations of standard non-linear differential equations satisfied by the Jacobi elliptic functions. Finally, we obtain explicit answers for a number of definite integrals and simpler forms for several indefinite integrals involving Jacobi elliptic functions.

  13. Longitudinal data analysis for rare variants detection with penalized quadratic inference function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongyan; Li, Zhi; Yang, Haitao; Cui, Yuehua; Zhang, Yanbo

    2017-04-05

    Longitudinal genetic data provide more information regarding genetic effects over time compared with cross-sectional data. Coupled with next-generation sequencing technologies, it becomes reality to identify important genes containing both rare and common variants in a longitudinal design. In this work, we adopted a weighted sum statistic (WSS) to collapse multiple variants in a gene region to form a gene score. When multiple genes in a pathway were considered together, a penalized longitudinal model under the quadratic inference function (QIF) framework was applied for efficient gene selection. We evaluated the estimation accuracy and model selection performance under different model settings, then applied the method to a real dataset from the Genetic Analysis Workshop 18 (GAW18). Compared with the unpenalized QIF method, the penalized QIF (pQIF) method achieved better estimation accuracy and higher selection efficiency. The pQIF remained optimal even when the working correlation structure was mis-specified. The real data analysis identified one important gene, angiotensin II receptor type 1 (AGTR1), in the Ca2+/AT-IIR/α-AR signaling pathway. The estimated effect implied that AGTR1 may have a protective effect for hypertension. Our pQIF method provides a general tool for longitudinal sequencing studies involving large numbers of genetic variants.

  14. Functional analysis of four LDLR 5'UTR and promoter variants in patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamis, Amna; Palmen, Jutta; Lench, Nick; Taylor, Alison; Badmus, Ebele; Leigh, Sarah; Humphries, Steve E

    2015-06-01

    Familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH) is an autosomal dominant inherited disease characterised by increased low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. The functionality of four novel variants within the LDLR 5'UTR and promoter located at c.-13A>G, c.-101T>C, c.-121T>C and c.-215A>G was investigated using in silico and in vitro assays, and a systemic bioinformatics analysis of all 36 reported promoter variants are presented. Bioinformatic tools predicted that all four variants occurred in sites likely to bind transcription factors and that binding was altered by the variant allele. Luciferase assay was performed for all the variants. Compared with wild type, the c.-101T>C and c.-121T>C variants showed significantly lower mean (±SD) luciferase activity (64 ± 8 and 72 ± 8%, all PG or c.-215A>G variants (96 ± 15 and 100 ± 12%), suggesting these variants are not FH causing. Similar results were seen for the c.-101T>C and c.-121T>C variants in lipid-depleted serum. However, a significant reduction in luciferase activity was seen in the c.-215A>G variant in lipid-depleted serum. Electrophoretic-mobility shift assays identified allele-specific binding of liver (hepatoma) nuclear proteins to c.-121T>C and suggestive differential binding to c.-101T>C but no binding to c.-215A>G. These data highlight the importance of in vitro testing of reported LDLR promoter variants to establish their role in FH. The functional assays performed suggest that the c.-101T>C and c.-121T>C variants are pathogenic, whereas c.-13A>G variant is benign, and the status of c.-215A>G remains unclear.

  15. Complex Variant of Philadelphia Translocation Involving Chromosomes 9, 12, and 22 in a Case with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malvestiti, F.; Agrati, C.; Chinetti, S.; Di Meco, A.; Cirrincione, S.; Oggionni, M.; Grimi, B.; Maggi, F.; Simoni, G.; Grati, F. R.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9) may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of CML with complex variant Ph translocation involving chromosomes 9, 12, and 22. We present the hematologic response and cytogenetic response after Imatinib treatment. We also speculated the mechanism which had originated the chromosome rearrangement. PMID:25045550

  16. Complex Variant of Philadelphia Translocation Involving Chromosomes 9, 12, and 22 in a Case with Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Malvestiti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is a hematopoietic stem cell disorder included in the broader diagnostic category of myeloproliferative neoplasms, associated with fusion by BCR gene at chromosome 22q11 to ABL1 gene at chromosome 9q34 with the formation of the Philadelphia (Ph chromosome. In 2–10% of CML cases, the fusion gene arises in connection with a variant translocation, involving chromosomes 9, 22, and one or more different chromosomes; consequently, the Ph chromosome could be masked within a complex chromosome rearrangement. In cases with variant Ph translocation a deletion on der(9 may be more frequently observed than in cases with the classical one. Herein we describe a novel case of CML with complex variant Ph translocation involving chromosomes 9, 12, and 22. We present the hematologic response and cytogenetic response after Imatinib treatment. We also speculated the mechanism which had originated the chromosome rearrangement.

  17. Loss-of-function variants in HIVEP2 are a cause of intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Siddharth; Engels, Hartmut; Schanze, Ina; Cremer, Kirsten; Wieland, Thomas; Menzel, Moritz; Schubach, Max; Biskup, Saskia; Kreiß, Martina; Endele, Sabine; Strom, Tim M; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Zenker, Martin; Gupta, Siddharth; Cohen, Julie; Zink, Alexander M; Naidu, SakkuBai

    2016-04-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) affects 2-3% of the population. In the past, many genetic causes of ID remained unidentified due to its vast heterogeneity. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) studies have shown that de novo variants underlie a significant portion of sporadic cases of ID. Applying WES to patients with ID or global developmental delay at different centers, we identified three individuals with distinct de novo variants in HIVEP2 (human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein), which belongs to a family of zinc-finger-containing transcriptional proteins involved in growth and development. Two of the variants were nonsense changes, and one was a 1 bp deletion resulting in a premature stop codon that was reported previously without clinical detail. In silico prediction programs suggest loss-of-function in the mutated allele leading to haploinsufficiency as a putative mechanism in all three individuals. All three patients presented with moderate-to-severe ID, minimal structural brain anomalies, hypotonia, and mild dysmorphic features. Growth parameters were in the normal range except for borderline microcephaly at birth in one patient. Two of the patients exhibited behavioral anomalies including hyperactivity and aggression. Published functional data suggest a neurodevelopmental role for HIVEP2, and several of the genes regulated by HIVEP2 are implicated in brain development, for example, SSTR-2, c-Myc, and genes of the NF-κB pathway. In addition, HIVEP2-knockout mice exhibit several working memory deficits, increased anxiety, and hyperactivity. On the basis of the genotype-phenotype correlation and existing functional data, we propose HIVEP2 as a causative ID gene.

  18. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacArthur, D.G.; Balasubramanian, S.; Frankish, A.; Huang, N.; Morris, J.; Walter, K.; Jostins, L.; Habegger, L.; Pickrell, J.K.; Montgomery, S.B.; Albers, C.A.; Zhang, Z.D.; Conrad, D.F.; Lunter, G.; Zheng, H.; Ayub, Q.; DePristo, M.A.; Banks, E.; Hu, M.; Handsaker, R.E.; Rosenfeld, J.A.; Fromer, M.; Jin, M.; Mu, X.J.; Khurana, E.; Ye, K.; Kay, M.; Saunders, G.I.; Suner, M.M.; Hunt, T.; Barnes, I.H.; Amid, C.; Carvalho-Silva, D.R.; Bignell, A.H.; Snow, C.; Yngvadottir, B.; Bumpstead, S.; Cooper, D.N.; Xue, Y.; Romero, I.G.; Genomes Project, C.; Wang, J.; Li, Y.; Gibbs, R.A.; McCarroll, S.A.; Dermitzakis, E.T.; Pritchard, J.K.; Barrett, J.C.; Harrow, J.; Hurles, M.E.; Gerstein, M.B.; Tyler-Smith, C.

    2012-01-01

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to det

  19. Fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Jiang, C.L.; Esbensen, H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Measurements of fusion excitation functions involving transitional nuclei {sup 78}Kr and {sup 100}Mo showed a different behavior at low energies, if compared to measurements with {sup 86}Kr and {sup 92}Mo. This points to a possible influence of nuclear structure on the fusion process. One way to characterize the structure of vibrational nuclei is via their restoring force parameters C{sub 2} which can be calculated from the energy of the lowest 2{sup +} state and the corresponding B(E2) value. A survey of the even-even nuclei between A = 28-150 shows strong variations in C{sub 2} values spanning two orders of magnitude. The lowest values for C{sub 2} are observed for {sup 78}Kr, {sup 104}Ru and {sup 124}Xe followed by {sup 74,76}Ge, {sup 74,76}Se, {sup 100}Mo and {sup 110}Pd. In order to learn more about the influence of {open_quotes}softness{close_quotes} on the sub-barrier fusion enhancement, we measured cross sections for evaporation residue production for the systems {sup 78}Kr + {sup 104}Ru and {sup 78}Kr + {sup 76}Ge with the gas-filled magnet technique. For both systems, fusion excitation functions involving the closed neutron shell nucleus {sup 86}Kr were measured previously. The data are presently being analyzed.

  20. Integrating functional data to prioritize causal variants in statistical fine-mapping studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleb Kichaev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Standard statistical approaches for prioritization of variants for functional testing in fine-mapping studies either use marginal association statistics or estimate posterior probabilities for variants to be causal under simplifying assumptions. Here, we present a probabilistic framework that integrates association strength with functional genomic annotation data to improve accuracy in selecting plausible causal variants for functional validation. A key feature of our approach is that it empirically estimates the contribution of each functional annotation to the trait of interest directly from summary association statistics while allowing for multiple causal variants at any risk locus. We devise efficient algorithms that estimate the parameters of our model across all risk loci to further increase performance. Using simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we find that our framework consistently outperforms the current state-of-the-art fine-mapping methods, reducing the number of variants that need to be selected to capture 90% of the causal variants from an average of 13.3 to 10.4 SNPs per locus (as compared to the next-best performing strategy. Furthermore, we introduce a cost-to-benefit optimization framework for determining the number of variants to be followed up in functional assays and assess its performance using real and simulation data. We validate our findings using a large scale meta-analysis of four blood lipids traits and find that the relative probability for causality is increased for variants in exons and transcription start sites and decreased in repressed genomic regions at the risk loci of these traits. Using these highly predictive, trait-specific functional annotations, we estimate causality probabilities across all traits and variants, reducing the size of the 90% confidence set from an average of 17.5 to 13.5 variants per locus in this data.

  1. Functional Assessment of Genetic Variants with Outcomes Adapted to Clinical Decision-Making

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thouvenot, Pierre; Ben Yamin, Barbara; Fourrière, Lou; Lescure, Aurianne; Boudier, Thomas; Del Nery, Elaine; Chauchereau, Anne; Goldgar, David E; Houdayer, Claude; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Nicolas, Alain; Millot, Gaël A

    2016-01-01

    ..., to be implemented in the clinical decision-making process. Here, we assessed 25 pathogenic and 15 neutral missense variants of the BRCA1 breast/ovarian cancer susceptibility gene in four BRCA1 functional assays...

  2. Functional MicroRNA Involved in Endometriosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creighton, Chad J.; Han, Derek Y.; Zariff, Azam; Anderson, Matthew L.; Gunaratne, Preethi H.; Matzuk, Martin M.

    2011-01-01

    Endometriosis is a common disease seen by gynecologists. Clinical features involve pelvic pain and unexplained infertility. Although endometriosis is pathologically characterized by endometrial tissue outside the normal uterine location, endometriosis is otherwise not easily explained. Endometriomas, endometriotic cysts of the ovary, typically cause pain and distortion of pelvic anatomy. To begin to understand the pathogenesis of endometriomas, we describe the first transcriptome-microRNAome analysis of endometriomas and eutopic endometrium using next-generation sequencing technology. Using this approach, we generated a total of more than 54 million independent small RNA reads from our 19 clinical samples. At the microRNA level, we found 10 microRNA that were up-regulated (miR-202, 193a-3p, 29c, 708, 509-3-5p, 574-3p, 193a-5p, 485-3p, 100, and 720) and 12 microRNA that were down-regulated (miR-504, 141, 429, 203, 10a, 200b, 873, 200c, 200a, 449b, 375, and 34c-5p) in endometriomas compared with endometrium. Using in silico prediction algorithms, we correlated these microRNA with their corresponding differentially expressed mRNA targets. To validate the functional roles of microRNA, we manipulated levels of miR-29c in an in vitro system of primary cultures of human endometrial stromal fibroblasts. Extracellular matrix genes that were potential targets of miR-29c in silico were significantly down-regulated using this biological in vitro system. In vitro functional studies using luciferase reporter constructs further confirmed that miR-29c directly affects specific extracellular matrix genes that are dysregulated in endometriomas. Thus, miR-29c and other abnormally regulated microRNA appear to play important roles in the pathophysiology of uterine function and dysfunction. PMID:21436257

  3. MicroRNA Genetic Variation: From Population Analysis to Functional Implications of Three Allele Variants Associated with Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torruella-Loran, Ignasi; Laayouni, Hafid; Dobon, Begoña; Gallego, Alicia; Balcells, Ingrid; Garcia-Ramallo, Eva; Espinosa-Parrilla, Yolanda

    2016-10-01

    Nucleotide variants in microRNA regions have been associated with disease; nevertheless, few studies still have addressed the allele-dependent effect of these changes. We studied microRNA genetic variation in human populations and found that while low-frequency variants accumulate indistinctly in microRNA regions, the mature and seed regions tend to be depleted of high-frequency variants, probably as a result of purifying selection. Comparison of pairwise population fixation indexes among regions showed that the seed had higher population fixation indexes than the other regions, suggesting the existence of local adaptation in the seed region. We further performed functional studies of three microRNA variants associated with cancer (rs2910164:C > G in MIR146A, rs11614913:C > T in MIR196A2, and rs3746444:A > G in both MIR499A and MIR499B). We found differences in the expression between alleles and in the regulation of several genes involved in cancer, such as TP53, KIT, CDH1, CLH, and TERT, which may result in changes in regulatory networks related to tumorigenesis. Furthermore, luciferase-based assays showed that MIR499A could be regulating the cadherin CDH1 and the cell adhesion molecule CLH1 in an allele-dependent fashion. A better understanding of the effect of microRNA variants associated with disease could be key in our way to a more personalized medicine.

  4. A role for coding functional variants in HNF4A in type 2 diabetes susceptibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jafar-Mohammadi, B; Groves, C J; Gjesing, A P;

    2011-01-01

    allele frequency [MAF] ~0.1%; T130I, MAF ~3.0%)-known to influence downstream HNF-4A target gene expression-are of interest, but previous type 2 diabetes association reports were inconclusive. We aimed to evaluate the contribution of these variants to type 2 diabetes susceptibility through large......Rare mutations in the gene HNF4A, encoding the transcription factor hepatocyte nuclear factor 4a (HNF-4A), account for ~5% of cases of MODY and more frequent variants in this gene may be involved in multifactorial forms of diabetes. Two low-frequency, non-synonymous variants in HNF4A (V255M, minor...

  5. Functional Characterization of the Plasmacytoma Variant Translocation 1 Gene (PVT1) in Diabetic Nephropathy

    OpenAIRE

    M Lucrecia Alvarez; Johanna K. DiStefano

    2011-01-01

    We previously observed association between variants in the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributed to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and demonstrated PVT1 expression in a variety of renal cell types. While these findings suggest a role for PVT1 in the development of ESRD, potential mechanisms for involvement remain unknown. The goal of this study was to identify possible molecular mechanisms by which PVT1 may contribute to the developme...

  6. A guide for functional analysis of BRCA1 variants of uncertain significance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millot, Gaël A; Carvalho, Marcelo A; Caputo, Sandrine M;

    2012-01-01

    Germline mutations in the tumor suppressor gene BRCA1 confer an estimated lifetime risk of 56-80% for breast cancer and 15-60% for ovarian cancer. Since the mid 1990s when BRCA1 was identified, genetic testing has revealed over 1,500 unique germline variants. However, for a significant number...... of these variants, the effect on protein function is unknown making it difficult to infer the consequences on risks of breast and ovarian cancers. Thus, many individuals undergoing genetic testing for BRCA1 mutations receive test results reporting a variant of uncertain clinical significance (VUS), leading...... to issues in risk assessment, counseling, and preventive care. Here, we describe functional assays for BRCA1 to directly or indirectly assess the impact of a variant on protein conformation or function and how these results can be used to complement genetic data to classify a VUS as to its clinical...

  7. Establishment of Sf9 transformants constitutively expressing PBAN receptor (PBANR variants: application to functional evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Min Lee

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate further evaluation of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR functionality and regulation, we generated cultured insect cell lines constitutively expressing green fluorescent protein chimeras of the recently identified Bombyx mori PBANR (BommoPBANR and Pseudaletia separata PBANR (PsesePBANR variants. Fluorescent chimeras included the BommoPBANR-A, B, and C variants and the PsesePBANR-B and C variants. Cell lines expressing non-chimeric BommoPBANR-B and C variants were also generated. Functional evaluation of these transformed cell lines using confocal laser microscopy revealed that a Rhodamine Red-labeled PBAN derivative (RR-C10PBANR2K specifically co-localized with all of the respective PBANR variants at the plasma membrane. Near complete internalization of the fluorescent RR-C10PBANR2K ligand 30 min after binding was observed in all cell lines except those expressing the BommoPBANR-A variant, in which the ligand/receptor complex remained at the plasma membrane. Fluorescent Ca2+ imaging further showed that, unlike the BommoPBANR-B or BommoPBANR-C cell lines, RR-C10PBANR2K binding failed to mobilize extracellular Ca2+ in the BommoPBANR-A cell line even at concentrations of 10 M. These observations demonstrate a clear functional difference between the BommoPBANR-A variant and the BommoPBANR-B and –C variants in terms of receptor regulation and activation of downstream effector molecules. We also found that, contrary to previous reports, ligand-induced internalization of BommoPBANR-B and BommoPBANR-C in cell lines stably expressing these variants occurred in the absence of extracellular Ca2+.

  8. A functional variant in the UBE2B gene promoter is associated with idiopathic azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lisha; Zhang, Qiang; Diao, Ruiying; Cai, Zhiming; Gui, Yaoting

    2015-07-30

    A variety of genetic variants lead to abnormal human spermatogenesis. The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2B (UBE2B) plays a significant role in spermatogenesis as Ube2b-knockout male mice are infertile. In this study, we sequenced the exon and promoter region of UBE2B in 776 patients diagnosed with idiopathic azoospermia (IA) and 709 proven fertile men to examine whether UBE2B is involved in the pathogenesis of IA. In the exon region, two novel synonymous variants were detected in the patient group. In the promoter region, four known variants and four novel variants were identified in the patient group. Of the novel variants in the promoter region, three were located at the binding site of specificity protein 1 (SP1) transcription factor analyzed by TRANSFAC software. Luciferase assays demonstrated that one heterozygous variant (Chr5.133706925 A > G) inhibited the transcriptional regulation activity of SP1. A novel variant (Chr5.133706925 A > G) residing in the UBE2B gene promoter region confers a high risk for IA in a Chinese population. These results support a role for UBE2B in the pathogenesis of IA.

  9. Exact solutions for nonlinear variants of Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (, ) equation using functional variable method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Mirzazadeh; M Eslami

    2013-12-01

    Studying compactons, solitons, solitary patterns and periodic solutions is important in nonlinear phenomena. In this paper we study nonlinear variants of the Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) and the Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) equations with positive and negative exponents. The functional variable method is used to establish compactons, solitons, solitary patterns and periodic solutions for these variants. This method is a powerful tool for searching exact travelling solutions in closed form.

  10. Pain modality- and sex-specific effects of COMT genetic functional variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfer, Inna; Segall, Samantha K; Lariviere, William R; Smith, Shad B; Dai, Feng; Slade, Gary D; Rashid, Naim U; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Campbell, Claudia M; Edwards, Robert R; Liu, Qian; Bair, Eric; Maixner, William; Diatchenko, Luda

    2013-08-01

    The enzyme catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) metabolizes catecholamine neurotransmitters involved in a number of physiological functions, including pain perception. Both human and mouse COMT genes possess functional polymorphisms contributing to interindividual variability in pain phenotypes such as sensitivity to noxious stimuli, severity of clinical pain, and response to pain treatment. In this study, we found that the effects of Comt functional variation in mice are modality specific. Spontaneous inflammatory nociception and thermal nociception behaviors were correlated the most with the presence of the B2 SINE transposon insertion residing in the 3'UTR mRNA region. Similarly, in humans, COMT functional haplotypes were associated with thermal pain perception and with capsaicin-induced pain. Furthermore, COMT genetic variations contributed to pain behaviors in mice and pain ratings in humans in a sex-specific manner. The ancestral Comt variant, without a B2 SINE insertion, was more strongly associated with sensitivity to capsaicin in female vs male mice. In humans, the haplotype coding for low COMT activity increased capsaicin-induced pain perception in women, but not men. These findings reemphasize the fundamental contribution of COMT to pain processes, and provide a fine-grained resolution of this contribution at the genetic level that can be used to guide future studies in the area of pain genetics.

  11. Distribution and medical impact of loss-of-function variants in the Finnish founder population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine T Lim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exome sequencing studies in complex diseases are challenged by the allelic heterogeneity, large number and modest effect sizes of associated variants on disease risk and the presence of large numbers of neutral variants, even in phenotypically relevant genes. Isolated populations with recent bottlenecks offer advantages for studying rare variants in complex diseases as they have deleterious variants that are present at higher frequencies as well as a substantial reduction in rare neutral variation. To explore the potential of the Finnish founder population for studying low-frequency (0.5-5% variants in complex diseases, we compared exome sequence data on 3,000 Finns to the same number of non-Finnish Europeans and discovered that, despite having fewer variable sites overall, the average Finn has more low-frequency loss-of-function variants and complete gene knockouts. We then used several well-characterized Finnish population cohorts to study the phenotypic effects of 83 enriched loss-of-function variants across 60 phenotypes in 36,262 Finns. Using a deep set of quantitative traits collected on these cohorts, we show 5 associations (p<5×10⁻⁸ including splice variants in LPA that lowered plasma lipoprotein(a levels (P = 1.5×10⁻¹¹⁷. Through accessing the national medical records of these participants, we evaluate the LPA finding via Mendelian randomization and confirm that these splice variants confer protection from cardiovascular disease (OR = 0.84, P = 3×10⁻⁴, demonstrating for the first time the correlation between very low levels of LPA in humans with potential therapeutic implications for cardiovascular diseases. More generally, this study articulates substantial advantages for studying the role of rare variation in complex phenotypes in founder populations like the Finns and by combining a unique population genetic history with data from large population cohorts and centralized research access to National Health

  12. Nicotinic involvement in memory function in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Edward D; Chen, Elaine

    2004-01-01

    Zebrafish are an emerging model for the study of the molecular mechanisms of brain function. To conduct studies of the neural bases of behavior in zebrafish, we must understand the behavioral function of zebrafish and how it is altered by perturbations of brain function. This study determined nicotine actions on memory function in zebrafish. With the methods that we have developed to assess memory in zebrafish using delayed spatial alternation (DSA), we determined the dose effect function of acute nicotine on memory function in zebrafish. As in rodents and primates, low nicotine doses improve memory in zebrafish, while high nicotine doses have diminished effect and can impair memory. This study shows that nicotine affects memory function in zebrafish much like in rats, mice, monkeys and humans. Now, zebrafish can be used to help understand the molecular mechanisms crucial to nicotine effects on memory.

  13. Weighted hardy type integral inequalities involving many functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabir Hussain

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of this paper is to derive some new weighted Hardy type integral inequalities involving many functions and to obtain a classical weighted Hardy type inequality involving many functions.

  14. Onco-lncRNA HOTAIR and its functional genetic variants in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Lv, Zheng; An, Changming; Shi, Meng; Pan, Wenting; Zhou, Liqing; Yang, Wenjun; Yang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) HOX transcript antisense RNA (HOTAIR) and its functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is still largely unclear. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of lncRNA HOTAIR and its three haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) in PTC. There was higher expression of HOTAIR in PTC tissues compared to normal tissues. A series of gain-loss assays demonstrated that HOTAIR acts as a PTC oncogene via promoting tumorigenic properties of PTC cells. Additionally, the functional HOTAIR rs920778 genetic variant was a PTC susceptibility SNP. Subjects with the HOTAIR rs920778 TT genotype had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.88, 1.25 and 1.61 (P = 6.0 × 10−6, P = 0.028 and P = 3.2 × 10−5) for developing PTC in Shandong, Jiangsu and Jilin case-control sets compared with subjects with the CC genotype. This statistically significant associations were only found between the rs920778 genetic polymorphism and PTC risk in females but not in males. The allele-specific regulation on HOTAIR expression by the rs920778 SNP was confirmed both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrate that functional SNPs influencing lncRNA regulation may explain a part of PTC genetic basis. PMID:27549736

  15. STRONG GRAVITATIONAL LENS MODELING WITH SPATIALLY VARIANT POINT-SPREAD FUNCTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, Adam; Fiege, Jason D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T-2N2 (Canada)

    2011-12-10

    Astronomical instruments generally possess spatially variant point-spread functions, which determine the amount by which an image pixel is blurred as a function of position. Several techniques have been devised to handle this variability in the context of the standard image deconvolution problem. We have developed an iterative gravitational lens modeling code called Mirage that determines the parameters of pixelated source intensity distributions for a given lens model. We are able to include the effects of spatially variant point-spread functions using the iterative procedures in this lensing code. In this paper, we discuss the methods to include spatially variant blurring effects and test the results of the algorithm in the context of gravitational lens modeling problems.

  16. Congruences involving F-partition functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sellers

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this note is to prove the congruence ϕ3(3n+2≡0(mod3, where ϕ3(n denotes the number of F-partitions of n with at most 3 repetitions. Secondarily, we conjecture a new family of congruences involving cϕ2(n, the number of F-partitions of n with 2 colors.

  17. Functional assessment of population and tumor-associated APE1 protein variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Illuzzi

    Full Text Available Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1 is the predominant AP site repair enzyme in mammals. APE1 also maintains 3'-5' exonuclease and 3'-repair activities, and regulates transcription factor DNA binding through its REF-1 function. Since complete or severe APE1 deficiency leads to embryonic lethality and cell death, it has been hypothesized that APE1 protein variants with slightly impaired function will contribute to disease etiology. Our data indicate that except for the endometrial cancer-associated APE1 variant R237C, the polymorphic variants Q51H, I64V and D148E, the rare population variants G241R, P311S and A317V, and the tumor-associated variant P112L exhibit normal thermodynamic stability of protein folding; abasic endonuclease, 3'-5' exonuclease and REF-1 activities; coordination during the early steps of base excision repair; and intracellular distribution when expressed exogenously in HeLa cells. The R237C mutant displayed reduced AP-DNA complex stability, 3'-5' exonuclease activity and 3'-damage processing. Re-sequencing of the exonic regions of APE1 uncovered no novel amino acid substitutions in the 60 cancer cell lines of the NCI-60 panel, or in HeLa or T98G cancer cell lines; only the common D148E and Q51H variants were observed. Our results indicate that APE1 missense mutations are seemingly rare and that the cancer-associated R237C variant may represent a reduced-function susceptibility allele.

  18. Cloning and functional studies of a splice variant of CYP26B1 expressed in vascular cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ateia Elmabsout

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All-trans retinoic acid (atRA plays an essential role in the regulation of gene expression, cell growth and differentiation and is also important for normal cardiovascular development but may in turn be involved in cardiovascular diseases, i.e. atherosclerosis and restenosis. The cellular atRA levels are under strict control involving several cytochromes P450 isoforms (CYPs. CYP26 may be the most important regulator of atRA catabolism in vascular cells. The present study describes the molecular cloning, characterization and function of atRA-induced expression of a spliced variant of the CYP26B1 gene. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The coding region of the spliced CYP26B1 lacking exon 2 was amplified from cDNA synthesized from atRA-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells and sequenced. Both the spliced variant and full length CYP26B1 was found to be expressed in cultured human endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and in normal and atherosclerotic vessel. atRA induced both variants of CYP26B1 in cultured vascular cells. Furthermore, the levels of spliced mRNA transcript were 4.5 times higher in the atherosclerotic lesion compared to normal arteries and the expression in the lesions was increased 20-fold upon atRA treatment. The spliced CYP26B1 still has the capability to degrade atRA, but at an initial rate one-third that of the corresponding full length enzyme. Transfection of COS-1 and THP-1 cells with the CYP26B1 spliced variant indicated either an increase or a decrease in the catabolism of atRA, probably depending on the expression of other atRA catabolizing enzymes in the cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Vascular cells express the spliced variant of CYP26B1 lacking exon 2 and it is also increased in atherosclerotic lesions. The spliced variant displays a slower and reduced degradation of atRA as compared to the full-length enzyme. Further studies are needed, however, to clarify the substrate specificity and role of the CYP26B1

  19. An integral involving the generalized zeta function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Elizalde

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available A general value for ∫abdtlogΓ(t, for a, b positive reals, is derived in terms of the Hurwitz ζ function. That expression is checked for a previously known special integral, and the case where a is a positive integer and b is half an odd integer is considered. The result finds application in calculating the numerical value of the derivative of the Riemann zeta function at the point −1, a quantity that arises in the evaluation of determinants of Laplacians on compact Riemann surfaces.

  20. Genetic diversity of variants involved in drug response and metabolism in Sri Lankan populations: implications for clinical implementation of pharmacogenomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sze Ling; Samaranayake, Nilakshi; Ross, Colin J.D.; Toh, Meng Tiak; Carleton, Bruce; Hayden, Michael R.; Teo, Yik Ying; Dissanayake, Vajira H.W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Interpopulation differences in drug responses are well documented, and in some cases they correspond to differences in the frequency of associated genetic markers. Understanding the diversity of genetic markers associated with drug response across different global populations is essential to infer population rates of drug response or risk for adverse drug reactions, and to guide implementation of pharmacogenomic testing. Sri Lanka is a culturally and linguistically diverse nation, but little is known about the population genetics of the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of pharmacogenomic variants in the major Sri Lankan ethnic groups. Methods We examined the allelic diversity of more than 7000 variants in genes involved in drug biotransformation and response in the three major ethnic populations of Sri Lanka (Sinhalese, Sri Lankan Tamils, and Moors), and compared them with other South Asian, South East Asian, and European populations using Wright’s Fixation Index, principal component analysis, and STRUCTURE analysis. Results We observed overall high levels of similarity within the Sri Lankan populations (median FST=0.0034), and between Sri Lankan and other South Asian populations (median FST=0.0064). Notably, we observed substantial differentiation between Sri Lankan and European populations for important pharmacogenomic variants related to warfarin (VKORC1 rs9923231) and clopidogrel (CYP2C19 rs4986893) response. Conclusion These data expand our understanding of the population structure of Sri Lanka, provide a resource for pharmacogenomic research, and have implications for the clinical use of genetic testing of pharmacogenomic variants in these populations. PMID:26444257

  1. Multireference spin-adapted variant of density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khait, Yuriy G; Hoffmann, Mark R

    2004-03-15

    A new Kohn-Sham formalism is developed for studying the lowest molecular electronic states of given space and spin symmetry whose densities are represented by weighted sums of several reference configurations. Unlike standard spin-density functional theory, the new formalism uses total spin conserving spin-density operators and spin-invariant density matrices so that the method is fully spin-adapted and solves the so-called spin-symmetry dilemma. The formalism permits the use of an arbitrary set of reference (noninteracting) configurations with any number of open shells. It is shown that the requirement of degeneracy of the total noninteracting energies of the reference configurations (or configuration state functions) is equivalent to the stationary condition of the exact energy relative to the weights of the configurations (or configuration state functions). Consequently, at any molecular geometry, the weights can be determined by minimization of the energy, and, for given reference weights, the Kohn-Sham orbitals can be determined. From this viewpoint, the developed theory can be interpreted as an analog of the multiconfiguration self-consistent field approach within density functional theory.

  2. In Vitro Functional Analyses of Infrequent Nucleotide Variants in the Lactase Enhancer Reveal Different Molecular Routes to Increased Lactase Promoter Activity and Lactase Persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Anke; Jones, Bryony L.; Danielsen, Erik Thomas; Olsen, Anders Krüger; Troelsen, Jesper T.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The genetic trait that allows intestinal lactase to persist into adulthood in some 35% of humans worldwide operates at the level of transcription, the effect being caused by cis‐acting nucleotide changes upstream of the lactase gene (LCT). A single nucleotide substitution, ‐13910 C>T, the first causal variant to be identified, accounts for lactase persistence over most of Europe. Located in a region shown to have enhancer function in vitro, it causes increased activity of the LCT promoter in Caco‐2 cells, and altered transcription factor binding. Three other variants in close proximity, ‐13907 C>G, ‐13915 T>C and ‐14010 G>C, were later shown to behave in a similar manner. Here, we study four further candidate functional variants. Two, ‐14009 T>G and ‐14011 C>T, adjacent to the well‐studied ‐14010 G>C variant, also have a clear effect on promoter activity upregulation as assessed by transfection assays, but notably are involved in different molecular interactions. The results for the two other variants (‐14028 T>C, ‐13779 G>C) were suggestive of function, ‐14028*C showing a clear change in transcription factor binding, but no obvious effect in transfections, while ‐13779*G showed greater effect in transfections but less on transcription factor binding. Each of the four variants arose on independent haplotypic backgrounds with different geographic distribution. PMID:27714771

  3. Establishment of Sf9 transformants constitutively expressing PBAN receptor variants: application to functional evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    To facilitate further evaluation of pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide receptor (PBANR) functionality and regulation, we generated cultured insect cell lines stably expressing a number of fluorescent Bombyx mori PBANR (BommoPBANR) and Pseudaletia separata PBANR (PsesePBANR) variants incl...

  4. Loss-of-function variants of the filaggrin gene are associated with clinical reactivity to foods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ginkel, C. D.; Flokstra-de Blok, B. M. J.; Kollen, B. J.; Kukler, J.; Koppelman, G. H.; Dubois, A. E. J.

    The aim of this study was to assess the genetic association of Filaggrin loss-of-function (FLG LOF) genetic variants with food allergy, and to investigate the added value of this test in diagnosing food allergy. Clinical reactivity to foods was diagnosed by the gold standard, the double-blind,

  5. Convergence rate of a new Bezier variant of Chlodowsky operators to bounded variation functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsli, Harun; Ibikli, Ertan

    2008-03-01

    In the present paper, we estimate the rate of pointwise convergence of the Bezier Variant of Chlodowsky operators Cn,[alpha] for functions, defined on the interval extending infinity, of bounded variation. To prove our main result, we have used some methods and techniques of probability theory.

  6. Functional characterization of MLH1 missense variants identified in Lynch Syndrome patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sofie Dabros; Liberti, Sascha Emilie; Lützen, Anne;

    2012-01-01

    localization and protein-protein interaction with the dimer partner PMS2 and the MMR-associated exonuclease 1. We show that a significant proportion of examined variant proteins have functional defects in either subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions, which is suspected to lead to the cancer...

  7. Functional and clinical relevance of novel and known PCSK1 variants for childhood obesity and glucose metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Löffler

    2017-03-01

    Conclusions: We identified and functionally characterized two rare novel PCSK1 variants of which c.1095 + 1G > A caused complete loss of protein function. In addition to confirming rs6232 and rs6234 in PCSK1 as polygenic risk variants for childhood obesity, we describe an association of rs725522 with insulin metabolism. Our results support the contribution of PCSK1 variants to obesity predisposition in children.

  8. Clinical and functional characterization of URAT1 variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velibor Tasic

    Full Text Available Idiopathic renal hypouricaemia is an inherited form of hypouricaemia, associated with abnormal renal handling of uric acid. There is excessive urinary wasting of uric acid resulting in hypouricaemia. Patients may be asymptomatic, but the persistent urinary abnormalities may manifest as renal stone disease, and hypouricaemia may manifest as exercise induced acute kidney injury. Here we have identified Macedonian and British patients with hypouricaemia, who presented with a variety of renal symptoms and signs including renal stone disease, hematuria, pyelonephritis and nephrocalcinosis. We have identified heterozygous missense mutations in SLC22A12 encoding the urate transporter protein URAT1 and correlate these genetic findings with functional characterization. Urate handling was determined using uptake experiments in HEK293 cells. This data highlights the importance of the URAT1 renal urate transporter in determining serum urate concentrations and the clinical phenotypes, including nephrolithiasis, that should prompt the clinician to suspect an inherited form of renal hypouricaemia.

  9. The Interaction between Pesticide Use and Genetic Variants Involved in Lipid Metabolism on Prostate Cancer Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Andreotti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lipid metabolism processes have been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis. Since several pesticides are lipophilic or are metabolized via lipid-related mechanisms, they may interact with variants of genes in the lipid metabolism pathway. Methods. In a nested case-control study of 776 cases and 1444 controls from the Agricultural Health Study (AHS, a prospective cohort study of pesticide applicators, we examined the interactions between 39 pesticides (none, low, and high exposure and 220 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in 59 genes. The false discovery rate (FDR was used to account for multiple comparisons. Results. We found 17 interactions that displayed a significant monotonic increase in prostate cancer risk with pesticide exposure in one genotype and no significant association in the other genotype. The most noteworthy association was for ALOXE3 rs3027208 and terbufos, such that men carrying the T allele who were low users had an OR of 1.86 (95% CI = 1.16–2.99 and high users an OR of 2.00 (95% CI = 1.28–3.15 compared to those with no use of terbufos, while men carrying the CC genotype did not exhibit a significant association. Conclusion. Genetic variation in lipid metabolism genes may modify pesticide associations with prostate cancer; however our results require replication.

  10. IRF4 rs12203592 functional variant and melanoma survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potrony, Miriam; Rebollo-Morell, Aida; Giménez-Xavier, Pol; Zimmer, Lisa; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Sucker, Antje; Badenas, Celia; Carrera, Cristina; Malvehy, Josep; Schadendorf, Dirk; Puig, Susana

    2017-04-15

    Inherited genetic factors may modulate clinical outcome in melanoma. Some low-to-medium risk genes in melanoma susceptibility play a role in melanoma outcome. Our aim was to assess the role of the functional IRF4 SNP rs12203592 in melanoma prognosis in two independent sets (Barcelona, N = 493 and Essen, N = 438). Genotype association analyses showed that the IRF4 rs12203592 T allele increased the risk of dying from melanoma in both sets (Barcelona: odds ratio [OR] = 6.53, 95% CI 1.38-30.87, Adj p = 0.032; Essen: OR = 1.68, 95% CI 1.04-2.72, Adj p = 0.035). Survival analyses only showed significance for the Barcelona set (hazard ratio = 4.58, 95% CI 1.11-18.92, Adj p = 0.036). This SNP was also associated with tumour localization, increasing the risk of developing melanoma in head or neck (OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.07-2.98, Adj p = 0.032) and protecting from developing melanoma in the trunk (OR = 0.59, 95% CI 0.41-0.85, Adj p = 0.004). These findings suggest for the first time that IRF4 rs12203592 plays a role in the modulation of melanoma outcome and confirms its contribution to the localization of the primary tumour. © 2017 UICC.

  11. An IL-4R alpha allelic variant, I50, acts as a gain-of-function variant relative to V50 for Stat6, but not Th2 differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, Linda; Johns, Mary H; Woodward, Emily; Mora, Ana L; Boothby, Mark

    2004-10-01

    Signaling through the IL-4R alpha-chain (IL-4Ralpha) is crucial for the development of Th2 cells, central effectors in atopic disease. Alleles of the IL-4Ralpha have been identified that have been variably associated with increased incidence of allergic disease, but there is little direct evidence that any variant is sufficient to alter a target that determines allergic pathophysiology or susceptibility. Variants of IL-4Ralpha encoding isoleucine instead of valine at position 50 (I50 vs V50, respectively) can signal increased Stat6-dependent transcriptional activity, whether in an I50, Q551 or I50, R551 haplotype. Strikingly, signaling through these receptors did not increase the efficiency of Th2 development or the IL-4 mediated repression of Th1 development or a target gene, IL-18Ralpha. Further, IL-4-induced proliferation was similar for Th2 cells independent of the variant expressed. Together these findings indicate that IL-4Ralpha variants that exhibit gain-of-function with respect to Stat6 do not act directly through alterations in Th2/Th1 induction after Ag exposure. The data further suggest that for such variants, any mechanistic involvement is based on a role in cellular targets of Th2 cytokines.

  12. DTNBP1 (dysbindin) gene variants modulate prefrontal brain function in schizophrenic patients--support for the glutamate hypothesis of schizophrenias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallgatter, A J; Ehlis, A-C; Herrmann, M J; Hohoff, C; Reif, A; Freitag, C M; Deckert, J

    2010-07-01

    Dysbindin (DTNBP1) is a recently characterized protein that seems to be involved in the modulation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the human brain, thereby influencing prefrontal cortex function and associated cognitive processes. While association, neuroanatomical and cellular studies indicate that DTNBP1 might be one of several susceptibility genes for schizophrenia, the effect of dysbindin on prefrontal brain function at an underlying neurophysiological level has not yet been explored for these patients. The NoGo-anteriorization (NGA) is a topographical event-related potential measure, which has been established as a valid neurophysiological marker of prefrontal brain function. In the present study, we investigated the influence of seven dysbindin gene variants on the NGA in a group of 44 schizophrenic patients. In line with our a priori hypothesis, one DTNBP1 polymorphism previously linked to schizophrenia (rs2619528) was found to be associated with changes in the NGA; however, the direction of this association directly contrasts with our previous findings in a healthy control sample. This differential impact of DTNBP1 gene variation on prefrontal functioning in schizophrenic patients vs. healthy controls is discussed in terms of abnormal glutamatergic baseline levels in patients suffering from schizophrenic illnesses. This is the first report on a role of DTNBP1 gene variation for prefrontal functioning at a basic neurophysiological level in schizophrenic patients. An impact on fundamental processes of cognitive response control may be one mechanism by which DTNBP1 gene variants via glutamatergic transmission contribute to the pathophysiology underlying schizophrenic illnesses.

  13. Two functional variants of IRF5 influence the development of macular edema in patients with non-anterior uveitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Márquez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Interferon (IFN signaling plays a crucial role in autoimmunity. Genetic variation in interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5, a major regulator of the type I interferon induction, has been associated with risk of developing several autoimmune diseases. In the current study we aimed to evaluate whether three sets of correlated IRF5 genetic variants, independently associated with SLE and with different functional roles, are involved in uveitis susceptibility and its clinical subphenotypes. METHODS: Three IRF5 polymorphisms, rs2004640, rs2070197 and rs10954213, representative of each group, were genotyped using TaqMan® allelic discrimination assays in a total of 263 non-anterior uveitis patients and 724 healthy controls of Spanish origin. RESULTS: A clear association between two of the three analyzed genetic variants, rs2004640 and rs10954213, and the absence of macular edema was observed in the case/control analysis (P FDR =5.07E-03, OR=1.48, CI 95%=1.14-1.92 and P FDR =3.37E-03, OR=1.54, CI 95%=1.19-2.01, respectively. Consistently, the subphenotype analysis accordingly with the presence/absence of this clinical condition also reached statistical significance (rs2004640: P=0.037, OR=0.69, CI 95%=0.48-0.98; rs10954213: P=0.030, OR=0.67, CI 95%=0.47-0.96, thus suggesting that both IRF5 genetic variants are specifically associated with the lack of macular edema in uveitis patients. CONCLUSION: Our results clearly showed for the first time that two functional genetic variants of IRF5 may play a role in the development of macular edema in non-anterior uveitis patients. Identifying genetic markers for macular edema could lead to the possibility of developing novel treatments or preventive therapies.

  14. Identification and functional characterization of de novo FOXP1 variants provides novel insights into the etiology of neurodevelopmental disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollis, Elliot; Graham, Sarah A; Vino, Arianna; Froehlich, Henning; Vreeburg, Maaike; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Gilissen, Christian; Pfundt, Rolph; Rappold, Gudrun A; Brunner, Han G; Deriziotis, Pelagia; Fisher, Simon E

    2016-02-01

    De novo disruptions of the neural transcription factor FOXP1 are a recently discovered, rare cause of sporadic intellectual disability (ID). We report three new cases of FOXP1-related disorder identified through clinical whole-exome sequencing. Detailed phenotypic assessment confirmed that global developmental delay, autistic features, speech/language deficits, hypotonia and mild dysmorphic features are core features of the disorder. We expand the phenotypic spectrum to include sensory integration disorder and hypertelorism. Notably, the etiological variants in these cases include two missense variants within the DNA-binding domain of FOXP1. Only one such variant has been reported previously. The third patient carries a stop-gain variant. We performed functional characterization of the three missense variants alongside our stop-gain and two previously described truncating/frameshift variants. All variants severely disrupted multiple aspects of protein function. Strikingly, the missense variants had similarly severe effects on protein function as the truncating/frameshift variants. Our findings indicate that a loss of transcriptional repression activity of FOXP1 underlies the neurodevelopmental phenotype in FOXP1-related disorder. Interestingly, the three novel variants retained the ability to interact with wild-type FOXP1, suggesting these variants could exert a dominant-negative effect by interfering with the normal FOXP1 protein. These variants also retained the ability to interact with FOXP2, a paralogous transcription factor disrupted in rare cases of speech and language disorder. Thus, speech/language deficits in these individuals might be worsened through deleterious effects on FOXP2 function. Our findings highlight that de novo FOXP1 variants are a cause of sporadic ID and emphasize the importance of this transcription factor in neurodevelopment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email

  15. RELAXATION OF FUNCTIONALS INVOLVING HOMOGENEOUS FUNCTIONS AND INVARIANCE OF ENVELOPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The authors compute the quasiconvex envelope of certain functions defined on the space Mmn of real m× n matrices via a homogeneous function on Mmn. They also deduce invariance properties for various convex envelopes from corresponding invariance properties satisfied by a function. Some applications related in particular to nonlinear elasticity are given.

  16. Ischemic stroke in Ukrainian population: possible involvement of the F2 G20210A, F5 G1691A and MTHFR C677T gene variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova S. M.

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate a possible involvement of the F2, F5, MTHFR gene variants into ischemic stroke pathogenesis in population of Ukraine. Methods. Polymorphic variants were analyzed in unrelated 183 stroke patients, 100 individuals from the general population of Ukraine and 88 healthy individuals elder than 65 years using PCR followed by RFLP analysis. Results. Unfavourable polymorphic variants F2 20210A, F5 1691A and MTHFR 677T were observed more frequently in patients with ischemic stroke comparing to control groups. Conclusions. F5 1691A and MTHFR 677T polymorphic variants are associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in women. F2 20210A is associated with the occurrence of ischemic stroke in men. Cumulative risk factor for stroke development is revealed in a combination of unfavorable polymorphic variants 20210A, 1691A and 677T of F2, F5 and MTHFR genes.

  17. Gauge-fixing parameter dependence of two-point gauge variant correlation functions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhai, C

    1996-01-01

    The gauge-fixing parameter \\xi dependence of two-point gauge variant correlation functions is studied for QED and QCD. We show that, in three Euclidean dimensions, or for four-dimensional thermal gauge theories, the usual procedure of getting a general covariant gauge-fixing term by averaging over a class of covariant gauge-fixing conditions leads to a nontrivial gauge-fixing parameter dependence in gauge variant two-point correlation functions (e.g. fermion propagators). This nontrivial gauge-fixing parameter dependence modifies the large distance behavior of the two-point correlation functions by introducing additional exponentially decaying factors. These factors are the origin of the gauge dependence encountered in some perturbative evaluations of the damping rates and the static chromoelectric screening length in a general covariant gauge. To avoid this modification of the long distance behavior introduced by performing the average over a class of covariant gauge-fixing conditions, one can either choose ...

  18. Identification of a novel functional deletion variant in the 5'-UTR of the DJ-1 gene

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    Warnich Louise

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DJ-1 forms part of the neuronal cellular defence mechanism against oxidative insults, due to its ability to undergo self-oxidation. Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system damage in different neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease (PD. Various mutations in the DJ-1 (PARK7 gene have been shown to cause the autosomal recessive form of PD. In the present study South African PD patients were screened for mutations in DJ-1 and we aimed to investigate the functional significance of a novel 16 bp deletion variant identified in one patient. Methods The possible effect of the deletion on promoter activity was investigated using a Dual-Luciferase Reporter assay. The DJ-1 5'-UTR region containing the sequence flanking the 16 bp deletion was cloned into a pGL4.10-Basic luciferase-reporter vector and transfected into HEK293 and BE(2-M17 neuroblastoma cells. Promoter activity under hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress conditions was also investigated. Computational (in silico cis-regulatory analysis of DJ-1 promoter sequence was performed using the transcription factor-binding site database, TRANSFAC via the PATCH™ and rVISTA platforms. Results A novel 16 bp deletion variant (g.-6_+10del was identified in DJ-1 which spans the transcription start site and is situated 93 bp 3' from a Sp1 site. The deletion caused a reduction in luciferase activity of approximately 47% in HEK293 cells and 60% in BE(2-M17 cells compared to the wild-type (P Conclusion This is the first report of a functional DJ-1 promoter variant, which has the potential to influence transcript stability or translation efficiency. Further work is necessary to determine the extent to which the g.-6_+10del variant affects the normal function of the DJ-1 promoter and whether this variant confers a risk for PD.

  19. Alternative splicing variations in mouse CAPS2: differential expression and functional properties of splicing variants

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    Furuichi Teiichi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ca2+-dependent activator protein 2 (CAPS2/CADPS2 is a secretory vesicle-associated protein involved in the release of neurotrophin. We recently reported that an aberrant, alternatively spliced CAPS2 mRNA that lacks exon 3 (CAPS2Δexon3 is detected in some patients with autism. Splicing variations in mouse CAPS2 and their expression and functions remain unclear. Results In this study, we defined 31 exons in the mouse CAPS2 gene and identified six alternative splicing variants, CAPS2a-f. CAPS2a is an isoform lacking exons 22 and 25, which encode part of the Munc13-1-homologous domain (MHD. CAPS2b lacks exon 25. CAPS2c lacks exons 11 and 22. CAPS2d, 2e, and 2f have C-terminal deletions from exon 14, exon 12, and exon 5, respectively. On the other hand, a mouse counterpart of CAPS2Δexon3 was not detected in the mouse tissues tested. CAPS2b was expressed exclusively in the brain, and the other isoforms were highly expressed in the brain, but also in some non-neural tissues. In the brain, all isoforms showed predominant expression patterns in the cerebellum. In the developing cerebellum, CAPS2b showed an up-regulated expression pattern, whereas the other isoforms exhibited transiently peaked expression patterns. CAPS2 proteins were mostly recovered in soluble fractions, but some were present in membrane fractions, except for CAPS2c and 2f, both of which lack the PH domain, suggesting that the PH domain is important for membrane association. In contrast to CAPS2a and 2b, CAPS2c showed slightly decreased BDNF-releasing activity, which is likely due to the C-terminal truncation of the PH domain in CAPS2c. Conclusion This study indicates that, in mouse, there are six splicing variants of CAPS2 (CAPS2a-f, and that these are subdivided into two groups: a long form containing the C-terminal MHD and a short form lacking the C-terminal MHD. These results demonstrate that the splicing variations correlate with their expression patterns and

  20. Self-calibrated correlation imaging with k-space variant correlation functions.

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    Li, Yu; Edalati, Masoud; Du, Xingfu; Wang, Hui; Cao, Jie J

    2017-07-07

    Correlation imaging is a previously developed high-speed MRI framework that converts parallel imaging reconstruction into the estimate of correlation functions. The presented work aims to demonstrate this framework can provide a speed gain over parallel imaging by estimating k-space variant correlation functions. Because of Fourier encoding with gradients, outer k-space data contain higher spatial-frequency image components arising primarily from tissue boundaries. As a result of tissue-boundary sparsity in the human anatomy, neighboring k-space data correlation varies from the central to the outer k-space. By estimating k-space variant correlation functions with an iterative self-calibration method, correlation imaging can benefit from neighboring k-space data correlation associated with both coil sensitivity encoding and tissue-boundary sparsity, thereby providing a speed gain over parallel imaging that relies only on coil sensitivity encoding. This new approach is investigated in brain imaging and free-breathing neonatal cardiac imaging. Correlation imaging performs better than existing parallel imaging techniques in simulated brain imaging acceleration experiments. The higher speed enables real-time data acquisition for neonatal cardiac imaging in which physiological motion is fast and non-periodic. With k-space variant correlation functions, correlation imaging gives a higher speed than parallel imaging and offers the potential to image physiological motion in real-time. Magn Reson Med, 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  1. The role of functionally defective rare germline variants of sialic acid acetylesterase in autoimmune Addison's disease

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    Gan, Earn H; MacArthur, Katie; Mitchell, Anna L; Pearce, Simon H S

    2012-01-01

    Background Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is a rare condition with a complex genetic basis. A panel of rare and functionally defective genetic variants in the sialic acid acetylesterase (SIAE) gene has recently been implicated in several common autoimmune conditions. We performed a case–control study to determine whether these rare variants are associated with a rarer condition, AAD. Method We analysed nine SIAE gene variants (W48X, M89V, C196F, C226G, R230W, T312M, Y349C, F404S and R479C) in a United Kingdom cohort of 378 AAD subjects and 387 healthy controls. All samples were genotyped using Sequenom iPlex chemistry to characterise primer extension products. Results A heterozygous rare allele at codon 312 (312*M) was found in one AAD patient (0.13%) but was not detected in the healthy controls. The commoner, functionally recessive variant at codon 89 (89*V) was found to be homozygous in two AAD patients but was only found in the heterozygous state in controls. Taking into account all nine alleles examined, 4/378 (1.06%) AAD patients and 1/387 (0.25%) healthy controls carried the defective SIAE alleles, with a calculated odds ratio of 4.13 (95% CI 0.44–97.45, two-tailed P value 0.212, NS). Conclusion We demonstrated the presence of 89*V homozygotes and the 312*M rare allele in the AAD cohort, but overall, our analysis does not support a role for rare variants in SIAE in the pathogenesis of AAD. However, the relatively small collection of AAD patients limits the power to exclude a small effect. PMID:23011869

  2. Functional characteristics of the Staphylococcus aureus δ-toxin allelic variant G10S.

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    Cheung, Gordon Y C; Yeh, Anthony J; Kretschmer, Dorothee; Duong, Anthony C; Tuffuor, Kwame; Fu, Chih-Lung; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Diep, Binh A; Li, Min; Nakamura, Yuumi; Nunez, Gabriel; Peschel, Andreas; Otto, Michael

    2015-12-10

    Staphylococcus aureus δ-toxin is a member of the phenol-soluble modulin (PSM) peptide family. PSMs have multiple functions in staphylococcal pathogenesis; for example, they lyse red and white blood cells and trigger inflammatory responses. Compared to other PSMs, δ-toxin is usually more strongly expressed but has only moderate cytolytic capacities. The amino acid sequences of S. aureus PSMs are well conserved with two exceptions, one of which is the δ-toxin allelic variant G10S. This variant is a characteristic of the subspecies S. argenteus and S. aureus sequence types ST1 and ST59, the latter representing the most frequent cause of community-associated infections in Asia. δ-toxin G10S and strains expressing that variant from plasmids or the genome had significantly reduced cytolytic and pro-inflammatory capacities, including in a strain background with pronounced production of other PSMs. However, in murine infection models, isogenic strains expressing the two δ-toxin variants did not cause measurable differences in disease severity. Our findings indicate that the widespread G10S allelic variation of the δ-toxin locus has a significant impact on key pathogenesis mechanisms, but more potent members of the PSM peptide family may overshadow that impact in vivo.

  3. Involving Corporate Functions: Who Contributes to Sustainable Development?

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    Stefan Schaltegger

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A large body of literature claims that corporate sustainable development is a cross-functional challenge, which requires all functional units to be involved. However, it remains uncertain to what extent and in which way different corporate functions are actually involved in corporate sustainability management. To bridge this research gap, our paper draws on a concept of involvement introduced in the field of consumer behavior. Based on this previous research, our paper distinguishes two components of involvement: first, a cognitive-affective component, incorporating being affected by sustainability issues and being supportive of corporate sustainability; and second, a behavioral component, represented by the application of sustainability management tools. We use this concept to empirically analyze the involvement of corporate functions in sustainability management and find considerable differences in large German companies. Whereas public relations and strategic management are heavily involved, finance, accounting and management control appear not to be involved. A multinomial logistic regression shows that the cognitive-affective component significantly influences the behavioral component, with a functional unit being affected influencing the application of tools the most. Building on the model proposed, the paper provides implications on how to increase a functional unit’s involvement in sustainability management.

  4. Copy number variants in extended autism spectrum disorder families reveal candidates potentially involved in autism risk.

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    Daria Salyakina

    Full Text Available Copy number variations (CNVs are a major cause of genetic disruption in the human genome with far more nucleotides being altered by duplications and deletions than by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In the multifaceted etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs, CNVs appear to contribute significantly to our understanding of the pathogenesis of this complex disease. A unique resource of 42 extended ASD families was genotyped for over 1 million SNPs to detect CNVs that may contribute to ASD susceptibility. Each family has at least one avuncular or cousin pair with ASD. Families were then evaluated for co-segregation of CNVs in ASD patients. We identified a total of five deletions and seven duplications in eleven families that co-segregated with ASD. Two of the CNVs overlap with regions on 7p21.3 and 15q24.1 that have been previously reported in ASD individuals and two additional CNVs on 3p26.3 and 12q24.32 occur near regions associated with schizophrenia. These findings provide further evidence for the involvement of ICA1 and NXPH1 on 7p21.3 in ASD susceptibility and highlight novel ASD candidates, including CHL1, FGFBP3 and POUF41. These studies highlight the power of using extended families for gene discovery in traits with a complex etiology.

  5. Psammomatoid variant of juvenile ossifying fibroma involving mandible: A rare case report

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    Saurabh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF is used in literature in naming two microscopically distinct fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial skeleton. One is characterized by small uniform spherical ossicles resembling psammoma bodies (psammomatoid JOF [PsJOF]. The other is distinguished by trabeculae of fibrillary osteoid and woven bone (trabecular JOF. Psammomatoid ossifying fibromas represent a unique subset of fibro-osseous lesions of the craniofacial region. PsJOF has been distinguished because of its location, clinical behavior, and age of occurrence. They have distinctive histomorphologic features and a tendency toward locally aggressive behavior, including invasion and destruction of adjacent anatomic structures. It is generally seen in the younger age group, and the most common site is paranasal sinuses, orbits, and frontoethmoidal complex. We report a case of JPOF involving mandible which is rarely been described in literature. An insight into the radiographic progression of this rare entity along with the clinical feature and surgical management is discussed.

  6. Expression and functional characterization of ABCG1 splice variant ABCG1(666).

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    Engel, Thomas; Bode, Guenther; Lueken, Aloys; Knop, Markus; Kannenberg, Frank; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Assmann, Gerd; Seedorf, Udo

    2006-08-07

    The ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCG1 mediates the transport of excess cholesterol from macrophages and other cell types to high density lipoprotein (HDL) but not to lipid-depleted apolipoprotein AI. Several splice variants which may have different functions have been identified in mammals. In the current study, we characterized the human splice variant ABCG1(666), which differs from full-length ABCG1(678) by absence of an internal segment of 12 amino acids (VKQTKRLKGLRK). Accordingly spliced ABCG1 transcripts were detected in macrophages and liver in approximately twofold higher amounts than the alternatively spliced ABCG1 form encoding full-length ABCG1. We used transient and stable expression of ABCG1(666) fusion proteins to characterize glycosylation, subcellular localization, molecular interaction and functions of this ABCG1 variant. It could be demonstrated that ABCG1(666) is located at the cell surface and has the ability to form cholesterol transport competent homodimers which affect cellular cholesterol export in a similar manner as previously characterized forms of ABCG1. Our results support that ABCG1(666) may in fact be the most prominent form of functional ABCG1 expressed in the human.

  7. Functional variant in the autophagy-related 5 gene promotor is associated with childhood asthma.

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    Lisa J Martin

    Full Text Available RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVE: Autophagy is a cellular process directed at eliminating or recycling cellular proteins. Recently, the autophagy pathway has been implicated in immune dysfunction, the pathogenesis of inflammatory disorders, and response to viral infection. Associations between two genes in the autophagy pathway, ATG5 and ATG7, with childhood asthma were investigated. METHODS: Using genetic and experimental approaches, we examined the association of 13 HapMap-derived tagging SNPs in ATG5 and ATG7 with childhood asthma in 312 asthmatic and 246 non-allergic control children. We confirmed our findings by using independent cohorts and imputation analysis. Finally, we evaluated the functional relevance of a disease associated SNP. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We demonstrated that ATG5 single nucleotide polymorphisms rs12201458 and rs510432 were associated with asthma (p = 0.00085 and 0.0025, respectively. In three independent cohorts, additional variants in ATG5 in the same LD block were associated with asthma (p<0.05. We found that rs510432 was functionally relevant and conferred significantly increased promotor activity. Furthermore, Atg5 expression was increased in nasal epithelium of acute asthmatics compared to stable asthmatics and non-asthmatic controls. CONCLUSION: Genetic variants in ATG5, including a functional promotor variant, are associated with childhood asthma. These results provide novel evidence for a role for ATG5 in childhood asthma.

  8. Reliable and rapid characterization of functional FCN2 gene variants reveals diverse geographical patterns

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    Ojurongbe Olusola

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ficolin-2 coded by FCN2 gene is a soluble serum protein and an innate immune recognition element of the complement system. FCN2 gene polymorphisms reveal distinct geographical patterns and are documented to alter serum ficolin levels and modulate disease susceptibility. Methods We employed a real-time PCR based on Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET method to genotype four functional SNPs including -986 G > A (#rs3124952, -602 G > A (#rs3124953, -4A > G (#rs17514136 and +6424 G > T (#rs7851696 in the ficolin-2 (FCN2 gene. We characterized the FCN2 variants in individuals representing Brazilian (n = 176, Nigerian (n = 180, Vietnamese (n = 172 and European Caucasian ethnicity (n = 165. Results We observed that the genotype distribution of three functional SNP variants (−986 G > A, -602 G > A and -4A > G differ significantly between the populations investigated (p p  Conclusions The observed distribution of the FCN2 functional SNP variants may likely contribute to altered serum ficolin levels and this may depend on the different disease settings in world populations. To conclude, the use of FRET based real-time PCR especially for FCN2 gene will benefit a larger scientific community who extensively depend on rapid, reliable method for FCN2 genotyping.

  9. Functional testing strategy for coding genetic variants of unclear significance in MLH1 in Lynch syndrome diagnosis.

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    Hinrichsen, Inga; Schäfer, Dieter; Langer, Deborah; Köger, Nicole; Wittmann, Margarethe; Aretz, Stefan; Steinke, Verena; Holzapfel, Stefanie; Trojan, Jörg; König, Rainer; Zeuzem, Stefan; Brieger, Angela; Plotz, Guido

    2015-02-01

    Lynch syndrome is caused by inactivating mutations in the MLH1 gene, but genetic variants of unclear significance frequently preclude diagnosis. Functional testing can reveal variant-conferred defects in gene or protein function. Based on functional defect frequencies and clinical applicability of test systems, we developed a functional testing strategy aimed at efficiently detecting pathogenic defects in coding MLH1 variants. In this strategy, tests of repair activity and expression are prioritized over analyses of subcellular protein localization and messenger RNA (mRNA) formation. This strategy was used for four unclear coding MLH1 variants (p.Asp41His, p.Leu507Phe, p.Gln689Arg, p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met). Expression was analyzed using a transfection system, mismatch repair (MMR) activity by complementation in vitro, mRNA formation by reverse transcriptase-PCR in carrier lymphocyte mRNA, and subcellular localization with dye-labeled fusion constructs. All tests included clinically meaningful controls. The strategy enabled efficient identification of defects in two unclear variants: the p.Asp41His variant showed loss of MMR activity, whereas the compound variant p.Glu605del + p.Val716Met had a defect of expression. This expression defect was significantly stronger than the pathogenic expression reference variant analyzed in parallel, therefore the defect of the compound variant is also pathogenic. Interestingly, the expression defect was caused additively by both of the compound variants, at least one of which is non-pathogenic when occurring by itself. Tests were neutral for p.Leu507Phe and p.Gln689Arg, and the results were consistent with available clinical data. We finally discuss the improved sensitivity and efficiency of the applied strategy and its limitations in analyzing unclear coding MLH1 variants.

  10. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

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    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  11. Reelin and its complex involvement in brain development and function.

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    Lakatosova, Silvia; Ostatnikova, Daniela

    2012-09-01

    Reelin is a neuroprotein with crucial role during neurodevelopment and also in postnatal period. It regulates neuronal migration and positioning in developing neocortex and cerebellar cortex. Postnatally it participates in regulation of dendritic and axonal growth, synaptogenesis, neurotransmission and it contribute to synaptic plasticity necessary for learning and memory functions. Role of Reelin seems to be rather complex, profound research gradually uncovers its further functions. Deficits of Reelin were detected in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism. Pathogenesis of these disorders is far from being clearly understood. Reelin contribution to these diseases seems to be vital, since genetic variants of Reelin were associated with these diseases and often influence symptom severity. Reelin is a promising candidate molecule with potential future use in diagnostics and therapy, however further detailed research is essential. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Associations of Filaggrin Gene Loss-of-Function Variants with Urinary Phthalate Metabolites and Testicular Function in Young Danish Men

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    Jørgensen, Niels; Meldgaard, Michael; Frederiksen, Hanne; Andersson, Anna-Maria; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Carlsen, Berit Christina; Stender, Steen; Szecsi, Pal Bela; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik; De Meyts, Ewa Rajpert; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Filaggrin is an epidermal protein that is crucial for skin barrier function. Up to 10% of Europeans and 5% of Asians carry at least one null allele in the filaggrin gene (FLG). Reduced expression of filaggrin in carriers of the null allele is associated with facilitated transfer of allergens across the epidermis. We hypothesized that these individuals may have increased transdermal uptake of endocrine disruptors, including phthalates. Objectives: We investigated urinary excretion of phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young men with and without FLG loss-of-function variants in a cross-sectional study of 861 young men from the general Danish population. Methods: All men were genotyped for FLG R501X, 2282del4, and R2447X loss-of-function variants. We measured urinary concentrations of 14 phthalate metabolites and serum levels of reproductive hormones. We also evaluated semen quality. Results: Sixty-five men (7.5%) carried at least one FLG-null allele. FLG-null carriers had significantly higher urinary concentrations of several phthalate metabolites, including a 33% higher concentration of MnBP (mono-n-butyl phthalate; 95% CI: 16, 51%). FLG-null variants were not significantly associated with reproductive hormones or semen quality parameters. Conclusion: This study provides evidence that carriers of FLG loss-of-function alleles may have higher internal exposure to phthalates, possibly due to increased transepidermal absorption. FLG loss-of-function variants may indicate susceptible populations for which special attention to transepidermal absorption of chemicals and medication may be warranted. Citation: Joensen UN, Jørgensen N, Meldgaard M, Frederiksen H, Andersson AM, Menné T, Johansen JD, Carlsen BC, Stender S, Szecsi PB, Skakkebæk NE, Rajpert-De Meyts E, Thyssen JP. 2014. Associations of filaggrin gene loss-of-function variants with urinary phthalate metabolites and testicular function in young Danish men. Environ Health Perspect 122

  13. DUAL INTEGRAL EQUATIONS INVOLVING LEGENDRE FUNCTIONS IN DISTRIBUTION SPACES

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    P. K. BANERJI, DESHNA LOONKER

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use the Mehler-Fock transformation to obtain thesolution of dual integral equations involving Legendre functions. The solutionso obtained is proved to be distributional because they satisfy properties ofdistribution space.

  14. Functional Characterization of C-terminal Ryanodine Receptor 1 Variants Associated with Central Core Disease or Malignant Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Remai; Schiemann, Anja H; Langton, Elaine; Bulger, Terasa; Pollock, Neil; Bjorksten, Andrew; Gillies, Robyn; Hutchinson, David; Roxburgh, Richard; Stowell, Kathryn M

    2017-01-01

    Central core disease and malignant hyperthermia are human disorders of skeletal muscle resulting from aberrant Ca2+ handling. Most malignant hyperthermia and central core disease cases are associated with amino acid changes in the type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyR1), the skeletal muscle Ca2+-release channel. Malignant hyperthermia exhibits a gain-of-function phenotype, and central core disease results from loss of channel function. For a variant to be classified as pathogenic, functional studies must demonstrate a correlation with the pathophysiology of malignant hyperthermia or central core disease. We assessed the pathogenicity of four C-terminal variants of the ryanodine receptor using functional analysis. The variants were identified in families affected by either malignant hyperthermia or central core disease. Four variants were introduced separately into human cDNA encoding the skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor. Following transient expression in HEK-293T cells, functional studies were carried out using calcium release assays in response to an agonist. Two previously characterized variants and wild-type skeletal muscle ryanodine receptor were used as controls. The p.Met4640Ile variant associated with central core disease showed no difference in calcium release compared to wild-type. The p.Val4849Ile variant associated with malignant hyperthermia was more sensitive to agonist than wild-type but did not reach statistical significance and two variants (p.Phe4857Ser and p.Asp4918Asn) associated with central core disease were completely inactive. The p.Val4849Ile variant should be considered a risk factor for malignant hyperthermia, while the p.Phe4857Ser and p.Asp4918Asn variants should be classified as pathogenic for central core disease.

  15. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  16. Cloning and functional expression of alternative spliced variants of the ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torres, Ataúlfo; Vazquez, Ana E.; Panicker, Mitradas M.; Miledi, Ricardo

    1998-01-01

    The ρ1 γ-aminobutyrate receptor (GABAρ1) is expressed predominantly in the retina and forms homomeric GABA-gated Cl− channels that are clearly different from the multisubunit GABAA receptors. In contrast to these, GABAρ1 receptors desensitize very little and are not blocked by bicuculline. In addition to GABAρ1, two new variants were identified in human retina cDNA libraries. Cloning and sequence analysis showed that both variants contain large deletions in the putative extracellular domain of the receptor. These deletions extend from a common 5′ site to different 3′ sites. The cDNA with the largest deletion, named GABAρ1Δ450, contains a complete ORF identical to that of GABAρ1 but missing 450 nt. This cDNA encodes a protein of 323 aa, identical to the GABAρ1, but has a deletion of 150 aa in the amino-terminal extracellular domain. GABAρ1Δ450 mRNA injected into Xenopus oocytes did not produce functional GABA receptors. The second GABAρ1 variant (GABAρ1Δ51) contains a 51-nt deletion. In Xenopus oocytes, GABAρ1Δ51 led to the expression of GABA receptors that had the essential GABAρ1 characteristics of low desensitization and bicuculline resistance. Therefore, alternative splicing increases the coding potential of this gene family expressed in the human retina, but the functional diversity created by the alternative spliced forms is still not understood. PMID:9520485

  17. Genome-Wide Functional Annotation of Human Protein-Coding Splice Variants Using Multiple Instance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Bharat; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-06-03

    The vast majority of human multiexon genes undergo alternative splicing and produce a variety of splice variant transcripts and proteins, which can perform different functions. These protein-coding splice variants (PCSVs) greatly increase the functional diversity of proteins. Most functional annotation algorithms have been developed at the gene level; the lack of isoform-level gold standards is an important intellectual limitation for currently available machine learning algorithms. The accumulation of a large amount of RNA-seq data in the public domain greatly increases our ability to examine the functional annotation of genes at isoform level. In the present study, we used a multiple instance learning (MIL)-based approach for predicting the function of PCSVs. We used transcript-level expression values and gene-level functional associations from the Gene Ontology database. A support vector machine (SVM)-based 5-fold cross-validation technique was applied. Comparatively, genes with multiple PCSVs performed better than single PCSV genes, and performance also improved when more examples were available to train the models. We demonstrated our predictions using literature evidence of ADAM15, LMNA/C, and DMXL2 genes. All predictions have been implemented in a web resource called "IsoFunc", which is freely available for the global scientific community through http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isofunc .

  18. Systematic Functional Interrogation of Rare Cancer Variants Identifies Oncogenic Alleles | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer genome characterization efforts now provide an initial view of the somatic alterations in primary tumors. However, most point mutations occur at low frequency, and the function of these alleles remains undefined. We have developed a scalable systematic approach to interrogate the function of cancer-associated gene variants. We subjected 474 mutant alleles curated from 5,338 tumors to pooled in vivo tumor formation assays and gene expression profiling. We identified 12 transforming alleles, including two in genes (PIK3CB, POT1) that have not been shown to be tumorigenic.

  19. Association Between Variants of PRDM1 and NDP52 and Crohn's Disease, Based on Exome Sequencing and Functional Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellinghaus, David; Zhang, Hu; Zeissig, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 140 Crohn's disease (CD) susceptibility loci. For most loci, the variants that cause disease are not known and the genes affected by these variants have not been identified. We aimed to identify variants that cause CD through...... detailed sequencing, genetic association, expression, and functional studies. METHODS: We sequenced whole exomes of 42 unrelated subjects with CD and 5 healthy subjects (controls) and then filtered single nucleotide variants by incorporating association results from meta-analyses of CD GWAS and in silico...... mutation effect prediction algorithms. We then genotyped 9348 subjects with CD, 2868 subjects with ulcerative colitis, and 14,567 control subjects and associated variants analyzed in functional studies using materials from subjects and controls and in vitro model systems. RESULTS: We identified rare...

  20. Novel genes involved in severe early-onset obesity revealed by rare copy number and sequence variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clara Serra-Juhé

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a multifactorial disorder with high heritability (50-75%, which is probably higher in early-onset and severe cases. Although rare monogenic forms and several genes and regions of susceptibility, including copy number variants (CNVs, have been described, the genetic causes underlying the disease still remain largely unknown. We searched for rare CNVs (>100kb in size, altering genes and present in 3 standard deviations above the mean at <3 years of age using SNP array molecular karyotypes. We then performed case control studies (480 EOO cases/480 non-obese controls with the validated CNVs and rare sequence variants (RSVs detected by targeted resequencing of selected CNV genes (n = 14, and also studied the inheritance patterns in available first-degree relatives. A higher burden of gain-type CNVs was detected in EOO cases versus controls (OR = 1.71, p-value = 0.0358. In addition to a gain of the NPY gene in a familial case with EOO and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, likely pathogenic CNVs included gains of glutamate receptors (GRIK1, GRM7 and the X-linked gastrin-peptide receptor (GRPR, all inherited from obese parents. Putatively functional RSVs absent in controls were also identified in EOO cases at NPY, GRIK1 and GRPR. A patient with a heterozygous deletion disrupting two contiguous and related genes, SLCO4C1 and SLCO6A1, also had a missense RSV at SLCO4C1 on the other allele, suggestive of a recessive model. The genes identified showed a clear enrichment of shared co-expression partners with known genes strongly related to obesity, reinforcing their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Our data reveal a higher burden of rare CNVs and RSVs in several related genes in patients with EOO compared to controls, and implicate NPY, GRPR, two glutamate receptors and SLCO4C1 in highly penetrant forms of familial obesity.

  1. Novel genes involved in severe early-onset obesity revealed by rare copy number and sequence variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra-Juhé, Clara; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Bou de Pieri, Francesc; Flores, Raquel; González, Juan R; Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Argente, Jesús; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2017-05-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disorder with high heritability (50-75%), which is probably higher in early-onset and severe cases. Although rare monogenic forms and several genes and regions of susceptibility, including copy number variants (CNVs), have been described, the genetic causes underlying the disease still remain largely unknown. We searched for rare CNVs (>100kb in size, altering genes and present in obesity (EOO: body mass index >3 standard deviations above the mean at obese controls) with the validated CNVs and rare sequence variants (RSVs) detected by targeted resequencing of selected CNV genes (n = 14), and also studied the inheritance patterns in available first-degree relatives. A higher burden of gain-type CNVs was detected in EOO cases versus controls (OR = 1.71, p-value = 0.0358). In addition to a gain of the NPY gene in a familial case with EOO and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, likely pathogenic CNVs included gains of glutamate receptors (GRIK1, GRM7) and the X-linked gastrin-peptide receptor (GRPR), all inherited from obese parents. Putatively functional RSVs absent in controls were also identified in EOO cases at NPY, GRIK1 and GRPR. A patient with a heterozygous deletion disrupting two contiguous and related genes, SLCO4C1 and SLCO6A1, also had a missense RSV at SLCO4C1 on the other allele, suggestive of a recessive model. The genes identified showed a clear enrichment of shared co-expression partners with known genes strongly related to obesity, reinforcing their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Our data reveal a higher burden of rare CNVs and RSVs in several related genes in patients with EOO compared to controls, and implicate NPY, GRPR, two glutamate receptors and SLCO4C1 in highly penetrant forms of familial obesity.

  2. Some integrals involving generalized k-Struve functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottakkaran Sooppy Nisar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The close form of some integrals involving recently developed generalized k-Struve functions is obtained. The outcome of these integrations is expressed in terms of generalized Wright functions. Several special cases are deduced which lead to some known results.

  3. Association Between a Functional Variant Downstream of TNFAIP3 and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrianto, Indra; Wen, Feng; Templeton, Amanda; Wiley, Graham; King, Jarrod B.; Lessard, Christopher J.; Bates, Jared S.; Hu, Yanqing; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Bang, So-Young; Boackle, Susan A.; Brown, Elizabeth E.; Petri, Michelle A.; Gallant, Caroline; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Reveille, John D.; Vila, Luis M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Edberg, Jeffrey C.; Freedman, Barry I.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Gilkeson, Gary S.; Jacob, Chaim O.; James, Judith A.; Kamen, Diane L.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Martin, Javier; Merrill, Joan T.; Niewold, Timothy B.; Park, So-Yeon; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A.; Scofield, R. Hal; Stevens, Anne M.; Tsao, Betty P.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Moser, Kathy L.; Webb, Carol F.; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Montgomery, Courtney Gray; Gaffney, Patrick M.

    2011-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE, OMIM 152700) is an autoimmune disease characterized by self-reactive antibodies resulting in systemic inflammation and organ failure. TNFAIP3, encoding the ubiquitin-modifying enzyme A20, is an established susceptibility locus for SLE. By fine mapping and genomic resequencing in ethnically diverse populations we fully characterized the TNFAIP3 risk haplotype and isolated a novel TT>A polymorphic dinucleotide associated with SLE in subjects of European (P = 1.58 × 10−8; odds ratio (OR) = 1.70) and Korean (P = 8.33 × 10−10; OR = 2.54) ancestry. This variant, located in a region of high conservation and regulatory potential, bound a nuclear protein complex comprised of NF-κB subunits with reduced avidity. Furthermore, compared with the non-risk haplotype, the haplotype carrying this variant resulted in reduced TNFAIP3 mRNA and A20 protein expression. These results establish this TT>A variant as the most likely functional polymorphism responsible for the association between TNFAIP3 and SLE. PMID:21336280

  4. Investigation and functional characterization of rare genetic variants in the adipose triglyceride lipase in a large healthy working population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Coassin

    Full Text Available Recent studies demonstrated a strong influence of rare genetic variants on several lipid-related traits. However, their impact on free fatty acid (FFA plasma concentrations, as well as the role of rare variants in a general population, has not yet been thoroughly addressed. The adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL is encoded by the PNPLA2 gene and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis. It represents a prominent candidate gene affecting FFA concentrations. We therefore screened the full genomic region of ATGL for mutations in 1,473 randomly selected individuals from the SAPHIR (Salzburg Atherosclerosis Prevention program in subjects at High Individual Risk Study using a combined Ecotilling and sequencing approach and functionally investigated all detected protein variants by in-vitro studies. We observed 55 novel mostly rare genetic variants in this general population sample. Biochemical evaluation of all non-synonymous variants demonstrated the presence of several mutated but mostly still functional ATGL alleles with largely varying residual lipolytic activity. About one-quarter (3 out of 13 of the investigated variants presented a marked decrease or total loss of catalytic function. Genetic association studies using both continuous and dichotomous approaches showed a shift towards lower plasma FFA concentrations for rare variant carriers and an accumulation of variants in the lower 10%-quantile of the FFA distribution. However, the generally rather small effects suggest either only a secondary role of rare ATGL variants on the FFA levels in the SAPHIR population or a recessive action of ATGL variants. In contrast to these rather small effects, we describe here also the first patient with "neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy" (NLSDM with a point mutation in the catalytic dyad, but otherwise intact protein.

  5. Investigation and functional characterization of rare genetic variants in the adipose triglyceride lipase in a large healthy working population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coassin, Stefan; Schweiger, Martina; Kloss-Brandstätter, Anita; Lamina, Claudia; Haun, Margot; Erhart, Gertraud; Paulweber, Bernhard; Rahman, Yusof; Olpin, Simon; Wolinski, Heimo; Cornaciu, Irina; Zechner, Rudolf; Zimmermann, Robert; Kronenberg, Florian

    2010-12-09

    Recent studies demonstrated a strong influence of rare genetic variants on several lipid-related traits. However, their impact on free fatty acid (FFA) plasma concentrations, as well as the role of rare variants in a general population, has not yet been thoroughly addressed. The adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) is encoded by the PNPLA2 gene and catalyzes the rate-limiting step of lipolysis. It represents a prominent candidate gene affecting FFA concentrations. We therefore screened the full genomic region of ATGL for mutations in 1,473 randomly selected individuals from the SAPHIR (Salzburg Atherosclerosis Prevention program in subjects at High Individual Risk) Study using a combined Ecotilling and sequencing approach and functionally investigated all detected protein variants by in-vitro studies. We observed 55 novel mostly rare genetic variants in this general population sample. Biochemical evaluation of all non-synonymous variants demonstrated the presence of several mutated but mostly still functional ATGL alleles with largely varying residual lipolytic activity. About one-quarter (3 out of 13) of the investigated variants presented a marked decrease or total loss of catalytic function. Genetic association studies using both continuous and dichotomous approaches showed a shift towards lower plasma FFA concentrations for rare variant carriers and an accumulation of variants in the lower 10%-quantile of the FFA distribution. However, the generally rather small effects suggest either only a secondary role of rare ATGL variants on the FFA levels in the SAPHIR population or a recessive action of ATGL variants. In contrast to these rather small effects, we describe here also the first patient with "neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy" (NLSDM) with a point mutation in the catalytic dyad, but otherwise intact protein.

  6. Hereditary fructose intolerance: functional study of two novel ALDOB natural variants and characterization of a partial gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Gabriella; Imperato, Maria Rosaria; Ieno, Luigi; Sorvillo, Rosa; Benigno, Vincenzo; Parenti, Giancarlo; Parini, Rossella; Vitagliano, Luigi; Zagari, Adriana; Salvatore, Francesco

    2010-12-01

    Hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by impaired functioning of human liver aldolase (ALDOB). At least 54 subtle/point mutations and only two large intragenic deletions have been found in the ALDOB gene. Here we report two novel ALDOB variants (p.R46W and p.Y343H) and an intragenic deletion that we found in patients with suspected HFI. The residual catalytic activity of the recombinant p.R46W and p.Y343H variants toward F1P was particularly altered. We also characterized a large intragenic deletion that we found in six unrelated patients. This is the first report of six unrelated patients sharing the same ALDOB deletion, thus indicating a founder effect for this allele in our geographic area. Because this deletion involves ALDOB exon 5, it can mimic worldwide common pathogenic genotypes, that is, homozygous p.A150P and p.A175D. Finally, the identification of only one ALDOB mutation in symptomatic patients suggests that HFI symptoms can, albeit rarely, appear also in heterozygotes. Therefore, an excessive and continuous fructose dietary intake may have deleterious effects even in apparently asymptomatic HFI carriers.

  7. Postnatally-transmitted HIV-1 Envelope variants have similar neutralization-sensitivity and function to that of nontransmitted breast milk variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fouda Genevieve G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breastfeeding is a leading cause of infant HIV-1 infection in the developing world, yet only a minority of infants exposed to HIV-1 via breastfeeding become infected. As a genetic bottleneck severely restricts the number of postnatally-transmitted variants, genetic or phenotypic properties of the virus Envelope (Env could be important for the establishment of infant infection. We examined the efficiency of virologic functions required for initiation of infection in the gastrointestinal tract and the neutralization sensitivity of HIV-1 Env variants isolated from milk of three postnatally-transmitting mothers (n=13 viruses, five clinically-matched nontransmitting mothers (n=16 viruses, and seven postnatally-infected infants (n = 7 postnatally-transmitted/founder (T/F viruses. Results There was no difference in the efficiency of epithelial cell interactions between Env virus variants from the breast milk of transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. Moreover, there was similar efficiency of DC-mediated trans-infection, CCR5-usage, target cell fusion, and infectivity between HIV-1 Env-pseudoviruses from nontransmitting mothers and postnatal T/F viruses. Milk Env-pseudoviruses were generally sensitive to neutralization by autologous maternal plasma and resistant to breast milk neutralization. Infant T/F Env-pseudoviruses were equally sensitive to neutralization by broadly-neutralizing monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies as compared to nontransmitted breast milk Env variants. Conclusion Postnatally-T/F Env variants do not appear to possess a superior ability to interact with and cross a mucosal barrier or an exceptional resistance to neutralization that define their capability to initiate infection across the infant gastrointestinal tract in the setting of preexisting maternal antibodies.

  8. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekhar Natarajan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages, and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization. In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level.

  9. Convergent Evolution of Hemoglobin Function in High-Altitude Andean Waterfowl Involves Limited Parallelism at the Molecular Sequence Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Chandrasekhar; Projecto-Garcia, Joana; Moriyama, Hideaki; Weber, Roy E; Muñoz-Fuentes, Violeta; Green, Andy J; Kopuchian, Cecilia; Tubaro, Pablo L; Alza, Luis; Bulgarella, Mariana; Smith, Matthew M; Wilson, Robert E; Fago, Angela; McCracken, Kevin G; Storz, Jay F

    2015-12-01

    A fundamental question in evolutionary genetics concerns the extent to which adaptive phenotypic convergence is attributable to convergent or parallel changes at the molecular sequence level. Here we report a comparative analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) function in eight phylogenetically replicated pairs of high- and low-altitude waterfowl taxa to test for convergence in the oxygenation properties of Hb, and to assess the extent to which convergence in biochemical phenotype is attributable to repeated amino acid replacements. Functional experiments on native Hb variants and protein engineering experiments based on site-directed mutagenesis revealed the phenotypic effects of specific amino acid replacements that were responsible for convergent increases in Hb-O2 affinity in multiple high-altitude taxa. In six of the eight taxon pairs, high-altitude taxa evolved derived increases in Hb-O2 affinity that were caused by a combination of unique replacements, parallel replacements (involving identical-by-state variants with independent mutational origins in different lineages), and collateral replacements (involving shared, identical-by-descent variants derived via introgressive hybridization). In genome scans of nucleotide differentiation involving high- and low-altitude populations of three separate species, function-altering amino acid polymorphisms in the globin genes emerged as highly significant outliers, providing independent evidence for adaptive divergence in Hb function. The experimental results demonstrate that convergent changes in protein function can occur through multiple historical paths, and can involve multiple possible mutations. Most cases of convergence in Hb function did not involve parallel substitutions and most parallel substitutions did not affect Hb-O2 affinity, indicating that the repeatability of phenotypic evolution does not require parallelism at the molecular level.

  10. Genetic variants involved in gallstone formation and capsaicin metabolism,and the risk of gallbladder cancer in Chilean women

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sergio; Báez; Yasuo; Tsuchiya; Alfonso; Calvo; Martha; Pruyas; Kazutoshi; Nakamura; Chikako; Kiyohara; Mari; Oyama; Masaharu; Yamamoto

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To determine the effects of genetic variants associated with gallstone formation and capsaicin (a pungent component of chili pepper) metabolism on the risk of gallbladder cancer (GBC).METHODS: A total of 57 patients with GBC, 119 patients with gallstones, and 70 controls were enrolled in this study. DNA was extracted from their blood or paraffi n block sample using standard commercial kits. The statuses of the genetic variants were assayed using Taqman SNP Genotyping Assays or Custom Taqman SNP Genotypi...

  11. Functional role of the polymorphic 647 T/C variant of ENT1 (SLC29A1 and its association with alcohol withdrawal seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adenosine is involved in several neurological and behavioral disorders including alcoholism. In cultured cell and animal studies, type 1 equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT1, slc29a1, which regulates adenosine levels, is known to regulate ethanol sensitivity and preference. Interestingly, in humans, the ENT1 (SLC29A1 gene contains a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (647 T/C; rs45573936 that might be involved in the functional change of ENT1. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Our functional analysis showed that prolonged ethanol exposure increased adenosine uptake activity of mutant cells (ENT1-216Thr compared to wild-type (ENT1-216Ile transfected cells, which might result in reduced extracellular adenosine levels. We found that mice lacking ENT1 displayed increased propensity to ethanol withdrawal seizures compared to wild-type littermates. We further investigated a possible association of the 647C variant with alcoholism and the history of alcohol withdrawal seizures in subjects of European ancestry recruited from two independent sites. Analyses of the combined data set showed an association of the 647C variant and alcohol dependence with withdrawal seizures at the nominally significant level. CONCLUSIONS: Together with the functional data, our findings suggest a potential contribution of a genetic variant of ENT1 to the development of alcoholism with increased risk of alcohol withdrawal-induced seizures in humans.

  12. Type 2 Diabetes Variants Disrupt Function of SLC16A11 through Two Distinct Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Victor; Hoch, Eitan; Mercader, Josep M; Tenen, Danielle E; Gymrek, Melissa; Hartigan, Christina R; DeRan, Michael; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Fontanillas, Pierre; Spooner, Alexandra; Guzman, Gaelen; Deik, Amy A; Pierce, Kerry A; Dennis, Courtney; Clish, Clary B; Carr, Steven A; Wagner, Bridget K; Schenone, Monica; Ng, Maggie C Y; Chen, Brian H; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Zerrweck, Carlos; Orozco, Lorena; Altshuler, David M; Schreiber, Stuart L; Florez, Jose C; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Lander, Eric S

    2017-06-29

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects Latinos at twice the rate seen in populations of European descent. We recently identified a risk haplotype spanning SLC16A11 that explains ∼20% of the increased T2D prevalence in Mexico. Here, through genetic fine-mapping, we define a set of tightly linked variants likely to contain the causal allele(s). We show that variants on the T2D-associated haplotype have two distinct effects: (1) decreasing SLC16A11 expression in liver and (2) disrupting a key interaction with basigin, thereby reducing cell-surface localization. Both independent mechanisms reduce SLC16A11 function and suggest SLC16A11 is the causal gene at this locus. To gain insight into how SLC16A11 disruption impacts T2D risk, we demonstrate that SLC16A11 is a proton-coupled monocarboxylate transporter and that genetic perturbation of SLC16A11 induces changes in fatty acid and lipid metabolism that are associated with increased T2D risk. Our findings suggest that increasing SLC16A11 function could be therapeutically beneficial for T2D. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Integrative analysis of functional genomic annotations and sequencing data to identify rare causal variants via hierarchical modeling

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    Marinela eCapanu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the small number of rare causal variants contributing to disease has beena major focus of investigation in recent years, but represents a formidable statisticalchallenge due to the rare frequencies with which these variants are observed. In thiscommentary we draw attention to a formal statistical framework, namely hierarchicalmodeling, to combine functional genomic annotations with sequencing data with theobjective of enhancing our ability to identify rare causal variants. Using simulations weshow that in all configurations studied, the hierarchical modeling approach has superiordiscriminatory ability compared to a recently proposed aggregate measure of deleteriousness,the Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion (CADD score, supportingour premise that aggregate functional genomic measures can more accurately identifycausal variants when used in conjunction with sequencing data through a hierarchicalmodeling approach

  14. On identities involving the sixth order mock theta functions

    CERN Document Server

    Lovejoy, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    We present q-series proofs of four identities involving sixth order mock theta functions from Ramanujan's lost notebook. We also show how Ramanujan's identities can be used to give a quick proof of four sixth order identities of Berndt and Chan.

  15. The genomic distribution and function of histone variant HTZ-1 during C. elegans embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Whittle

    Full Text Available In all eukaryotes, histone variants are incorporated into a subset of nucleosomes to create functionally specialized regions of chromatin. One such variant, H2A.Z, replaces histone H2A and is required for development and viability in all animals tested to date. However, the function of H2A.Z in development remains unclear. Here, we use ChIP-chip, genetic mutation, RNAi, and immunofluorescence microscopy to interrogate the function of H2A.Z (HTZ-1 during embryogenesis in Caenorhabditis elegans, a key model of metazoan development. We find that HTZ-1 is expressed in every cell of the developing embryo and is essential for normal development. The sites of HTZ-1 incorporation during embryogenesis reveal a genome wrought by developmental processes. HTZ-1 is incorporated upstream of 23% of C. elegans genes. While these genes tend to be required for development and occupied by RNA polymerase II, HTZ-1 incorporation does not specify a stereotypic transcription program. The data also provide evidence for unexpectedly widespread independent regulation of genes within operons during development; in 37% of operons, HTZ-1 is incorporated upstream of internally encoded genes. Fewer sites of HTZ-1 incorporation occur on the X chromosome relative to autosomes, which our data suggest is due to a paucity of developmentally important genes on X, rather than a direct function for HTZ-1 in dosage compensation. Our experiments indicate that HTZ-1 functions in establishing or maintaining an essential chromatin state at promoters regulated dynamically during C. elegans embryogenesis.

  16. A functional variant in the CD209 promoter is associated with DQ2-negative celiac disease in the Spanish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C Nú(n)ez; E Urcelay; J Martín; B Rueda; A Martínez; C Maluenda; I Polanco; MA López-Nevot; E Ortega; E Sierra; E Gómez de la Concha

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To address the role of CD209 in celiac disease (CD)patients. Non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genetic factors in CD predisposition are poorly understood, and environmental factors like infectious pathogens may play a role. CD209 is a dendritic and macrophage surface molecule involved in pathogen recognition and immune activation. Recently, a functional variant in the promoter of the CD209 gene (-336A/G) has been shown to affect the transcriptional CD209 activity in vitro and it has been associated with a higher susceptibility to/or severity of infection.METHODS: The study population was composed of two case-control cohorts of 103 and 386 CD patients and 312 y 419 healthy controls as well as a panel of 257 celiac families. Genotyping for the -336A/G CD209promoter polymorphism was performed using a TaqMan 5' allelic discrimination assay. HLA-DQ was determined by hybridization with allele specific probes.RESULTS: Initially, the case-control and familial studies did not find any association of the -336 A/G CD209 genetic variant with CD susceptibility. However,the stratification by HLA-DQ2 did reveal a significant association of CD209 promoter polymorphism in the HLA-DQ2 (-) group (carrier Avs GG in DQ2 (-) vs DQ2 (+)patients (P = 0.026, OR = 3.71).CONCLUSION: The -336G CD209 allele seems to be involved in CD susceptibility in HLA-DQ2 (-) patients. Our results might suggest a possible role of pathogens in the onset of a minor group of CD patients.

  17. Certain Subclasses of Analytic and Bi-Univalent Functions Involving Double Zeta Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saibah Siregar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we introduce two new subclasses of the functions class Σ of bi-univalent functions involving double zeta functions in the open unit disc U={z:zEC, |z|<1}. The estimates on the coefficients |a2| and |a3| for functions in these new subclasses of the function class Σ are obtained in our investigation.

  18. Open Chromatin Profiling in hiPSC-Derived Neurons Prioritizes Functional Noncoding Psychiatric Risk Variants and Highlights Neurodevelopmental Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Marc P; Zhang, Hanwen; Moy, Winton; McGowan, Heather; Leites, Catherine; Dionisio, Leonardo E; Xu, Zihui; Shi, Jianxin; Sanders, Alan R; Greenleaf, William J; Cowan, Chad A; Pang, Zhiping P; Gejman, Pablo V; Penzes, Peter; Duan, Jubao

    2017-09-07

    Most disease variants lie within noncoding genomic regions, making their functional interpretation challenging. Because chromatin openness strongly influences transcriptional activity, we hypothesized that cell-type-specific open chromatin regions (OCRs) might highlight disease-relevant noncoding sequences. To investigate, we mapped global OCRs in neurons differentiating from hiPSCs, a cellular model for studying neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ). We found that the OCRs are highly dynamic and can stratify GWAS-implicated SZ risk variants. Of the more than 3,500 SZ-associated variants analyzed, we prioritized ∼100 putatively functional ones located in neuronal OCRs, including rs1198588, at a leading risk locus flanking MIR137. Excitatory neurons derived from hiPSCs with CRISPR/Cas9-edited rs1198588 or a rare proximally located SZ risk variant showed altered MIR137 expression, dendrite arborization, and synapse maturation. Our study shows that noncoding disease variants in OCRs can affect neurodevelopment, and that analysis of open chromatin regions can help prioritize functionally relevant noncoding variants identified by GWAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional variant disrupts insulin induction of USF1: mechanism for USF1-associated dyslipidemias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naukkarinen, J.; Nilsson, E.; Koistinen, H.A.;

    2009-01-01

    of known USF1 target genes as well as for broader effects on the transcript profile. Allelic imbalance of USF1 in fat was assessed using a quantitative sequencing approach. The possible allele-specific effect of insulin on the expression of USF1 was studied in 118 muscle biopsies before and after...... in USF1 is involved in the development of dyslipidemia. The effects of the risk variant on gene expression were studied in 2 relevant human tissues, fat and muscle. Global transcript profiles of 47 fat biopsies ascertained for carriership of the risk allele were tested for differential expression...... a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. The risk allele of single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2073658 seems to eradicate the inductive effect of insulin on the expression of USF1 in muscle and fat. The expression of numerous target genes is in turn perturbed in adipose tissue. CONCLUSIONS: In risk allele carriers...

  20. Functional characterization of the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) in diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, M Lucrecia; DiStefano, Johanna K

    2011-04-22

    We previously observed association between variants in the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) attributed to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and demonstrated PVT1 expression in a variety of renal cell types. While these findings suggest a role for PVT1 in the development of ESRD, potential mechanisms for involvement remain unknown. The goal of this study was to identify possible molecular mechanisms by which PVT1 may contribute to the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease. We knocked-down PVT1 expression in mesangial cells using RNA interference, and analyzed RNA and protein levels of fibronectin 1 (FN1), collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (SERPINE1 or PAI-1) by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. PVT1 expression was significantly upregulated by glucose treatment in human mesangial cells, as were levels of FN1, COL4A1, TGFB1, and PAI-1. Importantly, PVT1 knockdown significantly reduced mRNA and protein levels of the major ECM proteins, FN1 and COL4A1, and two key regulators of ECM proteins, TGFB1 and PAI-1. However, we observed a higher and more rapid reduction in levels of secreted FN1, COL4A1, and PAI-1 compared with TGFB1, suggesting that at least some of the PVT1 effects on ECM proteins may be independent of this cytokine. These results indicate that PVT1 may mediate the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy through mechanisms involving ECM accumulation.

  1. Functional characterization of the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1 in diabetic nephropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Lucrecia Alvarez

    Full Text Available We previously observed association between variants in the plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1 and end-stage renal disease (ESRD attributed to both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and demonstrated PVT1 expression in a variety of renal cell types. While these findings suggest a role for PVT1 in the development of ESRD, potential mechanisms for involvement remain unknown. The goal of this study was to identify possible molecular mechanisms by which PVT1 may contribute to the development and progression of diabetic kidney disease. We knocked-down PVT1 expression in mesangial cells using RNA interference, and analyzed RNA and protein levels of fibronectin 1 (FN1, collagen, type IV, alpha 1 (COL4A1, transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFB1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (SERPINE1 or PAI-1 by qPCR and ELISA, respectively. PVT1 expression was significantly upregulated by glucose treatment in human mesangial cells, as were levels of FN1, COL4A1, TGFB1, and PAI-1. Importantly, PVT1 knockdown significantly reduced mRNA and protein levels of the major ECM proteins, FN1 and COL4A1, and two key regulators of ECM proteins, TGFB1 and PAI-1. However, we observed a higher and more rapid reduction in levels of secreted FN1, COL4A1, and PAI-1 compared with TGFB1, suggesting that at least some of the PVT1 effects on ECM proteins may be independent of this cytokine. These results indicate that PVT1 may mediate the development and progression of diabetic nephropathy through mechanisms involving ECM accumulation.

  2. Genetic Variants in KLOTHO Associate With Cognitive Function in the Oldest Old Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, Jonas; Sørensen, Mette; Nygaard, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    cognitive measures in two cohort strata. The haplotype effect was stronger than that of KL-VS. Two variants, rs2283368 and rs9526984, were the only variants significantly associated with cognitive decline over 7 years. We discuss an age-dependent effect of KL and the possibility that multiple gene variants...

  3. Functional characterization of BRCA1 gene variants by mini-gene splicing assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Ane Y; Dandanell, Mette; Jønson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Mutational screening of the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 leads to the identification of numerous pathogenic variants such as frameshift and nonsense variants, as well as large genomic rearrangements. The screening moreover identifies a large number of variants, for example, missense...

  4. Rare Functional Variant in TM2D3 is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Megan L.; Naj, Adam; Vronskaya, Maria; DeStefano, Anita L.; Brody, Jennifer A.; Smith, Albert V.; Amin, Najaf; Sims, Rebecca; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Lopez, Oscar L.; Beiser, Alexa; Ikram, M. Arfan; Garcia, Melissa E.; Hayward, Caroline; Ripatti, Samuli; Franks, Paul W.; Hallmans, Göran; Rolandsson, Olov; Jansson, Jan-Håkon; Porteous, David J.; Salomaa, Veikko; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Rice, Kenneth M.; Bellen, Hugo J.; Levy, Daniel; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Emilsson, Valur; Rotter, Jerome I.; Aspelund, Thor; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Wang, Li-San; Williams, Julie; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Psaty, Bruce M.; Seshadri, Sudha; Shulman, Joshua M.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

    2016-01-01

    We performed an exome-wide association analysis in 1393 late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) cases and 8141 controls from the CHARGE consortium. We found that a rare variant (P155L) in TM2D3 was enriched in Icelanders (~0.5% versus <0.05% in other European populations). In 433 LOAD cases and 3903 controls from the Icelandic AGES sub-study, P155L was associated with increased risk and earlier onset of LOAD [odds ratio (95% CI) = 7.5 (3.5–15.9), p = 6.6x10-9]. Mutation in the Drosophila TM2D3 homolog, almondex, causes a phenotype similar to loss of Notch/Presenilin signaling. Human TM2D3 is capable of rescuing these phenotypes, but this activity is abolished by P155L, establishing it as a functionally damaging allele. Our results establish a rare TM2D3 variant in association with LOAD susceptibility, and together with prior work suggests possible links to the β-amyloid cascade. PMID:27764101

  5. Rare Functional Variant in TM2D3 is Associated with Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Jakobsdottir

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We performed an exome-wide association analysis in 1393 late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD cases and 8141 controls from the CHARGE consortium. We found that a rare variant (P155L in TM2D3 was enriched in Icelanders (~0.5% versus <0.05% in other European populations. In 433 LOAD cases and 3903 controls from the Icelandic AGES sub-study, P155L was associated with increased risk and earlier onset of LOAD [odds ratio (95% CI = 7.5 (3.5-15.9, p = 6.6x10-9]. Mutation in the Drosophila TM2D3 homolog, almondex, causes a phenotype similar to loss of Notch/Presenilin signaling. Human TM2D3 is capable of rescuing these phenotypes, but this activity is abolished by P155L, establishing it as a functionally damaging allele. Our results establish a rare TM2D3 variant in association with LOAD susceptibility, and together with prior work suggests possible links to the β-amyloid cascade.

  6. Anatomical and functional correlation of the endomorphins with mu opioid receptor splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbadie, C; Rossi, G C; Orciuolo, A; Zadina, J E; Pasternak, G W

    2002-09-01

    The present study characterizes the relationship between the endogenous mu opioid peptides endomorphin-1 (EM-1) and endomorphin-2 (EM-2) and several splice variants of the cloned mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) encoded by the mu opioid receptor gene (Oprm). Confocal laser microscopy revealed that fibers containing EM-2-like immunoreactivity (-LI) were distributed in close apposition to fibers showing MOR-1-LI (exon 4-LI) and to MOR-1C-LI (exons 7/8/9-LI) in the superficial laminae of the lumbar spinal cord. We also observed colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1-LI in a few fibers of lamina II, and colocalization of EM-2-LI and MOR-1C-LI in laminae I-II, and V-VI. To assess the functional relevance of the MOR-1 variants in endomorphin analgesia, we examined the effects of antisense treatments that targeted individual exons within the Oprm1 gene on EM-1 and EM-2 analgesia in the tail flick test. This antisense mapping study implied mu opioid receptor mechanisms for the endomorphins are distinct from those of morphine or morphine-6beta-glucuronide (M6G).

  7. Structure-function analysis of two variants of mumps virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase protein

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    Gerardo Santos-López

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available A point mutation from guanine (G to adenine (A at nucleotide position 1081 in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN gene has been associated with neurovirulence of Urabe AM9 mumps virus vaccine. This mutation corresponds to a glutamic acid (E to lysine (K change at position 335 in the HN glycoprotein. We have experimentally demonstrated that two variants of Urabe AM9 strain (HN-A1081 and HN-G1081 differ in neurotropism, sialic acidbinding affinity and neuraminidase activity. In the present study, we performed a structure-function analysis of that amino acid substitution; the structures of HN protein of both Urabe AM9 strain variants were predicted. Based on our analysis, the E/K mutation changes the protein surface properties and to a lesser extent their conformations, which in turn reflects in activity changes. Our modeling results suggest that this E/K interchange does not affect the structure of the sialic acid binding motif; however, the electrostatic surface differs drastically due to an exposed short alpha helix. Consequently, this mutation may affect the accessibility of HN to substrates and membrane receptors of the host cells. Our findings appear to explain the observed differences in neurotropism of these vaccine strains.

  8. Association study of functional genetic variants of innate immunity related genes in celiac disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggest that the innate immune system is implicated in the early events of celiac disease (CD pathogenesis. In this work for the first time we have assessed the relevance of different proinflammatory mediators typically related to innate immunity in CD predisposition. Methods We performed a familial study in which 105 celiac families characterized by the presence of an affected child with CD were genotyped for functional polymorphisms located at regulatory regions of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes. Familial data was analysed with a transmission disequilibrium test (TDT that revealed no statistically significant differences in the transmission pattern of the different genetic markers considered. Results The TDT analysis for IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, and MCP-1 genes genetic variants did not reveal biased transmission to the affected offspring. Only a borderline association of RANTES promoter genetic variants with CD predisposition was observed. Conclusion Our results suggest that the analysed polymorphisms of IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RN, IL-18, RANTES and MCP-1 genes do not seem to play a major role in CD genetic predisposition in our population.

  9. Functional Assessment of Disease-Associated Regulatory Variants In Vivo Using a Versatile Dual Colour Transgenesis Strategy in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Shipra; Gordon, Christopher T.; Foster, Robert G.; Melin, Lucie; Abadie, Véronique; Baujat, Geneviève; Vazquez, Marie-Paule; Amiel, Jeanne; Lyonnet, Stanislas; van Heyningen, Veronica; Kleinjan, Dirk A.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of gene regulation by sequence variation in non-coding regions of the genome is now recognised as a significant cause of human disease and disease susceptibility. Sequence variants in cis-regulatory elements (CREs), the primary determinants of spatio-temporal gene regulation, can alter transcription factor binding sites. While technological advances have led to easy identification of disease-associated CRE variants, robust methods for discerning functional CRE variants from background variation are lacking. Here we describe an efficient dual-colour reporter transgenesis approach in zebrafish, simultaneously allowing detailed in vivo comparison of spatio-temporal differences in regulatory activity between putative CRE variants and assessment of altered transcription factor binding potential of the variant. We validate the method on known disease-associated elements regulating SHH, PAX6 and IRF6 and subsequently characterise novel, ultra-long-range SOX9 enhancers implicated in the craniofacial abnormality Pierre Robin Sequence. The method provides a highly cost-effective, fast and robust approach for simultaneously unravelling in a single assay whether, where and when in embryonic development a disease-associated CRE-variant is affecting its regulatory function. PMID:26030420

  10. Functional characterization of a GFAP variant of uncertain significance in an Alexander disease case within the setting of an individualized medicine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Nicole J; Sigafoos, Ashley N; Zimmermann, Michael T; Maus, Rachel L; Cousin, Margot A; Blackburn, Patrick R; Urrutia, Raul; Clark, Karl J; Patterson, Marc C; Wick, Myra J; Klee, Eric W

    2016-09-01

    A de novo GFAP variant, p.R376W, was identified in a child presenting with hypotonia, developmental delay, and abnormal brain MRI. Following the 2015 ACMG variant classification guidelines and the functional studies showing protein aggregate formation in vitro, p.R376W should be classified as a pathogenic variant, causative for Alexander disease.

  11. Comparative functional characterization of novel non-syndromic GJB2 gene variant p.Gly45Arg and lethal syndromic variant p.Gly45Glu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordhandas, Jeenal A.; Pique, Lynn

    2016-01-01

    We characterized a novel GJB2 missense variant, c.133G>A, p.Gly45Arg, and compared it with the only other variant at the same amino acid position of the connexin 26 protein (Cx26) reported to date: c.134G>A, p.Gly45Glu. Whereas both variants are associated with hearing loss and are dominantly inherited, p.Gly45Glu has been implicated in the rare fatal keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome, which results in cutaneous infections and septicemia with premature demise in the first year of life. In contrast, p.Gly45Arg appears to be non-syndromic. Subcellular localization experiments in transiently co-transfected HeLa cells demonstrated that Cx26-WT (wild-type) and p.Gly45Arg form gap junctions, whereas Cx26-WT with p.Gly45Glu protein does not. The substitution of a nonpolar amino acid glycine in wildtype Cx26 at position 45 with a negatively charged glutamic acid (acidic) has previously been shown to interfere with Ca2+ regulation of hemichannel gating and to inhibit the formation of gap junctions, resulting in cell death. The novel variant p.Gly45Arg, however, changes this glycine to a positively charged arginine (basic), resulting in the formation of dysfunctional gap junctions that selectively affect the permeation of negatively charged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and contribute to hearing loss. Cx26 p.Gly45Arg transfected cells, unlike cells transfected with p.Gly45Glu, thrived at physiologic Ca2+ concentrations, suggesting that Ca2+ regulation of hemichannel gating is unaffected in Cx26 p.Gly45Arg transfected cells. Thus, the two oppositely charged amino acids that replace the highly conserved uncharged glycine in p.Gly45Glu and p.Gly45Arg, respectively, produce strikingly different effects on the structure and function of the Cx26 protein. PMID:27761313

  12. Function after pelvic tumour resection involving the acetabular ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsonne, U; Kreicbergs, A; Olsson, E; Stark, A

    1982-01-01

    Seven patients subjected to pelvic tumour resection involving the acetabular ring were analyzed with respect to function. In addition to conventional clinical assessment gait was analyzed objectively by means of an electronic walk-way and residual hip-muscle power tested by means of a Cybex II dynamometer. Functional results reported by the patients with respect to pain, walking and working capacity appeared better than those elicited by clinical examination. All patients exhibited a marked pelvic tilt and a positive Trendelenburg sign. Only one patient walked without any kind of support. Leg-length discrepancy was on an average 6 cm. Objective gait analysis disclosed that all patients had reduced weight-bearing time on the operated side as compared to the non-operated. This, however, was clearly less pronounced for those patients who appeared best with respect to pain, walking and working capacity. These patients also showed the best hip extension power which appeared more important from a functional point of view than hip flexion and, surprisingly, hip abduction power. Radiographic examination showed that bony support for the proximal femur, provided either by the formation of a bone shelf from the remaining iliac bone or by the remaining iliac bone itself, was of decisive importance for function. The results of the present study show that pelvic tumour resection involving the acetabular ring, provided radical tumour removal can be achieved, constitutes a feasible alternative to hemipelvectomy from a functional point of view.

  13. Functional modulation of the glutamate transporter variant GLT1b by the PDZ domain protein PICK1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Borre, Lars; Braunstein, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    effect on trafficking of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. The 11 extreme C-terminal residues specific for the GLT1b variant are essential for its specific interaction with the PICK1 PDZ domain, but a functional consequence of this interaction has remained unresolved. To identify a functional effect of PICK...

  14. Association of ABCB1 genetic variants with renal function in Africans and in Caucasians

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    Elston Robert C

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The P-glycoprotein, encoded by the ABCB1 gene, is expressed in human endothelial and mesangial cells, which contribute to control renal plasma flow and glomerular filtration rate. We investigated the association of ABCB1 variants with renal function in African and Caucasian subjects. Methods In Africans (290 subjects from 62 pedigrees, we genotyped the 2677G>T and 3435 C>T ABCB1 polymorphisms. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR was measured using inulin clearance and effective renal plasma flow (ERPF using para-aminohippurate clearance. In Caucasians (5382 unrelated subjects, we analyzed 30 SNPs located within and around ABCB1, using data from the Affymetrix 500 K chip. GFR was estimated using the simplified Modification of the Diet in Renal Disease (MDRD and Cockcroft-Gault equations. Results In Africans, compared to the reference genotype (GG or CC, each copy of the 2677T and 3435T allele was associated, respectively, with: GFR higher by 10.6 ± 2.9 (P P = 0.06 mL/min; ERPF higher by 47.5 ± 11.6 (P P = 0.007 mL/min; and renal resistances lower by 0.016 ± 0.004 (P P = 0.004 mm Hg/mL/min. In Caucasians, we identified 3 polymorphisms in the ABCB1 gene that were strongly associated with all estimates of GFR (smallest P value = 0.0006, overall P = 0.014 after multiple testing correction. Conclusion Variants of the ABCB1 gene were associated with renal function in both Africans and Caucasians and may therefore confer susceptibility to nephropathy in humans. If confirmed in other studies, these results point toward a new candidate gene for nephropathy in humans.

  15. Functional Studies and In Silico Analyses to Evaluate Non-Coding Variants in Inherited Cardiomyopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisso, Giulia; Detta, Nicola; Coppola, Pamela; Mazzaccara, Cristina; Pricolo, Maria Rosaria; D’Onofrio, Antonio; Limongelli, Giuseppe; Calabrò, Raffaele; Salvatore, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Point mutations are the most common cause of inherited diseases. Bioinformatics tools can help to predict the pathogenicity of mutations found during genetic screening, but they may work less well in determining the effect of point mutations in non-coding regions. In silico analysis of intronic variants can reveal their impact on the splicing process, but the consequence of a given substitution is generally not predictable. The aim of this study was to functionally test five intronic variants (MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C, MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T, MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C, SCN5A-c.393-5C>A, and ACTC1-c.617-7T>C) found in five patients affected by inherited cardiomyopathies in the attempt to verify their pathogenic role. Analysis of the MYBPC3-c.506-2A>C mutation in mRNA from the peripheral blood of one of the patients affected by hypertrophic cardiac myopathy revealed the loss of the canonical splice site and the use of an alternative splicing site, which caused the loss of the first seven nucleotides of exon 5 (MYBPC3-G169AfsX14). In the other four patients, we generated minigene constructs and transfected them in HEK-293 cells. This minigene approach showed that MYBPC3-c.2308+3G>C and SCN5A-c.393-5C>A altered pre-mRNA processing, thus resulting in the skipping of one exon. No alterations were found in either MYBPC3-c.906-7G>T or ACTC1-c.617-7T>C. In conclusion, functional in vitro analysis of the effects of potential splicing mutations can confirm or otherwise the putative pathogenicity of non-coding mutations, and thus help to guide the patient's clinical management and improve genetic counseling in affected families. PMID:27834932

  16. Meiotic Interactors of a Mitotic Gene TAO3 Revealed by Functional Analysis of its Rare Variant

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    Saumya Gupta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Studying the molecular consequences of rare genetic variants has the potential to identify novel and hitherto uncharacterized pathways causally contributing to phenotypic variation. Here, we characterize the functional consequences of a rare coding variant of TAO3, previously reported to contribute significantly to sporulation efficiency variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During mitosis, the common TAO3 allele interacts with CBK1—a conserved NDR kinase. Both TAO3 and CBK1 are components of the RAM signaling network that regulates cell separation and polarization during mitosis. We demonstrate that the role of the rare allele TAO3(4477C in meiosis is distinct from its role in mitosis by being independent of ACE2—a RAM network target gene. By quantitatively measuring cell morphological dynamics, and expressing the TAO3(4477C allele conditionally during sporulation, we show that TAO3 has an early role in meiosis. This early role of TAO3 coincides with entry of cells into meiotic division. Time-resolved transcriptome analyses during early sporulation identified regulators of carbon and lipid metabolic pathways as candidate mediators. We show experimentally that, during sporulation, the TAO3(4477C allele interacts genetically with ERT1 and PIP2, regulators of the tricarboxylic acid cycle and gluconeogenesis metabolic pathways, respectively. We thus uncover a meiotic functional role for TAO3, and identify ERT1 and PIP2 as novel regulators of sporulation efficiency. Our results demonstrate that studying the causal effects of genetic variation on the underlying molecular network has the potential to provide a more extensive understanding of the pathways driving a complex trait.

  17. Tropomyosin variants describe distinct functional subcellular domains in differentiated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallant, Cynthia; Appel, Sarah; Graceffa, Philip; Leavis, Paul; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Gunning, Peter W; Schevzov, Galina; Chaponnier, Christine; DeGnore, Jon; Lehman, William; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2011-06-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is known to be an important gatekeeper of actin function. Tm isoforms are encoded by four genes, and each gene produces several variants by alternative splicing, which have been proposed to play roles in motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Smooth muscle studies have focused on gizzard smooth muscle, where a heterodimer of Tm from the α-gene (Tmsm-α) and from the β-gene (Tmsm-β) is associated with contractile filaments. In this study we examined Tm in differentiated mammalian vascular smooth muscle (dVSM). Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC MS/MS) analysis and Western blot screening with variant-specific antibodies revealed that at least five different Tm proteins are expressed in this tissue: Tm6 (Tmsm-α) and Tm2 from the α-gene, Tm1 (Tmsm-β) from the β-gene, Tm5NM1 from the γ-gene, and Tm4 from the δ-gene. Tm6 is by far most abundant in dVSM followed by Tm1, Tm2, Tm5NM1, and Tm4. Coimmunoprecipitation and coimmunofluorescence studies demonstrate that Tm1 and Tm6 coassociate with different actin isoforms and display different intracellular localizations. Using an antibody specific for cytoplasmic γ-actin, we report here the presence of a γ-actin cortical cytoskeleton in dVSM cells. Tm1 colocalizes with cortical cytoplasmic γ-actin and coprecipitates with γ-actin. Tm6, on the other hand, is located on contractile bundles. These data indicate that Tm1 and Tm6 do not form a classical heterodimer in dVSM but rather describe different functional cellular compartments.

  18. Functional limitations due to foot involvement in spondyloarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaras, Nihal; Havan, Nuri; Poyraz, Emine; Rezvanı, Aylin; Aydın, Teoman

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Spondyloarthritis is a major inflammatory disease followed-up in the rheumatology clinics, foot involvement in spodyloarthritis is common. The functional states of patients with spondyloarthritis are usually evaluated globally. The aim of this study was to assess the foot involvement-related functional limitations in patients with spondyloarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Patients with ankylosing spondylitis and psoriatic arthritis with foot pain more than 4 weeks who underwent anteroposterior and lateral feet radiography were enrolled into the study. A “clinical findings score” was calculated by assigning 1 point for every finding of swelling, redness, and tenderness. C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were used as serum markers for disease activity. Foot radiograms were evaluated using the spondyloarthropathy tarsal radiographic index and the foot-related functional state of patients was determined by the Turkish version of the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score. [Results] There were no relationships between Foot and Ankle Outcome Score subscales and clinical findings score, serum markers, or radiologic score. Pain and symptoms subscale scores were result positively correlated with activity of daily living, sport and recreation, and quality of life subscale scores. [Conclusion] Pain and symptoms are the main determinants of foot-related functional limitations in spondyloarthritis. PMID:27512252

  19. Weaver Syndrome‐Associated EZH2 Protein Variants Show Impaired Histone Methyltransferase Function In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Damian B.; Lewis, M.E. Suzanne; Chijiwa, Chieko; Ramos‐Arroyo, Maria A.; Tkachenko, Natália; Milano, Valentina; Fradin, Mélanie; McKinnon, Margaret L.; Townsend, Katelin N.; Xu, Jieqing; Van Allen, M.I.; Ross, Colin J.D.; Dobyns, William B.; Weaver, David D.; Gibson, William T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weaver syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by generalized overgrowth, macrocephaly, specific facial features, accelerated bone age, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to cancers. De novo mutations in the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) have been shown to cause WS. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase that acts as the catalytic agent of the polycomb‐repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to maintain gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). Functional studies investigating histone methyltransferase activity of mutant EZH2 from various cancers have been reported, whereas WS‐associated mutations remain poorly characterized. To investigate the role of EZH2 in WS, we performed functional studies using artificially assembled PRC2 complexes containing mutagenized human EZH2 that reflected the codon changes predicted from patients with WS. We found that WS‐associated amino acid alterations reduce the histone methyltransferase function of EZH2 in this in vitro assay. Our results support the hypothesis that WS is caused by constitutional mutations in EZH2 that alter the histone methyltransferase function of PRC2. However, histone methyltransferase activities of different EZH2 variants do not appear to correlate directly with the phenotypic variability between WS patients and individuals with a common c.553G>C (p.Asp185His) polymorphism in EZH2. PMID:26694085

  20. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Aprile-Garcia

    Full Text Available The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln by arginine (Arg substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations.

  1. Expansion of a class of functions into an integral involving associated Legendre functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanigopal Mandal

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A theorem for expansion of a class of functions into an integral involving associated Legendre functions is obtained in this paper. This is a somewhat general integral expansion formula for a function f(x defined in (x1,x2 where -1involving conical boundaries.

  2. Rare loss-of-function variants in SETD1A are associated with schizophrenia and developmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tarjinder; Kurki, Mitja I; Curtis, David; Purcell, Shaun M; Crooks, Lucy; McRae, Jeremy; Suvisaari, Jaana; Chheda, Himanshu; Blackwood, Douglas; Breen, Gerome; Pietiläinen, Olli; Gerety, Sebastian S; Ayub, Muhammad; Blyth, Moira; Cole, Trevor; Collier, David; Coomber, Eve L; Craddock, Nick; Daly, Mark J; Danesh, John; DiForti, Marta; Foster, Alison; Freimer, Nelson B; Geschwind, Daniel; Johnstone, Mandy; Joss, Shelagh; Kirov, Georg; Körkkö, Jarmo; Kuismin, Outi; Holmans, Peter; Hultman, Christina M; Iyegbe, Conrad; Lönnqvist, Jouko; Männikkö, Minna; McCarroll, Steve A; McGuffin, Peter; McIntosh, Andrew M; McQuillin, Andrew; Moilanen, Jukka S; Moore, Carmel; Murray, Robin M; Newbury-Ecob, Ruth; Ouwehand, Willem; Paunio, Tiina; Prigmore, Elena; Rees, Elliott; Roberts, David; Sambrook, Jennifer; Sklar, Pamela; St Clair, David; Veijola, Juha; Walters, James T R; Williams, Hywel; Sullivan, Patrick F; Hurles, Matthew E; O'Donovan, Michael C; Palotie, Aarno; Owen, Michael J; Barrett, Jeffrey C

    2016-04-01

    By analyzing the whole-exome sequences of 4,264 schizophrenia cases, 9,343 controls and 1,077 trios, we identified a genome-wide significant association between rare loss-of-function (LoF) variants in SETD1A and risk for schizophrenia (P = 3.3 × 10(-9)). We found only two heterozygous LoF variants in 45,376 exomes from individuals without a neuropsychiatric diagnosis, indicating that SETD1A is substantially depleted of LoF variants in the general population. Seven of the ten individuals with schizophrenia carrying SETD1A LoF variants also had learning difficulties. We further identified four SETD1A LoF carriers among 4,281 children with severe developmental disorders and two more carriers in an independent sample of 5,720 Finnish exomes, both with notable neuropsychiatric phenotypes. Together, our observations indicate that LoF variants in SETD1A cause a range of neurodevelopmental disorders, including schizophrenia. Combining these data with previous common variant evidence, we suggest that epigenetic dysregulation, specifically in the histone H3K4 methylation pathway, is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia.

  3. Targeted resequencing of regulatory regions at schizophrenia risk loci: Role of rare functional variants at chromatin repressive states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Peñas, Javier; Amigo, Jorge; Santomé, Luis; Sobrino, Beatriz; Brenlla, Julio; Agra, Santiago; Paz, Eduardo; Páramo, Mario; Carracedo, Ángel; Arrojo, Manuel; Costas, Javier

    2016-07-01

    There is mounting evidence that regulatory variation plays an important role in genetic risk for schizophrenia. Here, we specifically search for regulatory variants at risk by sequencing promoter regions of twenty-three genes implied in schizophrenia by copy number variant or genome-wide association studies. After strict quality control, a total of 55,206bp per sample were analyzed in 526 schizophrenia cases and 516 controls from Galicia, NW Spain, using the Applied Biosystems SOLiD System. Variants were filtered based on frequency from public databases, chromatin states from the RoadMap Epigenomics Consortium at tissues relevant for schizophrenia, such as fetal brain, mid-frontal lobe, and angular gyrus, and prediction of functionality from RegulomeDB. The proportion of rare variants at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues was higher in cases than in controls. The proportion of rare variants with predicted regulatory role was significantly higher in cases than in controls (P=0.0028, OR=1.93, 95% C.I.=1.23-3.04). Combination of information from both sources led to the identification of an excess of carriers of rare variants with predicted regulatory role located at polycomb repressive chromatin state at relevant tissues in cases versus controls (P=0.0016, OR=19.34, 95% C.I.=2.45-2495.26). The variants are located at two genes affected by the 17q12 copy number variant, LHX1 and HNF1B. These data strongly suggest that a specific epigenetic mechanism, chromatin remodeling by histone modification during early development, may be impaired in a subset of schizophrenia patients, in agreement with previous data.

  4. Variants of the CNTNAP2 5' promoter as risk factors for autism spectrum disorders: a genetic and functional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiocchetti, A G; Kopp, M; Waltes, R; Haslinger, D; Duketis, E; Jarczok, T A; Poustka, F; Voran, A; Graab, U; Meyer, J; Klauck, S M; Fulda, S; Freitag, C M

    2015-07-01

    Contactin-associated protein-like 2 gene (CNTNAP2), a member of the Neurexin gene superfamily, is one of the best-replicated risk genes for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). ASD are predominately genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorders characterized by impairments of language development, social interaction and communication, as well as stereotyped behavior and interests. Although CNTNAP2 expression levels were proposed to alter ASD risk, no study to date has focused on its 5' promoter. Here, we directly sequenced the CNTNAP2 5' promoter region of 236 German families with one child with ASD and detected four novel variants. Furthermore, we genotyped the three most frequent variants (rs150447075, rs34712024, rs71781329) in an additional sample of 356 families and found nominal association of rs34712024G with ASD and rs71781329GCG[7] with language development. The four novel and the three known minor alleles of the identified variants were predicted to alter transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). At the functional level, the respective sequences spanning these seven variants were bound by nuclear factors. In a luciferase promoter assay, the respective minor alleles showed cell line-specific and differentiation stage-dependent effects at the level of promoter activation. The novel potential rare risk-variant M2, a G>A mutation -215 base pairs 5' of the transcriptional start site, significantly reduced promoter efficiency in HEK293T and in undifferentiated and differentiated neuroblastoid SH-SY5Y cells. This variant was transmitted to a patient with autistic disorder. The under-transmitted, protective minor G allele of the common variant rs34712024, in contrast, increased transcriptional activity. These results lead to the conclusion that the pathomechanism of CNTNAP2 promoter variants on ASD risk is mediated by their effect on TFBSs, and thus confirm the hypothesis that a reduced CNTNAP2 level during neuronal development increases liability for ASD.

  5. Biochemical analysis of six genetic variants of error-prone human DNA polymerase ι involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinsook; Song, Insil; Jo, Ara; Shin, Joo-Ho; Cho, Hana; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2014-10-20

    DNA polymerase (pol) ι is the most error-prone among the Y-family polymerases that participate in translesion synthesis (TLS). Pol ι can bypass various DNA lesions, e.g., N(2)-ethyl(Et)G, O(6)-methyl(Me)G, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), and an abasic site, though frequently with low fidelity. We assessed the biochemical effects of six reported genetic variations of human pol ι on its TLS properties, using the recombinant pol ι (residues 1-445) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, N(2)-EtG, O(6)-MeG, 8-oxoG, or abasic site. The Δ1-25 variant, which is the N-terminal truncation of 25 residues resulting from an initiation codon variant (c.3G > A) and also is the formerly misassigned wild-type, exhibited considerably higher polymerase activity than wild-type with Mg(2+) (but not with Mn(2+)), coinciding with its steady-state kinetic data showing a ∼10-fold increase in kcat/Km for nucleotide incorporation opposite templates (only with Mg(2+)). The R96G variant, which lacks a R96 residue known to interact with the incoming nucleotide, lost much of its polymerase activity, consistent with the kinetic data displaying 5- to 72-fold decreases in kcat/Km for nucleotide incorporation opposite templates either with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), except for that opposite N(2)-EtG with Mn(2+) (showing a 9-fold increase for dCTP incorporation). The Δ1-25 variant bound DNA 20- to 29-fold more tightly than wild-type (with Mg(2+)), but the R96G variant bound DNA 2-fold less tightly than wild-type. The DNA-binding affinity of wild-type, but not of the Δ1-25 variant, was ∼7-fold stronger with 0.15 mM Mn(2+) than with Mg(2+). The results indicate that the R96G variation severely impairs most of the Mg(2+)- and Mn(2+)-dependent TLS abilities of pol ι, whereas the Δ1-25 variation selectively and substantially enhances the Mg(2+)-dependent TLS capability of pol ι, emphasizing the potential translational importance of these pol ι genetic variations, e.g., individual differences

  6. Variants of the yeast MAPK Mpk1 are fully functional independently of activation loop phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goshen-Lago, Tal; Goldberg-Carp, Anat; Melamed, Dganit; Darlyuk-Saadon, Ilona; Bai, Chen; Ahn, Natalie G.; Admon, Arie; Engelberg, David

    2016-01-01

    MAP kinases of the ERK family are conserved from yeast to humans. Their catalytic activity is dependent on dual phosphorylation of their activation loop’s TEY motif, catalyzed by MAPK kinases (MEKs). Here we studied variants of Mpk1, a yeast orthologue of Erk, which is essential for cell wall integrity. Cells lacking MPK1, or the genes encoding the relevant MEKs, MKK1 and MKK2, do not proliferate under cell wall stress, imposed, for example, by caffeine. Mutants of Mpk1, Mpk1(Y268C) and Mpk1(Y268A), function independently of Mkk1 and Mkk2. We show that these variants are phosphorylated at their activation loop in mkk1∆mkk2∆ and mkk1∆mkk2∆pbs2∆ste7∆ cells, suggesting that they autophosphorylate. However, strikingly, when Y268C/A mutations were combined with the kinase-dead mutation, K54R, or mutations at the TEY motif, T190A+Y192F, the resulting proteins still allowed mkk1∆mkk2∆ cells to proliferate under caffeine stress. Mutating the equivalent residue, Tyr-280/Tyr-261, in Erk1/Erk2 significantly impaired Erk1/2’s catalytic activity. This study describes the first case in which a MAPK, Erk/Mpk1, imposes a phenotype via a mechanism that is independent of TEY phosphorylation and an unusual case in which an equivalent mutation in a highly conserved domain of yeast and mammalian Erks causes an opposite effect. PMID:27413009

  7. Identification of functional DNA variants in the constitutive promoter region of MDM2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Marie-Eve; Ouimet, Manon; Larivière, Mathieu; Kritikou, Ekaterini A; Sinnett, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Although mutations in the oncoprotein murine double minute 2 (MDM2) are rare, MDM2 gene overexpression has been observed in several human tumors. Given that even modest changes in MDM2 levels might influence the p53 tumor suppressor signaling pathway, we postulated that sequence variation in the promoter region of MDM2 could lead to disregulated expression and variation in gene dosage. Two promoters have been reported for MDM2; an internal promoter (P2), which is located near the end of intron 1 and is p53-responsive, and an upstream constitutive promoter (P1), which is p53-independent. Both promoter regions contain DNA variants that could influence the expression levels of MDM2, including the well-studied single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) SNP309, which is located in the promoter P2; i.e., upstream of exon 2. In this report, we screened the promoter P1 for DNA variants and assessed the functional impact of the corresponding SNPs. Using the dbSNP database and genotyping validation in individuals of European descent, we identified three common SNPs (-1494 G > A; indel 40 bp; and -182 C > G). Three major promoter haplotypes were inferred by using these three promoter SNPs together with rs2279744 (SNP309). Following subcloning into a gene reporter system, we found that two of the haplotypes significantly influenced MDM2 promoter activity in a haplotype-specific manner. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that the 40 bp insertion/deletion variation is causing the observed allelic promoter activity. This study suggests that part of the variability in the MDM2 expression levels could be explained by allelic p53-independent P1 promoter activity.

  8. Analysis of the Involvement of Different Ceramide Variants in the Response to Hydroxyurea Stress in Baker's Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Sphingolipids have been identified as important signaling compounds in stress responses. However, it is not always clear how different sphingolipid profiles are achieved in a particular stress situation. Here we propose a detailed mass action model, containing 42 dependent variables and 137 reactions, that offers explanations of the roles of variant ceramides species, which differ in the lengths of their fatty acyl chains and their saturation state, in the response to hydroxyurea stress. The simulations demonstrate that the cells manage to achieve hydroxyurea tolerance through a well-coordinated, differential usage of the variant ceramide species. Moreover, the results suggest that key enzymes have different affinities toward saturated and unsaturated fatty acyl chains, which implies that the saturation state affords the cells with an additional mode of regulation that had not been recognized so far. These conclusions from our computational analysis are yet to be validated experimentally.

  9. CNS structures presumably involved in vagal control of ovarian function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerendai, I; Tóth, I E; Boldogköi, Z; Medveczky, I; Halász, B

    2000-04-12

    The contribution of the vagus nerve to viral transneuronal labeling of brain structures from the ovaries demonstrated recently by us was investigated. Unilateral vagotomy was performed prior to ipsilateral intraovarian virus injection. Virus-infected neurons were visualized by immunostaining. In vagotomized rats such neurons were detected only in certain cell groups of the brain (parapyramidal nucleus, A(1), A(5) cell group, caudal raphe nuclei, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, lateral hypothalamus). Vagotomy interfered with labeling of several structures that were labeled in controls, including area postrema, nucleus of the solitary tract, dorsal vagal complex, nucleus ambiguus, A(7) cell group, Barrington's nucleus, locus coeruleus, periaqueductal gray, dorsal hypothalamus. Findings provide a morphological basis to study the functional significance of brain structures presumably involved in the control of ovarian function and acting via the vagus or the sympathetic nerves.

  10. Human variants in the neuronal basic helix-loop-helix/Per-Arnt-Sim (bHLH/PAS transcription factor complex NPAS4/ARNT2 disrupt function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Bersten

    Full Text Available Neuronal Per-Arnt-Sim homology (PAS Factor 4 (NPAS4 is a neuronal activity-dependent transcription factor which heterodimerises with ARNT2 to regulate genes involved in inhibitory synapse formation. NPAS4 functions to maintain excitatory/inhibitory balance in neurons, while mouse models have shown it to play roles in memory formation, social interaction and neurodegeneration. NPAS4 has therefore been implicated in a number of neuropsychiatric or neurodegenerative diseases which are underpinned by defects in excitatory/inhibitory balance. Here we have explored a broad set of non-synonymous human variants in NPAS4 and ARNT2 for disruption of NPAS4 function. We found two variants in NPAS4 (F147S and E257K and two variants in ARNT2 (R46W and R107H which significantly reduced transcriptional activity of the heterodimer on a luciferase reporter gene. Furthermore, we found that NPAS4.F147S was unable to activate expression of the NPAS4 target gene BDNF due to reduced dimerisation with ARNT2. Homology modelling predicts F147 in NPAS4 to lie at the dimer interface, where it appears to directly contribute to protein/protein interaction. We also found that reduced transcriptional activation by ARNT2 R46W was due to disruption of nuclear localisation. These results provide insight into the mechanisms of NPAS4/ARNT dimerisation and transcriptional activation and have potential implications for cognitive phenotypic variation and diseases such as autism, schizophrenia and dementia.

  11. Functional variants of human APE1 rescue the DNA repair defects of the yeast AP endonuclease/3'-diesterase-deficient strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiqiang; Ayoub, Emily; Mazouzi, Abdelghani; Grin, Inga; Ishchenko, Alexander A; Fan, Jinjiang; Yang, Xiaoming; Harihar, Taramatti; Saparbaev, Murat; Ramotar, Dindial

    2014-10-01

    Human APE1 is an essential enzyme performing functions in DNA repair and transcription. It possesses four distinct repair activities acting on a variety of base and sugar derived DNA lesions. APE1 has seven cysteine residues and Cys65, and to a lesser extent Cys93 and Cys99, is uniquely involved in maintaining a subset of transcription factors in the reduced and active state. Four of the cysteines Cys93, 99, 208 and 310 of APE1 are located proximal to its active site residues Glu96, Asp210 and His309 involved in processing damaged DNA, raising the possibility that missense mutation of these cysteines could alter the enzyme DNA repair functions. An earlier report documented that serine substitution of the individual cysteine residues did not affect APE1 ability to cleave an abasic site oligonucleotide substrate in vitro, except for Cys99Ser, although any consequences of these variants in the repair of in vivo DNA lesions were not tested. Herein, we mutated all seven cysteines of APE1, either singly or in combination, to alanine and show that none of the resulting variants interfered with the enzyme DNA repair functions. Cross-specie complementation analysis reveals that these APE1 cysteine variants fully rescued the yeast DNA repair deficient strain YW778, lacking AP endonucleases and 3'-diesterases, from toxicities caused by DNA damaging agents. Moreover, the elevated spontaneous mutations arising in strain YW778 from the lack of the DNA repair activities were completely suppressed by the APE1 cysteine variants. These findings suggest that the cysteine residues of APE1 are unlikely to play a role in the DNA repair functions of the enzyme in vivo. We also examine other APE1 missense mutations and provide the first evidence that the variant Asp308Ala with normal AP endonuclease, but devoid of 3'→5' exonuclease, displays hypersensitivity to the anticancer drug bleomycin, and not to other agents, suggesting that it has a defect in processing unique DNA lesions

  12. Possible Involvement of a Mitochondrial Translation Initiation Factor 3 Variant Causing Decreased mRNA Levels in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Anvret

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Genes important for mitochondrial function have been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD. Mitochondrial translation initiation factor 3 (MTIF3 is a nuclear encoded protein required for the initiation of complex formation on mitochondrial ribosomes. Dysfunction of MTIF3 may impair mitochondrial function and dopamine neurons appear to be particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress, which may relate to their degeneration in PD. An association was recently reported between the synonymous rs7669(C>T in MTIF3 and PD in a German case-control material. We investigated rs7669 in a Swedish Parkinson case-control material. The study revealed no significant association of the individual genotypes or alleles with PD. When comparing the combined TT/CT-genotypes versus the CC-genotype, we observed a significant association (P=.0473 with PD. We also demonstrated that the TT-genotype causes a significant decrease in MTIF3 mRNA expression compared to the CC-genotype (P=.0163. Our findings support the hypothesis that MTIF3 may be involved in the etiology of PD.

  13. Dynamic functional brain networks involved in simple visual discrimination learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, Camino; Conejo, Nélida María; González-Pardo, Héctor; Arias, Jorge Luis

    2014-10-01

    Visual discrimination tasks have been widely used to evaluate many types of learning and memory processes. However, little is known about the brain regions involved at different stages of visual discrimination learning. We used cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry to evaluate changes in regional brain oxidative metabolism during visual discrimination learning in a water-T maze at different time points during training. As compared with control groups, the results of the present study reveal the gradual activation of cortical (prefrontal and temporal cortices) and subcortical brain regions (including the striatum and the hippocampus) associated to the mastery of a simple visual discrimination task. On the other hand, the brain regions involved and their functional interactions changed progressively over days of training. Regions associated with novelty, emotion, visuo-spatial orientation and motor aspects of the behavioral task seem to be relevant during the earlier phase of training, whereas a brain network comprising the prefrontal cortex was found along the whole learning process. This study highlights the relevance of functional interactions among brain regions to investigate learning and memory processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Characterization of functional methylomes by next-generation capture sequencing identifies novel disease-associated variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allum, Fiona; Shao, Xiaojian; Guénard, Frédéric; Simon, Marie-Michelle; Busche, Stephan; Caron, Maxime; Lambourne, John; Lessard, Julie; Tandre, Karolina; Hedman, Åsa K; Kwan, Tony; Ge, Bing; Rönnblom, Lars; McCarthy, Mark I; Deloukas, Panos; Richmond, Todd; Burgess, Daniel; Spector, Timothy D; Tchernof, André; Marceau, Simon; Lathrop, Mark; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin

    2015-05-29

    Most genome-wide methylation studies (EWAS) of multifactorial disease traits use targeted arrays or enrichment methodologies preferentially covering CpG-dense regions, to characterize sufficiently large samples. To overcome this limitation, we present here a new customizable, cost-effective approach, methylC-capture sequencing (MCC-Seq), for sequencing functional methylomes, while simultaneously providing genetic variation information. To illustrate MCC-Seq, we use whole-genome bisulfite sequencing on adipose tissue (AT) samples and public databases to design AT-specific panels. We establish its efficiency for high-density interrogation of methylome variability by systematic comparisons with other approaches and demonstrate its applicability by identifying novel methylation variation within enhancers strongly correlated to plasma triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol, including at CD36. Our more comprehensive AT panel assesses tissue methylation and genotypes in parallel at ∼4 and ∼3 M sites, respectively. Our study demonstrates that MCC-Seq provides comparable accuracy to alternative approaches but enables more efficient cataloguing of functional and disease-relevant epigenetic and genetic variants for large-scale EWAS.

  15. Novel and functional DNA sequence variants within the GATA5 gene promoter in ventricular septal defects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-Ping Shan; Xiao-Li Wang; Yuan-Gang Qiao; Hong-Xin Wan Yan; Wen-Hui Huang; Shu-Chao Pang; Bo Yan

    2014-01-01

    Background: Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common human birth defect. Genetic causes for CHD remain largely unknown. GATA transcription factor 5 (GATA 5) is an essential regulator for the heart development. Mutations in the GATA5 gene have been reported in patients with a variety of CHD. Since misregulation of gene expression have been associated with human diseases, we speculated that changed levels of cardiac transcription factors, GATA5, may mediate the development of CHD. Methods: In this study, GATA5 gene promoter was genetically and functionally analyzed in large cohorts of patients with ventricular septal defect (VSD) (n=343) and ethnic-matched healthy controls (n=348). Results: Two novel and heterozygous DNA sequence variants (DSVs), g.61051165A>G and g.61051463delC, were identified in three VSD patients, but not in the controls. In cultured cardiomyocytes, GATA5 gene promoter activities were significantly decreased by DSV g.61051165A>G and increased by DSV g.61051463delC. Moreover, fathers of the VSD patients carrying the same DSVs had reduced diastolic function of left ventricles. Three SNPs, g.61051279C>T (rs77067995), g.61051327A>C (rs145936691) and g.61051373G>A (rs80197101), and one novel heterozygous DSV, g.61051227C>T, were found in both VSD patients and controls with similar frequencies. Conclusion: Our data suggested that the DSVs in the GATA5 gene promoter may increase the susceptibility to the development of VSD as a risk factor.

  16. Can common functional gene variants affect visual discrimination in metacontrast masking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Maksimov

    Full Text Available Mechanisms of visual perception should be robustly fast and provide veridical information about environmental objects in order to facilitate survival and successful coping. Because species-specific brain mechanisms for fast vision must have evolved under heavy pressure for efficiency, it has been held that different human individuals see the physical world in the same way and produce psychophysical functions of visual discrimination that are qualitatively the same. For many years, this assumption has been implicitly accepted in vision research studying extremely fast, basic visual processes, including studies of visual masking. However, in recent studies of metacontrast masking surprisingly robust individual differences in the qualitative aspects of subjects' performance have been found. As the basic species-specific visual functions very likely are based on universal brain mechanisms of vision, these differences probably are the outcome of variability in ontogenetic development (i.e., formation of idiosyncrasic skills of perception. Such developmental differences can be brought about by variants of genes that are differentially expressed in the course of CNS development. The objective of this study was to assess whether visual discrimination in metacontrast masking is related to three widely studied genetic polymorphisms implicated in brain function and used here as independent variables. The findings suggest no main effects of BDNF Val66Met, NRG1/rs6994992, or 5-HTTLPR polymorphisms on metacontrast performance, but several notable interactions of genetic variables with gender, stage of the sequence of experimental trials, perceptual strategies, and target/mask shape congruence were found. Thus, basic behavioral functions of fast vision may be influenced by common genetic variability. Also, when left uncontrolled, genetic factors may seriously confound variables in vision research using masking, obscure clear theoretical interpretation, lead to

  17. Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene are modestly associated with normal cognitive function in the elderly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel-From, J; Christensen, K; Thinggaard, M;

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants in the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene have been suggested as risk factors for neurodegenerative Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we tested the importance of genetic variants in the ChAT gene in normal cognitive function of elderly in a study sample of Danish twins...... and singletons (N = 2070). The ChAT rs3810950 A allele, which has been associated with increased risk for AD, was found to be associated with a decrease cognitive status evaluated by a five-component cognitive composite score [P = 0.03, regression coefficient -0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.57 to -0...

  18. Expression pattern and function of alternative splice variants of glutamate-gated chloride channel in the housefly Musca domestica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Tomo; Ozoe, Fumiyo; Ozoe, Yoshihisa

    2014-02-01

    Glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission in invertebrate nervous systems. cDNAs encoding two alternative splice variants (MdGluClB and C) of the GluCl subunit were cloned from the housefly Musca domestica. The expression patterns of three variants, including the previously reported MdGluClA, differed among the body parts (head, thorax, abdomen, and leg) of the adult housefly and among developmental stages (embryo, larva, pupa, and adult). The MdGluClA and B transcripts were abundant in the central nervous system of the adult, whereas the MdGluClC transcript was expressed in the central nervous system and as the predominant variant in the peripheral tissues. The sensitivities to the agonist glutamate and the allosteric activator ivermectin B1a did not differ between channels containing MdGluCl variants when they were singly or co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes. By contrast, MdGluClA and B channels were more sensitive to the channel blockers fipronil and picrotoxinin than was MdGluClC channels. Heteromeric channels containing different subunit variants were more sensitive to picrotoxinin than were homomeric channels. Heteromeric channels were more sensitive to fipronil than were homomeric MdGluClC channels but not than homomeric MdGluClA and B channels. These results suggest that functionally indistinguishable but pharmacologically distinct GluCls are expressed in a spatially and temporally distinct manner in the housefly.

  19. Molecular dynamics and docking simulation of a natural variant of Activated Protein C with impaired protease activity: implications for integrin-mediated antiseptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Orro, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Moscatelli, Marco; Trombetti, Gabriele; Milanesi, Luciano; Rovida, Ermanna

    2015-01-01

    Activated Protein C (APC) is a multifunctional serine protease, primarily known for its anticoagulant function in the coagulation system. Several studies have already elucidated its role in counteracting apoptosis and inflammation in cells, while significant effort is still ongoing for defining its involvement in sepsis. Earlier literature has shown that the antiseptic function of APC is mediated by its binding to leukocyte integrins, which is due to the presence of the integrin binding motif Arg-Gly-Asp at the N-terminus of the APC catalytic chain. Many natural mutants have been identified in patients with Protein C deficiency diagnosis including a variant of specificity pocket (Gly216Asp). In this work, we present a molecular model of the complex of APC with αVβ3 integrin obtained by protein-protein docking approach. A computational analysis of this variant is hereby presented, based on molecular dynamics and docking simulations, aiming at investigating the effects of the Gly216Asp mutation on the protein conformation and inferring its functional implications. Our study shows that such mutation is likely to impair the protease activity while preserving the overall protein fold. Moreover, superposition of the integrin binding motifs in wild-type and mutant forms suggests that the interaction with integrin can still occur and thus the mutant is likely to retain its antiseptic function related to the neutrophyl integrin binding. Therapeutic applications could result in this APC mutant which retains antiseptic function without anticoagulant side effects.

  20. Structural and Functional Characterization of Two Alternative Splicing Variants of Mouse Endothelial Cell-Specific Chemotaxis Regulator (ECSCR

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    Yongchang Chang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Endothelial cells (ECs that line the lumen of blood vessels are important players in blood vessel formation, and EC migration is a key component of the angiogenic process. Thus, identification of genes that are specifically or preferentially expressed in vascular ECs and in-depth understanding of their biological functions may lead to discovery of new therapeutic targets. We have previously reported molecular characterization of human endothelial cell-specific molecule 2 (ECSM2/endothelial cell-specific chemotaxis regulator (ECSCR. In the present study, we cloned two mouse full-length cDNAs by RT-PCR, which encode two putative ECSCR isoform precursors with considerable homology to the human ECSCR. Nucleotide sequence and exon-intron junction analyses suggested that they are alternative splicing variants (ECSCR isoform-1 and -2, differing from each other in the first and second exons. Quantitative RT-PCR results revealed that isoform-2 is the predominant form, which was most abundant in heart, lung, and muscles, and moderately abundant in uterus and testis. In contrast, the expression of isoform-1 seemed to be more enriched in testis. To further explore their potential cellular functions, we expressed GFP- and FLAG-tagged ECSCR isoforms, respectively, in an ECSCR deficient cell line (HEK293. Interestingly, the actual sizes of either ECSCR-GFP or -FLAG fusion proteins detected by immunoblotting are much larger than their predicted sizes, suggesting that both isoforms are glycoproteins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that both ECSCR isoforms are localized at the cell surface, which is consistent with the structural prediction. Finally, we performed cell migration assays using mouse endothelial MS1 cells overexpressing GFP alone, isoform-1-GFP, and isoform-2-GFP, respectively. Our results showed that both isoforms significantly inhibited vascular epidermal growth factor (VEGF-induced cell migration. Taken together, we have provided several lines

  1. Identification and characterization of functional risk variants for colorectal cancer mapping to chromosome 11q23.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancolella, Michela; Fortini, Barbara K; Tring, Stephanie; Plummer, Sarah J; Mendoza-Fandino, Gustavo A; Hartiala, Jaana; Hitchler, Michael J; Yan, Chunli; Schumacher, Fredrick R; Conti, David V; Edlund, Christopher K; Noushmehr, Houtan; Coetzee, Simon G; Bresalier, Robert S; Ahnen, Dennis J; Barry, Elizabeth L; Berman, Benjamin P; Rice, Judd C; Coetzee, Gerhard A; Casey, Graham

    2014-04-15

    Genome-wide association studies of colorectal cancer (CRC) have identified a number of common variants associated with modest risk, including rs3802842 at chromosome 11q23.1. Several genes map to this region but rs3802842 does not map to any known transcribed or regulatory sequences. We reasoned, therefore, that rs3802842 is not the functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), but is in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with a functional SNP(s). We performed ChIP-seq for histone modifications in SW480 and HCT-116 CRC cells, and incorporated ChIP-seq and DNase I hypersensitivity data available through ENCODE within a 137-kb genomic region containing rs3802842 on 11q23.1. We identified SNP rs10891246 in LD with rs3802842 that mapped within a bidirectional promoter region of genes C11orf92 and C11orf93. Following mutagenesis to the risk allele, the promoter demonstrated lower levels of reporter gene expression. A second SNP rs7130173 was identified in LD with rs3802842 that mapped to a candidate enhancer region, which showed strong unidirectional activity in both HCT-116 and SW480 CRC cells. The risk allele of rs7130173 demonstrated reduced enhancer activity compared with the common allele, and reduced nuclear protein binding affinity in electromobility shift assays compared with the common allele suggesting differential transcription factor (TF) binding. SNPs rs10891246 and rs7130173 are on the same haplotype, and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) analyses of neighboring genes implicate C11orf53, C11orf92 and C11orf93 as candidate target genes. These data imply that rs10891246 and rs7130173 are functional SNPs mapping to 11q23.1 and that C11orf53, C11orf92 and C11orf93 represent novel candidate target genes involved in CRC etiology.

  2. GWAS for executive function and processing speed suggests involvement of the CADM2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ibrahim-Verbaas, C. A.; Bressler, J.; Debette, S.; Schuur, M.; Smith, A. V.; Bis, J. C.; Davies, G.; Trompet, S.; Smith, J. A.; Wolf, C.; Chibnik, L. B.; Liu, Y.; Vitart, V.; Kirin, M.; Petrovic, K.; Polasek, O.; Zgaga, L.; Fawns-Ritchie, C.; Hoffmann, P.; Karjalainen, J.; Lahti, J.; Llewellyn, D. J.; Schmidt, C.O.; Mather, K. A.; Chouraki, V.; Sun, Q.; Resnick, S. M.; Rose, L. M.; Oldmeadow, C.; Stewart, M.; Smith, B.H.; Gudnason, V.; Yang, Q.; Mirza, S. S.; Jukema, J. W.; Dejager, P. L.; Harris, T. B.; Liewald, D. C.; Amin, N.; Coker, L. H.; Stegle, O.; Lopez, O. L.; Schmidt, R.; Teumer, A.; Ford, I.; Karbalai, N.; Becker, J. T.; Jonsdottir, M. K.; Au, R.; Fehrmann, R. S. N.; Herms, S.; Nalls, M.; Zhao, Wei; Turner, S. T.; Yaffe, K.; Lohman, K.; van Swieten, J. C.; Kardia, S. L. R.; Knopman, D. S.; Meeks, W. M.; Heiss, G.; Holliday, E. G.; Schofield, P. W.; Tanaka, T.; Stott, D. J.; Wang, J.; Ridker, P.; Gow, A. J.; Pattie, A.; Starr, J. M.; Hocking, L. J.; Armstrong, N. J.; McLachlan, S.; Shulman, J. M.; Pilling, L. C.; Eiriksdottir, G.; Scott, R. J.; Kochan, N. A.; Palotie, A.; Hsieh, Y-C; Eriksson, J. G.; Penman, A.; Gottesman, R. F.; Oostra, B. A.; Yu, L.; DeStefano, A. L.; Beiser, A.; Garcia, M.; Rotter, J. i; Noethen, M. M.; Hofman, A.; Slagboom, P. E.; Westendorp, R. G. J.; Buckley, B. M.; Wolf, P. A.; Uitterlinden, A. G.; Psaty, B. M.; Grabe, H. J.; Bandinelli, S.; Chasman, D. I.; Grodstein, F.; Roikkonen, K.; Lambert, J-C; Porteous, D. J.; Price, J. F.; Sachdev, P. S.; Ferrucci, L.; Attia, J. R.; Rudan, I.; Hayward, C.; Wright, A. F.; Wilson, James F.; Cichon, S.; Franke, L.; Schmidt, H.; Ding, J.; de Craen, A. J. M.; Fornage, M.; Bennett, D. A.; Deary, I. J.; Ikram, M. A.; Launer, L. J.; Fitzpatrick, A. L.; Seshadri, S.; van Duijn, C. M.; Mosley, T. H.

    2016-01-01

    To identify common variants contributing to normal variation in two specific domains of cognitive functioning, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of executive functioning and information processing speed in non-demented older adults from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and Aging Resea

  3. GWAS for executive function and processing speed suggests involvement of the CADM2 gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Ibrahim-Verbaas (Carla); J. Bressler; S. Debette (Stéphanie); M. Schuur (Maaike); A.V. Smith; J.C. Bis (Joshua); G. Davies (Gail); S. Trompet (Stella); J.A. Smith; A. Björnsson (Asgeir); L.B. Chibnik (Lori); Y. Liu; V. Vitart (Veronique); M. Kirin (Mirna); K. Petrovic (Katja); O. Polasek (Ozren); L. Zgaga (Lina); C. Fawns-Ritchie; P. Hoffmann (Per); J. Karjalainen (Juha); J. Lahti; D.J. Llewellyn; C.O. Schmidt (Carsten O.); R. Mather; V. Chouraki (Vincent); Q. Sun; S. Resnick (Susan); L.M. Rose (Lynda M.); C. Oldmeadow (Christopher); M. Stewart; B.H. Smith; V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); Q. Yang (Qiong); S.S. Mirza (Saira); J.W. Jukema; P.L. DeJager (Philip L.); T.B. Harris (Tamara); D.C. Liewald (David C.); N. Amin; L.H. Coker (Laura); O. Stegle (Oliver); O.L. Lopez; R. Schmidt; A. Teumer (Alexander); I. Ford; N. Karbalai (Nazanin); J.T. Becker; M.K. Jonsdottir (Maria K.); R. Au; R.S.N. Fehrmann (Rudolf); S. Herms (Stefan); M.A. Nalls (Michael); W. Zhao; S.T. Turner; K. Yaffe; K. Lohman (Kurt); J.C. van Swieten (John); S.L.R. Kardia; D.S. Knopman (David); W.M. Meeks (William); G. Heiss (Gerardo); E.G. Holliday (Elizabeth); P.W. Schofield; T. Tanaka (Toshiko); D.J. Stott (David J.); J. Wang (Jing); P.M. Ridker (Paul); A.J. Gow; A. Pattie (Alison); J.M. Starr (John); L.J. Hocking; N.J. Armstrong (Nicola J.); S. McLachlan (Stela); L. Shulman (Lee); L.C. Pilling (Luke); G. Eiriksdottir (Gudny); R.J. Scott; N.A. Kochan (Nicole A.); A. Palotie; Y.-C. Hsieh; J.G. Eriksson (Johan G.); A.D. Penman (Alan); R.F. Gottesman (Rebecca); B.A. Oostra (Ben); L. Yu; A.L. DeStefano (Anita L.); A. Beiser; M. Garcia; J.I. Rotter; M.M. Nöthen; A. Hofman (Albert); P.E. Slagboom (Eline); R.G.J. Westendorp; B.M. Buckley (Brendan M.); P.A. Wolf; A.G. Uitterlinden (André); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); H.J. Grabe (Hans Jörgen); S. Bandinelli (Stefania); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); F. Grodstein (Francine); K. Räikkönen (Katri); J.-C. Lambert; D.J. Porteous (David J.); J.F. Price (Jackie F.); P.S. Sachdev (Perminder); L. Ferrucci (Luigi); J. Attia (John); I. Rudan (Igor); C. Hayward; A.F. Wright; J.F. Wilson (James F); S. Cichon (Sven); L. Franke (Lude); H. Schmidt; J. Ding; A.J. de Craen (Anton); M. Fornage (Myriam); D.A. Bennett (David); I.J. Deary (Ian); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); L.J. Launer (Lenore); A.L. Fitzpatrick; S. Seshadri (Sudha); C.M. van Duijn (Cock); T.H. Mosley (Thomas H.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTo identify common variants contributing to normal variation in two specific domains of cognitive functioning, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of executive functioning and information processing speed in non-demented older adults from the CHARGE (Cohorts for Heart and

  4. Functional type 1 secretion system involved in Legionella pneumophila virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuche, Fabien; Vianney, Anne; Andrea, Claire; Doublet, Patricia; Gilbert, Christophe

    2015-02-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a Gram-negative pathogen found mainly in water, either in a free-living form or within infected protozoans, where it replicates. This bacterium can also infect humans by inhalation of contaminated aerosols, causing a severe form of pneumonia called legionellosis or Legionnaires' disease. The involvement of type II and IV secretion systems in the virulence of L. pneumophila is now well documented. Despite bioinformatic studies showing that a type I secretion system (T1SS) could be present in this pathogen, the functionality of this system based on the LssB, LssD, and TolC proteins has never been established. Here, we report the demonstration of the functionality of the T1SS, as well as its role in the infectious cycle of L. pneumophila. Using deletion mutants and fusion proteins, we demonstrated that the repeats-in-toxin protein RtxA is secreted through an LssB-LssD-TolC-dependent mechanism. Moreover, fluorescence monitoring and confocal microscopy showed that this T1SS is required for entry into the host cell, although it seems dispensable to the intracellular cycle. Together, these results underline the active participation of L. pneumophila, via its T1SS, in its internalization into host cells.

  5. Internalization of isolated functional mitochondria: involvement of macropinocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitani, Tomoya; Kami, Daisuke; Matoba, Satoaki; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with a variety of human diseases. Delivery of exogenous functional mitochondria into damaged cells has been proposed as a mechanism of cell transplant and physiological repair for damaged tissue. We here demonstrated that isolated mitochondria can be transferred into homogeneic and xenogeneic cells by simple co-incubation using genetically labelled mitochondria, and elucidated the mechanism and the effect of direct mitochondrial transfer. Intracellular localization of exogenous mitochondria was confirmed by PCR, real-time PCR, live fluorescence imaging, three-dimensional reconstruction imaging, continuous time-lapse microscopic observation, flow cytometric analysis and immunoelectron microscopy. Isolated homogeneic mitochondria were transferred into human uterine endometrial gland-derived mesenchymal cells in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, mitochondrial transfer rescued the mitochondrial respiratory function and improved the cellular viability in mitochondrial DNA-depleted cells and these effects lasted several days. Finally, we discovered that mitochondrial internalization involves macropinocytosis. In conclusion, these data support direct transfer of exogenous mitochondria as a promising approach for the treatment of various diseases. PMID:24912369

  6. Runs of homozygosity and distribution of functional variants in cattle genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qianqian; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bosse, Mirte;

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent developments in sequencing technology have facilitated widespread investigations of genomic variants, including continuous stretches of homozygous genomic regions. For cattle, a large proportion of these runs of homozygosity (ROH) are likely the result of inbreeding due to the a......Background Recent developments in sequencing technology have facilitated widespread investigations of genomic variants, including continuous stretches of homozygous genomic regions. For cattle, a large proportion of these runs of homozygosity (ROH) are likely the result of inbreeding due...... non-deleterious variants, which is consistent with observations in the human genome. We also found that increased enrichment of deleterious variants was significantly higher in short (100 kbp) and medium (0.1 to 3 Mbp) ROH regions compared with long (>3 Mbp) ROH regions (P 

  7. Amygdala Function and 5-HTT Gene Variants in Adolescent Anxiety and Major Depressive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Jennifer Y. F.; Goldman, David; Buzas, Beata; Fromm, Stephen J.; Guyer, Amanda E.; Hodgkinson, Colin; Monk, Christopher S.; Nelson, Eric E.; Shen, Pei-Hong; Pine, Daniel S.; Ernst, Monique

    2009-01-01

    Background Associations between a functional polymorphism in the serotonin transporter gene and amygdala activation have been found in healthy, depressed, and anxious adults. This study explored these gene–brain associations in adolescents by examining predictive effects of serotonin transporter gene variants (S and LG allele carriers vs. LA allele homozygotes) and their interaction with diagnosis (healthy vs. patients) on amygdala responses to emotional faces. Methods Functional magnetic resonance data were collected from 33 healthy adolescents (mean age: 13.71, 55% female) and 31 medication-free adolescents with current anxiety or depressive disorders (or both; mean age: 13.58, 56% female) while viewing fearful, angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions under varying attention states. Results A significant three-way genotype-by-diagnosis-by-face-emotion interaction characterized right amygdala activity while subjects monitored internal fear levels. This interaction was decomposed to map differential gene–brain associations in healthy and affected adolescents. First, consistent with healthy adult data, healthy adolescents with at least one copy of the S or LG allele showed stronger amygdala responses to fearful faces than healthy adolescents without these alleles. Second, patients with two copies of the LA allele exhibited greater amygdala responses to fearful faces relative to patients with S or LG alleles. Third, although weaker, genotype differences on amygdala responses in patients extended to happy faces. All effects were restricted to the fear-monitoring attention state. Conclusions S/LG alleles in healthy adolescents, as in healthy adults, predict enhanced amygdala activation to fearful faces. Contrary findings of increased activation in patients with LALA relative to the S or LG alleles require further exploration. PMID:18950748

  8. Frequent somatic CDH1 loss-of-function mutations in plasmacytoid variant bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Iyer, Gopa; Lee, Byron H; Scott, Sasinya N; Mehra, Rohit; Bagrodia, Aditya; Jordan, Emmet J; Gao, Sizhi Paul; Ramirez, Ricardo; Cha, Eugene K; Desai, Neil B; Zabor, Emily C; Ostrovnaya, Irina; Gopalan, Anuradha; Chen, Ying-Bei; Fine, Samson W; Tickoo, Satish K; Gandhi, Anupama; Hreiki, Joseph; Viale, Agnès; Arcila, Maria E; Dalbagni, Guido; Rosenberg, Jonathan E; Bochner, Bernard H; Bajorin, Dean F; Berger, Michael F; Reuter, Victor E; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B

    2016-04-01

    Plasmacytoid bladder cancer is an aggressive histologic variant with a high risk of disease-specific mortality. Using whole-exome and targeted sequencing, we find that truncating somatic alterations in the CDH1 gene occur in 84% of plasmacytoid carcinomas and are specific to this histologic variant. Consistent with the aggressive clinical behavior of plasmacytoid carcinomas, which frequently recur locally, CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockout of CDH1 in bladder cancer cells enhanced cell migration.

  9. De novo loss-of-function variants in STAG2 are associated with developmental delay, microcephaly, and congenital anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullegama, Sureni V; Klein, Steven D; Mulatinho, Milene V; Senaratne, Tharanga Niroshini; Singh, Kathryn; Nguyen, Dzung C; Gallant, Natalie M; Strom, Samuel P; Ghahremani, Shahnaz; Rao, Nagesh P; Martinez-Agosto, Julian A

    2017-05-01

    The cohesin complex is an evolutionarily conserved multi-subunit protein complex which regulates sister chromatid cohesion during mitosis and meiosis. Additionally, the cohesin complex regulates DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcription. The core of the complex consists of four subunits: SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and STAG1/2. Loss-of-function mutations in many of these proteins have been implicated in human developmental disorders collectively termed "cohesinopathies." Through clinical exome sequencing (CES) of an 8-year-old girl with a clinical history of global developmental delay, microcephaly, microtia with hearing loss, language delay, ADHD, and dysmorphic features, we describe a heterozygous de novo variant (c.205C>T; p.(Arg69*)) in the integral cohesin structural protein, STAG2. This variant is associated with decreased STAG2 protein expression. The analyses of metaphase spreads did not exhibit premature sister chromatid separation; however, delayed sister chromatid cohesion was observed. To further support the pathogenicity of STAG2 variants, we identified two additional female cases from the DECIPHER research database with mutations in STAG2 and phenotypes similar to our patient. Interestingly, the clinical features of these three cases are remarkably similar to those observed in other well-established cohesinopathies. Herein, we suggest that STAG2 is a dosage-sensitive gene and that heterozygous loss-of-function variants lead to a cohesinopathy. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF, a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002. Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005 and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001. WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in

  11. Discovery and functional annotation of SIX6 variants in primary open-angle glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Ulmer Carnes

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG is the most common subtype and is a complex trait with multigenic inheritance. Genome-wide association studies have previously identified a significant association between POAG and the SIX6 locus (rs10483727, odds ratio (OR = 1.32, p = 3.87×10(-11. SIX6 plays a role in ocular development and has been associated with the morphology of the optic nerve. We sequenced the SIX6 coding and regulatory regions in 262 POAG cases and 256 controls and identified six nonsynonymous coding variants, including five rare and one common variant, Asn141His (rs33912345, which was associated significantly with POAG (OR = 1.27, p = 4.2×10(-10 in the NEIGHBOR/GLAUGEN datasets. These variants were tested in an in vivo Danio rerio (zebrafish complementation assay to evaluate ocular metrics such as eye size and optic nerve structure. Five variants, found primarily in POAG cases, were hypomorphic or null, while the sixth variant, found only in controls, was benign. One variant in the SIX6 enhancer increased expression of SIX6 and disrupted its regulation. Finally, to our knowledge for the first time, we have identified a clinical feature in POAG patients that appears to be dependent upon SIX6 genotype: patients who are homozygous for the SIX6 risk allele (His141 have a statistically thinner retinal nerve fiber layer than patients homozygous for the SIX6 non-risk allele (Asn141. Our results, in combination with previous SIX6 work, lead us to hypothesize that SIX6 risk variants disrupt the development of the neural retina, leading to a reduced number of retinal ganglion cells, thereby increasing the risk of glaucoma-associated vision loss.

  12. Immunogenetics of systemic sclerosis: Defining heritability, functional variants and shared-autoimmunity pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossini-Castillo, Lara; López-Isac, Elena; Martín, Javier

    2015-11-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a clinically heterogeneous connective tissue disorder of complex etiology. The development of large-scale genetic studies, such as genome-wide association studies (GWASs) or the Immunochip platform, has achieved remarkable progress in the knowledge of the genetic background of SSc. Herein, we provide an updated picture SSc genetic factors, offering an insight into their role in pathogenic mechanisms that characterize the disease. We review the most recent findings in the HLA region and the well-established non-HLA loci. Up to 18 non-HLA risk factors fulfilled the selected criteria and they were classified according to their role in the innate or adaptive immune response, in apoptosis, autophagy or fibrosis. Additionally, SSc heritability has remained as a controversial question since twin studies provided low SSc heritability estimates. However, we have recalculated the lower bond of narrow sense SSc heritability using GWAS data. Remarkably, our results suggest a greater influence of genetics on SSc than previously reported. Furthermore, we also offer a functional classification of SSc-associated SNPs and their proxies, based on annotated data, to provide clues for the identification of causal variants in these loci. Finally, we explore the genetic overlap between SSc and other autoimmune diseases (ADs). The vast majority of SSc risk loci are shared with at least one additional AD, being the overlap between SSc and systemic lupus erythematous the largest. Nevertheless, we found that an important portion of SSc risk factors are also common to rheumatoid arthritis or primary biliary cirrhosis. Considering all these evidences, we are confident that future research will be successful in understanding the relevant altered pathways in SSc and in identifying new biomarkers and therapeutic targets for the disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The functional influences of common ABCB1 genetic variants on the inhibition of P-glycoprotein by Antrodia cinnamomea extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Jyh Sheu

    Full Text Available Antrodia cinnamomea is a traditional healthy food that has been demonstrated to possess anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, and anticacer effects. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the ethanolic extract of A. cinnamomea (EEAC can affect the efflux function of P-glycoprotein (P-gp and the effect of ABCB1 genetic variants on the interaction between EEAC and P-gp. To investigate the mechanism of this interaction, Flp-In™-293 cells stably transfected with various genotypes of human P-gp were established and the expression of P-gp was confirmed by Western blot. The results of the rhodamine 123 efflux assay demonstrated that EEAC efficiently inhibited wild-type P-gp function at an IC50 concentration of 1.51 ± 0.08 µg/mL through non-competitive inhibition. The IC50 concentrations for variant-type 1236T-2677T-3435T P-gp and variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp were 5.56 ± 0.49 µg/mL and 3.33±0.67 µg/mL, respectively. In addition, the inhibition kinetics of EEAC also changed to uncompetitive inhibition in variant-type 1236T-2677A-3435T P-gp. The ATPase assay revealed that EEAC was an ATPase stimulator and was capable of reducing verapamil-induced ATPase levels. These results indicate that EEAC may be a potent P-gp inhibitor and higher dosages may be required in subjects carrying variant-types P-gp. Further studies are required to translate this basic knowledge into clinical applications.

  14. Whole exome sequencing identifies genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia with secondary qualitative function defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ben; Lowe, Gillian C.; Futterer, Jane; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; MacDonald, David; Simpson, Michael A.; Sanchez-Guiú, Isabel; Drake, Sian; Bem, Danai; Leo, Vincenzo; Fletcher, Sarah J.; Dawood, Ban; Rivera, José; Allsup, David; Biss, Tina; Bolton-Maggs, Paula HB; Collins, Peter; Curry, Nicola; Grimley, Charlotte; James, Beki; Makris, Mike; Motwani, Jayashree; Pavord, Sue; Talks, Katherine; Thachil, Jecko; Wilde, Jonathan; Williams, Mike; Harrison, Paul; Gissen, Paul; Mundell, Stuart; Mumford, Andrew; Daly, Martina E.; Watson, Steve P.; Morgan, Neil V.

    2016-01-01

    Inherited thrombocytopenias are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by abnormally low platelet counts which can be associated with abnormal bleeding. Next-generation sequencing has previously been employed in these disorders for the confirmation of suspected genetic abnormalities, and more recently in the discovery of novel disease-causing genes. However its full potential has not yet been exploited. Over the past 6 years we have sequenced the exomes from 55 patients, including 37 index cases and 18 additional family members, all of whom were recruited to the UK Genotyping and Phenotyping of Platelets study. All patients had inherited or sustained thrombocytopenia of unknown etiology with platelet counts varying from 11×109/L to 186×109/L. Of the 51 patients phenotypically tested, 37 (73%), had an additional secondary qualitative platelet defect. Using whole exome sequencing analysis we have identified “pathogenic” or “likely pathogenic” variants in 46% (17/37) of our index patients with thrombocytopenia. In addition, we report variants of uncertain significance in 12 index cases, including novel candidate genetic variants in previously unreported genes in four index cases. These results demonstrate that whole exome sequencing is an efficient method for elucidating potential pathogenic genetic variants in inherited thrombocytopenia. Whole exome sequencing also has the added benefit of discovering potentially pathogenic genetic variants for further study in novel genes not previously implicated in inherited thrombocytopenia. PMID:27479822

  15. Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4): structural and functional differences, and distribution in fly stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyubomirskaya, N V; Smirnova, J B; Razorenova, O V; Karpova, N N; Surkov, S A; Avedisov, S N; Kim, A I; Ilyin, Y V

    2001-04-01

    Two variants of the Drosophila melanogaster retrotransposon gypsy were subjected to detailed structural and functional analysis. A series of hybrid constructs containing various combinations of "active" and "inactive" gypsy copies were tested for their ability to produce new DNA copies in cultured cells by means of reverse transcription. It was shown that the previously demonstrated variations in retrotranspositional activity are associated with either one or both of two amino acid substitutions at the beginning of ORF2. The first substitution is located at the boundary between the putative protease and reverse transcriptase domains and, hence, may influence the processing of the polyprotein. The other substitution may alter reverse transcriptase activity since it is located in the second of the seven conserved domains of the RT gene. To address the question of the evolutionary relationship between the two gypsy variants, their distribution was analyzed in among various fly stocks. Southern analysis revealed that all D. melanogaster strains studied so far contain the "inactive" gypsy variant, while the "active" copies are present only in some strains; most of the latter were established from flies recently isolated from natural populations. Finally, in stocks carrying the flamenco mutation the "active" gypsy variant is much more abundant than the "inactive" form. Possible scenarios for the orgin of the "active" form of gypsy are discussed.

  16. Multiple splice variants within the bovine silver homologue (SILV gene affecting coat color in cattle indicate a function additional to fibril formation in melanophores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weikard Rosemarie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The silver homologue(SILV gene plays a major role in melanosome development. SILV is a target for studies concerning melanoma diagnostics and therapy in humans as well as on skin and coat color pigmentation in many species ranging from zebra fish to mammals. However, the precise functional cellular mechanisms, in which SILV is involved, are still not completely understood. While there are many studies addressing SILV function upon a eumelaneic pigment background, there is a substantial lack of information regarding the further relevance of SILV, e.g. for phaeomelanosome development. Results In contrast to previous results in other species reporting SILV expression exclusively in pigmented tissues, our experiments provide evidence that the bovine SILV gene is expressed in a variety of tissues independent of pigmentation. Our data show that the bovine SILV gene generates an unexpectedly large number of different transcripts occurring in skin as well as in non-pigmented tissues, e.g. liver or mammary gland. The alternative splice sites are generated by internal splicing and primarily remove complete exons. Alternative splicing predominantly affects the repeat domain of the protein, which has a functional key role in fibril formation during eumelanosome development. Conclusion The expression of the bovine SILV gene independent of pigmentation suggests SILV functions exceeding melanosome development in cattle. This hypothesis is further supported by transcript variants lacking functional key elements of the SILV protein relevant for eumelanosome development. Thus, the bovine SILV gene can serve as a model for the investigation of the putative additional functions of SILV. Furthermore, the splice variants of the bovine SILV gene represent a comprehensive natural model to refine the knowledge about functional domains in the SILV protein. Our study exemplifies that the extent of alternative splicing is presumably much higher than

  17. Role of transcription factor KLF11 and its diabetes-associated gene variants in pancreatic beta cell function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neve, Bernadette; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Ashkenazi-Katalan, Vered

    2005-01-01

    a role in free radical clearance that may render beta cells more sensitive to oxidative stress. Thus, both functional and genetic analyses reveal that KLF11 plays a role in the regulation of pancreatic beta cell physiology, and its variants may contribute to the development of diabetes.......KLF11 (TIEG2) is a pancreas-enriched transcription factor that has elicited significant attention because of its role as negative regulator of exocrine cell growth in vitro and in vivo. However, its functional role in the endocrine pancreas remains to be established. Here, we report, for the first...... in beta cells. Genetic analysis of the KLF11 gene revealed two rare variants (Ala347Ser and Thr220Met) that segregate with diabetes in families with early-onset type 2 diabetes, and significantly impair its transcriptional activity. In addition, analysis of 1,696 type 2 diabetes mellitus and 1...

  18. Functional variants of 5S rRNA in the ribosomes of common sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimarco, Eufrosina; Cascone, Eleonora; Bellavia, Daniele; Caradonna, Fabio

    2012-10-15

    We have previously reported a molecular and cytogenetic characterization of three different 5S rDNA clusters in the sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus; this study, performed at DNA level only, lends itself as starting point to verify that these clusters could contain transcribed genes, then, to demonstrate the presence of heterogeneity at functional RNA level, also. In the present work we report in P. lividus ribosomes the existence of several transcribed variants of the 5S rRNA and we associate all transcribed variants to the cluster to which belong. Our finding is the first demonstration of the presence of high heterogeneity in functional 5S rRNA molecules in animal ribosomes, a feature that had been considered a peculiarity of some plants.

  19. Olive oil and immune system functions: potential involvement in immunonutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvarez de Cienfuegos, Gerardo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Olive oil plays a crucial role as a main component of the Mediterranean diet, which has shown important benefits for the human health. According to the current knowledge, the administration of diets containing olive oil exerts some beneficial effects on the immune system functions due likely to the action of oleic acid rather than other substances contained in this fat. In the last few years, epidemiological, clinical and experimental studies have evidenced the potential of certain dietary lipids (containing polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fatty acids as modulators of immune system functions due to their ability to suppress several functions of immune system in both humans and animals. As a result, these fats have been applied in the reduction of symptoms from diseases characterized by an overactivation of the immune system (autoimmune diseases or in the reduction of cancer risk. Here, we review several relevant experimental and clinical data associated with the beneficial effects of olive oil upon the health, the mechanisms of action and the immune function susceptible of being be altered by the administration of dietary lipids and particularly of olive oil. In addition, we will also discuss the detrimental effects on the immune system functions caused by the administration of certain dietary lipids attributed mainly to a reduction of host natural resistance against infectious microorganisms as well as the involvement of olive oil diets in the regulation of immune resistance.El aceite de oliva tiene un papel crucial como componente de la dieta Mediterránea, con importantes beneficios sobre la salud humana. Dietas conteniendo aceite de oliva actúan de manera favorable en las funciones del sistema inmune por la acción sobretodo del ácido oleico. Los estudios epidemiológicos, clínicos y experimentales publicados en los últimos años demuestran que ciertos lípidos de la dieta [ácidos grasos monoinsaturados (MUFA y poliinsaturados (PUFA

  20. Identification and validation of loss of function variants in clinical contexts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lescai, Francesco; Marasco, Elena; Bacchelli, Chiara;

    2014-01-01

    The choice of an appropriate variant calling pipeline for exome sequencing data is becoming increasingly more important in translational medicine projects and clinical contexts. Within GOSgene, which facilitates genetic analysis as part of a joint effort of the University College London...... and 55.9% for INDELs. We confirm that GATK/Queue is a reliable pipeline in translational medicine and clinical context. We conclude that in our working environment, UnifiedGenotyper is the caller of choice, being an accurate method, with a high validation rate of error-prone calls like LoF variants. We...

  1. Neanderthal origin of the haplotypes carrying the functional variant Val92Met in the MC1R in modern humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ruyue; Yan, Shi; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-08-01

    Skin color is one of the most visible and important phenotypes of modern humans. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and its receptor played an important role in regulating skin color. In this article, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression encompassing the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor gene MC1R. The haplotypes from Neanderthal introgression diverged with the Altai Neanderthal 103.3 ka, which postdates the anatomically modern human-Neanderthal divergence. We further discovered that all of the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry the Val92Met variant, a loss-of-function variant in MC1R that is associated with multiple dermatological traits including skin color and photoaging. Frequency of this Neanderthal introgression is low in Europeans (∼5%), moderate in continental East Asians (∼30%), and high in Taiwanese aborigines (60-70%). As the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry a loss-of-function variant that could alter the function of MC1R and is associated with multiple traits related to skin color, we speculate that the Neanderthal introgression may have played an important role in the local adaptation of Eurasians to sunlight intensity.

  2. A computational method to classify variants of uncertain significance using functional assay data with application to BRCA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Edwin S; Couch, Fergus J; Goldgar, David E; Tavtigian, Sean V; Monteiro, Alvaro N A

    2011-06-01

    Besides revealing cancer predisposition variants or the absence of any changes, genetic testing for cancer predisposition genes can also identify variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS). Classifying VUSs is a pressing problem, as ever more patients seek genetic testing for disease syndromes and receive noninformative results from those tests. In cases such as the breast and ovarian cancer syndrome in which prophylactic options can be severe and life changing, having information on the disease relevance of the VUS that a patient harbors can be critical. We describe a computational approach for inferring the disease relevance of VUSs in disease genes from data derived from an in vitro functional assay. It is based on a Bayesian hierarchical model that accounts for sources of experimental heterogeneity. The functional data correlate well with the pathogenicity of BRCA1 BRCT VUSs, thus providing evidence regarding pathogenicity when family and genetic data are absent or uninformative. We show the utility of the model by using it to classify 76 VUSs located in the BRCT region of BRCA1. The approach is both sensitive and specific when evaluated on variants previously classified using independent sources of data. Although the functional data are very informative, they will need to be combined with other forms of data to meet the more stringent requirements of clinical application. Our work will lead to improved classification of VUSs and will aid in the clinical decision making of their carriers. ©2011 AACR.

  3. Fatal neonatal encephalopathy and lactic acidosis caused by a homozygous loss-of-function variant in COQ9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danhauser, Katharina; Herebian, Diran; Haack, Tobias B; Rodenburg, Richard J; Strom, Tim M; Meitinger, Thomas; Klee, Dirk; Mayatepek, Ertan; Prokisch, Holger; Distelmaier, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) has an important role in mitochondrial energy metabolism by way of its functioning as an electron carrier in the respiratory chain. Genetic defects disrupting the endogenous biosynthesis pathway of CoQ10 may lead to severe metabolic disorders with onset in early childhood. Using exome sequencing in a child with fatal neonatal lactic acidosis and encephalopathy, we identified a homozygous loss-of-function variant in COQ9. Functional studies in patient fibroblasts showed that the absence of the COQ9 protein was concomitant with a strong reduction of COQ7, leading to a significant accumulation of the substrate of COQ7, 6-demethoxy ubiquinone10. At the same time, the total amount of CoQ10 was severely reduced, which was reflected in a significant decrease of mitochondrial respiratory chain succinate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase (complex II/III) activity. Lentiviral expression of COQ9 restored all these parameters, confirming the causal role of the variant. Our report on the second COQ9 patient expands the clinical spectrum associated with COQ9 variants, indicating the importance of COQ9 already during prenatal development. Moreover, the rescue of cellular CoQ10 levels and respiratory chain complex activities by CoQ10 supplementation points to the importance of an early diagnosis and immediate treatment.

  4. Spectrum and Prevalence of CALM1-, CALM2-, and CALM3-Encoded Calmodulin (CaM) Variants in Long QT Syndrome (LQTS) and Functional Characterization of a Novel LQTS-Associated CaM Missense Variant, E141G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Melissa L.; Tester, David J.; Kryshtal, Dmytro; Hwang, Hyun Seok; Johnson, Christopher N.; Chazin, Walter J.; Loporcaro, Christina G.; Shah, Maully; Papez, Andrew L.; Lau, Yung R.; Kanter, Ronald; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Calmodulin (CaM) is encoded by three genes, CALM1, CALM2, and CALM3, all of which harbor pathogenic variants linked to long QT syndrome (LQTS) with early and severe expressivity. These LQTS-causative variants reduce CaM affinity to Ca2+ and alter the properties of the cardiac L-type calcium channel (CaV1.2). CaM also modulates NaV1.5 and the ryanodine receptor, RyR2. All of these interactions may play a role in disease pathogenesis. Here, we determine the spectrum and prevalence of pathogenic CaM variants in a cohort of genetically elusive LQTS, and functionally characterize the novel variants. Methods and Results Thirty-nine genetically elusive LQTS cases underwent whole exome sequencing to identify CaM variants. Non-synonymous CaM variants were overrepresented significantly in this heretofore LQTS cohort (15.4%) compared to exome aggregation consortium (0.04%; p<0.0001). When the clinical sequelae of these 6 CaM-positive cases was compared to the 33 CaM-negative cases, CaM-positive cases had a more severe phenotype with an average age of onset of 8 months, an average QTc of 679 ms, and a high prevalence of cardiac arrest. Functional characterization of one novel variant, E141G-CaM, revealed an 11-fold reduction in Ca2+ binding affinity and a functionally-dominant loss of inactivation in CaV1.2, mild accentuation in NaV1.5 late current, but no effect on intracellular RyR2-mediated calcium release. Conclusions Overall, 15% of our genetically elusive LQTS cohort harbored non-synonymous variants in CaM. Genetic testing of CALM1-3 should be pursued for individuals with LQTS, especially those with early childhood cardiac arrest, extreme QT prolongation, and a negative family history. PMID:26969752

  5. Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variants (SCVs: A Road Map for the Metabolic Pathways Involved in Persistent Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Allan Proctor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Persistent and relapsing infections, despite apparently adequate antibiotic therapy, occur frequently with many pathogens, but it is an especially prominent problem with Staphylococcus aureus infections. For the purposes of this review, persistence will encompass both of the concepts of long term survival within the host, including colonization, and the concept of resisting antibiotic therapy even when susceptible in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Over the past two decades, the mechanisms whereby bacteria achieve persistence are slowly being unraveled. S. aureus small colony variants (SCVs are linked to chronic, recurrent, and antibiotic-resistant infections, and the study of SCVs has contributed significantly to understanding of persistence. In our earlier work, defects in electron transport and thymidylate biosynthesis were linked to the development of the SCV phenotype (reviewed in 2006, thus this work will be discussed only briefly. Since 2006, it has been found that persistent organisms including SCVs are part of the normal life cycle of bacteria, and often they arise in response to harsh conditions, e.g., antibiotics, starvation, host cationic peptides. Many of the changes found in these early SCVs have provided a map for the discovery mechanisms (pathways for the development of persistent organisms. For example, changes in RNA processing, stringent response, toxin-antitoxin, ribosome protein L6 (RplF, and cold shock protein B (CspB found in SCVs are also found in other persisters. In addition, many classic persister organisms also show slow growth, hence SCVs. Recent work on S. aureus USA300 has elucidated the impact of aerobic expression of arginine deiminase genes on its ability to chronically colonize the skin and survive in abscesses. S. aureus SCVs also express arginine deiminase genes aerobically as well. Thus, many pathways found activated in electron transport type of SCVs are also increased in persisters that have intact

  6. The SDH mutation database: an online resource for succinate dehydrogenase sequence variants involved in pheochromocytoma, paraganglioma and mitochondrial complex II deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devilee Peter

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SDHA, SDHB, SDHC and SDHD genes encode the subunits of succinate dehydrogenase (succinate: ubiquinone oxidoreductase, a component of both the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain. SDHA, a flavoprotein and SDHB, an iron-sulfur protein together constitute the catalytic domain, while SDHC and SDHD encode membrane anchors that allow the complex to participate in the respiratory chain as complex II. Germline mutations of SDHD and SDHB are a major cause of the hereditary forms of the tumors paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma. The largest subunit, SDHA, is mutated in patients with Leigh syndrome and late-onset optic atrophy, but has not as yet been identified as a factor in hereditary cancer. Description The SDH mutation database is based on the recently described Leiden Open (source Variation Database (LOVD system. The variants currently described in the database were extracted from the published literature and in some cases annotated to conform to current mutation nomenclature. Researchers can also directly submit new sequence variants online. Since the identification of SDHD, SDHC, and SDHB as classic tumor suppressor genes in 2000 and 2001, studies from research groups around the world have identified a total of 120 variants. Here we introduce all reported paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma related sequence variations in these genes, in addition to all reported mutations of SDHA. The database is now accessible online. Conclusion The SDH mutation database offers a valuable tool and resource for clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with paraganglioma-pheochromocytoma, clinical geneticists needing an overview of current knowledge, and geneticists and other researchers needing a solid foundation for further exploration of both these tumor syndromes and SDHA-related phenotypes.

  7. Genetic variants involved in oxidative stress, base excision repair, DNA methylation, and folate metabolism pathways influence myeloid neoplasias susceptibility and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Cristina; Alves, Raquel; Baldeiras, Inês; Cortesão, Emília; Carda, José Pedro; Branco, Claudia C; Oliveiros, Bárbara; Loureiro, Luísa; Pereira, Amélia; Nascimento Costa, José Manuel; Sarmento-Ribeiro, Ana Bela; Mota-Vieira, Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) share common features: elevated oxidative stress, DNA repair deficiency, and aberrant DNA methylation. We performed a hospital-based case-control study to evaluate the association in variants of genes involved in oxidative stress, folate metabolism, DNA repair, and DNA methylation with susceptibility and prognosis of these malignancies. To that end, 16 SNPs (one per gene: CAT, CYBA, DNMT1, DNMT3A, DNMT3B, GPX1, KEAP1, MPO, MTRR, NEIL1, NFE2F2, OGG1, SLC19A1, SOD1, SOD2, and XRCC1) were genotyped in 191 patients (101 MDS and 90 AML) and 261 controls. We also measured oxidative stress (reactive oxygen species/total antioxidant status ratio), DNA damage (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and DNA methylation (5-methylcytosine) in 50 subjects (40 MDS and 10 controls). Results showed that five genes (GPX1, NEIL1, NFE2L2, OGG1, and SOD2) were associated with MDS, two (DNMT3B and SLC19A1) with AML, and two (CYBA and DNMT1) with both diseases. We observed a correlation of CYBA TT, GPX1 TT, and SOD2 CC genotypes with increased oxidative stress levels, as well as NEIL1 TT and OGG1 GG genotypes with higher DNA damage. The 5-methylcytosine levels were negatively associated with DNMT1 CC, DNMT3A CC, and MTRR AA genotypes, and positively with DNMT3B CC genotype. Furthermore, DNMT3A, MTRR, NEIL1, and OGG1 variants modulated AML transformation in MDS patients. Additionally, DNMT3A, OGG1, GPX1, and KEAP1 variants influenced survival of MDS and AML patients. Altogether, data suggest that genetic variability influence predisposition and prognosis of MDS and AML patients, as well AML transformation rate in MDS patients. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Gain-of-function Prolactin Receptor Variants Are Not Associated With Breast Cancer and Multiple Fibroadenoma Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhtoura, Zeina; Laki, Fatima; Bernadet, Marie; Cherifi, Ibtissem; Chiche, Aurélie; Pigat, Natascha; Bernichtein, Sophie; Courtillot, Carine; Boutillon, Florence; Bièche, Ivan; Vacher, Sophie; Tanguy, Marie-Laure; Bissery, Anne; Grouthier, Virginie; Camparo, Philippe; Foretz, Marc; Do Cruzeiro, Marcio; Pierre, Rémi; Rakotozafy, Fabienne; Tichet, Jean; Tejedor, Isabelle; Guidotti, Jacques-Emmanuel; Sigal-Zafrani, Brigitte; Goffin, Vincent; Touraine, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    In a cohort of 95 women with multiple breast fibroadenomas (MFAs), we recently identified patients harboring germline heterozygous variants of the prolactin receptor (PRLR) exhibiting constitutive activity (PRLRI146L and PRLRI176V). This study sought to better delineate the potential role of PRLR gain-of-function variants in benign and malignant mammary tumorigenesis. This was an observational study and transgenic mouse model analysis. The study took place at the Department of Endocrinology, Reproductive Disorders and Rare Gynecologic Diseases, Pitié Salpêtrière, Paris, and Inserm Unit 1151, Paris. We generated a second MFA cohort (n = 71) as well as a group of control subjects (n = 496) and a cohort of women with breast cancer (n = 119). We also generated two transgenic mouse models carrying the coding sequences of human PRLRI146L or PRLRWT. We aimed to determine the prevalence of PRLR variants in these three populations and to uncover any association of the latter with specific tumor pattern, especially in patients with breast cancer. This study did not highlight a higher prevalence of PRLR variants in the MFA group and in the breast cancer group compared with control subjects. Transgenic mice expressing PRLRI146L exhibited very mild histological mammary phenotype but tumors were never observed. PRLRI146L and PRLRI176V variants are not associated with breast cancer or MFA risk. However, one cannot exclude that low but sustained PRLR signaling may facilitate or contribute to pathological development driven by oncogenic pathways. Long-term patient follow-up should help to address this issue.

  9. Platelets express three different splice variants of ApoER2 that are all involved in signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, M.T.; Derksen, R.H.W.M.; Urbanus, R.T; Dalessi - Tekelenburg, W.L.H.; Hemrika, W.; de Groot, Ph.G.

    2007-01-01

    Background: ß2-Glycoprotein I is themost relevant antigen in antiphospholipid syndrome. We have shown that binding of dimerized ß2-GPI to platelets viaApoER2¢ sensitizes platelets for second activating stimuli. Objective: Determine the region of ApoER2 involved in the binding of dimeric b2-GPI. Meth

  10. Functional and in silico assessment of MAX variants of unknown significance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comino-Mendez, I.; Leandro-Garcia, L.J.; Montoya, G.; Inglada-Perez, L.; Cubas, A.A. de; Curras-Freixes, M.; Tysoe, C.; Izatt, L.; Leton, R.; Gomez-Grana, A.; Mancikova, V.; Apellaniz-Ruiz, M.; Mannelli, M.; Schiavi, F.; Favier, J.; Gimenez-Roqueplo, A.P.; Timmers, H.J.L.M.; Roncador, G.; Garcia, J.F.; Rodriguez-Antona, C.; Robledo, M.; Cascon, A.

    2015-01-01

    The presence of germline mutations affecting the MYC-associated protein X (MAX) gene has recently been identified as one of the now 11 major genetic predisposition factors for the development of hereditary pheochromocytoma and/or paraganglioma. Little is known regarding how missense variants of

  11. Molecular weight fibrinogen variants alter gene expression and functional characteristics of human endothelial cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, E.M.; Wijhe, M.H. van; Joosten, L.; Horrevoets, A.J.; Maat, M.P. de; Hinsbergh, V.W.H. van; Koolwijk, P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Fibrin is a temporary matrix that not only seals a wound, but also provides a temporary matrix structure for invading cells during wound healing. Two naturally occurring fibrinogen variants, high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) fibrinogen, display different properti

  12. Resting state functional connectivity differences between behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hafkemeijer (Anne); C. Möller (Christiane); E.G.P. Dopper (Elise); L.C. Jiskoot (Lize); T.M. Schouten (Tijn M.); J.C. van Swieten (John); W.M. van der Flier (Wiesje); H. Vrenken (Hugo); Y. Pijnenburg (Yolande); F. Barkhof (Frederik); P. Scheltens (Philip); J. van der Grond (Jeroen); S.A.R.B. Rombouts (Serge)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Alzheimer's disease (AD) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common types of early-onset dementia. Early differentiation between both types of dementia may be challenging due to heterogeneity and overlap of symptoms. Here, we apply resting st

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Small Colony Variants (SCVs): a road map for the metabolic pathways involved in persistent infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Richard A; Kriegeskorte, André; Kahl, Barbara C; Becker, Karsten; Löffler, Bettina; Peters, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Persistent and relapsing infections, despite apparently adequate antibiotic therapy, occur frequently with many pathogens, but it is an especially prominent problem with Staphylococcus aureus infections. For the purposes of this review, persistence will encompass both of the concepts of long term survival within the host, including colonization, and the concept of resisting antibiotic therapy even when susceptible in the clinical microbiology laboratory. Over the past two decades, the mechanisms whereby bacteria achieve persistence are slowly being unraveled. S. aureus small colony variants (SCVs) are linked to chronic, recurrent, and antibiotic-resistant infections, and the study of SCVs has contributed significantly to understanding of persistence. In our earlier work, defects in electron transport and thymidylate biosynthesis were linked to the development of the SCV phenotype (reviewed in 2006), thus this work will be discussed only briefly. Since 2006, it has been found that persistent organisms including SCVs are part of the normal life cycle of bacteria, and often they arise in response to harsh conditions, e.g., antibiotics, starvation, host cationic peptides. Many of the changes found in these early SCVs have provided a map for the discovery mechanisms (pathways) for the development of persistent organisms. For example, changes in RNA processing, stringent response, toxin-antitoxin, ribosome protein L6 (RplF), and cold shock protein B (CspB) found in SCVs are also found in other persisters. In addition, many classic persister organisms also show slow growth, hence SCVs. Recent work on S. aureus USA300 has elucidated the impact of aerobic expression of arginine deiminase genes on its ability to chronically colonize the skin and survive in abscesses. S. aureus SCVs also express arginine deiminase genes aerobically as well. Thus, many pathways found activated in electron transport type of SCVs are also increased in persisters that have intact electron

  14. Three-way complex variant translocation involving short arm chromosome (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASIF, MUHAMMAD; HUSSAIN, ABRAR; MALIK, ARIF; RASOOL, MAHMOOD

    2015-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a disease of the clonal hematopoietic stem cells caused by a balanced translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22. Overall, 90–95% of CML patients present with a Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation and in addition, variant complex translocations, involving a third chromosome, are observed in 5–8% of CML patients. Cytogenic testing using bone marrow sample was performed and the FISH test was used for the detection of BCR-ABL fusion gene and complete blood analysis of CML patient was also performed. Results of hematological analysis showed the induced values of white blood cells (168,5000/mm3) and platelets (300,000/mm3) and FISH analysis test showed that 98% cells were positive for BCR/ABL gene translocation. The present study describes a three-way (1;9;22)(p36;q34;q11) Ph chromosome translocation in a 24-year-old female with CML. The patient, who was in the chronic phase of the disease, was treated with daily dose of 400 mg/dl with imatinib mesylateand was monitored constantly at various intervals over a 6-month period. Many studies reported that certain CML patents with variant translocation responded poorly to imatinib. In the current case report, the CML patient exhibited a suboptimal response to imatinib, denoting a poor prognosis. PMID:26622740

  15. GADD45a promoter regulation by a functional genetic variant associated with acute lung injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumegha Mitra

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Growth arrest DNA damage inducible alpha (GADD45a is a stress-induced gene we have shown to participate in the pathophysiology of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI via regulation of mechanical stress-induced Akt ubiquitination and phosphorylation. The regulation of GADD45a expression by mechanical stress and its relationship with acute lung injury (ALI susceptibility and severity, however, remains unknown. OBJECTIVES: We examined mechanical stress-dependent regulatory elements (MSRE in the GADD45a promoter and the contribution of promoter polymorphisms in GADD45a expression and ALI susceptibility. METHODS AND RESULTS: Initial studies in GADD45a knockout and heterozygous mice confirmed the relationship of GADD45a gene dose to VILI severity. Human lung endothelial cells (EC transfected with a luciferase vector containing the full length GADD45a promoter sequence (-771 to +223 demonstrated a >4 fold increase in GADD45a expression in response to 18% cyclic stretch (CS, 4 h compared to static controls while specific promoter regions harboring CS-dependent MSRE were identified using vectors containing serial deletion constructs of the GADD45a promoter. In silico analyses of GADD45a promoter region (-371 to -133 revealed a potential binding site for specificity protein 1 (SP1, a finding supported by confirmed SP1 binding with the GADD45a promoter and by the significant attenuation of CS-dependent GADD45a promoter activity in response to SP1 silencing. Separately, case-control association studies revealed a significant association of a GADD45a promoter SNP at -589 (rs581000, G>C with reduced ALI susceptibility. Subsequently, we found allelic variation of this SNP is associated with both differential GADD45a expression in mechanically stressed EC (18% CS, 4 h and differential binding site of interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7 at this site. CONCLUSION: These results strongly support a functional role for GADD45a in ALI/VILI and identify a

  16. BANK1 functional variants are associated with susceptibility to diffuse systemic sclerosis in Caucasians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, B; Gourh, P; Broen, J; Agarwal, S K; Simeon, C; Ortego-Centeno, N; Vonk, M C; Coenen, M; Riemekasten, G; Hunzelmann, N; Hesselstrand, R; Tan, F K; Reveille, J D; Assassi, S; Garcia-Hernandez, F J; Carreira, P; Camps, M; Fernandez-Nebro, A; de la Peña, P Garcia; Nearney, T; Hilda, D; Gónzalez-Gay, M A; Airo, P; Beretta, L; Scorza, R; Radstake, T R D J; Mayes, M D; Arnett, F C; Martin, J

    2010-01-01

    Objective To investigate the possible association of the BANK1 gene with genetic susceptibility to systemic sclerosis (SSc) and its subphenotypes. Methods A large multicentre case–control association study including 2380 patients with SSc and 3270 healthy controls from six independent case–control sets of Caucasian ancestry (American, Spanish, Dutch, German, Swedish and Italian) was conducted. Three putative functional BANK1 polymorphisms (rs17266594 T/C, rs10516487 G/A, rs3733197 G/A) were selected as genetic markers and genotyped by Taqman 5´ allelic discrimination assay. Results A significant association of the rs10516487 G and rs17266594 T alleles with SSc susceptibility was observed (pooled OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.03 to 1.22; p=0.01 and pooled OR=1.14, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.25; p=0.003, respectively), whereas the rs3733197 genetic variant showed no statistically significant deviation. Stratification for cutaneous SSc phenotype showed that the BANK1 rs10516487 G, rs17266594 T and rs3733197 G alleles were strongly associated with susceptibility to diffuse SSc (dcSSc) (pooled OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.37, p=0.005; pooled OR=1.23, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.41, p=0.001; pooled OR=1.15, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.31, p=0.02, respectively). Similarly, stratification for specific SSc autoantibodies showed that the association of BANK1 rs10516487, rs17266594 and rs3733197 polymorphisms was restricted to the subgroup of patients carrying anti-topoisomerase I antibodies (pooled OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.41, p=0.03; pooled OR=1.24, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.46, p=0.01; pooled OR=1.26, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.47, p=0.004, respectively). Conclusion The results suggest that the BANK1 gene confers susceptibility to SSc in general, and specifically to the dcSSc and anti-topoisomerase I antibody subsets. PMID:19815934

  17. Molecular dynamics analysis of the structural and dynamic properties of the functionally enhanced hepta-variant of mouse 5-aminolevulinate synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Insung; DeForte, Shelly; Stojanovski, Bosko M; Ferreira, Gloria C; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2017-01-09

    Heme biosynthesis, a complex, multistage, and tightly controlled process, starts with 5-aminolevulinate (ALA) production, which, in metazoa and certain bacteria, is a reaction catalyzed by 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS), a pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-dependent enzyme. Functional aberrations in ALAS are associated with several human diseases. ALAS can adopt open and closed conformations, with segmental rearrangements of a C-terminal, 16-amino acid loop and an α-helix regulating accessibility to the ALAS active site. Of the murine erythroid ALAS (mALAS2) forms previously engineered to assess the role of the flexible C-terminal loop versus mALAS2 function one stood out due to its impressive gain in catalytic power. To elucidate how the simultaneously introduced seven mutations of this activity-enhanced variant affected structural and dynamic properties of mALAS2, we conducted extensive molecular dynamics simulation analysis of the dimeric forms of wild-type mALAS2, hepta-variant and Rhodobacter capsulatus ALAS (aka R. capsulatus HemA). This analysis revealed that the seven simultaneous mutations in the C-terminal loop, which extends over the active site of the enzyme, caused the bacterial and murine proteins to adopt different conformations. Specifically, a new β-strand in the mutated 'loop' led to interaction with two preexisting β-strands and formation of an anti-parallel three-stranded β-sheet, which likely endowed the murine hepta-variant a more 'stable' open conformation than that of wild-type mALAS2, consistent with a kinetic mechanism involving a faster closed-to-open conformation transition and product release for the mutated than wild-type enzyme. Further, the dynamic behavior of the mALAS2 protomers was strikingly different in the two dimeric forms.

  18. Complementation of Yeast Genes with Human Genes as an Experimental Platform for Functional Testing of Human Genetic Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamza, Akil; Tammpere, Erik; Kofoed, Megan; Keong, Christelle; Chiang, Jennifer; Giaever, Guri; Nislow, Corey; Hieter, Philip

    2015-11-01

    While the pace of discovery of human genetic variants in tumors, patients, and diverse populations has rapidly accelerated, deciphering their functional consequence has become rate-limiting. Using cross-species complementation, model organisms like the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, can be utilized to fill this gap and serve as a platform for testing human genetic variants. To this end, we performed two parallel screens, a one-to-one complementation screen for essential yeast genes implicated in chromosome instability and a pool-to-pool screen that queried all possible essential yeast genes for rescue of lethality by all possible human homologs. Our work identified 65 human cDNAs that can replace the null allele of essential yeast genes, including the nonorthologous pair yRFT1/hSEC61A1. We chose four human cDNAs (hLIG1, hSSRP1, hPPP1CA, and hPPP1CC) for which their yeast gene counterparts function in chromosome stability and assayed in yeast 35 tumor-specific missense mutations for growth defects and sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. This resulted in a set of human-yeast gene complementation pairs that allow human genetic variants to be readily characterized in yeast, and a prioritized list of somatic mutations that could contribute to chromosome instability in human tumors. These data establish the utility of this cross-species experimental approach. Copyright © 2015 by the Genetics Society of America.

  19. FunSAV: predicting the functional effect of single amino acid variants using a two-stage random forest model.

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    Mingjun Wang

    Full Text Available Single amino acid variants (SAVs are the most abundant form of known genetic variations associated with human disease. Successful prediction of the functional impact of SAVs from sequences can thus lead to an improved understanding of the underlying mechanisms of why a SAV may be associated with certain disease. In this work, we constructed a high-quality structural dataset that contained 679 high-quality protein structures with 2,048 SAVs by collecting the human genetic variant data from multiple resources and dividing them into two categories, i.e., disease-associated and neutral variants. We built a two-stage random forest (RF model, termed as FunSAV, to predict the functional effect of SAVs by combining sequence, structure and residue-contact network features with other additional features that were not explored in previous studies. Importantly, a two-step feature selection procedure was proposed to select the most important and informative features that contribute to the prediction of disease association of SAVs. In cross-validation experiments on the benchmark dataset, FunSAV achieved a good prediction performance with the area under the curve (AUC of 0.882, which is competitive with and in some cases better than other existing tools including SIFT, SNAP, Polyphen2, PANTHER, nsSNPAnalyzer and PhD-SNP. The sourcecodes of FunSAV and the datasets can be downloaded at http://sunflower.kuicr.kyoto-u.ac.jp/sjn/FunSAV.

  20. Structure and function of splice variants of the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel Na(v)1.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeter, Annett; Walzik, Stefan; Blechschmidt, Steve; Haufe, Volker; Benndorf, Klaus; Zimmer, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels mediate the rapid upstroke of the action potential in excitable tissues. The tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant isoform Na(v)1.5, encoded by the SCN5A gene, is the predominant isoform in the heart. This channel plays a key role for excitability of atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and for rapid impulse propagation through the specific conduction system. During recent years, strong evidence has been accumulated in support of the expression of several Na(v)1.5 splice variants in the heart, and in various other tissues and cell lines including brain, dorsal root ganglia, breast cancer cells and neuronal stem cell lines. This review summarizes our knowledge on the structure and putative function of nine Na(v)1.5 splice variants detected so far. Attention will be paid to the distinct biophysical properties of the four functional splice variants, to the pronounced tissue- and species-specific expression, and to the developmental regulation of Na(v)1.5 splicing. The implications of alternative splicing for SCN5A channelopathies, and for a better understanding of genotype-phenotype correlations, are discussed.

  1. Acquired bilateral nevus of ota-like macules with Mucosal involvement: A new variant of Hori′s nevus

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    Ramesh M Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules (ABNOM or Hori′s nevus, a rare form of acquired dermal melanocytoses, presents as bilateral facial blue-gray macules without ocular or mucosal involvement. This condition is mostly found in women of Asian descent and usually appears in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Pathogenesis is unknown, though few theories have been proposed. Effective treatment has been found to be achieved with pigment-specific lasers. Herein, we report a case of Hori′s nevus with mucosal involvement. A 42-year-old male patient, presented to us with blue-gray discoloration on either side of his face, both eyes, and in the mouth since the age of one year. Histopathological examination showed clusters and singly dispersed pigmented melanocytes within the upper and mid-dermis regions. Special staining of melanocytes using Masson-Fontana stain was positive. Diagnosis of Hori′s nevus was made by correlating clinical and histopathological findings. Patient was informed of his treatment options, but refused treatment. A similar case of Hori′s nevus with mucosal involvement has not been reported so far.

  2. Acquired Bilateral Nevus of ota-like Macules with Mucosal Involvement: A New Variant of Hori's Nevus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Ramesh M; Pinto, Hyacinth Peter; Dandekeri, Sukumar; Ambil, Srinath Madapally

    2014-05-01

    Acquired bilateral nevus of Ota-like macules (ABNOM) or Hori's nevus, a rare form of acquired dermal melanocytoses, presents as bilateral facial blue-gray macules without ocular or mucosal involvement. This condition is mostly found in women of Asian descent and usually appears in the fourth or fifth decade of life. Pathogenesis is unknown, though few theories have been proposed. Effective treatment has been found to be achieved with pigment-specific lasers. Herein, we report a case of Hori's nevus with mucosal involvement. A 42-year-old male patient, presented to us with blue-gray discoloration on either side of his face, both eyes, and in the mouth since the age of one year. Histopathological examination showed clusters and singly dispersed pigmented melanocytes within the upper and mid-dermis regions. Special staining of melanocytes using Masson-Fontana stain was positive. Diagnosis of Hori's nevus was made by correlating clinical and histopathological findings. Patient was informed of his treatment options, but refused treatment. A similar case of Hori's nevus with mucosal involvement has not been reported so far.

  3. Schizophrenia risk variants affecting microRNA function and site-specific regulation of NT5C2 by miR-206.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauberg, Mads Engel; Holm-Nielsen, Marie Hebsgaard; Mattheisen, Manuel; Askou, Anne Louise; Grove, Jakob; Børglum, Anders Dupont; Corydon, Thomas Juhl

    2016-09-01

    Despite the identification of numerous schizophrenia-associated genetic variants, few have been examined functionally to identify and characterize the causal variants. To mitigate this, we aimed at identifying functional variants affecting miRNA function. Using data from a large-scale genome-wide association study of schizophrenia, we looked for schizophrenia risk variants altering either miRNA binding sites, miRNA genes, promoters for miRNA genes, or variants that were expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for miRNA genes. We hereby identified several potentially functional variants relating to miRNA function with our top finding being a schizophrenia protective allele that disrupts miR-206׳s binding to NT5C2 thus leading to increased expression of this gene. A subsequent experimental follow-up of the variant using a luciferase-based reporter assay confirmed that the allele disrupts the binding. Our study therefore suggests that miR-206 may contribute to schizophrenia risk through allele-dependent regulation of the genome-wide significant gene NT5C2.

  4. A functional variant at a prostate cancer predisposition locus at 8q24 is associated with PVT1 expression.

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    Kerstin B Meyer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Genetic mapping studies have identified multiple cancer susceptibility regions at chromosome 8q24, upstream of the MYC oncogene. MYC has been widely presumed as the regulated target gene, but definitive evidence functionally linking these cancer regions with MYC has been difficult to obtain. Here we examined candidate functional variants of a haplotype block at 8q24 encompassing the two independent risk alleles for prostate and breast cancer, rs620861 and rs13281615. We used the mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites as a tool to prioritise regions for further functional analysis. This approach identified rs378854, which is in complete linkage disequilibrium (LD with rs620861, as a novel functional prostate cancer-specific genetic variant. We demonstrate that the risk allele (G of rs378854 reduces binding of the transcription factor YY1 in vitro. This factor is known to repress global transcription in prostate cancer and is a candidate tumour suppressor. Additional experiments showed that the YY1 binding site is occupied in vivo in prostate cancer, but not breast cancer cells, consistent with the observed cancer-specific effects of this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP. Using chromatin conformation capture (3C experiments, we found that the region surrounding rs378854 interacts with the MYC and PVT1 promoters. Moreover, expression of the PVT1 oncogene in normal prostate tissue increased with the presence of the risk allele of rs378854, while expression of MYC was not affected. In conclusion, we identified a new functional prostate cancer risk variant at the 8q24 locus, rs378854 allele G, that reduces binding of the YY1 protein and is associated with increased expression of PVT1 located 0.5 Mb downstream.

  5. Transcriptome outlier analysis implicates schizophrenia susceptibility genes and enriches putatively functional rare genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Sanders, Alan R; Moy, Winton; Drigalenko, Eugene I; Brown, Eric C; Freda, Jessica; Leites, Catherine; Göring, Harald H H; Gejman, Pablo V

    2015-08-15

    We searched a gene expression dataset comprised of 634 schizophrenia (SZ) cases and 713 controls for expression outliers (i.e., extreme tails of the distribution of transcript expression values) with SZ cases overrepresented compared with controls. These outlier genes were enriched for brain expression and for genes known to be associated with neurodevelopmental disorders. SZ cases showed higher outlier burden (i.e., total outlier events per subject) than controls for genes within copy number variants (CNVs) associated with SZ or neurodevelopmental disorders. Outlier genes were enriched for CNVs and for rare putative regulatory variants, but this only explained a small proportion of the outlier subjects, highlighting the underlying presence of additional genetic and potentially, epigenetic mechanisms.

  6. Functional characterization and identification of mouse Rad51d splice variants

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    Rajesh Changanamkandath

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homologous recombination (HR pathway is vital for maintaining genomic integrity through the restoration of double-stranded breaks and interstrand crosslinks. The RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3 are essential for this process in vertebrates, and the RAD51D paralog is unique in that it participates in both HR repair and telomere maintenance. RAD51D is also known to directly interact with the RAD51C and XRCC2 proteins. Rad51d splice variants have been reported in mouse and human tissues, supportive of a role for alternative splicing in HR regulation. The present study evaluated the interaction of the Rad51d splice isoform products with RAD51C and XRCC2 and their expression patterns. Results Yeast-2-hybrid analysis was used to determine that the Mus musculus Rad51d splice variant product RAD51DΔ7b (deleted for residues 219 through 223 was capable of interacting with both RAD51C and XRCC2 and that RAD51D+int3 interacted with XRCC2. In addition, the linker region (residues 54 through 77 of RAD51D was identified as a region that potentially mediates binding with XRCC2. Cellular localization, detected by EGFP fusion proteins, demonstrated that each of the splice variant products tested was distributed throughout the cell similar to the full-length protein. However, none of the splice variants were capable of restoring resistance of Rad51d-deficient cell lines to mitomycin C. RT-PCR expression analysis revealed that Rad51dΔ3 (deleted for exon 3 and Rad51dΔ5 (deleted for exon 5transcripts display tissue specific expression patterns with Rad51dΔ3 being detected in each tissue except ovary and Rad51dΔ5 not detected in mammary gland and testis. These expression studies also led to the identification of two additional Rad51d ubiquitously expressed transcripts, one deleted for both exon 9 and 10 and one deleted for only exon 10. Conclusion These results suggest Rad51d alternative splice variants potentially

  7. Functional Characterization of Exonic Variants of the PPARGC1B Gene in Coregulation of Estrogen Receptor Alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hun Soo; Lee, Shin-Hwa; Lee, Jong-Uk; Park, Jong Sook; Chung, Il Yup; Park, Choon-Sik

    2016-07-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 beta (PPARGC1B) is a coactivator of estrogen receptor (ER)α and ERβ. We previously demonstrated a significant association between a variant of exon 5 of the PPARGC1B gene (+102525 G>A, R265Q) and airway hyperreactivity (AHR). The aims of the study were to evaluate the genetic effects of variants of the PPARGC1B gene on the function of ERs. PPARGC1B +102525G and A gene constructs were generated using PCR and cloned into a pCMV4 promoter vector. A luciferase reporter assay was undertaken in 293T cells cotransfected with one of the PPARGC1B +102525G>A constructs, ERα, and an estrogen response element (ERE) containing a luciferase construct after treatment with 17β-estradiol. According to the luciferase reporter assay, the +102525A allele showed higher ERα activity than the +102525G allele in response to stimulation with 17β-estradiol. In addition, the interaction between ERα and PPARGC1B was evaluated by coprecipitation assay. Human influenza hemagglutinin-tagged PPARGC1B coprecipitated more intensely with ERα in the +102525A than the +102525G construct after 17β estradiol treatment. The variant +102525A allele enhances the activity of ERα to a greater degree than the +102525G allele of PPARGC1B.

  8. Type-2 diabetes-associated variants with cross-trait relevance: Post-GWAs strategies for biological function interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Francesca; Crowther, Daniel; Ruetten, Hartmut; Allebrandt, Karla V

    2017-05-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAs) for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been successful in identifying many loci with robust association signals. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for post-GWAs strategies to understand mechanism of action and clinical relevance of these variants. The association of several comorbidities with T2D suggests a common etiology for these phenotypes and complicates the management of the disease. In this study, we focused on the genetics underlying these relationships, using systems genomics to identify genetic variation associated with T2D and 12 other traits. GWAs studies summary statistics for pairwise comparisons were obtained for glycemic traits, obesity, coronary artery disease, and lipids from large consortia GWAs meta-analyses. We used a network medicine approach to leverage experimental information about the identified genes and variants with cross traits effects for biological function interpretation. We identified a set of 38 genetic variants with cross traits effects that point to a main network of genes that should be relevant for T2D and its comorbidities. We prioritized the T2D associated genes based on the number of traits they showed association with and the experimental evidence showing their relation to the disease etiology. In this study, we demonstrated how systems genomics and network medicine approaches can shed light into GWAs discoveries, translating findings into a more therapeutically relevant context. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetic and sequence-structure-function analysis of known LinA variants with different hexachlorocyclohexane isomers.

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    Pooja Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Here we report specific activities of all seven naturally occurring LinA variants towards three different isomers, α, γ and δ, of a priority persistent pollutant, hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH. Sequence-structure-function differences contributing to the differences in their stereospecificity for α-, γ-, and δ-HCH and enantiospecificity for (+- and (--α -HCH are also discussed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Enzyme kinetic studies were performed with purified LinA variants. Models of LinA2(B90A A110T, A111C, A110T/A111C and LinA1(B90A were constructed using the FoldX computer algorithm. Turnover rates (min(-1 showed that the LinAs exhibited differential substrate affinity amongst the four HCH isomers tested. α-HCH was found to be the most preferred substrate by all LinA's, followed by the γ and then δ isomer. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The kinetic observations suggest that LinA-γ1-7 is the best variant for developing an enzyme-based bioremediation technology for HCH. The majority of the sequence variation in the various linA genes that have been isolated is not neutral, but alters the enantio- and stereoselectivity of the encoded proteins.

  10. Studies of the associations between functional beta2-adrenergic receptor variants and obesity, hypertension and type 2 diabetes in 7,808 white subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjesing, A P; Andersen, G; Burgdorf, K S

    2007-01-01

    Functional and common Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms have been identified in ADRB2, the gene encoding the beta2-adrenergic receptor. These variants have previously been examined for association with obesity, hypertension and diabetes with inconclusive results.......Functional and common Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms have been identified in ADRB2, the gene encoding the beta2-adrenergic receptor. These variants have previously been examined for association with obesity, hypertension and diabetes with inconclusive results....

  11. Expression and function of variants of human catecholamine transporters lacking the fifth transmembrane region encoded by exon 6.

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    Chiharu Sogawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The transporters for dopamine (DAT and norepinephrine (NET are members of the Na+- and Cl--dependent neurotransmitter transporter family SLC6. There is a line of evidence that alternative splicing results in several isoforms of neurotransmitter transporters including NET. However, its relevance to the physiology and pathology of the neurotransmitter reuptake system has not been fully elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found novel isoforms of human DAT and NET produced by alternative splicing in human blood cells (DAT and placenta (NET, both of which lacked the region encoded by exon 6. RT-PCR analyses showed a difference in expression between the full length (FL and truncated isoforms in the brain and peripheral tissues, suggesting tissue-specific alternative splicing. Heterologous expression of the FL but not truncated isoforms of DAT and NET in COS-7 cells revealed transport activity. However, immunocytochemistry with confocal microscopy and a cell surface biotinylation assay demonstrated that the truncated as well as FL isoform was expressed at least in part in the plasma membrane at the cell surface, although the truncated DAT was distributed to the cell surface slower than FL DAT. A specific antibody to the C-terminus of DAT labeled the variant but not FL DAT, when cells were not treated with Triton for permeabilization, suggesting the C-terminus of the variant to be located extracellulary. Co-expression of the FL isoform with the truncated isoform in COS-7 cells resulted in a reduced uptake of substrates, indicating a dominant negative effect of the variant. Furthermore, an immunoprecipitation assay revealed physical interaction between the FL and truncated isoforms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The unique expression and function and the proposed membrane topology of the variants suggest the importance of isoforms of catecholamine transporters in monoaminergic signaling in the brain and peripheral tissues.

  12. Variants of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 but not the Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 genes significantly influence functional outcome after stroke

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    Sobral João

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple lines of evidence suggest that genetic factors contribute to stroke recovery. The matrix metalloproteinases -2 (MMP-2 and -9 (MMP-9 are modulators of extracellular matrix components, with important regulatory functions in the Central Nervous System (CNS. Shortly after stroke, MMP-2 and MMP-9 have mainly damaging effects for brain tissue. However, MMPs also have a beneficial activity in angiogenesis and neurovascular remodelling during the delayed neuroinflammatory response phase, thus possibly contributing to stroke functional recovery. Methods In the present study, the role of MMP-2 and MMP-9 genetic variants in stroke recovery was investigated in 546 stroke patients. Functional outcome was assessed three months after a stroke episode using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS, and patients were classified in two groups: good recovery (mRS ≤ 1 or poor recovery (mRS>1. Haplotype tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the MMP-2 (N = 21 and MMP-9 (N = 4 genes were genotyped and tested for association with stroke outcome, adjusting for significant non-genetic clinical variables. Results Six SNPs in the MMP-2 gene were significantly associated with stroke outcome (0.0018P P MMP-9 gene. Conclusions The results presented strongly indicate that MMP-2 genetic variants are an important mediator of functional outcome after stroke.

  13. CTL responses of high functional avidity and broad variant cross-reactivity are associated with HIV control.

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    Beatriz Mothe

    Full Text Available Cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses targeting specific HIV proteins, in particular Gag, have been associated with relative control of viral replication in vivo. However, Gag-specific CTL can also be detected in individuals who do not control the virus and it remains thus unclear how Gag-specific CTL may mediate the beneficial effects in some individuals but not in others. Here, we used a 10mer peptide set spanning HIV Gag-p24 to determine immunogen-specific T-cell responses and to assess functional properties including functional avidity and cross-reactivity in 25 HIV-1 controllers and 25 non-controllers without protective HLA class I alleles. Our data challenge the common belief that Gag-specific T cell responses dominate the virus-specific immunity exclusively in HIV-1 controllers as both groups mounted responses of comparable breadths and magnitudes against the p24 sequence. However, responses in controllers reacted to lower antigen concentrations and recognized more epitope variants than responses in non-controllers. These cross-sectional data, largely independent of particular HLA genetics and generated using direct ex-vivo samples thus identify T cell responses of high functional avidity and with broad variant reactivity as potential functional immune correlates of relative HIV control.

  14. Some Infinite Summation Formulae Involving Kampe de Feriet Function

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    V. L. Deshpande

    1971-04-01

    Full Text Available Two infinite summation formulae for Kampe de Feriet function have been established and results are generalised by applying operational technique and method of finite mathematical induction. Various special cases are also obtained of which few are known.

  15. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction : Involvement of neuroinflammation and neuronal functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hovens, Iris B.; Schoemaker, Regien G.; van der Zee, Eddy A.; Absalom, Anthony R.; Heineman, Erik; van Leeuwen, Barbara L.

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) has been hypothesized to be mediated by surgery-induced inflammatory processes, which may influence neuronal functioning either directly or through modulation of intraneuronal pathways, such as the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mediated pathway.

  16. Functional analysis of thermostable proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Thermostable proteins can resist temperature stress whilst keeping their integrity and functionality. In many cases,  thermostable proteins originate from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that thrive in extreme environments. These systems are generally located close to geothermal (volcanic) activity

  17. Pleiotropic effects of GIP on islet function involve osteopontin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyssenko, Valeriya; Eliasson, Lena; Kotova, Olga;

    2011-01-01

    The incretin hormone GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide) promotes pancreatic β-cell function by potentiating insulin secretion and β-cell proliferation. Recently, a combined analysis of several genome-wide association studies (Meta-analysis of Glucose and Insulin-Related Traits...... Consortium [MAGIC]) showed association to postprandial insulin at the GIP receptor (GIPR) locus. Here we explored mechanisms that could explain the protective effects of GIP on islet function....

  18. in silico identification of genetic variants in glucocerebrosidase (GBA gene involved in Gaucher’s disease using multiple software tools.

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    Madhumathi eManickam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gaucher’s disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the deficiency of glucocerebrosidase, a lysosomal enzyme that catalysis the hydrolysis of the glycolipid glucocerebroside to ceramide and glucose. Polymorphisms in GBA gene have been associated with the development of Gaucher disease. We hypothesize that prediction of SNPs using multiple state of the art software tools will help in increasing the confidence in identification of SNPs involved in Gaucher's disease. Enzyme replacement therapy is the only option for GD. Our goal is to use several state of art SNP algorithms to predict/address harmful SNPs using comparative studies. In this study seven different algorithms (SIFT, MutPred, nsSNP Analyzer, PANTHER, PMUT, PROVEAN and SNPs&GO were used to predict the harmful polymorphisms. Among the 7 programs, SIFT found 47 nsSNPs as deleterious, MutPred found 46 nsSNPs as harmful. nsSNP Analyzer program found 43 out of 47 nsSNPs are disease causing SNPs whereas PANTHER found 32 out of 47 as highly deleterious, 22 out of 47 are classified as pathological mutations by PMUT, 44 out of 47 were predicted to be deleterious by PROVEAN server, all 47 shows the disease related mutations by SNPs&GO. Twenty two nsSNPs were commonly predicted by all the seven different algorithms. The common 22 targeted mutations are F251L, C342G, W312C, P415R, R463C, D127V, A309V, G46E, G202E, P391L, Y363C, Y205C, W378C, I402T, S366R, F397S, Y418C, P401L, G195E, W184R, R48W and T43R.

  19. Hsp10: anatomic distribution, functions, and involvement in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Sabrina; Bucchieri, Fabio; Corrao, Simona; Czarnecka, Anna M; Campanella, Claudia; Farina, Felicia; Peri, Giovanni; Tomasello, Giovanni; Sciumè, Carmelo; Modica, Giuseppe; La Rocca, Giampiero; Anzalone, Rita; Giuffrè, Mario; Conway De Macario, Everly; Macario, Alberto J L; Cappello, Francesco; Zummo, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence that molecular chaperones/heat shock proteins are involved in the pathogenesis of a number of human diseases, known as chaperonopathies. A better molecular understanding of the pathogenetic mechanisms is essential for addressing new strategies in diagnostics, therapeutics and clinical management of chaperonopathies, including those in which Hsp10 is involved. This chaperonin has been studied for a long time as a member of the mitochondrial protein-folding machine. However, although in normal cells Hsp10 is mainly localized in the mitochondrial matrix, it has also been found during and after stress in other subcellular compartments, such as cytosol, vesicles and secretory granules, alone or in combination with other proteins. In these extramitochondrial locales, Hsp10 plays an active role in cell signalling. For example, cancer cells often show altered levels of Hsp10, compared to normal cells. Hsp10 may also be found in the extracellular space and in the bloodstream, with a possible immunomodulatory activity. This minireview focuses on some studies to date on the involvement of Hsp10 in human disease pathogenesis.

  20. The Ser82 RAGE Variant Affects Lung Function and Serum RAGE in Smokers and sRAGE Production In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Suzanne; Henry, Amanda P; Hodge, Emily; Kheirallah, Alexander K; Billington, Charlotte K; Rimington, Tracy L; Bhaker, Sangita K; Obeidat, Ma'en; Melén, Erik; Merid, Simon K; Swan, Caroline; Gowland, Catherine; Nelson, Carl P; Stewart, Ceri E; Bolton, Charlotte E; Kilty, Iain; Malarstig, Anders; Parker, Stuart G; Moffatt, Miriam F; Wardlaw, Andrew J; Hall, Ian P; Sayers, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Genome-Wide Association Studies have identified associations between lung function measures and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and chromosome region 6p21 containing the gene for the Advanced Glycation End Product Receptor (AGER, encoding RAGE). We aimed to (i) characterise RAGE expression in the lung, (ii) identify AGER transcripts, (iii) ascertain if SNP rs2070600 (Gly82Ser C/T) is associated with lung function and serum sRAGE levels and (iv) identify whether the Gly82Ser variant is functionally important in altering sRAGE levels in an airway epithelial cell model. Immunohistochemistry was used to identify RAGE protein expression in 26 human tissues and qPCR was used to quantify AGER mRNA in lung cells. Gene expression array data was used to identify AGER expression during lung development in 38 fetal lung samples. RNA-Seq was used to identify AGER transcripts in lung cells. sRAGE levels were assessed in cells and patient serum by ELISA. BEAS2B-R1 cells were transfected to overexpress RAGE protein with either the Gly82 or Ser82 variant and sRAGE levels identified. Immunohistochemical assessment of 6 adult lung samples identified high RAGE expression in the alveoli of healthy adults and individuals with COPD. AGER/RAGE expression increased across developmental stages in human fetal lung at both the mRNA (38 samples) and protein levels (20 samples). Extensive AGER splicing was identified. The rs2070600T (Ser82) allele is associated with higher FEV1, FEV1/FVC and lower serum sRAGE levels in UK smokers. Using an airway epithelium model overexpressing the Gly82 or Ser82 variants we found that HMGB1 activation of the RAGE-Ser82 receptor results in lower sRAGE production. This study provides new information regarding the expression profile and potential role of RAGE in the human lung and shows a functional role of the Gly82Ser variant. These findings advance our understanding of the potential mechanisms underlying COPD particularly for carriers of this AGER

  1. A functional NPSR1 gene variant and environment shape personality and impulsive action: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laas, Kariina; Reif, Andreas; Kiive, Evelyn; Domschke, Katharina; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Veidebaum, Toomas; Harro, Jaanus

    2014-03-01

    Neuropeptide S and its receptor NPSR1 are involved in the regulation of arousal, attention and anxiety. We examined whether the NPSR1 gene functional polymorphism Asn¹⁰⁷Ile (rs324981, A>T) influences personality, impulsivity, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)-related symptoms in a population-representative sample, and whether any eventual associations depend on age, sex, family relations and stressful life events (SLE). We used self-reports or teachers' ratings for both the younger (n=593) and older (n=583) cohort of the longitudinal Estonian Children Personality, Behaviour and Health Study. Males with the TT genotype displayed more ADHD-related symptoms. Adaptive impulsivity and Extraversion increased the most from age 18 to 25. While highest increases were observed in AA men, TT women exhibited the largest decreases. For participants with the AA genotype, Warmth in family was inversely associated with Neuroticism, and positively associated with Extraversion and Adaptive impulsivity. High exposure to SLE increased impulsivity and ADHD scores in TT genotype subjects. We conclude that the NPSR1 A/T polymorphism is associated with impulsivity, ADHD symptoms and personality, mirroring the activity- and anxiety-mediating role of NPSR1. Heterozygous individuals were the least sensitive to environmental factors, whereas subjects with the AA genotype and TT genotype reacted to different types of environmental adversities.

  2. Developmental profile of speech-language and communicative functions in an individual with the preserved speech variant of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschik, Peter B; Vollmann, Ralf; Bartl-Pokorny, Katrin D; Green, Vanessa A; van der Meer, Larah; Wolin, Thomas; Einspieler, Christa

    2014-08-01

    We assessed various aspects of speech-language and communicative functions of an individual with the preserved speech variant of Rett syndrome (RTT) to describe her developmental profile over a period of 11 years. For this study, we incorporated the following data resources and methods to assess speech-language and communicative functions during pre-, peri- and post-regressional development: retrospective video analyses, medical history data, parental checklists and diaries, standardized tests on vocabulary and grammar, spontaneous speech samples and picture stories to elicit narrative competences. Despite achieving speech-language milestones, atypical behaviours were present at all times. We observed a unique developmental speech-language trajectory (including the RTT typical regression) affecting all linguistic and socio-communicative sub-domains in the receptive as well as the expressive modality. Future research should take into consideration a potentially considerable discordance between formal and functional language use by interpreting communicative acts on a more cautionary note.

  3. Whole-exome sequencing reveals a rapid change in the frequency of rare functional variants in a founding population of humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casals, Ferran; Hodgkinson, Alan; Hussin, Julie; Idaghdour, Youssef; Bruat, Vanessa; de Maillard, Thibault; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Grenier, Jean-Cristophe; Gbeha, Elias; Hamdan, Fadi F; Girard, Simon; Spinella, Jean-François; Larivière, Mathieu; Saillour, Virginie; Healy, Jasmine; Fernández, Isabel; Sinnett, Daniel; Michaud, Jacques L; Rouleau, Guy A; Haddad, Elie; Le Deist, Françoise; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Whole-exome or gene targeted resequencing in hundreds to thousands of individuals has shown that the majority of genetic variants are at low frequency in human populations. Rare variants are enriched for functional mutations and are expected to explain an important fraction of the genetic etiology of human disease, therefore having a potential medical interest. In this work, we analyze the whole-exome sequences of French-Canadian individuals, a founder population with a unique demographic history that includes an original population bottleneck less than 20 generations ago, followed by a demographic explosion, and the whole exomes of French individuals sampled from France. We show that in less than 20 generations of genetic isolation from the French population, the genetic pool of French-Canadians shows reduced levels of diversity, higher homozygosity, and an excess of rare variants with low variant sharing with Europeans. Furthermore, the French-Canadian population contains a larger proportion of putatively damaging functional variants, which could partially explain the increased incidence of genetic disease in the province. Our results highlight the impact of population demography on genetic fitness and the contribution of rare variants to the human genetic variation landscape, emphasizing the need for deep cataloguing of genetic variants by resequencing worldwide human populations in order to truly assess disease risk.

  4. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Ranieri

    Full Text Available In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA. Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate receptor inputs to cell function.

  5. Excessive signal transduction of gain-of-function variants of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) are associated with increased ER to cytosol calcium gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Vezzoli, Giuseppe; Soldati, Laura; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    In humans, gain-of-function mutations of the calcium-sensing receptor (CASR) gene are the cause of autosomal dominant hypocalcemia or type 5 Bartter syndrome characterized by an abnormality of calcium metabolism with low parathyroid hormone levels and excessive renal calcium excretion. Functional characterization of CaSR activating variants has been so far limited at demonstrating an increased sensitivity to external calcium leading to lower Ca-EC50. Here we combine high resolution fluorescence based techniques and provide evidence that for the efficiency of calcium signaling system, cells expressing gain-of-function variants of CaSR monitor cytosolic and ER calcium levels increasing the expression of the Sarco-Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium-ATPase (SERCA) and reducing expression of Plasma Membrane Calcium-ATPase (PMCA). Wild-type CaSR (hCaSR-wt) and its gain-of-function (hCaSR-R990G; hCaSR-N124K) variants were transiently transfected in HEK-293 cells. Basal intracellular calcium concentration was significantly lower in cells expressing hCaSR-wt and its gain of function variants compared to mock. In line, FRET studies using the D1ER probe, which detects [Ca2+]ER directly, demonstrated significantly higher calcium accumulation in cells expressing the gain of function CaSR variants compared to hCaSR-wt. Consistently, cells expressing activating CaSR variants showed a significant increase in SERCA activity and expression and a reduced PMCA expression. This combined parallel regulation in protein expression increases the ER to cytosol calcium gradient explaining the higher sensitivity of CaSR gain-of-function variants to external calcium. This control principle provides a general explanation of how cells reliably connect (and exacerbate) receptor inputs to cell function.

  6. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  7. A Bioinformatics Approach to the Identification of Variants Associated with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus that Reside in Functionally Validated miRNAs Binding Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, Hamid; Bastami, Milad; Jahani, Mohammad Mehdi; Alipoor, Behnam; Tabasinezhad, Maryam; Ghaderi, Omar; Nariman-Saleh-Fam, Ziba; Mirfakhraie, Reza; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Omrani, Mir Davood; Masotti, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The present work is aimed at finding variants associated with Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) that reside in functionally validated miRNAs binding sites and that can have a functional role in determining diabetes and related pathologies. Using bioinformatics analyses we obtained a database of validated polymorphic miRNA binding sites which has been intersected with genes related to DM or to variants associated and/or in linkage disequilibrium (LD) with it and is reported in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The workflow we followed allowed us to find variants associated with DM that also reside in functional miRNA binding sites. These data have been demonstrated to have a functional role by impairing the functions of genes implicated in biological processes linked to DM. In conclusion, our work emphasized the importance of SNPs located in miRNA binding sites. The results discussed in this work may constitute the basis of further works aimed at finding functional candidates and variants affecting protein structure and function, transcription factor binding sites, and non-coding epigenetic variants, contributing to widen the knowledge about the pathogenesis of this important disease.

  8. Functions of genes and enzymes involved in phenalinolactone biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daum, Martina; Schnell, Hans-Jörg; Herrmann, Simone; Günther, Andreas; Murillo, Renato; Müller, Rolf; Bisel, Philippe; Müller, Michael; Bechthold, Andreas

    2010-07-05

    Phenalinolactones are novel terpene glycoside antibiotics produced by Streptomyces sp. Tü6071. Inactivation of three oxygenase genes (plaO2, plaO3 and plaO5), two dehydrogenase genes (plaU, plaZ) and one putative acetyltransferase gene (plaV) led to the production of novel phenalinolactone derivatives (PL HS6, PL HS7, PL HS2 and PL X1). Furthermore, the exact biosynthetic functions of two enzymes were determined, and their in vitro activities were demonstrated. PlaO1, an Fe(II)/alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase, is responsible for the key step in gamma-butyrolactone formation, whereas PlaO5, a cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase, catalyses the 1-C-hydroxylation of phenalinolactone D. In addition, stable isotope feeding experiments with biosynthetic precursors shed light on the origin of the carbons in the gamma-butyrolactone moiety.

  9. Involvement of distinct PKC gene products in T cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gottfried eBaier

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available It is well established that members of the Protein kinase C(PKC family seem to have important roles in T cells. Focusing on the physiological and non-redundant PKC functions established in primary mouse T cells via germline gene-targeting approaches, our current knowledge defines two particularly critical PKC gene products, PKCθ and PKCα, as the flavor of PKC in T cells that appear to have a positive role in signaling pathways that are necessary for full antigen receptor-mediated T cell activation ex vivo and T cell-mediated immunity in vivo. Consistently, in spite of the current dogma that PKCθ inhibition might be sufficient to achieve complete immunosuppressive effects, more recent results have indicated that the pharmacological inhibition of PKCθ, and additionally, at least PKCα, appears to be needed to provide a successful approach for the prevention of allograft rejection and treatment of autoimmune diseases.

  10. Large-scale studies of the functional K variant of the butyrylcholinesterase gene in relation to Type 2 diabetes and insulin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, A; Nielsen, E-M D; Andersen, G;

    2004-01-01

    Polymorphisms of the butyrylcholinesterase gene (BCHE) are reported to associate with Alzheimer's disease and a recent study found a significant association of the BCHE K variant (G1615A/Ala539Thr) with Type 2 diabetes. The objectives of our study were to examine whether the BCHE K variant...... is associated with Type 2 diabetes or estimates of pancreatic beta cell function in large-scale populations of glucose-tolerant Caucasians....

  11. Functional involvement of cerebral cortex in adult sleepwalking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, A; Della Marca, G; Tonali, P A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Rubino, M; Di Lazzaro, V

    2007-08-01

    The pathophysiology of adult sleepwalking is still poorly understood. However, it is widely accepted that sleepwalking is a disorder of arousal. Arousal circuits widely project to the cortex, including motor cortex. We hypothesized that functional abnormality of these circuits could lead to changes in cortical excitability in sleepwalkers, even during wakefulness. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to examine the excitability of the human motor cortex during wakefulness in a group of adult sleepwalkers. When compared with the healthy control group, short interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), cortical silent period (CSP) duration, and short latency afferent inhibition (SAI) were reduced in adult sleepwalkers during wakefulness. Mean CSP duration was shorter in patients than in controls (80.9 +/- 41 ms vs. 139.4 +/- 37 ms; p = 0.0040). Mean SICI was significantly reduced in patients than in controls (73.5 +/- 38.4% vs. 36.7 +/- 13.1%; p = 0.0061). Mean SAI was also significantly reduced in patients than in controls (65.8 +/- 14.2% vs. 42.8 +/- 16.9%; p = 0.0053). This neurophysiological study suggests that there are alterations in sleepwalkers consistent with an impaired efficiency of inhibitory circuits during wakefulness. This inhibitory impairment could represent the neurophysiological correlate of brain "abnormalities" of sleepwalkers like "immaturity" of some neural circuits, synapses, or receptors.

  12. An abundance of rare functional variants in 202 drug target genes sequenced in 14.002 people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelson, Matthew R.; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2012-01-01

    Rare genetic variants contribute to complex disease risk; however, the abundance of rare variants in human populations remains unknown. We explored this spectrum of variation by sequencing 202 genes encoding drug targets in 14,002 individuals. We find rare variants are abundant (1 every 17 bases)...

  13. Association Between Variants of PRDM1 and NDP52 and Crohn's Disease, Based on Exome Sequencing and Functional Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellinghaus, David; Zhang, Hu; Zeissig, Sebastian; Lipinski, Simone; Till, Andreas; Jiang, Tao; Stade, Bjoern; Bromberg, Yana; Ellinghaus, Eva; Keller, Andreas; Rivas, Manuel A.; Skieceviciene, Jurgita; Doncheva, Nadezhda T.; Liu, Xiao; Liu, Qing; Jiang, Fuman; Forster, Michael; Mayr, Gabriele; Albrecht, Mario; Haesler, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Goodall, Jane; Berzuini, Carlo R.; Lee, James; Andersen, Vibeke; Vogel, Ulla; Kupcinskas, Limas; Kayser, Manfred; Krawczak, Michael; Nikolaus, Susanna; Weersma, Rinse K.; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y.; Sans, Miquel; Wijmenga, Cisca; Strachan, David P.; McAardle, Wendy L.; Vermeire, Severine; Rutgeerts, Paul; Sanderson, Jeremy D.; Mathew, Christopher G.; Vatn, Morten H.; Wang, Jun; Noethen, Markus M.; Duerr, Richard H.; Buening, Carsten; Brand, Stephan; Glas, Juergen; Winkelmann, Juliane; Illig, Thomas; Latiano, Anna; Annese, Vito; Halfvarson, Jonas; D'Amato, Mauro; Daly, Mark J.; Nothnagel, Michael; Karlsen, Tom H.; Subramani, Suresh; Rosenstiel, Philip; Schreiber, Stefan; Parkes, Miles; Franke, Andre

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 140 Crohn's disease (CD) susceptibility loci. For most loci, the variants that cause disease are not known and the genes affected by these variants have not been identified. We aimed to identify variants that cause CD through

  14. Update of the pompe disease mutation database with 60 novel GAA sequence variants and additional studies on the functional effect of 34 previously reported variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroos, Marian; Hoogeveen-Westerveld, Marianne; Michelakakis, Helen; Pomponio, Robert; Van der Ploeg, Ans; Halley, Dicky; Reuser, Arnold

    2012-08-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal glycogen storage disorder, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (EC; 3.2.1.20/3) can be caused by numerous pathogenic variants in the GAA gene. The Pompe Disease Mutation Database at http://www.pompecenter.nl aims to list all variants and their effect. This update reports on 94 variants. We examined 35 novel and 34 known mutations by site-directed mutagenesis and transient expression in COS-7 cells or HEK293T cells. Each of these mutations was given a severity rating using a previously published system, based on the level of acid α-glucosidase activity in medium and transfected cells and on the quantity and quality of the different molecular mass species in the posttranslational modification and transport of acid α-glucosidase. This approach enabled to classify 55 missense mutations as pathogenic and 13 as likely nonpathogenic. Based on their nature and the use of in silico analysis (Alamut® software), 12 of the additional 25 novel mutations were predicted to be pathogenic including 4 splicing mutations, 6 mutations leading to frameshift, and 2 point mutations causing stop codons. Seven of the additional mutations were considered nonpathogenic (4 silent and 3 occurring in intron regions), and 6 are still under investigation.

  15. Large-scale genome-wide analysis identifies genetic variants associated with cardiac structure and function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wild, Philipp S.; Felix, Janine F.; Schillert, Arne; Teumer, Alexander; Chen, Ming-Huei; Leening, Maarten J. G.; Voelker, Uwe; Grossmann, Vera; Brody, Jennifer A.; Irvin, Marguerite R.; Shah, Sanjiv J.; Pramana, Setia; Lieb, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Reinhold; Stanton, Alice V.; Malzahn, Doerthe; Smith, Albert Vernon; Sundstrom, Johan; Minelli, Cosetta; Ruggiero, Daniela; Lyytikainen, Leo-Pekka; Tiller, Daniel; Smith, J. Gustav; Monnereau, Claire; Di Tullio, Marco R.; Musani, Solomon K.; Morrison, Alanna C.; Pers, Tune H.; Morley, Michael; Kleber, Marcus E.; Aragam, Jayashri; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Bis, Joshua C.; Bisping, Egbert; Broeckel, Ulrich; Cheng, Susan; Deckers, Jaap W.; Del Greco, Fabiola; Edelmann, Frank; Fornage, Myriam; Franke, Lude; Friedrich, Nele; Harris, Tamara B.; Hofer, Edith; Hofman, Albert; Huang, Jie; Hughes, Alun D.; Kahonen, Mika; Kruppa, Jochen; Lackner, Karl J.; Lannfelt, Lars; Laskowski, Rafael; Launer, Lenore J.; Leosdottir, Margret; Lin, Honghuang; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Loley, Christina; MacRae, Calum A.; Mascalzoni, Deborah; Mayet, Jamil; Medenwald, Daniel; Morris, Andrew P.; Mueller, Christian; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nappo, Stefania; Nilsson, Peter M.; Nuding, Sebastian; Nutile, Teresa; Peters, Annette; Pfeufer, Arne; Pietzner, Diana; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Raitakari, Olli T.; Rice, Kenneth M.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rotter, Jerome I.; Ruohonen, Saku T.; Sacco, Ralph L.; Samdarshi, Tandaw E.; Schmidt, Helena; Sharp, Andrew S. P.; Shields, Denis C.; Sorice, Rossella; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Stricker, Bruno H.; Surendran, Praveen; Thom, Simon; Toeglhofer, Anna M.; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wachter, Rolf; Voelzke, Henry; Ziegler, Andreas; Muenzel, Thomas; Maerz, Winfried; Cappola, Thomas P.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Mitchell, Gary F.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Fox, Ervin R.; Dueker, Nicole D.; Jaddoe, Vincent W. V.; Melander, Olle; Russ, Martin; Lehtimaki, Terho; Ciullo, Marina; Hicks, Andrew A.; Lind, Lars; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Pieske, Burkert; Barron, Anthony J.; Zweiker, Robert; Schunkert, Heribert; Ingelsson, Erik; Liu, Kiang; Arnett, Donna K.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Blankenberg, Stefan; Larson, Martin G.; Felix, Stephan B.; Franco, Oscar H.; Zeller, Tanja; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Doerr, Marcus

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Understanding the genetic architecture of cardiac structure and function may help to prevent and treat heart disease. This investigation sought to identify common genetic variations associated with inter-individual variability in cardiac structure and function. METHODS. A GWAS

  16. Use of density functional theory orbitals in the GVVPT2 variant of second-order multistate multireference perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Mark R; Helgaker, Trygve

    2015-03-01

    A new variation of the second-order generalized van Vleck perturbation theory (GVVPT2) for molecular electronic structure is suggested. In contrast to the established procedure, in which CASSCF or MCSCF orbitals are first obtained and subsequently used to define a many-electron model (or reference) space, the use of an orbital space obtained from the local density approximation (LDA) variant of density functional theory is considered. Through a final, noniterative diagonalization of an average Fock matrix within orbital subspaces, quasicanonical orbitals that are otherwise indistinguishable from quasicanonical orbitals obtained from a CASSCF or MCSCF calculation are obtained. Consequently, all advantages of the GVVPT2 method are retained, including use of macroconfigurations to define incomplete active spaces and rigorous avoidance of intruder states. The suggested variant is vetted on three well-known model problems: the symmetric stretching of the O-H bonds in water, the dissociation of N2, and the stretching of ground and excited states C2 to more than twice the equilibrium bond length of the ground state. It is observed that the LDA-based GVVPT2 calculations yield good results, of comparable quality to conventional CASSCF-based calculations. This is true even for the C2 model problem, in which the orbital space for each state was defined by the LDA orbitals. These results suggest that GVVPT2 can be applied to much larger problems than previously accessible.

  17. Functional variants in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes are associated with shorter telomere length in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerne, Jasmina Z; Pohar-Perme, Maja; Cerkovnik, Petra; Gersak, Ksenija; Novakovic, Srdjan

    2015-07-01

    Estrogens and antioxidants indirectly alleviate telomere attrition. However, available clinical data on the association between hormone exposure and telomere length are inconclusive. In the present study, we examined the effects of exogenous estrogen use and of some genetic factors implicated in estrogen metabolism and oxidative stress response on mean leukocyte telomere length. We studied 259 postmenopausal women. Genotyping was conducted for CYP1B1 (rs1056836), COMT (rs4680), GSTP1 (rs1695), MnSOD (rs4880), KRAS (rs61764370), and MTHFR (rs1801133 and rs1801131) polymorphisms. Mean leukocyte telomere length was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR assay. In multivariate analysis we found no association between oral contraceptives or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and mean leukocyte telomere length. The presence of variant alleles in CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genes was statistically significantly associated with shorter mean leukocyte telomere length. Further, the data provided evidence for the effect modification of the association between HRT and mean leukocyte telomere length by the CYP1B1, KRAS and MTHFR genotypes. Our findings suggest that functionally relevant genetic variants within estrogen and folate metabolic pathways may influence telomere length. We propose these genetic factors should be taken into consideration when interpreting associations between hormone exposure and telomere length.

  18. The relationship between genetic risk variants with brain structure and function in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Licia P; Köhler, Cristiano A; de Sousa, Rafael T

    2017-01-01

    Genetic-neuroimaging paradigms could provide insights regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD). Nevertheless, findings have been inconsistent across studies. A systematic review of gene-imaging studies involving individuals with BD was conducted across electronic major databases fro...

  19. A functional Tyr1306Cys variant in LARG is associated with increased insulin action in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Bogardus, Clifton; Hanson, Robert L; Baier, Leslie J

    2006-05-01

    Diminished insulin sensitivity is a characteristic feature of type 2 diabetes. Inhibition of insulin action, resulting in reduced skeletal muscle glucose uptake, is mediated in part through stimulation of RhoA activity. One regulator of RhoA activity is leukemia-associated Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor (LARG). The LARG gene maps to a region on chromosome 11q23-24 that shows genetic linkage to BMI and type 2 diabetes in Pima Indians. Because of its role in RhoA activation, the LARG gene was analyzed as a positional candidate gene for this linkage. Sequencing of the LARG gene and genotyping of variants identified several polymorphisms that were associated with in vivo rates of insulin-mediated glucose uptake, at both physiological and maximally stimulating insulin concentrations, among 322 nondiabetic Pima Indians who had undergone a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. The strongest association with rate of glucose uptake was found with a Tyr1306Cys polymorphism (P LARG(Cys1306) protein had reduced activity compared with LARG(Tyr1306) protein (P LARG, through its differential activation of RhoA, increases insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic Pima Indians.

  20. Identification and Functional Characterization of G6PC2 Coding Variants Influencing Glycemic Traits Define an Effector Transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Anubha; Sim, Xueling; Ng, Hui Jin; Manning, Alisa; Rivas, Manuel A.; Highland, Heather M.; Locke, Adam E.; Grarup, Niels; Im, Hae Kyung; Cingolani, Pablo; Flannick, Jason; Fontanillas, Pierre; Fuchsberger, Christian; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Teslovich, Tanya M.; Rayner, N. William; Robertson, Neil R.; Beer, Nicola L.; Rundle, Jana K.; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Ladenvall, Claes; Blancher, Christine; Buck, David; Buck, Gemma; Burtt, Noël P.; Gabriel, Stacey; Gjesing, Anette P.; Groves, Christopher J.; Hollensted, Mette; Huyghe, Jeroen R.; Jackson, Anne U.; Jun, Goo; Justesen, Johanne Marie; Mangino, Massimo; Murphy, Jacquelyn; Neville, Matt; Onofrio, Robert; Small, Kerrin S.; Stringham, Heather M.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Trakalo, Joseph; Abecasis, Goncalo; Bell, Graeme I.; Blangero, John; Cox, Nancy J.; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Hanis, Craig L.; Seielstad, Mark; Wilson, James G.; Christensen, Cramer; Brandslund, Ivan; Rauramaa, Rainer; Surdulescu, Gabriela L.; Doney, Alex S. F.; Lannfelt, Lars; Linneberg, Allan; Isomaa, Bo; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Jørgensen, Marit E.; Jørgensen, Torben; Kuusisto, Johanna; Uusitupa, Matti; Salomaa, Veikko; Spector, Timothy D.; Morris, Andrew D.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Collins, Francis S.; Mohlke, Karen L.; Bergman, Richard N.; Ingelsson, Erik; Lind, Lars; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Hansen, Torben; Watanabe, Richard M.; Prokopenko, Inga; Dupuis, Josee; Karpe, Fredrik; Groop, Leif; Laakso, Markku; Pedersen, Oluf; Florez, Jose C.; Morris, Andrew P.; Altshuler, David; Meigs, James B.; Boehnke, Michael; McCarthy, Mark I.; Lindgren, Cecilia M.; Gloyn, Anna L.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) for fasting glucose (FG) and insulin (FI) have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7) evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF)=1.5%) influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1%) influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding) GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser) influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D), the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights. PMID:25625282

  1. Identification and functional characterization of G6PC2 coding variants influencing glycemic traits define an effector transcript at the G6PC2-ABCB11 locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubha Mahajan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Genome wide association studies (GWAS for fasting glucose (FG and insulin (FI have identified common variant signals which explain 4.8% and 1.2% of trait variance, respectively. It is hypothesized that low-frequency and rare variants could contribute substantially to unexplained genetic variance. To test this, we analyzed exome-array data from up to 33,231 non-diabetic individuals of European ancestry. We found exome-wide significant (P<5×10-7 evidence for two loci not previously highlighted by common variant GWAS: GLP1R (p.Ala316Thr, minor allele frequency (MAF=1.5% influencing FG levels, and URB2 (p.Glu594Val, MAF = 0.1% influencing FI levels. Coding variant associations can highlight potential effector genes at (non-coding GWAS signals. At the G6PC2/ABCB11 locus, we identified multiple coding variants in G6PC2 (p.Val219Leu, p.His177Tyr, and p.Tyr207Ser influencing FG levels, conditionally independent of each other and the non-coding GWAS signal. In vitro assays demonstrate that these associated coding alleles result in reduced protein abundance via proteasomal degradation, establishing G6PC2 as an effector gene at this locus. Reconciliation of single-variant associations and functional effects was only possible when haplotype phase was considered. In contrast to earlier reports suggesting that, paradoxically, glucose-raising alleles at this locus are protective against type 2 diabetes (T2D, the p.Val219Leu G6PC2 variant displayed a modest but directionally consistent association with T2D risk. Coding variant associations for glycemic traits in GWAS signals highlight PCSK1, RREB1, and ZHX3 as likely effector transcripts. These coding variant association signals do not have a major impact on the trait variance explained, but they do provide valuable biological insights.

  2. On a new class of integrals involving Bessel functions of the first kind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Agarwal

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several integral formulas involving a variety of special functions have been developed by many authors. Also many integral formulas containing the Bessel function $J_\

  3. The NOS1 variant rs6490121 is associated with variation in prefrontal function and grey matter density in healthy individuals.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rose, Emma J

    2012-03-01

    A common polymorphism within the nitric oxide sythanse-1 (NOS1) gene (rs6490121), initially identified as risk variant for schizophrenia, has been associated with variation in working memory and IQ. Here we investigated how this variation might be mediated at the level of brain structure and function. In healthy individuals (N=157), voxel based morphometry was used to compare grey matter (GM) volume between homozygous and heterozygous carriers of the \\'G\\' allele (i.e. the allele associated with impaired cognition and schizophrenia risk) and homozygous carriers of the non-risk \\'A\\' allele. Functional brain imaging data were also acquired from 48 participants during performance of a spatial working memory (SWM) task, and analysed to determine any effect of NOS1 risk status. An a priori region-of-interest analysis identified a significant reduction in ventromedial prefrontal GM volume in \\'G\\' allele carriers. Risk carriers also exhibited altered patterns of activation in the prefrontal cortex, caudate, and superior parietal lobe, which were characteristic of abnormal increases in activation in frontoparietal working memory networks and a failure to disengage regions of the default mode network. These functional changes suggest a NOS1-mediated processing inefficiency, which may contribute to cognitive dysfunction in schizophrenia. While the mechanisms by which NOS1 may influence brain structure and\\/or function have not yet been well delineated, these data provide further evidence for a role of NOS1 in risk for schizophrenia via an impact upon cognitive function.

  4. Exploring developmental and physiological functions of fatty acid and lipid variants through worm and fly genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Huanhu; Han, Min

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are more than biomolecules for energy storage and membrane structure. With ample structural variation, lipids critically participate in nearly all aspects of cellular function. Lipid homeostasis and metabolism are closely related to major human diseases and health problems. However, lipid functional studies have been significantly underdeveloped, partly because of the difficulty in applying genetics and common molecular approaches to tackle the complexity associated with lipid biosynthesis, metabolism, and function. In the past decade, a number of laboratories began to analyze the roles of lipid metabolism in development and other physiological functions using animal models and combining genetics, genomics, and biochemical approaches. These pioneering efforts have not only provided valuable insights regarding lipid functions in vivo but have also established feasible methodology for future studies. Here, we review a subset of these studies using Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster.

  5. ABCB1 genetic variant and its associated tacrolimus pharmacokinetics affect renal function in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Takafumi; Mino, Yasuaki; Aoki, Yuki; Hirano, Kumi; Shimoyama, Kumiko; Ogawa, Noriyoshi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kawakami, Junichi

    2015-05-20

    This study aimed to evaluate the blood exposure of and clinical responses to tacrolimus based on genetic variants of CYP3A5 and ABCB1 in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Seventy rheumatoid arthritis patients treated with oral tacrolimus once daily were enrolled. Blood concentrations of tacrolimus and its major metabolite 13-O-demethylate at 12h after dosing were determined. The relationships between the tacrolimus pharmacokinetics and efficacy, renal function, and CYP3A5 and ABCB1 genotypes were evaluated. Dose-normalized blood concentration of tacrolimus was significantly higher in the CYP3A5*3/*3 group than in the *1 allele carrier group. A lower metabolic ratio of 13-O-demethylate to tacrolimus was observed in the CYP3A5*3/*3 group. The ABCB1 3435TT group had higher dose-normalized blood concentrations of tacrolimus and 13-O-demethylate. The blood tacrolimus concentration was inversely correlated with the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). ABCB1 C3435T but not CYP3A5 genotype had decreased eGFR. Patients lacking the CYP3A5*3 allele had a higher incidence of tacrolimus withdrawal. CYP3A5*3 increased the blood exposure of tacrolimus through its metabolic reduction. ABCB1 C3435T led to a higher blood exposure of tacrolimus and its major metabolite. The ABCB1 genetic variant and its associated tacrolimus pharmacokinetics affected renal function in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic Variants Involved in Mitochondrial Oxidative Metabolism are associated with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in studies of 8,441 Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Henriksen, Jan Erik; Beck-Nielsen, Henning;

    a surrogate marker (BIG-AIR) for insulin secretion and variants in COX5B (rs11904110) and COX10 (rs10521253), and between fasting p-glucose and a variant in COX5B (rs11904110) and 2-h post-OGTT plasma glucose and a variant in NDUFV3 (rs8134542) (pdata suggest that genetic variants......=1.14, p=0.02) were significantly associated with T2D. In a subsequent meta-analysis combining our results with data from an avaliable subset of the DIAGRAM data, we demonstrated that three SNPs (rs10775377, rs8077302, rs9915302) in COX10 and a SNP (rs2267584) in a gene (UPK1A) next to COX6B1 were...

  7. A Bayesian method to incorporate hundreds of functional characteristics with association evidence to improve variant prioritization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A Gagliano

    Full Text Available The increasing quantity and quality of functional genomic information motivate the assessment and integration of these data with association data, including data originating from genome-wide association studies (GWAS. We used previously described GWAS signals ("hits" to train a regularized logistic model in order to predict SNP causality on the basis of a large multivariate functional dataset. We show how this model can be used to derive Bayes factors for integrating functional and association data into a combined Bayesian analysis. Functional characteristics were obtained from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE, from published expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL, and from other sources of genome-wide characteristics. We trained the model using all GWAS signals combined, and also using phenotype specific signals for autoimmune, brain-related, cancer, and cardiovascular disorders. The non-phenotype specific and the autoimmune GWAS signals gave the most reliable results. We found SNPs with higher probabilities of causality from functional characteristics showed an enrichment of more significant p-values compared to all GWAS SNPs in three large GWAS studies of complex traits. We investigated the ability of our Bayesian method to improve the identification of true causal signals in a psoriasis GWAS dataset and found that combining functional data with association data improves the ability to prioritise novel hits. We used the predictions from the penalized logistic regression model to calculate Bayes factors relating to functional characteristics and supply these online alongside resources to integrate these data with association data.

  8. Molecular epidemiology and functional assessment of novel allelic variants of SLC26A4 in non-syndromic hearing loss patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Yuan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mutations in SLC26A4, which encodes pendrin, are a common cause of deafness. SLC26A4 mutations are responsible for Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA. The mutation spectrum of SLC26A4 varies widely among ethnic groups. To investigate the incidence of EVA in Chinese population and to provide appropriate genetic testing and counseling to patients with SLC26A4 variants, we conducted a large-scale molecular epidemiological survey of SLC26A4. METHODS: A total of 2352 unrelated non-syndromic hearing loss patients from 27 different regions of China were included. Hot spot regions of SLC26A4, exons 8, 10 and 19 were sequenced. For patients with one allelic variant in the hot spot regions, the other exons were sequenced one by one until two mutant alleles had been identified. Patients with SLC26A4 variants were then examined by temporal bone computed tomography scan for radiological diagnosis of EVA. Ten SLC26A4 variants were cloned for functional study. Confocal microscopy and radioisotope techniques were used to examine the membrane expression of pendrin and transporter function. RESULTS: Of the 86 types of variants found, 47 have never been reported. The ratio of EVA in the Chinese deaf population was at least 11%, and that in patients of Han ethnicity reached at least 13%. The mutational spectrum and mutation detection rate of SLC26A4 are distinct among both ethnicities and regions of Mainland China. Most of the variants caused retention of pendrin in the intracellular region. All the mutant pendrins showed significantly reduced transport capability. CONCLUSION: An overall description of the molecular epidemiological findings of SLC26A4 in China is provided. The functional assessment procedure can be applied to identification of pathogenicity of variants. These findings are valuable for genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, prenatal testing and pre-implantation diagnosis in EVA families.

  9. Discovery and functional assessment of gene variants in the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Paré-Brunet, Laia; Glubb, Dylan; Evans, Patrick; Berenguer-Llergo, Antoni; Etheridge, Amy S.; Skol, Andrew D.; Di Rienzo, Anna; Duan, Shiwei; Gamazon, Eric R.; Innocenti, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Angiogenesis is a host-mediated mechanism in disease pathophysiology. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pathway is a major determinant of angiogenesis, and a comprehensive annotation of the functional variation in this pathway is essential to understand the genetic basis of angiogenesis-related diseases. We assessed the allelic heterogeneity of gene expression, population specificity of cis expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), and eQTL function in luciferase assays in CEU a...

  10. Divergence in the plasminogen-binding group a streptococcal M protein family: functional conservation of binding site and potential role for immune selection of variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson-Smith, Martina; Batzloff, Michael; Sriprakash, Kabada S; Dowton, Mark; Ranson, Marie; Walker, Mark J

    2006-02-10

    Group A streptococci (GAS) display receptors for the human zymogen plasminogen on the cell surface, one of which is the plasminogen-binding group A streptococcal M protein (PAM). Characterization of PAM genes from 12 GAS isolates showed significant variation within the plasminogen-binding repeat motifs (a1/a2) of this protein. To determine the impact of sequence variation on protein function, recombinant proteins representing five naturally occurring variants of PAM, together with a recombinant M1 protein, were expressed and purified. Equilibrium dissociation constants for the interaction of PAM variants with biotinylated Glu-plasminogen ranged from 1.58 to 4.99 nm. Effective concentrations of prototype PAM required for 50% inhibition of plasminogen binding to immobilized PAM variants ranged from 0.68 to 22.06 nm. These results suggest that although variation in the a1/a2 region of the PAM protein does affect the comparative affinity of PAM variants, the functional capacity to bind plasminogen is conserved. Additionally, a potential role for the a1 region of PAM in eliciting a protective immune response was investigated by using a mouse model for GAS infection. The a1 region of PAM was found to protect immunized mice challenged with a PAM-positive GAS strain. These data suggest a link between selective immune pressure against the plasminogen-binding repeats and the functional conservation of the binding domain in PAM variants.

  11. Intra- and interfamily phenotypic diversity in pain syndromes associated with a gain-of-function variant of NaV1.7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estacion Mark

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium channel NaV1.7 is preferentially expressed within dorsal root ganglia (DRG, trigeminal ganglia and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their fine-diamter axons, where it acts as a threshold channel, amplifying stimuli such as generator potentials in nociceptors. Gain-of-function mutations and variants (single amino acid substitutions of NaV1.7 have been linked to three pain syndromes: Inherited Erythromelalgia (IEM, Paroxysmal Extreme Pain Disorder (PEPD, and Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN. IEM is characterized clinically by burning pain and redness that is usually focused on the distal extremities, precipitated by mild warmth and relieved by cooling, and is caused by mutations that hyperpolarize activation, slow deactivation, and enhance the channel ramp response. PEPD is characterized by perirectal, periocular or perimandibular pain, often triggered by defecation or lower body stimulation, and is caused by mutations that severely impair fast-inactivation. SFN presents a clinical picture dominated by neuropathic pain and autonomic symptoms; gain-of-function variants have been reported to be present in approximately 30% of patients with biopsy-confirmed idiopathic SFN, and functional testing has shown altered fast-inactivation, slow-inactivation or resurgent current. In this paper we describe three patients who house the NaV1.7/I228M variant. Methods We have used clinical assessment of patients, quantitative sensory testing and skin biopsy to study these patients, including two siblings in one family, in whom genomic screening demonstrated the I228M NaV1.7 variant. Electrophysiology (voltage-clamp and current-clamp was used to test functional effects of the variant channel. Results We report three different clinical presentations of the I228M NaV1.7 variant: presentation with severe facial pain, presentation with distal (feet, hands pain, and presentation with scalp discomfort in three patients housing this NaV1.7 variant

  12. Generalized fractional kinetic equations involving generalized Struve function of the first kind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.S. Nisar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent paper Dinesh Kumar et al. developed a generalized fractional kinetic equation involving generalized Bessel function of first kind. The object of this paper is to derive the solution of the fractional kinetic equation involving generalized Struve function of the first kind. The results obtained in terms of generalized Struve function of first kind are rather general in nature and can easily construct various known and new fractional kinetic equations.

  13. SLC6A3 coding variant Ala559Val found in two autism probands alters dopamine transporter function and trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowton, E; Saunders, C; Reddy, I A; Campbell, N G; Hamilton, P J; Henry, L K; Coon, H; Sakrikar, D; Veenstra-VanderWeele, J M; Blakely, R D; Sutcliffe, J; Matthies, H J G; Erreger, K; Galli, A

    2014-10-14

    Emerging evidence associates dysfunction in the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) with the pathophysiology of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The human DAT (hDAT; SLC6A3) rare variant with an Ala to Val substitution at amino acid 559 (hDAT A559V) was previously reported in individuals with bipolar disorder or attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). We have demonstrated that this variant is hyper-phosphorylated at the amino (N)-terminal serine (Ser) residues and promotes an anomalous DA efflux phenotype. Here, we report the novel identification of hDAT A559V in two unrelated ASD subjects and provide the first mechanistic description of its impaired trafficking phenotype. DAT surface expression is dynamically regulated by DAT substrates including the psychostimulant amphetamine (AMPH), which causes hDAT trafficking away from the plasma membrane. The integrity of DAT trafficking directly impacts DA transport capacity and therefore dopaminergic neurotransmission. Here, we show that hDAT A559V is resistant to AMPH-induced cell surface redistribution. This unique trafficking phenotype is conferred by altered protein kinase C β (PKCβ) activity. Cells expressing hDAT A559V exhibit constitutively elevated PKCβ activity, inhibition of which restores the AMPH-induced hDAT A559V membrane redistribution. Mechanistically, we link the inability of hDAT A559V to traffic in response to AMPH to the phosphorylation of the five most distal DAT N-terminal Ser. Mutation of these N-terminal Ser to Ala restores AMPH-induced trafficking. Furthermore, hDAT A559V has a diminished ability to transport AMPH, and therefore lacks AMPH-induced DA efflux. Pharmacological inhibition of PKCβ or Ser to Ala substitution in the hDAT A559V background restores AMPH-induced DA efflux while promoting intracellular AMPH accumulation. Although hDAT A559V is a rare variant, it has been found in multiple probands with neuropsychiatric disorders associated with imbalances in DA neurotransmission

  14. Sequence and functional analysis of the envelope glycoproteins of hepatitis C virus variants selectively transmitted to a new host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arienzo, Valentina; Moreau, Alain; D'Alteroche, Louis; Gissot, Valérie; Blanchard, Emmanuelle; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Roch, Emmanuelle; Dubois, Frédéric; Giraudeau, Bruno; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Goudeau, Alain; Roingeard, Philippe; Brand, Denys

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) remains a challenging public health problem worldwide. The identification of viral variants establishing de novo infections and definition of the phenotypic requirements for transmission would facilitate the design of preventive strategies. We explored the transmission of HCV variants in three cases of acute hepatitis following needlestick accidents. We used single-genome amplification of glycoprotein E1E2 gene sequences to map the genetic bottleneck upon transmission accurately. We found that infection was likely established by a single variant in two cases and six variants in the third case. Studies of donor samples showed that the transmitted variant E1E2 amino acid sequences were identical or closely related to those of variants from the donor virus populations. The transmitted variants harbored a common signature site at position 394, within hypervariable region 1 of E2, together with additional signature amino acids specific to each transmission pair. Surprisingly, these E1E2 variants conferred no greater capacity for entry than the E1E2 derived from nontransmitted variants in lentiviral pseudoparticle assays. Mutants escaping the antibodies of donor sera did not predominate among the transmitted variants either. The fitness parameters affecting the selective outgrowth of HCV variants after transmission in an immunocompetent host may thus be more complex than those suggested by mouse models. Human antibodies directed against HCV envelope effectively cross-neutralized the lentiviral particles bearing E1E2 derived from transmitted variants. These findings provide insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying HCV transmission and suggest that viral entry is a potential target for the prevention of HCV infection.

  15. Predicting the effects of coding non-synonymous variants on protein function using the SIFT algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prateek; Henikoff, Steven; Ng, Pauline C

    2009-01-01

    The effect of genetic mutation on phenotype is of significant interest in genetics. The type of genetic mutation that causes a single amino acid substitution (AAS) in a protein sequence is called a non-synonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (nsSNP). An nsSNP could potentially affect the function of the protein, subsequently altering the carrier's phenotype. This protocol describes the use of the 'Sorting Tolerant From Intolerant' (SIFT) algorithm in predicting whether an AAS affects protein function. To assess the effect of a substitution, SIFT assumes that important positions in a protein sequence have been conserved throughout evolution and therefore substitutions at these positions may affect protein function. Thus, by using sequence homology, SIFT predicts the effects of all possible substitutions at each position in the protein sequence. The protocol typically takes 5-20 min, depending on the input. SIFT is available as an online tool (http://sift.jcvi.org).

  16. Algorithm for finding partitionings of hard variants of boolean satisfiability problem with application to inversion of some cryptographic functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Zaikin, Oleg

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose an approach for constructing partitionings of hard variants of the Boolean satisfiability problem (SAT). Such partitionings can be used for solving corresponding SAT instances in parallel. For the same SAT instance one can construct different partitionings, each of them is a set of simplified versions of the original SAT instance. The effectiveness of an arbitrary partitioning is determined by the total time of solving of all SAT instances from it. We suggest the approach, based on the Monte Carlo method, for estimating time of processing of an arbitrary partitioning. With each partitioning we associate a point in the special finite search space. The estimation of effectiveness of the particular partitioning is the value of predictive function in the corresponding point of this space. The problem of search for an effective partitioning can be formulated as a problem of optimization of the predictive function. We use metaheuristic algorithms (simulated annealing and tabu search) to move from point to point in the search space. In our computational experiments we found partitionings for SAT instances encoding problems of inversion of some cryptographic functions. Several of these SAT instances with realistic predicted solving time were successfully solved on a computing cluster and in the volunteer computing project SAT@home. The solving time agrees well with estimations obtained by the proposed method.

  17. Determining the functional significance of mismatch repair gene missense variants using biochemical and cellular assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinen, Christopher D; Juel Rasmussen, Lene

    2012-01-01

    provided an important experimental tool for studying the functional consequences of VUS. However, beyond this repair assay, a number of other experimental methods have been developed that allow us to test the effect of a VUS on discrete biochemical steps or other aspects of MMR function. Here, we describe......ABSTRACT: With the discovery that the hereditary cancer susceptibility disease Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by deleterious germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes nearly 20 years ago, genetic testing can now be used to diagnose this disorder in patients. A definitive diagnosis...

  18. Constitutively-active androgen receptor variants function independently of the HSP90 chaperone but do not confer resistance to HSP90 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, Joanna L; Selth, Luke A; Centenera, Margaret M; Townley, Scott L; Sun, Shihua; Plymate, Stephen R; Tilley, Wayne D; Butler, Lisa M

    2013-05-01

    The development of lethal, castration resistant prostate cancer is associated with adaptive changes to the androgen receptor (AR), including the emergence of mutant receptors and truncated, constitutively active AR variants. AR relies on the molecular chaperone HSP90 for its function in both normal and malignant prostate cells, but the requirement for HSP90 in environments with aberrant AR expression is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the efficacy of three HSP90 inhibitors, 17-AAG, HSP990 and AUY922, against clinically-relevant AR missense mutants and truncated variants. HSP90 inhibition effectively suppressed the signaling of wild-type AR and all AR missense mutants tested. By contrast, two truncated AR variants, AR-V7 and ARv567es, exhibited marked resistance to HSP90 inhibitors. Supporting this observation, nuclear localization of the truncated AR variants was not affected by HSP90 inhibition and AR variant:HSP90 complexes could not be detected in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, HSP90 inhibition resulted in accumulation of AR-V7 and ARv567es in both cell lines and human tumor explants. Despite the apparent independence of AR variants from HSP90 and their treatment-associated induction, the growth of cell lines with endogenous or enforced expression of AR-V7 or ARv567es remained highly sensitive to AUY922. This study demonstrates that functional AR variant signaling does not confer resistance to HSP90 inhibition, yields insight into the interaction between AR and HSP90 and provides further impetus for the clinical application of HSP90 inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer.

  19. Variant in OXTR gene and functional connectivity of the hypothalamus in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junping; Qin, Wen; Liu, Bing; Wang, Dawei; Zhang, Yunting; Jiang, Tianzi; Yu, Chunshui

    2013-11-01

    The oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) rs53576A has been associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). A smaller hypothalamic volume has been reported in healthy male A-allele carriers than in male GG homozygotes and in patients with ASDs than in healthy controls. These findings prompt the hypothesis that male AA homozygotes may have weaker hypothalamic functional connectivity when compared to male G-allele carriers. We calculated local functional connectivity density (FCD) using a voxel-wise data-driven approach based on resting-state functional MRI data in 270 young healthy subjects. Both the main effect of genotype and the gender-by-genotype interaction were considered. Of the whole brain, only the local FCD of the hypothalamus exhibited the main effect of genotype. Post-hoc testing revealed significantly lower local FCD in male AA homozygotes compared to male G-allele carriers although there was only a trend of significance in the gender-by-genotype interaction. We further analyzed the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the hypothalamic region that demonstrating significant genotype differences in local FCD. We found a significant gender-by-genotype interaction in rsFC between the hypothalamic region and the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, but no significant main effect of genotype was found. Post-hoc testing revealed that this rsFC was significantly weaker in male AA homozygotes compared to male G-allele carriers. Our findings identify gender-dependent mechanisms of OXTR rs53576 gene variation impacting the functional connectivity of the hypothalamus in healthy individuals and suggest that these mechanisms are important for understanding ASDs.

  20. CAUSEL: an epigenome- and genome-editing pipeline for establishing function of noncoding GWAS variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spisák, Sándor; Lawrenson, Kate; Fu, Yanfang

    2015-01-01

    a general pipeline in which candidate functional SNPs are first evaluated by fine mapping, epigenomic profiling, and epigenome editing, and then interrogated for causal function by using genome editing to create isogenic cell lines followed by phenotypic characterization. To validate this approach, we...... analyzed the 6q22.1 prostate cancer risk locus and identified rs339331 as the top-scoring SNP. Epigenome editing confirmed that the rs339331 region possessed regulatory potential. By using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome editing, we created a panel of isogenic 22Rv1...... prostate cancer cell lines representing all three genotypes (TT, TC, CC) at rs339331. Introduction of the 'T' risk allele increased transcription of the regulatory factor 6 (RFX6) gene, increased homeobox B13 (HOXB13) binding at the rs339331 region, and increased deposition of the enhancer-associated H3K4...

  1. A New Hybrid MGBPSO-GSA Variant for Improving Function Optimization Solution in Search Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narinder Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a newly hybrid nature-inspired approach (MGBPSO-GSA is developed with a combination of Mean Gbest Particle Swarm Optimization (MGBPSO and Gravitational Search Algorithm (GSA. The basic inspiration is to integrate the ability of exploitation in MGBPSO with the ability of exploration in GSA to synthesize the strength of both approaches. As a result, the presented approach has the automatic balance capability between local and global searching abilities. The performance of the hybrid approach is tested on a variety of classical functions, ie, unimodal, multimodal, and fixed-dimension multimodal functions. Furthermore, Iris data set, Heart data set, and economic dispatch problems are used to compare the hybrid approach with several metaheuristics. Experimental statistical solutions prove empirically that the new hybrid approach outperforms significantly a number of metaheuristics in terms of solution stability, solution quality, capability of local and global optimum, and convergence speed.

  2. Dissociation of Structural and Functional Integrities of the Motor System in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Behavioral-Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jong Seok; Ferguson, Michele; Tan, Rachel; Mioshi, Eneida; Simon, Neil; Burrell, James; Vucic, Steve; Hodges, John R.; Kiernan, Matthew C

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study investigated the structural and functional changes in the motor system in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; n=25) and behavioral-variant fronto-temporal dementia (bvFTD; n=17) relative to healthy controls (n=37). Methods Structural changes were examined using a region-of-interest approach, applying voxel-based morphometry for gray-matter changes and diffusion tensor imaging for white-matter changes. Functional changes in the motor system were elucidated using threshold-tracking transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) measurements of upper motor-neuron excitability. Results The structural analyses showed that in ALS there were more white-matter changes in the corticospinal and motor-cortex regions and more gray-matter changes in the cerebellum in comparison to controls. bvFTD showed substantial gray- and white-matter changes across virtually all motor-system regions compared to controls, although the brainstem was affected less than the other regions. Direct comparisons across patient groups showed that the gray- and white-matter motor-system changes inclusive of the motor cortex were greater in bvFTD than in ALS. By contrast, the functional integrity of the motor system was more adversely affected in ALS than in bvFTD, with both patient groups showing increased excitability of upper motor neurons compared to controls. Conclusions Cross-correlation of structural and functional data further revealed a neural dissociation of different motor-system regions and tracts covarying with the TMS excitability across both patient groups. The structural and functional motor-system integrities appear to be dissociated between ALS and bvFTD, which represents useful information for the diagnosis of motor-system changes in these two disorders. PMID:26932257

  3. IMHOTEP—a composite score integrating popular tools for predicting the functional consequences of non-synonymous sequence variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Carolin; Mort, Matthew; Junge, Olaf; Cooper, David N.; Krawczak, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The in silico prediction of the functional consequences of mutations is an important goal of human pathogenetics. However, bioinformatic tools that classify mutations according to their functionality employ different algorithms so that predictions may vary markedly between tools. We therefore integrated nine popular prediction tools (PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, SIFT, MutationTaster2, Mutation Assessor and FATHMM as well as conservation-based Grantham Score and PhyloP) into a single predictor. The optimal combination of these tools was selected by means of a wide range of statistical modeling techniques, drawing upon 10 029 disease-causing single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from Human Gene Mutation Database and 10 002 putatively ‘benign’ non-synonymous SNVs from UCSC. Predictive performance was found to be markedly improved by model-based integration, whilst maximum predictive capability was obtained with either random forest, decision tree or logistic regression analysis. A combination of PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, MutationTaster2 and FATHMM was found to perform as well as all tools combined. Comparison of our approach with other integrative approaches such as Condel, CoVEC, CAROL, CADD, MetaSVM and MetaLR using an independent validation dataset, revealed the superiority of our newly proposed integrative approach. An online implementation of this approach, IMHOTEP (‘Integrating Molecular Heuristics and Other Tools for Effect Prediction’), is provided at http://www.uni-kiel.de/medinfo/cgi-bin/predictor/. PMID:28180317

  4. IMHOTEP-a composite score integrating popular tools for predicting the functional consequences of non-synonymous sequence variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Carolin; Mort, Matthew; Junge, Olaf; Cooper, David N; Krawczak, Michael; Caliebe, Amke

    2017-02-17

    The in silico prediction of the functional consequences of mutations is an important goal of human pathogenetics. However, bioinformatic tools that classify mutations according to their functionality employ different algorithms so that predictions may vary markedly between tools. We therefore integrated nine popular prediction tools (PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, SIFT, MutationTaster2, Mutation Assessor and FATHMM as well as conservation-based Grantham Score and PhyloP) into a single predictor. The optimal combination of these tools was selected by means of a wide range of statistical modeling techniques, drawing upon 10 029 disease-causing single nucleotide variants (SNVs) from Human Gene Mutation Database and 10 002 putatively ‘benign’ non-synonymous SNVs from UCSC. Predictive performance was found to be markedly improved by model-based integration, whilst maximum predictive capability was obtained with either random forest, decision tree or logistic regression analysis. A combination of PolyPhen-2, SNPs&GO, MutPred, MutationTaster2 and FATHMM was found to perform as well as all tools combined. Comparison of our approach with other integrative approaches such as Condel, CoVEC, CAROL, CADD, MetaSVM and MetaLR using an independent validation dataset, revealed the superiority of our newly proposed integrative approach. An online implementation of this approach, IMHOTEP (‘Integrating Molecular Heuristics and Other Tools for Effect Prediction’), is provided at http://www.uni-kiel.de/medinfo/cgi-bin/predictor/.

  5. Functional identification of a novel transcript variant of INPP4B in human colon and breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, Amanda; Guo, Su Tang; Sherwin, Simonne; Farrelly, Margaret; Yan, Xu Guang; Zhang, Xu Dong; Jiang, Chen Chen

    2017-03-25

    The 4-phosphatase Inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase II (INPP4B) is a regulator of the PI3K signalling pathway and functions to suppress or promote activation of downstream kinases depending on cell type and context. Here we report the identification of a novel small transcript variant of INPP4B (INPP4B-S) that has a role in promoting proliferation of colon and breast cancer cells. INPP4B-S differed from full length INPP4B (INPP4B-FL) by the insertion of a small exon between exons 15 and 16 and the deletion of exons 20-24. Nevertheless, INPP4B-S retained all the functional domains of INPP4B-FL and was similarly located to the cytoplasm. Overexpression of INPP4B-S increased, whereas selective knockdown of INPP4B-S reduced the rate of proliferation in HCT116 and MCF-7 cells. These results warrant further investigation of the role INPP4B-S in activation of downstream kinases and in regulation of cancer pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Hb Santa Clara (beta 97His-->Asn), a human haemoglobin variant: functional characterization and structure modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Maria Cristina; Carelli Alinovi, Cristiana; Schininà, Maria Eugenia; Clementi, Maria Elisabetta; Amato, Antonio; Cappabianca, Maria Pia; Pezzotti, Michela; Giardina, Bruno

    2007-10-01

    This study examines the functional and structural effects of amino acid substitution at alpha(1)beta(2) interface of Hb Santa Clara (beta 97His-->Asn). We have characterized the variation by a combination of electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry and DNA sequence analysis followed by oxygen-binding experiments. Functional studies outlined an increased oxygen affinity, reduced effect of organic phosphates and a reduced Bohr effect with respect to HbA. In view of the primary role of this interface in the cooperative quaternary transition from the T to R conformational state, a theoretical three-dimensional model of Hb Santa Clara was generated. Structural investigations suggest that replacement of Asn for His beta 97 results in a significant stabilization of the high affinity R-state of the haemoglobin molecule with respect to the low affinity T-state. The role of beta FG4 position has been further examined by computational models of known beta FG4 variants, namely Hb Malmö (beta 97His-->Gln), Hb Wood (beta 97His-->Leu), Hb Nagoya (beta 97His-->Pro) and Hb Moriguchi (beta 97His-->Tyr). These findings demonstrate that, among the various residues at the alpha(1)beta(2) (and alpha(2)beta(1)) intersubunit interface, His beta FG4 contributes significantly to the quaternary constraints that are responsible for the low oxygen affinity of human deoxyhaemoglobin.

  7. Functional analysis of a promoter variant identified in the CFTR gene in cis of a frameshift mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viart, Victoria; Des Georges, Marie; Claustres, Mireille; Taulan, Magali

    2012-02-01

    In monogenic diseases, the presence of several sequence variations in the same allele may complicate our understanding of genotype-phenotype relationships. We described new alterations identified in a cystic fibrosis (CF) patient harboring a 48C>G promoter sequence variation associated in cis of a 3532AC>GTA mutation and in trans with the F508del mutation. Functional analyses including in vitro experiments confirmed the deleterious effect of the 3532GTA frameshift mutation through the creation of a premature termination codon. The analyses also revealed that the 48G promoter variant has a negative effect on both transcription and mRNA level, thus demonstrating the importance of analyzing all mutations or sequence variations with potential impact on CF transmembrane conductance regulator processing, even when the two known disease-causing mutations have already been detected. Our results emphasize the need to perform, wherever possible, functional studies that may greatly assist the interpretation of the disease-causing potential of rare mutation-associated sequence variations.

  8. BRCA1 R1699Q variant displaying ambiguous functional abrogation confers intermediate breast and ovarian cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spurdle, Amanda B; Whiley, Phillip J; Thompson, Bryony

    2012-01-01

    Clinical classification of rare sequence changes identified in the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 is essential for appropriate genetic counselling of individuals carrying these variants. We previously showed that variant BRCA1 c.5096G>A p.Arg1699Gln in the BRCA1 transcriptional...

  9. Structural and Functional Characterization of the VQ Protein Family and VQ Protein Variants from Soybean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yuan; Yang, Yan; Zhou, Xinjian; Chi, Yingjun; Fan, Baofang; Chen, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing the FxxxVQxhTG or VQ motif interact with WRKY transcription factors. Although VQ proteins have been reported in several plants, knowledge about their structures, functions and evolution is still very limited. Here, we report structural and functional analysis of the VQ protein family from soybean. Like Arabidopsis homologues, soybean VQ proteins bind only Group I and IIc WRKY proteins and a substantial number of their genes are responsive to stress-associated phytohormones. Overexpression of some soybean VQ genes in Arabidopsis had strong effects on plant growth, development, disease resistance and heat tolerance. Phylogenetic analysis, sequence alignment and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that the region immediately upstream of the FxxxVQxhTG motif also affects binding to WRKY proteins. Consistent with a larger WRKY-binding VQ domain, soybean VQ22 protein from cultivated soybean contains a 4-amino acid deletion in the region preceding its VQ motif that completely abolishes its binding to WRKY proteins. By contrast, the 4-amino acid deletion is absent in the VQ22 protein from wild soybean species (Glycine soja). Overexpression of wild soybean VQ22 in cultivated soybean inhibited growth, particularly after cold treatment. Thus, the mutation of soybean VQ22 is associated with advantageous phenotypes and may have been positively selected during evolution. PMID:27708406

  10. Effect of genetic variant in BICC1 on functional and structural brain changes in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermingham, Rachel; Carballedo, Angela; Lisiecka, Danuta; Fagan, Andrew; Morris, Derek; Fahey, Ciara; Donohoe, Gary; Meaney, James; Gill, Michael; Frodl, Thomas

    2012-12-01

    Genes and early-life adversity (ELA) interactively increase the risk of developing major depressive disorder (MDD). A recent genome-wide association study suggests that the minor T-allele of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the bicaudal C homolog 1 gene (BICC1) has a protective role against MDD. The aims of the study were to investigate whether the minor T-allele of BICC1 is protective against hippocampal structural brain changes, whether it is associated with increased functional brain activity in the emotion regulation system, and how ELA would modify this association. Forty-four patients with MDD and 44 healthy controls were investigated using structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and functional MRI with an emotion inhibition task. Analysis of a single-nucleotide polymorphism in the BICC1-1 (rs999845) gene was performed. Right hippocampal bodies of patients and controls without a history of ELA and who carry the protective T-allele of BICC1 were significantly larger compared with those participants homozygous for the major C-allele of BICC1. However, MDD patients with ELA, who carry the T-allele, had smaller hippocampal head volumes compared with MDD patients without ELA. FMRI showed that patients and controls carrying the protective T-allele of BICC1 activate the emotion regulation system significantly more compared with those participants homozygous for the major C-allele (pELA.

  11. Biochemical monitoring in fenugreek to develop functional food and medicinal plant variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, James E; Bandara, Manjula; Lee, Ee Lynn; Driedger, Darcy; Acharya, Surya

    2011-02-28

    Many plants used as functional foods or for medicinal purposes have been criticized for their inconsistent physiological effects. Variation in genotype and environmental conditions under which plants are produced can contribute to this inconsistency in biochemical composition. Fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L.) is a medicinal plant that not only can lower blood glucose and cholesterol levels in animals, but also can be used as a forage crop for livestock feed. Seed content for the bioactive compounds diosgenin, galactomannan and 4-hydroxyisoleucine was characterized for ten fenugreek genotypes under rainfed and irrigated conditions. High and low seed yielding genotype/environment combinations were identified that possessed distinct biochemical and seed production traits. In general high seed yielding genotype/environment combinations exhibited a more stable biochemical composition and consisted largely of irrigated fenugreek. This research indicates that comprehensive biochemical analysis of plant products would facilitate the development of more reliable produce for use by the functional food/medicinal plant industry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Secret Agent Society Social Skills Program for Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Comparison of Two School Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Renae; Rotolone, Cassie; Sofronoff, Kate

    2015-01-01

    School is often considered an ideal setting for child social skills training due to the opportunities it provides for skills teaching, modeling, and practice. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of two variants of the Secret Agent Society social skills program for children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFASD) in a…

  13. Functional promoter variant in zinc finger protein 202 predicts severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frikke-Schmidt, R.; Nordestgaard, Børge; Grande, Peer

    2008-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to test the hypotheses that single nucleotide polymorphisms ( SNPs), in zinc finger protein 202 ( ZNF202), predict severe atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease ( IHD). Background ZNF202 is a transcriptional repressor controlling promoter elements in genes......,998 controls. Finally, we determined whether g. -660A>G altered transcriptional activity of the ZNF202 promoter in vitro. Results Cross-sectionally, ZNF202 g. -660 GG versus AA homozygosity predicted an odds ratio for severe atherosclerosis of 2.01 ( 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34 to 3.01). Prospectively...... were highly correlated with g. -660A>G, also predicted risk of severe atherosclerosis and IHD. Finally, ZNF202 g. -660G versus g. -660A was associated with a 60% reduction in transcriptional activity in vitro, whereas none of the 2 correlated SNPs were predicted to be functional. Conclusions...

  14. Assessment of respiratory involvement in children with mucoplysaccharidosis using pulmonary function tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. El Falaki

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Evaluation and follow up of patients with MPS using pulmonary function tests are essential to detect early involvement of respiratory system and hence start treatment for respiratory complications early in the course of the disease.

  15. Functional analysis of promoter variants in the microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Diana; Schneider-Muntau, Alexandra; Klapper, Maja; Nitz, Inke; Helwig, Ulf; Fölsch, Ulrich R; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Döring, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTTP) is required for the assembly and secretion of apolipoprotein B (apoB)-containing lipoproteins from the intestine and liver. According to this function, polymorphic sites in the MTTP gene showed associations to low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and related traits of the metabolic syndrome. Here we studied the functional impact of common MTTP promoter polymorphisms rs1800804:T>C (-164T>C), rs1800803:A>T (-400A>T), and rs1800591:G>T (-493G>T) using gene-reporter assays in intestinal Caco-2 and liver Huh-7 cells. Significant results were obtained in Huh-7 cells. The common MTTP promoter haplotype -164T/-400A/-493G showed about two-fold lower activity than the rare haplotype -164C/-400T/-493T. MTTP promoter mutant constructs -164T/-400A/-493T and -164T/-400T/-493T exhibited similar activity than the common haplotype. Activities of mutants -164C/-400A/-493G and -164C/-400A/-493T resembled the rare MTTP promoter haplotype. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSAs) revealed higher binding capacity of the transcriptional factor Sterol regulatory element binding protein1a (SREBP1a) to the -164T probe in comparison to the -164C probe. In conclusion, our study indicates that the polymorphism -164T>C mediates different activities of common MTTP promoter haplotypes via SREBP1a. This suggested that the already described SREBP-dependent modulation of MTTP expression by diet is more effective in -164T than in -164C carriers.

  16. Cellulase variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  17. In Vitro Functional Analyses of Infrequent Nucleotide Variants in the Lactase Enhancer Reveal Different Molecular Routes to Increased Lactase Promoter Activity and Lactase Persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebert, A.; Jones, B.L.; Danielsen, Erik Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The genetic trait that allows intestinal lactase to persist into adulthood in some 35% of humans worldwide operates at the level of transcription, the effect being caused by cis-acting nucleotide changes upstream of the lactase gene (LCT). A single nucleotide substitution, -13910 C>T, the first...... causal variant to be identified, accounts for lactase persistence over most of Europe. Located in a region shown to have enhancer function in vitro, it causes increased activity of the LCT promoter in Caco-2 cells, and altered transcription factor binding. Three other variants in close proximity, -13907...

  18. Certain Fractional Integral Formulas Involving the Product of Generalized Bessel Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleanu, D.; Agarwal, P.; Purohit, S. D.

    2013-01-01

    We apply generalized operators of fractional integration involving Appell's function F 3(·) due to Marichev-Saigo-Maeda, to the product of the generalized Bessel function of the first kind due to Baricz. The results are expressed in terms of the multivariable generalized Lauricella functions. Corresponding assertions in terms of Saigo, Erdélyi-Kober, Riemann-Liouville, and Weyl type of fractional integrals are also presented. Some interesting special cases of our two main results are presented. We also point out that the results presented here, being of general character, are easily reducible to yield many diverse new and known integral formulas involving simpler functions. PMID:24379745

  19. New modular relations involving cubes of the Göllnitz–Gordon functions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    OLIVIA X M YAO

    2017-06-01

    Chen and Huang established some elegant modular relations for the Göllnitz–Gordon functions analogous to Ramanujan’s list of forty identities for the Rogers–Ramanujan functions. In this paper, we derive some new modular relations involving cubes of the Göllnitz–Gordon functions. Furthermore, we also provide newproofs of some modular relations for the Göllnitz–Gordon functions due to Gugg.

  20. Quality of Parental Homework Involvement: Predictors and Reciprocal Relations with Academic Functioning in the Reading Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Hanna; Trautwein, Ulrich; Nagy, Gabriel; Nagengast, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined predictors of the quality of parental homework involvement and reciprocal relations between the quality of parental homework involvement and students' reading achievement and academic functioning in a reading-intensive subject (German). Data from 2,830 students in nonacademic tracks and their parents who were surveyed in both…

  1. [Chronic diseases, functional ability, social involvement and satisfaction in community-dwelling elderly: the Fibra study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Juliana Martins; Neri, Anita Liberalesso

    2013-12-01

    The scope of this article is to describe variations in the measurement of chronic diseases, functional ability, social involvement and satisfaction with respect to memory, problem solving, social relationships, environment, health services and transportation. This is done according to gender, age and income. It analyzes correlations between social involvement and functional ability in independent community dwelling-elderly aged 65 and above. 2,472 seniors without cognitive deficit, from probabilistic samples of seven Brazilian locations, were submitted to self-reported measurement concerning all variables, with the exception of grip strength and gait speed assessed by objective tests. Mean age was 72.2 ± 5.5 years and mean income was 3.9 ± 4.9 MW; 65.7% were women, who had more diseases, worse functional performance and greater social involvement than men; those aged 80 and above and the poorest participants had worse functional performance and less social involvement. Correlations were observed between functional ability and social involvement. Level of income was related to satisfaction concerning memory, problem solving, health and transport services. Health, functionality and satisfaction interact in old age, influencing patterns of activity and social involvement.

  2. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cigliola

    Full Text Available Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36, which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D. GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123 associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  3. Functional characterization of the ubiquitin variant encoded by the baculovirus Autographa californica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, A L; Katzung, D J; Reback, P M; Guarino, L A

    1996-04-30

    The marked evolutionary conservation of ubiquitin is assumed to arise from constraints imposed by folding, stability, and interaction of the polypeptide with various components of the ATP, ubiquitin-dependent degradative pathway. The present studies characterize the most divergent (75% identity) of the species-specific ubiquitin isoforms encoded as a late gene product of the baculovirus Autographa californica [Guarino, L. A. (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 87, 409-413]. Viral ubiquitin supports 40% of the rate of ATP-dependent degradation exhibited by eukaryotic ubiquitin. Inhibition of proteolysis correlated with a lower steady-state concentration of ubiquitin-conjugated degradative intermediates. Rate studies revealed that viral ubiquitin exerts its effect at the step of isopeptide ligase-catalyzed (E3) ubiquitin conjugation since viral and eukaryotic polypeptides are identical in their abilities to support ATP-coupled activation by E1 and transthiolation to E2 carrier proteins. Other studies demonstrated viral ubiquitin severely attenuated the rate of K48-linked multiubiquitin chain formation in E3-independent conjugation catalyzed by recombination yeast CDC34 or rabbit reticulocyte E232K but not chain elongation of alternate linkages formed by yeast RAD6 or human E2EPF. The latter observations suggest nonconserved positions on viral ubiquitin constitute recognition signals for K48-linked chain formation. Sequence comparison of species-specific ubiquitin isoforms indicates that nonconserved positions localized to a defined region on the polypeptide surface distinct from the basic face required for E1 binding. These results suggest this novel ubiquitin isoform may function in baculoviral replication to block destruction of a short-lived protein(s) by the host degradative pathway, targeted through either E2-catalyzed K48-linked multibiquitin chain formation or general E3-mediated conjugation.

  4. Functional Study of the P32T ITPA Variant Associated with Drug Sensitivity in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepchenkova, Elena I.; Tarakhovskaya, Elena R.; Spitler, Kathryn; Frahm, Christin; Menezes, Miriam R.; Simone, Peter D.; Kolar, Carol; Marky, Luis A.; Borgstahl, Gloria E. O.; Pavlov, Youri I.

    2009-01-01

    Sanitization of the cellular nucleotide pools from mutagenic base analogs is necessary for the accuracy of transcription and replication of genetic material and plays a substantial role in cancer prevention. The undesirable mutagenic, recombinogenic and toxic incorporation of purine base analogs (i.e. ITP, dITP, XTP, dXTP or 6-hydroxyaminopurine (HAP) deoxynucleoside triphosphate) into nucleic acids is prevented by inosine triphosphate pyrophosphatase (ITPA). The ITPA gene is a highly conserved, moderately expressed gene. Defects in ITPA orthologs in model organisms cause severe sensitivity to HAP and chromosome fragmentation. A human polymorphic allele 94C->A encodes for the enzyme with a P32T amino acid change and leads to accumulation of non-hydrolyzed ITP. ITPase activity is not detected in erythrocytes of these patients. The P32T polymorphism has also been associated with adverse sensitivity to purine base analog drugs. We have found that the ITPA-P32T mutant is a dimer in solution, as is wild-type ITPA, and has normal ITPA activity in vitro, but the melting point of ITPA-P32T is 5 degrees C lower than that of wild-type. ITPA-P32T is also fully functional in vivo in model organisms as determined by a HAP mutagenesis assay and its complementation of a bacterial ITPA defect. The amount of ITPA protein detected by western blot is severely diminished in a human fibroblast cell line with the 94C->A change. We propose that the P32T mutation exerts its effect in certain human tissues by cumulative effects of destabilization of transcripts, protein stability and availability. PMID:19631656

  5. Analysis of ancestral and functionally relevant CD5 variants in systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carmen Cenit

    Full Text Available CD5 plays a crucial role in autoimmunity and is a well-established genetic risk factor of developing RA. Recently, evidence of positive selection has been provided for the CD5 Pro224-Val471 haplotype in East Asian populations. The aim of the present work was to further analyze the functional relevance of non-synonymous CD5 polymorphisms conforming the ancestral and the newly derived haplotypes (Pro224-Ala471 and Pro224-Val471, respectively as well as to investigate the potential role of CD5 on the development of SLE and/or SLE nephritis.The CD5 SNPs rs2241002 (C/T; Pro224Leu and rs2229177 (C/T; Ala471Val were genotyped using TaqMan allelic discrimination assays in a total of 1,324 controls and 681 SLE patients of Spanish origin. In vitro analysis of CD3-mediated T cell proliferative and cytokine response profiles of healthy volunteers homozygous for the above mentioned CD5 haplotypes were also analyzed.T-cell proliferation and cytokine release were significantly increased showing a bias towards to a Th2 profile after CD3 cross-linking of peripheral mononuclear cells from healthy individuals homozygous for the ancestral Pro224-Ala471 (CC haplotype, compared to the more recently derived Pro224-Val471 (CT. The same allelic combination was statistically associated with Lupus nephritis.The ancestral Ala471 CD5 allele confers lymphocyte hyper-responsiveness to TCR/CD3 cross-linking and is associated with nephritis in SLE patients.

  6. The region of XRCC1 which harbours the three most common nonsynonymous polymorphic variants, is essential for the scaffolding function of XRCC1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanssen-Bauer, Audun; Solvang-Garten, Karin; Gilljam, Karin Margaretha

    2012-01-01

    XRCC1 functions as a non-enzymatic, scaffold protein in single strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER). Here, we examine different regions of XRCC1 for their contribution to the scaffolding functions of the protein. We found that the central BRCT1 domain is essential for recruit......XRCC1 functions as a non-enzymatic, scaffold protein in single strand break repair (SSBR) and base excision repair (BER). Here, we examine different regions of XRCC1 for their contribution to the scaffolding functions of the protein. We found that the central BRCT1 domain is essential......-nuclear localization or the ability to support recruitment of POLß or PNKP to micro-irradiated sites for these variants relative to the conservative protein, we did observe lower foci intensity after micro-irradiation and a reduced stability of the foci with the Arg280His and Arg399Gln variants, respectively...

  7. Protein C Thr315Ala variant results in gain of function but manifests as type II deficiency in diagnostic assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiulan; Yang, Likui; Dinarvand, Peyman; Wang, Xuefeng; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2015-04-09

    Protein C (PC) is a vitamin K-dependent plasma glycoprotein, which upon activation by thrombin in complex with thrombomodulin (TM), regulates the coagulation cascade through a feedback loop inhibition mechanism. PC deficiency is associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). A recent cohort study aimed at establishing a normal PC range identified a healthy PC-deficient subject whose PC antigen level of 65% and activity levels of 50% (chromogenic assay) and 36% (clotting assay) were markedly low. The proband has a negative family history of VTE. Genetic analysis revealed the proband has a heterozygous missense mutation in which Thr-315 of the PC heavy chain has been substituted with Ala. We expressed this mutant in HEK-293 cells and purified it to homogeneity. A similar decrease in both anticoagulant and anti-inflammatory activities of the activated protein C mutant was observed in plasma- and cell-based assays. Interestingly, we discovered if functional assays were coupled to PC activation by the thrombin-TM complex, the variant exhibits improved activities in all assays. Sequence analysis revealed Thr-315 is a consensus N-linked glycosylation site for Asn-313 and that its elimination significantly (∼four- to fivefold) improves the maximum velocity of PC activation by the thrombin-TM complex, explaining the basis for the proband's negative VTE pedigree. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  8. Stable expression and functional characterisation of the diamondback moth ryanodine receptor G4946E variant conferring resistance to diamide insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williams, Alan J; Williamson, Martin S; Field, Linda M; Lüemmen, Peter; Davies, T G Emyr

    2015-10-01

    Diamides, such as flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole, belong to a new chemical class of insecticides that act as conformation-sensitive activators of insect ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Both compounds are registered for use against lepidopteran species such as the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, a notorious global pest of cruciferous crops. Recently acquired resistance to diamide insecticides in this species is thought to be due to a target-site mutation conferring an amino acid substitution (G4946E), located within the trans-membrane domain of the RyR, though the exact role of this mutation has not yet been fully determined. To address this we have cloned a full-length cDNA encoding the P. xylostella RyR and established clonal Sf9 cell lines stably expressing either the wildtype RyR or the G4946E variant, in order to test the sensitivity to flubendiamide and chlorantraniliprole on the recombinant receptor. We report that the efficacy of both diamides was dramatically reduced in clonal Sf9 cells stably expressing the G4946E modified RyR, providing clear functional evidence that the G4946E RyR mutation impairs diamide insecticide binding.

  9. Functional effects of different medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase genotypes and identification of asymptomatic variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marga Sturm

    Full Text Available Medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (MCAD deficiency (OMIM 201450 is the most common inherited disorder of fatty acid metabolism presenting with hypoglycaemia, hepatopathy and Reye-like symptoms during catabolism. In the past, the majority of patients carried the prevalent c.985A>G mutation in the ACADM gene. Since the introduction of newborn screening many other mutations with unknown clinical relevance have been identified in asymptomatic newborns. In order to identify functional effects of these mutant genotypes we correlated residual MCAD (OMIM 607008 activities as measured by octanoyl-CoA oxidation in lymphocytes with both genotype and relevant medical reports in 65 newborns harbouring mutant alleles. We identified true disease-causing mutations with residual activities of 0 to 20%. In individuals carrying the c.199T>C or c.127G>A mutation on one allele, residual activities were much higher and in the range of heterozygotes (31%-60%. Therefore, both mutations cannot clearly be associated with a clinical phenotype. This demonstrates a correlation between the octanoyl-CoA oxidation rate in lymphocytes and the clinical outcome. With newborn screening, the natural course of disease is difficult to assess. The octanoyl-CoA oxidation rate, therefore, allows a risk assessment at birth and the identification of new ACADM genotypes associated with asymptomatic disease variants.

  10. Association between functional variants of the ICAM1 and CRP genes and metabolic syndrome in Taiwanese subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Lung-An; Chang, Chi-Jen; Wu, Semon; Teng, Ming-Sheng; Chou, Hsin-Hua; Chang, Hsien-Hsun; Chang, Pi-Yueh; Ko, Yu-Lin

    2010-12-01

    Although inflammation has been shown to play an important role in metabolic syndrome (MetS), the association between inflammatory marker gene polymorphisms and the risk of MetS has not been fully elucidated. This study was initiated to investigate the association between functional variants of inflammatory marker genes and the risk of MetS in Taiwanese adults. The sample population comprised 615 unrelated subjects, of which 22% had MetS. The single nucleotide polymorphisms rs5491 on the intercellular adhesive molecule 1 (ICAM1) gene and rs3091244 on C-reactive protein (CRP) were genotyped. The ICAM1 rs5491 polymorphism was significantly associated with the level of soluble intercellular adhesive molecule 1 (P gene polymorphisms play an important role in modulating the risk of insulin resistance and MetS for subjects with central obesity. These findings will contribute toward a better understanding of the mechanism of association between inflammatory markers and the risk of developing atherosclerotic disease.

  11. Association of a functional variant of the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene with personality, anxiety, and depressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurrikoff, Triin; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Kiive, Evelyn; Konstabel, Kenn; Herterich, Sabine; Veidebaum, Toomas; Reif, Andreas; Harro, Jaanus

    2012-11-01

    A functional promoter polymorphism of the nitric oxide synthase 1 gene first exon 1f variable number tandem repeat (NOS1 ex1f-VNTR) is associated with impulsivity and related psychopathology. Facets of impulsivity are strongly associated with personality traits; maladaptive impulsivity with neuroticism; and adaptive impulsivity with extraversion. Both high neuroticism and low extraversion predict anxiety and depressive symptoms. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the NOS1 ex1f-VNTR genotype and possible interaction with environmental factors on personality, anxiety, and depressiveness in a population-representative sample. Short allele carriers had higher neuroticism and anxiety than individuals with the long/long (l/l) genotype. Male short/short homozygotes also had higher extraversion. In the face of environmental adversity, females with a short allele had higher scores of neuroticism, anxiety, and depressiveness compared to the l/l genotype. Males were more sensitive to environmental conditions when they had the l/l genotype and low extraversion. In conclusion, the NOS1 ex1f-VNTR influences personality and emotional regulation dependent on gender and environment. Together with previous findings on the effect of the NOS1 genotype on impulse control, these data suggest that NOS1 should be considered another plasticity gene, because its variants are associated with different coping strategies.

  12. The BRCA1 variant p.Ser36Tyr abrogates BRCA1 protein function and potentially confers a moderate risk of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Charita M; Hadjisavvas, Andreas; Kyratzi, Maria; Flouri, Christina; Neophytou, Ioanna; Anastasiadou, Violetta; Loizidou, Maria A; Kyriacou, Kyriacos

    2014-01-01

    The identification of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS) in the BRCA1 gene complicates genetic counselling and causes additional anxiety to carriers. In silico approaches currently used for VUS pathogenicity assessment are predictive and often produce conflicting data. Furthermore, functional assays are either domain or function specific, thus they do not examine the entire spectrum of BRCA1 functions and interpretation of individual assay results can be misleading. PolyPhen algorithm predicted that the BRCA1 p.Ser36Tyr VUS identified in the Cypriot population was damaging, whereas Align-GVGD predicted that it was possibly of no significance. In addition the BRCA1 p.Ser36Tyr variant was found to be associated with increased risk (OR = 3.47, 95% CI 1.13-10.67, P = 0.02) in a single case-control series of 1174 cases and 1109 controls. We describe a cellular system for examining the function of exogenous full-length BRCA1 and for classifying VUS. We achieved strong protein expression of full-length BRCA1 in transiently transfected HEK293T cells. The p.Ser36Tyr VUS exhibited low protein expression similar to the known pathogenic variant p.Cys61Gly. Co-precipitation analysis further demonstrated that it has a reduced ability to interact with BARD1. Further, co-precipitation analysis of nuclear and cytosolic extracts as well as immunofluorescence studies showed that a high proportion of the p.Ser36Tyr variant is withheld in the cytoplasm contrary to wild type protein. In addition the ability of p.Ser36Tyr to co-localize with conjugated ubiquitin foci in the nuclei of S-phase synchronized cells following genotoxic stress with hydroxyurea is impaired at more pronounced levels than that of the p.Cys61Gly pathogenic variant. The p.Ser36Tyr variant demonstrates abrogated function, and based on epidemiological, genetic, and clinical data we conclude that the p.Ser36Tyr variant is probably associated with a moderate breast cancer risk.

  13. Applying GG-Convex Function to Hermite-Hadamard Inequalities Involving Hadamard Fractional Integrals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available By virtue of fractional integral identities, incomplete beta function, useful series, and inequalities, we apply the concept of GG-convex function to derive new type Hermite-Hadamard inequalities involving Hadamard fractional integrals. Finally, some applications to special means of real numbers are demonstrated.

  14. Effect of azithromycin, terbutaline combined with montelukast on airway function and gradient of infection in cough variant asthma children with infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Xin Pei

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To analyze the effect of azithromycin, terbutaline combined with montelukast on airway function and gradient of infection in cough variant asthma children with infection. Methods: A total of 116 cases of cough variant asthma children with infection were included in the study and randomly divided into observation group and control group (n=58), control group received azithromycin treatment, observation group received azithromycin, terbutaline combined with montelukast treatment, and then differences in basic lung function and small airway function, asthma attack and airway remodeling-related indicators, infection-related indicators, etc. were compared between two groups after treatment.Results: Basic lung function indexes FEV1 and FVC of observation group after treatment were significantly higher than those of control group, and small airway function indexes MMEF, FEF50% and FEF75% were significantly lower than those of control group; serum ECP, IgE, IL-5, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, PET, CRP and IL-4 levels of observation group after treatment were lower than those of control group while IFN-γ and hBD-1 levels were higher than those of control group.Conclusion:Azithromycin, terbutaline combined with montelukast can improve airway function and infection status and promote disease rehabilitation in cough variant asthma children with infection.

  15. High frequency of rare copy number variants affecting functionally related genes in patients with structural brain malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Tümer, Zeynep;

    2011-01-01

    ) to investigate copy number variants (CNVs) in a cohort of 169 patients with various structural brain malformations including lissencephaly, polymicrogyria, focal cortical dysplasia, and corpus callosum agenesis. The majority of the patients had intellectual disabilities (ID) and suffered from symptomatic...

  16. A functional variant of PTPN22 confers risk for Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome but not for ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 22 (PTPN22 is a key negative regulator of T lymphocytes and has emerged as an important candidate susceptibility factor for a number of immune-related diseases. This study aimed to examine the predisposition of PTPN22 SNPs to Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH syndrome and acute anterior uveitis (AAU associated with ankylosing spondylitis (AS. METHODS: A total of 1005 VKH syndrome, 302 AAU+AS+ patients and 2010 normal controls among the Chinese Han population were enrolled in the study. Genotyping, PTPN22 expression, cell proliferation, cytokine production and cell activation were examined by PCR-RFLP, Real-time PCR, CCK8, ELISA and Flow cytometry. RESULTS: The results showed significantly increased frequencies of the rs2488457 CC genotype and C allele but a decreased frequency of the GG genotype in VKH syndrome patients (PBonferroni correction (Pc = 3.47×10(-7, OR = 1.54; Pc = 3.83×10(-8, OR = 1.40; Pc = 6.35×10(-4, OR = 0.62; respectively. No significant association of the tested SNPs with AAU+AS+ patients was observed. Functional studies showed a decreased PTPN22 expression, impaired cell proliferation and lower production of IL-10 in rs2488457 CC cases compared to GG cases (Pc = 0.009, Pc = 0.015 and Pc = 0.048 respectively. No significant association was observed concerning T cell activation and rs2488457 genotype. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that a functional variant of PTPN22 confers risk for VKH syndrome but not for AAU+AS+ in a Chinese Han population, which may be due to a modulation of the PTPN22 expression, PBMC proliferation and IL-10 production.

  17. Sufficient Optimality Conditions for Multiobjective Programming Involving (V, ρ) h,ψ-type Ⅰ Functions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qing-xiang; JIANG Yan; KANG Rui-rui

    2012-01-01

    New classes of functions namely (V,ρ)h,ψ-type Ⅰ,quasi (V,ρ)h,ψ-type Ⅰ and pseudo (V,ρ)h,ψ-type Ⅰ functions are defined for multiobjective programming problem by using BenTal's generalized algebraic operation.The examples of (V,ρ)h.ψ-type Ⅰ functions are given.The sufficient optimality conditions are obtained for multi-objective programming problem involving above new generalized convexity.

  18. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Manzo, Saúl; Marcial-Quino, Jaime; Vanoye-Carlo, America; Enríquez-Flores, Sergio; De la Mora-De la Mora, Ignacio; González-Valdez, Abigail; García-Torres, Itzhel; Martínez-Rosas, Víctor; Sierra-Palacios, Edgar; Lazcano-Pérez, Fernando; Rodríguez-Bustamante, Eduardo; Arreguin-Espinosa, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency), and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency) (Class I, II and III, respectively) affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS) fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients. PMID:26633385

  19. Mutations of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Durham, Santa-Maria and A+ Variants Are Associated with Loss Functional and Structural Stability of the Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD deficiency is the most common enzymopathy in the world. More than 160 mutations causing the disease have been identified, but only 10% of these variants have been studied at biochemical and biophysical levels. In this study we report on the functional and structural characterization of three naturally occurring variants corresponding to different classes of disease severity: Class I G6PD Durham, Class II G6PD Santa Maria, and Class III G6PD A+. The results showed that the G6PD Durham (severe deficiency, and the G6PD Santa Maria and A+ (less severe deficiency (Class I, II and III, respectively affect the catalytic efficiency of these enzymes, are more sensitive to temperature denaturing, and affect the stability of the overall protein when compared to the wild type WT-G6PD. In the variants, the exposure of more and buried hydrophobic pockets was induced and monitored with 8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid (ANS fluorescence, directly affecting the compaction of structure at different levels and probably reducing the stability of the protein. The degree of functional and structural perturbation by each variant correlates with the clinical severity reported in different patients.

  20. THIRD-ORDER DIFFERENTIAL SUBORDINATION RESULTS FOR ANALYTIC FUNCTIONS INVOLVING THE GENERALIZED BESSEL FUNCTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huo TANG; Erhan DENIZ

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we derive some third-order differential subordination results for analytic functions in the open unit disk, using the operator Bcκf by means of normalized form of the generalized Bessel functions of the first kind, which is defined as z(Bcκ+1f(z))′=κBcκf(z)−(κ−1)Bcκ+1f(z), where b, c, p ∈ C and κ = p+(b+1)/2 ∈ C\\Z−0 (Z−0 = {0,−1,−2, · · ·}). The results are obtained by considering suitable classes of admissible functions. Various known or new special cases of our main results are also pointed out.

  1. Functional variants of human papillomavirus type 16 demonstrate host genome integration and transcriptional alterations corresponding to their unique cancer epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Robert; Rosa, Bruce A; Lameiras, Sonia; Cuninghame, Sean; Bernard, Josee; Floriano, Wely B; Lambert, Paul F; Nicolas, Alain; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2016-11-02

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a worldwide burden as they are a widespread group of tumour viruses in humans. Having a tropism for mucosal tissues, high-risk HPVs are detected in nearly all cervical cancers. HPV16 is the most common high-risk type but not all women infected with high-risk HPV develop a malignant tumour. Likely relevant, HPV genomes are polymorphic and some HPV16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are under evolutionary constraint instigating variable oncogenicity and immunogenicity in the infected host. To investigate the tumourigenicity of two common HPV16 variants, we used our recently developed, three-dimensional organotypic model reminiscent of the natural HPV infectious cycle and conducted various "omics" and bioinformatics approaches. Based on epidemiological studies we chose to examine the HPV16 Asian-American (AA) and HPV16 European Prototype (EP) variants. They differ by three non-synonymous SNPs in the transforming and virus-encoded E6 oncogene where AAE6 is classified as a high- and EPE6 as a low-risk variant. Remarkably, the high-risk AAE6 variant genome integrated into the host DNA, while the low-risk EPE6 variant genome remained episomal as evidenced by highly sensitive Capt-HPV sequencing. RNA-seq experiments showed that the truncated form of AAE6, integrated in chromosome 5q32, produced a local gene over-expression and a large variety of viral-human fusion transcripts, including long distance spliced transcripts. In addition, differential enrichment of host cell pathways was observed between both HPV16 E6 variant-containing epithelia. Finally, in the high-risk variant, we detected a molecular signature of host chromosomal instability, a common property of cancer cells. We show how naturally occurring SNPs in the HPV16 E6 oncogene cause significant changes in the outcome of HPV infections and subsequent viral and host transcriptome alterations prone to drive carcinogenesis. Host genome instability is closely linked to viral

  2. Whole-exome sequencing and imaging genetics identify functional variants for rate of change in hippocampal volume in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nho, K; Corneveaux, J J; Kim, S; Lin, H; Risacher, S L; Shen, L; Swaminathan, S; Ramanan, V K; Liu, Y; Foroud, T; Inlow, M H; Siniard, A L; Reiman, R A; Aisen, P S; Petersen, R C; Green, R C; Jack, C R; Weiner, M W; Baldwin, C T; Lunetta, K; Farrer, L A; Furney, S J; Lovestone, S; Simmons, A; Mecocci, P; Vellas, B; Tsolaki, M; Kloszewska, I; Soininen, H; McDonald, B C; Farlow, M R; Ghetti, B; Huentelman, M J; Saykin, A J

    2013-07-01

    Whole-exome sequencing of individuals with mild cognitive impairment, combined with genotype imputation, was used to identify coding variants other than the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 allele associated with rate of hippocampal volume loss using an extreme trait design. Matched unrelated APOE ε3 homozygous male Caucasian participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) were selected at the extremes of the 2-year longitudinal change distribution of hippocampal volume (eight subjects with rapid rates of atrophy and eight with slow/stable rates of atrophy). We identified 57 non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which were found exclusively in at least 4 of 8 subjects in the rapid atrophy group, but not in any of the 8 subjects in the slow atrophy group. Among these SNVs, the variants that accounted for the greatest group difference and were predicted in silico as 'probably damaging' missense variants were rs9610775 (CARD10) and rs1136410 (PARP1). To further investigate and extend the exome findings in a larger sample, we conducted quantitative trait analysis including whole-brain search in the remaining ADNI APOE ε3/ε3 group (N=315). Genetic variation within PARP1 and CARD10 was associated with rate of hippocampal neurodegeneration in APOE ε3/ε3. Meta-analysis across five independent cross sectional cohorts indicated that rs1136410 is also significantly associated with hippocampal volume in APOE ε3/ε3 individuals (N=923). Larger sequencing studies and longitudinal follow-up are needed for confirmation. The combination of next-generation sequencing and quantitative imaging phenotypes holds significant promise for discovery of variants involved in neurodegeneration.

  3. ABCC8 R1420H Loss-of-Function Variant in a Southwest American Indian Community: Association With Increased Birth Weight and Doubled Risk of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Leslie J; Muller, Yunhua Li; Remedi, Maria Sara; Traurig, Michael; Piaggi, Paolo; Wiessner, Gregory; Huang, Ke; Stacy, Alyssa; Kobes, Sayuko; Krakoff, Jonathan; Bennett, Peter H; Nelson, Robert G; Knowler, William C; Hanson, Robert L; Nichols, Colin G; Bogardus, Clifton

    2015-12-01

    Missense variants in KCNJ11 and ABCC8, which encode the KIR6.2 and SUR1 subunits of the β-cell KATP channel, have previously been implicated in type 2 diabetes, neonatal diabetes, and hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (HHI). To determine whether variation in these genes affects risk for type 2 diabetes or increased birth weight as a consequence of fetal hyperinsulinemia in Pima Indians, missense and common noncoding variants were analyzed in individuals living in the Gila River Indian Community. A R1420H variant in SUR1 (ABCC8) was identified in 3.3% of the population (N = 7,710). R1420H carriers had higher mean birth weights and a twofold increased risk for type 2 diabetes with a 7-year earlier onset age despite being leaner than noncarriers. One individual homozygous for R1420H was identified; retrospective review of his medical records was consistent with HHI and a diagnosis of diabetes at age 3.5 years. In vitro studies showed that the R1420H substitution decreases KATP channel activity. Identification of this loss-of-function variant in ABCC8 with a carrier frequency of 3.3% affects clinical care as homozygous inheritance and potential HHI will occur in 1/3,600 births in this American Indian population.

  4. Functional analyses for tRNase Z variants: an aspartate and a histidine in the active site are essential for the catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbarbary, Reyad A; Takaku, Hiroaki; Nashimoto, Masayuki

    2008-12-01

    We performed functional analyses for various single amino-acid substitution variants of Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis, and human tRNase Zs. The well-conserved six histidine, His(I)-His(VI), and two aspartate, Asp(I) and Asp(II), residues together with metal ions are thought to form the active site of tRNase Z. The Mn(2+)-rescue analysis for Thermotoga maritima tRNase Z(S) has suggested that Asp(I) and His(V) directly contribute the proton transfer for the catalysis, and a catalytic mechanism has been proposed. However, experimental evidence supporting the proposed mechanism was limited. Here we intensively examined E. coli and B. subtilis tRNase Z(S) variants and human tRNase Z(L) variants for cleavage activities on pre-tRNAs in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) ions. We observed that the Mn(2+) ions cannot rescue the activities of Asp(I)Ala and His(V)Ala variants from each species, which are lost in the presence of Mg(2+). This observation may support the proposed catalytic mechanism.

  5. Associations of potentially functional variants in IL-6, JAKs and STAT3 with gastric cancer risk in an eastern Chinese population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Li-Xin; Wang, Meng-Yun; Li, Jin; Sun, Meng-Hong; Yang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jiu-Cun; Jin, Li; Wang, Ya-Nong; Wei, Qing-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-6 (IL-6)/JAK/STAT3 signaling pathway plays a central role in inflammation-mediated cancers, including gastric cancer (GCa). We evaluated associations between 10 potentially functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of four essential genes in the pathway and GCa risk in a study of 1,125 GCa cases and 1,221 cancer-free controls. We found that a significant higher GCa risk was associated with IL-6 rs2069837G variant genotypes [adjusted odds ratios (OR) = 1.33; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.12-1.59 for AG + GG vs. AA)] and JAK1 rs2230587A variant genotypes (adjusted OR = 1.20; 95% CI = 1.02-1.43 for GA + AA vs. GG). We also found that a significant decreased GCa risk was associated with STAT3 rs1053004G variant genotypes (adjusted OR = 0.84; 95% CI = 0.71-0.99 for AG + GG vs. AA). The combined analysis of IL-6 rs2069837G and JAK1 rs2230587A variant risk genotypes revealed that individuals with one-or-two risk genotypes exhibited an increased risk for GCa (adjusted OR = 1.34; 95% CI = 1.13-1.59). Genotypes and mRNA expression correlation analysis using the data from the HapMap 3 database provided further support for the observed risk associations. Larger studies are warranted to validate these findings. PMID:27049718

  6. Minimax fractional programming problem involving nonsmooth generalized α-univex functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anurag JAYSWAL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a new class of generalized α-univex functions where the involved functions are locally Lipschitz. We extend the concept of α-type I invex [S. K. Mishra, J. S. Rautela, On nondifferentiable minimax fractional programming under generalized α-type I invexity, J. Appl. Math. Comput. 31 (2009 317-334] to α-univexity and an example is provided to show that there exist functions that are α-univex but not α-type I invex. Furthermore, Karush-Kuhn-Tucker-type sufficient optimality conditions and duality results for three different types of dual models are obtained for nondifferentiable minimax fractional programming problem involving generalized α-univex functions. The results in this paper extend some known results in the literature.

  7. Remarks on the paper: "Bounds for functions involving ratios of modified Bessel functions"

    CERN Document Server

    Segura, Javier

    2011-01-01

    A recent paper by C.G. Kokologiannaki published in J. Math. Anal. Appl. \\cite{Kolo:2012:BFI} gives some properties for ratios of modified Bessel functions and, in particular, some bounds. These bounds are said to improve the range of some inequalities in \\cite{Segura:2011:BRM} or to be sharper. Unfortunately, Kokologiannaki made some mistakes in the comparison and no improvement or extension is made over the results in \\cite{Segura:2011:BRM}. We explain the errors in these comments and show that the bounds given in \\cite{Kolo:2012:BFI} are already contained in \\cite{Segura:2011:BRM}.

  8. On Generalized Fractional Kinetic Equations Involving Generalized Bessel Function of the First Kind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a new and further generalized form of the fractional kinetic equation involving generalized Bessel function of the first kind. The manifold generality of the generalized Bessel function of the first kind is discussed in terms of the solution of the fractional kinetic equation in the paper. The results obtained here are quite general in nature and capable of yielding a very large number of known and (presumably new results.

  9. New Relations Involving an Extended Multiparameter Hurwitz-Lerch Zeta Function with Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Srivastava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We derive several new expansion formulas involving an extended multiparameter Hurwitz-Lerch zeta function introduced and studied recently by Srivastava et al. (2011. These expansions are obtained by using some fractional calculus methods such as the generalized Leibniz rules, the Taylor-like expansions in terms of different functions, and the generalized chain rule. Several (known or new special cases are also given.

  10. Chondroitin sulfate A-adhering Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes express functionally important antibody epitopes shared by multiple variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Lea; Dobrilovic, Tina; Magistrado, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes to chond......Acquired protection from Plasmodium falciparum placental malaria, a major cause of maternal, fetal, and infant morbidity, is mediated by IgG specific for the P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 variant VAR2CSA. This protein enables adhesion of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes...

  11. Selection of IgG variants with increased FcRn binding using random and directed mutagenesis: impact on effector functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline eMonnet

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the reasonably long half-life of IgGs, market pressure for higher patient convenience while conserving efficacy continues to drive IgG half-life improvement. IgG half-life is dependent on the neonatal Fc receptor FcRn, which amongst other functions, protects IgG from catabolism. FcRn binds the Fc domain of IgG at an acidic pH ensuring that endocytosed IgG will not be degraded in lysosomal compartments and will then be released into the bloodstream. Consistent with this mechanism of action, several Fc engineered IgG with increased FcRn affinity and conserved pH-dependency were designed and resulted in longer half-life in vivo in human FcRn transgenic mice (hFcRn, cynomolgus monkeys and recently in healthy humans. These IgG variants were usually obtained by in silico approaches or directed mutagenesis in the FcRn binding site. Using random mutagenesis, combined with a pH-dependent phage display selection process, we isolated IgG variants with improved FcRn-binding which exhibited longer in vivo half-life in hFcRn mice. Interestingly, many mutations enhancing Fc/FcRn interaction were located at a distance from the FcRn binding site validating our random molecular approach. Directed mutagenesis was then applied to generate new variants to further characterize our IgG variants and the effect of the mutations selected. Since these mutations are distributed over the whole Fc sequence, binding to other Fc effectors, such as complement C1q and FcgRs, was dramatically modified, even by mutations distant from these effectors’ binding sites. Hence, we obtained numerous IgG variants with increased FcRn binding and different binding patterns to other Fc effectors, including variants without any effector function, providing distinct fit-for-purpose Fc molecules. We therefore provide evidence that half-life and effector functions should be optimized simultaneously as mutations can have unexpected effects on all Fc receptors that are critical for Ig

  12. Can Parents' Involvement in Children's Education Offset the Effects of Early Insensitivity on Academic Functioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Jennifer D.; Pomerantz, Eva M.; Roisman, Glenn I.

    2014-01-01

    Data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (N = 1,312) were analyzed to examine whether the adverse effects of early insensitive parenting on children's academic functioning can be offset by parents' later involvement in children's education. Observations of mothers' early…

  13. Relationship between involvement and functional milk desserts intention to purchase. Influence on attitude towards packaging characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Gastón; Besio, Mariángela; Giménez, Ana; Deliza, Rosires

    2010-10-01

    Consumers perceive functional foods as member of the particular food category to which they belong. In this context, apart from health and sensory characteristics, non-sensory factors such as packaging might have a key role on determining consumers' purchase decisions regarding functional foods. The aims of the present work were to study the influence of different package attributes on consumer willingness to purchase regular and functional chocolate milk desserts; and to assess if the influence of these attributes was affected by consumers' level of involvement with the product. A conjoint analysis task was carried out with 107 regular milk desserts consumers, who were asked to score their willingness to purchase of 16 milk dessert package concepts varying in five features of the package, and to complete a personal involvement inventory questionnaire. Consumers' level of involvement with the product affected their interest in the evaluated products and their reaction towards the considered conjoint variables, suggesting that it could be a useful segmentation tool during food development. Package colour and the presence of a picture on the label were the variables with the highest relative importance, regardless of consumers' involvement with the product. The importance of these variables was higher than the type of dessert indicating that packaging may play an important role in consumers' perception and purchase intention of functional foods.

  14. CI in the work place: does involving the HRM function make any difference?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyland, Paul; Becker, Karen; Sload, Terry

    2008-01-01

    People are central to successful Continuous Improvement (CI), and in larger organisations a Human Resource Management (HRM) function is responsible for people related issues. Central to CI is learning and a culture that supports CI. Learning needs to be both individual and organisational, and must...... benefit the organisation's performance. The HRM function is often given the task of championing cultural change and managing aspects of training and learning, and it would appear that involvement of HRM professionals would enhance CI efforts and assist in the timely solution of issues within the CI...... process. This paper aims to determine the influence of involving HRM professionals in CI, and if their involvement has any impact on support and tools used in CI and the contribution of CI to business performance....

  15. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Liu, Shujun; Gerrits, Monique M; te Morsche, Rene H M; Lauria, Giuseppe; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-09-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system within sensory dorsal root ganglion and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their small diameter peripheral axons. We recently reported missense substitutions in SCN9A that encode functional Na(v)1.7 variants in 28% of patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy. Two patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy manifested minimal autonomic dysfunction unlike the other six patients in this series, and both of these patients carry the Na(v)1.7/R185H variant, presenting the opportunity to compare variants associated with extreme ends of a spectrum from minimal to severe autonomic dysfunction. Herein, we show by voltage-clamp that R185H variant channels enhance resurgent currents within dorsal root ganglion neurons and show by current-clamp that R185H renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable. We also show that in contrast, R185H variant channels do not produce detectable changes when studied by voltage-clamp within sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion, and have no effect on the excitability of these cells. As a comparator, we studied the Na(v)1.7 variant I739V, identified in three patients with small fibre neuropathy characterized by severe autonomic dysfunction as well as neuropathic pain, and show that this variant impairs channel slow inactivation within both dorsal root ganglion and superior cervical ganglion neurons, and renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable and superior cervical ganglion neurons hypoexcitable. Thus, we show that R185H, from patients with minimal autonomic dysfunction, does not produce detectable changes in the properties of

  16. A Novel four-way complex variant translocation involving chromosome 46, XY, t(4;9; 19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 in a chronic myeloid leukemia patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad eAsif

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Philadelphia (Ph chromosome (9; 22(q34;q11 is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients and the remaining 5-8% CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth or fifth chromosome other then 9;22. However, in very rare cases the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we find a novel case of four way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY, t(4;9;19;22(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2 with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin and platelets. Fluorescence In situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR-ABL fusion gene and cryptogenic test for the confirmation of Ph (9; 22(q34;q11 and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with Imatinib mesylate (Gleevec with 400mg/day dose. We observed a significant decrease in WBC count after 48 months follow up 11.7 x109/L. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue and anxiety.

  17. A Novel Four-Way Complex Variant Translocation Involving Chromosome 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) in a Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Jamal, Mohammad Sarwar; Khan, Abdul Rehman; Naseer, Muhammad Imran; Hussain, Abrar; Choudhry, Hani; Malik, Arif; Khan, Shahida Aziz; Mahmoud, Maged Mostafa; Ali, Ashraf; Iram, Saima; Kamran, Kashif; Iqbal, Asim; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Pushparaj, Peter Natesan; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome (9;22)(q34;q11) is well established in more than 90% of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) patients, and the remaining 5–8% of CML patients show variant and complex translocations, with the involvement of third, fourth, or fifth chromosome other than 9;22. However, in very rare cases, the fourth chromosome is involved. Here, we found a novel case of four-way Ph+ chromosome translocation involving 46,XY,t(4;9;19;22)(q25:q34;p13.3;q11.2) with CML in the chronic phase. Complete blood cell count of the CML patient was carried out to obtain total leukocytes count, hemoglobin, and platelets. Fluorescence in situ hybridization technique was used for the identification of BCR–ABL fusion gene, and cytogenetic test for the confirmation of Ph (9;22)(q34;q11) and the mechanism of variant translocation in the bone marrow. The patient is successfully treated with a dose of 400 mg/day imatinib mesylate (Gleevec). We observed a significant decrease in white blood cell count of 11.7 × 109/L after 48-month follow-up. Patient started feeling better generally. There was a reduction in the swelling of the body, fatigue, and anxiety. PMID:27303656

  18. Identification of a functional variant in the KIF5A-CYP27B1-METTL1-FAM119B locus associated with multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, Maria; Fernández, Óscar; Saiz, Albert; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lucas, Miguel; Leyva, Laura; García-León, Juan-Antonio; Abad-Grau, María del Mar; Alloza, Iraide; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Garcia-Barcina, María J; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Varadé, Jezabel; de la Hera, Belén; Arroyo, Rafael; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Petit-Marty, Natalia; Navarro, Arcadi; Otaegui, David; Olascoaga, Javier; Blanco, Yolanda; Urcelay, Elena; Matesanz, Fuencisla

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim Several studies have highlighted the association of the 12q13.3–12q14.1 region with coeliac disease, type 1 diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis (MS); however, the causal variants underlying diseases are still unclear. The authors sought to identify the functional variant of this region associated with MS. Methods Tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis of the associated region encoding 15 genes was performed in 2876 MS patients and 2910 healthy Caucasian controls together with expression regulation analyses. Results rs6581155, which tagged 18 variants within a region where 9 genes map, was sufficient to model the association. This SNP was in total linkage disequilibrium (LD) with other polymorphisms that associated with the expression levels of FAM119B, AVIL, TSFM, TSPAN31 and CYP27B1 genes in different expression quantitative trait loci studies. Functional annotations from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) showed that six out of these rs6581155-tagged-SNPs were located in regions with regulatory potential and only one of them, rs10877013, exhibited allele-dependent (ratio A/G=9.5-fold) and orientation-dependent (forward/reverse=2.7-fold) enhancer activity as determined by luciferase reporter assays. This enhancer is located in a region where a long-range chromatin interaction among the promoters and promoter-enhancer of several genes has been described, possibly affecting their expression simultaneously. Conclusions This study determines a functional variant which alters the enhancer activity of a regulatory element in the locus affecting the expression of several genes and explains the association of the 12q13.3–12q14.1 region with MS. PMID:23160276

  19. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K.; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D.; de Ángeles Granados-Silvestre, Ma; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M.; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P.; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L.; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S.; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M.; Knowler, William C.; Bortolini, M. Cátira; Hayden, Michael R.; Baier, Leslie J.; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 × 10−11) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations. PMID:20418488

  20. A functional ABCA1 gene variant is associated with low HDL-cholesterol levels and shows evidence of positive selection in Native Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acuña-Alonzo, Víctor; Flores-Dorantes, Teresa; Kruit, Janine K; Villarreal-Molina, Teresa; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Hünemeier, Tábita; Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Ortiz-López, Ma Guadalupe; Villamil-Ramírez, Hugo; León-Mimila, Paola; Villalobos-Comparan, Marisela; Jacobo-Albavera, Leonor; Ramírez-Jiménez, Salvador; Sikora, Martin; Zhang, Lin-Hua; Pape, Terry D; Granados-Silvestre, Ma de Angeles; Montufar-Robles, Isela; Tito-Alvarez, Ana M; Zurita-Salinas, Camilo; Bustos-Arriaga, José; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Gómez-Trejo, Celta; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Vieira-Filho, Joao P; Granados, Julio; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Huertas-Vázquez, Adriana; González-Martín, Antonio; Gorostiza, Amaya; Bonatto, Sandro L; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Wang, Li; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Lisker, Ruben; Moises, Regina S; Menjivar, Marta; Salzano, Francisco M; Knowler, William C; Bortolini, M Cátira; Hayden, Michael R; Baier, Leslie J; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel

    2010-07-15

    It has been suggested that the higher susceptibility of Hispanics to metabolic disease is related to their Native American heritage. A frequent cholesterol transporter ABCA1 (ATP-binding cassette transporter A1) gene variant (R230C, rs9282541) apparently exclusive to Native American individuals was associated with low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels, obesity and type 2 diabetes in Mexican Mestizos. We performed a more extensive analysis of this variant in 4405 Native Americans and 863 individuals from other ethnic groups to investigate genetic evidence of positive selection, to assess its functional effect in vitro and to explore associations with HDL-C levels and other metabolic traits. The C230 allele was found in 29 of 36 Native American groups, but not in European, Asian or African individuals. C230 was observed on a single haplotype, and C230-bearing chromosomes showed longer relative haplotype extension compared with other haplotypes in the Americas. Additionally, single-nucleotide polymorphism data from the Human Genome Diversity Panel Native American populations were enriched in significant integrated haplotype score values in the region upstream of the ABCA1 gene. Cells expressing the C230 allele showed a 27% cholesterol efflux reduction (P< 0.001), confirming this variant has a functional effect in vitro. Moreover, the C230 allele was associated with lower HDL-C levels (P = 1.77 x 10(-11)) and with higher body mass index (P = 0.0001) in the combined analysis of Native American populations. This is the first report of a common functional variant exclusive to Native American and descent populations, which is a major determinant of HDL-C levels and may have contributed to the adaptive evolution of Native American populations.

  1. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    OpenAIRE

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma,Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.; Bray, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    White individuals have a high frequency of the common PAR4 gene (F2RL3) variant Ala120; blacks have a high frequency of Thr120.PAR4 Thr120 induces greater signaling and is associated with greater platelet aggregation and reduced inhibition by a PAR4 antagonist.

  2. Cloning and functional expression of intracellular loop variants of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) RDL GABA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Hawkins, Joseph; Colombo, Claudia; Bermudez, Isabel; Jones, Andrew K

    2016-06-08

    The insect GABA receptor, RDL (resistance to dieldrin), plays central roles in neuronal signalling and is the target of several classes of insecticides. To study the GABA receptor from an important pollinator species, we cloned Rdl cDNA from the honey bee, Apis mellifera. Three Rdl variants were identified, arising from differential use of splice acceptor sites in the large intracellular loop between transmembrane regions 3 and 4. These variants were renamed from previously, as Amel_RDLvar1, Amel_RDLvar2 and Amel_RDLvar3. When expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, the three variants showed no difference in sensitivity to the agonist, GABA, with EC50s of 29μM, 20μM and 29μM respectively. Also, the potencies of the antagonists, fipronil and imidacloprid, were similar on all three variants. Fipronil IC50 values were 0.18μM, 0.31μM and 0.20μM whereas 100μM imidacloprid reduced the GABA response by 17%, 24% and 31%. The possibility that differential splicing of the RDL intracellular loop may represent a species-specific mechanism leading to insensitivity to insecticides is discussed.

  3. CD36 and SR-BI are involved in cellular uptake of provitamin A carotenoids by Caco-2 and HEK cells, and some of their genetic variants are associated with plasma concentrations of these micronutrients in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borel, Patrick; Lietz, Georg; Goncalves, Aurélie; Szabo de Edelenyi, Fabien; Lecompte, Sophie; Curtis, Peter; Goumidi, Louisa; Caslake, Muriel J; Miles, Elizabeth A; Packard, Christopher; Calder, Philip C; Mathers, John C; Minihane, Anne M; Tourniaire, Franck; Kesse-Guyot, Emmanuelle; Galan, Pilar; Hercberg, Serge; Breidenassel, Christina; González Gross, Marcela; Moussa, Myriam; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2013-04-01

    Scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) and cluster determinant 36 (CD36) have been involved in cellular uptake of some provitamin A carotenoids. However, data are incomplete (e.g., there are no data on α-carotene), and it is not known whether genetic variants in their encoding genes can affect provitamin A carotenoid status. The objectives were 1) to assess the involvement of these scavenger receptors in cellular uptake of the main provitamin A carotenoids (i.e., β-carotene, α-carotene, and β-cryptoxanthin) as well as that of preformed vitamin A (i.e., retinol) and 2) to investigate the contribution of genetic variations in genes encoding these proteins to interindividual variations in plasma concentrations of provitamin A carotenoids. The involvement of SR-BI and CD36 in carotenoids and retinol cellular uptake was investigated in Caco-2 and human embryonic kidney (HEK) cell lines. The involvement of scavenger receptor class B type I (SCARB1) and CD36 genetic variants on plasma concentrations of provitamin A carotenoids was assessed by association studies in 3 independent populations. Cell experiments suggested the involvement of both proteins in cellular uptake of provitamin A carotenoids but not in that of retinol. Association studies showed that several plasma provitamin A carotenoid concentrations were significantly different (P < 0.0083) between participants who bore different genotypes at single nucleotide polymorphisms and haplotypes in CD36 and SCARB1. In conclusion, SR-BI and CD36 are involved in cellular uptake of provitamin A carotenoids, and genetic variations in their encoding genes may modulate plasma concentrations of provitamin A carotenoids at a population level.

  4. Lack of involvement of strand s1'A of the viral serpin CrmA in anti-apoptotic or caspase-inhibitory functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonovic, Miljan; Denault, Jean-Bernard; Salvesen, Guy S.; Volz, Karl; Gettins, Peter G.W. (Brunham); (UIC); (Burnham)

    2010-11-30

    CrmA is a cowpox virus serpin required for full host infectivity and virulence. Residues 51-56 (DKNKDD), the only region that differs significantly from related viral serpins, were investigated for functional importance. A 1.6 {angstrom} X-ray structure reported here showed that this region can adopt either structured or unstructured conformations. Three variants were expressed, one with the region 51-56 deleted, one substituted by alanines, and one in which this region was replaced by the sequence encoded in smallpox virus. NMR showed that the region is an exposed, flexible loop that can be deleted without perturbing the serpin. The region is also very susceptible to proteolysis. Significantly, inhibition of caspases 1 and 8 was unaffected by the mutations, and each of the variants was as effective as wild-type CrmA in promoting survival from apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL). Thus, although the 51-56 region of CrmA is unique, and is exposed and highly susceptible to proteolysis, any in vivo role must involve a function other than proteinase inhibition or cell sparing.

  5. Common genetic variants associated with thyroid function may be risk alleles for Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Purdey; Brix, Thomas H; Wilson, Scott G; Ward, Lynley C; Hui, Jennie; Beilby, John P; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Walsh, John P

    2015-02-14

    Recent studies have identified common genetic variants associated with TSH, free T4 and thyroid peroxidase antibodies, but it is unclear whether these differ between patients with Hashimoto's disease and Graves' disease. To examine whether 11 common genetic variants differ between Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease. We genotyped 11 common variants in a discovery cohort of 203 Australian patients with autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD). Two variants with significant or suggestive associations were analysed in a replication cohort of 384 Danish patients. For rs753760 (PDE10A), the minor allele frequency in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·38 vs. 0·23, respectively, (P = 6·42 × 10(-4) ) in the discovery cohort, 0·29 vs. 0·24 (P = 0·147) in the replication cohort and 0·32 vs. 0·24 in combined analysis (P = 0·0021; all analyses adjusted for sex). In healthy controls from Busselton, the frequency was 0·29, significantly different from Hashimoto's disease but not Graves' disease. For rs4889009 (MAF gene region), the frequency of the minor G-allele in Graves' disease and Hashimoto's disease was 0·48 vs. 0·36 (P = 0·0156) in the discovery cohort, 0·48 vs. 0·34 (P = 1·83 × 10(-4) ) in the replication cohort and 0·48 vs. 0·35 in the combined analysis (P = 7·53 × 10(-6) ); in controls, the frequency was 0·38, significantly different from Graves' disease but not Hashimoto's disease. After further adjustment for smoking, associations with rs4889009 remained significant, whereas those with rs753760 were not. Common variants in PDE10A and MAF gene regions may influence whether patients with AITD develop Graves' disease or Hashimoto's disease. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Histone Variants in Development and Diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Chen; Jicheng Zhao; Guohong Li

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomic DNA is highly packaged into chromatin by histones to fit inside the nucleus.Other than the bulk packaging role of canonical histones with an expression peak at S phase and replication-coupled deposition,different histone variants have evolved distinct regulatory mechanisms for their expression,deposition and functional implications.The diversity of histone variants results in structural plasticity of chromatin and highlights functionally distinct chromosomal domain,which plays critical roles in development from a fertilized egg into a complex organism,as well as in aging and diseases.However,the mechanisms of this fundamental process are poorly understood so far.It is of particular interest to investigate how the variants are incorporated into chromatin and mark specific chromatin states to regulate gene expression,and how they are involved in development and diseases.In this review,we focus on recent progress in studies of epigenetic regulation of three extensively investigated variants including H2A.Z,macroH2A and H3.3,and their functional implications in development and diseases.

  7. Morphological and functional changes in spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry in macular microhole variants: Spectral domain optical coherence tomography and microperimetry correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laxmi Gella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the relationship between the morphology and retinal function of macular microhole (MMH variants. Materials and Methods: We evaluated 12 eyes of 11 patients with defects in the IS/OS junction of photoreceptor layer with SD-OCT. All patients underwent comprehensive ophthalmic examination including spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT and microperimetry. Results: The mean logMAR visual acuity in the affected eye was 0.15 ± 0.17 (range 0.00-0.5. Mean horizontal diameter of the MMH was 163 ± 99 μm; the mean retinal sensitivity in the area corresponding to the MMH was 13.79 ± 4.6 dB. Negative correlation was found between the MMH diameter and the retinal sensitivity (r = -0.65, p0 = 0.02. Three morphological patterns of MMH variants were recognized on SD-OCT, which did not differ in retinal sensitivities. Conclusion: We described and classified the MMH variants and made an assessment on the physiological functions using microperimeter.

  8. Expression and replication studies to identify new candidate genes involved in normal hearing function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girotto, Giorgia; Vuckovic, Dragana; Buniello, Annalisa; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Lewis, Morag; Gasparini, Paolo; Steel, Karen P

    2014-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in identifying deafness genes, but still little is known about the genetic basis of normal variation in hearing function. We recently carried out a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) of quantitative hearing traits in southern European populations and found several SNPs with suggestive but none with significant association. In the current study, we followed up these SNPs to investigate which of them might show a genuine association with auditory function using alternative approaches. Firstly, we generated a shortlist of 19 genes from the published GWAS results. Secondly, we carried out immunocytochemistry to examine expression of these 19 genes in the mouse inner ear. Twelve of them showed distinctive cochlear expression patterns. Four showed expression restricted to sensory hair cells (Csmd1, Arsg, Slc16a6 and Gabrg3), one only in marginal cells of the stria vascularis (Dclk1) while the others (Ptprd, Grm8, GlyBP, Evi5, Rimbp2, Ank2, Cdh13) in multiple cochlear cell types. In the third step, we tested these 12 genes for replication of association in an independent set of samples from the Caucasus and Central Asia. Nine out of them showed nominally significant association (pgene-based test. Finally, to look for genotype-phenotype relationship, the audiometric profiles of the three genotypes of the most strongly associated gene variants were analyzed. Seven out of the 9 replicated genes (CDH13, GRM8, ANK2, SLC16A6, ARSG, RIMBP2 and DCLK1) showed an audiometric pattern with differences between different genotypes further supporting their role in hearing function. These data demonstrate the usefulness of this multistep approach in providing new insights into the molecular basis of hearing and may suggest new targets for treatment and prevention of hearing impairment.

  9. Expression of insulin receptor spliced variants and their functional correlates in muscle from patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Torben; Bjørbaek, C; Vestergaard, H;

    1993-01-01

    Due to alternative splicing of exon 11 of the receptor gene, the human insulin receptor exists in two forms, that have distinct tissue-specific expression and are functionally different. Needle biopsies obtained from vastus lateralis muscle from 20 patients with noninsulin-dependent diabetes...... mellitus (NIDDM) and 20 normal control subjects were analyzed for the relative expression of insulin receptor mRNA variants in a novel assay using fluorescence-labeled primers and subsequent analysis on an automated DNA sequencer. In subgroups of patients and control subjects, insulin binding and tyrosine...... kinase activity were examined in wheat germ agglutinin-purified insulin receptors isolated from muscle biopsies. Moreover, insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was studied by means of the euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. No difference in the relative expression of spliced variants...

  10. Identification of independent association signals and putative functional variants for breast cancer risk through fine-scale mapping of the 12p11 locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chenjie; Guo, Xingyi; Long, Jirong; Kuchenbaecker, Karoline B; Droit, Arnaud; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Ghoussaini, Maya; Kar, Siddhartha; Freeman, Adam; Hopper, John L; Milne, Roger L; Bolla, Manjeet K; Wang, Qin; Dennis, Joe; Agata, Simona; Ahmed, Shahana; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Andrulis, Irene L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Antonenkova, Natalia N; Arason, Adalgeir; Arndt, Volker; Arun, Banu K; Arver, Brita; Bacot, Francois; Barrowdale, Daniel; Baynes, Caroline; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Benitez, Javier; Bermisheva, Marina; Blomqvist, Carl; Blot, William J; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Bojesen, Stig E; Bonanni, Bernardo; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brand, Judith S; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brennan, Paul; Brenner, Hermann; Broeks, Annegien; Brüning, Thomas; Burwinkel, Barbara; Buys, Saundra S; Cai, Qiuyin; Caldes, Trinidad; Campbell, Ian; Carpenter, Jane; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Claes, Kathleen B M; Clarke, Christine; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Czene, Kamila; Daly, Mary B; de la Hoya, Miguel; De Leeneer, Kim; Devilee, Peter; Diez, Orland; Domchek, Susan M; Doody, Michele; Dorfling, Cecilia M; Dörk, Thilo; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Dumont, Martine; Dwek, Miriam; Dworniczak, Bernd; Egan, Kathleen; Eilber, Ursula; Einbeigi, Zakaria; Ejlertsen, Bent; Ellis, Steve; Frost, Debra; Lalloo, Fiona; Fasching, Peter A; Figueroa, Jonine; Flyger, Henrik; Friedlander, Michael; Friedman, Eitan; Gambino, Gaetana; Gao, Yu-Tang; Garber, Judy; García-Closas, Montserrat; Gehrig, Andrea; Damiola, Francesca; Lesueur, Fabienne; Mazoyer, Sylvie; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Giles, Graham G; Godwin, Andrew K; Goldgar, David E; González-Neira, Anna; Greene, Mark H; Guénel, Pascal; Haeberle, Lothar; Haiman, Christopher A; Hallberg, Emily; Hamann, Ute; Hansen, Thomas V O; Hart, Steven; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Hartman, Mikael; Hassan, Norhashimah; Healey, Sue; Hogervorst, Frans B L; Verhoef, Senno; Hendricks, Carolyn B; Hillemanns, Peter; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Hulick, Peter J; Hunter, David J; Imyanitov, Evgeny N; Isaacs, Claudine; Ito, Hidemi; Jakubowska, Anna; Janavicius, Ramunas; Jaworska-Bieniek, Katarzyna; Jensen, Uffe Birk; John, Esther M; Joly Beauparlant, Charles; Jones, Michael; Kabisch, Maria; Kang, Daehee; Karlan, Beth Y; Kauppila, Saila; Kerin, Michael J; Khan, Sofia; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Knight, Julia A; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Kraft, Peter; Kwong, Ava; Laitman, Yael; Lambrechts, Diether; Lazaro, Conxi; Le Marchand, Loic; Lee, Chuen Neng; Lee, Min Hyuk; Lester, Jenny; Li, Jingmei; Liljegren, Annelie; Lindblom, Annika; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Lubinski, Jan; Mai, Phuong L; Mannermaa, Arto; Manoukian, Siranoush; Margolin, Sara; Marme, Frederik; Matsuo, Keitaro; McGuffog, Lesley; Meindl, Alfons; Menegaux, Florence; Montagna, Marco; Muir, Kenneth; Mulligan, Anna Marie; Nathanson, Katherine L; Neuhausen, Susan L; Nevanlinna, Heli; Newcomb, Polly A; Nord, Silje; Nussbaum, Robert L; Offit, Kenneth; Olah, Edith; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Olswold, Curtis; Osorio, Ana; Papi, Laura; Park-Simon, Tjoung-Won; Paulsson-Karlsson, Ylva; Peeters, Stephanie; Peissel, Bernard; Peterlongo, Paolo; Peto, Julian; Pfeiler, Georg; Phelan, Catherine M; Presneau, Nadege; Radice, Paolo; Rahman, Nazneen; Ramus, Susan J; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Rennert, Gad; Rhiem, Kerstin; Rudolph, Anja; Salani, Ritu; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Sawyer, Elinor J; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schmutzler, Rita K; Schoemaker, Minouk J; Schürmann, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Shen, Chen-Yang; Shrubsole, Martha J; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Sigurdson, Alice; Singer, Christian F; Slager, Susan; Soucy, Penny; Southey, Melissa; Steinemann, Doris; Swerdlow, Anthony; Szabo, Csilla I; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Teixeira, Manuel R; Teo, Soo H; Terry, Mary Beth; Tessier, Daniel C; Teulé, Alex; Thomassen, Mads; Tihomirova, Laima; Tischkowitz, Marc; Toland, Amanda E; Tung, Nadine; Turnbull, Clare; van den Ouweland, Ans M W; van Rensburg, Elizabeth J; Ven den Berg, David; Vijai, Joseph; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Whittemore, Alice S; Winqvist, Robert; Wong, Tien Y; Wu, Anna H; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Pharoah, Paul D P; Hall, Per; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Dunning, Alison M; Simard, Jacques; Couch, Fergus J; Antoniou, Antonis C; Easton, Douglas F; Zheng, Wei

    2016-06-21

    Multiple recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs10771399, at 12p11 that is associated with breast cancer risk. We performed a fine-scale mapping study of a 700 kb region including 441 genotyped and more than 1300 imputed genetic variants in 48,155 cases and 43,612 controls of European descent, 6269 cases and 6624 controls of East Asian descent and 1116 cases and 932 controls of African descent in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC; http://bcac.ccge.medschl.cam.ac.uk/ ), and in 15,252 BRCA1 mutation carriers in the Consortium of Investigators of Modifiers of BRCA1/2 (CIMBA). Stepwise regression analyses were performed to identify independent association signals. Data from the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements project (ENCODE) and the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) were used for functional annotation. Analysis of data from European descendants found evidence for four independent association signals at 12p11, represented by rs7297051 (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = 1.06-1.12; P = 3 × 10(-9)), rs805510 (OR = 1.08, 95 % CI = 1.04-1.12, P = 2 × 10(-5)), and rs1871152 (OR = 1.04, 95 % CI = 1.02-1.06; P = 2 × 10(-4)) identified in the general populations, and rs113824616 (P = 7 × 10(-5)) identified in the meta-analysis of BCAC ER-negative cases and BRCA1 mutation carriers. SNPs rs7297051, rs805510 and rs113824616 were also associated with breast cancer risk at P < 0.05 in East Asians, but none of the associations were statistically significant in African descendants. Multiple candidate functional variants are located in putative enhancer sequences. Chromatin interaction data suggested that PTHLH was the likely target gene of these enhancers. Of the six variants with the strongest evidence of potential functionality, rs11049453 was statistically significantly associated with the expression of PTHLH and its nearby

  11. Differential functional avidity of dengue virus-specific T-cell clones for variant peptides representing heterologous and previously encountered serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imrie, Allison; Meeks, Janet; Gurary, Alexandra; Sukhbataar, Munkhzul; Kitsutani, Paul; Effler, Paul; Zhao, Zhengshan

    2007-09-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines secreted by memory CD8+ and CD4+ T cells are thought to play a direct role in the pathogenesis of dengue virus infection by increasing vascular permeability and thereby inducing the pathophysiologic events associated with dengue hemorrhagic fever and dengue shock syndrome. Severe disease is frequently observed in the setting of secondary infection with heterologous dengue virus serotypes, suggesting a role for cross-reactive memory T cells in the immunopathogenesis of severe disease. We used a large panel of well-characterized dengue virus-specific CD8+ T-cell clones isolated from Pacific Islanders previously infected with dengue virus 1 to examine effector memory function, focusing on a novel dominant HLA-B*5502-restricted NS5(329-337) epitope, and assessed T-cell responses to stimulation with variant peptides representing heterologous serotypes. Variant peptides were differentially recognized by dengue virus 1-specific effector CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in a heterogeneous and clone-specific manner, in which cytolytic function and cytokine secretion could be enhanced, diminished, or abrogated compared with cognate peptide stimulation. Dengue virus-specific CTL stimulated with cognate and variant peptides demonstrated a cytokine response hierarchy of gamma IFN (IFN-gamma) > tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) > interleukin-2 (IL-2), and a subset of clones also produced IL-4 and IL-6. Individual clones demonstrated greater avidity for variant peptides representing heterologous serotypes, including serotypes previously encountered by the subject, and IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha secretion was enhanced by stimulation with these heterologous peptides. Altered antiviral T-cell responses in response to stimulation with heterologous dengue virus serotypes have implications for control of virus replication and for disease pathogenesis.

  12. Analysis of the interferon gamma (rs2430561, +874T/A functional gene variant in relation to the presence of cardiovascular events in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes García-Bermúdez

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased cardiovascular (CV morbidity and mortality. Since interferon-gamma (IFN-γ has a direct effect on inflammation, in this study we assessed the potential association of the IFNG functional gene variant rs2430561 with CV disease in patients with RA. METHODS: One thousand six hundred and thirty-five patients fulfilling the 1987 American College of Rheumatology classification criteria for RA were genotyped for the IFNG (rs2430561, +874T/A gene polymorphism using TaqMan genotyping assay. Patients were stratified according to the presence of CV events or not. Logistic regression models to explain the presence of CV disease according to the IFNG rs2430561 allele distribution were performed. The potential influence of this variant in the development of subclinical atherosclerosis was also analyzed in a subgroup of patients with no history of CV events to determine carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT (n = 286 and presence of carotid plaques. Levels of the cytokine were determined in a subgroup of patients by ELISA. RESULTS: Adjusted logistic regression model disclosed that presence of the minor allele A was not associated with increased risk of suffering CV events in RA patients. Besides, differences did not achieve statistical significance regarding carotid IMT and presence of carotid plaques in RA patients carrying IFNG rs2430561 variant allele. Levels of IFN-γ were higher in patients who had suffered CV events compared to patients who did not. CONCLUSION: Our results do not support a role of IFNG rs2430561 (+874T/A functional gene variant in the development of CV disease in RA patients.

  13. A Loss-Of-Function Splice Acceptor Variant in IGF2 is Protective for Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercader, Josep M; Liao, Rachel G; Bell, Avery; Dymek, Zachary; Estrada, Karol; Tukiainen, Taru; Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Jablonski, Kathleen A; Hanson, Robert L; Walford, Geoffrey A; Moran, Ignasi; Chen, Ling; Agarwala, Vineeta; Ordoñez-Sánchez, María Luisa; Rodríguez-Guillen, Rosario; Rodríguez-Torres, Maribel; Segura-Kato, Yayoi; García-Ortiz, Humberto; Centeno-Cruz, Federico; Barajas-Olmos, Francisco; Caulkins, Lizz; Puppala, Sobha; Fontanillas, Pierre; Williams, Amy; Bonàs-Guarch, Sílvia; Hartl, Chris; Ripke, Stephan; Tooley, Katherine; Lane, Jacqueline; Zerrweck, Carlos; Martínez-Hernández, Angélica; Córdova, Emilio J; Mendoza-Caamal, Elvia; Contreras-Cubas, Cecilia; González-Villalpando, María E; Cruz-Bautista, Ivette; Muñoz-Hernández, Liliana; Gómez-Velasco, Donaji; Alvirde, Ulises; Henderson, Brian E; Wilkens, Lynne R; Le Marchand, Loic; Arellano-Campos, Olimpia; Riba, Laura; Harden, Maegan; Platform, Broad Genomics; Gabriel, Stacey; Abboud, Hanna E; Cortes, Maria L; Revilla-Monsalve, Cristina; Islas-Andrade, Sergio; Soberon, Xavier; Curran, Joanne E; Jenkinson, Christopher P; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Lehman, Donna M; Hanis, Craig L; Bell, Graeme I; Boehnke, Michael; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Saxena, Richa; MacArthur, Daniel; Ferrer, Jorge; McCarroll, Steven A; Torrents, David; Knowler, William C; Baier, Leslie J; Burtt, Noel; González-Villalpando, Clicerio; Haiman, Christopher A; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Flannick, Jason; Jacobs, Suzanne B R; Orozco, Lorena; Altshuler, David; Florez, Jose C

    2017-08-24

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) affects more than 415 million people worldwide and its costs to the health care system continue to rise. To identify common or rare genetic variation with potential therapeutic implications for T2D, we analyzed and replicated genome-wide protein coding variation in a total of 8,227 individuals with T2D and 12,966 individuals without T2D of Latino descent. We identified a novel genetic variant in the IGF2 gene associated with ∼20% reduced risk for T2D. This variant, which has an allele frequency of 17% in the Mexican population but is rare in Europe, prevents splicing between IGF2 exons 1 and 2. We show in vitro and in human liver and adipose tissue that the variant is associated with a specific, allele-dosage dependent reduction in expression of IGF2 isoform 2. In individuals who do not carry the protective allele, expression of IGF2 isoform 2 in adipose is positively correlated with both incidence of T2D and increased plasma glycated hemoglobin in individuals without T2D, providing support that the protective effects are mediated by reductions in IGF2 isoform 2. Broad phenotypic examination of carriers of the protective variant revealed no association with other disease states or impaired reproductive health. These findings suggest that reducing IGF2 isoform 2 expression in relevant tissues has potential as a new therapeutic strategy for T2D, also beyond the Latin-American population, with no major adverse effects on health or reproduction. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  14. Functional balance between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza A(H1N1pdm09 HA D222 variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Sébastien Casalegno

    Full Text Available D222G/N substitutions in A(H1N1pdm09 hemagglutinin may be associated with increased binding of viruses causing low respiratory tract infections and human pathogenesis. We assessed the impact of such substitutions on the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage, viral growth and in vivo virulence.Seven viruses with differing polymorphisms at codon 222 (2 with D, 3 G, 1 N and 1 E were isolated from patients and characterized with regards hemagglutinin binding affinity (Kd to α-2,6 sialic acid (SAα-2,6 and SAα-2,3 and neuraminidase enzymatic properties (Km, Ki and Vmax. The hemagglutination assay was used to quantitatively assess the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage. Viral growth properties were compared in vitro in MDCK-SIAT1 cells and in vivo in BALB/c mice. Compared with D222 variants, the binding affinity of G222 variants was greater for SAα-2,3 and lower for SAα-2,6, whereas that of both E222 and N222 variants was greater for both SAα-2,3 and SAα-2,6. Mean neuraminidase activity of D222 variants (16.0 nmol/h/10(6 was higher than that of G222 (1.7 nmol/h/10(6 viruses and E/N222 variants (4.4 nmol/h/10(6 viruses. The hemagglutination assay demonstrated a deviation from functional balance by E222 and N222 variants that displayed strong hemagglutinin binding but weak neuraminidase activity. This deviation impaired viral growth in MDCK-SIAT1 cells but not infectivity in mice. All strains but one exhibited low infectious dose in mice (MID50 and replicated to high titers in the lung; this D222 strain exhibited a ten-fold higher MID50 and replicated to low titers. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance status had a greater impact on viral replication than hemagglutinin affinity strength, at least in vitro, thus emphasizing the importance of an optimal balance for influenza virus fitness. The mouse model is effective in assessing binding to SAα-2,3 but cannot differentiate SAα-2,3- from SA

  15. Functional balance between the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 HA D222 variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Ferraris, Olivier; Escuret, Vanessa; Bouscambert, Maude; Bergeron, Corinne; Linès, Laetitia; Excoffier, Thierry; Valette, Martine; Frobert, Emilie; Pillet, Sylvie; Pozzetto, Bruno; Lina, Bruno; Ottmann, Michèle

    2014-01-01

    D222G/N substitutions in A(H1N1)pdm09 hemagglutinin may be associated with increased binding of viruses causing low respiratory tract infections and human pathogenesis. We assessed the impact of such substitutions on the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage, viral growth and in vivo virulence.Seven viruses with differing polymorphisms at codon 222 (2 with D, 3 G, 1 N and 1 E) were isolated from patients and characterized with regards hemagglutinin binding affinity (Kd) to α-2,6 sialic acid (SAα-2,6) and SAα-2,3 and neuraminidase enzymatic properties (Km, Ki and Vmax). The hemagglutination assay was used to quantitatively assess the balance between hemagglutinin binding and neuraminidase cleavage. Viral growth properties were compared in vitro in MDCK-SIAT1 cells and in vivo in BALB/c mice. Compared with D222 variants, the binding affinity of G222 variants was greater for SAα-2,3 and lower for SAα-2,6, whereas that of both E222 and N222 variants was greater for both SAα-2,3 and SAα-2,6. Mean neuraminidase activity of D222 variants (16.0 nmol/h/10(6)) was higher than that of G222 (1.7 nmol/h/10(6) viruses) and E/N222 variants (4.4 nmol/h/10(6) viruses). The hemagglutination assay demonstrated a deviation from functional balance by E222 and N222 variants that displayed strong hemagglutinin binding but weak neuraminidase activity. This deviation impaired viral growth in MDCK-SIAT1 cells but not infectivity in mice. All strains but one exhibited low infectious dose in mice (MID50) and replicated to high titers in the lung; this D222 strain exhibited a ten-fold higher MID50 and replicated to low titers. Hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance status had a greater impact on viral replication than hemagglutinin affinity strength, at least in vitro, thus emphasizing the importance of an optimal balance for influenza virus fitness. The mouse model is effective in assessing binding to SAα-2,3 but cannot differentiate SAα-2,3- from SAα-2

  16. Detecting variants with Metabolic Design, a new software tool to design probes for explorative functional DNA microarray development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gravelat Fabrice

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microorganisms display vast diversity, and each one has its own set of genes, cell components and metabolic reactions. To assess their huge unexploited metabolic potential in different ecosystems, we need high throughput tools, such as functional microarrays, that allow the simultaneous analysis of thousands of genes. However, most classical functional microarrays use specific probes that monitor only known sequences, and so fail to cover the full microbial gene diversity present in complex environments. We have thus developed an algorithm, implemented in the user-friendly program Metabolic Design, to design efficient explorative probes. Results First we have validated our approach by studying eight enzymes involved in the degradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from the model strain Sphingomonas paucimobilis sp. EPA505 using a designed microarray of 8,048 probes. As expected, microarray assays identified the targeted set of genes induced during biodegradation kinetics experiments with various pollutants. We have then confirmed the identity of these new genes by sequencing, and corroborated the quantitative discrimination of our microarray by quantitative real-time PCR. Finally, we have assessed metabolic capacities of microbial communities in soil contaminated with aromatic hydrocarbons. Results show that our probe design (sensitivity and explorative quality can be used to study a complex environment efficiently. Conclusions We successfully use our microarray to detect gene expression encoding enzymes involved in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon degradation for the model strain. In addition, DNA microarray experiments performed on soil polluted by organic pollutants without prior sequence assumptions demonstrate high specificity and sensitivity for gene detection. Metabolic Design is thus a powerful, efficient tool that can be used to design explorative probes and monitor metabolic pathways in complex environments

  17. Functional characterisation of three o-methyltransferases involved in the biosynthesis of phenolglycolipids in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxane Simeone

    Full Text Available Phenolic glycolipids are produced by a very limited number of slow-growing mycobacterial species, most of which are pathogen for humans. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the etiologic agent of tuberculosis, these molecules play a role in the pathogenicity by modulating the host immune response during infection. The major variant of phenolic glycolipids produced by M. tuberculosis, named PGL-tb, consists of a large lipid core terminated by a glycosylated aromatic nucleus. The carbohydrate part is composed of three sugar residues, two rhamnosyl units and a terminal fucosyl residue, which is per-O-methylated, and seems to be important for pathogenicity. While most of the genes responsible for the synthesis of the lipid core domain and the saccharide appendage of PGL-tb have been characterized, the enzymes involved in the O-methylation of the fucosyl residue of PGL-tb remain unknown. In this study we report the identification and characterization of the methyltransferases required for the O-methylation of the terminal fucosyl residue of PGL-tb. These enzymes are encoded by genes Rv2954c, Rv2955c and Rv2956. Mutants of M. tuberculosis harboring deletion within these genes were constructed. Purification and analysis of the phenolglycolipids produced by these strains, using a combination of mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy, revealed that Rv2954c, Rv2955c and Rv2956 encode the methyltransferases that respectively catalysed the O-methylation of the hydroxyl groups located at positions 3, 4 and 2 of the terminal fucosyl residue of PGL-tb. Our data also suggest that methylation at these positions is a sequential process, starting with position 2, followed by positions 4 and 3.

  18. Mild solutions for nonlocal fractional semilinear functional differential inclusions involving Caputo derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed G. Ibrahim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we prove various existence results of a mild solution for a fractional nonlocal functional semilinear differential inclusion involving Caputo derivative in Banach spaces. We consider the case when the values of the orient field are convex as well as nonconvex. Moreover, we study the topological structure of solution sets. Our results extend or generalize results proved in recent papers.

  19. Roles, authority and involvement of the management accounting function: a multiple case-study perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Caroline; Sponem, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Recent techniques and shifts in the environment are often foreseen as leading management accountants to adopt a business orientation. However, empirical evidence pointing to fundamental shifts in the roles played by management accountants remains relatively scarce. The authors explore this paradox and give sense to the various roles played by the management accounting function by focusing on how management accountants are involved in and endowed with authority in decision-making situations.

  20. Transcriptome analysis of periodontitis-associated fibroblasts by CAGE sequencing identified DLX5 and RUNX2 long variant as novel regulators involved in periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horie, Masafumi; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Saito, Akira; Nagase, Takahide; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Suzutani, Tatsuo; Kappert, Kai; Micke, Patrick; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is affecting over half of the adult population, and represents a major public health problem. Previously, we isolated a subset of gingival fibroblasts (GFs) from periodontitis patients, designated as periodontitis-associated fibroblasts (PAFs), which were highly capable of collagen degradation. To elucidate their molecular profiles, GFs isolated form healthy and periodontitis-affected gingival tissues were analyzed by CAGE-seq and integrated with the FANTOM5 atlas. GFs from healthy gingival tissues displayed distinctive patterns of CAGE profiles as compared to fibroblasts from other organ sites and characterized by specific expression of developmentally important transcription factors such as BARX1, PAX9, LHX8, and DLX5. In addition, a novel long non-coding RNA associated with LHX8 was described. Furthermore, we identified DLX5 regulating expression of the long variant of RUNX2 transcript, which was specifically active in GFs but not in their periodontitis-affected counterparts. Knockdown of these factors in GFs resulted in altered expression of extracellular matrix (ECM) components. These results indicate activation of DLX5 and RUNX2 via its distal promoter represents a unique feature of GFs, and is important for ECM regulation. Down-regulation of these transcription factors in PAFs could be associated with their property to degrade collagen, which may impact on the process of periodontitis. PMID:27645561

  1. A novel variant of androgen receptor is associated with idiopathic azoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Lisha; Gui, Yaoting

    2016-10-01

    A variety of genetic variants can lead to abnormal human spermatogenesis. The androgen receptor (AR) is an important steroid hormone receptor that is critical for male sexual differentiation and the maintenance of normal spermatogenesis. In the present study, each exon of AR in 776 patients diagnosed with idiopathic azoospermia (IA) and 709 proven fertile men were sequenced using use panel re‑sequencing methods to examine whether AR is involved in the pathogenesis of IA. Two synonymous variants and seven missense variants were detected. Of the missense variants, a luciferase assay demonstrated that the R630W variant reduced the transcriptional regulatory function of AR. This novel variant (p. R630W) of AR is the first to be identified in association with IA, thereby highlighting the importance of AR during spermatogenesis.

  2. Neuronal fast activating and meningeal silent modulatory BK channel splice variants cloned from rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Asser Nyander; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    The big conductance calcium-activated K(+) channel (BK) is involved in regulating neuron and smooth muscle cell excitability. Functional diversity of BK is generated by alpha-subunit splice variation and co-expression with beta subunits. Here, we present six different splice combinations cloned...... from rat brain or cerebral vascular/meningeal tissues, of which at least three variants were previously uncharacterized (X1, X2(92), and X2(188)). An additional variant was identified by polymerase chain reaction but not cloned. Expression in Xenopus oocytes showed that the brain-specific X1 variant...... displays reduced current, faster activation, and less voltage sensitivity than the insert-less Zero variant. Other cloned variants Strex and Slo27,3 showed slower activation than Zero. The X1 variant contains sequence inserts in the S1-S2 extracellular loop (8 aa), between intracellular domains RCK1...

  3. Structure and function of a novel LD-carboxypeptidase a involved in peptidoglycan recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debanu; Hervé, Mireille; Elsliger, Marc-André; Kadam, Rameshwar U; Grant, Joanna C; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Knuth, Mark W; Klock, Heath E; Miller, Mitchell D; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A; Deacon, Ashley M; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Wilson, Ian A

    2013-12-01

    Approximately 50% of cell wall peptidoglycan in Gram-negative bacteria is recycled with each generation. The primary substrates used for peptidoglycan biosynthesis and recycling in the cytoplasm are GlcNAc-MurNAc(anhydro)-tetrapeptide and its degradation product, the free tetrapeptide. This complex process involves ∼15 proteins, among which the cytoplasmic enzyme ld-carboxypeptidase A (LdcA) catabolizes the bond between the last two l- and d-amino acid residues in the tetrapeptide to form the tripeptide, which is then utilized as a substrate by murein peptide ligase (Mpl). LdcA has been proposed as an antibacterial target. The crystal structure of Novosphingobium aromaticivorans DSM 12444 LdcA (NaLdcA) was determined at 1.89-Å resolution. The enzyme was biochemically characterized and its interactions with the substrate modeled, identifying residues potentially involved in substrate binding. Unaccounted electron density at the dimer interface in the crystal suggested a potential site for disrupting protein-protein interactions should a dimer be required to perform its function in bacteria. Our analysis extends the identification of functional residues to several other homologs, which include enzymes from bacteria that are involved in hydrocarbon degradation and destruction of coral reefs. The NaLdcA crystal structure provides an alternate system for investigating the structure-function relationships of LdcA and increases the structural coverage of the protagonists in bacterial cell wall recycling.

  4. No association of functional variant in pri-miR-218 and risk of congenital heart disease in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaobo; Yang, Liping; Ma, Yan; Yang, Juhua; Zhang, Guican; Huang, Guoying; Huang, Qiuyu; Chen, Liangwan; Fu, Fangmeng; Chen, Yandan; Su, Dongmei; Dong, Yi; Ma, Xu; Lu, Cailing; Peng, Xiaozhong

    2013-07-10

    MiR-218 plays an important role in heart development in zebrafish. pri-miR-218 rs11134527 variant is associated with cervical cancer carcinogenesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in pri-miR-218 might influence susceptibility to sporadic congenital heart disease (CHD). We conducted a case-control study of CHD in a Chinese population to test our hypothesis by sequencing and genotyping pri-miR-218 in 1116 CHD cases and 1219 non-CHD controls. We identified one SNP rs11134527 located in pri-miR-218 sequence. Logistic regression analyses showed that there was no significant association in genotype and allele frequencies of pri-miR-218 rs11134527 A/G polymorphism between CHD cases in overall or various subtypes and the control group. However, real-time PCR analysis showed that rs11134527 allele G significantly increased mature miR-218 expression. In vitro binding assays further revealed that the rs11134527 variant affects miR-218-mediated regulation of Robo1. This is the first study to investigate the relationship between miR-218 and CHD cases. Our results demonstrate that the functional variant rs11134527 in pri-miR-218 has no major role in genetic susceptibility to sporadic CHD, at least in the population studied here. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. EcoTILLING-based association mapping efficiently delineates functionally relevant natural allelic variants of candidate genes governing agronomic traits in chickpea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak eBajaj

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The large-scale mining and high-throughput genotyping of novel gene-based allelic variants in natural mapping population are essential for association mapping to identify functionally relevant molecular tags governing useful agronomic traits in chickpea. The present study employs an alternative time-saving, non-laborious and economical pool-based EcoTILLING approach coupled with agarose gel detection assay to discover 1133 novel SNP allelic variants from diverse coding and regulatory sequence components of 1133 transcription factor (TF genes by genotyping in 192 diverse desi and kabuli chickpea accessions constituting a seed weight association panel. Integrating these SNP genotyping data with seed weight field phenotypic information of 192 structured association panel identified eight SNP alleles in the eight TF genes regulating seed weight of chickpea. The associated individual and combination of all SNPs explained 10-15 and 31% phenotypic variation for seed weight, respectively. The EcoTILLING-based large-scale allele mining and genotyping strategy implemented for association mapping is found much effective for a diploid genome crop species like chickpea with narrow genetic base and low genetic polymorphism. This optimized approach thus can be deployed for various genomics-assisted breeding applications with optimal expense of resources in domesticated chickpea. The seed weight-associated natural allelic variants and candidate TF genes delineated have potential to accelerate marker-assisted genetic improvement of chickpea.

  6. A rare functional noncoding variant at the GWAS-implicated MIR137/MIR2682 locus might confer risk to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jubao; Shi, Jianxin; Fiorentino, Alessia; Leites, Catherine; Chen, Xiangning; Moy, Winton; Chen, Jingchun; Alexandrov, Boian S; Usheva, Anny; He, Deli; Freda, Jessica; O'Brien, Niamh L; McQuillin, Andrew; Sanders, Alan R; Gershon, Elliot S; DeLisi, Lynn E; Bishop, Alan R; Gurling, Hugh M D; Pato, Michele T; Levinson, Douglas F; Kendler, Kenneth S; Pato, Carlos N; Gejman, Pablo V

    2014-12-04

    Schizophrenia (SZ) genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified common risk variants in >100 susceptibility loci; however, the contribution of rare variants at these loci remains largely unexplored. One of the strongly associated loci spans MIR137 (miR137) and MIR2682 (miR2682), two microRNA genes important for neuronal function. We sequenced ∼6.9 kb MIR137/MIR2682 and upstream regulatory sequences in 2,610 SZ cases and 2,611 controls of European ancestry. We identified 133 rare variants with minor allele frequency (MAF) T, presented exclusively in 11 SZ cases (nominal p = 4.8 × 10(-4)). We further identified its risk allele T in 2 of 2,434 additional SZ cases, 11 of 4,339 bipolar (BP) cases, and 3 of 3,572 SZ/BP study controls and 1,688 population controls; yielding combined p values of 0.0007, 0.0013, and 0.0001 for SZ, BP, and SZ/BP, respectively. The risk allele T of 1:g.98515539A>T reduced enhancer activity of its flanking sequence by >50% in human neuroblastoma cells, predicting lower expression of MIR137/MIR2682. Both empirical and computational analyses showed weaker transcription factor (YY1) binding by the risk allele. Chromatin conformation capture (3C) assay further indicated that 1:g.98515539A>T influenced MIR137/MIR2682, but not the nearby DPYD or LOC729987. Our results suggest that rare noncoding risk variants are associated with SZ and BP at MIR137/MIR2682 locus, with risk alleles decreasing MIR137/MIR2682 expression. Copyright © 2014 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Crystal structure of the S187F variant of human liver alanine: glyoxylate [corrected] aminotransferase associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I and its functional implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppici, Elisa; Fodor, Krisztian; Paiardini, Alessandro; Williams, Chris; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Wilmanns, Matthias; Cellini, Barbara

    2013-08-01

    The substitution of Ser187, a residue located far from the active site of human liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), by Phe gives rise to a variant associated with primary hyperoxaluria type I. Unexpectedly, previous studies revealed that the recombinant form of S187F exhibits a remarkable loss of catalytic activity, an increased pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) binding affinity and a different coenzyme binding mode compared with normal AGT. To shed light on the structural elements responsible for these defects, we solved the crystal structure of the variant to a resolution of 2.9 Å. Although the overall conformation of the variant is similar to that of normal AGT, we noticed: (i) a displacement of the PLP-binding Lys209 and Val185, located on the re and si side of PLP, respectively, and (ii) slight conformational changes of other active site residues, in particular Trp108, the base stacking residue with the pyridine cofactor moiety. This active site perturbation results in a mispositioning of the AGT-pyridoxamine 5'-phosphate (PMP) complex and of the external aldimine, as predicted by molecular modeling studies. Taken together, both predicted and observed movements caused by the S187F mutation are consistent with the following functional properties of the variant: (i) a 300- to 500-fold decrease in both the rate constant of L-alanine half-transamination and the kcat of the overall transamination, (ii) a different PMP binding mode and affinity, and (iii) a different microenvironment of the external aldimine. Proposals for the treatment of patients bearing S187F mutation are discussed on the basis of these results.

  8. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-05-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids.

  9. Human thromboxane A2 receptor genetic variants: in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gleim

    Full Text Available Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity or promote (hyperactivity vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C(68S, V(80E, E(94V, A(160T, V(176E, and V(217I for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C(68S to normal (V(217I, with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V(80E, E(94V, A(160T, and V(176E. In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and "in platelet" evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants.

  10. IBRD AND ITS INVOLVEMENT IN MODERNISING AND IMPROVING THE FUNCTIONALITY OF PENSION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In our research we review the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development’s (IBRD most important contributions to the functionality of the pension systems around the world. The pension systems design constitutes an important premise for the adequate functioning of these systems. In international practice, there is a wide variety of principles and mechanisms which can constitute the foundation of pension systems, the most common being materialized in the multi-pillar pension system, promoted by the IBRD. Its involvement in modernizing and improving the functionality of pension systems has reached also many other aspects such as evaluation of the national pension systems’ performance, financial assistance to governments with the aim of meeting the objectives corresponding to pension systems, scientific, technical and informational support. We conclude that IBRD’s involvement in modernizing and improving the functionality of pension systems has determined a significant transformation of the national pension systems, especially in Latin America and Eastern and Central Europe. However, its well-known multi-pillar model is not free of criticism as a result of the various analytical errors.

  11. Single scan parameterization of space-variant point spread functions in image space via a printed array: the impact for two PET/CT scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Angelis, G I; Noonan, P J; Jackson, A [Imaging, Genomics and Proteomics, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, MAHSC, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Price, P [Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Lionheart, W R [School of Mathematics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Reader, A J, E-mail: fotis.kotasidis@mmic.man.ac.uk [Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-05-21

    Incorporation of a resolution model during statistical image reconstruction often produces images of improved resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. A novel and practical methodology to rapidly and accurately determine the overall emission and detection blurring component of the system matrix using a printed point source array within a custom-made Perspex phantom is presented. The array was scanned at different positions and orientations within the field of view (FOV) to examine the feasibility of extrapolating the measured point source blurring to other locations in the FOV and the robustness of measurements from a single point source array scan. We measured the spatially-variant image-based blurring on two PET/CT scanners, the B-Hi-Rez and the TruePoint TrueV. These measured spatially-variant kernels and the spatially-invariant kernel at the FOV centre were then incorporated within an ordinary Poisson ordered subset expectation maximization (OP-OSEM) algorithm and compared to the manufacturer's implementation using projection space resolution modelling (RM). Comparisons were based on a point source array, the NEMA IEC image quality phantom, the Cologne resolution phantom and two clinical studies (carbon-11 labelled anti-sense oligonucleotide [{sup 11}C]-ASO and fluorine-18 labelled fluoro-l-thymidine [{sup 18}F]-FLT). Robust and accurate measurements of spatially-variant image blurring were successfully obtained from a single scan. Spatially-variant resolution modelling resulted in notable resolution improvements away from the centre of the FOV. Comparison between spatially-variant image-space methods and the projection-space approach (the first such report, using a range of studies) demonstrated very similar performance with our image-based implementation producing slightly better contrast recovery (CR) for the same level of image roughness (IR). These results demonstrate that image-based resolution modelling within reconstruction is a valid alternative to

  12. Time's up! Involvement of metamemory knowledge, executive functions, and time monitoring in children's prospective memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geurten, Marie; Lejeune, Caroline; Meulemans, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    This study examined time-based prospective memory (PM) in children and explored the possible involvement of metamemory knowledge and executive functions in the use of an appropriate time-monitoring strategy depending on the ongoing task's difficulty. Specifically, a sample of 72 typically developing children aged 4, 6, and 9 years old were given an original PM paradigm composed of both an ongoing procedural activity and a PM task. Half of the participants (expert group) were trained in the ongoing activity before the prospective test. As expected, results show that time monitoring had a positive effect on children's PM performance. Furthermore, mediation analyses reveal that strategic time monitoring was predicted by metamemory knowledge in the expert group but only by executive functions in the novice group. Overall, these findings provide interesting avenues to explain how metamemory knowledge, strategy use, and executive functions interact to improve PM performance during childhood.

  13. On the regularization of extremal three-point functions involving giant gravitons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Kristjansen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In the AdS5/CFT4 set-up, extremal three-point functions involving two giant 1/2 BPS gravitons and one point-like 1/2 BPS graviton, when calculated using semi-classical string theory methods, match the corresponding three-point functions obtained in the tree-level gauge theory. The string theory computation relies on a certain regularization procedure whose justification is based on the match between gauge and string theory. We revisit the regularization procedure and reformulate it in a way which allows a generalization to the ABJM set-up where three-point functions of 1/2 BPS operators are not protected and where a match between tree-level gauge theory and semi-classical string theory is hence not expected.

  14. Executive function plays a role in coordinating different perspectives, particularly when one's own perspective is involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fizke, Ella; Barthel, Dana; Peters, Thomas; Rakoczy, Hannes

    2014-03-01

    While developmental experiments with children and elderly subjects, work with neuropsychological patients and adult experimental studies have consistently found close relations between executive function and theory of mind, the foundation of this relation still remains somewhat unclear. One prominent account holds that executive function is specifically involved in ascribing such mental states, paradigmatically beliefs, that aim at representing the world truly because ascribing such states requires inhibition of normative defaults (beliefs being true) (e.g. Sabbagh, Moses, & Shiverick, 2006). The present studies systematically tested for the role of executive function in different forms of mental state ascription as a function of the type of state ascribed (beliefs or desires) and the first person involvement of the ascriber (whether she herself has an attitude conflicting with one to be ascribed to someone else) in young children. The results reveal that (i) executive function is related not only to belief ascription but equally to desire ascription when both are matched in terms of logical complexity (such that two subjective attitudes have to be ascribed to two agents that are incompatible with each other). (ii) Both for desires and for beliefs, these relations are strongest in such tasks where the ascriber herself is one of the two agents, i.e. has a belief or desire herself that stands in contrast to that to be ascribed to someone else. All in all, these findings suggest that executive function figures in coordinating perspectives more generally, not only epistemic ones, and in particular in coordinating others' and one's own conflicting perspectives. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Govindaraghavan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell

  16. Identification of interphase functions for the NIMA kinase involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meera Govindaraghavan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Never in Mitosis A (NIMA kinase (the founding member of the Nek family of kinases has been considered a mitotic specific kinase with nuclear restricted roles in the model fungus Aspergillus nidulans. By extending to A. nidulans the results of a synthetic lethal screen performed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the NIMA ortholog KIN3, we identified a conserved genetic interaction between nimA and genes encoding proteins of the Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT pathway. Absence of ESCRT pathway functions in combination with partial NIMA function causes enhanced cell growth defects, including an inability to maintain a single polarized dominant cell tip. These genetic insights suggest NIMA potentially has interphase functions in addition to its established mitotic functions at nuclei. We therefore generated endogenously GFP-tagged NIMA (NIMA-GFP which was fully functional to follow its interphase locations using live cell spinning disc 4D confocal microscopy. During interphase some NIMA-GFP locates to the tips of rapidly growing cells and, when expressed ectopically, also locates to the tips of cytoplasmic microtubules, suggestive of non-nuclear interphase functions. In support of this, perturbation of NIMA function either by ectopic overexpression or through partial inactivation results in marked cell tip growth defects with excess NIMA-GFP promoting multiple growing cell tips. Ectopic NIMA-GFP was found to locate to the plus ends of microtubules in an EB1 dependent manner, while impairing NIMA function altered the dynamic localization of EB1 and the cytoplasmic microtubule network. Together, our genetic and cell biological analyses reveal novel non-nuclear interphase functions for NIMA involving microtubules and the ESCRT pathway for normal polarized fungal cell tip growth. These insights extend the roles of NIMA both spatially and temporally and indicate that this conserved protein kinase could help integrate cell

  17. Mutations in blaKPC-3 that confer ceftazidime-avibactam resistance encode novel KPC-3 variants that function as extended-spectrum β-lactamases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ghady; Clancy, Cornelius J; Shields, Ryan K; Hao, Binghua; Cheng, Shaoji; Nguyen, M Hong

    2017-02-21

    We identified four blaKPC-3 mutations in ceftazidime-avibactam resistant clinical Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates, corresponding to D179Y, T243M, D179Y/T243M, and EL165 KPC-3 variants. Using site-directed mutagenesis and transforming vectors into Escherichia coli, we conclusively demonstrated that mutant blaKPC-3 encoded enzymes that functioned as extended-spectrum β-lactamases; mutations directly conferred higher MICs of ceftazidime-avibactam MICs, and decreased MICs of carbapenems and other β-lactams. Impact was strongest for the D179Y mutant, highlighting the importance of the KPC Ω-loop.

  18. Identification of Variants in Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes and Determination of Functional and Clinical Significance of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    likely deleterious variants in genes for which clinical guidelines exist for management, namely TP53 (4), CDKN2A (1) MSH2 (1), and MUTYH (double...included 26 study genes plus BRCA1 and BRCA2 and were: 1) high penetrance breast cancer susceptibility genes (CDH1, PTEN, STK11, TP53 ); 2) genes known...for management, namely TP53 (4), CDKN2A (1) MSH2 (1), and MUTYH (double heterozygote). Twenty- four patients (8.6%) had deleterious or likely

  19. A disposable electrochemical immunosensor for prolactin involving affinity reaction on streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Guzman, Maria; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma, E-mail: yseo@quim.ucm.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pingarron, Jose M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University Computense of Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-04-29

    A novel electrochemical immunosensor was developed for the determination of the hormone prolactin. The design involved the use of screen-printed carbon electrodes and streptavidin-functionalized magnetic particles. Biotinylated anti-prolactin antibodies were immobilized onto the functionalized magnetic particles and a sandwich-type immunoassay involving prolactin and anti-prolactin antibody labelled with alkaline phosphatase was employed. The resulting bio-conjugate was trapped on the surface of the screen-printed electrode with a small magnet and prolactin quantification was accomplished by differential pulse voltammetry of 1-naphtol formed in the enzyme reaction using 1-naphtyl phosphate as alkaline phosphatase substrate. All variables involved in the preparation of the immunosensor and in the electrochemical detection step were optimized. The calibration plot for prolactin exhibited a linear range between 10 and 2000 ng mL{sup -1} with a slope value of 7.0 nA mL ng{sup -1}. The limit of detection was 3.74 ng mL{sup -1}. Furthermore, the modified magnetic beads-antiprolactin conjugates showed an excellent stability. The immunosensor exhibited also a high selectivity with respect to other hormones. The analytical usefulness of the immnunosensor was demonstrated by analyzing human sera spiked with prolactin at three different concentration levels.

  20. Novel application of luciferase assay for the in vitro functional assessment of KAL1 variants in three females with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Mark J.; Hu, Youli; Gregory, Louise C.; Gaston-Massuet, Carles; Alatzoglou, Kyriaki S.; Saldanha, José W.; Gualtieri, Angelica; Thankamony, Ajay; Hughes, Ieuan; Townshend, Sharron; Martinez-Barbera, Juan-Pedro; Bouloux, Pierre-Marc; Dattani, Mehul T.

    2015-01-01

    KAL1 is implicated in 5% of Kallmann syndrome cases, a disorder which genotypically overlaps with septo-optic dysplasia (SOD). To date, a reporter-based assay to assess the functional consequences of KAL1 mutations is lacking. We aimed to develop a luciferase assay for novel application to functional assessment of rare KAL1 mutations detected in a screen of 422 patients with SOD. Quantitative analysis was performed using L6-myoblasts stably expressing FGFR1, transfected with a luciferase-reporter vector containing elements of the FGF-responsive osteocalcin promoter. The two variants assayed [p.K185N, p.P291T], were detected in three females with SOD (presenting with optic nerve hypoplasia, midline and pituitary defects). Our novel assay revealed significant decreases in transcriptional activity [p.K185N: 21% (p < 0.01); p.P291T: 40% (p < 0.001)]. Our luciferase-reporter assay, developed for assessment of KAL1 mutations, determined that two variants in females with hypopituitarism/SOD are loss-of-function; demonstrating that this assay is suitable for quantitative assessment of mutations in this gene. PMID:26375424

  1. Hepatitis C virus in Vietnam: high prevalence of infection in dialysis and multi-transfused patients involving diverse and novel virus variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Dunford

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a genetically diverse pathogen infecting approximately 2-3% of the world's population. Herein, we describe results of a large, multicentre serological and molecular epidemiological study cataloguing the prevalence and genetic diversity of HCV in five regions of Vietnam; Ha Noi, Hai Phong, Da Nang, Khanh Hoa and Can Tho. Individuals (n=8654 with varying risk factors for infection were analysed for the presence of HCV Ab/Ag and, in a subset of positive specimens, for HCV RNA levels (n=475 and genotype (n=282. In lower risk individuals, including voluntary blood donors, military recruits and pregnant women, the prevalence of infection was 0.5% (n=26/5250. Prevalence rates were significantly higher (p<0.001 in intravenous drug users (IDUs; 55.6%, n=556/1000, dialysis patients (26.6%, n=153/575 commercial sex workers (CSWs; 8.7%, n=87/1000, and recipients of multiple blood transfusions (6.0%, n=32/529. The prevalence of HCV in dialysis patients varied but remained high in all regions (11-43% and was associated with the receipt of blood transfusions [OR: 2.08 (1.85-2.34, p=0.001], time from first transfusion [OR: 1.07 (1.01-1.13, p=0.023], duration of dialysis [OR: 1.31 (1.19-1.43, p<0.001] and male gender [OR: 1.60 (1.06-2.41, p=0.026]. Phylogenetic analysis revealed high genetic diversity, particularly amongst dialysis and multi-transfused patients, identifying subtypes 1a (33%, 1b (27%, 2a (0.4%, 3a (0.7%, 3b (1.1%, 6a (18.8%, 6e (6.0%, 6h (4.6%, 6l (6.4% and 2 clusters of novel genotype 6 variants (2.1%. HCV genotype 1 predominated in Vietnam (60%, n=169/282 but the proportion of infections attributable to genotype 1 varied between regions and risk groups and, in the Southern part of Vietnam, genotype 6 viruses dominated in dialysis and multi-transfused patients (73.9%. This study confirms a high prevalence of HCV infection in Vietnamese IDUs and, notably, reveals high levels of HCV infection associated with dialysis and

  2. Proton transfer reactions in the red light-activatable channelrhodopsin variant ReaChR and their relevance for its function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Joel C D; Krause, Benjamin S; Grimm, Christiane; Ritter, Eglof; Hegemann, Peter; Bartl, Franz J

    2017-08-25

    Channelrhodopsins (ChRs) are light-gated ion channels widely used for activating selected cells in large cellular networks. ChR variants with a red-shifted absorption maximum, such as the modified Volvox carteri ChR1 red-activatable channelrhodopsin ("ReaChR," λmax = 527 nm), are of particular interest because longer wavelengths allow optical excitation of cells in deeper layers of organic tissue. In all ChRs investigated so far, proton transfer reactions and hydrogen bond changes are crucial for the formation of the ion-conducting pore and the selectivity for protons versus cations, such as Na(+), K(+), and Ca(2+) (1). By using a combination of electrophysiological measurements and UV-visible and FTIR spectroscopy, we characterized the proton transfer events in the photocycle of ReaChR and describe their relevance for its function. 1) The central gate residue Glu(130) (Glu(90) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (Cr) ChR2) (i) undergoes a hydrogen bond change in D → K transition and (ii) deprotonates in K → M transition. Its negative charge in the open state is decisive for proton selectivity. 2) The counter-ion Asp(293) (Asp(253) in CrChR2) receives the retinal Schiff base proton during M-state formation. Starting from M, a photocycle branching occurs involving (i) a direct M → D transition and (ii) formation of late photointermediates N and O. 3) The DC pair residue Asp(196) (Asp(156) in CrChR2) deprotonates in N → O transition. Interestingly, the D196N mutation increases 15-syn-retinal at the expense of 15-anti, which is the predominant isomer in the wild type, and abolishes the peak current in electrophysiological measurements. This suggests that the peak current is formed by 15-anti species, whereas 15-syn species contribute only to the stationary current. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Expression and functional characterization of the Agrobacterium VirB2 amino acid substitution variants in T-pilus biogenesis, virulence, and transient transformation efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Yi Wu

    Full Text Available Agrobacterium tumefaciens is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes crown gall disease by transferring transferred DNA (T-DNA into the plant genome. The translocation process is mediated by the type IV secretion system (T4SS consisting of the VirD4 coupling protein and 11 VirB proteins (VirB1 to VirB11. All VirB proteins are required for the production of T-pilus, which consists of processed VirB2 (T-pilin and VirB5 as major and minor subunits, respectively. VirB2 is an essential component of T4SS, but the roles of VirB2 and the assembled T-pilus in Agrobacterium virulence and the T-DNA transfer process remain unknown. Here, we generated 34 VirB2 amino acid substitution variants to study the functions of VirB2 involved in VirB2 stability, extracellular VirB2/T-pilus production and virulence of A. tumefaciens. From the capacity for extracellular VirB2 production (ExB2+ or ExB2- and tumorigenesis on tomato stems (Vir+ or Vir-, the mutants could be classified into three groups: ExB2-/Vir-, ExB2-/Vir+, and ExB2+/Vir+. We also confirmed by electron microscopy that five ExB2-/Vir+ mutants exhibited a wild-type level of virulence with their deficiency in T-pilus formation. Interestingly, although the five T-pilus-/Vir+ uncoupling mutants retained a wild-type level of tumorigenesis efficiency on tomato stems and/or potato tuber discs, their transient transformation efficiency in Arabidopsis seedlings was highly attenuated. In conclusion, we have provided evidence for a role of T-pilus in Agrobacterium transformation process and have identified the domains and amino acid residues critical for VirB2 stability, T-pilus biogenesis, tumorigenesis, and transient transformation efficiency.

  4. Involvement of the crebellum in sequential finger movement learning: Evidence from functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yihong; DI Haibo; YUAN Yi; REN Jin'ge; YU Wei; ZHANG Zhaoqi; GAO Jiahong; WENG Xuchu; CHEN Yizhang

    2005-01-01

    Whether the cerebellum is involved in voluntary motor learning or motor performance is the subject of a new debate. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we examined cerebellar activation in eight volunteers before and after an extended period of training. Activation volume on both sides of cerebellum after learning was significantly reduced compared to that before learning even under the same motor frequency. Remarkably, while motor frequency for the training sequence was significantly higher than the control sequence after 41 d of learning, activation in the cerebellum for both sequences, with respect to activation loci and volumes, was very similar. These results suggest that the cerebellum was involved in motor learning but not motor performance. Changes of cerebellar activation from training thus appear to be associated with learning but not with improvement on task performance.

  5. Characterization of splice variants of human caspase-activated DNase with CIDE-N structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayascas, José R; Yuste, Víctor J; Solé, Carme; Sánchez-López, Isabel; Segura, Miquel F; Perera, Remei; Comella, Joan X

    2004-05-21

    Internucleosomal DNA fragmentation is an apoptotic event that depends on the activity of different nucleases. Among them, the DNA fragmentation factor B, better known as caspase-activated DNase (CAD), is mainly responsible for this DNA fragmentation in dying cells. CAD is an endonuclease that is chaperoned and inhibited by inhibitor of CAD (ICAD). Activation of CAD needs the cleavage of ICAD by activated caspase-3. During the characterization of the staurosporine-induced apoptotic process in human neuroblastoma cell lines, we have found three novel splice variants of CAD. In all three messengers, the open reading frame is truncated after the second exon of the CAD gene. This truncated open reading frame codifies the CAD protein amino terminal part corresponding to the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector-N (CIDE-N) domain. We have detected these splicing variants in human tissues and in peripheral white blood cells from 10 unrelated individuals, and their products have been showed to be expressed in certain mouse tissues. We demonstrate that these truncated forms of CAD are soluble proteins that interact with ICAD. We also provided evidences that these CIDE-N forms of CAD promote apoptosis in a caspase-dependent manner.

  6. Structure-function studies of an engineered scaffold protein derived from stefin A. I: Development of the SQM variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Toni; Stadler, Lukas Kurt Josef; Busby, Michael; Song, Qifeng; Buxton, Anthony T; Wagner, Simon D; Davis, Jason J; Ko Ferrigno, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Non-antibody scaffold proteins are used for a range of applications, especially the assessment of protein-protein interactions within human cells. The search for a versatile, robust and biologically neutral scaffold previously led us to design STM (stefin A triple mutant), a scaffold derived from the intracellular protease inhibitor stefin A. Here, we describe five new STM-based scaffold proteins that contain modifications designed to further improve the versatility of our scaffold. In a step-by-step approach, we introduced restriction sites in the STM open reading frame that generated new peptide insertion sites in loop 1, loop 2 and the N-terminus of the scaffold protein. A second restriction site in 'loop 2' allows substitution of the native loop 2 sequence with alternative oligopeptides. None of the amino acid changes interfered significantly with the folding of the STM variants as assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Of the five scaffold variants tested, one (stefin A quadruple mutant, SQM) was chosen as a versatile, stable scaffold. The insertion of epitope tags at varying positions showed that inserts into loop 1, attempted here for the first time, were generally well tolerated. However, N-terminal insertions of epitope tags in SQM had a detrimental effect on protein expression.

  7. Functional Characterization of NIPBL Physiological Splice Variants and Eight Splicing Mutations in Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E. Teresa-Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, growth retardation, cognitive impairment, limb defects, hirsutism, and multisystem involvement. Mutations in five genes encoding structural components (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 or functionally associated factors (NIPBL, HDAC8 of the cohesin complex have been found in patients with CdLS. In about 60% of the patients, mutations in NIPBL could be identified. Interestingly, 17% of them are predicted to change normal splicing, however, detailed molecular investigations are often missing. Here, we report the first systematic study of the physiological splicing of the NIPBL gene, that would reveal the identification of four new splicing isoforms ΔE10, ΔE12, ΔE33,34, and B’. Furthermore, we have investigated nine mutations affecting splice-sites in the NIPBL gene identified in twelve CdLS patients. All mutations have been examined on the DNA and RNA level, as well as by in silico analyses. Although patients with mutations affecting NIPBL splicing show a broad clinical variability, the more severe phenotypes seem to be associated with aberrant transcripts resulting in a shift of the reading frame.

  8. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic beta cell secretory function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumann, Desiree M; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in beta cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending......-kappaB-inducing kinase and RelB. This led to increased PDX-1 and insulin production independent of changes in cell turnover. The results support a previously undescribed role for the Fas pathway in regulating insulin production and release....

  9. Transcription factors involved in the regulation of natural killer cell development and function: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Elia Luevano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells belong to the innate immune system and are key effectors in the immune response against cancer and infection. Recent studies have contributed to the knowledge of events controlling NK cell fate. The use of knockout mice has enabled the discovery of key transcription factors (TFs essential for NK cell development and function. Yet, unwrapping the downstream targets of these TFs and their influence on NK cells remains a challenge. In this review we discuss the latest TFs described to be involved in the regulation of NK cell development and maturation.

  10. Exercise Influence on Hippocampal Function: Possible Involvement of Orexin-A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieffi, Sergio; Messina, Giovanni; Villano, Ines; Messina, Antonietta; Esposito, Maria; Monda, Vincenzo; Valenzano, Anna; Moscatelli, Fiorenzo; Esposito, Teresa; Carotenuto, Marco; Viggiano, Andrea; Cibelli, Giuseppe; Monda, Marcellino

    2017-01-01

    In the present article, we provide a brief review of current knowledge regarding the effects induced by physical exercise on hippocampus. Research involving animals and humans supports the view that physical exercise, enhancing hippocampal neurogenesis and function, improves cognition, and regulates mood. These beneficial effects depend on the contribute of more factors including the enhancement of vascularization and upregulation of growth factors. Among these, the BDNF seems to play a significant role. Another putative factor that might contribute to beneficial effects of exercise is the orexin-A. In support of this hypothesis there are the following observations: (1) orexin-A enhances hippocampal neurogenesis and function and (2) the levels of orexin-A increase with physical exercise. The beneficial effects of exercise may represent an important resource to hinder the cognitive decline associated with the aging-related hippocampal deterioration and ameliorate depressive symptoms. PMID:28261108

  11. Involvement of S6K1 in mitochondria function and structure in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jisoo; Tran, Quangdon; Mun, Kisun; Masuda, Kouhei; Kwon, So Hee; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Kim, Dong-Hoon; Thomas, George; Park, Jongsun

    2016-12-01

    The major biological function of mitochondria is to generate cellular energy through oxidative phosphorylation. Apart from cellular respiration, mitochondria also play a key role in signaling processes, including aging and cancer metabolism. It has been shown that S6K1-knockout mice are resistant to obesity due to enhanced beta-oxidation, with an increased number of large mitochondria. Therefore, in this report, the possible involvement of S6K1 in regulating mitochondria dynamics and function has been investigated in stable lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells. Interestingly, S6K1-stably depleted HeLa cells showed phenotypical changes in mitochondria morphology. This observation was further confirmed by detailed image analysis of mitochondria shape. Corresponding molecular changes were also observed in these cells, such as the induction of mitochondrial fission proteins (Drp1 and Fis1). Oxygen consumption is elevated in S6K1-depeleted HeLa cells and FL5.12 cells. In addition, S6K1 depletion leads to enhancement of ATP production in cytoplasm and mitochondria. However, the relative ratio of mitochondrial ATP to cytoplasmic ATP is actually decreased in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells compared to control cells. Lastly, induction of mitophagy was found in lenti-shS6K1-HeLa cells with corresponding changes of mitochondria shape on electron microscope analysis. Taken together, our results indicate that S6K1 is involved in the regulation of mitochondria morphology and function in HeLa cells. This study will provide novel insights into S6K1 function in mitochondria-mediated cellular signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional connectivity between brain regions involved in learning words of a new language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veroude, Kim; Norris, David G; Shumskaya, Elena; Gullberg, Marianne; Indefrey, Peter

    2010-04-01

    Previous studies have identified several brain regions that appear to be involved in the acquisition of novel word forms. Standard word-by-word presentation is often used although exposure to a new language normally occurs in a natural, real world situation. In the current experiment we investigated naturalistic language exposure and applied a model-free analysis for hemodynamic-response data. Functional connectivity, temporal correlations between hemodynamic activity of different areas, was assessed during rest before and after presentation of a movie of a weather report in Mandarin Chinese to Dutch participants. We hypothesized that learning of novel words might be associated with stronger functional connectivity of regions that are involved in phonological processing. Participants were divided into two groups, learners and non-learners, based on the scores on a post hoc word recognition task. The learners were able to recognize Chinese target words from the weather report, while the non-learners were not. In the first resting state period, before presentation of the movie, stronger functional connectivity was observed for the learners compared to the non-learners between the left supplementary motor area and the left precentral gyrus as well as the left insula and the left rolandic operculum, regions that are important for phonological rehearsal. After exposure to the weather report, functional connectivity between the left and right supramarginal gyrus was stronger for learners than for non-learners. This is consistent with a role of the left supramarginal gyrus in the storage of phonological forms. These results suggest both pre-existing and learning-induced differences between the two groups.

  13. Obesity is marked by distinct functional connectivity in brain networks involved in food reward and salience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijngaarden, M A; Veer, I M; Rombouts, S A R B; van Buchem, M A; Willems van Dijk, K; Pijl, H; van der Grond, J

    2015-01-01

    We hypothesized that brain circuits involved in reward and salience respond differently to fasting in obese versus lean individuals. We compared functional connectivity networks related to food reward and saliency after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged fast of 48 h in lean versus obese subjects. We included 13 obese (2 males, 11 females, BMI 35.4 ± 1.2 kg/m(2), age 31 ± 3 years) and 11 lean subjects (2 males, 9 females, BMI 23.2 ± 0.5 kg/m(2), age 28 ± 3 years). Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans were made after an overnight fast (baseline) and after a prolonged 48 h fast. Functional connectivity of the amygdala, hypothalamus and posterior cingulate cortex (default-mode) networks was assessed using seed-based correlations. At baseline, we found a stronger connectivity between hypothalamus and left insula in the obese subjects. This effect diminished upon the prolonged fast. After prolonged fasting, connectivity of the hypothalamus with the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) increased in lean subjects and decreased in obese subjects. Amygdala connectivity with the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was stronger in lean subjects at baseline, which did not change upon the prolonged fast. No differences in posterior cingulate cortex connectivity were observed. In conclusion, obesity is marked by alterations in functional connectivity networks involved in food reward and salience. Prolonged fasting differentially affected hypothalamic connections with the dACC and the insula between obese and lean subjects. Our data support the idea that food reward and nutrient deprivation are differently perceived and/or processed in obesity.

  14. A variant at 9p21.3 functionally implicates CDKN2B in paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungate, Eric A.; Vora, Sapana R.; Gamazon, Eric R.; Moriyama, Takaya; Best, Timothy; Hulur, Imge; Lee, Younghee; Evans, Tiffany-Jane; Ellinghaus, Eva; Stanulla, Martin; Rudant, Jéremie; Orsi, Laurent; Clavel, Jacqueline; Milne, Elizabeth; Scott, Rodney J.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Cox, Nancy J.; Loh, Mignon L.; Yang, Jun J.; Skol, Andrew D.; Onel, Kenan

    2016-01-01

    Paediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (BCP-ALL) is the most common cancer of childhood, yet little is known about BCP-ALL predisposition. In this study, in 2,187 cases of European ancestry and 5,543 controls, we discover and replicate a locus indexed by rs77728904 at 9p21.3 associated with BCP-ALL susceptibility (Pcombined=3.32 × 10−15, OR=1.72) and independent from rs3731217, the previously reported ALL-associated variant in this region. Of correlated SNPs tagged by this locus, only rs662463 is significant in African Americans, suggesting it is a plausible causative variant. Functional analysis shows that rs662463 is a cis-eQTL for CDKN2B, with the risk allele associated with lower expression, and suggests that rs662463 influences BCP-ALL risk by regulating CDKN2B expression through CEBPB signalling. Functional analysis of rs3731217 suggests it is associated with BCP-ALL by acting within a splicing regulatory element determining CDKN2A exon 3 usage (P=0.01). These findings provide new insights into the critical role of the CDKN2 locus in BCP-ALL aetiology. PMID:26868379

  15. Functional and Biochemical Analysis of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G6PD Variants: Elucidating the Molecular Basis of G6PD Deficiency

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    Saúl Gómez-Manzo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available G6PD deficiency is the most common enzymopathy, leading to alterations in the first step of the pentose phosphate pathway, which interferes with the protection of the erythrocyte against oxidative stress and causes a wide range of clinical symptoms of which hemolysis is one of the most severe. The G6PD deficiency causes several abnormalities that range from asymptomatic individuals to more severe manifestations that can lead to death. Nowadays, only 9.2% of all recognized variants have been related to clinical manifestations. It is important to understand the molecular basis of G6PD deficiency to understand how gene mutations can impact structure, stability, and enzymatic function. In this work, we reviewed and compared the functional and structural data generated through the characterization of 20 G6PD variants using different approaches. These studies showed that severe clinical manifestations of G6PD deficiency were related to mutations that affected the catalytic and structural nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH binding sites, and suggests that the misfolding or instability of the 3D structure of the protein could compromise the half-life of the protein in the erythrocyte and its activity.

  16. 40LoVe and Samba are involved in Xenopus neural development and functionally distinct from hnRNP AB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Andreou

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs comprise a large group of modular RNA-binding proteins classified according to their conserved domains. This modular nature, coupled with a large choice of alternative splice variants generates functional diversity. Here, we investigate the biological differences between 40LoVe, its splice variant Samba and its pseudoallele hnRNP AB in neural development. Loss of function experiments lead to defects in neural development with reduction of eye size, which stem primarily from increased apoptosis and reduced proliferation in neural tissues. Despite very high homology between 40LoVe/Samba and hnRNP AB, these proteins display major differences in localization, which appear to be in part responsible for functional differences. Specifically, we show that the 40Love/Samba carboxy-terminal domain (GRD enables nucleocytoplasmic shuttling behavior. This domain is slightly different in hnRNP AB, leading to nuclear-restricted localization. Finally, we show that shuttling is required for 40LoVe/Samba function in neural development.

  17. Functional Analysis of a Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Locus Implicates BCAR1 and Suggests a Causal Variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boardman-Pretty, Freya; Smith, Andrew J. P.; Cooper, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    Carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) is a marker of subclinical atherosclerosis that can predict cardiovascular disease events over traditional risk factors. This study examined the BCAR1-CFDP1-TMEM170A locus on chromosome 16, associated with carotid IMT and coronary artery disease in the IMT...... associations of rs4888378 with BCAR1 in vascular tissues. Molecular studies suggest the lead SNP as a potentially causal SNP at the BCAR1-CFDP1-TMEM170A locus, and expression quantitative trait loci studies implicate BCAR1 as the causal gene. This variant showed stronger effects on common carotid IMT in women......, raising questions about the mechanism of the causal SNP on atherosclerosis....

  18. Person perception involves functional integration between the extrastriate body area and temporal pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greven, Inez M; Ramsey, Richard

    2017-02-01

    The majority of human neuroscience research has focussed on understanding functional organisation within segregated patches of cortex. The ventral visual stream has been associated with the detection of physical features such as faces and body parts, whereas the theory-of-mind network has been associated with making inferences about mental states and underlying character, such as whether someone is friendly, selfish, or generous. To date, however, it is largely unknown how such distinct processing components integrate neural signals. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and connectivity analyses, we investigated the contribution of functional integration to social perception. During scanning, participants observed bodies that had previously been associated with trait-based or neutral information. Additionally, we independently localised the body perception and theory-of-mind networks. We demonstrate that when observing someone who cues the recall of stored social knowledge compared to non-social knowledge, a node in the ventral visual stream (extrastriate body area) shows greater coupling with part of the theory-of-mind network (temporal pole). These results show that functional connections provide an interface between perceptual and inferential processing components, thus providing neurobiological evidence that supports the view that understanding the visual environment involves interplay between conceptual knowledge and perceptual processing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular clock is involved in predictive circadian adjustment of renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Annie Mercier; Centeno, Gabriel; Pradervand, Sylvain; Nikolaeva, Svetlana; Maquelin, Lionel; Cardinaux, Léonard; Bonny, Olivier; Firsov, Dmitri

    2009-09-22

    Renal excretion of water and major electrolytes exhibits a significant circadian rhythm. This functional periodicity is believed to result, at least in part, from circadian changes in secretion/reabsorption capacities of the distal nephron and collecting ducts. Here, we studied the molecular mechanisms underlying circadian rhythms in the distal nephron segments, i.e., distal convoluted tubule (DCT) and connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Temporal expression analysis performed on microdissected mouse DCT/CNT or CCD revealed a marked circadian rhythmicity in the expression of a large number of genes crucially involved in various homeostatic functions of the kidney. This analysis also revealed that both DCT/CNT and CCD possess an intrinsic circadian timing system characterized by robust oscillations in the expression of circadian core clock genes (clock, bma11, npas2, per, cry, nr1d1) and clock-controlled Par bZip transcriptional factors dbp, hlf, and tef. The clock knockout mice or mice devoid of dbp/hlf/tef (triple knockout) exhibit significant changes in renal expression of several key regulators of water or sodium balance (vasopressin V2 receptor, aquaporin-2, aquaporin-4, alphaENaC). Functionally, the loss of clock leads to a complex phenotype characterized by partial diabetes insipidus, dysregulation of sodium excretion rhythms, and a significant decrease in blood pressure. Collectively, this study uncovers a major role of molecular clock in renal function.

  20. Functional involvement of Annexin-2 in cAMP induced AQP2 trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamma, Grazia; Procino, Giuseppe; Mola, Maria Grazia; Svelto, Maria; Valenti, Giovanna

    2008-07-01

    Annexin-2 is required for the apical transport in epithelial cells. In this study, we investigated the involvement of annexin-2 in cAMP-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) translocation to the apical membrane in renal cells. We found that the cAMP-elevating agent forskolin increased annexin-2 abundance in the plasma membrane enriched fraction with a parallel decrease in the soluble fraction. Interestingly, forskolin stimulation resulted in annexin-2 enrichment in lipid rafts, suggesting that hormonal stimulation might be responsible for a new configuration of membrane interacting proteins involved in the fusion of AQP2 vesicles to the apical plasma membrane. To investigate the functional involvement of annexin-2 in AQP2 exocytosis, the fusion process between purified AQP2 membrane vesicles and plasma membranes was reconstructed in vitro and monitored by a fluorescence assay. An N-terminal peptide that comprises 14 residues of annexin-2 and that includes the binding site for the calcium binding protein p11 strongly inhibited the fusion process. Preincubation of cells with this annexin-2 peptide also failed to increase the osmotic water permeability in the presence of forskolin in intact cells. Altogether, these data demonstrate that annexin-2 is required for cAMP-induced AQP2 exocytosis in renal cells.

  1. Microarray technology reveals potentially novel genes and pathways involved in non-functioning pituitary adenomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, X; Wang, H; Wang, X; Zhao, B

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Microarray data of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFPAs) were analyzed to disclose novel genes and pathways involved in NFPA tumorigenesis. Raw microarray data were downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. Data pre-treatment and differential analysis were conducted using packages in R. Functional and pathway enrichment analyses were performed using package GOs-tats. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was constructed using server STRING and Cytoscape. Known genes involved in pituitary adenomas (PAs), were obtained from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database. A total of 604 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identifed between NFPAs and controls, including 177 up- and 427 down-regulated genes. Jak-STAT and p53 signaling pathways were significantly enriched by DEGs. The PPI network of DEGs was constructed, containing 99 up- and 288 down-regulated known disease genes (e.g. EGFR and ESR1) as well as 16 up- and 17 down-regulated potential novel NFPAs-related genes (e.g. COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR). Genes like COL4A5, LHX3, MSN, and GHSR and pathways such as p53 signaling and Jak-STAT signaling, might participate in NFPA development. Although further validations are required, these findings might provide guidance for future basic and therapy researches. PMID:28289583

  2. Does regulation of skeletal muscle function involve circulating microRNAs?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru eAoi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation. Recently, growing evidence has shown that miRNAs are taken in by intracellular exosomes, secreted into circulation, and taken up by other cells. Circulating levels of several miRNAs are changed in diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases; therefore, they are suggested to regulate functions of the recipient cells by modulating protein expression. Circulating miRNAs (c-miRNAs may also modulate skeletal muscle function in physiological and pathological conditions. It has been suggested that acute and chronic exercise transiently or adaptively changes the level of c-miRNAs, thus posttranscriptionally regulating proteins associated with energy metabolism, myogenesis, and angiogenesis. Circulating levels of several miRNAs that are enriched in muscle are altered in muscle disorders and may be involved in their development and progression. In addition, such c-miRNAs may be useful as biomarkers to determine various interactions between tissues and also to reflect athletic performance, physical fatigue, incidence risk, and development of diseases.

  3. Functional characterization of an α-esterase gene involving malathion detoxification in Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luo-Luo; Lu, Xue-Ping; Meng, Li-Wei; Huang, Yong; Wei, Dong; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Extensive use of insecticides in many orchards has prompted resistance development in the oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis (Hendel). In this study, a laboratory selected strain of B. dorsalis (MR) with a 21-fold higher resistance to malathion was used to examine the resistance mechanisms to this organophosphate insecticide. Carboxylesterase (CarE) was found to be involved in malathion resistance in B. dorsalis from the synergism bioassay by CarE-specific inhibitor triphenylphosphate (TPP). Molecular studies further identified a previously uncharacterized α-esterase gene, BdCarE2, that may function in the development of malathion resistance in B. dorsalis via gene upregulation. This gene is predominantly expressed in the Malpighian tubules, a key insect tissue for detoxification. The transcript levels of BdCarE2 were also compared between the MR and a malathion-susceptible (MS) strain of B. dorsalis, and it was significantly more abundant in the MR strain. No sequence mutation or gene copy changes were detected between the two strains. Functional studies using RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of BdCarE2 significantly increased the malathion susceptibility in the adult files. Furthermore, heterologous expression of BdCarE2 combined with cytotoxicity assay in Sf9 cells demonstrated that BdCarE2 could probably detoxify malathion. Taken together, the current study bring new molecular evidence supporting the involvement of CarE-mediated metabolism in resistance development against malathion in B. dorsalis and also provide bases on functional analysis of insect α-esterase associated with insecticide resistance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A Functional Toll-Interacting Protein Variant Is Associated with Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Specific Immune Responses and Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Javeed A; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Shey, Muki; Horne, David J; Wells, Richard D; Peterson, Glenna J; Cox, Jeffery S; Daya, Michelle; Hoal, Eileen G; Lin, Lin; Gottardo, Raphael; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J; Hatherill, Mark; Hawn, Thomas R

    2017-08-15

    The molecular mechanisms that regulate tuberculosis susceptibility and bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-induced immunity are mostly unknown. However, induction of the adaptive immune response is a critical step in host control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Toll-interacting protein (TOLLIP) is a ubiquitin-binding protein that regulates innate immune responses, including Toll-like receptor signaling, which initiate adaptive immunity. TOLLIP variation is associated with susceptibility to tuberculosis, but the mechanism by which it regulates tuberculosis immunity is poorly understood. To identify functional TOLLIP variants and evaluate the role of TOLLIP variation on innate and adaptive immune responses to mycobacteria and susceptibility to tuberculosis. We used human cellular immunology approaches to characterize the role of a functional TOLLIP variant on monocyte mRNA expression and M. tuberculosis-induced monocyte immune functions. We also examined the association of TOLLIP variation with BCG-induced T-cell responses and susceptibility to latent tuberculosis infection. We identified a functional TOLLIP promoter region single-nucleotide polymorphism, rs5743854, which was associated with decreased TOLLIP mRNA expression in infant monocytes. After M. tuberculosis infection, TOLLIP-deficient monocytes demonstrated increased IL-6, increased nitrite, and decreased bacterial replication. The TOLLIP-deficiency G/G genotype was associated with decreased BCG-specific IL-2(+) CD4(+) T-cell frequency and proliferation. This genotype was also associated with increased susceptibility to latent tuberculosis infection. TOLLIP deficiency is associated with decreased BCG-specific T-cell responses and increased susceptibility to tuberculosis. We hypothesize that the heightened antibacterial monocyte responses after vaccination of TOLLIP-deficient infants are responsible for decreased BCG-specific T-cell responses. Activating TOLLIP may provide a novel adjuvant strategy for BCG

  5. Involvement of fission yeast Pdc2 in RNA degradation and P-body function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Yu; Wang, Yi-Ting; Hsiao, Wan-Yi; Wang, Shao-Win

    2017-04-01

    In this study we identified Pdc2, the fission yeast ortholog of human Pat1b protein, which forms a complex with Lsm1-7 and plays a role in coupling deadenylation and decapping. The involvement of Pdc2 in RNA degradation and P-body function was also determined. We found that Pdc2 interacts with Dcp2 and is required for decapping in vivo. Although not absolutely essential for P-body assembly, overexpression of Pdc2 enhanced P-body formation even in the absence of Pdc1, the fission yeast functional homolog of human Edc4 protein, indicating that Pdc2 also plays a role in P-body formation. Intriguingly, in the absence of Pdc2, Lsm1 was found to accumulate in the nucleus, suggesting that Pdc2 shuttling between nucleus and cytoplasm plays a role in decreasing the nuclear concentration of Lsm1 to increase Lsm1 in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, unlike other components of P-bodies, the deadenylase Ccr4 did not accumulate in P-bodies in cells growing under favorable conditions and was only recruited to P-bodies after deprivation of glucose in a Pdc2-Lsm1-dependent manner, indicating a function of Pdc2 in cellular response to environmental stress. In supporting this idea, pdc2 mutants are defective in recovery from glucose starvation with a much longer time to re-enter the cell cycle. In keeping with the notion that Pat1 is a nucleocytoplasmic protein, functioning also in the nucleus, we found that Pdc2 physically and genetically interacts with the nuclear 5'-3' exonuclease Dhp1. A function of Pdc2-Lsm1, in concert with Dhp1, regulating RNA by promoting its decapping/destruction in the nucleus was suggested.

  6. Genetic analysis of functions involved in adhesion of Pseudomonas putida to seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Urgel, M; Salido, A; Ramos, J L

    2000-05-01

    Many agricultural uses of bacteria require the establishment of efficient bacterial populations in the rhizosphere, for which colonization of plant seeds often constitutes a critical first step. Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is a strain that colonizes the rhizosphere of a number of agronomically important plants at high population densities. To identify the functions involved in initial seed colonization by P. putida KT2440, we subjected this strain to transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants defective in attachment to corn seeds. Eight different mutants were isolated and characterized. While all of them showed reduced attachment to seeds, only two had strong defects in their adhesion to abiotic surfaces (glass and different plastics). Sequences of the loci affected in all eight mutants were obtained. None of the isolated genes had previously been described in P. putida, although four of them showed clear similarities with genes of known functions in other organisms. They corresponded to putative surface and membrane proteins, including a calcium-binding protein, a hemolysin, a peptide transporter, and a potential multidrug efflux pump. One other showed limited similarities with surface proteins, while the remaining three presented no obvious similarities with known genes, indicating that this study has disclosed novel functions.

  7. Comparison of Functional Variants in IFNL4 and IFNL3 for Association with Hepatitis C Virus Clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Brien, Thomas R.; Pfeiffer, Ruth M.; Paquin, Ashley; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Chen, Sabrina; Bonkovsky, Herbert L.; Edlin, Brian R.; Howell, Charles D.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Kuniholm, Mark H.; Morgan, Timothy R.; Strickler, Howard D.; Thomas, David L.; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Genetic polymorphisms within the interferon lambda (IFN-λ) region are strongly associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV) clearance; the IFNL4-ΔG/TT (rs368234815) polymorphism, which controls generation of the IFN-λ4 protein, is more strongly associated with HCV clearance than rs12979860 (the ‘IL28B variant’). An IFNL3 3′ untranslated region polymorphism (rs4803217) has been proposed as a causal variant that may affect HCV clearance by altering IFNL3 mRNA stability. Methods We compared IFNL4-ΔG/TT and rs4803217 for association with response to pegylated-IFN-α/ribavirin in the VIRAHEP-C and HALT-C trials, and spontaneous HCV clearance in the ALIVE, UHS and WIHS studies. Genotyping was performed with TaqMan assays. We compared differences in mean reduction in HCV RNA levels by genotype and haplotype. For HCV clearance, we calculated p-values comparing c-statistics for IFNL4-ΔG/TT and rs4803217 genotypes by a bootstrap approach. Results Among European Americans, linkage disequilibrium between IFNL4-ΔG/TT and rs4803217 was strong (r2=0.89–0.99) and there were no significant differences between the variants. In African American (AA) individuals enrolled in VIRAHEP-C, HCV RNA at treatment day 28 was more strongly associated with IFNL4-ΔG/TT than rs4803217 (p=0.003); the IFNL4-ΔG:rs4803217-G haplotype, which includes the putatively favorable IFNL3 allele, was actually associated with the poorest day 28 response (p=0.03, comparison to IFNL4-ΔG:rs4803217-T haplotype). Among AA participants, associations were stronger for IFNL4-ΔG/TT than rs4803217 for undetectable HCV RNA at week 24 in Virahep C (p=0.03) and week 20 in HALT-C (p=0.03), as well as for spontaneous HCV clearance (p=0.048). Conclusion IFNL4-ΔG/TT is the primary IFN-λ region polymorphism for impaired HCV clearance. PMID:26186989

  8. Contribution of ARLTS1 Cys148Arg (T442C variant with prostate cancer risk and ARLTS1 function in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanna Siltanen

    Full Text Available ARLTS1 is a recently characterized tumor suppressor gene at 13q14.3, a region frequently deleted in both sporadic and hereditary prostate cancer (PCa. ARLTS1 variants, especially Cys148Arg (T442C, increase susceptibility to different cancers, including PCa. In this study the role of Cys148Arg substitution was investigated as a risk factor for PCa using both genetic and functional analysis. Cys148Arg genotypes and expression of the ARLTS1 were explored in a large set of familial and unselected PCa cases, clinical tumor samples, xenografts, prostate cancer cell lines and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH samples. The frequency of the variant genotype CC was significantly higher in familial (OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.08-2.56, P = 0.019 and unselected patients (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.18-1.97, P = 0.001 and the overall risk was increased (OR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.20-1.98, P = 0.0007. Additional analysis with clinicopathological data revealed an association with an aggressive disease (OR = 1.28, 95% CI = 1.05-∞, P = 0.02. The CC genotype of the Cys148Arg variant was also contributing to the lowered ARLTS1 expression status in lymphoblastoid cells from familial patients. In addition significantly lowered ARLTS1 expression was observed in clinical tumor samples compared to BPH samples (P = 0.01. The ARLTS1 co-expression signature based on previously published microarray data was generated from 1587 cancer samples confirming the low expression of ARLTS1 in PCa and showed that ARLTS1 expression was strongly associated with immune processes. This study provides strong confirmation of the important role of ARLTS1 Cys148Arg variant as a contributor in PCa predisposition and a potential marker for aggressive disease outcome.

  9. Improvement of a predictive model of castration-resistant prostate cancer: functional genetic variants in TGFβ1 signaling pathway modulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L Teixeira

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in men. The acquisition of castration-resistant (CR phenotype is associated with the activation of signaling pathways mediated by growth factors. The TGFβ1 and its receptors have an important role in tumor progression, being the pro-apoptotic function modulated by the expression of TGFBR2. A single nucleotide polymorphism -875 G > A in TGFBR2 gene has been described, which may influence the expression levels of the receptor. Our purpose was to investigate the potential role of TGFBR2-875G>A in PC risk and in the response to androgen deprivation therapy (ADT. TGFBR2-875G>A polymorphism was studied by allelic discrimination using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR in 891 patients with PC and 874 controls. A follow-up study was undertaken to evaluate response to ADT. The TGFBR2 and SMAD7 mRNA expression were analyzed by a quantitative real-time PCR. We found that TGFBR2-875GG homozygous patients present lower expression levels of TGFBR2 mRNA (AA/AG: 2(-ΔΔCT =1.5, P=0.016. GG genotype was also associated with higher Gleason grade (OR=1.51, P=0.019 and increased risk of an early relapse after ADT (HR=1.47, P=0.024. The concordance (c index analysis showed that the definition of profiles that contains information regarding tumor characteristics associated with genetic information present an increased capacity to predict the risk for CR development (c-index model 1: 0.683 vs model 2: 0.736 vs model 3: 0.746 vs model 4: 0.759. The TGFBR2-875G>A contribution to an early relapse in ADT patients, due to changes in mRNA expression, supports the involvement of TGFβ1 pathway in CRPC. Furthermore, according to our results, we hypothesize the potential benefits of the association of genetic information in predictive models of CR development.

  10. Structural and functional interaction of fatty acids with human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2014-05-01

    The human liver fatty acid-binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant, the most common in the FABP family, has been associated with elevated liver triglyceride levels. How this amino acid substitution elicits these effects is not known. This issue was addressed using human recombinant wild-type (WT) and T94A variant L-FABP proteins as well as cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the respective proteins (genotyped as TT, TC and CC). The T94A substitution did not alter or only slightly altered L-FABP binding affinities for saturated, monounsaturated or polyunsaturated long chain fatty acids, nor did it change the affinity for intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Nevertheless, the T94A substitution markedly altered the secondary structural response of L-FABP induced by binding long chain fatty acids or intermediates of triglyceride synthesis. Finally, the T94A substitution markedly decreased the levels of induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, fatty acid transport protein 5 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α itself meditated by the polyunsaturated fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in cultured primary human hepatocytes. Thus, although the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of human L-FABP for long chain fatty acids, it significantly altered human L-FABP structure and stability, as well as the conformational and functional response to these ligands.

  11. Functional characterisation of the TSC1–TSC2 complex to assess multiple TSC2 variants identified in single families affected by tuberous sclerosis complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dommering Charlotte

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by seizures, mental retardation and the development of hamartomas in a variety of organs and tissues. The disease is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 gene on chromosome 9q34, or the TSC2 gene on chromosome 16p13.3. The TSC1 and TSC2 gene products, TSC1 and TSC2, interact to form a protein complex that inhibits signal transduction to the downstream effectors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR. Methods We have used a combination of different assays to characterise the effects of a number of pathogenic TSC2 amino acid substitutions on TSC1–TSC2 complex formation and mTOR signalling. Results We used these assays to compare the effects of 9 different TSC2 variants (S132C, F143L, A196T, C244R, Y598H, I820del, T993M, L1511H and R1772C identified in individuals with symptoms of TSC from 4 different families. In each case we were able to identify the pathogenic mutation. Conclusion Functional characterisation of TSC2 variants can help identify pathogenic changes in individuals with TSC, and assist in the diagnosis and genetic counselling of the index cases and/or other family members.

  12. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  13. Significant interethnic differencies in functional variants of PON1 and P2RY12 genes in Roma and Hungarian population samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicsek, Ingrid; Sipeky, Csilla; Bene, Judit; Duga, Balazs; Melegh, Bela I; Melegh, Bela; Sümegi, Katalin; Jaromi, Luca; Magyari, Lili; Melegh, Bela

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel is one of the most common therapies given to patients worldwide. However, the clinical efficacy and toxicity of clopidogrel is not constant in every patient due to interindividual variations. There are several factors that contribute to these interindividual differencies such as SNPs in genes of specific receptors and enzymes. PON1 (paraoxonase 1) plays an important role in the bioactivation of clopidogrel. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of this gene decrease the activity of paraoxonase enzyme and lead to an unefficient clopidogrel effect. P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G-protein coupled, 12) gene is coding a receptor, which is situated on the surface of the platelets and plays a role in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. In this study we investigated 2 functional SNPs of PON1 gene (rs662 and rs854560) and 3 variants of the P2RY12 gene (rs2046934, rs6798347, rs6801273) in samples pooled from average Hungarian Roma and Hungarian population samples with PCR-RFLP method. For the PON1 variants we detected that the R allele frequency was significantly lower in the Roma group compared to the Hungarian population. (0.249 vs 0.318 p Roma than in Hungarians (0.332 vs 0.290 p Romas (1.4 vs 0.2 %, p Roma people that has not been reported for other populations.

  14. Evidence for the involvement of genetic variation in the oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) in the etiology of autistic disorders on high-functioning level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermter, Anne-Kathrin; Kamp-Becker, Inge; Hesse, Philipp; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Strauch, Konstantin; Remschmidt, Helmut

    2010-03-05

    An increasing number of animal studies advert to a substantial role of the neuropeptide oxytocin in the regulation of social attachment and affiliation. Furthermore, animal studies showed anxiety and stress-reduced effects of oxytocin. First human studies confirm these findings in animal studies and implicate a crucial role of oxytocin in human social attachment behavior and in social interactions. Thus, the oxytocin system might be involved in the impairment of social interaction and attachment in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The human oxytocin receptor gene (OXTR) represents a plausible candidate gene for the etiology of ASD. To analyze whether genetic variants in the OXTR gene are associated with ASD we performed family-based single-marker and haplotype association analyses with 22 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OXTR and its 5' region in 100 families with autistic disorders on high-functioning level (Asperger syndrome (AS), high-functioning autism (HFA), and atypical autism (AA)). Single-marker and haplotype association analyses revealed nominally significant associations of one single SNP and one haplotype with autism, respectively. Furthermore, employing a "reverse phenotyping" approach, patients carrying the haplotype associated with autism showed nominally significant impairments in comparison to noncarriers of the haplotype in items of the Autism Diagnostic Interview-Revised algorithm describing aspects of social interaction and communication. In conclusion, our results implicate that genetic variation in the OXTR gene might be relevant in the etiology of autism on high-functioning level.

  15. A closer look at evolution: Variants (SNPs) of genes involved in skin pigmentation, including EXOC2, TYR, TYRP1, and DCT, are associated with 25(OH)D serum concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saternus, Roman; Pilz, Stefan; Gräber, Stefan; Kleber, Marcus; März, Winfried; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin D deficiency is common in the Caucasian population and is associated with increased incidence and unfavorable outcome of many diseases, including various types of cancer, infectious, cardiovascular, and autoimmune diseases. Individual factors that predispose for a person's vitamin D status, such as skin type, have been identified, but limited data exist on genetic determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration. We have tested the hypothesis that variants of genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) involved in skin pigmentation are predictive of serum 25(OH)D levels. Serum 25(OH)D and SNPs (n = 960) related to genes with relevance for skin pigmentation (tyrosinase [TYR], TYR-related protein 1 [TYRP1], dopachrome tautomerase [DCT], oculocutaneous albinism II [OCA2], two pore segment channel 2 [TPCN2], solute carrier family 24 A4 [SLC24A4], solute carrier family 45 A2 [SLC45A2], agouti signalling peptide [ASIP], cyclic AMP-dependent transcription factor [ATF1], microphthalmia-associated transcription factor [MITF], proopiomelanocortin [POMC], cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit beta [PRKACB], cAMP-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit gamma [PRKACG], cAMP-dependent protein kinase type I-alpha regulatory subunit [PRKAR1A], cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II-alpha regulatory subunit [PRKAR2A], cAMP-dependent protein kinase type II-beta regulatory subunit [PRKAR2B], tubulin beta-3 chain/melanocortin receptor 1 [TUBB3/MC1R], Cadherin-1 [CDH1], catenin beta 1 [CTNNB1], Endothelin 1 [EDN1], endothelin 3 [EDN3], endothelin receptor type B [EDNRB], fibroblast growth factor 2 [FGF2], KIT, KIT ligand [KITLG], nerve growth factor [NGF], interferon regulatory factor 4 [IRF4], exocyst complex component 2 [EXOC2], and tumor protein 53 [TP53]) were analyzed in a cohort of participants of the Ludwigshafen Risk and Cardiovascular Health Study (n = 2970). A total of 46 SNPs were associated (P OH)D levels as compared with the total

  16. MicroRNA: biogenetic and functional mechanisms and involvements in cell differentiation and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Soken; Okuno, Yasushi; Tsujimoto, Gozoh

    2006-08-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small noncoding RNAs (20-23 nucleotides) that negatively regulate the gene expressions at the posttranscriptional level by base pairing to the 3' untranslated region of target messenger RNAs. Hundreds of miRNAs have been identified in humans and evolutionarily conserved from plants to animals. It is revealed that miRNAs regulate various physiological and pathological pathways such as cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tumoriogenesis. By the computational analysis, it is predicted that 30% of protein-encoding genes are regulated by miRNAs. In this review, we discuss recent remarkable advances in the miRNA biogenetic and functional mechanisms and the involvements of miRNAs in cell differentiation, especially in hematopoietic lineages, and cancer. These evidences offer the possibility that miRNAs would be potentially useful for drug discovery.

  17. Structure and function of enzymes involved in the anaerobic degradation of L-threonine to propionate

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhirendra K Simanshu; Sagar Chittori; H S Savithri; M R N Murthy

    2007-09-01

    In Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, L-threonine is cleaved non-oxidatively to propionate via 2-ketobutyrate by biodegradative threonine deaminase, 2-ketobutyrate formate-lyase (or pyruvate formate-lyase), phosphotransacetylase and propionate kinase. In the anaerobic condition, L-threonine is converted to the energy-rich keto acid and this is subsequently catabolised to produce ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation, providing a source of energy to the cells. Most of the enzymes involved in the degradation of L-threonine to propionate are encoded by the anaerobically regulated tdc operon. In the recent past, extensive structural and biochemical studies have been carried out on these enzymes by various groups. Besides detailed structural and functional insights, these studies have also shown the similarities and differences between the other related enzymes present in the metabolic network. In this paper, we review the structural and biochemical studies carried out on these enzymes.

  18. Study of $\\tau$ decays involving kaons, spectral functions and determination of the strange quark mass

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Merle, E; Minard, M N; Pietrzyk, B; Alemany, R; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Crespo, J M; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Graugès-Pous, E; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Merino, G; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Pacheco, A; Park, I C; Riu, I; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Becker, U; Boix, G; Cattaneo, M; Ciulli, V; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Halley, A W; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Lehraus, Ivan; Leroy, O; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moutoussi, A; Ranjard, F; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Teubert, F; Tomalin, I R; Tournefier, E; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Badaud, F; Chazelle, G; Deschamps, O; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Swynghedauw, M; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Cavanaugh, R J; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Cerutti, F; Chiarella, V; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Lynch, J G; Negus, P; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Buchmüller, O L; Dhamotharan, S; Geweniger, C; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Marinelli, N; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Thomson, E; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kneringer, E; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Buck, P G; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Robertson, N A; Williams, M; Giehl, I; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Wachsmuth, H W; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Etienne, F; Ealet, A; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Thulasidas, M; Aleppo, M; Antonelli, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Hüttmann, K; Lütjens, G; Mannert, C; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Schune, M H; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bettarini, S; Boccali, T; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzo, G; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Sguazzoni, G; Tenchini, Roberto; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Chambers, J T; Cowan, G D; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Konstantinidis, N P; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Thompson, L F; Affholderbach, K; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Foss, J; Grupen, Claus; Prange, G; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; Gao, Y; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; Mamier, G; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Vogt, M; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Zobernig, G

    1999-01-01

    All ALEPH measurements of branching ratios of tau decays involving kaons are summarized including a combination of results obtained with K^0_S and K^0_L detection. The decay dynamics are studied, leading to the determination of contributions from vector K^*(892) and K^{*}(1410), and axial-vector K_1(1270) and K_1(1400) resonances. Agreement with isospin symmetry is observed among the different final states. Under the hypothesis of the conserved vector current, the spectral function for the K\\bar{K}\\pi mode is compared with the corresponding cross section for low energy e^+e^- annihilation, yielding an axial-vector fraction of (94^{+6}_{-8})% for this mode. The branching ratio for tau decay into all strange final states is determined to be B(\\tau^-\\to X^-(S=-1)\

  19. Amphioxus SARM involved in neural development may function as a suppressor of TLR signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shaochun; Wu, Kui; Yang, Manyi; Xu, Liqun; Huang, Ling; Liu, Huiling; Tao, Xin; Huang, Shengfeng; Xu, Anlong

    2010-06-15

    Among five Toll/IL-1R resistance adaptors, sterile alpha and Toll/IL-1R resistance motif containing protein (SARM) is the only one conserved from Caenorhabditis elegans to human. However, its physiologic roles are hardly understood, and its involvement in TLR signaling remains debatable. In this study, we first demonstrated a predominant expression of amphioxus SARM (Branchiostoma belcheri tsingtauense SARM) in neural cells during embryogenesis and its predominant expression in the digestive system from larva to adult, suggesting its primitive role in neural development and a potential physiologic role in immunity. We further found that B. belcheri tsingtauense SARM was localized in mitochondria and could attenuate the TLR signaling via interacting with amphioxus MyD88 and tumor necrosis receptor associated factor 6. Thus, amphioxus SARM appears unique in that it may play dual functions in neural development and innate immunity by targeting amphioxus TLR signaling.

  20. Identification and functional characterization of pfm, a novel gene involved in swimming motility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Fang; Li, Yingli; Xu, Haijing; Xia, Huiming; Yin, Tengfei; Yao, Hongming; Zhang, Lu; Zhang, Xiuming; Bai, Yanling; Jin, Shouguang; Qiao, Mingqiang

    2007-10-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an important opportunistic pathogen, has a single polar flagellum which is an important virulence and colonization factor by providing swimming motility. This paper describes the functional characterization of a novel gene pfm (PA2950) of P. aeruginosa. The pfm encodes a protein that is similar to a number of short-chain alcohol dehydrogenases of other bacterial species. Mutation of this gene results in a defect in swimming motility which can be completed back to that of wild type by a plasmid containing the pfm. Interestingly, the pfm mutant possesses an intact flagellum which does not rotate, thus giving rise to a non-motile phenotype. The pfm gene is encoded on an operon together with two upstream genes which code for electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF). Yeast two-hybrid tests indicated that the PFM interacts with the ETF, suggesting that the putative dehydrogenase (PFM) is involved in energy metabolism that is critical for the rotation of flagellum in P. aeruginosa.

  1. Involvement of Technical Reasoning more than Functional Knowledge in development of tool use in childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystelle Remigereau

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that even toddlers are able to manipulate tools in an appropriate manner according to their physical properties. The ability of children to make novel tools in order to solve problems is, however, surprisingly limited. In adults, mechanical problem solving has been proposed to be supported by technical reasoning skills, which are thought to be involved in every situation requiring the use of a tool (whether conventional or unusual. The aim of this study was to investigate the typical development of real tool use skills and its link with technical reasoning abilities in healthy children. Three experimental tasks were adapted from those used with adults: mechanical problem solving (three different apparatus, real tool use (10 familiar tool-object pairs, and functional knowledge (10 functional picture matching with familiar tools previously used. The tasks were administered to 85 healthy children divided into six age groups (from 6 to 14 years of age. The results revealed that real tool use (p = .01 and mechanical problem solving skills improve with age, even if this improvement differs according to the apparatus for the latter (p < .01 for the Hook task and p < .05 for the Sloping task. Results also showed that mechanical problem solving is a better predictor of real tool use than functional knowledge, with a significant and greater weight (importance weight: 0.65; Estimate±Standard Error: 0.27±0.08. Ours findings suggest that real tool use and technical reasoning develop jointly in children, independently from development of functional knowledge. In addition, technical reasoning appears partially operative from the age of 6 onwards, even though the outcome of these skills depends of the context in which they are applied (i.e., the type of apparatus.

  2. A novel splice variant in the N-propeptide of COL5A1 causes an EDS phenotype with severe kyphoscoliosis and eye involvement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Symoens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS is a heritable connective tissue disorder characterized by hyperextensible skin, joint hypermobility and soft tissue fragility. The classic subtype of EDS is caused by mutations in one of the type V collagen genes (COL5A1 and COL5A2. Most mutations affect the type V collagen helical domain and lead to a diminished or structurally abnormal type V collagen protein. Remarkably, only two mutations were reported to affect the extended, highly conserved N-propeptide domain, which plays an important role in the regulation of the heterotypic collagen fibril diameter. We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide mutation, resulting in an unusual but severe classic EDS phenotype and a remarkable splicing outcome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation (IVS6-2A>G, NM_000093.3_c.925-2A>G in a patient with cutaneous features of EDS, severe progressive scoliosis and eye involvement. Two mutant transcripts were identified, one with an exon 7 skip and one in which exon 7 and the upstream exon 6 are deleted. Both transcripts are expressed and secreted into the extracellular matrix, where they can participate in and perturb collagen fibrillogenesis, as illustrated by the presence of dermal collagen cauliflowers. Determination of the order of intron removal and computational analysis showed that simultaneous skipping of exons 6 and 7 is due to the combined effect of delayed splicing of intron 7, altered pre-mRNA secondary structure, low splice site strength and possibly disturbed binding of splicing factors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We report a novel COL5A1 N-propeptide acceptor-splice site mutation in intron 6, which not only affects splicing of the adjacent exon 7, but also causes a splicing error of the upstream exon 6. Our findings add further insights into the COL5A1 splicing order and show for the first time that a single COL5A1 acceptor-splice site

  3. Linking mother and youth parenting attitudes: indirect effects via maltreatment, parent involvement, and youth functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Richard; Jones, Deborah J; Litrownik, Alan J; English, Diana J; Kotch, Jonathan B; Lewis, Terri; Dubowitz, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Evidence suggests that parenting attitudes are transmitted within families. However, limited research has examined this prospectively. The current prospective study examined direct effects of early maternal attitudes toward parenting (as measured at child age 4 by the Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory [AAPI]) on later youth parenting attitudes (as measured by the AAPI at youth age 18). Indirect effects via child maltreatment (physical abuse, sexual abuse, neglect, and emotional maltreatment), parent involvement, and youth functioning (internalizing and externalizing problems) were also assessed. Analyses were conducted on data from 412 families enrolled in the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN). There were significant direct effects for three of the four classes of mother parenting attitudes (appropriate developmental expectations of children, empathy toward children, and appropriate family roles) on youth attitudes but not for rejection of punishment. In addition, the following indirect effects were obtained: Mother expectations influenced youth expectations via neglect; mother empathy influenced youth empathy via both parental involvement and youth externalizing problems; and mother rejection of punishment influenced youth rejection of punishment via youth internalizing problems. None of the child or family process variables, however, affected the link between mother and youth attitudes about roles.

  4. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked potentials in Machado-Joseph disease: Functional involvement of otolith pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Souza; Pereira, Melissa Marques; Pedroso, José Luiz; Braga-Neto, Pedro; Barsottini, Orlando Graziani Povoas; Manzano, Gilberto Mastrocola

    2015-11-15

    Machado-Joseph disease is defined as an autosomal dominant ataxic disorder caused by degeneration of the cerebellum and its connections and is associated with a broad range of clinical symptoms. The involvement of the vestibular system is responsible for several symptoms and signs observed in the individuals affected by the disease. We measured cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in a sample of Machado-Joseph disease patients in order to assess functional pathways involved. Bilateral measures of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMP and oVEMP) were obtained from 14 symptomatic patients with genetically proven Machado-Joseph disease and compared with those from a control group of 20 healthy subjects. Thirteen (93%) patients showed at least one abnormal test result; oVEMP and cVEMP responses were absent in 17/28 (61%) and 11/28 (39%) measures, respectively; and prolonged latency of cVEMP was found in 3/28 (11%) measures. Of the 13 patients with abnormal responses, 9/13 (69%) patients showed discordant abnormal responses: four with absent oVEMP and present cVEMP, two with absent cVEMP and present oVEMP, and three showed unilateral prolonged cVEMP latencies. Both otolith-related vestibulocollic and vestibulo-ocular pathways are severely affected in Machado-Joseph disease patients evaluated by VEMPs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Functional analysis of soybean genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis by virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamatsu, Atsushi; Masuta, Chikara; Senda, Mineo; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Kasai, Atsushi; Hong, Jin-Sung; Kitamura, Keisuke; Abe, Jun; Kanazawa, Akira

    2007-11-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for functional analysis of genes in plants. A wide-host-range VIGS vector, which was developed based on the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), was tested for its ability to silence endogenous genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in soybean. Symptomless infection was established using a pseudorecombinant virus, which enabled detection of specific changes in metabolite content by VIGS. It has been demonstrated that the yellow seed coat phenotype of various cultivated soybean lines that lack anthocyanin pigmentation is induced by natural degradation of chalcone synthase (CHS) mRNA. When soybean plants with brown seed coats were infected with a virus that contains the CHS gene sequence, the colour of the seed coats changed to yellow, which indicates that the naturally occurring RNA silencing is reproduced by VIGS. In addition, CHS VIGS consequently led to a decrease in isoflavone content in seeds. VIGS was also tested on the putative flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene in the pathway. This experiment resulted in a decrease in the content of quercetin relative to kaempferol in the upper leaves after viral infection, which suggests that the putative gene actually encodes the F3'H protein. In both experiments, a marked decrease in the target mRNA and accumulation of short interfering RNAs were detected, indicating that sequence-specific mRNA degradation was induced. The present report is a successful demonstration of the application of VIGS for genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis in plants; the CMV-based VIGS system provides an efficient tool for functional analysis of soybean genes.

  6. Dopamine D4 receptor, but not the ADHD-associated D4.7 variant, forms functional heteromers with the dopamine D2S receptor in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Sergio; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Peper, Marcela; Lorenzo, Ramiro; Moreno, Estefanía; Ciruela, Francisco; Borycz, Janusz; Ortiz, Jordi; Lluís, Carme; Franco, Rafael; McCormick, Peter J.; Volkow, Nora D.; Rubinstein, Marcelo; Floran, Benjamin; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Polymorphic variants of the dopamine D4 receptor have been consistently associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However the functional significance of the risk polymorphism (variable number of tandem repeats in exon 3) is still unclear. Here we show that whereas the most frequent 4-repeat (D4.4) and the 2-repeat (D4.2) variants form functional heteromers with the short isoform of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2S), the 7-repeat risk allele (D4.7) does not. D2 receptor activation in the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer potentiates D4 receptor-mediated MAPK signaling in transfected cells and in the striatum, which did not occur in cells expressing D4.7 or in the striatum of knock-in mutant mice carrying the 7 repeats of the human D4.7 in the third intracellular loop of the D4 receptor. In the striatum D4 receptors are localized in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals, where they selectively modulate glutamatergic neurotransmission by interacting with D2S receptors. This interaction shows the same qualitative characteristics than the D2S-D4 receptor heteromer-mediated MAPK signaling and D2S receptor activation potentiates D4 receptor-mediated inibition of striatal glutamate release. It is therefore postulated that dysfunctional D2S-D4.7 heteromers may impair presynaptic dopaminergic control of corticostriatal glutamatergic neurotransmission and explain functional deficits associated with ADHD. PMID:21844870

  7. PVRL1 as a Candidate Gene for Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip With or Without Cleft Palate: No Evidence for the Involvement of Common or Rare Variants in Southern Han Chinese Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hong-Qiu; Huang, En-Min; Xu, Ming-Yan; Shu, Shen-You

    2012-01-01

    The poliovirus receptor related-1 (PVRL1) gene encodes nectin-1, a cell–cell adhesion molecule (OMIM #600644), and is mutated in the cleft lip with or without cleft palate/ectodermal dysplasia-1 syndrome (CLPED1, OMIM #225000). In addition, PVRL1 mutations have been associated with nonsyndromic cleft lip with or without a cleft palate (NSCL/P) in studies of multiethnic samples. To investigate the possible involvement of this gene in southern Han Chinese NSCL/P patients, we performed (i) a case–control association study, and (ii) a resequencing study. A set of 470 patients with NSCL/P and 693 controls were recruited, and a total of 45 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. In the resequencing study, the coding regions of the PVRL1 α isoform were direct sequenced in 45 trios from multiply affected families. One (rs7128327) of the 45 tested SNPs showed a trend toward statistical significance in the genotypic-level chi-square test (p=0.009567). However, this result did not withstand correction for multiple testing. Likewise, sliding window haplotype analyses consisting of two, three, or four SNPs failed to detect any positive association. Resequencing analysis also failed to identify any novel rare sequence variants. In conclusion, the present study provided no support for the hypothesis that common or rare variants in PVRL1 play a significant role in NSCL/P development in the southern Han Chinese population. This is the first study that has used tagging SNPs covering all the coding and noncoding regions to search for common NSCL/P-associated mutations of PVRL1. PMID:22455396

  8. Prevalence Of Lung Involvement Due To Rheumatoid Arthritis Based On Clinical, Radiographic And Pulmonary Functions Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighi N

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary involvement is a common and serious complication of rheumatoid arthritis. This cross sectional study sought to determine the prevalence of pulmonary disease in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of history, physical examination, chest X-ray and PFT. Materials and Methods: 103 patients (81 Women, 22 Men fulfilling the ACR (American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA (Rheumatoid arthritis were consecutively included in a cross sectional study. Detailed medical (including respiratory symptoms and the disease activity symptoms and drug and occupational histories and smoking were obtained. All patients underwent a complete pulmonary and rheumatologic examination and conventional chest radiography. All patients underwent PFT that comprised spirometry and body plethysmography. Results for PFTs were expressed as percentage of predicted values for each individual adjusted for age, sex, and height. Results: On the basis of history: Their mean age was 43.3 ± 2.6 years (range: 17-74 and the mean duration of the disease was 69.3 ± 15.6 months. Rheumatoid factor was positive in% 61.2. No patients were 0.5Pack/Year smoker in whole life. Prevalence of pulmonary involvement based on radiographic and pulmonary function test detected in 41 patients (39/7%. The most frequent respiratory clinical finding was dyspnea (33%, (NYHA grade I in 17.5% and NYHA grade II in 15.5%, Cough (with or without sputum in 13.6 %, Crackle was the most sign in pulmonary examination (5.8%. Chest X-ray was abnormal in 13.3 % that the most common finding in this study was reticulonodular pattern in 20 patients (19.4 %, and pleural effusion detected in 7 patients (6.7%. PFT was abnormal in 30 patients (29.1 %. A significant decrease of FEF 25%-75% below 1.64 SD. Small airway involvements was the most abnormal finding of PFT. No relation between rheumatoid arthritis disease activity (ESR>30, Morning stiffness>30', Anemia, thrombocytosis with

  9. Functional adaptation to loading of a single bone is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sample, Susannah J; Behan, Mary; Smith, Lesley; Oldenhoff, William E; Markel, Mark D; Kalscheur, Vicki L; Hao, Zhengling; Miletic, Vjekoslav; Muir, Peter

    2008-09-01

    Regulation of load-induced bone formation is considered a local phenomenon controlled by osteocytes, although it has also been hypothesized that functional adaptation may be neuronally regulated. The aim of this study was to examine bone formation in multiple bones, in response to loading of a single bone, and to determine whether adaptation may be neuronally regulated. Load-induced responses in the left and right ulnas and humeri were determined after loading of the right ulna in male Sprague-Dawley rats (69 +/- 16 days of age). After a single period of loading at -760-, -2000-, or -3750-microepsilon initial peak strain, rats were given calcein to label new bone formation. Bone formation and bone neuropeptide concentrations were determined at 10 days. In one group, temporary neuronal blocking was achieved by perineural anesthesia of the brachial plexus with bupivicaine during loading. We found right ulna loading induces adaptive responses in other bones in both thoracic limbs compared with Sham controls and that neuronal blocking during loading abrogated bone formation in the loaded ulna and other thoracic limb bones. Skeletal adaptation was more evident in distal long bones compared with proximal long bones. We also found that the single period of loading modulated bone neuropeptide concentrations persistently for 10 days. We conclude that functional adaptation to loading of a single bone in young rapidly growing rats is neuronally regulated and involves multiple bones. Persistent changes in bone neuropeptide concentrations after a single loading period suggest that plasticity exists in the innervation of bone.

  10. Functional characterization of Sporothrix schenckii glycosidases involved in the N-linked glycosylation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M; Lozoya-Pérez, Nancy E; López-Ramírez, Luz A; Martínez-Álvarez, José A; Teixeira, Marcus M; Felipe, Maria S S; Flores-Carreón, Arturo; Mora-Montes, Héctor M

    2015-01-01

    Protein glycosylation pathways are conserved metabolic processes in eukaryotic organisms and are required for cell fitness. In fungal pathogens, the N-linked glycosylation pathway is indispensable for proper cell wall composition and virulence. In Sporothrix schenckii sensu stricto, the causative agent of sporotrichosis, little is known about this glycosylation pathway. Here, using a genome-wide screening for putative members of the glycosyl hydrolase (CAZy - GH) families 47 and 63, which group enzymes involved in the processing step during N-linked glycan maturation, we found seven homologue genes belonging to family 47 and one to family 63. The eight genes were individually expressed in C. albicans null mutants lacking either MNS1 (for members of family 47) or CWH41 (for the member of family 63). Our results indicate that SsCWH41 is the functional ortholog of CaCWH41, whereas SsMNS1 is the functional ortholog of CaMNS1. The remaining genes of family 47 encode Golgi mannosidases and endoplasmic reticulum degradation-enhancing alpha-mannosidase-like proteins (EDEMs). Since these GH families gather proteins used as target for drugs to control cell growth, identification of these genes could help in the design of antifungals that could be used to treat sporotrichosis and other fungal diseases. In addition, to our knowledge, we are the first to report that Golgi mannosidases and EDEMs are expressed and characterized in yeast cells.

  11. The Fas pathway is involved in pancreatic β cell secretory function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Desiree M.; Maedler, Kathrin; Franklin, Isobel; Konrad, Daniel; Størling, Joachim; Böni-Schnetzler, Marianne; Gjinovci, Asllan; Kurrer, Michael O.; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Bosco, Domenico; Andres, Axel; Berney, Thierry; Greter, Melanie; Becher, Burkhard; Chervonsky, Alexander V.; Halban, Philippe A.; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Wollheim, Claes B.; Donath, Marc Y.

    2007-01-01

    Pancreatic β cell mass and function increase in conditions of enhanced insulin demand such as obesity. Failure to adapt leads to diabetes. The molecular mechanisms controlling this adaptive process are unclear. Fas is a death receptor involved in β cell apoptosis or proliferation, depending on the activity of the caspase-8 inhibitor FLIP. Here we show that the Fas pathway also regulates β cell secretory function. We observed impaired glucose tolerance in Fas-deficient mice due to a delayed and decreased insulin secretory pattern. Expression of PDX-1, a β cell-specific transcription factor regulating insulin gene expression and mitochondrial metabolism, was decreased in Fas-deficient β cells. As a consequence, insulin and ATP production were severely reduced and only partly compensated for by increased β cell mass. Up-regulation of FLIP enhanced NF-κB activity via NF-κB-inducing kinase and RelB. This led to increased PDX-1 and insulin production independent of changes in cell turnover. The results support a previously undescribed role for the Fas pathway in regulating insulin production and release. PMID:17299038

  12. Specific involvement of gonadal hormones in the functional maturation of growth hormone releasing hormone (GHRH) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouty-Colomer, Laurie-Anne; Méry, Pierre-François; Storme, Emilie; Gavois, Elodie; Robinson, Iain C; Guérineau, Nathalie C; Mollard, Patrice; Desarménien, Michel G

    2010-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is the key hormone involved in the regulation of growth and metabolism, two functions that are highly modulated during infancy. GH secretion, controlled mainly by GH releasing hormone (GHRH), has a characteristic pattern during postnatal development that results in peaks of blood concentration at birth and puberty. A detailed knowledge of the electrophysiology of the GHRH neurons is necessary to understand the mechanisms regulating postnatal GH secretion. Here, we describe the unique postnatal development of the electrophysiological properties of GHRH neurons and their regulation by gonadal hormones. Using GHRH-eGFP mice, we demonstrate that already at birth, GHRH neurons receive numerous synaptic inputs and fire large and fast action potentials (APs), consistent with effective GH secretion. Concomitant with the GH secretion peak occurring at puberty, these neurons display modifications of synaptic input properties, decrease in AP duration, and increase in a transient voltage-dependant potassium current. Furthermore, the modulation of both the AP duration and voltage-dependent potassium current are specifically controlled by gonadal hormones because gonadectomy prevented the maturation of these active properties and hormonal treatment restored it. Thus, GHRH neurons undergo specific developmental modulations of their electrical properties over the first six postnatal weeks, in accordance with hormonal demand. Our results highlight the importance of the interaction between the somatotrope and gonadotrope axes during the establishment of adapted neuroendocrine functions.

  13. The function and catalysis of 2-oxoglutarate-dependent oxygenases involved in plant flavonoid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ai-Xia; Han, Xiao-Juan; Wu, Yi-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-01-15

    Flavonoids are secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and acetate metabolism. They fulfil a variety of functions in plants and have health benefits for humans. During the synthesis of the tricyclic flavonoid natural products in plants, oxidative modifications to the central C ring are catalyzed by four of FeII and 2-oxoglutarate dependent (2-ODD) oxygenases, namely flavone synthase I (FNS I), flavonol synthase (FLS), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS) and flavanone 3β-hydroxylase (FHT). FNS I, FLS and ANS are involved in desaturation of C2-C3 of flavonoids and FHT in hydroxylation of C3. FNS I, which is restricted to the Apiaceae species and in rice, is predicted to have evolved from FHT by duplication. Due to their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, FLS and ANS, which interact with the α surface of the substrate, belong to a group of dioxygenases having a broad substrate specificity, while FNS I and FHT are more selective, and interact with the naringenin β surface. Here, we summarize recent findings regarding the function of the four 2-ODD oxygenases and the relationship between their catalytic activity, their polypeptide sequence and their tertiary structure.

  14. The Function and Catalysis of 2-Oxoglutarate-Dependent Oxygenases Involved in Plant Flavonoid Biosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Xia Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flavonoids are secondary metabolites derived from phenylalanine and acetate metabolism. They fulfil a variety of functions in plants and have health benefits for humans. During the synthesis of the tricyclic flavonoid natural products in plants, oxidative modifications to the central C ring are catalyzed by four of FeII and 2-oxoglutarate dependent (2-ODD oxygenases, namely flavone synthase I (FNS I, flavonol synthase (FLS, anthocyanidin synthase (ANS and flavanone 3β-hydroxylase (FHT. FNS I, FLS and ANS are involved in desaturation of C2–C3 of flavonoids and FHT in hydroxylation of C3. FNS I, which is restricted to the Apiaceae species and in rice, is predicted to have evolved from FHT by duplication. Due to their sequence similarity and substrate specificity, FLS and ANS, which interact with the α surface of the substrate, belong to a group of dioxygenases having a broad substrate specificity, while FNS I and FHT are more selective, and interact with the naringenin β surface. Here, we summarize recent findings regarding the function of the four 2-ODD oxygenases and the relationship between their catalytic activity, their polypeptide sequence and their tertiary structure.

  15. Certain variants of multipermutohedron ideals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    AJAY KUMAR; CHANCHAL KUMAR

    2016-10-01

    Multipermutohedron ideals have rich combinatorial properties. An explicit combinatorial formula for the multigraded Betti numbers of a multipermutohedron ideal and their Alexander duals are known. Also, the dimension of the Artinian quotient of an Alexander dual of a multipermutohedron ideal is the number of generalized parking functions. In this paper, monomial ideals which are certain variants of multipermutohedron ideals are studied. Multigraded Betti numbers of these variant monomial ideals and their Alexander duals are obtained. Further, many interesting combinatorial properties of multipermutohedron ideals are extended to these variant monomial ideals.

  16. Egalitarianism and Achievement in the Involvement of Others in Consumer Decisions: A Functional Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Duane I.

    1980-01-01

    Studied how egalitaranism and success through individual achievement, were expressed in the involvement of others in consumer decisions. Results found egalitarians involved others in seeking more information. Individual achievement subjects delegated more decision responsibility for non-ego involving decisions. Suggests involvement of others could…

  17. Functional characterization of chitinase-3 reveals involvement of chitinases in early embryo immunity in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Zinan; Sun, Chen; Liu, Shousheng; Wang, Hongmiao; Zhang, Shicui

    2014-10-01

    The function and mechanism of chitinases in early embryonic development remain largely unknown. We show here that recombinant chitinase-3 (rChi3) is able to hydrolyze the artificial chitin substrate, 4-methylumbelliferyl-β-D-N,N',N″-triacetylchitotrioside, and to bind to and inhibit the growth of the fungus Candida albicans, implicating that Chi3 plays a dual function in innate immunity and chitin-bearing food digestion in zebrafish. This is further corroborated by the expression profile of Chi3 in the liver and gut, which are both immune- and digestion-relevant organs. Compared with rChi3, rChi3-CD lacking CBD still retains partial capacity to bind to C. albicans, but its enzymatic and antifungal activities are significantly reduced. By contrast, rChi3-E140N with the putative catalytic residue E140 mutated shows little affinity to chitin, and its enzymatic and antifungal activities are nearly completely lost. These suggest that both enzymatic and antifungal activities of Chi3 are dependent on the presence of CBD and E140. We also clearly demonstrate that in zebrafish, both the embryo extract and the developing embryo display antifungal activity against C. albicans, and all the findings point to chitinase-3 (Chi3) being a newly-identified factor involved in the antifungal activity. Taken together, a dual function in both innate immunity and food digestion in embryo is proposed for zebrafish Chi3. It also provides a new angle to understand the immune role of chitinases in early embryonic development of animals.

  18. A functional variant in microRNA-146a promoter modulates its expression and confers disease risk for systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobing Luo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE is a complex autoimmune disease with a strong genetic predisposition, characterized by an upregulated type I interferon pathway. MicroRNAs are important regulators of immune homeostasis, and aberrant microRNA expression has been demonstrated in patients with autoimmune diseases. We recently identified miR-146a as a negative regulator of the interferon pathway and linked the abnormal activation of this pathway to the underexpression of miR-146a in SLE patients. To explore why the expression of miR-146a is reduced in SLE patients, we conducted short parallel sequencing of potentially regulatory regions of miR-146a and identified a novel genetic variant (rs57095329 in the promoter region exhibiting evidence for association with SLE that was replicated independently in 7,182 Asians (P(meta = 2.74×10(-8, odds ratio = 1.29 [1.18-1.40]. The risk-associated G allele was linked to reduced expression of miR-146a in the peripheral blood leukocytes of the controls. Combined functional assays showed that the risk-associated G allele reduced the protein-binding affinity and activity of the promoter compared with those of the promoter containing the protective A allele. Transcription factor Ets-1, encoded by the lupus-susceptibility gene ETS1, identified in recent genome-wide association studies, binds near this variant. The manipulation of Ets-1 levels strongly affected miR-146a promoter activity in vitro; and the knockdown of Ets-1, mimicking its reduced expression in SLE, directly impaired the induction of miR-146a. We also observed additive effects of the risk alleles of miR-146a and ETS1. Our data identified and confirmed an association between a functional promoter variant of miR-146a and SLE. This risk allele had decreased binding to transcription factor Ets-1, contributing to reduced levels of miR-146a in SLE patients.

  19. A Functional Variant at the miR-214 Binding Site in the Methylenetetrahydrofolatereductase Gene Alters Susceptibility to Gastric Cancer in a Chinese Han Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaoyun Chen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in miRNA binding sites, which are located in mRNA 3' untranslated regions (3'-UTRs, were recently found to influence microRNA-target interactions. Specifically, such polymorphisms can modulatebinding affinity or create or destroy miRNA-binding sites; such variants have also been found to be associated with cancer risk. In this study, we explored the effect of a functional variant at the miR-214 binding site in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (rs114673809 on gastric cancer (GC risk in a hospital-based case-control study in a Chinese Han population. Methods and Results: We genotyped the rs114673809 polymorphism in 345 gastric cancer patients and 376 cancer-free controls using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP technique. The functions of rs114673809 were investigated using a luciferase activity assay and validated by immunoblotting. We found that participants carrying the rs114673809 AA genotype or A allele had a significantly increased risk of gastric cancer (OR = 1.667, 95% CI = 1.044-2.660, P = 0.034; OR = 1.261, 95% CI = 1.017-1.563, P = 0.037, respectively compared to those carrying the GG genotype and G allele. In addition, rs114673809 modified the binding of hsa-miR-214 to MTHFR as well as MTHFR protein levels in gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: Our data suggested that rs114673809, which is located at the miR-214 binding site in the 3'-UTR of MTHFR, may play an important role in the development of gastric cancer in a Chinese Han population.

  20. Variants in microRNA genes in familial papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsic, Jerneja; Fultz, Rebecca; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Genutis, Luke K; Wang, Yanqiang; Li, Wei; Volinia, Stefano; Jazdzewski, Krystian; He, Huiling; Wakely, Paul E; Senter, Leigha; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2017-01-24

    Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (PTC) displays one of the highest familiality scores of all cancers as measured by case-control studies, yet only a handful of genes have been implicated until now. Variants in microRNAs have been associated with the risk of several cancers including PTC but the magnitude of this involvement is unclear. This study was designed to test to what extent genomic variants in microRNAs contribute to PTC risk. We used SOLiD technology to sequence 321 genomic regions encoding 427 miRNAs in one affected individual from each of 80 PTC families. After excluding variants with frequency ≥ 1% in 1000 Genomes Phase 1 (n = 1092) we detected 1978 variants. After further functional filtering steps 25 variants in pre-miRs remained. Co-segregation was observed for six out of 16 tested miRNA variants with PTC in the families, namely let-7e, miR-181b, miR-135a, miR-15b, miR-320, and miR-484. Expression of miR-135a and miR-181b was tested in normal thyroid and tumor tissue from patients that carry the variants and a decrease in expression was observed. In vitro assays were applied to measure the effect of the variants on microRNAs' maturation. Four out of six variants were tested. Only the let-7e and miR-181b variants showed an effect on processing leading to lower levels of mature miRNA. These two variants were not detected in 1170 sporadic PTC cases nor in 1404 controls. Taken together, our data show that high penetrance germline sequence variants of miRNAs potentially predispose to a fraction of all PTC but are not common.

  1. Identification of 153 new loci associated with heel bone mineral density and functional involvement of GPC6 in osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, John P; Morris, John A; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Warrington, Nicole M; Youlten, Scott E; Zheng, Jie; Gregson, Celia L; Grundberg, Elin; Trajanoska, Katerina; Logan, John G; Pollard, Andrea S; Sparkes, Penny C; Ghirardello, Elena J; Allen, Rebecca; Leitch, Victoria D; Butterfield, Natalie C; Komla-Ebri, Davide; Adoum, Anne-Tounsia; Curry, Katharine F; White, Jacqueline K; Kussy, Fiona; Greenlaw, Keelin M; Xu, Changjiang; Harvey, Nicholas C; Cooper, Cyrus; Adams, David J; Greenwood, Celia M T; Maurano, Matthew T; Kaptoge, Stephen; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Tobias, Jonathan H; Croucher, Peter I; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Bassett, J H Duncan; Williams, Graham R; Richards, J Brent; Evans, David M

    2017-09-04

    Osteoporosis is a common disease diagnosed primarily by measurement of bone mineral density (BMD). We undertook a genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 142,487 individuals from the UK Biobank to identify loci associated with BMD as estimated by quantitative ultrasound of the heel. We identified 307 conditionally independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that attained genome-wide significance at 203 loci, explaining approximately 12% of the phenotypic variance. These included 153 previously unreported loci, and several rare variants with large effect sizes. To investigate the underlying mechanisms, we undertook (1) bioinformatic, functional genomic annotation and human osteoblast expression studies; (2) gene-function prediction; (3) skeletal phenotyping of 120 knockout mice with deletions of genes adjacent to lead independent SNPs; and (4) analysis of gene expression in mouse osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts. The results implicate GPC6 as a novel determinant of BMD, and also identify abnormal skeletal phenotypes in knockout mice associated with a further 100 prioritized genes.

  2. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Maen; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Kai-Wang, Kelvin; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restri

  3. Functional variants regulating LGALS1 (Galectin 1) expression affect human susceptibility to influenza A(H7N9)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yu; Zhou, Jie; Cheng, Zhongshan; Yang, Shigui; Chu, Hin; Fan, Yanhui; Li, Cun; Wong, Bosco Ho-Yin; Zheng, Shufa; Zhu, Yixin; Yu, Fei; Wang, Yiyin; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hainv; Yu, Liang; Tang, Linglin; Cui, Dawei; Hao, Ke; Bosse, Yohan; Obeidat, Maen; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Song, You-Qiang; Kai-Wang, Kelvin; Sham, Pak Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    The fatality of avian influenza A(H7N9) infection in humans was over 30%. To identify human genetic susceptibility to A(H7N9) infection, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving 102 A(H7N9) patients and 106 heavily-exposed healthy poultry workers, a sample size critically restri

  4. Molecular and functional characterization of a CS1 (CRACC) splice variant expressed in human NK cells that does not contain immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kyung; Boles, Kent S; Mathew, Porunelloor A

    2004-10-01

    CS1 (CRACC, novel Ly9) is a novel member of the CD2 family expressed on natural killer (NK), T and stimulated B cells. Although the cytoplasmic domain of CS1 contains immunoreceptor tyrosine-based switch motifs (ITSM), which enables to recruite signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP/SH2D1A), it activates NK cells in the absence of a functional SAP. CS1 is a self ligand and homophilic interaction of CS1 regulates NK cell cytolytic activity. Here we have identified a novel splice variant of CS1 (CS1-S), which lacks ITSM. Human NK cells express mRNA for both wild-type CS1 (CS1-L) and CS1-S and their expression level remained steady upon various stimulations. To determine the function of each isoform, cDNA for CS1-L and CS1-S were transfected into the rat NK cell line RNK-16 and functionally tested using redirected cytotoxicity assays and calcium flux experiments. CS1-L was able to mediate redirected cytotoxicity of P815 target cells in the presence of monoclonal antibody against CS1 and a rise in intracellular calcium within RNK-16 cells, suggesting that CS1-L is an activating receptor, whereas CS1-S showed no effects. Interestingly, SAP associated with unstimulated CS1-L and dissociated upon pervanadate stimulation. These results indicate that CS1-L and CS1-S may differentially regulate human NK cell functions.

  5. Functional characterization of enzymes involved in cysteine biosynthesis and H(2)S production in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marciano, Daniela; Santana, Marianela; Nowicki, Cristina

    2012-10-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is expected to synthetize de novo cysteine by different routes, among which the two-step pathway involving serine acetyltransferase and cysteine synthase (CS) is comprised. Also, cystathionine β synthase (CBS) might contribute to the de novo generation of cysteine in addition to catalyze the first step of the reverse transsulfuration route producing cystathionine. However, neither the functionality of CS nor that of cystathionine γ lyase (CGL) has been assessed. Our results show that T. cruzi CS could participate notably more actively than CBS in the de novo synthesis of cysteine. Interestingly, at the protein level T. cruzi CS is more abundant in amastigotes than in epimastigotes. Unlike the mammalian homologues, T. cruzi CGL specifically cleaves cystathionine into cysteine and is unable to produce H(2)S. The expression pattern of T. cruzi CGL parallels that of CBS, which unexpectedly suggests that in addition to the de novo synthesis of cysteine, the reverse transsulfuration pathway could be operative in the mammalian and insect stages. Besides, T. cruzi CBS produces H(2)S by decomposing cysteine or via condensation of cysteine with homocysteine. The latter reaction leads to cystathionine production, and is catalyzed remarkably more efficiently than the breakdown of cysteine. In T. cruzi like in other organisms, H(2)S could exert regulatory effects on varied metabolic processes. Notably, T. cruzi seems to count on stage-specific routes involved in cysteine production, the multiple cysteine-processing alternatives could presumably reflect this parasite's high needs of reducing power for detoxification of reactive oxygen species.

  6. Toward a More Complex Understanding of Acculturation and Adjustment: Cultural Involvements and Psychosocial Functioning in Vietnamese Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huong H.; Messe, Lawrence A.; Stollak, Gary E.

    1999-01-01

    Examines link between acculturation and adjustment in 182 Vietnamese youths living in an Anglo-American community. Results indicate involvement in U.S. culture predicts positive functioning on personal, interpersonal, and academic levels. Involvement in the Vietnamese culture predicts positive family relationships. (MMU)

  7. A Note on Starlike Functions of Order α Associated with a Fractional Calculus Operator Involving Caputo’s Fractional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Salah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we introduce a class of starlike functions of order α by using a fractional operator involving Caputo's fractional which was introduced recently by the authors. The coefficient inequalities and distortion theorems are determined. Further some subordination theorems are given. In addition, results involving Hadamard product are also discussed.

  8. Multiple functional involvement of thymosin beta-4 in tooth germ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookuma, Yukiko F; Kiyoshima, Tamotsu; Kobayashi, Ieyoshi; Nagata, Kengo; Wada, Hiroko; Fujiwara, Hiroaki; Yamaza, Haruyoshi; Nonaka, Kazuaki; Sakai, Hidetaka

    2013-02-01

    Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4) is known to be ubiquitously involved in the actin monomer sequestering on the cytoskeleton. Our previous study showed specific temporal and special in situ expression pattern of Tβ4 mRNA in dental epithelial and mesenchymal cells in the developing tooth germ of the mouse lower first molar. In this study, we examined the functional implications of Tβ4 in the developmental course of the mouse lower first molar. An inhibition assay using Tβ4 antisense sulfur-substituted oligodeoxynucleotide (AS S-ODN) in cultured embryonic day 11.0 (E11.0) mandibles showed a significant growth inhibition of the tooth germ. However, no growth arrest of the cultured E15.0 tooth germ was observed by using Tβ4 AS S-ODN. The Tβ4 knockdown led to significantly decreased expression levels of type II/III runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and nucleolin (Ncl) in the cultured E11.0 mandibles. Since our previous studies proved that the inhibition of type II/III Runx2 and Ncl translations resulted in the developmental arrest of the tooth germ in the cultured E11.0 mandible, Tβ4 appears to play roles in tooth germ development via the regulation of the type II/III Runx2 and Ncl expressions. Tβ4 knockdown also resulted in decreased secretion of matrix metalloproteinase (Mmp)-2, a reduced cell motility activity and upregulation of E-cadherin in dental epithelial mDE6 cells. These results suggest that Tβ4 plays multiple functional roles in odontogenic epithelial cells in the early stages of tooth germ development by regulating the expression of odontogenesis-related genes.

  9. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants--an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draizen, Eli J; Shaytan, Alexey K; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. 'HistoneDB 2.0--with variants' is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0.

  10. Reduced cyclooxygenase involvement in vascular endothelial function in rat renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-Van Oosten, Annemieke; Boonstra, Arnold H.; Navis, Gerjan; Van Goor, Harry; Buikema, Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death following renal transplantation. Mechanisms leading to vascular dysfunction outside the transplanted organ involve common risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, proteinuria, but immune-mediated factors may also be involve

  11. Reduced cyclooxygenase involvement in vascular endothelial function in rat renal transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit-Van Oosten, Annemieke; Boonstra, Arnold H.; Navis, Gerjan; Van Goor, Harry; Buikema, Hendrik

    2005-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular disease is a major cause of death following renal transplantation. Mechanisms leading to vascular dysfunction outside the transplanted organ involve common risk factors such as hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, proteinuria, but immune-mediated factors may also be involve

  12. Functional G894T (rs1799983) polymorphism and intron-4 VNTR variant of nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) gene are susceptibility biomarkers of obesity among Tunisians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasr, Hela Ben; Dimassi, Saloua; M'hadhbi, Refka; Debbabi, Haithem; Kortas, Mondher; Tabka, Zouhair; Chahed, Karim

    2016-01-01

    The endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS3) has been shown to play a role in the modulation of lipolysis. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of the G894T (rs1799983) and a 27 bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR 4a/b) of NOS3 gene on obesity in a sample of the Tunisian population. The study included 211 normal weight subjects and 183 obese patients. NOS3 G894T and 4a/b variants were determined by PCR analysis and examined for association with obesity-related traits. The effect of obesity on forearm skin blood flow (FSBF) response to acetylcholine, an endothelium-dependent vasodilator was determined by laser Doppler iontophoresis. In case-control studies, both G894T and 4a/b variants were associated with obesity. A significantly increased risk of obesity was found with the NOS3(G894T) TT genotype (OR:2.62, P=0.04). This association remains significant after adjustments for age and gender (OR: 2.93, P=0.03). A higher risk was also observed for carriers of the G894T allele (OR: 1.72, P=0.001). Stratified analysis by gender revealed that obese men (but not women) had significantly higher frequency of TT genotypes compared to controls (9.9% vs. 2.9%, P=0.01). Carriers of the 4b allele presented a significantly higher risk of obesity than non-carriers even after adjustments for age and gender (OR (95%CI): 1.72 (1.16-2.56), P=0.004). Correlations with anthropometric parameters revealed that carriers of TT and bb genotypes had significantly higher body mass index compared to those homozygous for the G and a alleles (P=0.0004). This study provides the first evidence for the association of G894T and 4a/b variants with body mass index and the risk of obesity in Tunisians. These polymorphisms did not exhibit, however any significant association with both metabolic traits and vascular function. Copyright © 2015 Asia Oceania Association for the Study of Obesity. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Biological functions of glycosyltransferase genes involved in O-fucose glycan synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Tetsuya; Matsuura, Aiko; Matsuda, Tsukasa

    2008-07-01

    Rare types of glycosylation often occur in a domain-specific manner and are involved in specific biological processes. Well-known examples of such modification are O-linked fucose (O-fucose) and O-linked glucose (O-glucose) glycans on epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains. In particular, O-fucose glycans are reported to regulate the functions of EGF domain-containing proteins such as urinary-type plasminogen activator and Notch receptors. Two glycosyltransferases catalyze the initiation and elongation of O-fucose glycans. The initiation process is catalyzed by O-fucosyltransferase 1, which is essential for Notch signalling in both Drosophila and mice. O-fucosyltransferase 1 can affect the folding, ligand interaction and endocytosis of Notch receptors, and both the glycosyltransferase and non-catalytic activities of O-fucosyltransferase 1 have been reported. The elongation of O-fucose monosaccharide is catalyzed by Fringe-related genes, which differentially modulate the interaction between Notch and two classes of ligands, namely, Delta and Serrate/Jagged. In this article, we have reviewed the recent reports addressing the distinctive features of the glycosyltransferases and O-glycans present on the EGF domains.

  14. Sulfur Atom in its Bound State Is a Unique Element Involved in Physiological Functions in Mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Koike

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It was in the 1950s that the term polysulfide or persulfide was introduced in biological studies. The unfamiliar term “sulfane sulfur” sometimes appeared in papers published in the 1970s, and was defined in the review article by Westley in 1983. In the article, sulfane sulfur is described as sulfur atoms that are covalently bound only with sulfur atoms, and as this explanation was somewhat difficult to comprehend, it was not generally accepted. Thus, in the early 1990s, we redefined these sulfur species as “bound sulfur”, which easily converts to hydrogen sulfide on reduction with a thiol reducing agent. In other words, bound sulfur refers to a sulfur atom that exists in a zero to divalent form (0 to −2. The first part of this review focuses on the fluorescent derivatization HPLC method—which we developed for measurement of bound sulfur—and explains the distribution of bound sulfur and the hydrogen sulfide-producing ability of various tissues, as clarified by this method. Next, we discuss diverse physiological functions and involvement of polysulfide, a typical type of bound sulfur, in the redox regulation system. Additionally, we also address its possible physiological role in the central nervous system, based on its action of scavenging reactive carbonyl compounds.

  15. Functional analysis of gamma-carotene ketolase involved in the carotenoid biosynthesis of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongtao; Shen, Shaochuan; Tian, Bing; Wang, Hu; Xu, Zhenjian; Wang, Liangyan; Hua, Yuejin

    2009-11-01

    Deinococcus radiodurans strain R1 synthesizes a unique ketocarotenoid product named deinoxanthin. The detailed steps involved in the biosynthesis of deinoxanthin remain unresolved. A carotene ketolase homologue encoded by dr0093 was inactivated by gene mutation to verify its function in the native host D. radiodurans. Analysis of the carotenoids in the resultant mutant R1DeltacrtO demonstrated that dr0093 encodes gamma-carotene ketolase (CrtO) catalysing the introduction of one keto group into the C-4 position of gamma-carotene derivatives to form ketolated carotenoids. The mutant R1DeltacrtO became more sensitive to H(2)O(2) treatment than the wild-type strain R1, indicating that the C-4 keto group is important for the antioxidant activity of carotenoids in D. radiodurans. Carotenoid extracts from mutant R1DeltacrtO exhibited lower 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity than those from the wild-type strain R1. The enhanced antioxidant ability of ketocarotenoids in D. radiodurans might be attributed to its extended conjugated double bonds and relative stability by the C-4 keto group substitution.

  16. KD4v: Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin; Walter, Vincent; Linard, Benjamin; Poidevin, Laetitia; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Wicker, Nicolas; Lecompte, Odile; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-07-01

    A major challenge in the post-genomic era is a better understanding of how human genetic alterations involved in disease affect the gene products. The KD4v (Comprehensible Knowledge Discovery System for Missense Variant) server allows to characterize and predict the phenotypic effects (deleterious/neutral) of missense variants. The server provides a set of rules learned by Induction Logic Programming (ILP) on a set of missense variants described by conservation, physico-chemical, functional and 3D structure predicates. These rules are interpretable by non-expert humans and are used to accurately predict the deleterious/neutral status of an unknown mutation. The web server is available at http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/kd4v.

  17. A functional genetic variant (N521D in natriuretic peptide receptor 3 is associated with diastolic dysfunction: the prevalence of asymptomatic ventricular dysfunction study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen L Pereira

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of a functional genetic variant in the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor, NPR3, on circulating natriuretic peptides (NPs and myocardial structure and function in the general community.NPR3 plays an important role in the clearance of NPs and through direct signaling mechanisms modulates smooth muscle cell function and cardiac fibroblast proliferation. A NPR3 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP rs2270915, resulting in a N521D substitution in the intracellular catalytic domain that interacts with Gi could affect receptor function. Whether this SNP is associated with alterations in NPs levels and altered cardiac structure and function is unknown.DNA samples of 1931 randomly selected residents of Olmsted County, Minnesota were genotyped. Plasma NT-proANP1-98, ANP1-28, proBNP1-108, NT-proBNP1-76, BNP1-32 and BNP3-32 levels were measured. All subjects underwent comprehensive echocardiography.Genotype frequencies for rs2270915 were as follows: (A/A 60%, A/G 36%, G/G 4%. All analyses performed were for homozygotes G/G versus wild type A/A plus the heterozygotes A/G. Diastolic dysfunction was significantly more common (p = 0.007 in the homozygotes G/G (43% than the A/A+A/G (28% group. Multivariate regression adjusted for age, sex, body mass index and hypertension demonstrated rs2270915 to be independently associated with diastolic dysfunction (odds ratio 1.94, p = 0.03. There was no significant difference in NPs levels between the 2 groups suggesting that the clearance function of the receptor was not affected.A nonsynonymous NPR3 SNP is independently associated with diastolic dysfunction and this association does not appear to be related to alterations in circulating levels of natriuretic peptides.

  18. A functional variant in MIR137, a candidate gene for schizophrenia, affects Stroop test performance in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Giraldo, Yeimy; González-Reyes, Rodrigo E; Forero, Diego A

    2016-02-28

    MIR137, a brain expressed miRNA, has been identified as a top novel susceptibility gene for schizophrenia (SZ). 230 healthy participants completed the Stroop test and were genotyped for a functional Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) in MIR137 gene. MIR137 VNTR genotypes were associated with differences in Stroop facilitation and accuracies in congruent trials and for the total number of errors. This is the first study of the functional VNTR in MIR137 gene and Stroop test performance in healthy subjects. Our results could have important implications for the identification of genetic candidates for endophenotypes for SZ.

  19. Fine-Scale Mapping of the FGFR2 Breast Cancer Risk Locus: Putative Functional Variants Differentially Bind FOXA1 and E2F1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Kerstin B.; O’Reilly, Martin; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Carlebur, Saskia; Edwards, Stacey L.; French, Juliet D.; Prathalingham, Radhika; Dennis, Joe; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; de Santiago, Ines; Hopper, John L.; Tsimiklis, Helen; Apicella, Carmel; Southey, Melissa C.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; Hogervorst, Frans B.; Muir, Kenneth; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Stewart-Brown, Sarah; Siriwanarangsan, Pornthep; Fasching, Peter A.; Lux, Michael P.; Ekici, Arif B.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael J.; Miller, Nicola; Marme, Federick; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Burwinkel, Barbara; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Menegaux, Florence; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Nielsen, Sune F.; Flyger, Henrik; Milne, Roger L.; Zamora, M. Pilar; Arias, Jose I.; Benitez, Javier; Neuhausen, Susan; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Dur, Christina C.; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Stegmaier, Christa; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Engel, Christoph; Ditsch, Nina; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Nevanlinna, Heli; Muranen, Taru A.; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Matsuo, Keitaro; Ito, Hidemi; Iwata, Hiroji; Yatabe, Yasushi; Dörk, Thilo; Helbig, Sonja; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kataja, Vesa; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Wu, Anna H.; Tseng, Chiu-chen; Van Den Berg, David; Stram, Daniel O.; Lambrechts, Diether; Thienpont, Bernard; Christiaens, Marie-Rose; Smeets, Ann; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Seibold, Petra; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Bonanni, Bernardo; Bernard, Loris; Couch, Fergus J.; Olson, Janet E.; Wang, Xianshu; Purrington, Kristen; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Le Marchand, Loic; Simard, Jacques; Goldberg, Mark S.; Labrèche, France; Dumont, Martine; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Yip, Cheng-Har; Phuah, Sze-Yee; Kristensen, Vessela; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Deming-Halverson, Sandra; Shrubsole, Martha; Long, Jirong; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Kauppila, Saila; Andrulis, Irene L.; Knight, Julia A.; Glendon, Gord; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Figueroa, Jonine; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hartef; Eriksson, Kimael; Hooning, Maartje J.; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; van Deurzen, Carolien H.M.; Hall, Per; Li, Jingmei; Liu, Jianjun; Humphreys, Keith; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Lu, Wei; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Hui; Cox, Angela; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Blot, William; Signorello, Lisa B.; Cai, Qiuyin; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Ghoussaini, Maya; Harrington, Patricia; Tyrer, Jonathan; Kang, Daehee; Choi, Ji-Yeob; Park, Sue K.; Noh, Dong-Young; Hartman, Mikael; Hui, Miao; Lim, Wei-Yen; Buhari, Shaik A.; Hamann, Ute; Försti, Asta; Rüdiger, Thomas; Ulmer, Hans-Ulrich; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Vachon, Celine; Slager, Susan; Fostira, Florentia; Pilarski, Robert; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Wu, Pei-Ei; Hou, Ming-Feng; Swerdlow, Anthony; Ashworth, Alan; Orr, Nick; Schoemaker, Minouk J.; Ponder, Bruce A.J.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.

    2013-01-01

    The 10q26 locus in the second intron of FGFR2 is the locus most strongly associated with estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer in genome-wide association studies. We conducted fine-scale mapping in case-control studies genotyped with a custom chip (iCOGS), comprising 41 studies (n = 89,050) of European ancestry, 9 Asian ancestry studies (n = 13,983), and 2 African ancestry studies (n = 2,028) from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We identified three statistically independent risk signals within the locus. Within risk signals 1 and 3, genetic analysis identified five and two variants, respectively, highly correlated with the most strongly associated SNPs. By using a combination of genetic fine mapping, data on DNase hypersensitivity, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to study protein-DNA binding, we identified rs35054928, rs2981578, and rs45631563 as putative functional SNPs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that FOXA1 preferentially bound to the risk-associated allele (C) of rs2981578 and was able to recruit ERα to this site in an allele-specific manner, whereas E2F1 preferentially bound the risk variant of rs35054928. The risk alleles were preferentially found in open chromatin and bound by Ser5 phosphorylated RNA polymerase II, suggesting that the risk alleles are associated with changes in transcription. Chromatin conformation capture demonstrated that the risk region was able to interact with the promoter of FGFR2, the likely target gene of this risk region. A role for FOXA1 in mediating breast cancer susceptibility at this locus is consistent with the finding that the FGFR2 risk locus primarily predisposes to estrogen-receptor-positive disease. PMID:24290378

  20. Non-Bloom syndrome-associated partial and total loss-of-function variants of BLM helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Hamed; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2012-11-20

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the RecQ-like DNA helicase BLM, which functions in the maintenance of genome stability. Using a humanized model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that expresses a chimera of the N terminus of yeast Sgs1 and the C terminus of human BLM from the chromosomal SGS1 locus, we have functionally evaluated 27 BLM alleles that are not currently known to be associated with BS. We identified nine alleles with impaired function when assessed for hypersensitivity to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea (HU). Six of these alleles (P690L, R717T, W803R, Y811C, F857L, G972V) caused sensitivity to HU that was comparable to known BS-associated or helicase-dead alleles, suggesting that they may cause BS and, in the heterozygous state, act as risk factors for cancerogenesis. We also identified three alleles (R791C, P868L, G1120R) that caused intermediate sensitivity to HU; although unlikely to cause BS, these partial loss-of-function alleles may increase risk for cancers or other BS-associated complications if a person is homozygous or compound heterozygous for these alleles or if they carry a known BS-associated allele.

  1. Identification of Variant-Specific Functions of PIK3CA by Rapid Phenotyping of Rare Mutations | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large-scale sequencing efforts are uncovering the complexity of cancer genomes, which are composed of causal "driver" mutations that promote tumor progression along with many more pathologically neutral "passenger" events. The majority of mutations, both in known cancer drivers and uncharacterized genes, are generally of low occurrence, highlighting the need to functionally annotate the long tail of infrequent mutations present in heterogeneous cancers.

  2. Loss-of-function variants in the filaggrin gene are a significant risk factor for peanut allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brown, Sara J.; Asai, Yuka; Cordell, Heather J.; Campbell, Linda E.; Zhao, Yiwei; Liao, Haihui; Northstone, Kate; Henderson, John; Alizadehfar, Reza; Ben-Shoshan, Moshe; Morgan, Kenneth; Roberts, Graham; Masthoff, Laury J. N.; Pasmans, Suzanne G. M. A.; van den Akker, Peter C.; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hourihane, Jonathan O'B.; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Lack, Gideon; Clarke, Ann; Hull, Peter R.; Irvine, Alan D.; McLean, W. H. Irwin

    2011-01-01

    Background: IgE-mediated peanut allergy is a complex trait with strong heritability, but its genetic basis is currently unknown. Loss-of-function mutations within the filaggrin gene are associated with atopic dermatitis and other atopic diseases; therefore, filaggrin is a candidate gene in the etiol

  3. Variant B Cell Receptor Isotype Functions Differ in Hairy Cell Leukemia with Mutated BRAF and IGHV Genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weston-Bell, Nicola J.; Forconi, Francesco; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Sahota, Surinder S.

    2014-01-01

    A functional B-cell receptor (BCR) is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL) is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg) isotypes

  4. Variant B cell receptor isotype functions differ in hairy cell leukemia with mutated BRAF and IGHV genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola J Weston-Bell

    Full Text Available A functional B-cell receptor (BCR is critical for survival of normal B-cells, but whether it plays a comparable role in B-cell malignancy is as yet not fully delineated. Typical Hairy Cell Leukemia (HCL is a rare B-cell tumor, and unique in expressing multiple surface immunoglobulin (sIg isotypes on individual tumor cells (mult-HCL, to raise questions as to their functional relevance. Typical mult-HCL also displays a mutated BRAF V(600E lesion. Since wild type BRAF is a primary conduit for transducing normal BCR signals, as revealed by deletion modelling studies, it is as yet not apparent if mutated BRAF alters BCR signal transduction in mult-HCL. To address these questions, we examined BCR signalling in mult-HCL cases uniformly displaying mutated BRAF and IGHV genes. Two apparent functional sets were delineated by IgD co-expression. In sIgD(+ve mult-HCL, IgD mediated persistent Ca(2+ flux, also evident via >1 sIgH isotype, linked to increased ERK activation and BCR endocytosis. In sIgD(-ve mult-HCL however, BCR-mediated signals and downstream effects were restricted to a single sIgH isotype, with sIgM notably dysfunctional and remaining immobilised on the cell surface. These observations reveal discordance between expression and function of individual isotypes in mult-HCL. In dual sIgL expressing cases, only a single sIgL was fully functional. We examined effects of anti-BCR stimuli on mult-HCL survival ex-vivo. Significantly, all functional non-IgD isotypes increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation but triggered apoptosis of tumor cells, in both subsets. IgD stimuli, in marked contrast retained tumor viability. Despite mutant BRAF, BCR signals augment ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but isotype dictates functional downstream outcomes. In mult-HCL, sIgD retains a potential to transduce BCR signals for tumor survival in-vivo. The BCR in mult-HCL emerges as subject to complex regulation, with apparent conflicting signalling by individual isotypes when co

  5. Certain Fractional Derivative Formulae Involving the Product of a General Class of Polynomials and the Multivariable -Function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R C Soni; Deepika Singh

    2002-11-01

    In the present paper, we obtain three unified fractional derivative formulae (FDF). The first involves the product of a general class of polynomials and the multivariable -function. The second involves the product of a general class of polynomials and two multivariable -functions and has been obtained with the help of the generalized Leibniz rule for fractional derivatives. The last FDF also involves the product of a general class of polynomials and the multivariable -function but it is obtained by the application of the first FDF twice and it involves two independent variables instead of one. The polynomials and the functions involved in all our fractional derivative formulae as well as their arguments which are of the type $x^ρ\\prod_{i = 1}^s(x^{t_i} + _i)^{_i}$ are quite general in nature. These formulae, besides being of very general character have been put in a compact form avoiding the occurrence of infinite series and thus making them useful in applications. Our findings provide interesting unifications and extensions of a number of (new and known) results. For the sake of illustration, we give here exact references to the results (in essence) of five research papers [2, 3, 10, 12, 13] that follow as particular cases of our findings. In the end, we record a new fractional derivative formula involving the product of the Hermite polynomials, the Laguerre polynomials and the product of different Whittaker functions as a simple special case of our first formula.

  6. Functional involvement of β3-adrenergic receptors in melanoma growth and vascularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Massimo; Casini, Giovanni; Filippi, Luca; Nicchia, Grazia Paola; Svelto, Maria; Bagnoli, Paola

    2013-12-01

    β-adrenergic signaling is thought to facilitate cancer progression and blockade of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) may slow down tumor growth. A possible role of β3-ARs in tumor growth has not been investigated so far and the lack of highly specific antagonists makes difficult the evaluation of this role. In the present study, β3-AR expression in mouse B16F10 melanoma cells was demonstrated and the effects of two widely used β3-AR blockers, SR59230A and L-748,337, were evaluated in comparison with propranolol, a β1-/β2-AR blocker with poor affinity for β3-ARs, and with siRNAs targeting specific β-ARs. Both SR59230A and L-748,337 reduced cell proliferation and induced apoptosis, likely through the involvement of the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase. In addition, hypoxia upregulated β3-ARs and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in B16F10 cells, whereas SR59230A or L-748,337 prevented the hypoxia-induced VEGF upregulation. Melanoma was induced in mice by inoculation of B16F10 cells. Intra-tumor injections of SR59230A or L-748,337 significantly reduced melanoma growth by reducing cell proliferation and stimulating apoptosis. SR59230A or L-748,337 treatment also resulted in significant decrease of the tumor vasculature. The decrease in tumor vasculature was due to apoptosis of endothelial cells and not to downregulation of angiogenic factors. These results demonstrate that SR59230A and L-748,337 significantly inhibit melanoma growth by reducing tumor cell proliferation and activating tumor cell death. In addition, both drugs reduce tumor vascularization by inducing apoptosis of endothelial cells. Together, these findings indicate β3-ARs as promising, novel targets for anti-cancer therapy. β3-ARs are expressed in B16F10 melanoma cells β3-ARs are involved in B16F10 cell proliferation and apoptosis Reduced β3-AR function decreases the growth of melanoma induced by B16F10 cell inoculation Drugs targeting β3-ARs reduce tumor vasculature β3

  7. A rare case of a three way complex variant positive Philadelphia translocation involving chromosome (9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11) in chronic myeloid leukemia: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asif, Muhammad; Hussain, Abrar; Rasool, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) translocation is present in 90–95% of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Variant complex translocations have been observed in 5–8% of CML patients, in which a third chromosome other than (9;22) is involved. Imatinib mesylate is the first line breakpoint cluster region-Abelson gene (BCR/ABL)-targeted oral therapy for CML, and may produce a complete response in 70–80% of CML patients in the chronic phase. In the present study, a bone marrow sample was used for conventional cytogenetic analysis, and the fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) test was used for BCR/ABL gene detection. A hematological analysis was also performed to determine the white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, packed and mean cell volumes, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration and platelet values of the patient. The hematological analysis of the patient indicated the increased WBC of 186.5×103 cells/µl, and decreased hemoglobin levels of 11.1 g/dl. The FISH test revealed that 67% cells demonstrated BCR/ABL gene translocation. The patient was treated with 400 mg imatinib mesylate daily, and was monitored at various intervals over a 6-month period. The present study reports the rare case of a patient that demonstrates a three-way Philadelphia chromosome-positive translocation involving 46XY,t(9;11;22)(q34;p15;q11)[10], alongside CML in the chronic phase. The translocation was analyzed using cytogenetic and FISH tests. PMID:27602125

  8. Relative functions of Gαs and its extra-large variant XLαs in the endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastepe, M

    2012-09-01

    Gαs is a ubiquitous signaling protein necessary for the actions of many neurotransmitters, hormones, and autocrine/paracrine factors. Loss-of-function mutations within the gene encoding Gαs, GNAS, are responsible for multiple human diseases, including Albright's Hereditary Osteodystrophy, progressive osseous heteroplasia, and pseudohypoparathyroidism. Gain-of-function mutations in the same gene are found in various endocrine and nonendocrine tumors and in patients with McCune-Albright Syndrome and fibrous dysplasia of bone. In addition to Gαs, GNAS gives rise to multiple additional coding and noncoding transcripts. Among those, XLαs is a paternally expressed product that is partially identical to Gαs. This article reviews the cellular actions of Gαs and XLαs, focusing on the significance of XLαs relative to Gαs in mammalian physiology and human disease.

  9. Identification of a functional genetic variant driving racially dimorphic platelet gene expression of the thrombin receptor regulator, PCTP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xianguo; Simon, Lukas M; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Paul F; Edelstein, Leonard C

    2017-03-02

    Platelet activation in response to stimulation of the Protease Activated Receptor 4 (PAR4) receptor differs by race. One factor that contributes to this difference is the expression level of Phosphatidylcholine Transfer Protein (PCTP), a regulator of platelet PAR4 function. We have conducted an expression Quantitative Trait Locus (eQTL) analysis that identifies single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) linked to the expression level of platelet genes. This analysis revealed 26 SNPs associated with the expression level of PCTP at genome-wide significance (p Electromobility shift assays, luciferase assays, and overexpression studies indicated a role for the megakaryocytic transcription factor GATA1. In summary, we have integrated multi-omic data to identify and functionalise an eQTL. This, along with the previously described relationship between PCTP and PAR4 function, allows us to characterise a genotype-phenotype relationship through the mechanism of gene expression.

  10. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  11. TGF-beta1 regulates human brain pericyte inflammatory processes involved in neurovasculature function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustenhoven, Justin; Aalderink, Miranda; Scotter, Emma L; Oldfield, Robyn L; Bergin, Peter S; Mee, Edward W; Graham, E Scott; Faull, Richard L M; Curtis, Maurice A; Park, Thomas I-H; Dragunow, Mike

    2016-02-11

    adhesion molecules involved in CNS leukocyte trafficking and the modulation of microglial function, as well as reduced the phagocytic ability of pericytes. However, TGFβ1 also enhanced the expression of classical pro-inflammatory cytokines and enzymes which can disrupt BBB functioning, suggesting that pericytes adopt a phenotype which is neither solely pro- nor anti-inflammatory. Whilst the effects of pericyte modulation by TGFβ1 in vivo are difficult to infer, the reduction in pericyte proliferation together with the elevated IL-6, MMP-2 and NOX4 and reduced phagocytosis suggests a detrimental action of TGFβ1 on neurovasculature.

  12. Functional magnetic resonance adaptation reveals the involvement of the dorsomedial stream in hand orientation for grasping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaco, Simona; Cavina-Pratesi, Cristiana; Sedda, Anna; Fattori, Patrizia; Galletti, Claudio; Culham, Jody C

    2011-11-01

    Reach-to-grasp actions require coordination of different segments of the upper limbs. Previous studies have examined the neural substrates of arm transport and hand grip components of such actions; however, a third component has been largely neglected: the orientation of the wrist and hand appropriately for the object. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation (fMRA) to investigate human brain areas involved in processing hand orientation during grasping movements. Participants used the dominant right hand to grasp a rod with the four fingers opposing the thumb or to reach and touch the rod with the knuckles without visual feedback. In a control condition, participants passively viewed the rod. Trials in a slow event-related design consisted of two sequential stimuli in which the rod orientation changed (requiring a change in wrist posture while grasping but not reaching or looking) or remained the same. We found reduced activation, that is, adaptation, in superior parieto-occipital cortex (SPOC) when the object was repeatedly grasped with the same orientation. In contrast, there was no adaptation when reaching or looking at an object in the same orientation, suggesting that hand orientation, rather than object orientation, was the critical factor. These results agree with recent neurophysiological research showing that a parieto-occipital area of macaque (V6A) is modulated by hand orientation during reach-to-grasp movements. We suggest that the human dorsomedial stream, like that in the macaque, plays a key role in processing hand orientation in reach-to-grasp movements.

  13. A Natural Variant of the T Cell Receptor-Signaling Molecule Vav1 Reduces Both Effector T Cell Functions and Susceptibility to Neuroinflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Sahar; Bernard, Isabelle; Dejean, Anne S.; Liblau, Roland; Fournié, Gilbert J.; Colacios, Céline

    2016-01-01

    The guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1 is essential for transducing T cell antigen receptor signals and therefore plays an important role in T cell development and activation. Our previous genetic studies identified a locus on rat chromosome 9 that controls the susceptibility to neuroinflammation and contains a non-synonymous polymorphism in the major candidate gene Vav1. To formally demonstrate the causal implication of this polymorphism, we generated a knock-in mouse bearing this polymorphism (Vav1R63W). Using this model, we show that Vav1R63W mice display reduced susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) induced by MOG35-55 peptide immunization. This is associated with a lower production of effector cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-17 and GM-CSF) by autoreactive CD4 T cells. Despite increased proportion of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells in Vav1R63W mice, we show that this lowered cytokine production is intrinsic to effector CD4 T cells and that Treg depletion has no impact on EAE development. Finally, we provide a mechanism for the above phenotype by showing that the Vav1R63W variant has normal enzymatic activity but reduced adaptor functions. Together, these data highlight the importance of Vav1 adaptor functions in the production of inflammatory cytokines by effector T cells and in the susceptibility to neuroinflammation. PMID:27438086

  14. Genetic variants of FADS gene cluster, plasma LC-PUFA levels and the association with cognitive function of under-two-year-old Sasaknese Indonesian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmida, Umi; Htet, Min Kyaw; Adhiyanto, Chris; Kolopaking, Risatianti; Yudisti, Miza Agria; Maududi, Allay; Suryandari, Dwi Anita; Dillon, Drupadi; Afman, Lydia; Müller, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) are regarded as essential for child cognition. Genetic variation in fatty acid (FA) desaturase enzyme (FADS) has been recognized as an important effect modifier in the relation between LC-PUFA and child cognitive function. This study aimed to identify the distribution of genetic variant (genotype) SNP rs174468 and to assess plasma FA and developmental outcome by the genotype among under-2 year old Sasaknese Indonesian children. Data was collected at baseline of a randomized trial (NUPICO, clinicaltrials.gov NCT01504633) in East Lombok district, Indonesia. Breastfed, 12- 17 month old children were recruited and 240 subjects were included in the study. Child cognition was assessed as Bayley Mental Developmental Index (MDI). From 206 subjects whose blood samples can be collected, only two genotypes were found (90.3% GG homozygotes, 9.7% AG heterozygotes), and minor allele AG was significantly associated with higher level of arachidonic acid (20:4 n-6), n-6 LC-PUFA and FADS1 index. MDI score was associated with a FADS2 index (DHA:EPA ratio) but not genotype (Adjusted R-square= 0.043). FADS2 index was associated with cognitive function. No difference was found between children with GG and AG genotypes who were all breastfed and not low birth weight.