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Sample records for functional upper extremity

  1. Upper extremity function: What's posture got to do with it?

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    Harbourne, Regina; Kamm, Kathi

    2015-01-01

    This perspective paper reviews the linkage between developing postural control and upper extremity function. We suggest updated principles for guiding clinical practice, based on current views from motor learning, motor development, and motor control research. Using three clinical examples, we illustrate principles focusing on the use of variability, the importance of errors in learning movement, task specific exploration and practice, and the critical timing necessary to build skill of the upper extremity in a variety of postures. These principles differ from historic approaches in therapeutic exercise, which treated posture as a separate system and a precursor for extremity skill building. We maintain that current movement science supports the tight interaction of posture and upper extremity function through developmental time and in real time, such that one system cannot be considered separate from the other. Specific suggestions for clinical practice flow from the guiding principles outlined in this paper.

  2. Complete 3D kinematics of upper extremity functional tasks.

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    van Andel, Carolien J; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Doorenbosch, Caroline A M; Veeger, DirkJan H E J; Harlaar, Jaap

    2008-01-01

    Upper extremity (UX) movement analysis by means of 3D kinematics has the potential to become an important clinical evaluation method. However, no standardized protocol for clinical application has yet been developed, that includes the whole upper limb. Standardization problems include the lack of a single representative function, the wide range of motion of joints and the complexity of the anatomical structures. A useful protocol would focus on the functional status of the arm and particularly the orientation of the hand. The aim of this work was to develop a standardized measurement method for unconstrained movement analysis of the UX that includes hand orientation, for a set of functional tasks for the UX and obtain normative values. Ten healthy subjects performed four representative activities of daily living (ADL). In addition, six standard active range of motion (ROM) tasks were executed. Joint angles of the wrist, elbow, shoulder and scapula were analyzed throughout each ADL task and minimum/maximum angles were determined from the ROM tasks. Characteristic trajectories were found for the ADL tasks, standard deviations were generally small and ROM results were consistent with the literature. The results of this study could form the normative basis for the development of a 'UX analysis report' equivalent to the 'gait analysis report' and would allow for future comparisons with pediatric and/or pathologic movement patterns.

  3. Functional and Clinical Outcomes of Upper Extremity Amputation.

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    Fitzgibbons, Peter; Medvedev, Gleb

    2015-12-01

    Upper extremity amputation is an uncommon but often necessary procedure. It can be required as a result of trauma, infection, or malignancy. Amputation is a life-changing procedure. Careful planning for it must not only include the level of amputation and assurance of durable soft-tissue coverage of the amputation site, but it must also consider patients' goals and occupations, as well as social factors affecting amputees. The choice of prosthesis is an individual matter, but new technology permits lighter and more multifunctional prostheses. Targeted muscle reinnervation can be used to achieve improved myoelectric signaling and possibly decrease limb pain following amputation. Rehabilitation is crucial to achieving favorable results. Copyright 2015 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.

  4. Systematic review of the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, Danielle; Bongers, Raoul M.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. This review gives an overview of the current state of research regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function. Method. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy in upper extremity. The included journal articles were

  5. Systematic review of the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ezendam, Danielle; Bongers, Raoul M.; Jannink, Michiel J. A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose. This review gives an overview of the current state of research regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function. Method. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy in upper extremity. The included journal articles were

  6. Robot-Assisted Reach Training for Improving Upper Extremity Function of Chronic Stroke.

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    Cho, Ki Hun; Song, Won-Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Stroke, as a major risk factor for chronic impairment of upper limb function, can severely restrict the activities of daily living. Recently, robotic devices have been used to enhance the functional upper extremity movement of stroke patients. The purpose of the current study was to assess whether a robot-assisted reach training program using a whole arm manipulator (WAM) could improve upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement for chronic stroke patients. Using a single-group design, this study followed 10 people with chronic stroke (6 men, 61.5 years; Mini-Mental State Examination score: 27.0; onset duration: 8.9 years). WAM with seven degrees of freedom for the shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints was used during robot-assisted reach exercises. Subjects participated in the training program for 40 minutes per day, 2 times a week, for 4 weeks. The main outcome measures were upper extremity kinematic performance (movement velocity) for three directions and functional movement (Action Research Arm Test). Upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement measures were performed three times: at baseline, during intervention (at 2 weeks), and post intervention. Upper extremity kinematic performance and functional movement showed improvement after two weeks (P robot-assisted reach training on upper extremity kinematic performance as well as functional movement in individuals with chronic stroke. In addition, the findings of the current study may provide valuable information for subsequent randomized controlled trials.

  7. Proof of concept of the ability of the kinect to quantify upper extremity function in dystrophinopathy.

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    Lowes, Linda P; Alfano, Lindsay N; Yetter, Brent A; Worthen-Chaudhari, Lise; Hinchman, William; Savage, Jordan; Samona, Patrick; Flanigan, Kevin M; Mendell, Jerry R

    2013-03-14

    Individuals with dystrophinopathy lose upper extremity strength in proximal muscles followed by those more distal. Current upper extremity evaluation tools fail to fully capture changes in upper extremity strength and function across the disease spectrum as they tend to focus solely on distal ability. The Kinect by Microsoft is a gaming interface that can gather positional information about an individual's upper extremity movement which can be used to determine functional reaching volume, velocity of movement, and rate of fatigue while playing an engaging video game. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using the Kinect platform to assess upper extremity function in individuals with dystrophinopathy across the spectrum of abilities. Investigators developed a proof-of-concept device, ACTIVE (Abilities Captured Through Interactive Video Evaluation), to measure functional reaching volume, movement velocity, and rate of fatigue. Five subjects with dystrophinopathy and 5 normal controls were tested using ACTIVE during one testing session. A single subject with dystrophinopathy was simultaneously tested with ACTIVE and a marker-based motion analysis system to establish preliminary validity of measurements. ACTIVE proof-of-concept ranked the upper extremity abilities of subjects with dystrophinopathy by Brooke score, and also differentiated them from performance of normal controls for the functional reaching volume and velocity tests. Preliminary test-retest reliability of the ACTIVE for 2 sequential trials was excellent for functional reaching volume (ICC=0.986, pproof-of-concept demonstrates that newly available gaming technology has potential to be used to create a low-cost, widely-accessible and functional upper extremity outcome measure for use with children and adults with dystrophinopathy.

  8. Brachial index does not reflect upper extremity functionality following surgery for vascular trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Simsek

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vascular injuries to the upper extremities requiring surgical repair are common after accidents. However, neither postoperative functionality nor hemodynamic status of the extremity are routinely described. We evaluated the postoperative functional and hemodynamic status of patients with vascular traumas in the upper extremities. METHODS: 26 patients who suffered penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremities from November 2008 to December 2011 were retrospectively evaluated. Data on first approach, surgical technique employed and early postoperative outcomes were recorded. Further data on the post-discharge period, including clinical functional status of the arm, Doppler ultrasonography and brachial-brachial index were also evaluated. RESULTS: Average follow up was 33.5±10.8 months. Right (1.05±0.09 and left (1.04±0.08 brachial indexes were measured during follow up,. Doppler ultrasonography showed arterial occlusion in 4 patients (15%. Near-normal brachial-brachial indexes was observed in all four of these patients with occlusion of one of the upper extremity arteries, even though they exhibited limited arm function for daily work. CONCLUSIONS: Evaluation of the postoperative outcomes of this small series of patients with penetrating vascular traumas in the upper extremity revealed that 15% of them suffered occlusion of one artery of the upper extremity. Artery occlusion did not correlate with brachial-brachial Doppler index, probably due to rich collateral circulation, but occlusion was associated with an extremity that was dysfunctional for the purposes of daily work. The result of the brachial-brachial index does not therefore correlate with functionality.

  9. Systematic review of mirror therapy compared with conventional rehabilitation in upper extremity function in stroke survivors.

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    Pérez-Cruzado, David; Merchán-Baeza, Jose Antonio; González-Sánchez, Manuel; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2017-04-01

    Stroke is a leading cause of disability in developed countries. One of the most widespread techniques in clinical practice is mirror therapy (MT). To determine the effectiveness of MT over other methods of intervention in the recovery of upper limb function in people who have had a stroke. A systematic review was conducted. The search string was established based on the last systematic review about MT that dated from 2009: "upper extremity" OR "upper limb "AND "mirror therapy" AND stroke. For this search Pubmed, Scopus and SciELO databases were used. Fifteen studies were included in the systematic review. Recovery of the upper limb, upper limb function and gross manual dexterity were frequently measured in these studies. In the primary variables in promoting recovery, MT alone showed better results in acute and chronic stroke patients in upper limb functioning than either conventional rehabilitation (CR) or CR plus MT. PROSPERO registration number: CRD42015026869. © 2016 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  10. Upper extremity amputations and prosthetics.

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    Ovadia, Steven A; Askari, Morad

    2015-02-01

    Upper extremity amputations are most frequently indicated by severe traumatic injuries. The location of the injury will determine the level of amputation. Preservation of extremity length is often a goal. The amputation site will have important implications on the functional status of the patient and options for prosthetic reconstruction. Advances in amputation techniques and prosthetic reconstructions promote improved quality of life. In this article, the authors review the principles of upper extremity amputation, including techniques, amputation sites, and prosthetic reconstructions.

  11. Brief Assessment of Motor Function: Content Validity and Reliability of the Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale

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    Cintas, Holly Lea; Parks, Rebecca; Don, Sarah; Gerber, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    Content validity and reliability of the Brief Assessment of Motor Function (BAMF) Upper Extremity Gross Motor Scale (UEGMS) were evaluated in this prospective, descriptive study. The UEGMS is one of five BAMF ordinal scales designed for quick documentation of gross, fine, and oral motor skill levels. Designed to be independent of age and…

  12. A piano training program to improve manual dexterity and upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors.

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    Villeneuve, Myriam; Penhune, Virginia; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2014-01-01

    Music-supported therapy was shown to induce improvements in motor skills in stroke survivors. Whether all stroke individuals respond similarly to the intervention and whether gains can be maintained over time remain unknown. We estimated the immediate and retention effects of a piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. Thirteen stroke participants engaged in a 3-week piano training comprising supervised sessions (9 × 60 min) and home practice. Fine and gross manual dexterity, movement coordination, and functional use of the upper extremity were assessed at baseline, pre-intervention, post-intervention, and at a 3-week follow-up. Significant improvements were observed for all outcomes at post-intervention and follow-up compared to pre-intervention scores. Larger magnitudes of change in manual dexterity and functional use of the upper extremity were associated with higher initial levels of motor recovery. Piano training can result in sustainable improvements in upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors. Individuals with a higher initial level of motor recovery at baseline appear to benefit the most from this intervention.

  13. A piano training program to improve manual dexterity and upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam eVilleneuve

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Music-supported therapy was shown to induce improvements in motor skills in stroke survivors. Whether all stroke individuals respond similarly to the intervention and whether gains can be maintained over time remain unknown. We estimated the immediate and retention effects of a piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. Methods: Thirteen stroke participants engaged in a 3-week piano training comprising of supervised sessions (9 x 60min and home practice. Fine and gross manual dexterity, movement coordination and functional use of the upper extremity were assessed at baseline, pre-intervention, post-intervention and at a 3-week follow-up. Results: Significant improvements were observed for all outcomes at post-intervention and follow-up, compared to pre-intervention scores. Larger magnitudes of change in manual dexterity and functional use of the upper extremity were associated with higher initial levels of motor recovery. Conclusions: Piano training can result in sustainable improvements in upper extremity function in chronic stroke survivors. Individuals with a higher initial level of motor recovery at baseline appear to benefit the most from this intervention.

  14. Upper extremity function and quality of life in patients with breast cancer related lymphedema

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    Bojinović-Rodić Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Upper limb lymphedema is one of the most frequent chronic complications after breast cancer treatment with a significant impact on the upper extremity function and quality of life (QoL. The aim of this study was to estimate health-related quality of life (HRQoL in patients with breast-cancer-related lymphedema and its correlation with upper limb function and the size of edema. Methods. The cross-sectional study included 54 breast-cancer-related lymphedema patients. The quality of life was evaluated by the Short Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36. Upper limb function was assessed by the Quick Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (Quick DASH. The size of lymphedema was determined by the arm circumference. Results. The higher HRQoL score was assessed for mental health (47.0 ± 12.2 than for physical one (42.2 ± 7.5. The highest values of SF-36 were found in the domains of Mental Health (67.7 ± 22.9 and Social Function (70.1 ± 23.1. The lowest scores were registered in the domains of Role Physical (46.9 ± 39.1 and General Health (49.3 ± 20.1. Upper extremity function statistically significantly correlated with the domains Role Physical, Bodily Pain and Physical Composite Summary and also, with the domain Role Emotional (p 0.05. Conclusions. Physical disability in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema influences quality of life more than mental health. Upper limb function has a significant impact on quality of life, not only on the physical, but also on the mental component. The presence of breast-cancer-related lymphedema certainly affects upper limb function and quality of life, but in this study no significant correlation between the size of edema and quality of life was found.

  15. The Influence of Dynamic Orthosis Training on Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: A Pilot Study

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    Rodrigo Cappato de Araújo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to assess the use of a dynamic orthosis on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients. A case series approach was utilized, with provision of a training program (3x/week, 50 minutes/session for 8 weeks and employment of a dynamic orthosis. Six volunteers with persistent hemiparesis due to a single, unilateral stroke performed task-oriented movements with the aid of a dynamic orthosis. Tests were administered before and after training. Functional capacity was assessed using the TEMPA (Test d'Évaluation des Membres Supérieurs de Personnes Âgées test. The Wilcoxon test was used for pre-training and post-training comparisons of TEMPA scores. The volunteers showed significant improvement of upper extremity function in the performance of a bilateral task (p = 0.01 and three unilateral tasks (p = 0.04. This pilot study suggests that the dynamic orthosis associated with the performance of functional tasks can have positive outcomes regarding the improvement of functional capacity of upper extremity.

  16. Playing piano can improve upper extremity function after stroke: case studies.

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    Villeneuve, Myriam; Lamontagne, Anouk

    2013-01-01

    Music-supported therapy (MST) is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3), prior to (week6) and after the intervention (week9), and at 3-week follow-up (week12). Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test) and gross (box and block test) manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test). Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke.

  17. Playing Piano Can Improve Upper Extremity Function after Stroke: Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam Villeneuve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Music-supported therapy (MST is an innovative approach that was shown to improve manual dexterity in acute stroke survivors. The feasibility of such intervention in chronic stroke survivors and its longer-term benefits, however, remain unknown. The objective of this pilot study was to estimate the short- and long-term effects of a 3-week piano training program on upper extremity function in persons with chronic stroke. A multiple pre-post sequential design was used, with measurements taken at baseline (week0, week3, prior to (week6 and after the intervention (week9, and at 3-week follow-up (week12. Three persons with stroke participated in the 3-week piano training program that combined structured piano lessons to home practice program. The songs, played on an electronic keyboard, involved all 5 digits of the affected hand and were displayed using a user-friendly MIDI program. After intervention, all the three participants showed improvements in their fine (nine hole peg test and gross (box and block test manual dexterity, as well as in the functional use of the upper extremity (Jebsen hand function test. Improvements were maintained at follow-up. These preliminary results support the feasibility of using an MST approach that combines structured lessons to home practice to improve upper extremity function in chronic stroke.

  18. Quantitative assessment based on kinematic measures of functional impairments during upper extremity movements: A review.

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    de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Dimbwadyo-Terrer, Iris; Trincado-Alonso, Fernando; Monasterio-Huelin, Félix; Torricelli, Diego; Gil-Agudo, Angel

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative measures of human movement quality are important for discriminating healthy and pathological conditions and for expressing the outcomes and clinically important changes in subjects' functional state. However the most frequently used instruments for the upper extremity functional assessment are clinical scales, that previously have been standardized and validated, but have a high subjective component depending on the observer who scores the test. But they are not enough to assess motor strategies used during movements, and their use in combination with other more objective measures is necessary. The objective of the present review is to provide an overview on objective metrics found in literature with the aim of quantifying the upper extremity performance during functional tasks, regardless of the equipment or system used for registering kinematic data. A search in Medline, Google Scholar and IEEE Xplore databases was performed following a combination of a series of keywords. The full scientific papers that fulfilled the inclusion criteria were included in the review. A set of kinematic metrics was found in literature in relation to joint displacements, analysis of hand trajectories and velocity profiles. These metrics were classified into different categories according to the movement characteristic that was being measured. These kinematic metrics provide the starting point for a proposed objective metrics for the functional assessment of the upper extremity in people with movement disorders as a consequence of neurological injuries. Potential areas of future and further research are presented in the Discussion section. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Gurbuz, Nigar; Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Ayaş, Sehri; Cosar, Sacide Nur Saracgil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with a conventional rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a mirror (n=16) or conventional group (n=15). The patients in both groups underwent conventional therapy for 4 weeks (60–120 minutes/day, 5 days/week). The mirror group received mirror therapy,...

  20. Effect of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Nigar; Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Ayaş, Sehri; Cosar, Sacide Nur Saracgil

    2016-09-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with a conventional rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a mirror (n=16) or conventional group (n=15). The patients in both groups underwent conventional therapy for 4 weeks (60-120 minutes/day, 5 days/week). The mirror group received mirror therapy, consisting of periodic flexion and extension movements of the wrist and fingers on the non-paralyzed side. The patients in the conventional group performed the same exercises against the non-reflecting face of the mirror. The patients were evaluated at the beginning and end of the treatment by a blinded assessor using the Brunnstrom stage, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) upper extremity score, and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) self-care score. [Results] There was an improvement in Brunnstrom stage and the FIM self-care score in both groups, but the post-treatment FMA score was significantly higher in the mirror therapy group than in the conventional treatment group. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy in addition to a conventional rehabilitation program was found to provide additional benefit in motor recovery of the upper extremity in stroke patients.

  1. Effect of mirror therapy on upper extremity motor function in stroke patients: a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbuz, Nigar; Afsar, Sevgi Ikbali; Ayaş, Sehri; Cosar, Sacide Nur Saracgil

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of mirror therapy combined with a conventional rehabilitation program on upper extremity motor and functional recovery in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-one hemiplegic patients were included. The patients were randomly assigned to a mirror (n=16) or conventional group (n=15). The patients in both groups underwent conventional therapy for 4 weeks (60–120 minutes/day, 5 days/week). The mirror group received mirror therapy, consisting of periodic flexion and extension movements of the wrist and fingers on the non-paralyzed side. The patients in the conventional group performed the same exercises against the non-reflecting face of the mirror. The patients were evaluated at the beginning and end of the treatment by a blinded assessor using the Brunnstrom stage, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) upper extremity score, and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) self-care score. [Results] There was an improvement in Brunnstrom stage and the FIM self-care score in both groups, but the post-treatment FMA score was significantly higher in the mirror therapy group than in the conventional treatment group. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy in addition to a conventional rehabilitation program was found to provide additional benefit in motor recovery of the upper extremity in stroke patients. PMID:27799679

  2. Content Range and Precision of a Computer Adaptive Test of Upper Extremity Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Montpetit, Kathleen; Haley, Stephen; Bilodeau, Nathalie; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Gorton, George, III; Mulcahey, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the content range and measurement precision of an upper extremity (UE) computer adaptive testing (CAT) platform of physical function in children with cerebral palsy. Upper extremity items representing skills of all abilities were administered to 305 parents. These responses were compared with two traditional standardized…

  3. Content Range and Precision of a Computer Adaptive Test of Upper Extremity Function for Children with Cerebral Palsy

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    Montpetit, Kathleen; Haley, Stephen; Bilodeau, Nathalie; Ni, Pengsheng; Tian, Feng; Gorton, George, III; Mulcahey, M. J.

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on the content range and measurement precision of an upper extremity (UE) computer adaptive testing (CAT) platform of physical function in children with cerebral palsy. Upper extremity items representing skills of all abilities were administered to 305 parents. These responses were compared with two traditional standardized…

  4. Systematic review of the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezendam, Daniëlle; Bongers, Raoul M; Jannink, Michiel J A

    2009-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the current state of research regarding the effectiveness of mirror therapy in upper extremity function. A systematic literature search was performed to identify studies concerning mirror therapy in upper extremity. The included journal articles were reviewed according to a structured diagram and the methodological quality was assessed. Fifteen studies were identified and reviewed. Five different patient categories were studied: two studies focussed on mirror therapy after an amputation of the upper limb, five studies focussed on mirror therapy after stroke, five studies focussed on mirror therapy with complex regional pain syndrome type 1 (CRPS1) patients, one study on mirror therapy with complex regional pain syndrome type 2 (CRPS2) and two studies focussed on mirror therapy after hand surgery other than amputation. Most of the evidence for mirror therapy is from studies with weak methodological quality. The present review showed a trend that mirror therapy is effective in upper limb treatment of stroke patients and patients with CRPS, whereas the effectiveness in other patient groups has yet to be determined.

  5. Variables associated with upper extremity function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

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    Janssen, Mariska M H P; Hendriks, Jan C M; Geurts, Alexander C H; de Groot, Imelda J M

    2016-09-01

    Preserving upper extremity (UE) function in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is extremely important as it is related to independence and quality of life. For clinical decision making, knowledge of variables associated with UE function is necessary. This knowledge is, however, limited. Therefore, this study aims to gain more insight into the variables associated with UE function in DMD. Data from an international web-based questionnaire on UE function, obtained from 213 DMD patients, were used. Six dependent variables regarding UE function were used in multivariable linear regression analyses. In addition, 26 independent variables regarding patient characteristics, medication, therapy, supportive aids, pain, stiffness and participation were used. Twelve independent variables showed a significant relation to UE function. Variables with a negative relation to UE function were: later disease stage, occurrence of scoliosis, higher age, use of UE splints, more frequent stiffness complaints, more limitations due to stiffness, more frequent elbow pain, and having physical therapy. A positive relation with UE function was seen for going to school or work, use of corticosteroids, higher BMI, and higher age at diagnosis. These variables explained 56-81 % of the variation of the different measures of UE function. Knowledge of variables associated with UE function is very important in the clinical management of DMD patients. The results of this study suggest that corticosteroid use and participation in school and work related activities are positively related to UE function in DMD patients, as well as reducing pain and stiffness and preventing scoliosis.

  6. Concurrent neuromechanical and functional gains following upper-extremity power training post-stroke

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    Patten Carolynn

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repetitive task practice is argued to drive neural plasticity following stroke. However, current evidence reveals that hemiparetic weakness impairs the capacity to perform, and practice, movements appropriately. Here we investigated how power training (i.e., high-intensity, dynamic resistance training affects recovery of upper-extremity motor function post-stroke. We hypothesized that power training, as a component of upper-extremity rehabilitation, would promote greater functional gains than functional task practice without deleterious consequences. Method Nineteen chronic hemiparetic individuals were studied using a crossover design. All participants received both functional task practice (FTP and HYBRID (combined FTP and power training in random order. Blinded evaluations performed at baseline, following each intervention block and 6-months post-intervention included: Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT-FAS, Primary Outcome, upper-extremity Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment, Ashworth Scale, and Functional Independence Measure. Neuromechanical function was evaluated using isometric and dynamic joint torques and concurrent agonist EMG. Biceps stretch reflex responses were evaluated using passive elbow stretches ranging from 60 to 180º/s and determining: EMG onset position threshold, burst duration, burst intensity and passive torque at each speed. Results Primary outcome: Improvements in WMFT-FAS were significantly greater following HYBRID vs. FTP (p = .049, regardless of treatment order. These functional improvements were retained 6-months post-intervention (p = .03. Secondary outcomes: A greater proportion of participants achieved minimally important differences (MID following HYBRID vs. FTP (p = .03. MIDs were retained 6-months post-intervention. Ashworth scores were unchanged (p > .05. Increased maximal isometric joint torque, agonist EMG and peak power were significantly greater following HYBRID vs. FTP (p p

  7. Investigation of the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients using the manual function test

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hwanhee; Shim, Jemyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 14 hemiplegia patients (8 males, 6 females; 9 infarction, 5 hemorrhage; 8 right hemiplegia, 6 left hemiplegia) who voluntarily consented to participate in the study. [Methods] The Korean version of the manual function test (MFT) was used in this study. The test was performed in the following order: arm movement (4 ...

  8. Nerve Transfers to Restore Upper Extremity Function in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: Update and Preliminary Outcomes.

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    Fox, Ida K; Davidge, Kristen M; Novak, Christine B; Hoben, Gwendolyn; Kahn, Lorna C; Juknis, Neringa; Ruvinskaya, Rimma; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury can result in profound loss of upper extremity function. Recent interest in the use of nerve transfers to restore volitional control is an exciting development in the care of these complex patients. In this article, the authors review preliminary results of nerve transfers in spinal cord injury. Review of the literature and the authors' cases series of 13 operations in nine spinal cord injury nerve transfer recipients was performed. Representative cases were reviewed to explore critical concepts and preliminary outcomes. The nerve transfers used expendable donors (e.g., teres minor, deltoid, supinator, and brachialis) innervated above the level of the spinal cord injury to restore volitional control of missing function such as elbow extension, wrist extension, and/or hand function (posterior interosseous nerve or anterior interosseous nerve/finger flexors reinnervated). Results from the literature and the authors' patients (after a mean postsurgical follow-up of 12 months) indicate gains in function as assessed by both manual muscle testing and patients' self-reported outcomes measures. Nerve transfers can provide an alternative and consistent means of reestablishing volitional control of upper extremity function in people with cervical level spinal cord injury. Early outcomes provide evidence of substantial improvements in self-reported function despite relatively subtle objective gains in isolated muscle strength. Further work to investigate the optimal timing and combination of nerve transfer operations, the combination of these with traditional treatments (tendon transfer and functional electrical stimulation), and measurement of outcomes is imperative for determining the precise role of these operations. Therapeutic, IV.

  9. Proposition of a protocol to evaluate upper-extremity functional deficits and compensation mechanisms: application to elbow contracture.

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    Fradet, Laetitia; Liefhold, Beate; Rettig, Oliver; Bruckner, Thomas; Akbar, Michael; Wolf, Sebastian I

    2015-03-01

    Instrumented gait analysis is widely accepted as an objective assessment of lower-extremity function. Conversely, upper-extremity function suffers from lack of objective evaluation. The present paper aims at proposing a protocol to be used to clinically and objectively evaluate upper-extremity function whatever the pathological joint. Secondly, it aims at better understanding the consequences on upper-extremity function and the compensation mechanisms induced by elbow contracture. Elbow contracture was simulated in this study by using a brace. Twelve healthy subjects followed an instrumented 3D movement analysis while performing 11 daily life movements. The movements were performed with 3 different elbow contracture conditions, simulated by wearing an adjustable elbow brace. The proposed protocol was successful in creating a wide range of motion at all the upper-extremity joints. The activity-related range of motion and the mean range of motion computed on the whole set of daily life movements were effective in evaluating the severity of elbow contracture. The lack of elbow flexion was compensated by trunk flexion, hand flexion and radial deviation, and combined movement of shoulder flexion, abduction, and humeral internal rotation. Deficit in elbow extension was mainly compensated by the use of trunk flexion. A protocol could be proposed for the objective evaluation of upper-extremity function. Its application to elbow contracture suggests that loss of elbow flexion affects more movements than loss of elbow extension.

  10. Assessment of upper extremity function in multiple sclerosis: review and opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, George H; Amtmann, Dagmar; Bennett, Susan E; Finlayson, Marcia; Sutliff, Matthew H; Tullman, Mark; Sidovar, Matthew; Rabinowicz, Adrian L

    2014-09-01

    Upper extremity (UE) dysfunction may be present in up to ~80% of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS), although its importance may be under-recognized relative to walking impairment, which is the hallmark symptom of MS. Upper extremity dysfunction affects independence and can impact the ability to use walking aids. Under-recognition of UE dysfunction may result in part from limited availability of performance-based and patient self-report measures that are validated for use in MS and that can be readily incorporated into clinical practice for screening and regularly scheduled assessments. In addition to the 9-Hole Peg Test, which is part of the Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite, there are several performance-based measures that are generally used in the rehabilitation setting. These measures include the Box and Block Test, the Action Research Arm Test, the Test d'Evaluation de la performance des Membres Supérieurs des Personnes Agées, and the Jebsen-Taylor Test of Hand Function. Several of these measures were developed for use in stroke, although in contrast to stroke, which is characterized by unilateral dysfunction, UE impairment in MS is generally bilateral, and should be assessed as such. Similarly, patient-reported UE measures are available, including Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) and its shorter version, QuickDASH, the Manual Ability Measure, and ABILHAND, although none has been psychometrically validated for MS. Recently, item response theory was used to develop a Neuro-QOL (Quality of Life) UE measure and a Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System UE measure; neither of these have demonstrated sensitivity to change, limiting their use for longitudinal assessment. Consequently, although work is still needed to develop and validate performance-based and patient-reported measures of UE function that are suitable for use in daily MS clinical practice, currently available UE measures can be recommended for

  11. Upper extremity limb loss: functional restoration from prosthesis and targeted reinnervation to transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Brian T; Prigge, Pat; Peterson, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    For several decades, prosthetic use was the only option to restore function after upper extremity amputation. Recent years have seen advances in the field of prosthetics. Such advances include prosthetic design and function, activity-specific devices, improved aesthetics, and adjunctive surgical procedures to improve both form and function. Targeted reinnervation is one exciting advance that allows for more facile and more intuitive function with prosthetics following proximal amputation. Another remarkable advance that holds great promise in nearly all fields of medicine is the transplantation of composite tissue, such as hand and face transplantation. Hand transplantation holds promise as the ultimate restorative procedure that can provide form, function, and sensation. However, this procedure still comes with a substantial cost in terms of the rehabilitation and toxic immunosuppression and should be limited to carefully selected patients who have failed prosthetic reconstruction. Hand transplantation and prosthetic reconstruction should not be viewed as competing options. Rather, they are two treatment options with different risk/benefit profiles and different indications and, hence vastly different implications.

  12. Technology improves upper extremity rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczewski, Jan; Prochazka, Arthur

    2011-01-01

    Stroke survivors with hemiparesis and spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors with tetraplegia find it difficult or impossible to perform many activities of daily life. There is growing evidence that intensive exercise therapy, especially when supplemented with functional electrical stimulation (FES), can improve upper extremity function, but delivering the treatment can be costly, particularly after recipients leave rehabilitation facilities. Recently, there has been a growing level of interest among researchers and healthcare policymakers to deliver upper extremity treatments to people in their homes using in-home teletherapy (IHT). The few studies that have been carried out so far have encountered a variety of logistical and technical problems, not least the difficulty of conducting properly controlled and blinded protocols that satisfy the requirements of high-level evidence-based research. In most cases, the equipment and communications technology were not designed for individuals with upper extremity disability. It is clear that exercise therapy combined with interventions such as FES, supervised over the Internet, will soon be adopted worldwide in one form or another. Therefore it is timely that researchers, clinicians, and healthcare planners interested in assessing IHT be aware of the pros and cons of the new technology and the factors involved in designing appropriate studies of it. It is crucial to understand the technical barriers, the role of telesupervisors, the motor improvements that participants can reasonably expect and the process of optimizing IHT-exercise therapy protocols to maximize the benefits of the emerging technology.

  13. Assessing upper extremity motor function in practice of virtual activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard J; Lichter, Matthew D; Krepkovich, Eileen T; Ellington, Allison; White, Marga; Diamond, Paul T

    2015-03-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the criterion validity of measures of upper extremity (UE) motor function derived during practice of virtual activities of daily living (ADLs). Fourteen hemiparetic stroke patients employed a Virtual Occupational Therapy Assistant (VOTA), consisting of a high-fidelity virtual world and a Kinect™ sensor, in four sessions of approximately one hour in duration. An unscented Kalman Filter-based human motion tracking algorithm estimated UE joint kinematics in real-time during performance of virtual ADL activities, enabling both animation of the user's avatar and automated generation of metrics related to speed and smoothness of motion. These metrics, aggregated over discrete sub-task elements during performance of virtual ADLs, were compared to scores from an established assessment of UE motor performance, the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Spearman's rank correlation analysis indicates a moderate correlation between VOTA-derived metrics and the time-based WMFT assessments, supporting the criterion validity of VOTA measures as a means of tracking patient progress during an UE rehabilitation program that includes practice of virtual ADLs.

  14. Eclectic/mixed model method for upper extremity functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Vijaya; Joshua, Abraham M; Kedambadi, Rakshith; Mithra, P Prasanna

    2017-01-01

    Eclectic treatment method is a flexible approach that uses techniques drawn from various schools of thought involving several treatment methods and allows the therapist to adapt to each client's individual needs. Wider application for eclectic approach is however limited in stroke rehabilitation. The objective is to find out whether eclectic approach improves upper extremity (UE) functional recovery in acute stroke rehabilitation. Twenty-five postacute unilateral supratentorial stroke subjects recruited from tertiary care hospitals recovered with Stage 2-5 in Brunnstorm stage of UE motor recovery (BRS-UE) underwent 45 min of eclectic approach for UE every day involving seven different treatment methods (5 min for each method) for 6 days consecutively. The outcome was UE subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Motor test (UE-FM), UE subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (UE-STREAM), Wolf Motor Function test (WMFT-FAS), and Stroke Impact Scale-16 (SIS-16) was collected at the end of the sixth session. All the participants showed significant improvement in all the outcome measures. The Stage 2 and 3 subjects showed UE-STREAM (P = 0.007) WMFT-FAS (P rehabilitation when the stroke occurs.

  15. Effects of functional electrical therapy on upper extremity functional motor recovery in patients after stroke: Our experience and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plavšić Aleksandra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. New neurorehabilitation together with conventional techniques provide methods and technologies for maximizing what is preserved from the sensory motor system after cerebrovascular insult. The rehabilitation technique named functional electrical therapy was investigated in more than 60 patients in acute, subacute and chronic phase after cerebrovascular insult. The functional sensory information generated by functional electrical therapy was hypothesized to result in the intensive functional brain training of the activities performed. Functional Electrical Therapy. Functional electrical therapy is a combination of functional exercise and electrical therapy. The functional electrical therapy protocol comprises voluntary movement of the paretic arm in synchrony with the electrically assisted hand functions in order to perform typical daily activities. The daily treatment of 30 minutes lasts three weeks. The outcome measures include several tests for the evaluation of arm/hand functionality: upper extremity function test, drawing test, modified Aschworth scale, motor activity log and passive range of movement. Results of Functional Electrical Therapy Studies. Results from our several clinical studies showed that functional electrical therapy, if applied in acute and subacute stroke patients, leads to faster and greater improvement of functioning of the hemiplegic arm/hand compared to the control group. The outcomes were significantly superior at all times after the treatment for the higher functioning group. Discussion. Additional well-planned clinical studies are needed to determine the adequate dose of treatment (timing, duration, intensity with functional electrical therapy regarding the patient’s status. A combination with other techniques should be further investigated.

  16. The effect of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Young; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; Kim, Hee-Jung

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of mirror therapy on upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen subjects were each assigned to a mirror therapy group and a sham therapy group. The Fugl-Meyer Motor Function Assessment and the Box and Block Test were performed to compare paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities. The functional independence measurement was conducted to compare abilities to perform activities of daily living. [Results] Paretic upper-extremity function and hand coordination abilities were significantly different between the mirror therapy and sham therapy groups. Intervention in the mirror therapy group was more effective than in the sham therapy group for improving the ability to perform activities of daily living. Self-care showed statistically significant differences between the two groups. [Conclusion] Mirror therapy is effective in improving paretic upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in chronic stroke patients.

  17. Simple and Task-oriented Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Rim Paik; Su-Kyoung Kim; Jae-Shin Lee; Byoung-Jin Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Objective/Background: To compare the effects of simple and task-oriented mirror therapies on upper extremity function in stroke patients with hemiplegia. Methods: A single-subject, reversal (applied behaviour analysis) research design was used, and the study included four patients and two treatments. Treatment 1 involved simple mirror therapy that was performed using simple upper limb movements. Treatment 2 involved task-oriented mirror therapy that required each patient to perform functio...

  18. Simple and Task-oriented Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Rim Paik; Su-Kyoung Kim; Jae-Shin Lee; Byoung-Jin Jeon

    2014-01-01

    Objective/Background: To compare the effects of simple and task-oriented mirror therapies on upper extremity function in stroke patients with hemiplegia. Methods: A single-subject, reversal (applied behaviour analysis) research design was used, and the study included four patients and two treatments. Treatment 1 involved simple mirror therapy that was performed using simple upper limb movements. Treatment 2 involved task-oriented mirror therapy that required each patient to perform functio...

  19. The effects of very early mirror therapy on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeldan, Ipek; Huseyınsınoglu, Burcu Ersoz; Akıncı, Buket; Tarakcı, Ela; Baybas, Sevim; Ozdıncler, Arzu Razak

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of a very early mirror therapy program on functional improvement of the upper extremity in acute stroke patients. [Subjects] Eight stroke patients who were treated in an acute neurology unit were included in the study. [Methods] The patients were assigned alternatively to either the mirror therapy group receiving mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment or the neurodevelopmental treatment only group. The primary outcome measures were the upper extremity motor subscale of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Motricity Index upper extremity score, and the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale. Somatosensory assessment with the Ayres Southern California Sensory Integration Test, and the Barthel Index were used as secondary outcome measures. [Results] No statistically significant improvements were found for any measures in either group after the treatment. In terms of minimally clinically important differences, there were improvements in Fugl-Meyer Assessment and Barthel Index in both mirror therapy and neurodevelopmental treatment groups. [Conclusion] The results of this pilot study revealed that very early mirror therapy has no additional effect on functional improvement of upper extremity function in acute stroke patients. Multicenter trials are needed to determine the results of early application of mirror therapy in stroke rehabilitation.

  20. The effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Youngju; Chang, Moonyoung; Kim, Kyeong-Mi; An, Duk-Hyun

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of mirror therapy with tasks on upper extremity unction and self-care in stroke patients. [Subjects] Thirty participants were randomly assigned to either an experimental group (n=15) or a control group (n=15). [Methods] Subjects in the experimental group received mirror therapy with tasks, and those in the control group received a sham therapy; both therapies were administered, five times per week for six weeks. The main outcome measures were the Manual Function Test for the paralyzed upper limb and the Functional Independence Measure for self-care performance. [Results] The experimental group had more significant gains in change scores compared with the control group after the intervention. [Conclusion] We consider mirror therapy with tasks to be an effective form of intervention for upper extremity function and self-care in stroke patients.

  1. Acute Bouts of Assisted Cycling Improves Cognitive and Upper Extremity Movement Functions in Adolescents with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringenbach, Shannon D. R; Albert, Andrew R.; Chen, Chih-Chia; Alberts, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effectiveness of 2 modes of exercise on cognitive and upper extremity movement functioning in adolescents with Down syndrome (DS). Nine participants randomly completed 3 interventions over 3 consecutive weeks. The interventions were: (a) voluntary cycling (VC), in which participants cycled at their…

  2. [Upper extremity arterial diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, F

    2007-02-01

    Compared to lower limb arterial diseases, upper limb arterial diseases look rare, heterogeneous with various etiologies and a rather vague clinical picture, but with a negligible risk of amputation. Almost all types of arterial diseases can be present in the upper limb, but the anatomical and hemodynamic conditions particular to the upper limb often confuse the issue. Thus, atherosclerosis affects mainly the subclavian artery in its proximal segment where the potential of collateral pathway is high making the symptomatic forms not very frequent whereas the prevalence of subclavian artery stenosis or occlusion is relatively high. The clinical examination and the etiologies are discussed according to the clinical, anatomical and hemodynamic context.

  3. Sleep Disturbance and Upper-Extremity Disability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinne Peters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although upper-extremity disability correlates with psychosocial aspects of illness the association with sleep disturbance in upper extremity disability is less certain. To evaluate whether sleep disturbance is associated with upper-extremity disability among patients with upper extremity illness, accounting for sociodemographic, condition-related, and psychosocial factors. Methods: A cohort of 111 new or follow-up patients presenting to an urban academic hospital-based hand surgeon completed a sociodemographic survey and measures of sleep disturbance (PROMIS Sleep Disturbance, disability (PROMIS Upper-Extremity Physical Function, ineffective coping strategies (PROMIS Pain Interference, and depression (PROMIS Depression. Bivariate and multivariable linear regression modeling were performed. Results: Sleep disturbance correlated with disability (r=-0.38; P

  4. Functional Latissimus Dorsi Transfer for Upper-Extremity Reconstruction: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therattil, Paul J.; Russo, Gerardo; Lee, Edward S.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The latissimus dorsi flap is a workhorse for plastic surgeons, being used for many years for soft-tissue coverage of the upper extremity as well as for functional reconstruction to restore motion to the elbow and shoulder. The authors present a case of functional latissimus dorsi transfer for restoration of elbow flexion and review the literature on technique and outcomes. Methods: A literature review was performed using MEDLINE and the Cochrane Collaboration Library for primary research articles on functional latissimus dorsi flap transfer. Data related to surgical techniques and outcomes were extracted. Results: The literature search yielded 13 relevant studies, with a total of 52 patients who received pedicled, functional latissimus dorsi flaps for upper-extremity reconstruction. The most common etiology requiring reconstruction was closed brachial plexus injury (n = 13). After flap transfer, 98% of patients were able to flex the elbow against gravity and 82.3% were able to flex against resistance. In the presented case, a 77-year-old man underwent resection of myxofibrosarcoma of the upper arm with elbow prosthesis placement and functional latissimus dorsi transfer. The patient was able to actively flex against gravity at 3-month follow-up. Conclusions: A review of the literature shows that nearly all patients undergoing functional latissimus dorsi transfer for upper-extremity reconstruction regain at least motion against gravity whereas a large proportion regain motion against resistance. Considerations when planning for functional latissimus dorsi transfer include patient positioning, appropriate tensioning of the muscle, safe inset, polarity, management of other affected upper-extremity joints, and educating patients on the expected outcomes. PMID:28293330

  5. Effects of kinesiology taping on the upper-extremity function and activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Beom; Kim, Young-Dong

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] This study determined the effects of kinesiology taping on the upper-extremity function and activities of daily living of patients with hemiplegia. [Subjects] The experimental group and control group comprised 15 hemiplegia patients each. [Methods] This study was performed from June 4 to December 22, 2012, involving 30 hemiplegia patients. The experimental and controls groups performed task practices for 30 minutes, 3 times per week for 28 weeks with and without taping, respectively. [Results] After treatment, there were significant differences in every outcome measures within each group except for the Brunnstrom recovery stage of the hand. However, there was a significant difference in functional independence movements between the groups. [Conclusion] Task practice has the same effectiveness regardless of the taping of the upper extremities. Nevertheless, taping is helpful for improving both the functions and activities of daily living in patients with hemiplegia.

  6. Effects of interactive metronome training on postural stability and upper extremity function in Parkinson’s disease: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Arim; Lee, Hye-Sun; Song, Chiang-Soon

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of interactive metronome training on the postural stability and upper extremity function of an individual with Parkinson’s disease. [Subject and Methods] The participant of this case study was a 75-year-old female with Parkinson’s disease diagnosed 7 years prior. This study was a single-subject research with an A-B-A design. She received IM training during the treatment phase (B phase) for 40 minutes per session. She was assessed pretest and posttest using the Berg balance scale and Wolf motor function test, and at baseline and the treatment phase using the measured box-and-block test and a Tetrax system. [Results] After training, the patient’s static and dynamic balance, functional activity, and performance time of the upper extremity improved. Interactive metronome therapy improved the manual dexterity of both hands. Interactive metronome therapy also improved the limit of stability of the Parkinson’s disease. [Conclusion] Though a case study, the results of this study suggest that IM therapy is effective at restoring the postural stability and upper extremity function of patients with Parkinson’s disease. PMID:28210066

  7. Upper Extremity Functional Evaluation by Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scoring Using Depth-Sensing Camera in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won-Seok; Cho, Sungmin; Baek, Dongyoub; Bang, Hyunwoo; Paik, Nam-Jong

    2016-01-01

    Virtual home-based rehabilitation is an emerging area in stroke rehabilitation. Functional assessment tools are essential to monitor recovery and provide current function-based rehabilitation. We developed the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) tool using Kinect (Microsoft, USA) and validated it for hemiplegic stroke patients. Forty-one patients with hemiplegic stroke were enrolled. Thirteen of 33 items were selected for upper extremity motor FMA. One occupational therapist assessed the motor FMA while recording upper extremity motion with Kinect. FMA score was calculated using principal component analysis and artificial neural network learning from the saved motion data. The degree of jerky motion was also transformed to jerky scores. Prediction accuracy for each of the 13 items and correlations between real FMA scores and scores using Kinect were analyzed. Prediction accuracies ranged from 65% to 87% in each item and exceeded 70% for 9 items. Correlations were high for the summed score for the 13 items between real FMA scores and scores obtained using Kinect (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.873, Phemiplegic side (1.81 ± 0.76) compared to non-hemiplegic side (1.21 ± 0.43) and showed significant negative correlations with Brunnstrom stage (3 to 6; Spearman correlation coefficient = -0.387, P = 0.046). FMA using Kinect is a valid way to assess upper extremity function and can provide additional results for movement quality in stroke patients. This may be useful in the setting of unsupervised home-based rehabilitation.

  8. Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation Therapy: A New Strategy for Improving Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Hemiparesis following Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Fujiwara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation (HANDS therapy is one of the neurorehabilitation therapeutic approaches that facilitates the use of the paretic upper extremity (UE in daily life by combining closed-loop electromyography- (EMG- controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES with a wrist-hand splint. This closed-loop EMG-controlled NMES can change its stimulation intensity in direct proportion to the changes in voluntary generated EMG amplitudes recorded with surface electrodes placed on the target muscle. The stimulation was applied to the paretic finger extensors. Patients wore a wrist-hand splint and carried a portable stimulator in an arm holder for 8 hours during the daytime. The system was active for 8 hours, and patients were instructed to use their paretic hand as much as possible. HANDS therapy was conducted for 3 weeks. The patients were also instructed to practice bimanual activities in their daily lives. Paretic upper extremity motor function improved after 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. Functional improvement of upper extremity motor function and spasticity with HANDS therapy is based on the disinhibition of the affected hemisphere and modulation of reciprocal inhibition. HANDS therapy may offer a promising option for the management of the paretic UE in patients with stroke.

  9. Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation Therapy: A New Strategy for Improving Upper Extremity Function in Patients with Hemiparesis following Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honaga, Kaoru; Tochikura, Michi; Abe, Kaoru

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid Assistive Neuromuscular Dynamic Stimulation (HANDS) therapy is one of the neurorehabilitation therapeutic approaches that facilitates the use of the paretic upper extremity (UE) in daily life by combining closed-loop electromyography- (EMG-) controlled neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) with a wrist-hand splint. This closed-loop EMG-controlled NMES can change its stimulation intensity in direct proportion to the changes in voluntary generated EMG amplitudes recorded with surface electrodes placed on the target muscle. The stimulation was applied to the paretic finger extensors. Patients wore a wrist-hand splint and carried a portable stimulator in an arm holder for 8 hours during the daytime. The system was active for 8 hours, and patients were instructed to use their paretic hand as much as possible. HANDS therapy was conducted for 3 weeks. The patients were also instructed to practice bimanual activities in their daily lives. Paretic upper extremity motor function improved after 3 weeks of HANDS therapy. Functional improvement of upper extremity motor function and spasticity with HANDS therapy is based on the disinhibition of the affected hemisphere and modulation of reciprocal inhibition. HANDS therapy may offer a promising option for the management of the paretic UE in patients with stroke. PMID:28191352

  10. Investigation of the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients using the manual function test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hwanhee; Shim, Jemyung

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy on the upper extremity functions of stroke patients. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 14 hemiplegia patients (8 males, 6 females; 9 infarction, 5 hemorrhage; 8 right hemiplegia, 6 left hemiplegia) who voluntarily consented to participate in the study. [Methods] The Korean version of the manual function test (MFT) was used in this study. The test was performed in the following order: arm movement (4 items), grasp and pinch (2 items), and manipulation (2 items). The experiment was conducted with the subjects sitting in a chair. The mirror was vertically placed in the sagittal plane on the desk. The paretic hand was placed behind the mirror, and the non-paretic hand was placed in front of the mirror so that it was reflected in the mirror. In this position, the subjects completed activities repetitively according to the mirror therapy program over the course of four weeks. [Results] There were significant increases in the grasp-and-pinch score and manipulation score. [Conclusion] In conclusion, the grasp-and-pinch and manipulation functions were improved through mirror therapy.

  11. Upper Extremity Functional Evaluation by Fugl-Meyer Assessment Scoring Using Depth-Sensing Camera in Hemiplegic Stroke Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Seok Kim

    Full Text Available Virtual home-based rehabilitation is an emerging area in stroke rehabilitation. Functional assessment tools are essential to monitor recovery and provide current function-based rehabilitation. We developed the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA tool using Kinect (Microsoft, USA and validated it for hemiplegic stroke patients. Forty-one patients with hemiplegic stroke were enrolled. Thirteen of 33 items were selected for upper extremity motor FMA. One occupational therapist assessed the motor FMA while recording upper extremity motion with Kinect. FMA score was calculated using principal component analysis and artificial neural network learning from the saved motion data. The degree of jerky motion was also transformed to jerky scores. Prediction accuracy for each of the 13 items and correlations between real FMA scores and scores using Kinect were analyzed. Prediction accuracies ranged from 65% to 87% in each item and exceeded 70% for 9 items. Correlations were high for the summed score for the 13 items between real FMA scores and scores obtained using Kinect (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.873, P<0.0001 and those between total upper extremity scores (66 in full score and scores using Kinect (26 in full score (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.799, P<0.0001. Log transformed jerky scores were significantly higher in the hemiplegic side (1.81 ± 0.76 compared to non-hemiplegic side (1.21 ± 0.43 and showed significant negative correlations with Brunnstrom stage (3 to 6; Spearman correlation coefficient = -0.387, P = 0.046. FMA using Kinect is a valid way to assess upper extremity function and can provide additional results for movement quality in stroke patients. This may be useful in the setting of unsupervised home-based rehabilitation.

  12. Uncommon upper extremity compression neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Elisa J; Calfee, Ryan P

    2013-08-01

    Hand surgeons routinely treat carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes, which are the most common upper extremity nerve compression syndromes. However, more infrequent nerve compression syndromes of the upper extremity may be encountered. Because they are unusual, the diagnosis of these nerve compression syndromes is often missed or delayed. This article reviews the causes, proposed treatments, and surgical outcomes for syndromes involving compression of the posterior interosseous nerve, the superficial branch of the radial nerve, the ulnar nerve at the wrist, and the median nerve proximal to the wrist. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Motor relearning program and Bobath method improve motor function of the upper extremities in patients with stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinjing Liu; Fengsheng Li; Guihua Liu

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In the natural evolution of cerebrovascular disease, unconscious use of affected extremity during drug treatment and daily life can improve the function of affected upper extremity partially, but it is very slow and alsc accompanied by the formation of abnormal mode. Therefore, functional training should be emphasized in recovering the motor function of extremity.OBJECTIVE: To observe the effects of combination of motor relearning program and Bobath method on motor function of upper extremity of patients with stroke.DESIGN: Comparison of therapeutic effects taking stroke patients as observation subjects.SETTING: Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Jingmei Group.PARTICIPANTS: Totally 120 stroke patients, including 60 males and 60 females, averaged (59±3) years, who hospitalized in the Department of Neurology, General Hospital of Beijing Jingmei Group between January 2005 and June 2006 were recruited. The involved patients met the following criteria: Stroke attack within 2 weeks;diagnosis criteria of cerebral hemorrhage or infarction made in the 4th National Cerebrovascular Disease Conference; confirmed by skull CT or MRI; Informed consents of therapeutic regimen were obtained. The patients were assigned into 2 groups according to their wills: rehabilitation group and control group, with 30 males and 30 females in each group. Patients in rehabilitation group averaged (59±2)years old, and those in the control group averaged (58±2)years old.METHODS: ① Patients in two groups received routine treatment in the Department of Neurology. When the vital signs of patients in the rehabilitation group were stable, individualized treatment was conducted by combined application of motor relearning program and Bobath method. Meanwhile, training of activity of daily living was performed according to the disease condition changes of patients at different phases, including the nursing and instruction of body posture, the maintenance of good extremity

  14. Choice-Based Evaluation for the Improvement of Upper-Extremity Function Compared With Other Impairments in Tetraplegia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, Govert J.; IJzerman, Maarten Joost; Post, Marcel W.; Stiggelbout, Anne M.; Roach, Mary J.; Zilvold, Gerrit

    2005-01-01

    Objectives To assess preference of reconstructive treatment of upper extremities in subjects with tetraplegia compared with preference of treatment of 3 other impairments and to determine the effect of subjects’ characteristics on preference of upper-extremity reconstruction. Design Survey. Setting

  15. Effects of virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function in acute stage stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Eun-Kyu; Lee, Sang-Heon

    2016-11-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity motor function recovery in acute stage stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Four acute stage stroke patients participated in the study. A multiple baseline single subject experimental design was utilized. Modified constraint-induced movement therapy was used according to the EXplaining PLastICITy after stroke protocol during baseline sessions. Virtual reality training with modified constraint-induced movement therapy was applied during treatment sessions. The Manual Function Test and the Box and Block Test were used to measure upper extremity function before every session. [Results] The subjects' upper extremity function improved during the intervention period. [Conclusion] Virtual reality training combined with modified constraint-induced movement is effective for upper extremity function recovery in acute stroke patients.

  16. Meta-analysis on the effect of mental imagery on motor recovery of the hemiplegic upper extremity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kho, Adeline Y; Liu, Karen P Y; Chung, Raymond C K

    2014-04-01

    Studies have shown that mental imagery can enhance relearning and generalisation of function after stroke. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate evidence on the effects of mental imagery on motor recovery of the hemiplegic upper extremities after stroke. A comprehensive data base search of the literature up to December 2012 was performed using PubMed, EBSCO host (Academic Search Premier, CINAHL and Educational Resource Information Center), PsycINFO, Medline, and ISI Web of Knowledge (Science Citation Index and Social Sciences Citation Index). Randomised clinical trials or controlled clinical trials that included mental imagery for improving upper extremity motor function for stroke patients were located. Relevant articles were critically reviewed and methodological quality was evaluated using the PEDro Scale, and study results synthesised. Five randomised clinical trials and one controlled clinical trial met the inclusion criteria. Five of the six studies yielded positive findings in favour of mental imagery. Quantitative analysis showed a significant difference in the Action Research Arm Test (overall effect: Z=6.75; P<0.001). Review of the literature revealed a trend in support of the use of motor imagery for upper extremity motor rehabilitation after stroke. Mental imagery could be a viable intervention for stroke patients given its benefits of being safe, cost-effective and rendering multiple and unlimited practice opportunities. It is recommended that researchers incorporate imaging techniques into clinical studies so that the mechanism whereby mental imagery mediates motor recovery or neural adaptation for people with stroke can be better understood. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. Rehabilitation of motor function after stroke: a multiple systematic review focused on techniques to stimulate upper extremity recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Hatem

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is one of the leading causes for disability worldwide. Motor function deficits due to stroke affect the patients’ mobility, their limitation in daily life activities, their participation in society and their odds of returning to professional activities. All of these factors contribute to a low overall quality of life. Rehabilitation training is the most effective way to reduce motor impairments in stroke patients. This multiple systematic review focuses both on standard treatment methods and on innovating rehabilitation techniques used to promote upper extremity motor function in stroke patients. A total number of 5712 publications on stroke rehabilitation was systematically reviewed for relevance and quality with regards to upper extremity motor outcome. This procedure yielded 270 publications corresponding to the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. Recent technology-based interventions in stroke rehabilitation including non-invasive brain stimulation, robot-assisted training and virtual reality immersion are addressed. Finally, a decisional tree based on evidence from the literature and characteristics of stroke patients is proposed.At present, the stroke rehabilitation field faces the challenge to tailor evidence-based treatment strategies to the needs of the individual stroke patient. Interventions can be combined in order to achieve the maximal motor function recovery for each patient. Though the efficacy of some interventions may be under debate, motor skill learning and some new technological approaches give promising outcome prognosis in stroke motor rehabilitation.

  18. Contralaterally Controlled Functional Electrical Stimulation for Upper Extremity Hemiplegia: An Early-Phase Randomized Clinical Trial in Subacute Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, Jayme S.; Harley, Mary Y.; Hisel, Terri Z.; Hogan, Shannon D.; Maloney, Margaret M.; Chae, John

    2012-01-01

    Background Contralaterally controlled functional electrical stimulation (CCFES) is an experimental treatment intended to improve hand function after stroke. Objective To compare the effects of 6 weeks of CCFES vs. cyclic neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on upper extremity impairment and activity limitation in patients ≤ 6 months poststroke. Methods Twenty-one participants were randomized to CCFES or cyclic NMES. Treatment for both groups consisted of daily stimulation-assisted repetitive hand-opening exercise at home plus twice-weekly lab sessions of functional task practice. Assessments were made at pretreatment and posttreatment and at 1 month and 3 months posttreatment. They included maximum voluntary finger extension angle, finger movement tracking error, upper extremity Fugl-Meyer score, Box and Blocks test, and Arm Motor Abilities Test. Treatment effects were estimated using a 2-factor repeated measures analysis of variance with the value of the baseline measure as a covariate. Results Seventeen patients completed the treatment phase (9 CCFES, 8 cyclic NMES). At all post-treatment time points, CCFES produced larger improvements than cyclic NMES on every outcome measure. Maximum voluntary finger extension showed the largest treatment effect, with a mean group difference across the posttreatment time points of 28° more finger extension for CCFES. Conclusions The results favor CCFES over cyclic NMES though the small sample size limits the statistical power of the study. The effect size estimates from this study will be used to power a larger trial. PMID:21875892

  19. Rehabilitation of Motor Function after Stroke: A Multiple Systematic Review Focused on Techniques to Stimulate Upper Extremity Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, Samar M.; Saussez, Geoffroy; della Faille, Margaux; Prist, Vincent; Zhang, Xue; Dispa, Delphine; Bleyenheuft, Yannick

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is one of the leading causes for disability worldwide. Motor function deficits due to stroke affect the patients' mobility, their limitation in daily life activities, their participation in society and their odds of returning to professional activities. All of these factors contribute to a low overall quality of life. Rehabilitation training is the most effective way to reduce motor impairments in stroke patients. This multiple systematic review focuses both on standard treatment methods and on innovating rehabilitation techniques used to promote upper extremity motor function in stroke patients. A total number of 5712 publications on stroke rehabilitation was systematically reviewed for relevance and quality with regards to upper extremity motor outcome. This procedure yielded 270 publications corresponding to the inclusion criteria of the systematic review. Recent technology-based interventions in stroke rehabilitation including non-invasive brain stimulation, robot-assisted training, and virtual reality immersion are addressed. Finally, a decisional tree based on evidence from the literature and characteristics of stroke patients is proposed. At present, the stroke rehabilitation field faces the challenge to tailor evidence-based treatment strategies to the needs of the individual stroke patient. Interventions can be combined in order to achieve the maximal motor function recovery for each patient. Though the efficacy of some interventions may be under debate, motor skill learning, and some new technological approaches give promising outcome prognosis in stroke motor rehabilitation. PMID:27679565

  20. Correlation of the VEMP score, ambulation and upper extremity function in clinically isolated syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnošija, Luka; Krbot Skorić, Magdalena; Gabelić, Tereza; Adamec, Ivan; Brinar, Vesna; Habek, Mario

    2015-12-15

    To investigate the correlation of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) score with Timed 25-Foot Walk (T25FW), 9-Hole Peg Test (9HPT), Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT) and EDSS in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). This prospective, cross sectional study included 52 patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). Cervical VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular VEMP (oVEMP), analyzed in the form of the cVEMP, oVEMP and VEMP scores, T25FW, 9HPT, PASAT and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) were performed. The only predictor of walking impairment in this study was general disability as measured by the EDSS, after controlling for age, gender, PASAT and EDSS the effect of VEMP score was non-significant (p=0.419). 9HPT of the dominant hand did not correlate with the oVEMP score (rs=0.258, p=0.065), however after controlling for age, gender, PASAT and EDSS, the effect of the oVEMP score on 9HPT of the dominant hand was statistically significant (p=0.017). After controlling for age, gender and oVEMP score, the effect of the PASAT on 9HPT variable for the non-dominant hand was statistically significant (p=0.001). We found possible effects of brainstem dysfunction on walking impairment, however they were not seen after correction for EDSS and cognitive dysfunction. On the other hand, dominant hand function seems to be influenced by upper brainstem dysfunction measured with oVEMP, while cognitive dysfunction is related to non-dominant hand function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of robotic therapy on upper-extremity function in children with cerebral palsy: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Ping; Howard, Ayanna M

    2016-01-01

    To systematically examine the effects of robotic therapy on upper extremity (UE) function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic literature search was conducted in Pubmed, CINAHL, Cochrane, PsychInfo, TRIP, and Web of Science up to July 2013. Studies of children with CP, using robotic therapy and measures of UE were included. Nine articles using three different robotic systems were included. Of these, seven were case studies. Overall, robotic therapy showed the potential effects as all studies reported at least one positive outcome: a moderate effect in improving reaching duration, smoothness, or decreased muscle tone, and a small to large effect in standardized clinical assessment (e.g. Fugl-Meyer). This review confirms the potential for robotic therapy to improve UE function in children with CP. However, the paucity of group design studies summons the need for more rigorous research before conclusive recommendations can be made.

  2. Advances in upper extremity prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotolow, Dan A; Kozin, Scott H

    2012-11-01

    Until recently, upper extremity prostheses had changed little since World War II. In 2006, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency responded to an increasing number of military amputees with the Revolutionizing Prosthetics program. The program has yielded several breakthroughs both in the engineering of new prosthetic arms and in the control of those arms. Direct brain-wave control of a limb with 22° of freedom may be within reach. In the meantime, advances such as individually powered digits have opened the door to multifunctional full and partial hand prostheses. Restoring sensation to the prosthetic limb remains a major challenge to full integration of the limb into a patient's self-image.

  3. Outcome measures for hand function naturally reveal three distinct domains in older adults: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Lawrence

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mapping between individual outcome measures and the latent functional domains of interest is critical to a quantitative evaluation and rehabilitation of hand function. We examined whether and how the associations among six hand-specific outcome measures reveal latent functional domains in elderly individuals. We asked 66 healthy older adult participants (38F, 28M, 66.1±11.6yrs, range: 45-88yrs and 33 older adults (65.8±9.7yrs, 44-81yrs, 51 hands diagnosed with osteoarthritis (OA of the carpometacarpal (CMC joint, to complete six functional assessments: hand strength (Grip, Key and Precision Pinch, Box and Block, Nine Hole Pegboard, and Strength-Dexterity tests. The first three principal components suffice to explain 86% of variance among the six outcome measures in healthy older adults, and 84% of variance in older adults with CMC OA. The composition of these dominant associations revealed three distinct latent functional domains: strength, coordinated upper extremity function, and sensorimotor processing. Furthermore, in participants with thumb CMC OA we found a blurring of the associations between the latent functional domains of strength and coordinated upper extremity function. This motivates future work to understand how the physiological effects of thumb CMC OA lead upper extremity coordination to become strongly associated with strength, while dynamic sensorimotor ability remains an independent functional domain.Thus, when assessing the level of hand function in our growing older adult populations, it is particularly important to acknowledge its multidimensional nature—and explicitly consider how each outcome measure maps to these three latent and fundamental domains of function. Moreover, this ability to distinguish among latent functional domains may facilitate the design of treatment modalities to target the rehabilitation of each of them.

  4. Acquired Upper Extremity Growth Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Erich M; Casnovsky, Lauren L; Gauger, Erica J; Bohn, Deborah C; Van Heest, Ann E

    2017-01-01

    This study reviewed the clinical history and management of acquired growth arrest in the upper extremity in pediatric patients. The records of all patients presenting from 1996 to 2012 with radiographically proven acquired growth arrest were reviewed. Records were examined to determine the etiology and site of growth arrest, management, and complications. Patients with tumors or hereditary etiology were excluded. A total of 44 patients (24 boys and 20 girls) with 51 physeal arrests who presented at a mean age of 10.6 years (range, 0.8-18.2 years) were included in the study. The distal radius was the most common site (n=24), followed by the distal humerus (n=8), metacarpal (n=6), distal ulna (n=5), proximal humerus (n=4), radial head (n=3), and olecranon (n=1). Growth arrest was secondary to trauma (n=22), infection (n=11), idiopathy (n=6), inflammation (n=2), compartment syndrome (n=2), and avascular necrosis (n=1). Twenty-six patients (59%) underwent surgical intervention to address deformity caused by the physeal arrest. Operative procedures included ipsilateral unaffected bone epiphysiodesis (n=21), shortening osteotomy (n=10), lengthening osteotomy (n=8), excision of physeal bar or bone fragment (n=2), angular correction osteotomy (n=1), and creation of single bone forearm (n=1). Four complications occurred; 3 of these required additional procedures. Acquired upper extremity growth arrest usually is caused by trauma or infection, and the most frequent site is the distal radius. Growth disturbances due to premature arrest can be treated effectively with epiphysiodesis or osteotomy. In this series, the specific site of anatomic growth arrest was the primary factor in determining treatment. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e95-e103.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Effects of robotic-aided rehabilitation on recovery of upper extremity function in chronic stroke: a single case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, Nancy A; Smith, Jennifer L; Tripp, Christopher J; White, Matthew W

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the study was to examine the results of robotic therapy in a single client. A 48-year-old female client 15 months post-stroke, with right hemiparesis, received robotic therapy as an outpatient in a large Midwestern rehabilitation hospital. Robotic therapy was provided three times a week for 6 weeks. Robotic therapy consisted of goal-directed, robotic-aided reaching tasks to exercise the hemiparetic shoulder and elbow. No other therapeutic intervention for the affected upper extremity was provided during the study or 3 months follow-up period. The outcome measures included the Fugl-Meyer, graded Wolf motor function test (GWMFT), motor activity log, active range of motion and Canadian occupational performance measure. The participant made gains in active movement; performance; and satisfaction of functional tasks, GWMFT and functional use. Limitations involved in this study relate to the generalizability of the sample size, effect of medications, expense of robotic technologies and the impact of aphasia. Future research should incorporate functional use training along with robotic therapy.

  6. Current management of the mangled upper extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Bumbasirevic, Marko; Stevanovic, Milan; Lesic, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Henry D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Mangled describes an injury caused by cutting, tearing, or crushing, which leads to the limb becoming unrecognizable; in essence, there are two treatment options for mangled upper extremities, amputation and salvage reconstruction. With advances in our understanding of human physiology and basic science, and with the development of new fixation devices, modern microsurgical techniques and the possibility of different types of bony and soft tissue reconstruction, the clinical and functional ou...

  7. Role of the contralesional hemisphere in post-stroke recovery of upper extremity motor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathrin M Buetefisch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Identification of optimal treatment strategies to improve recovery is limited by the incomplete understanding of the neurobiological principles of recovery. Motor cortex (M1 reorganization of the lesioned hemisphere (ipsilesional M1 plays a major role in post-stroke motor recovery, and is a primary target for rehabilitation therapy. Reorganization of M1 in the hemisphere contralateral to the stroke (contralesional M1 may, however, serve as an additional source of cortical reorganization and related recovery. The extent and outcome of such reorganization depends on many factors, including lesion size and time since stroke. In the chronic phase post-stroke, contralesional M1 seems to interfere with motor function of the paretic limb in a subset of patients, possibly through abnormally increased inhibition of lesioned M1 by the contralesional M1. In such patients, decreasing contralesional M1 excitability by cortical stimulation results in improved performance of the paretic limb. However, emerging evidence suggests a potentially supportive role of contralesional M1. After infarction of M1 or its corticospinal projections, there is abnormally increased excitatory neural activity and activation in contralesional M1 that correlates with favorable motor recovery. Decreasing contralesional M1 excitability in these patients may result in deterioration of paretic limb performance. In animal stroke models, reorganizational changes in contralesional M1 depend on the lesion size and rehabilitation treatment and include long-term changes in neurotransmitter systems, dendritic growth and synapse formation. While there is, therefore, some evidence that activity in contralesional M1 will impact the extent of motor function of the paretic limb in the subacute and chronic phase post-stroke and may serve as a new target for rehabilitation treatment strategies, the precise factors that specifically influence its role in the recovery process remain to be defined.

  8. Changes in Upper-Extremity Functional Capacity and Daily Performance During Outpatient Occupational Therapy for People With Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doman, Caitlin A; Waddell, Kimberly J; Bailey, Ryan R; Moore, Jennifer L; Lang, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    This study explored how upper-extremity (UE) functional capacity and daily performance change during the course of outpatient rehabilitation in people with stroke. Fifteen participants receiving outpatient occupational therapy services for UE paresis poststroke were enrolled. UE motor capacity was measured with the Action Research Arm Test (ARAT), and UE performance was measured using bilateral, wrist-worn accelerometers. Measurements were taken at or near the start of therapy, at every 10th visit or every 30 days throughout the duration of services, and at discharge. Three patterns were observed: (1) increase in ARAT scores and more normalized accelerometry profiles, (2) increase in ARAT scores but no change in accelerometry profiles, and (3) no change in ARAT scores or in accelerometry profiles. UE performance in daily life was highly variable, with inconsistencies between change in UE capacity and change in UE performance. UE capacity and performance are important constructs to assess separately during rehabilitation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  9. Current management of the mangled upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirevic, Marko; Stevanovic, Milan; Lesic, Aleksandar; Atkinson, Henry D E

    2012-11-01

    Mangled describes an injury caused by cutting, tearing, or crushing, which leads to the limb becoming unrecognizable; in essence, there are two treatment options for mangled upper extremities, amputation and salvage reconstruction. With advances in our understanding of human physiology and basic science, and with the development of new fixation devices, modern microsurgical techniques and the possibility of different types of bony and soft tissue reconstruction, the clinical and functional outcomes are often good, and certainly preferable to those of contemporary prosthetics. Early or even immediate (emergency) complete upper extremity reconstruction appears to give better results than delayed or late reconstruction and should be the treatment of choice where possible. Before any reconstruction is attempted, injuries to other organs must be excluded. Each step in the assessment and treatment of a mangled extremity is of utmost importance. These include radical tissue debridement, prophylactic antibiotics, copious irrigation with a lavage system, stable bone fixation, revascularization, nerve repair, and soft tissue coverage. Well-planned and early rehabilitation leads to a better functional outcome. Despite the use of scoring systems to help guide decisions and predict outcomes, the decision to reconstruct or to amputate still ultimately lies with the surgical judgment and experience of the treating surgeon.

  10. Effects of a novel forced intensive strengthening technique on muscle size and upper extremity function in a patient with chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hee-Won; Chon, Seung-Chul

    2015-11-01

    [Purpose] This research demonstrated a forced intensive strength technique as a novel treatment for muscle power and function in the affected upper extremity muscle to determine the clinical feasibility with respect to upper extremity performance in a stroke hemiparesis. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a patient with chronic stroke who was dependent on others for performing the functional activities of his affected upper extremity. The technique incorporates a comprehensive approach of forced, intensive, and strength-inducing activities to enhance morphological changes associated with motor learning of the upper extremity. The forced intensive strength technique consisted of a 6-week course of sessions lasting 60 minutes per day, five times a week. [Results] After the 6-week intervention, the difference between relaxation and contraction of the affected extensor carpi radialis muscle increased from 0.28 to 0.63 cm(2), and that of the affected triceps brachii muscle increased from 0.30 to 0.90 cm(2). The results of clinical tests including the modified Ashworth scale (MAS; from 1+ to 1), muscle strength (from 15 to 32 kg), the manual function test (MFT; scores of 16/32 to 27/32 score), the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA; scores of 29/66 to 49/66 score), and the Jebsen-Taylor hand function test (JTHFT; from 38/60 to 19/60 sec) were improved. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that the forced intensive strength technique may have a beneficial effect on the muscle size of the upper extremity and motor function in patients with chronic stroke.

  11. Motor Function Evaluation of Hemiplegic Upper-Extremities Using Data Fusion from Wearable Inertial and Surface EMG Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanran; Zhang, Xu; Gong, Yanan; Cheng, Ying; Gao, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang

    2017-03-13

    Quantitative evaluation of motor function is of great demand for monitoring clinical outcome of applied interventions and further guiding the establishment of therapeutic protocol. This study proposes a novel framework for evaluating upper limb motor function based on data fusion from inertial measurement units (IMUs) and surface electromyography (EMG) sensors. With wearable sensors worn on the tested upper limbs, subjects were asked to perform eleven straightforward, specifically designed canonical upper-limb functional tasks. A series of machine learning algorithms were applied to the recorded motion data to produce evaluation indicators, which is able to reflect the level of upper-limb motor function abnormality. Sixteen healthy subjects and eighteen stroke subjects with substantial hemiparesis were recruited in the experiment. The combined IMU and EMG data yielded superior performance over the IMU data alone and the EMG data alone, in terms of decreased normal data variation rate (NDVR) and improved determination coefficient (DC) from a regression analysis between the derived indicator and routine clinical assessment score. Three common unsupervised learning algorithms achieved comparable performance with NDVR around 10% and strong DC around 0.85. By contrast, the use of a supervised algorithm was able to dramatically decrease the NDVR to 6.55%. With the proposed framework, all the produced indicators demonstrated high agreement with the routine clinical assessment scale, indicating their capability of assessing upper-limb motor functions. This study offers a feasible solution to motor function assessment in an objective and quantitative manner, especially suitable for home and community use.

  12. Deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitfod, Lotte; Broholm, R; Baekgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    to the condition. Malignancy and therapeutic interventions are major risk factors for the secondary deep vein thrombosis in combination with the patient's characteristics, comorbidities and prior history of deep vein thrombosis. Complications: recurrent deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism and Post......Upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) occurs either spontaneously, as a consequence of strenuous upper limb activity (also known as the Paget-Schroetter syndrome) or secondary to an underlying cause. Primary and secondary UEDVT differs in long-term sequelae and mortality. This review...... will focus on the clinical presentation, risk factors, diagnosis, and treatment strategies of UEDVT. In the period from January to October 2012 an electronic literature search was performed in the PubMed/MEDLINE database, and 27 publications were included. Clinical presentation: swelling, pain and functional...

  13. Effect of electrical stimulation therapy on upper extremity functional recovery and cerebral cortical changes in patients with chronic hemiplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Kana; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Tomite, Takenori; Yoshikawa, Takayuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2012-04-01

    Hemiplegia is a common sequel of stroke and assisted living care is needed in many cases. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of using surface electrode stimulation device in rehabilitation, in terms of functional improvement in upper limb and the changes in brain activation related to central nervous system reconstruction. Five patients with chronic hemiplegia received electrical stimulation therapy using the orthosis-type surface electrode stimulation device for 12 weeks. Training time was 30 min/day for the first weeks, and increased 30 min/day in every 4 weeks. Upper limb outcome measures included Brunnstrom stage, range of motion, Fugl-Meyer assessment and manual function test. Brain activation was measured using functional MRI. After therapy with therapeutic electrical stimulation (TES) for 12 weeks upper limb function improved in all cases. The results of brain activation showed two patterns. In the first, the stimulation produced an activity in the bilateral somatosensory cortices (SMC), which was seen to continue over time. The second, activation was bilateral and extensive before stimulation, but localized to the SMC after intervention. Treatment with TES using an orthosis-type electrode stimulation device improves upper limb function in chronic hemiplegia patients. The present findings suggest that there are not only efferent but also afferent effects that may promote central nervous system remodeling.

  14. Effects of mirror therapy combined with motor tasks on upper extremity function and activities daily living of stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyunghoon; Lee, Sukmin; Kim, Donghoon; Lee, Kyoungbo; Kim, Youlim

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of mirror therapy combined with exercise tasks on the function of the upper limbs and activities of daily living. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-five stroke patients who were receiving physical therapy at K Hospital in Gyeonggi-do, South Korea, were classified into a mirror therapy group (n=12) and a conventional therapy group (n=13). The therapies were applied for 30 minutes per day, five times per week, for a total of four weeks. Upper limb function was measured with the Action Research Arm test, the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, and the Box and Block test, and activities of daily living were measured with the Functional Independence Measure. A paired test was performed to compare the intragroup differences between before training and after four weeks of therapy, and an independent t-test was performed to compare the differences between the two groups before and after four weeks of therapy. [Results] In the intragroup comparison, both groups showed significant differences between measurements taken before and after four weeks of therapy. In the intergroup comparison, the mirror therapy group showed significant improvements compared with the conventional therapy group, both in upper limb function and activities of daily living. [Conclusion] The findings of this study demonstrated that mirror therapy is more effective than conventional therapy for the training of stroke patients to improve their upper limb function and activities of daily living.

  15. Replantation of upper extremity, hand and digits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbasirević, Marko Z; Vucković, Cedo D; Vucetić, Cedomir; Manojlović, Radovan; Andjelkovic, Sladjana Z; Palibrk, Tomislav D; Milutinović, Suzana M; Raspopović, Emilija Dubljanin

    2013-01-01

    Replantation is defined as reattachment of the part that has been completely amputated and there is no connection between the severed part and the patient. In Boston in 1962 Malt successfully replanted a completely amputated arm of a 12-year-old boy. Komatsu and Tamai reported the first successful replantation of an amputated digit by microvascular technique. There are no strict indications and contraindications for replantation. It's on surgeon to explain to the patient the chances of success of viability, expected function, length of operation, hospitalization and long rehabilitation protocol. Survival and useful function in replantation of upper extremity amputations is questionable. Success depends on microvascular anastomoses, but the final function is related with tendon, nerve, bone and joint repair.

  16. Updating upper extremity temporary prosthesis: thermoplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletchall, S; Tran, T; Ungaro, V; Hickerson, W

    1992-01-01

    Since 1989 amputees with upper-extremity burns have been fitted with a temporary prosthesis fabricated from low-temperature thermoplastic. Before 1989 conventional temporary prostheses were fabricated with plaster. The use of the thermoplastic material has produced a lightweight, cost-effective, modular system. No patients exhibited skin breakdown with the thermoplastic material. It appears that thermoplastics may be the next major breakthrough in terms of a design for a temporary upper-extremity prosthesis.

  17. Upper Extremity Injuries in Gymnasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Megan R; Avery, Daniel; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis

    2017-02-01

    Gymnastics is a unique sport, which loads the wrist and arms as weight-bearing extremities. Because of the load demands on the wrist in particular, stress fractures, physeal injury, and overuse syndromes may be observed. This spectrum of injury has been termed "gymnast's wrist," and incorporates such disorders as wrist capsulitis, ligamentous tears, triangular fibrocartilage complex tears, chondromalacia of the carpus, stress fractures, distal radius physeal arrest, and grip lock injury.

  18. Mirror therapy combined with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation for motor recovery of upper extremities after stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Hee; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy in combination with biofeedback functional electrical stimulation (BF-FES) on motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Twenty-nine patients who suffered a stroke > 6 months prior participated in this study and were randomly allocated to three groups. The BF-FES + mirror therapy and FES + mirror therapy groups practiced training for 5 × 30 min sessions over a 4-week period. The control group received a conventional physical therapy program. The following clinical tools were used to assess motor recovery of the upper extremities: electrical muscle tester, electrogoniometer, dual-inclinometer, electrodynamometer, the Box and Block Test (BBT) and Jabsen Taylor Hand Function Test (JHFT), the Functional Independence Measure, the Modified Ashworth Scale, and the Stroke Specific Quality of Life (SSQOL) assessment. The BF-FES + mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in wrist extension as revealed by the Manual Muscle Test and Range of Motion (p mirror therapy group showed significant improvement in the BBT, JTHT, and SSQOL compared with the FES + mirror therapy group and control group (p mirror therapy induced motor recovery and improved quality of life. These results suggest that mirror therapy, in combination with BF-FES, is feasible and effective for motor recovery of the upper extremities after stroke. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. The effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin-Hyuck; Park, Ji-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of game-based virtual reality movement therapy plus mental practice on upper extremity function in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Subjects] The subjects were chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. [Methods] Thirty subjects were randomly assigned to either the control group or experimental group. All subjects received 20 sessions (5 days in a week) of virtual reality movement therapy using the Nintendo Wii. In addition to Wii-based virtual reality movement therapy, experimental group subjects performed mental practice consisting of 5 minutes of relaxation, Wii games imagination, and normalization phases before the beginning of Wii games. To compare the two groups, the upper extremity subtest of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log were performed. [Results] Both groups showed statistically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of the movement subscale of Motor Activity Log after the interventions. Also, there were significant differences in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, Box and Block Test, and quality of movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log between the two groups. [Conclusion] Game-based virtual reality movement therapy alone may be helpful to improve functional recovery of the upper extremity, but the addition of MP produces a lager improvement.

  20. Effect of Intravenous Infusion of G-CSF-Mobilized Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells on Upper Extremity Function in Cerebral Palsy Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyeong Il; Lee, Young-Ho; Rah, Wee-Jin; Jo, Seung Hwi; Park, Si-Bog; Han, Seung Hoon; Koh, Hani; Suh, Jin Young; Um, Jang Soo; Choi, Eun Hye; Park, Un Jin; Kim, Mi Jung

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effect of intravenous infusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (mPBMC) mobilized by granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) on upper extremity function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Fifty-seven children with CP were enrolled. Ten patients were excluded due to follow-up loss. In total, 47 patients (30 males and 17 females) were analyzed. All patients' parents provided signed consent before the start of the study. After administration of G-CSF for 5 days, mPBMC was collected and cryopreserved. Patients were randomized into two groups 1 month later. Twenty-two patients were administered mPBMC and 25 patients received normal saline as placebo. Six months later, the two groups were switched, and administered mPBMC and placebo, respectively. Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) and the Manual Ability Classification System (MACS) were used to evaluate upper motor function. All subdomain and total scores of QUEST were significantly improved after mPBMC and placebo infusion, without significant differences between mPBMC and placebo groups. A month after G-CSF, all subdomain and total scores of QUEST were improved. The level of MACS remained unchanged in both mPBMC and placebo groups. In this study, intravenously infused mPBMC showed no significant effect on upper extremity function in children with CP, as compared to placebo. The effect of mPBMC was likely masked by the effect of G-CSF, which was used in both groups and/or G-CSF itself might have other neurotrophic potentials in children with CP.

  1. To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batool, Sana; Soomro, Nabila; Amjad, Fareeha; Fauz, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of constraint induced movement therapy versus motor relearning programme to improve motor function of hemiplegic upper extremity after stroke. Method: A sample of 42 patients was recruited from the Physiotherapy Department of IPM&R and Neurology OPD of Civil Hospital Karachi through non probability purposive sampling technique. Twenty one patients were placed to each experimental and control groups. Experimental group was treated with Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and control group was treated with motor relearning programme (MRP) for three consecutive weeks. Pre and post treatment measurements were determined by upper arm section of Motor Assessment Scale (MAS) and Self Care item of Functional Independence Measure (FIM) Scale. Results: Intra group analysis showed statistically significant results (p-value<0.05) in all items of MAS in both groups. However, advanced hand activities item of MAS in MRP group showed insignificant result (p-value=0.059). Self-care items of FIM Scale also showed significant result (p-value< 0.05) in both groups except dressing upper body item (p-value=0.059) in CIMT group and grooming and dressing upper body items (p-value=0.059 & 0.063) in MRP group showed insignificant p-values. Conclusion: CIMT group showed more significant improvement in motor function and self-care performance of hemiplegic upper extremity as compared to MRP group in patients with sub-acute stroke assessed by the MAS and FIM scales. Thus CIMT is proved to be more statistically significant and clinically effective intervention in comparison to motor relearning programme among the patients aged between 35-60 years. Further studies are needed to evaluate CIMT effects in acute and chronic post stroke population. PMID:26649007

  2. Effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy and functional bimanual training on upper extremity function and daily activities in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon-Ju; Kim, Jin-Kyung; Park, So-Yeon

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] In this study, we examined effects of modified constraint-induced movement therapy (m-CIMT) and functional bimanual training, when applied to a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury, on upper extremity function and daily activities. [Subject and Methods] One patient, diagnosed with C4 incomplete spinal cord injury, underwent physical therapy with constraint-induced movement therapy for 3 hours and task-oriented bimanual training for 1 hour, per day. This combined 4-hour session was performed five times a week, for 3 weeks, totaling 15 sessions. Upper extremity function was measured using the Manual Function Test (MFT) and Box & Block Test (BBT). Additionally, Spinal Cord Independence Measure Version III (SCIM-III) and Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36) were used to assess functional outcomes. [Results] Mobility of the hand and overall function of upper extremities were enhanced following intervention. Moreover, the subject's quality of life and ability to carry out daily activities also improved. [Conclusion] Modified constraint-induced movement therapy and bimanual training was effective in enhancing upper extremity function and performance of daily routines in a patient with incomplete spinal cord injury. Further studies, recruiting multiple subjects, should focus on m-CIMT using diverse methods, performed during the course of daily activities.

  3. Botulinum toxin-a in children with congenital spastic hemiplegia does not improve upper extremity motor-related function over rehabilitation alone: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rameckers, E A A; Speth, L A W M; Duysens, J; Vles, J S H; Smits-Engelsman, B C M

    2009-01-01

    Rehabilitation of the upper extremity in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy has not been compared to the same intensity of therapy combined with injected botulinum toxin (BTX). To measure the short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 and 9 months) effects of a standardized functional training program versus without the addition of chemodenervation of forearm and hand muscles. Twenty children with spastic hemiplegia, aged 4 to 16 years, were matched for baseline characteristics and then randomized to standardized functional physical and occupational therapies for 6 months (PT/OT group) or to the same therapies plus multimuscle BTX-A (BTX+ group). were isometric generated force, overshoot and undershoot (force production error), active and passive range of motion by goniometry (ROM), stretch restricted angle (SRA) of joints, Ashworth scores at the elbow and wrist, and the Melbourne assessment of unilateral upper limb function. All measures were performed at baseline, 2 weeks after BTX-A, 6 months (end of therapy), and then 3 months after termination of the therapy. Clinical measures (muscle tone, active ROM of wrist and elbow) showed improvement in both groups. However, no significant differences emerged between groups on functional measures. Generated force decreased directly after the BTX-A injection but increased during the therapy period. The PT/OT group, however, showed a significantly higher increase in force and accuracy with therapy compared with the BTX+ therapy group. Functional rehabilitation therapies for the upper extremity increase manual isometric flexor force at the wrist and ROM, but BTX injections cause weakness and do not lead to better outcomes than therapy alone.

  4. Disorders of the upper extremity in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azouz, E M; Oudjhane, K

    1998-08-01

    This article presents a brief overview of the indications of MR imaging in a variety of disorders of the upper extremity of the pediatric patient. This covers congenital anomalies: Sprengel shoulder, Poland sequence, arthrogryposis; posttraumatic lesions of cartilage, bone, tendon, muscle and nerve including the brachial plexus injury; inflammatory arthritis and synovitis; bone and joint infection; osteochondritis dissecans, bone necrosis and infarcts in sickle cell anemia and juvenile Gaucher disease, as well as tumors. In this last category, the authors briefly describe the appearances of cysts and tumors of bones and soft tissues of the upper extremity. Indications for the intravenous administration of Gadolinium are given throughout the article with emphasis on the synovial enhancement seen in active arthritis and synovitis.

  5. Application of RFID technology-upper extremity rehabilitation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Chen; Chen, Yu-Luen; Chen, Shih-Ching

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Upper extremity rehabilitation after an injury is very important. This study proposes radio frequency identification (RFID) technology to improve and enhance the effectiveness of the upper extremity rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] People use their upper extremities to conduct daily activities. When recovering from injuries, many patients neglect the importance of rehabilitation, which results in degraded function. This study recorded the training process using the traditional rehabilitation hand gliding cart with a RFID reader, RFID tags in the panel, and a servo host computer. [Results] Clinical evidence, time taken to achieve a full score, counts of missing the specified spots, and Brunnstrom stage of aided recovery, the proximal part of the upper extremity show that the RFID-based upper extremity training significantly and reduce negative impacts of the disability in daily life and activities. [Conclusion] This study combined a hand-gliding cart with an RFID reader, and when patients moved the cart, the movement could be observed via the activated RFID tags. The training data was collected and quantified for a better understanding of the recovery status of the patients. Each of the participating patients made progress as expected.

  6. Upper extremity compartmental anatomy: clinical relevance to radiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomayan, Glen A.; Robertson, Fabienne; Major, Nancy M. [Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Duke University Medical Center, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Duke University Medical Center, Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Department of Surgery, P.O. Box 3808, Durham, NC (United States)

    2006-04-15

    Malignant tumors of the upper extremity are uncommon, and their care should be referred to specialized facilities with experience treating these lesions. The Musculoskeletal Tumor Society (MSTS) staging system is used by the surgeon to determine appropriate surgical management, assess prognosis, and communicate with other healthcare providers. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is employed pre-operatively to identify a lesion's compartment of origin, determine extent of spread, and plan biopsy and resection approaches. Involvement of neurovascular structures may result in devastating loss of upper extremity function, requiring amputation. Violation of high-resistance compartmental barriers necessitates more extensive surgical resection. Biopsy may be performed by the radiologist using imaging guidance. Knowledge of compartmental anatomy allows the radiologist or surgeon to use an easily excisable biopsy approach and prevent iatrogenic spread to unaffected compartments. Case examples are presented to illustrate the importance of compartmental anatomy in the management of benign and malignant upper extremity tumors. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and motor learning methods for treatment of persistent upper extremity dysfunction after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Jessica; Monkiewicz, Michelle; Holcomb, John; Pundik, Svetlana; Daly, Janis J

    2015-06-01

    To compare response to upper-limb treatment using robotics plus motor learning (ML) versus functional electrical stimulation (FES) plus ML versus ML alone, according to a measure of complex functional everyday tasks for chronic, severely impaired stroke survivors. Single-blind, randomized trial. Medical center. Enrolled subjects (N=39) were >1 year postsingle stroke (attrition rate=10%; 35 completed the study). All groups received treatment 5d/wk for 5h/d (60 sessions), with unique treatment as follows: ML alone (n=11) (5h/d partial- and whole-task practice of complex functional tasks), robotics plus ML (n=12) (3.5h/d of ML and 1.5h/d of shoulder/elbow robotics), and FES plus ML (n=12) (3.5h/d of ML and 1.5h/d of FES wrist/hand coordination training). Primary measure: Arm Motor Ability Test (AMAT), with 13 complex functional tasks; secondary measure: upper-limb Fugl-Meyer coordination scale (FM). There was no significant difference found in treatment response across groups (AMAT: P≥.584; FM coordination: P≥.590). All 3 treatment groups demonstrated clinically and statistically significant improvement in response to treatment (AMAT and FM coordination: P≤.009). A group treatment paradigm of 1:3 (therapist/patient) ratio proved feasible for provision of the intensive treatment. No adverse effects. Severely impaired stroke survivors with persistent (>1y) upper-extremity dysfunction can make clinically and statistically significant gains in coordination and functional task performance in response to robotics plus ML, FES plus ML, and ML alone in an intensive and long-duration intervention; no group differences were found. Additional studies are warranted to determine the effectiveness of these methods in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoexum, Frank; Coveliers, Hans M; Lu, Joyce J; Jongkind, Vincent; Yeung, Kakkhee K; Wisselink, Willem

    2016-12-01

    Thoracic sympathectomy is performed in the management of a variety of disorders of the upper extremity. To evaluate the contemporary results of thoracic sympathectomy for upper extremity ischemia a systematic review of the literature was conducted. We performed a PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane search of the literature written in the English language from January 1975 to December 2015. All articles presenting original patient data regarding the effect of treatment on symptoms or on the healing of ulcers were eligible for inclusion. Individual analyses for Primary Raynaud's Disease (PRD) and Secondary Raynaud's Phenomenon (SRP) were performed. We included 6 prospective and 23 retrospective series with a total of 753 patients and 1026 affected limbs. Early beneficial effects of thoracic sympathectomy were noticed in 63-100% (median 94%) of all patients, in 73-100% (median 98%) of PRD patients and in 63-100% (median 94%) of SRP patients. The beneficial effect was noted to lessen over time. Long-term beneficial effects were reported in 13-100% (median 75%) of all patients, in 22-100% (median 58%) of PRD patients, and in 13-100% (median 79%) of SRD patients. Complete or improved ulcer healing was achieved in 33-100% and 25-67% respectively, of all patients. Thoracic sympathectomy can be beneficial in the treatment of upper extremity ischemia in select patients. Although the effect in patients with PRD will lessen over time, it may still reduce the severity of symptoms. In SRD, effects are more often long-lasting. In addition, thoracic sympathectomy may maximize tissue preservation or prevent amputation in cases of digital ulceration.

  9. Social networking among upper extremity patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozental, Tamara D; George, Tina M; Chacko, Aron T

    2010-05-01

    Despite their rising popularity, the health care profession has been slow to embrace social networking sites. These are Web-based initiatives, designed to bring people with common interests or activities under a common umbrella. The purpose of this study is to evaluate social networking patterns among upper extremity patients. A total of 742 anonymous questionnaires were distributed among upper extremity outpatients, with a 62% response rate (462 were completed). Demographic characteristics (gender, age, level of education, employment, type of health insurance, and income stratification) were defined, and data on computer ownership and frequency of social networking use were collected. Social network users and nonusers were compared according to their demographic and socioeconomic characteristics. Our patient cohort consisted of 450 patients. Of those 450 patients, 418 had a high school education or higher, and 293 reported a college or graduate degree. The majority of patients (282) were employed at the time of the survey, and income was evenly distributed among U.S. Census Bureau quintiles. A total of 349 patients reported computer ownership, and 170 reported using social networking sites. When compared to nonusers, social networking users were younger (pnetworking use. Most users (n = 114) regularly visit a single site. Facebook was the most popular site visited (n=142), followed by MySpace (n=28) and Twitter (n=16). Of the 450 upper extremity patients in our sample, 170 use social networking sites. Younger age, higher level of education, and computer ownership were associated with social networking use. Physicians should consider expanding their use of social networking sites to reach their online patient populations. Copyright 2010 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The direct and indirect effects of the negative affectivity trait on self reported physical function among patients with upper extremity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaei-Khoei, Mojtaba; Mohamadi, Amin; Mellema, Jos J; Tourjee, Stephen M; Ring, David; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria

    2016-12-30

    Negative affectivity is a personality trait that predisposes people to psychological distress and low life satisfaction. Negative affectivity may also affect pain intensity and physical function in patients with musculoskeletal conditions. We explored the association of negative affectivity to pain intensity and self-reported physical function, and tested whether pain intensity mediates the effect of negative affectivity on physical function. In a cross-sectional study, 102 patients with upper extremity musculoskeletal conditions presenting to an orthopedic surgeon completed self-report measures of negative affectivity, pain intensity, and physical function in addition to demographic and injury information. We used the Preacher and Hayes' bootstrapping approach to quantify the indirect effect of negative affectivity on physical function through pain intensity. Negative affectivity correlated with greater pain intensity and lower self-reported physical function significantly. Also, pain intensity mediated the association of negative affectivity with physical function. The indirect effect accounted for one-third of the total effect. To conclude, negative affectivity is associated with decreased engagement in daily life activities both directly, but also indirectly through increased pain intensity. Treatments targeting negative affectivity may be more economical and efficient for alleviation of pain and limitations associated with musculoskeletal illness than those addressing coping strategies or psychological distress.

  11. Upper extremity disorders in performing artists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozmaryn, L M

    1993-03-01

    Studies in the past decade have shown that a significant proportion of instrumentalists report musculoskeletal problems severely affecting their musical performance. Musicians endure daily intensive use of their upper extremities, frequently placing them in bizarre positions. Their training schedules are rigorous and long term Predisposing factors to, and treatment for, overuse syndromes, tendinitis, and tendon trauma commonly encountered by musical performers are discussed at length. Nerve entrapment has also surfaced as a major problem in musicians, and the means of evaluation and treatment and the role of surgery are put forth. Techniques for studying and analyzing the difficulties faced by instrumentalists are summarized.

  12. Upper extremity sensorimotor control among collegiate football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudner, Kevin G

    2012-03-01

    Injuries stemming from shoulder instability are very common among athletes participating in contact sports, such as football. Previous research has shown that increased laxity negatively affects the function of the sensorimotor system potentially leading to a pathological cycle of shoulder dysfunction. Currently, there are no data detailing such effects among football players. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the differences in upper extremity sensorimotor control among football players compared with that of a control group. Forty-five collegiate football players and 70 male control subjects with no previous experience in contact sports participated. All the subjects had no recent history of upper extremity injury. Each subject performed three 30-second upper extremity balance trials on each arm. The balance trials were conducted in a single-arm push-up position with the test arm in the center of a force platform and the subjects' feet on a labile device. The trials were averaged, and the differences in radial area deviation between groups were analyzed using separate 1-way analyses of variance (p football players showed significantly more radial area deviation of the dominant (0.41 ± 1.23 cm2, p = 0.02) and nondominant arms (0.47 ± 1.63 cm2, p = 0.03) when compared with the control group. These results suggest that football players may have decreased sensorimotor control of the upper extremity compared with individuals with no contact sport experience. The decreased upper extremity sensorimotor control among the football players may be because of the frequent impacts accumulated during football participation. Football players may benefit from exercises that target the sensorimotor system. These findings may also be beneficial in the evaluation and treatment of various upper extremity injuries among football players.

  13. Black breast cancer survivors experience greater upper extremity disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Lorraine T; DeMichele, Angela; LeBlanc, Mously; Stephens-Shields, Alisa; Li, Susan Q; Colameco, Chris; Coursey, Morgan; Mao, Jun J

    2015-11-01

    Over one-third of breast cancer survivors experience upper extremity disability. Black women present with factors associated with greater upper extremity disability, including: increased body mass index (BMI), more advanced disease stage at diagnosis, and varying treatment type compared with Whites. No prior research has evaluated the relationship between race and upper extremity disability using validated tools and controlling for these factors. Data were drawn from a survey study among 610 women with stage I-III hormone receptor positive breast cancer. The disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand (QuickDASH) is an 11-item self-administered questionnaire that has been validated for breast cancer survivors to assess global upper extremity function over the past 7 days. Linear regression and mediation analysis estimated the relationships between race, BMI and QuickDASH score, adjusting for demographics and treatment types. Black women (n = 98) had 7.3 points higher average QuickDASH scores than White (n = 512) women (p education, cancer treatment, months since diagnosis, and aromatase inhibitor status, Black women had an average 4-point (95 % confidence interval 0.18-8.01) higher QuickDASH score (p = 0.04) than White women. Mediation analysis suggested that BMI attenuated the association between race and disability by 40 %. Even several years post-treatment, Black breast cancer survivors had greater upper extremity disability, which was partially mediated by higher BMIs. Close monitoring of high BMI Black women may be an important step in reducing disparities in cancer survivorship. More research is needed on the relationship between race, BMI, and upper extremity disability.

  14. Upper extremity proprioception in healthy aging and stroke populations, and the effects of therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation therapies on proprioceptive function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charmayne Mary Lee Hughes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research.

  15. Upper extremity proprioception in healthy aging and stroke populations, and the effects of therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation therapies on proprioceptive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world's population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research.

  16. Upper Extremity Proprioception in Healthy Aging and Stroke Populations, and the Effects of Therapist- and Robot-Based Rehabilitation Therapies on Proprioceptive Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Charmayne Mary Lee; Tommasino, Paolo; Budhota, Aamani; Campolo, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    The world’s population is aging, with the number of people ages 65 or older expected to surpass 1.5 billion people, or 16% of the global total. As people age, there are notable declines in proprioception due to changes in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Moreover, the risk of stroke increases with age, with approximately two-thirds of stroke-related hospitalizations occurring in people over the age of 65. In this literature review, we first summarize behavioral studies investigating proprioceptive deficits in normally aging older adults and stroke patients, and discuss the differences in proprioceptive function between these populations. We then provide a state of the art review the literature regarding therapist- and robot-based rehabilitation of the upper extremity proprioceptive dysfunction in stroke populations and discuss avenues of future research. PMID:25784872

  17. Combined Cognitive-Strategy and Task-Specific Training Affects Cognition and Upper-Extremity Function in Subacute Stroke: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Timothy J; Polatajko, Helene; Baum, Carolyn; Rios, Jorge; Cirone, Dianne; Doherty, Meghan; McEwen, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance (CO-OP) compared with usual occupational therapy on upper-extremity movement, cognitive flexibility, and stroke impact in people less than 3 mo after stroke. An exploratory, single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with people referred to outpatient occupational therapy services at two rehabilitation centers. Arm movement was measured with the Action Research Arm Test, cognitive flexibility with the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making subtest, and stroke impact with subscales of the Stroke Impact Scale. A total of 35 participants were randomized, and 26 completed the intervention. CO-OP demonstrated measurable effects over usual care on all measures. These data provide early support for the use of CO-OP to improve performance and remediate cognitive and arm movement impairments after stroke over usual care; however, future study is warranted to confirm the effects observed in this trial.

  18. Interfacing a haptic robotic system with complex virtual environments to treat impaired upper extremity motor function in children with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    FLUET, GERARD G.; QIU, QINYIN; KELLY, DONNA; PARIKH, HETA D.; RAMIREZ, DIEGO; SALEH, SOHA; ADAMOVICH, SERGEI V.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the ability of the New Jersey Institute of Technology Robot Assisted Virtual Rehabilitation (NJIT-RAVR) system training to elicit changes in upper extremity (UE) function in children with hemiplegia secondary to cerebral palsy. Methods Nine children (mean age 9 years, three males) participated in three pilots. Subjects trained 1 hour, 3 days a week for 3 weeks. Two groups performed this protocol as their only intervention. The third group also performed 5–6 hours of constraint-induced movement therapy. Results All subjects participated in a short programme of nine, 60-minute training sessions without adverse effects. As a group, subjects demonstrated statistically significant improvements in Melbourne Assessment of Unilateral Upper Limb Function Test, a composite of three timed UE tasks and several measurements of reaching kinematics. Several subjects demonstrated clinically significant improvements in active shoulder abduction and flexion as well as forearm supination. Conclusion Three small pilots of NJIT-RAVR training demonstrated measurable benefit with no complications, warranting further examination. PMID:20828330

  19. Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Cuc; Hunt, Daniel

    2011-05-01

    Upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is less common than lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis. However, upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis is associated with similar adverse consequences and is becoming more common in patients with complex medical conditions requiring central venous catheters or wires. Although guidelines suggest that this disorder be managed using approaches similar to those for lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis, studies are refining the prognosis and management of upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis. Physicians should be familiar with the diagnostic and treatment considerations for this disease. This review will differentiate between primary and secondary upper-extremity deep venous thromboses; assess the risk factors and clinical sequelae associated with upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis, comparing these with lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis; and describe an approach to treatment and prevention of secondary upper-extremity deep venous thrombosis based on clinical evidence.

  20. Feasibility of the adaptive and automatic presentation of tasks (ADAPT system for rehabilitation of upper extremity function post-stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Younggeun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current guidelines for rehabilitation of arm and hand function after stroke recommend that motor training focus on realistic tasks that require reaching and manipulation and engage the patient intensively, actively, and adaptively. Here, we investigated the feasibility of a novel robotic task-practice system, ADAPT, designed in accordance with such guidelines. At each trial, ADAPT selects a functional task according to a training schedule and with difficulty based on previous performance. Once the task is selected, the robot picks up and presents the corresponding tool, simulates the dynamics of the tasks, and the patient interacts with the tool to perform the task. Methods Five participants with chronic stroke with mild to moderate impairments (> 9 months post-stroke; Fugl-Meyer arm score 49.2 ± 5.6 practiced four functional tasks (selected out of six in a pre-test with ADAPT for about one and half hour and 144 trials in a pseudo-random schedule of 3-trial blocks per task. Results No adverse events occurred and ADAPT successfully presented the six functional tasks without human intervention for a total of 900 trials. Qualitative analysis of trajectories showed that ADAPT simulated the desired task dynamics adequately, and participants reported good, although not excellent, task fidelity. During training, the adaptive difficulty algorithm progressively increased task difficulty leading towards an optimal challenge point based on performance; difficulty was then continuously adjusted to keep performance around the challenge point. Furthermore, the time to complete all trained tasks decreased significantly from pretest to one-hour post-test. Finally, post-training questionnaires demonstrated positive patient acceptance of ADAPT. Conclusions ADAPT successfully provided adaptive progressive training for multiple functional tasks based on participant's performance. Our encouraging results establish the feasibility of ADAPT; its

  1. Botulinum toxin-a in children with congenital spastic hemiplegia does not improve upper extremity motor-related function over rehabilitation alone: a randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rameckers, E.A.A.; Speth, L.A.; Duysens, J.E.J.; Vles, J.S.; Smits-Engelsman, B.C.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Rehabilitation of the upper extremity in children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy has not been compared to the same intensity of therapy combined with injected botulinum toxin (BTX). OBJECTIVE: To measure the short-term (2 weeks) and long-term (6 and 9 months) effects of a standardized

  2. Upper extremity constraint-induced movement therapy in infantile hemiplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvam Ramachandran

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Infantile hemiplegia is one of the clinical forms of cerebral palsy that refers to impaired motor function of one half of the body owing to contralateral brain damage due to prenatal, perinatal and postnatal causes amongst which vascular lesion is the most common causative factor. We report here the effects of constraint-induced movement therapy in a five-year-old female child with infantile hemiplegia on improvement of upper extremity motor skills.

  3. The potential power of robotics for upper extremity stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukelow, Sean P

    2017-01-01

    Two decades of research on robots and upper extremity rehabilitation has resulted in recommendations from systematic reviews and guidelines on their use in stroke. Robotics are often cited for their ability to encourage mass practice as a means to enhance recovery of movement. Yet, stroke recovery is a complex process occurring across many aspects of neurologic function beyond movement. As newer devices are developed and enhanced assessments are integrated into treatment protocols, the potential of robotics to advance rehabilitation will continue to grow.

  4. International spinal cord injury upper extremity basic data set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Bryden, A; Curt, A;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Upper Extremity Basic Data Set as part of the International SCI Data Sets, which facilitates consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population. SETTING: International. METHODS: A first draft.......iscos.org.uk). CONCLUSION: The International SCI Upper Extremity Basic Data Set will facilitate consistent collection and reporting of basic upper extremity findings in the SCI population....... of a SCI Upper Extremity Data Set was developed by an international working group. This was reviewed by many different organisations, societies and individuals over several months. A final version was created. VARIABLES: The final version of the International SCI Upper Extremity Data Set contains variables...

  5. Upper extremity thrombosis in Behçet’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adem Küçük

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Behçet’s disease (BD is a systemic disease characterizedby oral aphthosis, genital ulcers, ocular lesions andalso gastrointestinal, musculoskeletal, neurological andvessel involvements may develop. Venous manifestationsare more common than arterial involvement. Venousinvolvement often occurs in the veins of lower extremity.Upper extremity venous involvement is rare. In this paperwe report a case of BH presenting with upper extremitysuperficial vein thrombosis.Key words: Behçet’s disease, upper extremity, superficialvein thrombosis

  6. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    OpenAIRE

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der, D; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous thrombosis. In this review an overview of the different risk factors, possible treatments and the complications for patients with a venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is given

  7. Combined Cognitive-Strategy and Task-Specific Training Affects Cognition and Upper-Extremity Function in Subacute Stroke: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polatajko, Helene; Baum, Carolyn; Rios, Jorge; Cirone, Dianne; Doherty, Meghan; McEwen, Sara

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effect of Cognitive Orientation to Daily Occupational Performance (CO–OP) compared with usual occupational therapy on upper-extremity movement, cognitive flexibility, and stroke impact in people less than 3 mo after stroke. An exploratory, single-blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with people referred to outpatient occupational therapy services at two rehabilitation centers. Arm movement was measured with the Action Research Arm Test, cognitive flexibility with the Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System Trail Making subtest, and stroke impact with subscales of the Stroke Impact Scale. A total of 35 participants were randomized, and 26 completed the intervention. CO–OP demonstrated measurable effects over usual care on all measures. These data provide early support for the use of CO–OP to improve performance and remediate cognitive and arm movement impairments after stroke over usual care; however, future study is warranted to confirm the effects observed in this trial. PMID:26943113

  8. Evaluation of the box and blocks test, stereognosis and item banks of activity and upper extremity function in youths with brachial plexus birth palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahey, Mary Jane; Kozin, Scott; Merenda, Lisa; Gaughan, John; Tian, Feng; Gogola, Gloria; James, Michelle A; Ni, Pengsheng

    2012-09-01

    One of the greatest limitations to measuring outcomes in pediatric orthopaedics is the lack of effective instruments. Computer adaptive testing, which uses large item banks, select only items that are relevant to a child's function based on a previous response and filters items that are too easy or too hard or simply not relevant to the child. In this way, computer adaptive testing provides for a meaningful, efficient, and precise method to evaluate patient-reported outcomes. Banks of items that assess activity and upper extremity (UE) function have been developed for children with cerebral palsy and have enabled computer adaptive tests that showed strong reliability, strong validity, and broader content range when compared with traditional instruments. Because of the void in instruments for children with brachial plexus birth palsy (BPBP) and the importance of having an UE and activity scale, we were interested in how well these items worked in this population. Cross-sectional, multicenter study involving 200 children with BPBP was conducted. The box and block test (BBT) and Stereognosis tests were administered and patient reports of UE function and activity were obtained with the cerebral palsy item banks. Differential item functioning (DIF) was examined. Predictive ability of the BBT and stereognosis was evaluated with proportional odds logistic regression model. Spearman correlations coefficients (rs) were calculated to examine correlation between stereognosis and the BBT and between individual stereognosis items and the total stereognosis score. Six of the 86 items showed DIF, indicating that the activity and UE item banks may be useful for computer adaptive tests for children with BPBP. The penny and the button were strongest predictors of impairment level (odds ratio=0.34 to 0.40]. There was a good positive relationship between total stereognosis and BBT scores (rs=0.60). The BBT had a good negative (rs=-0.55) and good positive (rs=0.55) relationship with

  9. Current perspective of venous thrombosis in the upper extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flinterman, L.E.; Meer, van der F.J.M.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Doggen, C.J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Venous thrombosis of the upper extremity is a rare disease. Therefore, not as much is known about risk factors, treatment and the risk of recurrence as for venous thrombosis of the leg. Only central venous catheters and strenuous exercise are commonly known risk factors for an upper extremity venous

  10. Congenital monomelic muscular hypertrophy of the upper extremity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Zophel, O.T.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological muscular hypertrophy results from either muscular or neurogenic damage. Rarely, it is caused by a congenital malformation consisting of a unilateral muscular hyperplasia of the upper extremity. We report on a young woman with an enlargement of the right upper extremity. Electromyography

  11. Congenital monomelic muscular hypertrophy of the upper extremity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilhuis, H.J.; Zophel, O.T.; Lammens, M.M.Y.; Zwarts, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Pathological muscular hypertrophy results from either muscular or neurogenic damage. Rarely, it is caused by a congenital malformation consisting of a unilateral muscular hyperplasia of the upper extremity. We report on a young woman with an enlargement of the right upper extremity. Electromyography

  12. Reduction of pain-related fear and increased function and participation in work-related upper extremity pain (WRUEP): effects of exposure in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, Jeroen R; Vlaeyen, Johan W S; van Eijsden, Marjon; Loo, Christoph; Onghena, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    There is increasing evidence that pain-related fear influences the development and maintenance of pain disability, presumably mediated through the fear-related avoidance of valued activities. Individually tailored graded exposure in vivo (GEXP) has been demonstrated to reduce pain-related fear and increase functional abilities in patients with chronic low back pain, neck pain, and complex regional pain syndrome. The current study aimed to test whether these effects generalize towards patients with work-related upper extremity pain. A sequential replicated and randomized single-case experimental phase design with multiple measurements was used. Within each participant, GEXP was compared to a no-treatment baseline period and a no-treatment 6-month follow-up period. Eight patients who reported a high level of pain-related fear were included in the study. Daily changes in pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, and pain intensity were assessed using a diary, and subjected to randomization tests. Before the start of the baseline period, just after GEXP, and at 6-month follow-up, clinically relevant changes of pain catastrophizing, pain-related fear, perceived harmfulness of physical activity, pain disability, and participation/autonomy were verified. When GEXP was introduced, levels of pain catastrophizing and pain-related fear decreased significantly. Clinically relevant improvements were observed for pain disability, perceived participation, and autonomy. These favourable changes were maintained until 6-month follow-up. The findings of the current study underscore the external validity of a cognitive-behavioural GEXP treatment for patients with chronic pain reporting increased pain-related fear.

  13. Mirror therapy enhances upper extremity motor recovery in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirela Cristina, Luca; Matei, Daniela; Ignat, Bogdan; Popescu, Cristian Dinu

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of mirror therapy program in addition with physical therapy methods on upper limb recovery in patients with subacute ischemic stroke. 15 subjects followed a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment, 8 subjects received only control therapy (CT) and 7 subjects received mirror therapy (MT) for 30 min every day, five times a week, for 6 weeks in addition to the conventional therapy. Brunnstrom stages, Fugl-Meyer Assessment (upper extremity), the Ashworth Scale, and Bhakta Test (finger flexion scale) were used to assess changes in upper limb motor recovery and motor function after intervention. After 6 weeks of treatment, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in the variables measured. Patients who received MT showed greater improvements compared to the CT group. The MT treatment results included: improvement of motor functions, manual skills and activities of daily living. The best results were obtained when the treatment was started soon after the stroke. MT is an easy and low-cost method to improve motor recovery of the upper limb.

  14. Association Between Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Genotype and Upper Extremity Motor Outcome After Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Won Hyuk; Park, Eunhee; Lee, Jungsoo; Lee, Ahee; Kim, Yun-Hee

    2017-06-01

    The identification of intrinsic factors for predicting upper extremity motor outcome could aid the design of individualized treatment plans in stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this study was to identify prognostic factors, including intrinsic genetic factors, for upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke. A total of 97 patients with subacute stroke were enrolled. Upper limb motor impairment was scored according to the upper limb of Fugl-Meyer assessment score at 3 months after stroke. The prediction of upper extremity motor outcome at 3 months was modeled using various factors that could potentially influence this impairment, including patient characteristics, baseline upper extremity motor impairment, functional and structural integrity of the corticospinal tract, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype. Multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were used to identify the significance of each factor. The independent predictors of motor outcome at 3 months were baseline upper extremity motor impairment, age, stroke type, and corticospinal tract functional integrity in all stroke patients. However, in the group with severe motor impairment at baseline (upper limb score of Fugl-Meyer assessment stroke. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor genotype may be a potentially useful predictor of upper extremity motor outcome in patients with subacute stroke with severe baseline motor involvement. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. Skin Cancer of the Hand and Upper Extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Skin Cancer of the Hand and Upper Extremity Email to ... E – Evolving (changing in any way) How is Skin Cancer Diagnosed? Diagnosis starts with you asking your doctor ...

  16. Characterisation and Outcomes of Upper Extremity Amputations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    www.warms.vba.va.gov/bookc.html [accessed 01.10.10]. [14] Biddiss EA, Chau TT. Upper limb prosthesis use and abandonment: a survey of the last 25 years...combat injured patient. Foot Ankle Clin 2010;15(1):157–74. [22] Harvey ZT, Loomis GA, Mitsch S, Murphy IC, Griffin SC, Potter BK, et al. Advanced

  17. Survey of upper extremity injuries among martial arts participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesselhorst, Matthew M; Rayan, Ghazi M; Pasque, Charles B; Peyton Holder, R

    2013-01-01

    To survey participants at various experience levels of different martial arts (MA) about upper extremity injuries sustained during training and fighting. A 21-s question survey was designed and utilised. The survey was divided into four groups (Demographics, Injury Description, Injury Mechanism, and Miscellaneous information) to gain knowledge about upper extremity injuries sustained during martial arts participation. Chi-square testing was utilised to assess for significant associations. Males comprised 81% of respondents. Involvement in multiple forms of MA was the most prevalent (38%). The hand/wrist was the most common area injured (53%), followed by the shoulder/upper arm (27%) and the forearm/elbow (19%). Joint sprains/muscle strains were the most frequent injuries reported overall (47%), followed by abrasions/bruises (26%). Dislocations of the upper extremity were reported by 47% of participants while fractures occurred in 39%. Surgeries were required for 30% of participants. Females were less likely to require surgery and more likely to have shoulder and elbow injuries. Males were more likely to have hand injuries. Participants of Karate and Tae Kwon Do were more likely to have injuries to their hands, while participants of multiple forms were more likely to sustain injuries to their shoulders/upper arms and more likely to develop chronic upper extremity symptoms. With advanced level of training the likelihood of developing chronic upper extremity symptoms increases, and multiple surgeries were required. Hand protection was associated with a lower risk of hand injuries. Martial arts can be associated with substantial upper extremity injuries that may require surgery and extended time away from participation. Injuries may result in chronic upper extremity symptoms. Hand protection is important for reducing injuries to the hand and wrist.

  18. Longitudinal evaluation of upper extremity reachable workspace in ALS by Kinect sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bie, Evan; Oskarsson, Bjorn; Joyce, Nanette C; Nicorici, Alina; Kurillo, Gregorij; Han, Jay J

    2017-02-01

    Our objective was to evaluate longitudinal changes in Microsoft Kinect measured upper extremity reachable workspace relative surface area (RSA) versus the revised Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Functional Rating Scale (ALSFRS-R), ALSFRS-R upper extremity sub-scale and Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) in a cohort of patients diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Ten patients diagnosed with ALS (ages 52-76 years, ALSFRS-R: 8-41 at entry) were tested using single 3D depth sensor, Microsoft Kinect, to measure reachable workspace RSA across five visits spanning one year. Changes in RSA, ALSFRS-R, ALSFRS-R upper extremity sub-scale, and FVC were assessed using a linear mixed model. Results showed that upper lateral quadrant RSA declined significantly in one year by approximately 19% (p <0.01) while all other quadrants and total RSA did not change significantly in this time-period. Simultaneously, ALSFRS-R upper extremity sub-scale worsened significantly by 25% (p <0.01). In conclusion, upper extremity reachable workspace RSA as a novel ALS outcome measure is capable of objectively quantifying declines in upper extremity ability over time in patients with ALS with more granularity than other common outcome measures. RSA may serve as a clinical endpoint for the evaluation of upper extremity targeted therapeutics.

  19. Ergotamine-induced upper extremity ischemia: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Man Deuk; Lee, Gun [Bundang CHA General Hospital, Pochon (China); Shin, Sung Wook [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    Ergotamine-induced limb ischemia is an extremely rare case. We present a case of a 64-year-old man, who developed ischemia on the right upper extremity due to long-term use of Ergot for migraine headache. Angiography revealed diffused, smooth, and tapered narrowing of the brachial artery. The patient was successfully treated with intravenous nitroprusside.

  20. A Case Report on Upper Extremity Pain of Cardiac Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turgay Altınbilek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Upper extremity pain can originate from the musculoskeletal system, or be a reflection of problems originating from various organs. Therefore, it is highly important to perform a detailed clinical evaluation on patients during differential diagnosis. In this case report, we present a 61 year-old male patient who was admitted with pain in both upper extremities and the upper back that presumed to be of cardiac origin following our clinical evaluations. The patient was referred to the cardiology department, where he was diagnosed with coronary heart disease. The patient’s complaints of pain were fully resolved through the application of an intracoronary stent.

  1. Recapitulating flesh with silicon and steel: advancements in upper extremity robotic prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brian; Attenello, Frank J; Liu, Charles Y; McLoughlin, Michael P; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2014-01-01

    With the loss of function of an upper extremity because of stroke or spinal cord injury or a physical loss from amputation, an individual's life is forever changed, and activities that were once routine become a magnitude more difficult. Much research and effort have been put into developing advanced robotic prostheses to restore upper extremity function. For patients with upper extremity amputations, previously crude prostheses have evolved to become exceptionally functional. Because the upper extremities can perform a wide variety of activities, several types of upper extremity prostheses are available ranging from passive cosmetic limbs to externally powered robotic limbs. In addition, new developments in brain-machine interface are poised to revolutionize how patients can control these advanced prostheses using their thoughts alone. For patients with spinal cord injury or stroke, functional electrical stimulation promises to provide the most sophisticated prosthetic limbs possible by reanimating paralyzed arms of these patients. Advances in technology and robotics continue to help patients recover vital function. This article examines the latest neurorestorative technologies for patients who have either undergone amputation or lost the use of their upper extremities secondary to stroke or spinal cord injury.

  2. Application of virtual reality technique in rehabilitation of hemiplegic upper extremities function of stroke patients%虚拟现实技术在脑卒中患者偏瘫上肢功能康复中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁明; 窦祖林; 王清辉; 熊巍; 郑雅丹; 陈颖蓓; 杨琼; 邱雅贤

    2013-01-01

    目的:初步观察虚拟厨房上肢康复训练结合常规作业治疗对脑卒中恢复期患者偏瘫上肢功能康复的临床疗效.方法:将33例脑卒中恢复期偏瘫上肢功能障碍的患者随机分为治疗组(16例)和对照组(17例).对照组接受常规作业治疗每次40min,每日1次,每周5次,共3周.治疗组接受常规作业治疗和虚拟厨房上肢康复训练各20min,每次共40min,每日1次,每周5次,共3周.其余康复治疗如运动疗法和日常生活活动训练等两组均相同.两组患者分别于治疗前、治疗后予以FMA上肢部分(FMA-UE)、MAS上肢部分(MAS-UE)和MBI评定,比较两组的疗效.结果:两组患者治疗后FMA-UE、MAS-UE及MBI的评分均较治疗前提高,治疗前、后各量表的评分差异具有显著性(P< 0.05);与对照组相比,治疗组患者FMA-UE、MBI的评分提高幅度更大(P<0.05).结论:虚拟厨房上肢康复训练结合常规康复作业治疗能更好地改善脑卒中恢复期患者偏瘫上肢的运动功能,更有效地提高患者日常生活活动能力.%Objective: To observe the effect of virtual kitchen upper extremities training combined with traditional occupational therapy on hemiplegic upper extremities function of stroke patients in convalescent phase. Method: Thirty-three stroke patients with hemiplegic upper extremities dysfunction in convalescent phase, were divided into therapy group (n=16) and control group (n=17). The patients in control group accepted traditional occupational therapy, 40 min/d, 5d/week for 3 weeks. The patients in therapy group accepted virtual kitchen upper extremities training and traditional occupational therapy. Each part of virtual reality trainning lasted 20 min and the total was 40 min, the training schedule in therapy group was 40min/rl, 5d/week for 3 weeks. Physical therapy and training of activities of daily living were the same in both groups. Fugl-Meyer assessment of upper extremity (FMA-UE), motor assessment scale

  3. Lymphatic Filariasis Disseminating to the Upper Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Maldjian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphatic filariasis is the most common cause of acquired lymphedema worldwide (Szuba and Rockson, 1998. It is endemic to tropical and subtropical regions, and its effects are devastating. With over 100 million infected persons, it ranks second only to leprosy as the leading cause of permanent and long-term disability. Wuchereria bancrofti is the etiologic agent in 90% of cases. There is a dearth of published MRI findings with pathologically proven active infections, making this entity even more of a diagnostic dilemma. Imaging may provide the first clue that one is dealing with a parasite and may facilitate proper treatment and containment of this disease. This is the first report of pathologic correlation with MRI findings in the extremity in active filariasis. The magnetic resonance images demonstrate an enhancing, infiltrative, mass-like appearance with partial encasement of vasculature that has not been previously described in filariasis. Low signal strands in T2-hyperintense dilated lymphatic channels are seen and may depict live adult worms. We hypothesize that the low signal strands correspond to the collagen rich acellular cuticle. This, in combination with the surrounding hyperintense T2 signal, corresponding to a dilated lymphatic channel, may provide more specific MRI findings for active nematodal infection, which can prompt early biopsy, pathological correlation, and diagnosis.

  4. Abnormalities of the upper extremities on fetal magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, S F; Kasprian, G; Brugger, P C; Bettelheim, D; Amann, G; Nemec, U; Rotmensch, S; Graham, J M; Rimoin, D L; Lachman, R S; Prayer, D

    2011-11-01

    In view of the increasing use of fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an adjunct to prenatal ultrasonography, we sought to demonstrate the visualization of upper extremity abnormalities and associated defects on MRI, with regard to fetal outcomes and compared with ultrasound imaging. This retrospective study included 29 fetuses with upper extremity abnormalities visualized with fetal MRI following suspicious ultrasound findings and confirmed by postnatal assessment or autopsy. On a 1.5-Tesla unit, dedicated sequences were applied to image the extremities. Central nervous system (CNS) and extra-CNS anomalies were assessed to define extremity abnormalities as isolated or as complex, with associated defects. Fetal outcome was identified from medical records. MRI and ultrasound findings, when available, were compared. Isolated upper extremity abnormalities were found in three (10.3%) fetuses. In 26 (89.7%) fetuses complex abnormalities, including postural extremity disorders (21/26) and structural extremity abnormalities (15/26), were demonstrated. Associated defects involved: face (15/26); musculoskeletal system (14/26); thorax and cardio/pulmonary system (12/26); lower extremities (12/26); brain and skull (10/26); and abdomen (8/26). Of the 29 cases, 18 (62.1%) pregnancies were delivered and 11 (37.9%) were terminated. MRI and US findings were compared in 27/29 cases: the diagnosis was concordant in 14 (51.9%) of these cases, and additional findings were made on MRI in 13/27 (48.1%) cases. Visualization of upper extremity abnormalities on fetal MRI enables differentiation between isolated defects and complex ones, which may be related to poor fetal prognosis. MRI generally confirms the ultrasound diagnosis, and may provide additional findings in certain cases. Copyright © 2011 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Satisfaction with upper extremity surgery in individuals with tetraplegia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Hanne; Lybæk, Mille; Lauge Johannesen, Inger

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To supplement the scant information available regarding the satisfaction of patients with tetraplegia following upper extremity reconstructive surgery for such individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study with questionnaire follow-up. SETTING: The Danish...... questions (P satisfaction with upper extremity surgery is high. It can have a positive impact on life in general, ability to perform ADL, as well as supplying an increased level of independence....... to strongly disagree regarding satisfaction. Forty patients completed the questionnaire. RESULTS: Median time from first surgery was 13 years (2-36). Sixty-five percent of the sample had a C5-C6 SCI, with 64% experiencing complete injury. Initially, 76% of the sample expressed general satisfaction with life......OBJECTIVE: To supplement the scant information available regarding the satisfaction of patients with tetraplegia following upper extremity reconstructive surgery for such individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI). STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study with questionnaire follow-up. SETTING: The Danish...

  6. Study on reliability of Carroll upper extremities functional test in children with spastic hemiplegia%Carroll上肢功能试验在痉挛型偏瘫儿童中的信度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何璐; 徐开寿; 邱晒红; 靳晓坤; 麦坚凝

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the inter-rater reliability of Carroll upper extremities functional test (UEFT) for children with spastic hemiplegia in order to guide the clinical practice.Method: Thirty children who could understand simple orders with spastic hemiplegia were enrolled into this study. Carroll UEFT was applied to assess both upper extremities of each child by two trained occupational therapists. They evaluated subjects respectively at the same time, but didn't talk each other about children's scores in assessment course. The data statistics was performed by the authors who hadn't taken part in the assessment. The scores of five function areas(including grasping-holding, pinching, placing, rotating and writing) of UEFT and the total scores of UEFT were analyzed respectively.The inter-rater reliability was investigated on each extremity over both test sessions, and it was determined through the calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Result: There was good inter-rater reliability of UEFT on each function area score, not only for the involved upper extremity (ICC=0.921-1), but also for the non-involved upper extremity (ICC=0.926-0.973). They all concentrated in the 95% confidence interval (P<0.001).Conclusion: The Carroll UEFT demonstrated satisfactory inter-rater reliability for the upper extremities function of children with spastic hemiplegia. The UEFT is easy to implement and accurate for assessment, so it can be used as upper extremities function measure tool for children with spastic hemiplegia.Author's address Department of Neurology and Rehabilitation, Guangzhou Children's Hospital. Guangzhou Women and Children's Medical Center,Guangzhou.510120%检验Carroll上肢功能试验(UEFT)在痉挛型偏瘫儿童中的信度,为Carroll上肢功能试验在痉挛型偏瘫儿童的临床应用提供客观依据.方法:选取30例能理解简单指令的痉挛型偏瘫儿童参加本研究,由两位熟练掌握UEF评分标准的作业治疗师

  7. Thermograpic study of upper extremities in patients with cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampe, R.; Kawelke, S.; Mitternacht, J.; Turova, V.; Blumenstein, T.; Alves-Pinto, A.

    2015-03-01

    Trophic disorders like reduced skin blood circulation are well-known epiphenomenon of cerebral palsy (CP). They can influence quality of life and can lead to skin damages and, as a consequence, to decubitus. Therefore, it is important to analyse temperature regulation in patients with CP. Thermal imaging camera FLIR BCAM SD was used to study the dependency of skin blood circulation in upper extremities of patients with CP on hand dominance, hand force and hand volume. The hand force was evaluated using a conventional dynamometer. The hand volume was measured with a volumeter. A cold stress test for hands was applied in 22 patients with CP and 6 healthy subjects. The warming up process after the test was recorded with the thermal camera. It was confirmed that the hands of patients warm up slower comparing to healthy persons. The patients' working hands warm up faster than non-working ones. A slight correlation was established between the hand grip force of the working hands and their warm up time. No correlation was found between the warming up time and the volume of the hand. The results confirm our assumption that there is a connection of peripheral blood circulation to upper limb motor functions.

  8. Aggressive intramuscular hemangiomas in the upper extremity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hui; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Hu; Shen, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Intramuscular hemangioma (IMH) is a rare congenital soft tissue tumor. Here, we report a case of IMH patient who had undergone several surgeries and other treatments that were all ineffective before he visited us. Clinical Findings: This IMH patient was a 16-yearold male who was born with a tumor of unknown size in his right hand and forearm. On physical examination, the tumor and skin flap complex was seen with a size of 14 cm_12 cm in his right hand, and the multiple postoperative scars were shown on his right hand and forearm. The patient was not able to raise his right shoulder, and the ranges of motion of his right elbow, wrist, and finger were almost zero degrees. Interventions: Considering that the tumor had been surgically excised for several times and the multiple recurrences had affected adversely his daily life, an amputation of his right hand, forearm, and the part of his right arm was performed. Diagnoses: The pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of IMH. Outcomes: After the amputation surgery, the patient gained a functional recovery and the tumor did not recur during the 2 years after the surgery. Conclusion: A treatment of choice should be personalized according to an IMH patient's overall situation. For an IMH patient like our case with a history of multiple tumor recurrences, we suggest that an amputation surgery should be performed as early as possible to avoid the repeated, but ineffective surgical excisions and the unnecessary sufferings. PMID:28099360

  9. Predicting Recovery of Voluntary Upper Extremity Movement in Subacute Stroke Patients with Severe Upper Extremity Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Chia-Lin; Pan, Shin-Liang; Jeng, Jiann-Shing; Chen, Bang-Bin; Wang, Yen-Ho; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective Prediction of voluntary upper extremity (UE) movement recovery is largely unknown in patients with little voluntary UE movement at admission. The present study aimed to investigate (1) the extent and variation of voluntary UE movement recovery, and (2) the best predictive model of the recovery of voluntary UE movement by clinical variables in patients with severe UE paresis. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods 140 (out of 590) stroke patients with severe UE paresis completed all assessments. Voluntary UE movement was assessed using the UE subscale of the Stroke Rehabilitation Assessment of Movement (STREAM-UE). Two outcome measures, STREAM-UE scores at discharge (DCSTREAM-UE) and changes between admission and discharge (ΔSTREAM-UE), were investigated to represent the final states and improvement of the recovery of voluntary UE movement. Stepwise regression analyses were used to investigate 19 clinical variables and to find the best predictive models of the two outcome measures. Results The participants showed wide variation in both DCSTREAM-UE and ΔSTREAM-UE. 3.6% of the participants almost fully recovered at discharge (DCSTREAM-UE > 15). A large improvement (ΔSTREAM-UE >= 10) occurred in 16.4% of the participants, while 32.9% of the participants did not have any improvement. The four predictors for the DCSTREAM-UE (R2 = 35.0%) were ‘baseline STREAM-UE score’, ‘hemorrhagic stroke’, ‘baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score’, and ‘cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex’. The three predictors for the ΔSTREAM-UE (R2 = 22.0%) were ‘hemorrhagic stroke’, ‘baseline NIHSS score’, and ‘cortical lesion excluding primary motor cortex’. Conclusions Recovery of voluntary UE movement varied widely in patients with severe UE paresis after stroke. The predictive power of clinical variables was poor. Both results indicate the complex nature of voluntary UE movement recovery in patients

  10. EFFECT OF MIRROR THERAPY ON HEMIPARETIC UPPER EXTREMITY IN SUBACUTE STROKE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshini Rajappan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Stroke is one of the most common causes for chronic disability. Only 5 to 20% of stroke survivors attain complete functional recovery of their affected upper extremity. The primary objective of this study was to investigate the effect of mirror therapy on hemiparetic upper extremity motor recovery and functions in patients with subacute stroke. Methods: A total of 30 participants were selected for the study. They were randomly assigned to Mirror Therapy Group (MTG and Sham Mirror Therapy Group (SMTG with fifteen participants in each group. All the participants equally took part in conventional stroke rehabilitation program 5 days a week for 4 weeks. In addition to the conventional stroke rehabilitation program, MTG participated in 30 minutes of mirror therapy and SMTG received 30 minutes of sham mirror therapy for the affected hemiparetic upper limb. The participants were measured for upper extremity motor recovery and functions by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA-UE and Upper Extremity Functional Index (UEFI scales respectively. Results: Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Mann Whitney U test were used to statistically analyze the data. Spearman correlational technique was used to analyze the relationship between upper limb functions and motor recovery of hand. Based on Wilcoxon signed ranks test, the results were highly significant (p<0.05. On the basis of Mann Whitney U test, Mirror therapy group showed high significance (p<0.05 than sham mirror therapy group. The Spearman’s rho value was 0.65 which indicated moderate to maximum positive correlation between the two variables and the alpha level was set at 0.01. Conclusion: This study concludes that incorporating mirror therapy in subacute stroke rehabilitation program improves the hemiparetic upper extremity motor recovery and its functions and also motor recovery of hand can directly influence the upper limb functions.

  11. Management of penetrating injuries of the upper extremities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.J.F. van Waes (Oscar); P.H. Navsaria; R.C. Verschuren (Renske Cm); L.C. Vroon (Laurens); E.M.M. van Lieshout (Esther); J.A. Halm (Jens); A.J. Nicol; J. Vermeulen (Jefrey)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Routine surgical exploration after penetrating upper extremity trauma (PUET) to exclude arterial injury leads to a large number of negative explorations and iatrogenic injuries. Selective non-operative management (SNOM) is gaining in favor for patients with PUET. The present

  12. Upper extremity hemodynamics and sensation with backpack loads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae Hoon; Neuschwander, Timothy B; Macias, Brandon R; Bachman, Larry; Hargens, Alan R

    2014-05-01

    Heavy backpacks are often used in extreme environments, for example by military during combat, therefore completion of tasks quickly and efficiently is of operational relevance. The purpose of this study was to quantify hemodynamic parameters (brachial artery Doppler and microvascular flow by photoplethysmography; tissue oxygenation by near-infrared spectroscopy; arterial oxygen saturation by pulse oximeter) and sensation in upper extremities and hands (Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test and 2-point discrimination test) while wearing a loaded backpack (12 kg) in healthy adults for 10 min. All values were compared to baseline before wearing a backpack. Moderate weight loaded backpack loads significantly decreased upper extremity sensation as well as all macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamic values. Decreased macrovascular and microvascular hemodynamics may produce neurological dysfunction and consequently, probably affect fine motor control of the hands.

  13. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Ege

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS. However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the environmental circumstance. The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the extent of extremity injuries due to ballistic missiles and to detect the reliability of mangled extremity severity score (MESS in both upper and lower extremities. Materials and Methods: Between 2004 and 2014, 139 Gustillo Anderson Type III open fractures of both the upper and lower extremities were enrolled in the study. Data for patient age, fire arm type, transporting time from the field to the hospital (and the method, injury severity scores, MESS scores, fracture types, amputation levels, bone fixation methods and postoperative infections and complications retrieved from the two level-2 trauma center's data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the MESS were calculated to detect the ability in deciding amputation in the mangled limb. Results: Amputation was performed in 39 extremities and limb salvage attempted in 100 extremities. The mean followup time was 14.6 months (range 6–32 months. In the amputated group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremity were 8.8 (range 6–11 and 9.24 (range 6–11, respectively. In the limb salvage group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremities were 5.29 (range 4–7 and 5.19 (range 3–8, respectively. Sensitivity of MESS in upper and lower extremities were calculated as 80% and 79.4% and positive predictive values detected as 55.55% and 83.3%, respectively. Specificity of MESS

  14. Invited commentary on comparison of robotics, functional electrical stimulation, and motor learning methods for treatment of persistent upper extremity dysfunction after stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwakkel, Gert; van Wegen, Erwin E; Meskers, Carel M

    2015-06-01

    In this issue of Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Jessica McCabe and colleagues report findings from their methodologically sound, dose-matched clinical trial in 39 patients beyond 6 months poststroke. In this phase II trial, the effects of 60 treatment sessions, each involving 3.5 hours of intensive practice plus either 1.5 hours of functional electrical stimulation (FES) or a shoulder-arm robotic therapy, were compared with 5 hours of intensive daily practice alone. Although no significant between-group differences were found on the primary outcome measure of Arm Motor Ability Test and the secondary outcome measure of Fugl-Meyer Arm motor score, 10% to 15% within-group therapeutic gains were on the Arm Motor Ability Test and Fugl-Meyer Arm. These gains are clinically meaningful for patients with stroke. However, the underlying mechanisms that drive these improvements remain poorly understood. The approximately $1000 cost reduction per patient calculated for the use of motor learning (ML) methods alone or combined with FES, compared with the combination of ML and shoulder-arm robotics, further emphasizes the need for cost considerations when making clinical decisions about selecting the most appropriate therapy for the upper paretic limb in patients with chronic stroke.

  15. The impact of high-frequency magnetic stimulation of peripheral nerves: muscle hardness, venous blood flow, and motor function of upper extremity in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okudera, Yoshihiko; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of high-frequency peripheral nerve magnetic stimulation on the upper limb function. Twenty-five healthy adults (16 men and 9 women) participated in this study. The radial nerve of the non-dominant hand was stimulated by high-frequency magnetic stimulation device. A total of 600 impulses were applied at a frequency of 20 Hz and intensity of 1.2 resting motor threshold (rMT). At three time points (before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation), muscle hardness of the extensor digitorum muscle on the stimulated side was measured using a mechanical tissue hardness meter and a shear wave imaging device, cephalic venous blood flow on the stimulated side was measured using an ultrasound system, and the Box and Block test (BBT) was performed. Mechanical tissue hardness results did not show any significant differences between before, immediately after, and 15 min after stimulation. Measurements via shear wave imaging showed that muscle hardness significantly decreased both immediately and 15 min after stimulation compared to before stimulation (P nerve magnetic stimulation can achieve effects similar to electrical stimulation in a less invasive manner, and may therefore become an important element in next-generation rehabilitation.

  16. Principios de evaluación y resultados funcionales en los reimplantes de miembro superior Principles of evaluation and functional results in upper extremity replantation surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Camporro Fernández

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es evaluar nuestros resultados funcionales y subjetivos en pacientes sometidos a reimplante de miembro superior. Medimos rango de movilidad articular, fuerza de la prensión y otros tests en 41 pacientes con edad media 44,8 años que sufrieron amputación de miembro superior y fueron sometidos a reimplante quirúrgico en nuestro hospital entre enero del 2005 y diciembre del 2009. Los resultados funcionales se midieron con la tabla de Mayo modificada para lesiones de pulgar, dedos largos y mano, distal a muñeca. Las amputaciones proximales a muñeca se evaluaron según los criterios de Chen. Los resultados subjetivos fueron documentados aplicando a todos los casos el cuestionario de Russell. La mayoría de las lesiones fueron provocadas por mecanismos de avulsión y 30 (74 % fueron accidentes laborales. La tasa final de supervivencia fue del 85 % (35 pacientes incluyendo 2 pacientes en los que se realizó trasplante de pie a mano para salvar la amputación. Aplicando la tabla de Mayo modificada, los resultados fueron buenos en pulgar y discretos en mano y dedos largos. En reimplantes proximales obtuvimos 1 resultado excelente y 2 discretos. Diecinueve pacientes retornaron al mundo laboral en una media de 10 meses. Veintisiete manifiestan satisfacción alta con los resultados obtenidos. Los resultados de cualquier reimplante deben superar los del cierre simple de una amputación. Aunque los resultados objetivos de la serie son moderados, muchos pacientes retornan al trabajo y la mayoría es capaz de realizar sus actividades cotidianas.The aim of this study was to evaluate functional and subjective outcome after upper limb replantation, with assessment or range of motions, grip strength, and additional functional tests. Forty-one patients, mean age 44.8 years old, with upper limb amputations were treated in our hospital with replantation between January 2005 and December 2009. Functional results were assessed by

  17. Functional metagenomics of extreme environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirete, Salvador; Morgante, Verónica; González-Pastor, José Eduardo

    2016-04-01

    The bioprospecting of enzymes that operate under extreme conditions is of particular interest for many biotechnological and industrial processes. Nevertheless, there is a considerable limitation to retrieve novel enzymes as only a small fraction of microorganisms derived from extreme environments can be cultured under standard laboratory conditions. Functional metagenomics has the advantage of not requiring the cultivation of microorganisms or previous sequence information to known genes, thus representing a valuable approach for mining enzymes with new features. In this review, we summarize studies showing how functional metagenomics was employed to retrieve genes encoding for proteins involved not only in molecular adaptation and resistance to extreme environmental conditions but also in other enzymatic activities of biotechnological interest.

  18. A hybrid joint based controller for an upper extremity exoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Taha, Zahari; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Hakeem Deboucha, Abdel; Azraai Mohd Razman, Mohd; Aziz Jaafar, Abdul; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton. The Euler-Lagrange formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the human upper limb as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. The human model is based on anthropometrical measurements of the upper limb. The proportional-derivative (PD) computed torque control (CTC) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives specifically in rehabilitating the elbow and shoulder joints along the sagittal plane. An active force control (AFC) algorithm is also incorporated into the PD-CTC to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. It was found that the AFC- PD-CTC performs well against the disturbances introduced into the system whilst achieving acceptable trajectory tracking as compared to the conventional PD-CTC control architecture.

  19. 康复机器人训练对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能的影响%Effect of rehabilitation robot on upper extremity function of hemiplegic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙耀斌

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To observe the effect of the upper limb rehabilitation robot combined with conventional rehabilitation on upper extremity function of hemiplegic patients. Methods: 80 cases of hemiplegic upper limb dysfunction were divided into two groups. Both groups were given normal limb function training, at the same time the treatment group was given the upper iitnb rehabilitation robot training. Modified ashworth scale (MAS) score, simplified Fugl-Meyer upper limb motor function (FMA) score and the modified Barthel index (MBI) were compared before and after the treatment. Results: After 1 month of treatment, MAS scores in two groups were decreased as compared with those before treatment (F<0. 05), and those in treatment group was reduced as compared with control group (P<0. 05). FMA and ADL in two groups after treatment were improved as compared with those before treatment(Pupper limb rehabilitation robot training with conventional rehabilitation can not only effectively improve the upper limb function of hemiplegic patients, but also can promote the recovery of activities of daily living.%目的:探讨上肢康复机器人训练结合常规康复治疗对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能的影响.方法:80例脑梗死患者随机分为2组,均接受基础药物治疗和常规康复治疗;观察组增加上肢康复机器人训练.治疗前后分别进行上肢肌张力改良Ashworth量表(MAS)评分、上肢运动功能(FMA)评分及改良Barthel指数(MBI)评定.结果:治疗1个月后,2组患者上肢MAS评分均较治疗前明显下降(P<0.05),且观察组更低于对照组(P<0.05);FMA及改良Barthel指数(MBI)评分均较治疗前明显提高(P<0.05),且观察组较对照组更加显著(P<0.05).结论:上肢康复机器人训练结合常规康复治疗不仅能改善脑梗死患者上肢功能,而且能促进日常生活活动能力的恢复.

  20. Upper extremity venous thrombosis. Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmers, D W; Thorpe, P E; Knibbe, M A; Beard, D W

    1990-02-01

    Upper extremity venous thrombosis is a clinical entity with numerous etiologic factors. Only 2% of all cases of deep venous thrombosis involve the upper extremity, and the incidence of pulmonary embolism related to thrombosis in this location is approximately 12%. Primary or "effort" thrombosis of the upper limb is related to the inherent anatomical structure of the thoracic outlet and axillary region. Secondary thrombosis may have such diverse origins as trauma, infection, congestive heart failure, central venous catheters, neoplasms, septic phlebitis, intravenous drug use, and hypercoagulable states. Patients present with peripheral edema and prominent superficial veins, and neurologic symptoms (pain and paresthesias) are usually present as well. Clinical diagnosis is confirmed by venography or sonography. Treatment regimens include conservative measures, thrombolysis with fibrinolytic agents, and surgical correction of indicated thoracic outlet and axillary structures. We present an unusual case in which upper extremity venous thrombosis in a young healthy female athlete was associated with the presence of cervical ribs. The patient was successfully treated with focal thrombolysis and surgical resection of her ipsilateral cervical rib.

  1. Survey of Hand and Upper Extremity Injuries Among Rock Climbers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Clayton E; Rayan, Ghazi M; Judd, Dustin I; Ding, Kai; Stoner, Julie A

    2017-07-01

    Rock climbing first evolved as a sport in the late 18th century. With its growing popularity, the number of rock climbing-related injuries has potential to increase, spurring a rise in the number of articles associated with it. Despite the available literature, there remains a paucity of information about upper extremity injuries sustained by rock climbers, and no studies to date have focused on gender-specific injuries. A 24-question online survey was distributed to rock climbers about upper extremity injuries sustained during rock climbing. Statistical analysis was used to study association between participants' demographics and injuries. A total of 397 participants responded to the survey. Mean age was 32.5 years with males comprising 85%. No significant differences in demographics or climbing behaviors were found between males and females. Ninety percent of participants reported sustaining an upper extremity injury. Fingers were the most common injury followed by shoulder/arm and elbow/forearm. Our study found females to be more likely to report a rock climbing-related injury, and more likely to undergo surgery for it. Female rock climbers were significantly more likely to report a shoulder/upper arm injury and were also more likely to report undergoing surgery compared with males, where these differences were not due to age or climbing behaviors. Further investigation is warranted into the association between shoulder injuries and female athletes to determine how the gender differences relate to extent of injury as well as health service utilization behaviors.

  2. Intra-articular Fractures of the Sigmoid Notch of the Distal Radius: Analysis of Progression to Distal Radial Ulnar Joint Arthritis and Impact on Upper Extremity Function in Surgically Treated Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Mark A; Brogan, David M; Shin, Alexander Y; Berger, Richard A

    2016-03-01

    subluxation and either KL grade of arthritis or DASH scores. Conclusion Fractures involving the sigmoid notch did not appear to have a greater prevalence of DRUJ posttraumatic arthritis in operatively treated patients at greater than 6 years of follow-up. Postoperative sigmoid notch step-off, diastasis or DRUJ subluxation had a minimal effect on upper extremity function, but fractures with a coronal step-off of > 1.0-mm exhibited higher levels of upper extremity dysfunction. Level of Evidence Prognostic, Level III-Case control.

  3. Radiographic assessment of congenital malformations of the upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfeld, Matthew J. [Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Musculoskeletal Division, Penn Medicine University City, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Otero, Hansel [Children' s National Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Congenital and developmental malformations of the upper extremity are uncommon and their diagnosis can challenge radiologists. Many complex classification systems exist, the latest of which accounts for the complex embryology and pathogenetic mechanisms that govern the formation of these anomalies. Using appropriate descriptors allows for more specific diagnosis and improved consultation with referring pediatricians and surgeons, helping to guide medical and surgical interventions and, if indicated, further investigation for associated abnormalities and underlying syndromes. We review the imaging characteristics of upper limb malformations to help pediatric radiologists better understand the classification and workup necessary in these cases. (orig.)

  4. Upper extremity lymphatic function at rest and during exercise in breast cancer survivors with and without lymphedema compared with healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Kirstin N; Dolan, Lianne B; Worsley, Dan; McKenzie, Don C

    2007-09-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy was used to measure lymphatic function at rest and during exercise in breast cancer survivors with lymphedema (BCRL, n = 10), breast cancer survivors (BC, n = 10), and controls (Cont, n = 10). After injection of (99m)Tc-antimony colloid to the hands, subjects rested or performed 12 repeated sets of arm cranking for 2.5 min at 0.6 W/kg followed by 2.5 min of rest. One-minute spot views were taken with a gamma-radiation camera immediately postinjection and every 10 min over 60 min to calculate clearance rate. As well, an upper body scan was taken at 65 min postinjection to measure radiopharmaceutical uptake in the axilla (Ax) and forearm (Fore). All groups displayed similar increases in clearance rate with exercise (P = 0.000). Ax significantly increased with exercise in Cont only [Cont: (mean +/- SD) 4.9 +/- 2.6 vs. 7.9 +/- 4.2%, P = 0.000; BCRL: 1.4 +/- 1.2 vs. 1.7 +/- 2.1%, P = 0.531; BC: 3.9 +/- 3.4 vs. 5.2 +/- 3.2%, P = 0.130], whereas Fore, indicating dermal backflow, significantly increased in BCRL only (BCRL: 2.4 +/- 0.87 vs. 4.4 +/- 2.0%, P = 0.004; BC: 1.1 +/- 0.25 vs. 1.1 +/- 0.31%, P = 0.784; Cont: 0.93 +/- 0.26 vs. 1.0 +/- 0.20%, P = 0.296). The results indicate that, in women with BCRL, exercise causes radiopharmaceuticals to clear from the hand at the same rate as BC and Cont, but, instead of reaching the axilla, a greater amount of activity gets trapped in the dermis of the forearm. BC, meanwhile, have similar lymphatic function as Cont; however, there is a highly variable response that may suggest that some BC subjects may be at risk for developing lymphedema.

  5. Effect of Upper Limb Deformities on Gross Motor and Upper Limb Functions in Children with Spastic Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun Sook; Sim, Eun Geol; Rha, Dong-wook

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the nature and extent of upper limb deformities via the use of various classifications, and to analyze the relationship between upper limb deformities and gross motor or upper limb functionality levels. Upper extremity data were collected from 234 children with spastic cerebral palsy (CP) who were…

  6. Effect of Upper Extremity Robot-Assisted Exercise on Spasticity in Stroke Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of a stretching and strengthening exercise program using an upper extremity robot, as compared with a conventional occupational therapy program for upper extremity spasticity in stroke patients. Methods Subjects were randomly divided into a robot-assisted therapy (RT) group and a conventional rehabilitation therapy (CT) group. RT group patients received RT and CT once daily for 30 minutes each, 5 days a week, for 2 weeks. RT was performed using an upper-extremity robot (Neuro-X; Apsun Inc., Seoul, Korea), and CT was administered by occupational therapists. CT group patients received CT alone twice daily for 30 minutes, 5 days a week, for 2 weeks. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) was used to measure the spasticity of upper extremity. Manual muscle tests (MMT), Manual Function Tests (MFT), Brunnstrom stage, and the Korean version of Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) were used to measure the strength and function of upper extremity. All measurements were obtained before and after 2-week treatment. Results The RT and CT groups included 22 subjects each. After treatment, both groups showed significantly lower MAS scores and significant improvement in the MMT, MFT, Brunnstrom stage, and K-MBI scores. Treatment effects showed no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusion RT showed similar treatment benefits on spasticity, as compared to CT. The study results suggested that RT could be a useful method for continuous, repeatable, and relatively accurate range of motion exercise in stroke patients with spasticity. PMID:28119825

  7. Upper extremity neuro-rehabilitation through the use of power mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damiao, John; Kean, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    Power mobility is typically used as an accommodative form of assistive technology allowing individuals with impaired ambulation to remain mobile. While research has focused on the cognitive development and social benefits of power mobility for individuals with developmental disabilities, research is lacking on using this technology to rehabilitate physical dysfunction. Recent technology, such as robot-mediated neuro-rehabilitation, is proving effective in upper extremity rehabilitation, but lacks the movement feedback of power mobility. This article presents a case study of a client with cerebral palsy who experienced severe neural impairment following a motor vehicle accident. As a previous power mobility user, the client identified returning to using power mobility with the affected upper extremity as a key functional goal. This case study describes the series of steps that returned the client to independent mobility and increased upper extremity function.

  8. Upper extremity injuries in Danish children aged 6–12, mechanisms, and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nauta, J.; Jespersen, Eva; Verhagen, Evert

    2017-01-01

    Although injuries to the upper extremity are most costly, the picture of the upper extremity injury problem remains incomplete. This study is the first to describe the etiology and mechanisms of upper extremity injuries in Danish children. A 2.5-year observational prospective cohort study was con...... childhood injury prevention.......Although injuries to the upper extremity are most costly, the picture of the upper extremity injury problem remains incomplete. This study is the first to describe the etiology and mechanisms of upper extremity injuries in Danish children. A 2.5-year observational prospective cohort study...... was conducted to record upper extremity injuries in 1048 children. Data were weekly collected by sending a text message. A total of 176 upper extremity injuries were reported (128 acute injuries). Of the acute upper extremity injuries, 55% were sprains, 47% occurred in the hand/wrist, and 53% of cases were...

  9. PERIPHERAL BLOCK ANESTHESIA OF UPPER EXTREMITY AND ITS COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Tapar, Hakan; SÜREN, Mustafa; Kaya, Ziya; Arıcı, Semih; Karaman, Serkan; Kahveci, Mürsel

    2012-01-01

    Successful peripheral blocks and selection of appropriate technique according to surgery is possible with a good knowledge of anatomy. Regional peripheral block anesthesia of upper extremity which applied by single injection to plexus brachialis is the most recommended method of anesthesia in daily surgical procedures. The most important advantages of peripheral nerve blocks which are type of regional anesthesia according to general anesthesia and central blocks are less effect to...

  10. Online Health Information Seeking in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkan, Sezai; Mellema, Jos J; Nazzal, Adam; Lee, Sang-Gil; Ring, David

    2016-12-01

    Information gathering is a key component of shared decision making and has a measurable effect on treatment decisions. Access to health information might improve quality of care in hand surgery. Our purpose was to identify socio-demographic, condition-related, and psychosocial factors associated with online information-seeking behavior in patients with hand and upper-extremity conditions. From June 2015 to February 2016, we enrolled 134 patients with an upper-extremity condition who presented to an outpatient hand surgery office at an urban level I trauma center in this cross-sectional study. Participants provided socio-demographic information and completed online questionnaires assessing their online information-seeking behavior, pain intensity, symptoms of depression, and pain interference, and an upper extremity-specific, patient-reported outcome measure. A total of 57 patients (43%) sought information regarding their condition online before their visit. Compared with patients with no online information-seeking behavior, patients who sought information online were more educated. Psychosocial and condition-related factors were not associated with online information seeking. In multivariable analysis, education in years and involvement of the dominant upper limb were independently associated with online information-seeking behavior. Education in years and involvement of the dominant upper limb were independently associated with online information-seeking behavior but psychosocial and condition-related factors were not. As health information seeking is becoming an integral part of the modern day clinical experience, efforts to make online information more appealing and useful to people of all education levels are merited. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Our experience on brachial plexus blockade in upper extremity surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ömer Uslukaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Peripheral nerve blocks are usually used either alone or along with general anesthesia for postoperative analgesia. We also aimed to present the results and experiences.Materials and methods: This retrospective study was conducted to scan the files of patients who underwent orthopedic upper extremity surgery with peripheral nerve block between September 2009 and October 2010. After ethics committee approval was obtained, 114 patients who were ASA physical status I-III, aged 18-70, performed upper extremity surgery in the Orthopedics and Traumatology Clinic were included to study. Patients’ demographic data, clinical diagnoses, premedication status, peripheral block type, local anesthetic dose, stimuplex needle types, hemodynamic parameters at the during surgery, the first postoperative analgesic requirements, complications and patient satisfaction were recorded.Results: Demographic data were similar to each other. Brachial plexus block was commonly performed for the forearm surgery. Infraclavicular block was performed the most frequently to patients. As the classical methods in the supine position were preferred in 98.2% of patients, Stimuplex A needle (B. Braun, Melsungen AG, Germany have been used for blockage in 80.7% of patients. Also, in 54.4% of patients, 30 ml of local anesthetic solution composed of bupivacaine + prilocaine was used for blockade. Blocks applied to patients had provided adequate anesthesia.Conclusion: Since the brachial plexus blockade guided peripheral nerve stimulator for upper extremity surgery provide adequate depth of anesthesia and analgesia, it may be a good alternative to general anesthesia because of unwanted side effects

  12. A Low-Cost Video Game Applied for Training of Upper Extremity Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy: A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jannink, M.J.A.; van der Wilden, Gelske J.; Navis, D.W.; Visser, Gerben; Gussinklo, Jeanine; IJzerman, Maarten Joost

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the user satisfaction of the EyeToy for the training of the upper limb in children with cerebral palsy (CP). User satisfaction was measured in 12 children with CP, using a postexperience questionnaire, primarily based on a presence questionnaire. In

  13. Modelling and control of an upper extremity exoskeleton for rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Zahari; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Tze, Mohd Yashim Wong Paul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Azraai Mohd Razman, Mohd

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton for rehabilitation. The Lagrangian formulation was employed to obtain the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometric based human upper limb as well as the exoskeleton that comprises of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed to investigate its efficacy performing a joint task trajectory tracking in performing flexion/extension on the elbow joint as well as the forward adduction/abduction on the shoulder joint. An active force control (AFC) algorithm is also incorporated into the aforementioned controller to examine its effectiveness in compensating disturbances. It was found from the study that the AFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system without compromising its tracking performances as compared to the conventional PD control architecture.

  14. 镜像疗法对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能和手功能的影响%Mirror therapy on upper extremity function in patients with cerebral apoplexy hemiplegia and hand function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王维; 马跃文; 杨巍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore mirror therapy on upper extremity function in patients with cerebral apoplexy hemiplegia and hand function .Methods Forty patients with of stroke hemiplegia were divided into control group and rehabilitation group.Control group had routine rehabilitation training , including the good limb position puts , the passive joints , muscle strength training, balance training, walk training therapy, homework therapy, physical factor and so on.Rehabilitation group added mirror therapy besides those routine trainings .Both groups had finished 4 weeks treatment , before treatment and 2 weeks and 4 weeks after treatment for the Fugl -Mayer scale, STEF and Barthel index evaluation .Results Two and four weeks after rehabilitation treatment group FMA score were 36.37 ±16.36, 44.36 ±14.58, STEF score were 58.75 ± 7.57, 73.32 ±8.81, BI score were 57.33 ±15.26, 67.50 ±13.48, score before the treatment and control group in the two groups after treatment were increased , and the rehabilitation group was better than control group (P<0.05).Conclu-sion Mirror therapy can improve the stroke patients with hemiplegia of upper limb function and hand function , and to im-prove their ability of daily life activities has a role in promoting .%目的:探讨镜像疗法对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能和手功能的影响。方法将40例脑卒中偏瘫患者随机分为对照组和康复组,各20例。对照组进行常规康复训练,包括良肢位摆放、被动关节活动、肌力训练、平衡训练、步行训练、作业疗法、物理因子疗法等。康复组在此基础上增加镜像疗法。两组均治疗4周,治疗前及治疗2周后、4周后采用Fugl-Mayer(FMA)量表、STEF和Barthel(BI)指数进行评价。结果康复组治疗2周、4周后FMA评分分别为36.37±16.36、44.36±14.58,STEF评分分别为58.75±7.57、73.32±8.81,BI评分分别为57.33±15.26、67.50±13.48,治疗后两组评分

  15. Upper Extremity Sports Injury: Risk Factors in Comparison to Lower Extremity Injury in More Than 25 000 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, R.; Dekker, R.; Dijkstra, P.U.; ten Duis, H.J.; van der Sluis, C.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze differences in sports injury characteristics of the upper and lower extremity and to identify factors that contribute to the risk of sustaining an upper extremity injury compared with the risk of sustaining a lower extremity injury. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting:

  16. Upper Extremity Sports Injury : Risk Factors in Comparison to Lower Extremity Injury in More Than 25 000 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, Renee; Dekker, Rienk; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; ten Duis, Hendrik J.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    Objective: To analyze differences in sports injury characteristics of the upper and lower extremity and to identify factors that contribute to the risk of sustaining an upper extremity injury compared with the risk of sustaining a lower extremity injury. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting:

  17. Upper Extremity Sports Injury : Risk Factors in Comparison to Lower Extremity Injury in More Than 25 000 Cases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sytema, Renee; Dekker, Rienk; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; ten Duis, Hendrik J.; van der Sluis, Corry K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To analyze differences in sports injury characteristics of the upper and lower extremity and to identify factors that contribute to the risk of sustaining an upper extremity injury compared with the risk of sustaining a lower extremity injury. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Setting:

  18. Electrical stimulation of the upper extremity in stroke: cyclic versus EMG-triggered stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroon, de Joke R.; IJzerman, Maarten J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effect of cyclic and electromyography (EMG)-triggered electrical stimulation on motor impairment and function of the affected upper extremity in chronic stroke. Design: Randomized controlled trial. Setting: Outpatient clinic of a rehabilitation centre. Subjects and inte

  19. A pilot study of myoelectrically controlled FES of upper extremity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thorsen, Rune; Spadone, Rafaella; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2001-01-01

    Functional electrical stimulation (FES) of upper limbs can be used for the recovery of some hand functions on patients with CNS lesions. This study deals with the control of FES by means of myoelectrical activity detected from voluntarily activated paretic muscles. The specific aim of this paper is

  20. Quantification of human upper extremity nerves and fascicular anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Natalie A; Tyler, Dustin J

    2017-09-01

    In this study we provide detailed quantification of upper extremity nerve and fascicular anatomy. The purpose is to provide values and trends in neural features useful for clinical applications and neural interface device design. Nerve cross-sections were taken from 4 ulnar, 4 median, and 3 radial nerves from 5 arms of 3 human cadavers. Quantified nerve features included cross-sectional area, minor diameter, and major diameter. Fascicular features analyzed included count, perimeter, area, and position. Mean fascicular diameters were 0.57 ± 0.39, 0.6 ± 0.3, 0.5 ± 0.26 mm in the upper arm and 0.38 ± 0.18, 0.47 ± 0.18, 0.4 ± 0.27 mm in the forearm of ulnar, median, and radial nerves, respectively. Mean fascicular diameters were inversely proportional to fascicle count. Detailed quantitative anatomy of upper extremity nerves is a resource for design of neural electrodes, guidance in extraneural procedures, and improved neurosurgical planning. Muscle Nerve 56: 463-471, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Mangled extremity severity score: an accurate guide to treatment of the severely injured upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slauterbeck, J R; Britton, C; Moneim, M S; Clevenger, F W

    1994-08-01

    The mangled extremity severity score (MESS) is a scoring system that can be applied to mangled extremities and help one determine which mangled limbs will eventually come to amputation. The MESS is a graduated grading system based on skeletal and soft tissue injury, shock, ischemia, and age. The records of 37 patients having sustained 43 open fractures or mangled upper extremity injuries, seen and treated at the University of New Mexico's Regional Trauma Center between April 1987 and September 1990, have been reviewed. All nine extremity injuries with a MESS of greater than or equal to seven were amputated, and 34 of 34 with a MESS of less than seven were salvaged. Nine Grade IIIC and six mangled extremities were identified in our study. Five of these Grade IIIC and four of the mangled extremities with a MESS of greater than or equal to seven were amputated. All Grade IIIC or mangled extremities with a MESS of less than seven were salvaged. In conclusion, the MESS is an early and accurate predictor for identifying the extremities that may be best treated by amputation.

  2. A neurocognitive approach for recovering upper extremity movement following subacute stroke: a randomized controlled pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallés, Laia; Martín-Casas, Patricia; Gironès, Xavier; Durà, María José; Lafuente, José Vicente; Perfetti, Carlo

    2017-04-01

    [Purpose] This study aims to describe a protocol based on neurocognitive therapeutic exercises and determine its feasibility and usefulness for upper extremity functionality when compared with a conventional protocol. [Subjects and Methods] Eight subacute stroke patients were randomly assigned to a conventional (control group) or neurocognitive (experimental group) treatment protocol. Both lasted 30 minutes, 3 times a week for 10 weeks and assessments were blinded. Outcome measures included: Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke Patients, Motricity Index, Revised Nottingham Sensory Assessment and Kinesthetic and Visual Imagery Questionnaire. Descriptive measures and nonparametric statistical tests were used for analysis. [Results] The results indicate a more favorable clinical progression in the neurocognitive group regarding upper extremity functional capacity with achievement of the minimal detectable change. The functionality results are related with improvements on muscle strength and sensory discrimination (tactile and kinesthetic). [Conclusion] Despite not showing significant group differences between pre and post-treatment, the neurocognitive approach could be a safe and useful strategy for recovering upper extremity movement following stroke, especially regarding affected hands, with better and longer lasting results. Although this work shows this protocol's feasibility with the panel of scales proposed, larger studies are required to demonstrate its effectiveness.

  3. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis in a military patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Charlotte; Johnston, A McD

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 23-year-old serviceman on overseas deployment who presented with a painful, swollen arm. Investigations showed an upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) of the right arm with an associated asymptomatic pulmonary embolism, which was treated with warfarin anticoagulation. Further investigation identified positional obstruction at the thoracic outlet, and the patient was diagnosed with Paget-Schroetter syndrome. He underwent elective resection of the first rib, and has now returned to normal duties. After review of the literature on UEDVT, it is suggested that in this military patient, the occurrence of an anatomical variant put him at risk of upper limb venous thrombosis, which was probably potentiated by the occupational factor of carrying a rifle. The external compression of the subclavian vein from the rifle butt and hypertrophied muscles, in addition to the anatomical variation, caused repetitive microtrauma of the vessel intima, which precipitated venous thrombosis.

  4. Cross-arm replantation for traumatic bilateral upper extremity amputations: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kailu; Zhong, Gang; Yin, Jiahui; Xiang, Zhou; Cen, Shiqiang; Huang, Fuguo

    2011-02-01

    A 40-year-old woman had her right extremity avulsed at the proximal upper arm level and the wrist and hand of her left extremity irretrievably injured in a traffic accident. The right distal forearm was surgically amputated and replanted onto the stump of the left distal forearm. New strategy for nerve repair was applied and the function recovery of the cross-replanted hand was favorable. We thought that cross-extremity replantation was indicated when the patient suffered from bilateral total or subtotal amputation at different levels and orthotopic replantation was impossible.

  5. Isolated Upper Extremity Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Halula

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a well-described complication of solid organ and bone marrow transplants. The most common presentation is intra-abdominal lymphadenopathy or single or multiple intraparenchymal masses involving the liver, spleen, or kidneys. Here we describe the imaging and pathology findings of an unusual case of PTLD appearing as an intramuscular forearm lesion in a pediatric male. The manifestation of PTLD as an isolated upper extremity mass in a pediatric patient has to our knowledge not been described.

  6. Helping hands: caring for the upper extremity transplant patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovasik, Darlene; Foust, Daniel E; Losee, Joseph E; Lee, W P Andrew; Brandacher, Gerald; Gorantla, Vijay S

    2011-09-01

    Caring for upper extremity transplant recipients can offer challenges and opportunities to nursing staff in combining new patient procedures, new technologies, and complex patient care needs including unique physical care, monitoring and observation, rehabilitation expectations, and psychiatric/psychosocial support. Medical professionals continue to be apprehensive about the risks of immunosuppressive therapy and the possibility of acute and chronic rejection. The sustained development and research into reliable, reduced-dose immunosuppression or immunomodulatory strategies could expand the life-enhancing benefits of reconstructive transplantation.

  7. Electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and its major terminal branches, as well as the major causes and clinical presentations of lesions of these structures. An approach to electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies is provided, with an emphasis on those nerve conduction studies and portions of the needle examination, which permit localization of lesions to specific trunks, cords, and terminal branches. The importance of specific sensory nerve conduction studies for differentiating plexopathies from radiculopathies and mononeuropathies is emphasized.

  8. Lower extremity lipedema, upper extremity lipodystrophy and severe calcinosis complicating juvenile dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov-Dolijanovic, Slavica R; Vujasinovic Stupar, Nada Z; Gavrilov, Nikola; Seric, Srdjan

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare but complex and potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease of childhood. Significant proportions of patients have residual weakness, muscle atrophy, joint contractures, and calcinosis. Recently, new clinical findings, such as lipodystrophy accompanied with increased fat deposition in certain areas, have been reported. So far, it is not known whether the redistribution of body fat may be the type of lipedema of lower extremity. We describe a 39-year-old woman who was diagnosed with JDM at the age of 7. Later she developed symmetrical lipodystrophy of upper extremities and symmetrical lipedema of lower extremities (making 2 and 58.3 % of total body fat mass, respectively), with multiple calcified nodules in the subcutaneous tissues. These nodules gradually increased in size despite therapy. Capillaroscopy findings showed scleroderma-like abnormalities. ANA and anti-U1RNP antibodies were positive. Similar cases with simultaneous occurrence of the lipedema of lower extremities, lipodystrophy of upper extremities, and severe calcinosis complicating JDM have not been published so far. We showed that the calcinosis and lipodystrophy were associated with short duration of active disease. Also, we display case that raises the question whether it is possible overlapping autoimmune diseases revealed during follow-up.

  9. Is There Any Association between PEEP and Upper Extremity DVT?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Al-Saffar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We hypothesized that positive end-exploratory pressure (PEEP may promote venous stasis in the upper extremities and predispose to upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT. Methods. We performed a retrospective case control study of medical intensive care unit patients who required mechanical ventilation (MV for >72 hours and underwent duplex ultrasound of their upper veins for suspected DVT between January 2011 and December 2013. Results. UEDVT was found in 32 (28.5% of 112 patients. Nineteen (67.8% had a central venous catheter on the same side. The mean ± SD duration of MV was 13.2±9.5 days. Average PEEP was 7.13±2.97 cm H2O. Average PEEP was ≥10 cm H2O in 23 (20.5% patients. Congestive heart failure (CHF significantly increased the odds of UEDVT (OR 4.53, 95% CI 1.13–18.11; P=0.03 whereas longer duration of MV (≥13 vs. <13 days significantly reduced it (OR 0.29, 95% CI 0.11–0.8; P=0.02. Morbid obesity showed a trend towards significance (OR 3.82, 95% CI 0.95–15.4; P=0.06. Neither PEEP nor any of the other analyzed predictors was associated with UEDVT. Conclusions. There is no association between PEEP and UEDVT. CHF may predispose to UEDVT whereas the risk of UEDVT declines with longer duration of MV.

  10. 作业疗法对脑卒中患者上肢运动功能的影响%Effect of Occupational Therapy on Upper Extremity Function in Stroke Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邸叶青; 韩振萍; 马将

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of occupational therapy on stroke patients with motor dysfunction of upper extremities. Methods: Forty patients with stoke, aged from 60 to 75 years, were randomly divided into the occupational therapy group (n= 20) and control group (n = 20). Both two groups received exercise therapy, including active movement,passive movement and motor imagery therapy, etc. Besides, patients in the occupational therapy group received occupational therapy additionally, including the training of control ability of upper limbs, the training of ROM and the training of mental movement. The motor function of upper extremities was evaluated by Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) before and 2, 4, 8 weeks after treatment. Results: The scores of FMA in occupational therapy group were continually increased from 2nd week, 8th week>4th week>2nd week (P<0. 05 ). The scores of FMA in control group were increased from 4th week (P<0.05). The scores of FMA in occupational therapy group were significantly higher than in control group at each time point (P<0.05 or P<0.01). Conclusion: Early intervention of occupational therapy in stroke patients with hemiplegia can provide positive effects on recovery of upper extremities function.%目的:比较两种不同的康复治疗技术对存在有上肢运动功能障碍的脑卒中患者的治疗作用.方法:40例脑卒中患者随机分为作业组和对照组各20例,均配合运动疗法,包括主被动运动,运动想象等.作业组增加作业疗法,主要内容为上肢控制能力、关节活动度及精细动作训练.训练前及训练2、4、6及8周时均采用Fugl-Meyer评定量表(FMA)对2组患者上肢运动功能评分.结果:与训练前比较,作业组在介入训练2周后FMA评分持续上升,8周>4周>2周;对照组在训练4周后FMA评分开始上升,作业组在各训练时间段FMA评分均高于对照组(均P<0.05,0.01).结论:早期介入作业疗法对脑卒中偏瘫患者

  11. Motion functional training on upper extremity of stroke%脑卒中患者上肢运动功能训练

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴红瑛

    2000-01-01

    本文评价了目前常用的偏瘫上肢运动功能训练方法(包括Bobath方法、Brunnstrom方法、PNF方法、Rood方法、MRP方法等)的训练要点,以供临床康复工作者在对偏瘫患者运动功能训练中借鉴和应用。%They discussed common motion functional training therapies in the paper. There are Bobath therapy, Brunnstrom therapy, PNF therapy, Rood therapy, MRP therapy and so on. They discussed training key point about each therapy and hope to have a discussion about the paper to promote rehabilitation training technology.

  12. Using Free Internet Videogames in Upper Extremity Motor Training for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisa Sevick

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Movement therapy is one type of upper extremity intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP to improve function. It requires high-intensity, repetitive and task-specific training. Tedium and lack of motivation are substantial barriers to completing the training. An approach to overcome these barriers is to couple the movement therapy with videogames. This investigation: (1 tested the feasibility of delivering a free Internet videogame upper extremity motor intervention to four children with CP (aged 8–17 years with mild to moderate limitations to upper limb function; and (2 determined the level of intrinsic motivation during the intervention. The intervention used free Internet videogames in conjunction with the Microsoft Kinect motion sensor and the Flexible Action and Articulated Skeleton Toolkit software (FAAST software. Results indicated that the intervention could be successfully delivered in the laboratory and the home, and pre- and post- impairment, function and performance assessments were possible. Results also indicated a high level of motivation among the participants. It was concluded that the use of inexpensive hardware and software in conjunction with free Internet videogames has the potential to be very motivating in helping to improve the upper extremity abilities of children with CP. Future work should include results from additional participants and from a control group in a randomized controlled trial to establish efficacy.

  13. Using Free Internet Videogames in Upper Extremity Motor Training for Children with Cerebral Palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick, Marisa; Eklund, Elizabeth; Mensch, Allison; Foreman, Matthew; Standeven, John; Engsberg, Jack

    2016-06-07

    Movement therapy is one type of upper extremity intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) to improve function. It requires high-intensity, repetitive and task-specific training. Tedium and lack of motivation are substantial barriers to completing the training. An approach to overcome these barriers is to couple the movement therapy with videogames. This investigation: (1) tested the feasibility of delivering a free Internet videogame upper extremity motor intervention to four children with CP (aged 8-17 years) with mild to moderate limitations to upper limb function; and (2) determined the level of intrinsic motivation during the intervention. The intervention used free Internet videogames in conjunction with the Microsoft Kinect motion sensor and the Flexible Action and Articulated Skeleton Toolkit software (FAAST) software. Results indicated that the intervention could be successfully delivered in the laboratory and the home, and pre- and post- impairment, function and performance assessments were possible. Results also indicated a high level of motivation among the participants. It was concluded that the use of inexpensive hardware and software in conjunction with free Internet videogames has the potential to be very motivating in helping to improve the upper extremity abilities of children with CP. Future work should include results from additional participants and from a control group in a randomized controlled trial to establish efficacy.

  14. Using Free Internet Videogames in Upper Extremity Motor Training for Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevick, Marisa; Eklund, Elizabeth; Mensch, Allison; Foreman, Matthew; Standeven, John; Engsberg, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Movement therapy is one type of upper extremity intervention for children with cerebral palsy (CP) to improve function. It requires high-intensity, repetitive and task-specific training. Tedium and lack of motivation are substantial barriers to completing the training. An approach to overcome these barriers is to couple the movement therapy with videogames. This investigation: (1) tested the feasibility of delivering a free Internet videogame upper extremity motor intervention to four children with CP (aged 8–17 years) with mild to moderate limitations to upper limb function; and (2) determined the level of intrinsic motivation during the intervention. The intervention used free Internet videogames in conjunction with the Microsoft Kinect motion sensor and the Flexible Action and Articulated Skeleton Toolkit software (FAAST) software. Results indicated that the intervention could be successfully delivered in the laboratory and the home, and pre- and post- impairment, function and performance assessments were possible. Results also indicated a high level of motivation among the participants. It was concluded that the use of inexpensive hardware and software in conjunction with free Internet videogames has the potential to be very motivating in helping to improve the upper extremity abilities of children with CP. Future work should include results from additional participants and from a control group in a randomized controlled trial to establish efficacy. PMID:27338485

  15. Planning of surgical treatment of upper extremity in patients with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Umnov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose - to devise the algorithm of patient examination with spastic hand to determine what the variant of surgical treatment is indicated. The variant of surgical treatment and it's results are depend on the cause of upper extremity deformation. Materials and methods. This study is based on a survey of children with cerebral palsy with lesions of the upper extremity. The main criterion for the selection of patients was the presence of the combined lesion of the upper extremity, where the cause of dysfunction hands are not only fixed contractures, but primary tonic. Was to survey 47 patients with spastic forms of cerebral palsy with the defeat of the upper limb, but the study group included only 26 of them in the ages of 7 to 18 years (average 12,1, as having the clinical picture both types of contractures. We have developed and applied a system of examinations, modeling expected outcome of selective neurotomy motor nerves of the upper limb, which allows to estimate the possible result of such treatment, and clearly differentiate tonic and fixed contracture. Results and conclusions. Based on the results of study we supposed that, using diagnostic blockade motor nerve at the period of planning surgical treatment help us to create temporary reversible model of selective neurotomy motor nerve branches and identify the type of contracture, degree of manifestation and functional perspective.

  16. Postures of upper extremity correlated with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Liang Chiang

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Non-medical hospital staff members are in frequent contact with patients and therefore are required to perform a wide variety of repetitive and high-frequency activities. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between upper extremity activity and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS among non-medical hospital staff members. Material and Methods: Carpal tunnel syndrome in 144 non-medical hospital staff members was diagnosed using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ, a physician’s diagnosis, physical examination (Tinel’s signs and Phalen test and a nerve conduction velocity (NCV test. In addition, an ergonomic assessment was performed and a video camera was used to record the physical activities at work. Results: The prevalence rate of CTS was highest for the NMQ (51.9%, followed by physician’s diagnosis (49.5% for the right hand, 29.9% for the left hand, physical examination (54.7%, and nerve conduction test (motor nerve 27.5% and 25%, sensory nerve 21.7% and 15%, for right and left hands, respectively. Based on logistic regression models for the NMQ and physician’s diagnoses, there was a dose-dependently higher risk of CTS with the upper extremity index among participants, but this was non-significant based on the physical examination and nerve conduction tests. Conclusions: Nerve conduction velocity is the gold standard in diagnosis of CTS, but use of NMQ and physician’s diagnosis may overestimate the incidence of CTS in workers who have been engaging in repetitive stress activities for a relatively short time. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2017;30(2:281–290

  17. Upper extremity neuromotor dysfunction caused by local vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Shavlovskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration disease (VD (pneumatic hammer disease is a leader among occupational diseases. The prolonged use of vibrating tools is a high occupational health risk. The clinical picture of VD caused by local vibration includes sensorineural and upper extremity locomotor impairments that are polymorphic, polysyndromic, and not always specific. The International List of Occupational Diseases (2010 defines VD using the terms «vibration-induced white finger» (VWF and «hand-arm vibration syndrome» (HAVS. VWF as a manifestation of secondary Raynaud’s syndrome is the most noticeable vascular injury in HAVS. According to the recommendations of the International Labor Organization (2011 and the order of the Ministry of Health of Russia (2012, the clinical manifestations of local vibration include upper extremity polyneuropathy, secondary Raynaud’s phenomenon, and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS. The paper considers approaches to differentially diagnosing CTS and HAVS, primary and secondary Raynaud’s syndrome, as well as clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic studies. Prolonged exposure to vibration may affect the large myelinated (Ab fibers responsible for tactile touch, pressure, and vibration. Patients with VWF are frequently found to have hyperresponsiveness of the sympathetic nervous system, which affects digital vascular tone and appears as lower fingertip skin temperature. The paper discusses some possible mechanisms for the pathogenesis of vibration neuropathy (e.g. demyelinationof peripheral nerve fiber, as well as the involvement of plasma endothelin-1 in vascular response to cold as one of the components of the pathogenesis of vascular disorders. The central nervous system (cortical reorganization, plasticity phenomenon is believed to be implicated in the development and maintenance of vibration neuropathy.

  18. Automated assessment of upper extremity movement impairment due to stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erienne V Olesh

    Full Text Available Current diagnosis and treatment of movement impairment post-stroke is based on the subjective assessment of select movements by a trained clinical specialist. However, modern low-cost motion capture technology allows for the development of automated quantitative assessment of motor impairment. Such outcome measures are crucial for advancing post-stroke treatment methods. We sought to develop an automated method of measuring the quality of movement in clinically-relevant terms from low-cost motion capture. Unconstrained movements of upper extremity were performed by people with chronic hemiparesis and recorded by standard and low-cost motion capture systems. Quantitative scores derived from motion capture were compared to qualitative clinical scores produced by trained human raters. A strong linear relationship was found between qualitative scores and quantitative scores derived from both standard and low-cost motion capture. Performance of the automated scoring algorithm was matched by averaged qualitative scores of three human raters. We conclude that low-cost motion capture combined with an automated scoring algorithm is a feasible method to assess objectively upper-arm impairment post stroke. The application of this technology may not only reduce the cost of assessment of post-stroke movement impairment, but also promote the acceptance of objective impairment measures into routine medical practice.

  19. Automated assessment of upper extremity movement impairment due to stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesh, Erienne V; Yakovenko, Sergiy; Gritsenko, Valeriya

    2014-01-01

    Current diagnosis and treatment of movement impairment post-stroke is based on the subjective assessment of select movements by a trained clinical specialist. However, modern low-cost motion capture technology allows for the development of automated quantitative assessment of motor impairment. Such outcome measures are crucial for advancing post-stroke treatment methods. We sought to develop an automated method of measuring the quality of movement in clinically-relevant terms from low-cost motion capture. Unconstrained movements of upper extremity were performed by people with chronic hemiparesis and recorded by standard and low-cost motion capture systems. Quantitative scores derived from motion capture were compared to qualitative clinical scores produced by trained human raters. A strong linear relationship was found between qualitative scores and quantitative scores derived from both standard and low-cost motion capture. Performance of the automated scoring algorithm was matched by averaged qualitative scores of three human raters. We conclude that low-cost motion capture combined with an automated scoring algorithm is a feasible method to assess objectively upper-arm impairment post stroke. The application of this technology may not only reduce the cost of assessment of post-stroke movement impairment, but also promote the acceptance of objective impairment measures into routine medical practice.

  20. Effect of occupational therapy on upper extremity function and daily activities in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsied children%作业治疗对痉挛型偏瘫患儿上肢运动功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张洪梅; 姜南; 赵晓科; 高夫宁

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the occupational therapeutic effect on the upper extremity function and daily activities in spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsied childrea Methods Thirty children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy were equally randomized into two groups of A (treated with occupational therapy plus conventional treatments of exercise, massage and neuromuscular electrostimulation) and B( treated with conventional treatments alone). The fine motor, suitability and individual-society were evaluated with Gesell development scale and the activities of daily living( ADD before and after one month therapy. Results Compared with group B, the scores of Gesell and ADL after treatment in group A were significantly increased (P<0. 05). Conclusion The occupational therapy can improve movement of the upper extremities and daily living activity.%目的 探讨作业治疗对痉挛型偏瘫儿童上肢精细运动功能及日常生活能力的治疗作用.方法 30例痉挛型偏瘫患儿随机均分为治疗组和对照组,均进行运动疗法、推拿、神经肌肉电刺激等常规康复治疗1个月;治疗组在此基础上加用作业治疗.治疗前后采用Gesell发育量表进行评估,计算精细运动、适应性、个人社会的发育商及总发育商及日常生活活动能力.结果 治疗后,治疗组患儿精细运动、适应性、个人社会等能区的发育商、总发育商及日常生活活动能力均较对照组显著改善(P<0.05).结论 作业治疗有助于提高痉挛型偏瘫患儿的精细运动功能及日常生活活动能力.

  1. Enzymatic debridement for the treatment of severely burned upper extremities – early single center experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Cordts, Tomke; Horter, Johannes; Vogelpohl, Julian; Kremer, Thomas; Kneser, Ulrich; Hernekamp, Jochen-Frederick

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe burns of hands and arms are complex and challenging injuries. The Standard of care (SOC) – necrosectomy with skin grafting – is often associated with poor functional or aesthetic outcome. Enzymatic debridement (ED) is considered one promising alternative but, until recently, results proved to be highly variable. Methods Between 04/2014 and 04/2015, 16 patients with deep partial- to full-thickness burns of the upper extremities underwent enzymatic debridement (ED) in our Burn...

  2. Bilateral upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis following central cord syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Onmez, Hilal; Cingoz, Havva Turac; Kucuksen, Sami; Anliacık, Emel; Yaşar, Ozan; Yilmaz, Halim; Salli, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common complication following spinal cord injury (SCI). Although DVT of the upper extremity is much less common than DVT of the lower extremities, the risk of pulmonary embolism following upper-extremity DVT should not be disregarded.

  3. Self-reported upper extremity health status correlates with depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ring, David; Kadzielski, John; Fabian, Lauren; Zurakowski, David; Malhotra, Leah R; Jupiter, Jesse B

    2006-09-01

    The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire is the most widely used upper extremity-specific health-status measure. The DASH score often demonstrates greater variability than would be expected on the basis of objective pathology. This variability may be related to psychosocial factors. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the correlation between the DASH score and psychological factors for specific diagnoses with relatively limited variation in objective pathology. Two hundred and thirty-five patients with a single, common, discrete hand problem known to have limited variations in objective pathology completed the DASH questionnaire, the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised (EPQ-R) to assess neuroticism, the Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D) scale to quantify depressive symptoms, and the Pain Anxiety Symptoms Scale (PASS). Forty-five patients had carpal tunnel syndrome, forty-four had de Quervain tenosynovitis, forty-eight had lateral elbow pain, and seventy-one had a single trigger finger. In addition, twenty-seven patients were evaluated six weeks after a nonoperatively treated fracture of the distal part of the radius. Relationships between psychosocial factors and the DASH score were determined. A significant positive correlation between the DASH score and depression was noted for all diagnoses (r = 0.38 to 0.52; p Quervain tendinitis, r = 0.46; lateral elbow pain, r = 0.42; and trigger finger, r = 0.24) (p < 0.05 for all). The DASH score was not correlated with neuroticism for any diagnosis. There was a highly significant effect of depression (as measured with the CES-D score) on the DASH score for all diagnoses. Both the CES-D score (F = 62.68, p < 0.0001) and gender (F = 11.36, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of the DASH score. Self-reported upper extremity-specific health status as measured with the DASH score correlates with depression and pain anxiety but not neuroticism. These data

  4. Efficacy of Upper Extremity Robotic Therapy in Subacute Poststroke Hemiplegia: An Exploratory Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kayoko; Domen, Kazuhisa; Sakamoto, Tomosaburo; Toshima, Masahiko; Otaka, Yohei; Seto, Makiko; Irie, Katsumi; Haga, Bin; Takebayashi, Takashi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Our aim was to study the efficacy of robotic therapy as an adjuvant to standard therapy during poststroke rehabilitation. Prospective, open, blinded end point, randomized, multicenter exploratory clinical trial in Japan of 60 individuals with mild to moderate hemiplegia 4 to 8 weeks post stroke randomized to receive standard therapy plus 40 minutes of either robotic or self-guided therapy for 6 weeks (7 days/week). Upper extremity impairment before and after intervention was measured using the Fugl-Meyer assessment, Wolf Motor Function Test, and Motor Activity Log. Robotic therapy significantly improved Fugl-Meyer assessment flexor synergy (2.1±2.7 versus -0.1±2.4; Prehabilitation may improve upper extremity recovery in moderately impaired poststroke patients. Results of this exploratory study should be interpreted with caution. URL: http://www.umin.ac.jp/. Unique identifier: UMIN000001619. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Kietrys

    Full Text Available We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  6. Aging contributes to inflammation in upper extremity tendons and declines in forelimb agility in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kietrys, David M; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E; Amin, Mamta; Wade, Christine K; Popoff, Steve N; Barbe, Mary F

    2012-01-01

    We sought to determine if tendon inflammatory and histopathological responses increase in aged rats compared to young rats performing a voluntary upper extremity repetitive task, and if these changes are associated with motor declines. Ninety-six female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the rat model of upper extremity overuse: 67 aged and 29 young adult rats. After a training period of 4 weeks, task rats performed a voluntary high repetition low force (HRLF) handle-pulling task for 2 hrs/day, 3 days/wk for up to 12 weeks. Upper extremity motor function was assessed, as were inflammatory and histomorphological changes in flexor digitorum and supraspinatus tendons. The percentage of successful reaches improved in young adult HRLF rats, but not in aged HRLF rats. Forelimb agility decreased transiently in young adult HRLF rats, but persistently in aged HRLF rats. HRLF task performance for 12 weeks lead to increased IL-1beta and IL-6 in flexor digitorum tendons of aged HRLF rats, compared to aged normal control (NC) as well as young adult HRLF rats. In contrast, TNF-alpha increased more in flexor digitorum tendons of young adult 12-week HRLF rats than in aged HRLF rats. Vascularity and collagen fibril organization were not affected by task performance in flexor digitorum tendons of either age group, although cellularity increased in both. By week 12 of HRLF task performance, vascularity and cellularity increased in the supraspinatus tendons of only aged rats. The increased cellularity was due to increased macrophages and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF)-immunoreactive fibroblasts in the peritendon. In conclusion, aged rat tendons were overall more affected by the HRLF task than young adult tendons, particularly supraspinatus tendons. Greater inflammatory changes in aged HRLF rat tendons were observed, increases associated temporally with decreased forelimb agility and lack of improvement in task success.

  7. A clinical prediction score for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constans, Joel; Salmi, Louis-Rachid; Sevestre-Pietri, Marie-Antoinette; Perusat, Sophie; Nguon, Monika; Degeilh, Maryse; Labarere, Jose; Gattolliat, Olivier; Boulon, Carine; Laroche, Jean-Pierre; Le Roux, Philippe; Pichot, Olivier; Quéré, Isabelle; Conri, Claude; Bosson, Jean-Luc

    2008-01-01

    It was the objective of this study to design a clinical prediction score for the diagnosis of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). A score was built by multivariate logistic regression in a sample of patients hospitalized for suspicion of UEDVT (derivation sample). It was validated in a second sample in the same university hospital, then in a sample from the multicenter OPTIMEV study that included both outpatients and inpatients. In these three samples, UEDVT diagnosis was objectively confirmed by ultrasound. The derivation sample included 140 patients among whom 50 had confirmed UEDVT, the validation sample included 103 patients among whom 46 had UEDVT, and the OPTIMEV sample included 214 patients among whom 65 had UEDVT. The clinical score identified a combination of four items (venous material, localized pain, unilateral pitting edema and other diagnosis as plausible). One point was attributed to each item (positive for the first 3 and negative for the other diagnosis). A score of -1 or 0 characterized low probability patients, a score of 1 identified intermediate probability patients, and a score of 2 or 3 identified patients with high probability. Low probability score identified a prevalence of UEDVT of 12, 9 and 13%, respectively, in the derivation, validation and OPTIMEV samples. High probability score identified a prevalence of UEDVT of 70, 64 and 69% respectively. In conclusion we propose a simple score to calculate clinical probability of UEDVT. This score might be a useful test in clinical trials as well as in clinical practice.

  8. Risk of upper extremity biomechanical overload in automotive facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancini, Angela; Capozzella, Assunta; Caciar, Tiziana; Tomei, Francesco; Nardone, Nadia; Scala, Barbara; Fiaschetti, Maria; Cetica, Carlotta; Scimitto, Lara; Gioffrrè, PierAgostino; Sinibaldi, Federica; Di Pastena, Claudia; Corbosiero, Paola; Schifano, Maria Pia; Tomei, Gianfranco; Ciarrocca, Manuela

    2013-01-01

    To assess the risk factors for upper extremity-work-related musculoskeletal disorders (UE-WMSD) on 13 production lines in an airbag factory using the threshold limit values-American conference of industrial hygienists- hand activity level (TLV-ACGIH-HAL) method and introduce the ergonomic improvement to reduce the repetitiveness and the peak force (Pf). Professional exposure level on 13 production lines in a automobile factory was measured using the TLV-ACGIH-HAL method and a further risk was assessed according to the ergonomic improvement. The first assessment of 9 production lines showed that the professional exposure level was above the TLV or HAL limit. The second assessment showed that the professional exposure level was below the AL limit on all production lines except 1, in which the professional exposure level was between TLV and HAL. The assessment of UE-WMSD-related risk can identify the riskiest emplacements and evaluate the reduction of risk in professional exposure through interventions of structural- organizational type. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  9. Virtual reality for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke%虚拟现实技术对不同类型脑卒中患者偏瘫上肢功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁明; 窦祖林; 王清辉; 熊巍; 温红梅; 姜丽; 郑雅丹; 陈颖蓓; 杨琼

    2014-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of upper extremity training in a virtual kitchen combined with conventional occupational therapy on the hemiplegic upper extremity function of patients with hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke in the convalescent phase.Methods Sixty convalescing stroke patients with hemiplegia were divided into a therapy group (n =30) and a control group (n =30) using a random number table.The control group accepted conventional occupational therapy.The therapy group accepted virtual kitchen training in addition.Before the experiment and after 3 weeks of therapy,surface electromyogram (sEMG) signals over the biceps and triceps brachii during maximum isometric voluntary contractions (MIVCs) flexing and extending the affected elbow were recorded.The Fugl-Meyer assessment for the upper extremities (FMA-UE),the modified Barthel index (MBI) and the relevant cocontraction ratio (CR) were used as outcome measures.Results Compared with pre-training,both groups showed significant improvements post-training on all of the measures.But the therapy group showed significantly greater improvement in terms of both average FMA-UE score and average MBI.Both hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke patients showed these significant improvements.Conclusion Conventional occupational therapy for retraining the upper limbs after stroke may be more effective when combined with training using a virtual kitchen.%目的 观察虚拟厨房上肢训练结合常规作业治疗对不同类型脑卒中(脑出血和脑梗死)恢复期患者偏瘫上肢功能康复的临床疗效.方法 选取脑卒中恢复期偏瘫患者60例,按随机数字表法随机分为治疗组(30例)和对照组(30例).对照组接受常规作业治疗,治疗组在常规作业治疗基础上增加虚拟厨房上肢训练.2组患者均于治疗前和治疗3周后(治疗后)进行上肢运动功能评定(FMA-UE)及以改良巴氏指数(MBI)评定日常生活活动能力,同时记录患肘屈曲/伸展最大等长收

  10. Correlation of crossed cerebellar diaschisis with motor impairment of the hemiplegic upper extremity in stroke patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ho Chun; Choi, In Sung; Heo, Young Jun; Min, Jeong Jun; Lee, Sam Gyu; Bom, Hee Seung [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between crossed cerebellar diaschisis (CCD) and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) and to study the relationship between CCD and the severity and prognosis of stroke. Twenty-eight patients with first-ever unilateral stroke underwent brain perfusion SPECT with Tc-99m ECD. The existence of CCD was evaluated by visual inspection on SPECT images. The central motor conduction times were obtained from Abductor pollicis brevis and Abductor hallucis by recording MEPs. The National Institutes of Health stroke scale, the motricity Index (MI), and the functional outcome scales were measured. Fifteen of 28 patients (53.6%) had CCD. The presence of CCD was significantly correlated with 'not evoked' MEPs in the upper extremity (p<0.01). The existence of CCD was not associated with locations (p>0.05) and volume of brain lesion (p>0.05). There was a significant correlation between the presence of CCD and lower MI score of upper extremity (p<0.05). The presence of CCD would indicate the damage on the descending motor pathways and be associated with the severe motor impairment of the upper extremity in stroke patients.

  11. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silfies, Sheri P; Ebaugh, David; Pontillo, Marisa; Butowicz, Courtney M

    2015-09-01

    Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered. 1) Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability. 2) Provide an overview of current science linking core stability to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. 3) Provide an overview of evidence for the association between core stability and athletic performance. Core stability is the ability to control the position and movement of the trunk for optimal production, transfer, and control of forces to and from the upper and lower extremities during functional activities. Muscle capacity and neuromuscular control are critical components of core stability. A limited body of evidence provides some support for a link between core stability and upper extremity injuries amongst athletes who participate in baseball, football, or swimming. Likewise, few studies exist to support a relationship between core stability and athletic performance. A limited body of evidence exists to support the use of core stability training in injury prevention or performance enhancement programs for athletes. Clearly more research is needed to inform decision making when it comes to inclusion or emphasis of core training when designing injury prevention and rehabilitation programs for athletes.

  12. Home programs for upper extremity recovery post-stroke: a survey of occupational therapy practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoso Brown, Elena V; Fichter, Renae

    2017-09-08

    Upper extremity hemiparesis is an impairment post-stroke that impacts quality of life. Home programs are an intervention strategy used by many occupational therapists to support continued motor recovery post-stroke, yet little is known about how these programs are designed and implemented. The purpose of this study was to describe how occupational therapy practitioners approach this task and specifically what strategies they use to support adherence and what types of technology are most commonly used. An on-line survey methodology was used. Participants were recruited through multiple sources including state associations and occupational therapy educational program directors. A total of 73 occupational therapy practitioners submitted complete surveys. It was found that majority of occupational therapy practitioners in the sample (n = 53) reported creating home programs focused on upper extremity motor recovery more than 80% of the time. Range of motion and strengthening were reported as being in the top three most commonly used interventions by more than half the sample, however incorporating clients' goals and interests were reported most often as strategies to create meaning in the home program. Respondents also reported limited incorporation of technology and strategies to support adherence. Personal motivation was reported by occupational therapy practitioners to be a key moderator of adherence to a home program. Occupational therapy practitioners often provide home programs for individuals post-stroke focusing on upper extremity function. Future research that aims to understand stakeholders' perspectives on home programs and determine effective strategies for ensuring adherence is needed.

  13. Critical review of the impact of core stability on upper extremity athletic injury and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri P. Silfies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Programs designed to prevent or rehabilitate athletic injuries or improve athletic performance frequently focus on core stability. This approach is based upon the theory that poor core stability increases the risk of poor performance and/or injury. Despite the widespread use of core stability training amongst athletes, the question of whether or not sufficient evidence exists to support this practice remains to be answered.OBJECTIVES: 1 Open a dialogue on the definition and components of core stability. 2 Provide an overview of current science linking core stability to musculoskeletal injuries of the upper extremity. 3 Provide an overview of evidence for the association between core stability and athletic performance.DISCUSSION: Core stability is the ability to control the position and movement of the trunk for optimal production, transfer, and control of forces to and from the upper and lower extremities during functional activities. Muscle capacity and neuromuscular control are critical components of core stability. A limited body of evidence provides some support for a link between core stability and upper extremity injuries amongst athletes who participate in baseball, football, or swimming. Likewise, few studies exist to support a relationship between core stability and athletic performance.CONCLUSIONS: A limited body of evidence exists to support the use of core stability training in injury prevention or performance enhancement programs for athletes. Clearly more research is needed to inform decision making when it comes to inclusion or emphasis of core training when designing injury prevention and rehabilitation programs for athletes.

  14. Civilian traumatic vascular injuries of the upper extremity:report of the Iranian national trauma project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Moini, Majid; Khaji, Ali

    2009-12-01

    The determination of the pattern of traumatic vascular injuries of the upper extremity in Iran was the aim of this study. Data of the Iranian national trauma project were used to identify patients with upper extremity vascular injuries. This project was conducted in 8 major cities from 2000-2004. A total of 113 cases with 130 vascular injuries were found, including 2 axillary, 18 brachial, and 69 radial and ulnar arteries. In 91 cases (81%), penetrating trauma was responsible. Associated nerve and/or upper extremity fractures were seen in 20% and 18% of cases, respectively. End-to-end anastomosis, interposition of saphenous graft, and ligation were used for the management of 44%, 28%, and 17%, respectively, of brachial artery injuries. Ulnar and radial artery injuries had been either ligated (n = 36; 52%) or sutured (n = 33; 48%). Median, ulnar, and radial nerve injuries, except for one, had all been sutured primarily. No patients needed fasciotomy. Amputation and mortality resulting from associated injuries occurred in 3 (2.6%) and 5 (4.4%) patients, respectively. This study revealed that stabbings are the most frequent causes of these injuries in Iran, in spite of the management of patients in level 3 trauma centers; the rate of amputation is acceptable. However, this study does not provide limb functions of the patients.

  15. JIGSAW PUZZLE IMPROVE FINE MOTOR ABILITIES OF UPPER EXTREMITIES IN POST-STROKE ISCHEMIC CLIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ischemic stroke is a disease caused by focal cerebral ischemia, where is a decline in blood flow that needed for neuronal metabolism, leading to neurologic deficit include motor deficit such as fine motor skills impairment. Therapy of fine motor skills disorders is to improve motor function, prevent contractures and complications. These study aimed to identify the effect of playing Jigsaw Puzzle on muscle strength, extensive motion, and upper extremity fine motor skills in patients with ischemic stroke at Dr. Moewardi Hospital, Surakarta. Methods: Experimental Quasi pre-posttest one group control. The number of samples were 34 respondents selected using purposive sampling technique. The samples were divided into intervention and control groups. The intervention group was 17 respondents who were given standard treatment hospital and played Jigsaw Puzzle 2 times a day for six days. Control group is one respondent given by hospital standard therapy without given additional Jigsaw Puzzle game. Evaluation of these research is done on the first and seventh day for those groups. Result: The results showed that muscle strength, the range of joint motion and fine motor skills of upper extremities increased (p = 0.001 significantly after being given the Jigsaw Puzzle games. These means playing Jigsaw Puzzle increase muscle strength, the range of joint motion and upper extremity fine motor skill of ischemic stroke patients. Discussion and conclusion: Jigsaw puzzle game administration as additional rehabilitation therapy in upper extremity fine motor to minimize the occurrence of contractures and motor disorders in patients with ischemic stroke. Jigsaw puzzle game therapy capable of creating repetitive motion as a key of neurological rehabilitation in Ischemic Stroke. This study recommends using jigsaw puzzle game as one of intervention in the nursing care of Ischemic Stroke patients.

  16. A case report of a patient with upper extremity symptoms: differentiating radicular and referred pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daub Clifford W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Similar upper extremity symptoms can present with varied physiologic etiologies. However, due to the multifaceted nature of musculoskeletal conditions, a definitive diagnosis using physical examination and advanced testing is not always possible. This report discusses the diagnosis and case management of a patient with two episodes of similar upper extremity symptoms of different etiologies. Case Presentation On two separate occasions a forty-four year old female patient presented to a chiropractic office with a chief complaint of insidious right-sided upper extremity symptoms. During each episode she reported similar pain and parasthesias from her neck and shoulder to her lateral forearm and hand. During the first episode the patient was diagnosed with a cervical radiculopathy. Conservative treatment, including manual cervical traction, spinal manipulation and neuromobilization, was initiated and resolved the symptoms. Approximately eighteen months later the patient again experienced a severe acute flare-up of the upper extremity symptoms. Although the subjective complaint was similar, it was determined that the pain generator of this episode was an active trigger point of the infraspinatus muscle. A diagnosis of myofascial referred pain was made and a protocol of manual trigger point therapy and functional postural rehabilitative exercises improved the condition. Conclusion In this case a thorough physical evaluation was able to differentiate between radicular and referred pain. By accurately identifying the pain generating structures, the appropriate rehabilitative protocol was prescribed and led to a successful outcome for each condition. Conservative manual therapy and rehabilitative exercises may be an effective treatment for certain cases of cervical radiculopathy and myofascial referred pain.

  17. Diagnosis of occlusive lesions of upper extremity arteries in patients with thromboangiitis obliterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovskiĭ, A V; Kuntsevich, G I; Dan, V N; Chupin, A V; Kalinin, A A; Alekperov, R T; Makhmudova, L S

    2003-01-01

    The study accrued 84 patients suffering from thromboangiitis obliterans (TO) examined and treated at the A.V. Vishnevsky Institute of Surgery, RAMS, over the period 1988 to 2002. Based on the complaints on the part of the upper extremities the patients were distributed into four groups. Sixteen (19.1%) TO patients did not make any complaints on the part of the arms (degree I ischemia). Thirty-eight (45.2%) patients complained of numbness and paresthesia, chiefly of the tips of the fingers on both hands (degree II ischemia). Six (7.1%) persons complained of pains in the hands at physical exercise (decree III ischemia). Ulcers and necroses of the fingers were present in 24 (28.6%) patients (degree IV ischemia). The diagnostic procedures for arterial lesion of the upper extremities included laboratory investigations, duplex scanning of the great arteries, of the arteries of the hands, fingers and nail matrix, wide-field capillaroscopy, oxygen tension measurements, and angiography as well. Comparison of the clinical manifestations of arterial lesion of the upper extremities in TO patients to the data supplied by different research methods has revealed a direct correlation between the degree of ischemia and the pathomorphological as well as functional changes which increased as the ischemic syndrome was aggravated. As a result of the present work, there have been studied and systematized the criteria for the diagnosis of the degree of arterial lesion of the upper extremities in TO patients, based on the data, supplied by duplex scanning, capillaroscopy, measurements of transcutaneous oxygen tension and angiography. In addition, there has been studied the role of the humoral component of immunity in the delineation of inflammatory activity in patients with TO.

  18. Preconditioning electromyographic data for an upper extremity model using neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, D. J.; Fernjallah, M.; Barr, R. E.; Gonzalez, R. V.

    1994-01-01

    A back propagation neural network has been employed to precondition the electromyographic signal (EMG) that drives a computational model of the human upper extremity. This model is used to determine the complex relationship between EMG and muscle activation, and generates an optimal muscle activation scheme that simulates the actual activation. While the experimental and model predicted results of the ballistic muscle movement are very similar, the activation function between the start and the finish is not. This neural network preconditions the signal in an attempt to more closely model the actual activation function over the entire course of the muscle movement.

  19. Soft Tissue Coverage of the Hand and Upper Extremity: The Reconstructive Elevator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Erin Anne; Friedrich, Jeffrey

    2016-07-01

    Soft tissue reconstruction of the upper extremity is a complex topic because every defect has multiple potential solutions. Whereas the often-cited reconstructive ladder advised selection of the simplest reconstruction of the defect, the newer concept of the reconstructive elevator allows freedom to choose a more complex reconstruction to account for specialized function and aesthetic outcome. An algorithm for assessment of the defect is presented and demonstrated in this review, using 6 case examples to highlight key concepts. Representative flaps are presented and a discussion of functional and aesthetic outcomes is undertaken to provide a framework for achieving the patient's and surgeon's goals of reconstruction.

  20. The best of tendon and nerve transfers in the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuffre, Jennifer L; Bishop, Allen T; Spinner, Robert J; Shin, Alexander Y

    2015-03-01

    After reading this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Identify the prerequisite conditions to perform a tendon or a nerve transfer. 2. Detail some of the current nerve and tendon transfer options in upper extremity peripheral nerve injuries. 3. Understand the advantages and disadvantages of tendon and nerve transfers used in isolation and in combination. 4. Appreciate the controversies that surround the nerve/tendon transfers. 5. Realize the treatment outcomes of peripheral nerve injuries. Traditional treatment of a Sunderland fourth- or fifth-degree peripheral nerve injury has been direct neurorrhaphy, nerve grafting, or tendon transfers. With increasing knowledge of nerve pathophysiology, additional treatment options such as nerve transfers have become increasingly popular. With an array of choices for treating peripheral nerve injuries, there is debate as to whether tendon transfers and/or nerve transfers should be performed to restore upper extremity function. Often, tendon and nerve transfers are used in combination as opposed to one in isolation to obtain the most normal functioning extremity without unacceptable donor deficits. The authors tend to prefer reconstructive techniques that have proven long-term efficacy to restore function. Nerve transfers are becoming more common practice, with excellent results; however, the authors are wary of using nerve transfers that sacrifice possible secondary tendon reconstruction should the nerve transfer fail.

  1. Nerve conduction studies in upper extremities: skin temperature corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halar, E M; DeLisa, J A; Soine, T L

    1983-09-01

    The relationship of skin to near nerve (NN) temperature and to nerve conduction velocity (NCV) and distal latency (DL) was studied in 34 normal adult subjects before and after cooling both upper extremities. Median and ulnar motor and sensory NCV, DL, and NN temperature were determined at ambient temperature (mean X skin temp = 33 C) and after cooling, at approximately 26, 28, and 30 C of forearm skin temperature. Skin temperatures on the volar side of the forearm, wrist, palm, and fingers and NN temperature at the forearm, midpalm, and thenar or hypothenar eminence were compared with respective NCV and DL. Results showed a significant linear correlation between skin temperature and NN temperature at corresponding sites (r2 range, 0.4-0.84; p less than 0.005). Furthermore, both skin and NN temperatures correlated significantly with respective NCV and DL. Midline wrist skin temperature showed the best correlation to NCV and DL. Median motor and sensory NCV were altered 1.5 and 1.4m/sec/C degree and their DL 0.2 msec/C degree of wrist skin temperature change, respectively. Ulnar motor and sensory NCV were changed 2.1 and 1.6m/sec/C degree respectively, and 0.2 msec/C degree wrist temperature for motor and sensory DL. Average ambient skin temperature at the wrist (33 C) was used as a standard skin temperature in the temperature correction formula: NCV or DL(temp corrected) = CF(Tst degree - Tm degree) + obtained NCV or DL, where Tst = 33 C for wrist, Tm = the measured skin temperature, and CF = correction factor of tested nerve. Use of temperature correction formula for NCV and DL is suggested in patients with changed wrist skin temperature outside 29.6-36.4C temperature range.

  2. To Constrain or Not to Constrain, and Other Stories of Intensive Upper Extremity Training for Children with Unilateral Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Andrew M.

    2011-01-01

    Impaired hand function is among the most functionally disabling symptoms of unilateral cerebral palsy. Evidence-based treatment approaches are generally lacking. However, recent approaches providing intensive upper extremity training appear promising. In this review, we first describe two such approaches, constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT)…

  3. 3D stereophotogrammetry in upper-extremity lymphedema: An accurate diagnostic method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hameeteman, M.; Verhulst, A.C.; Vreeken, R.D.; Maal, T.J.; Ulrich, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper-extremity lymphedema is a frequent complication in patients treated for breast cancer. Current diagnostic methods for the upper-extremity volume measurements are cumbersome or time consuming. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of three-dimensional

  4. 3D stereophotogrammetry in upper-extremity lymphedema: An accurate diagnostic method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hameeteman, M.; Verhulst, A.C.; Vreeken, R.D.; Maal, T.J.; Ulrich, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Upper-extremity lymphedema is a frequent complication in patients treated for breast cancer. Current diagnostic methods for the upper-extremity volume measurements are cumbersome or time consuming. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity and reliability of three-dimensional

  5. Motor Cortex Stimulation for the Treatment of Chronic Facial, Upper Extremity, and Throat Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-29

    Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type I); Trigeminal Neuralgia (Burchiel Type II); Trigeminal Neuropathic Pain; Trigeminal Deafferentation Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (Types I and II, Involving the Upper Extremity); Glossopharyngeal Neuralgia; Upper Extremity Pain Due to Deafferentation of the Cervical Spine; Central Pain Syndromes

  6. A型肉毒毒素注射配合康复功能训练对痉挛型偏瘫脑瘫患儿上肢运动功能疗效观察%Effect of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Combined with Rehabilitation Functional Training on Upper Extremity Motor Function in Children with Spastic Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    颜华; 张惠佳; 阳伟红; 王益梅; 郭春光; 胡继红; 周平秋; 何金华; 段华林

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察A型肉毒毒素(BTX-A)注射治疗配合康复功能训练对痉挛型偏瘫脑瘫患儿上肢功能障碍的疗效.方法 60例痉挛型偏瘫型脑瘫患儿均接受BTX-A注射治疗,治疗后进行强制性诱导运动训练、物理疗法、肌电生物反馈治疗、作业治疗及家庭训练.在治疗前与治疗3个月后,分别用改良Ashworth痉挛量表(MAS)评定患侧上肢肌张力、关节量角器法测量患侧腕关节主动背伸角度、Peabody运动发育量表(PDMS-II)进行患侧手精细运动商(FMQ)的评估、日常生活活动能力(ADL)量表评估ADL能力以比较观察疗效.结果 治疗后患儿上述指标均较治疗前显著改善(P<0.001).结论 BTX-A注射治疗配合康复功能训练能明显降低痉挛型偏瘫型脑瘫患儿的上肢肌张力,改善关节活动范围,明显提高上肢运动功能.%Objective To observe the effect of Botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) injection combined with rehabilitation functional training on upper extremity motor function in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Methods 60 spastic hemiplegic CP children were treated with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), physical therapy, electromyographic biofeedback stimulation therapy, occupational therapy, family-based training and so on after injected with BTX-A. The muscle tension of the hemiplegic upper extremity accessed by Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), the wrist angle of active dorsiextention motion by orthrometer, fine movement quotient (FMQ) by Pea-body developmental motor scale (PDMS- II), and activities of daily living (ADL) were performed to evaluate the effects before and 3 months after treatment. Results These outcomes were improved significantly after treatment (P<0.001). Conclusion BTX-A injection combined with rehabilitation functional training could rapidly reduce spasticity of the upper extremity, increase the range of motion, improve motor function of upper extremity in children with spastic

  7. Comparative outcome of bomb explosion injuries versus high-powered gunshot injuries of the upper extremity in a civilian setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Shai; Rivkin, Gurion; Avitzour, Malka; Liebergall, Meir; Mintz, Yoav; Mosheiff, Ram

    2013-03-01

    Explosion injuries to the upper extremity have specific clinical characteristics that differ from injuries due to other mechanisms. To evaluate the upper extremity injury pattern of attacks on civilian targets, comparing bomb explosion injuries to gunshot injuries and their functional recovery using standard outcome measures. Of 157 patients admitted to the hospital between 2000 and 2004, 72 (46%) sustained explosion injuries and 85 (54%) gunshot injuries. The trauma registry files were reviewed and the patients completed the DASH Questionnaire (Disabilities of Arm, Shoulder and Hand) and SF-12 (Short Form-12) after a minimum period of 1 year. Of the 157 patients, 72 (46%) had blast injuries and 85 (54%) had shooting injuries. The blast casualties had higher Injury Severity Scores (47% vs. 22% with a score of > 16, P = 0.02) and higher percent of patients treated in intensive care units (47% vs. 28%, P = 0.02). Although the Abbreviated Injury Scale score of the upper extremity injury was similar in the two groups, the blast casualties were found to have more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries and were treated surgically more often. No difference was found in the SF-12 or DASH scores between the groups at follow up. The casualties with upper extremity blast injuries were more severely injured and sustained more bilateral and complex soft tissue injuries to the upper extremity. However, the rating of the local injury to the isolated limb is similar, as was the subjective functional recovery.

  8. [Hemiplegia and cerebral palsy - multidisciplinary treatment of the spastic upper extremity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haefeli, Mathias; Calcagni, Maurizio

    2014-09-17

    Spastic hemiplegia and cerebral palsy often lead to typical deformities of the upper extremity. Muscle- and joint-contractures may be painful and aesthetically unappealing and may interfere with function and hygiene. Within the first weeks after the cerebral incidence the vital threat is dominating and the exact amount of neurologic impairment is not assessable. During this period, conservative treatment should counteract the development of contractures. After spontaneous neurologic recovery, surgical options should be taken into account. When choosing surgical procedures, factors as volitional motor control, sensibility and cognition must be taken into account besides the morphologic changes. This is best achieved in a multidisciplinary setting of neurologists, rehabilitation specialists, physiotherapists and surgeons.

  9. The utility of onion extract gel containing topical allantoin and heparin after surgical treatment of upper extremity burn scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ihsan Okur

    2014-12-01

    Conclusion: Although no significant difference was obtained with Contractubex gel treatment in this study, cosmetic and functional success can be achieved through excision of the scar and use of medium thickness skin graft in patients with upper extremity hypertrophic burn scarring that is resistant to conservative treatments. [Hand Microsurg 2014; 3(3.000: 74-79

  10. New biomechanical model for clinical evaluation of the upper extremity motion in subjects with neurological disorders: an application case

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobo-Prat, Joan; Font-Llagunes, Josep M.; Gómez-Pérez, Cristina; Medina-Casanovas, Josep; Angulo-Barroso, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical spinal cord injury and acquired brain injury commonly imply a reduction in the upper extremity function which complicates, or even constrains, the performance of basic activities of daily living. Neurological rehabilitation in specialised hospitals is a common treatment for patients with ne

  11. Exercise training and postural correction improve upper extremity symptoms among touchscreen smartphone users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeer Ahmed Abdelhameed

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Postural correction combined with a selected exercise training programme improved the hand grip, key pinch grip strength, and upper extremity disability and symptoms associated with smartphone use among university students.

  12. Perfusion Assessment with the SPY System after Arterial Venous Reversal for Upper Extremity Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell Brooks, MD

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: AVR effectively reestablished blood flow in patients with terminal upper extremity ischemia. ICG angiography with SPY technology revealed that, in most cases, kinetic curves, timing, and patterns of perfusion gradually normalized over several PODs.

  13. Upper extremity kinematics and muscle activation patterns in subjects with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, A.; Murgia, A.; Cup, E.H.C.; Verstegen, P.P.; Meijer, K.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the kinematics and muscle activity of subjects with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) and healthy control subjects during the performance of standardized upper extremity tasks. DESIGN: Exploratory case-control study. SETTING: A movement laboratory. PARTICIPANTS: Subjects

  14. Upper Extremity Kinematics and Muscle Activation Patterns in Subjects With Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, Arjen; Murgia, Alessio; Cup, Edith H.; Verstegen, Paul P.; Meijer, Kenneth; de Groot, Imelda J.

    Objective: To compare the kinematics and muscle activity of subjects with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) and healthy control subjects during the performance of standardized upper extremity tasks. Design: Exploratory case-control study. Setting: A movement laboratory. Participants: Subjects

  15. Upper Extremity Kinematics and Muscle Activation Patterns in Subjects With Facioscapulohumeral Dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergsma, Arjen; Murgia, Alessio; Cup, Edith H.; Verstegen, Paul P.; Meijer, Kenneth; de Groot, Imelda J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To compare the kinematics and muscle activity of subjects with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD) and healthy control subjects during the performance of standardized upper extremity tasks. Design: Exploratory case-control study. Setting: A movement laboratory. Participants: Subjects (N=

  16. Hypnosis and upper digestive function and disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Giuseppe Chiarioni; Olafur S Palsson; William E Whitehead

    2008-01-01

    Hypnosis is a therapeutic technique that primarily involves aRentive receptive concentration. Even though a small number of health professionals are trained in hypnosis and lingering myths and misconceptions associated with this method have hampered its widespread use to treat medical conditions, hypnotherapy has gained relevance as an effective treatment for irritable bowel syndrome not responsive to standard care. More recently, a few studies have addressed the potential influence of hypnosis on upper digestive function and disease. This paper reviews the efficacy of hypnosis in the modulation of upper digestive motor and secretory function. The present evidence of the effectiveness of hypnotherapy as a treatment for functional and organic diseases of the upper bowel is also summarized, coupled with a discussion of potential mechanisms of its therapeutic action.

  17. The extremity function index (EFI), a disability severity measure for neuromuscular diseases : psychometric evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Isaac; Wynia, Klaske; Drost, Gea; Almansa, Josué; Kuks, Joannes

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt and to combine the self-report Upper Extremity Functional Index and Lower Extremity Function Scale, for the assessment of disability severity in patients with a neuromuscular disease and to examine its psychometric properties in order to make it suitable for indicating disease

  18. Quantitative Assessment of ADL: A Pilot Study of Upper Extremity Reaching Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saiyi Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective telerehabilitation technologies enable patients with certain physiological disabilities to engage in rehabilitative exercises for performing Activities of Daily Living (ADLs. Therefore, training and assessment scenarios for the performance of ADLs are vital for the promotion for telerehabilitation. In this paper we investigate quantitatively and automatically assessing patient’s kinematic ability to perform functional upper extremity reaching tasks. The shape of the movement trajectory and the instantaneous acceleration of kinematically crucial body parts, such as wrists, are used to compute the approximate entropy of the motions to represent stability (smoothness in addition to the duration of the activity. Computer simulations were conducted to illustrate the consistency, sensitivity and robustness of the proposed method. A preliminary experiment with kinematic data captured from healthy subjects mimicking a reaching task with dyskinesia showed a high degree of correlation (Cohen’s kappa 0.85 with p<0.05 between a human observer and the proposed automatic classification tool in terms of assigning the datasets to various levels to represent the subjects’ kinematic abilities to perform reaching tasks. This study supported the use of Microsoft Kinect to quantitatively evaluate the ability of individuals with involuntary movements to perform an upper extremity reaching task.

  19. Upper and lower extremity proprioceptive inputs modulate EMG activity of the trapezius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tataroglu, Cengiz; Kuçuk, Fatma Kursad; Ozkul, Ayca

    2011-02-01

    Axial muscles like the trapezius have different reflexive and functional properties. The aim of this study was to analyze the long latency reflexes obtained from the trapezius by the electrical stimulation of upper and lower extremity peripheral nerves. Thirty-one healthy volunteers were included in the study. Surface EMG activity of both trapezius muscles was recorded and averaged after electrical stimulation of the median and peroneal mixed nerves. The recordings were performed during supine and erect posture in nine subjects to evaluate of the effect of postural differences on reflex response. Reflex recordings were also performed in six subjects from some other muscles together with the trapezius by the stimulation of the peroneal nerve. Reflex responses including three components were recorded from the trapezius muscle (unilateral or bilateral) by electrical stimulation of the peroneal nerve. The most stable of them was the second component (23/31) which had a latency of 72.6 ± 7.9 ms for the ipsilateral, and 74.2 ± 8.5 ms for the contralateral trapezius (15/31). For median stimulation, the first component recorded at 32.0 ± 6.7 ms was the most stable (25/31). The second component was more frequently recorded on the contralateral side (14/31). Erect posture increased the amplitude of these components. Upper and lower extremity proprioceptive inputs modulate the EMG activity of the trapezius. This modulation probably related with postural adjustments.

  20. Virtual reality for upper extremity rehabilitation in early stroke: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chan Wai; Sien, Ng Yee; Ying, Low Ai; Chung, Stephanie Fook-Chong Man; Tan May Leng, Dawn

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the effect of virtual reality (VR) rehabilitation on upper extremity motor performance of patients with early stroke. Pilot randomized controlled trial. Rehabilitation wards. Twenty three adults with stroke (mean age (SD) = 58.35 (13.45) years and mean time since stroke (SD) = 16.30 (7.44) days). Participants were randomly assigned to VR group (n=11) or control group (n=12). VR group received nine 30 minutes upper extremity VR therapy in standing (five weekdays in two weeks) plus conventional therapy, which included physical and occupational therapy. Control group received only conventional therapy, which was comparable to total training time received by VR group (mean training hours (SD):VR = 17.07 (2.86); control = 15.50 (2.79)). The main outcome measure was the Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA). Secondary outcomes included Action Research Arm Test, Motor Activity Log and Functional Independence Measure. Results were taken at baseline, post intervention and 1-month post intervention. Participants' feedback and adverse effects were recorded. All participants improved in FMA scores (mean change (SD) = 11.65 (8.56), Ptherapy alone, this study demonstrates the feasibility of VR training in early stroke. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Effect of a Task-Oriented Rehabilitation Program on Upper Extremity Recovery Following Motor Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J.; Wolf, Steven L.; Dromerick, Alexander W.; Lane, Christianne J.; Nelsen, Monica A.; Lewthwaite, Rebecca; Cen, Steven Yong; Azen, Stanley P.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Clinical trials suggest that higher doses of task-oriented training are superior to current clinical practice for patients with stroke with upper extremity motor deficits. OBJECTIVE To compare the efficacy of a structured, task-oriented motor training program vs usual and customary occupational therapy (UCC) during stroke rehabilitation. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Phase 3, pragmatic, single-blind randomized trial among 361 participants with moderate motor impairment recruited from 7 US hospitals over 44 months, treated in the outpatient setting from June 2009 to March 2014. INTERVENTIONS Structured, task-oriented upper extremity training (Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program[ASAP]; n = 119); dose-equivalent occupational therapy (DEUCC; n = 120); or monitoring-only occupational therapy (UCC; n = 122). The DEUCC group was prescribed 30 one-hour sessions over 10 weeks; the UCC group was only monitored, without specification of dose. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The primary outcome was 12-month change in log-transformed Wolf Motor Function Test time score (WMFT, consisting of a mean of 15 timed arm movements and hand dexterity tasks). Secondary outcomes were change in WMFT time score (minimal clinically important difference [MCID] = 19 seconds) and proportion of patients improving ≥25 points on the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) hand function score (MCID = 17.8 points). RESULTS Among the 361 randomized patients (mean age, 60.7 years; 56% men; 42% African American; mean time since stroke onset, 46 days), 304 (84%) completed the 12-month primary outcome assessment; in intention-to-treat analysis, mean group change scores (log WMFT, baseline to 12 months) were, for the ASAP group, 2.2 to 1.4 (difference, 0.82); DEUCC group, 2.0 to 1.2 (difference, 0.84); and UCC group, 2.1 to 1.4 (difference, 0.75), with no significant between-group differences (ASAP vs DEUCC:0.14; 95% CI, −0.05 to 0.33; P = .16; ASAP vs UCC: −0.01; 95% CI, −0.22 to 0.21; P = .94; and

  2. Common Factors and Outcome in Late Upper Extremity Amputations After Military Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    are no quality studies that attempt to define an upper extremity limb salvage in a consistent way such as the Lower Extremity Assessment Project study...their prosthetic arm frequently despite all of them receiving multiple prostheses. This percentage is lower than the 76% found in a previous study that...following limb - threatening lower limb trauma: lessons learned from the Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP). J Am Acad Orthop Surg. 2006;14:S205

  3. Probability modeling of high flow extremes in Yingluoxia watershed, the upper reaches of Heihe River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanling; Li, Zhanjie; Li, Chengcheng

    2014-05-01

    Probability modeling of hydrological extremes is one of the major research areas in hydrological science. Most basins in humid and semi-humid south and east of China are concerned for probability modeling analysis of high flow extremes. While, for the inland river basin which occupies about 35% of the country area, there is a limited presence of such studies partly due to the limited data availability and a relatively low mean annual flow. The objective of this study is to carry out probability modeling of high flow extremes in the upper reach of Heihe River basin, the second largest inland river basin in China, by using the peak over threshold (POT) method and Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD), in which the selection of threshold and inherent assumptions for POT series are elaborated in details. For comparison, other widely used probability distributions including generalized extreme value (GEV), Lognormal, Log-logistic and Gamma are employed as well. Maximum likelihood estimate is used for parameter estimations. Daily flow data at Yingluoxia station from 1978 to 2008 are used. Results show that, synthesizing the approaches of mean excess plot, stability features of model parameters, return level plot and the inherent independence assumption of POT series, an optimum threshold of 340m3/s is finally determined for high flow extremes in Yingluoxia watershed. The resulting POT series is proved to be stationary and independent based on Mann-Kendall test, Pettitt test and autocorrelation test. In terms of Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, Anderson-Darling test and several graphical diagnostics such as quantile and cumulative density function plots, GPD provides the best fit to high flow extremes in the study area. The estimated high flows for long return periods demonstrate that, as the return period increasing, the return level estimates are probably more uncertain. The frequency of high flow extremes exhibits a very slight but not significant decreasing trend from 1978 to

  4. What's new in new technologies for upper extremity rehabilitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brochard, Sylvain; Robertson, Johanna; Médée, Béatrice; Rémy-Néris, Olivier

    2010-12-01

    The field of new technologies for upper-limb rehabilitation is exploding. The review presents new trends and studies of effectiveness from recent literature regarding robots, virtual reality and telerehabilitation for neurorehabilitation of the upper limb. There appears to be a greater focus on technological developments than on clinical trials or studies to evaluate the mechanisms behind the effectiveness of these systems. Developments are most abundant in the field of robotics. However, the first well designed and powered randomized-controlled trial on robot rehabilitation has appeared, confirming that the effectiveness of robot therapy lies in the number of repetitions provided. There is a move towards studies in populations other than stroke, particularly cerebral palsy with a few studies on multiple sclerosis and traumatic brain injury. There is also an increasing trend for the use of robotic devices as evaluation tools. Despite the fact that new technologies are based on knowledge from motor control and learning literature and that they provide an exciting potential for varied rehabilitation, recent evidence suggests that the only contribution to clinical practice currently is the provision of intensive, repetitive movements.

  5. Outcomes of Botulinum Toxin Type A Injection Followed by Rehabilitation in Cases of Cerebral Palsy With Upper Extremity Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Burcu; Ünlü, Ece; Köse, Gülşen; Gönen, Emel; Çakcı, Aytül

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the efficiency of botulinum toxin type A injection followed by a rehabilitation program including individual therapy, group therapy, and occupational therapy in cases of cerebral palsy with upper extremity involvement. A total of 29 injections were performed on 25 patients, and the patients were placed on rehabilitation program. At 3-month and 6-month assessments, there was a significant improvement in lateral grip strength, 9 Hole Peg test, Upper Limb Physician's Rating Scale and pediatric functional independence measure total scores. There were significant decreases in active range of motion in elbow extension, supination, and wrist extension, and Modified Ashworth Scale in elbow flexion, elbow pronation, and wrist flexion at 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month assessments. Combination of group therapy with traditional therapy methods after injection is effective in cases of cerebral palsy with upper extremity involvement.

  6. Factors associated with upper extremity contractures after cervical spinal cord injury: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardwick, Dustin; Bryden, Anne; Kubec, Gina; Kilgore, Kevin

    2017-06-05

    To examine the prevalence of joint contractures in the upper limb and association with voluntary strength, innervation status, functional status, and demographics in a convenience sample of individuals with cervical spinal cord injury to inform future prospective studies. Cross-sectional convenience sampled pilot study. Department of Veterans Affairs Research Laboratory. Thirty-eight participants with cervical level spinal cord injury. Not applicable. Contractures were measured with goniometric passive range of motion. Every joint in the upper extremity was evaluated bilaterally. Muscle strength was measured with manual muscle testing. Innervation status was determined clinically with surface electrical stimulation. Functional independence was measured with the Spinal Cord Independence Measure III (SCIM-III). Every participant tested had multiple joints with contractures and, on average, participants were unable to achieve the normative values of passive movement in 52% of the joints tested. Contractures were most common in the shoulder and hand. There was a weak negative relationship between percentage of contractures and time post-injury and a moderate positive relationship between percentage of contractures and age. There was a strong negative correlation between SCIM-III score and percentage of contractures. Joint contractures were noted in over half of the joints tested. These joint contractures were associated with decreased functional ability as measured by the SCIM-III. This highlights the need the need for detailed evaluation of the arm and hand early after injury as well as continued monitoring of joint characteristics throughout the life course of the individual with tetraplegia.

  7. Long-term complications of snake bites to the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowin, D J; Wright, T; Cowin, J A

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine long-term complications of upper-extremity snake envenomations. The records of 73 patients, who were seen for snake bites were obtained; 46 of these patients had bites to the upper extremity, and 27 had bites to the lower extremity. These patients were graded according to the severity of the bite. The snakes involved were eastern diamondback rattlesnake, coral snake, pigmy rattlesnake, water moccasin, and unknown. Fourteen of the 46 patients receiving upper extremity bites were examined by a hand surgeon and an occupational hand therapist 1 to 3.2 years after their bite. Subjective pain data, range-of-motion, intrinsic, extrinsic, finger-flexion tightness, grip strength, pinch strength and objective sensory data were collected. Four patients had continued pain and tissue atrophy at the bite site. There were no long-term sequelae from a missed compartment syndrome.

  8. Magnetic resonance angiographic assessment of upper extremity vessels prior to vascular access surgery: feasibility and accuracy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planken, Nils R. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Tordoir, Jan H. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Vascular Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Duijm, Lucien E.; Bosch, Harrie C. van den [Catharina Hospital, Department of Radiology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sande, Frank M. van der; Kooman, Jeroen P. [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Nephrology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands); Haan, Michiel W. de; Leiner, Tim [Maastricht University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical School, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht, Maastricht (Netherlands)

    2008-01-15

    A contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA) protocol for selective imaging of the entire upper extremity arterial and venous tree in a single exam has been developed. Twenty-five end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients underwent CE-MRA and duplex ultrasonography (DUS) of the upper extremity prior to hemodialysis vascular access creation. Accuracy of CE-MRA arterial and venous diameter measurements were compared with DUS and intraoperative (IO) diameter measurements, the standard of reference. Upper extremity vasculature depiction was feasible with CE-MRA. CE-MRA forearm and upper arm arterial diameters were 2.94 {+-} 0.67 mm and 4.05 {+-} 0.84 mm, respectively. DUS arterial diameters were 2.80 {+-} 0.48 mm and 4.38 {+-} 1.24 mm; IO diameters were 3.00 {+-} 0.35 mm and 3.55 {+-} 0.51 mm. Forearm arterial diameters were accurately determined with both techniques. Both techniques overestimated upper arm arterial diameters significantly. Venous diameters were accurately determined with CE-MRA but not with DUS (forearm: CE-MRA: 2.64 {+-} 0.61 mm; DUS: 2.50 {+-} 0.44 mm, and IO: 3.40 {+-} 0.22 mm; upper arm: CE-MRA: 4.09 {+-} 0.71 mm; DUS: 3.02 {+-} 1.65 mm, and IO: 4.30 {+-} 0.78 mm). CE-MRA enables selective imaging of upper extremity vasculature in patients requiring hemodialysis access. Forearm arterial diameters can be assessed accurately by CE-MRA. Both CE-MRA and DUS slightly overestimate upper arm arterial diameters. In comparison to DUS, CE-MRA enables a more accurate determination of upper extremity venous diameters. (orig.)

  9. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Tolga Ege; Aytekin Unlu; Huseyin Tas; Dogan Bek; Selim Turkan; Aytac Cetinkaya

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS). However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the envi...

  10. A Clinically Relevant Method of Analyzing Continuous Change in Robotic Upper Extremity Chronic Stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massie, Crystal L; Du, Yue; Conroy, Susan S; Krebs, H Igo; Wittenberg, George F; Bever, Christopher T; Whitall, Jill

    2016-09-01

    Robots designed for rehabilitation of the upper extremity after stroke facilitate high rates of repetition during practice of movements and record precise kinematic data, providing a method to investigate motor recovery profiles over time. To determine how motor recovery profiles during robotic interventions provide insight into improving clinical gains. A convenience sample (n = 22), from a larger randomized control trial, was taken of chronic stroke participants completing 12 sessions of arm therapy. One group received 60 minutes of robotic therapy (Robot only) and the other group received 45 minutes on the robot plus 15 minutes of translation-to-task practice (Robot + TTT). Movement time was assessed using the robot without powered assistance. Analyses (ANOVA, random coefficient modeling [RCM] with 2-term exponential function) were completed to investigate changes across the intervention, between sessions, and within a session. Significant improvement (P stroke robotic interventions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Feasibility of High-Repetition, Task-Specific Training for Individuals With Upper-Extremity Paresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kimberly J.; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L.; Moore, Jennifer L.; Hornby, T. George

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We investigated the feasibility of delivering an individualized, progressive, high-repetition upper-extremity (UE) task-specific training protocol for people with stroke in the inpatient rehabilitation setting. METHOD. Fifteen patients with UE paresis participated in this study. Task-specific UE training was scheduled for 60 min/day, 4 days/wk, during occupational therapy for the duration of a participant’s inpatient stay. During each session, participants were challenged to complete ≥300 repetitions of various tasks. RESULTS. Participants averaged 289 repetitions/session, spending 47 of 60 min in active training. Participants improved on impairment and activity level outcome measures. CONCLUSION. People with stroke in an inpatient setting can achieve hundreds of repetitions of task-specific training in 1-hr sessions. As expected, all participants improved on functional outcome measures. Future studies are needed to determine whether this high-repetition training program results in better outcomes than current UE interventions. PMID:25005508

  12. Short-Term Effects of Whole-Body Vibration Combined with Task-Related Training on Upper Extremity Function, Spasticity, and Grip Strength in Subjects with Poststroke Hemiplegia: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Sun; Kim, Chang-Yong; Kim, Hyeong-Dong

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training on arm function, spasticity, and grip strength in subjects with poststroke hemiplegia. Forty-five subjects with poststroke were randomly allocated to 3 groups, each with 15 subjects as follows: control group, whole-body vibration group, and whole-body vibration plus task-related training group. Outcome was evaluated by clinical evaluation and measurements of the grip strength before and 4 weeks after intervention. Our results show that there was a significantly greater increase in the Fugl-Meyer scale, maximal grip strength of the affected hand, and grip strength normalized to the less affected hand in subjects undergoing the whole-body vibration training compared with the control group after the test. Furthermore, there was a significantly greater increase in the Wolf motor function test and a decrease in the modified Ashworth spasticity total scores in subjects who underwent whole-body vibration plus task-related training compared with those in the other 2 groups after the test. The findings indicate that the use of whole-body vibration training combined with task-related training has more benefits on the improvement of arm function, spasticity, and maximal grip strength than conventional upper limb training alone or with whole-body vibration in people with poststroke hemiplegia.

  13. The clinical aspects of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR" use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, A. A.; Krivonozhkina, P. S.; Andryushchenko, F. A.; Zasypkina, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    The article considers some of indications and contraindications for the use of the exoskeleton "EXAR". Our experience with the present construction use shows that the exoskeleton "EXAR" is able to make up the following lost or disturbed muscle functions:- an arm raise; a drawing of the arm aside from the trunk;- a bending of the arm in shoulder or elbow joints.

  14. A rare disease in an atypical location - Kimura's Disease of the upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, Alan Cheuk Si; Lau, Vince Wing Hang [Queen Mary Hospital, Department of Radiology, Hong Kong (China); Au Yeung, Rex Kwok Him [University of Hong Kong, Department of Pathology, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-12-15

    Kimura's disease is a rare chronic inflammatory disorder predominantly affecting young Asian male patients, occurring mainly in the head and neck regions. Kimura's disease of the upper extremity is extremely rare, and previous case reports in the literature show similar imaging characteristics with consistent location at the medial epitrochlear region, predominantly with unilateral involvement. We present the first reported case of Kimura's disease affecting the anterolateral aspect of the upper arm, sparing the medial epitrochlear region, illustrating that with typical MR appearance and serology, the involvement of this rare disease in an atypical location still warrants consideration of this diagnosis. There was also bilateral asymmetrical involvement in our patient, suggesting the possibility of a propensity for Kimura's disease affecting the upper extremities to have bilateral involvement, which may necessitate imaging of the clinically asymptomatic contralateral limb in these patients for early lesion identification and treatment. (orig.)

  15. OrthoJacket: an active FES-hybrid orthosis for the paralysed upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Oliver; Wiegand, Roland; Schmitz, Bastian; Matthies, Richard; Eck, Ute; Pylatiuk, Christian; Reischl, Markus; Schulz, Stefan; Rupp, Rüdiger

    2011-02-01

    The loss of the grasp function in cervical spinal cord injured (SCI) patients leads to life-long dependency on caregivers and to a tremendous decrease of the quality of life. This article introduces the novel non-invasive modular hybrid neuro-orthosis OrthoJacket for the restoration of the restricted or completely lost hand and arm functions in high tetraplegic SCI individuals. The primary goal of the wearable orthosis is to improve the paralysed upper extremity function and, thus, to enhance a patient's independence in activities of daily living. The system combines the advantage of orthotics in mechanically stabilising joints together with the possibilities of functional electrical stimulation for activation of paralysed muscles. In patients with limited capacity, for force generation, flexible fluidic actuators are used to support the movement. Thus, the system is not only intended for functional restoration but also for training. Several sensor systems together with an intelligent signal processing allow for automatic adaptation to the anatomical and neurological individualities of SCI patients. The integration of novel user interfaces based on residual muscle activities and detection of movement intentions by real-time data mining methods will enable the user to autonomously control the system in a natural and cooperative way.

  16. First successful lower-extremity transplantation: technique and functional result.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuker, Ronald M; Redett, Rick; Alman, Ben; Coles, John G; Timoney, Norma; Ein, Sigmund H

    2006-05-01

    Composite tissue transplantation has emerged as a viable alternative to prosthetics and complex reconstructive surgery. Thus far it is reserved for cases which cannot be effectively reconstructed and where it offers some benefits over prostheses. It has been used in the upper extremity with encouraging results and, most recently, in the face. This report outlines what is believed to be the first such use in the lower extremity. A normal lower limb in a 3-month-old ischiopagus twin who was not going to survive was transplanted to the appropriate pelvic position, revascularized, and reinnervated in an otherwise healthy sister. The limb survived and, because of the immune compatibility, did not require immune suppressive therapy. The return of muscle function in the transplanted limb is encouraging. The transplanted limb appears to be fully sensate. In addition to reinnervation, the limb is now spontaneously under the cortical control of the recipient.

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute 'wiiitis' of the upper extremity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nett, Michael P.; Sperling, John W. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, MN (United States); Collins, Mark S. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States)

    2008-05-15

    We present the first reported case of acute 'wiiitis', documented clinically and by imaging, of the upper extremity, caused by prolonged participation in a physically interactive virtual video-game. Unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated marked T2-weighted signal abnormality within several muscles of the shoulder and upper arm, without evidence of macroscopic partial- or full-thickness tearing of the muscle or of intramuscular hematoma. (orig.)

  18. Postcontraction hyperemia after electrical stimulation: potential utility in rehabilitation of patients with upper extremity paralysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Nobusuke; Matsunaga, Toshiki; Kudo, Daisuke; Sasaki, Kana; Mizutani, Takashi; Sato, Mineyoshi; Chida, Satoaki; Hatakeyama, Kazutoshi; Watanabe, Motoyuki; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare postcontraction hyperemia after electrical stimulation between patients with upper extremity paralysis caused by upper motor neuron diseases and healthy controls. Thirteen healthy controls and eleven patients with upper extremity paralysis were enrolled. The blood flow in the basilic vein was measured by ultrasound before the electrical stimulation of the biceps brachii muscle and 30 s after the stimulation. The stimulation was performed at 10 mA and at a frequency of 70 Hz for 20 s. The mean blood flow in the healthy control group and in upper extremity paralysis group before the electrical stimulation was 60 ± 20 mL/min (mean ± SD) and 48 ± 25 mL/min, respectively. After the stimulation, blood flow in both groups increased to 117 ± 23 mL/min and 81 ± 41 mL/min, respectively. We show that it is possible to measure postcontraction hyperemia using an ultrasound system. In addition, blood flow in both groups increased after the electrical stimulation because of postcontraction hyperemia. These findings suggest that evaluating post contraction hyperemia in patients with upper extremity paralysis can assess rehabilitation effects.

  19. Biomechanical model for evaluation of pediatric upper extremity joint dynamics during wheelchair mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Wang, Mei; Vogel, Lawrence C; Smith, Peter A; Harris, Gerald F

    2014-01-03

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility using a SmartWheel instrumented handrim system. The bilateral model comprises thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments and includes the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist joints. A single 17 year-old male with a C7 spinal cord injury (SCI) was evaluated while propelling his wheelchair across a 15-meter walkway. The subject exhibited wrist extension angles up to 60°, large elbow ranges of motion and peak glenohumeral joint forces up to 10% body weight. Statistically significant asymmetry of the wrist, elbow, glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints was detected by the model. As demonstrated, the custom bilateral UE pediatric model may provide considerable quantitative insight into UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training, rehabilitation and long-term care of children with orthopedic disabilities. Further research is warranted to evaluate pediatric wheelchair mobility in a larger population of children with SCI to investigate correlations to pain, function and transitional changes to adulthood. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Prosthetic possibilities after amputations in the upper extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grüttner, B; Frohnauer, G; Burgkart, R

    2004-06-24

    Whereas passive prostheses are fitted onto the patient after the amputation of an arm, hand or finger and are mostly cosmetic in function, active prostheses have much more potential. They can transform the movements of other body regions to movement in the artificial limb. Belts or harnesses, for example, effect the direct transfer of the power from the muscle to the prosthesis. The range of movement possible depends upon the level of the amputation, the length of the residual limb, the age of the patient, his body build and fitness. Myoelectrically controlled prostheses possess their own drive and power source. They control movement through the electrical action potentials of the residual limb muscles, which are detected, amplified and transmitted with help of electrodes.

  1. [Remote intelligent Brunnstrom assessment system for upper limb rehabilitation for post-stroke based on extreme learning machine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Yu, Lei; Fu, Jianming; Fang, Qiang

    2014-04-01

    In order to realize an individualized and specialized rehabilitation assessment of remoteness and intelligence, we set up a remote intelligent assessment system of upper limb movement function of post-stroke patients during rehabilitation. By using the remote rehabilitation training sensors and client data sampling software, we collected and uploaded the gesture data from a patient's forearm and upper arm during rehabilitation training to database of the server. Then a remote intelligent assessment system, which had been developed based on the extreme learning machine (ELM) algorithm and Brunnstrom stage assessment standard, was used to evaluate the gesture data. To evaluate the reliability of the proposed method, a group of 23 stroke patients, whose upper limb movement functions were in different recovery stages, and 4 healthy people, whose upper limb movement functions were normal, were recruited to finish the same training task. The results showed that, compared to that of the experienced rehabilitation expert who used the Brunnstrom stage standard table, the accuracy of the proposed remote Brunnstrom intelligent assessment system can reach a higher level, as 92.1%. The practical effects of surgery have proved that the proposed system could realize the intelligent assessment of upper limb movement function of post-stroke patients remotely, and it could also make the rehabilitation of the post-stroke patients at home or in a community care center possible.

  2. Effects of virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training on brain activity in post-stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Hyun; Kim, Yu-Mi; Lee, Byoung-Hee

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the therapeutic effects of virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training on brain activity in patients with stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Eighteen chronic stroke patients were divided into two groups: the virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training group (n = 10) and the bilateral upper-limb training group (n = 8). The virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training group performed bilateral upper-extremity exercises in a virtual reality environment, while the bilateral upper-limb training group performed only bilateral upper-extremity exercise. All training was conducted 30 minutes per day, three times per week for six weeks, followed by brain activity evaluation. [Results] Electroencephalography showed significant increases in concentration in the frontopolar 2 and frontal 4 areas, and significant increases in brain activity in the frontopolar 1 and frontal 3 areas in the virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training group. [Conclusion] Virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training can improve the brain activity of stroke patients. Thus, virtual reality-based bilateral upper-extremity training is feasible and beneficial for improving brain activation in stroke patients.

  3. Endovascular stent placement in the treatment of upper extremity central venous obstruction in hemodialysis patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aytekin, Cueneyt E-mail: cuneytaytekin@hotmail.com; Boyvat, Fatih; Yagmurdur, Mahmut Can; Moray, Goekhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of stent placement for treating upper extremity central venous obstruction in chronic hemodialysis patients. Methods and Material: Between January 1999 and October 2001, we inserted metallic stents into the upper extremity central veins of 14 patients with shunt dysfunction and/or arm swelling. The indications for stent placement were stenosis or occlusion of the central vein in the upper extremity used for dialysis. Six of the individuals were diagnosed with subclavian vein stenosis, and 5 with brachiocephalic vein stenosis. Of the remaining 3 patients, 2 had subclavian vein occlusion, and 1 had left brachiocephalic vein occlusion. Results: All the stent placement procedures were technically successful, and there were no major complications. Follow-up ranged from 2 weeks to 29 months. The 1-, 3-, 6- and 12-month primary stent patency rates were 92.8, 85.7, 50 and 14.3%, respectively. Repeat interventions, including percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and additional stent placement, were required in 9 patients. The 3-, 6-, 12-month, and 2-year assisted primary stent patency rates were 100, 88.8, 55.5 and 33.3%, respectively. Conclusion: Endovascular stent placement is an effective alternative to surgery in patients with shunt dysfunction due to obstruction of an upper extremity central vein. Repeated interventions are usually required to prolong stent patency.

  4. Upper Extremity Artificial Limb Control as an Issue Related to Movement and Mobility in Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Steve; Anderson, David I.; Trujillo, Michael; Weeks, Douglas L.

    2005-01-01

    The 1992 NIH Research Planning Conference on Prosthetic and Orthotic Research for the 21st Century (Childress, 1992) recognized that the field of prosthetics lacks theoretical understanding and empirical studies on learning to control an upper-extremity prosthesis. We have addressed this problem using a novel approach in which persons without…

  5. Old and new risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, J.W.; Doggen, Catharina Jacoba Maria; Osanto, S.; Rosendaal, F.R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Well known risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis are the presence of a central venous catheter (CVC) and malignancy, but other potential risk factors, such as surgery, injury and hormone replacement therapy (HRT), have not yet been explored. Methods: We performed a

  6. Incidence and Risk Factors for Upper Extremity Climbing Injuries in Indoor Climbers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Middelkoop, M.; Bruens, M. L.; Coert, J. H.; Selles, R. W.; Verhagen, E.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S. M A; Koes, B. W.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the prevalence, incidence and risk factors for climbing-related injuries of the upper extremities in recreational climbers. A total of 426 recreational climbers were recruited from indoor climbing halls. The baseline questionnaire included questions on

  7. Statin-induced focal myositis of the upper extremity. A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M., E-mail: wagner.radiologie@herzchirurgie.de [Department of Radiology, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Salzburger Leite 1, D-97616 Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Muehldorfer-Fodor, M.; Prommersberger, K.J. [Department of Handsurgery, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany); Schmitt, R. [Department of Radiology, Herz- und Gefaessklinik GmbH, Salzburger Leite 1, D-97616 Bad Neustadt an der Saale (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Statins are widely used to lower increased cholesterol levels with the aim to prevent major cardiovascular events. However, they bare the risk of myotoxic side effects. We report on two patients with focal weakness and pain in the upper extremities. In both patients, abnormal MRI signal heights in the muscle groups involved were indicative of the final diagnosis of focal myositis during statin therapy.

  8. Upper extremities flexibility comparisons of collegiate "soft" martial art practitioners with other athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C-C; Yang, Y-H; Chen, C-H; Chen, T-W; Lee, C-L; Wu, C-L; Chuang, S-H; Huang, M-H

    2008-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the flexibility of the upper extremities in collegiate students involved in Aikido (a kind of soft martial art attracting youth) training with those involved in other sports. Fifty freshmen with a similar frequency of exercise were divided into the Aikido group (n = 18), the upper-body sports group (n = 17), and the lower-body sports group (n = 15) according to the sports that they participated in. Eight classes of range of motion in upper extremities were taken for all subjects by the same clinicians. The Aikido group had significantly better flexibility than the upper-body sports group except for range of motion in shoulder flexion (p = 0.22), shoulder lateral rotation (p > 0.99), and wrist extension (p > 0.99). The Aikido group also had significantly better flexibility than the lower-body sports group (p martial arts had good upper extremities flexibility that might not result from regular exercise alone.

  9. Patterns of decline in upper limb function of boys and men with DMD: an international survey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.M.H.P.; Bergsma, A.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Groot, I.J.M. de

    2014-01-01

    With increasing life expectancy, upper extremity (UE) function becomes more and more important in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Knowledge of UE function in these children is, however, limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the changing patterns of UE function during t

  10. An intelligent active force control algorithm to control an upper extremity exoskeleton for motor recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasbullah Mohd Isa, Wan; Taha, Zahari; Mohd Khairuddin, Ismail; Majeed, Anwar P. P. Abdul; Fikri Muhammad, Khairul; Abdo Hashem, Mohammed; Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Mohamed, Zulkifli

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the modelling and control of a two degree of freedom upper extremity exoskeleton by means of an intelligent active force control (AFC) mechanism. The Newton-Euler formulation was used in deriving the dynamic modelling of both the anthropometry based human upper extremity as well as the exoskeleton that consists of the upper arm and the forearm. A proportional-derivative (PD) architecture is employed in this study to investigate its efficacy performing joint-space control objectives. An intelligent AFC algorithm is also incorporated into the PD to investigate the effectiveness of this hybrid system in compensating disturbances. The Mamdani Fuzzy based rule is employed to approximate the estimated inertial properties of the system to ensure the AFC loop responds efficiently. It is found that the IAFC-PD performed well against the disturbances introduced into the system as compared to the conventional PD control architecture in performing the desired trajectory tracking.

  11. The influence of wheelchair propulsion hand pattern on upper extremity muscle power and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowik, Jonathan S; Requejo, Philip S; Mulroy, Sara J; Neptune, Richard R

    2016-06-14

    The hand pattern (i.e., full-cycle hand path) used during manual wheelchair propulsion is frequently classified as one of four distinct hand pattern types: arc, single loop, double loop or semicircular. Current clinical guidelines recommend the use of the semicircular pattern, which is based on advantageous levels of broad biomechanical metrics implicitly related to the demand placed on the upper extremity (e.g., lower cadence). However, an understanding of the influence of hand pattern on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand (e.g., muscle power and stress) is needed to help make such recommendations, but these quantities are difficult and impractical to measure experimentally. The purpose of this study was to use musculoskeletal modeling and forward dynamics simulations to investigate the influence of the hand pattern used on specific measures of upper extremity muscle demand. The simulation results suggest that the double loop and semicircular patterns produce the most favorable levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power. The double loop pattern had the lowest full-cycle and recovery-phase upper extremity demand but required high levels of muscle power during the relatively short contact phase. The semicircular pattern had the second-lowest full-cycle levels of overall muscle stress and total muscle power, and demand was more evenly distributed between the contact and recovery phases. These results suggest that in order to decrease upper extremity demand, manual wheelchair users should consider using either the double loop or semicircular pattern when propelling their wheelchairs at a self-selected speed on level ground.

  12. Range of Motion of the Upper Extremity in a Healthy Pediatric Population: Introduction to Normative Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Paz, Stephanie Nunes; Stalder, Andreas; Berger, Steffen; Ziebarth, Kai

    2016-10-01

    Objective In the pediatric population traumatic injuries of the upper extremity are common. After therapy a decision has to be made if the mobility of the joint lies within a normal range. The purpose of this study was to give an introduction to normative data. We investigate if there is a significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) between male and female probands and furthermore, if an effect of the age can be detected. Methods We performed an institutional review board-approved study of healthy girls and boys aged between 2 and 16 years without any medical history of an upper extremity fracture. We investigated the active ROM of the elbow, wrist, metacarpophalangeal, and interphalangeal joints. Furthermore, age, handedness, weight, and height were recorded. A total of 171 adolescents with a mean age of 10.6 years were included and separated into four cohorts by age: 2 to 5, 6 to 10, 11 to 13, and 14 to 16 years. Results We found significant differences between the genders in the age group from 11 to 13 years for the flexion of the elbow, the pronation, the flexion of the interphalangeal joint of the thumb, as well as the flexion of the metacarpophalangeal joints of digitus II to V. Furthermore, a significant difference in the same joints except from the elbow flexion could be demonstrated between the genders. Conclusion Our study contributes normative data for upper extremity ROM in the pediatric population and presents a gender-related difference in certain joints. Clinical Relevance Normative data for the ROM of upper extremity joints in children is helpful for the evaluation of pediatric orthopedic patients and provides the framework for therapeutic resolution. Since a great number of traumatic injuries in children affect the upper extremity, this information may help the physician to estimate the impact of the injury and decide on the therapeutic management.

  13. 强制性使用运动疗法对恢复期脑卒中患者上肢功能的影响%The effect of constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function in recovering stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李奎; 胡昔权; 郑金利; 周利红; 谢丽君

    2008-01-01

    目的 探讨强制性使用运动疗法(CIMT)对恢复期脑卒中患者上肢功能和日常生活活动能力的影响.方法 将符合入选条件的30例恢复期脑卒中偏瘫患者随机分为观察组和对照组,每组15例.观察组用CIMT,即用休息位夹板和吊带将健侧上肢固定,限制使用,每天在清醒时的固定时间不少于90%;每天强制性训练患者使用偏瘫侧上肢6 h(其中1 h在作业治疗室进行任务指向性塑形训练,其它5 h在家属监督下使用患手),每周6 d,持续3周.对照组用神经发育疗法(NDT),每天在作业治疗室以运动再学习方案训练为主,训练患者使用偏瘫侧上肢1 h,每周6 d,持续3周.2组患者均同时予以常规药物治疗及其它康复治疗,治疗前、后采用Wolf运动功能评价量表(WMFT)评定偏瘫侧上肢运动功能,采用Barthel指数(BI)评定ADL能力.结果 治疗前2组患者WMFT评分和BI评分比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05);2组治疗前、后比较,偏瘫侧上肢运动功能和ADL能力均有提高,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.001);治疗后2组患者WMFT评分比较,观察组优于对照组,差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05),而BI评分比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 CIMT与NDT对恢复期脑卒中患者上肢功能都有促进作用,都可提高患者ADL能力,但CIMT对促进恢复期脑卒中患者的上肢功能优于NDT.%Objective To observe the effect of constraint-induced movement therapy(CIMT)on upper extremity function and the ADL performance of recovering stroke patients. Methods Thirty recovering stroke patients were recruited and randomly and evenly divided into intervention and control groups.The patients in the intervention group were trained using constraint-induced movement therapy(CIMT),in which their unaffected upper extremities were immobilized by a resting splint and an arm sling no less than 90% of the waking time every day.They were forced to use their affected upper extremities

  14. An exploratory analysis of the self-reported goals of individuals with chronic upper-extremity paresis following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waddell, Kimberly J; Birkenmeier, Rebecca L; Bland, Marghuretta D; Lang, Catherine E

    2016-01-01

    To classify the self-identified goals of individuals post-stroke with chronic upper extremity (UE) paresis, and determine if age, UE functional capacity and pre-stroke hand dominance influence overall goal selection. Sixty-five subjects participated. Using the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) to establish treatment goals, the top five goals were categorized using the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework into five categories: activities of daily living (ADLs), instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), leisure, work and general UE movement. A Chi-square analysis determined if age, UE functional capacity (measured by the Action Research Arm Test) and UE hand dominance influenced individual goal selection. The majority of goals were in the ADL (37%) and IADL (40%) categories. A small percentage (12%) was related to general UE movement. Individuals with moderate UE functional capacity identified more ADL goals than those with higher UE functional capacity. There was not a difference between age and UE dominance across all five goal areas. Individuals with chronic UE paresis had specific goals that were not influenced by age or hand dominance, but partially influenced by severity. General UE movement goals were identified less than goals related to specific activities. Considering the specificity of individual goals following stroke, it is recommended that clinicians regularly utilize a goal setting tool to help establish client goals. It is recommended that clinicians further inquire about general goals in order to link upper extremity deficits to functional activity limitations. Age, upper extremity functional capacity and hand dominance have little influence on the rehabilitation goals for individuals with chronic paresis after stroke.

  15. 脑卒中后上肢运动功能恢复大脑可塑性的磁共振弥散张量成像研究%Brain Plasticity of Upper Extremity Motor Function Recovery after Stroke:A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    凌晴; 林丽萍; 胡世红; 何嫱; 许佳

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore brain plasticity of upper extremities motor function recovery after stroke with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Methods 25 stroke patients with internal capsule lesions and affected corticospinal tract (CST), 4-8 weeks after onset, were divided randomly into rehabilitation group (n=13) and control group (n=12). Both groups received routine medication and the rehabilitation group al-so received rehabilitation. All the patients were scanned with DTI and assessed with upper extremity Fugl-Myer Assessment (UE-FMA) be-fore and 3 months after treatment. The fractional anisotropy (FA), FA ratio (rFA) and FA asymmetry (FAasy) in cerebral peduncle, posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC) and corona radiate were obtained. The bilateral corticospinal tracts were reconstructed with diffusion tensor tractography. Results The scores of UE-FMA increased in both groups after treatment (P0.05)。对照组各层面FA、rFA、FAasy治疗前后均无显著性差异(P>0.05)。康复组治疗后病灶侧皮质脊髓束纤维较前致密,形态结构改善。结论康复治疗可促进上肢运动功能改善和大脑可塑性变化,主要表现为放射冠层面皮质脊髓束的修复。

  16. Efficacy of Occupational Therapy Task-oriented Approach in Upper Extremity Post-stroke Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almhdawi, Khader A; Mathiowetz, Virgil G; White, Matthew; delMas, Robert C

    2016-12-01

    There is a need for more effective rehabilitation methods for individuals post-stroke. Occupational Therapy Task-Oriented (TO) approach has not been evaluated in a randomized clinical trial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate functional and impairment efficacies of TO approach on the more-affected Upper Extremity (UE) of persons post-stroke. A randomized single-blinded cross-over trial recruited 20 participants post-stroke (mean chronicity = 62 months) who demonstrated at least 10° active more-affected shoulder flexion and abduction and elbow flexion-extension. Participants were randomized into immediate (n = 10) and delayed intervention (n = 10) groups. Immediate group had 6 weeks of 3 hr/week TO intervention followed by 6 weeks of no-intervention control. Delayed intervention group underwent the reversed order. Functional measures included Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM), Motor Activity Log (MAL), and Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT). Impairment measures included UE Active Range of Motion (AROM) and handheld dynamometry strength. Measurements were obtained at baseline, cross over, and end of the study. TO intervention showed statistically higher functional change scores. COPM performance and satisfaction scores were 2.83 and 3.46 units greater respectively (p stroke rehabilitation approach inducing clinically meaningful functional improvements. More studies are needed with larger samples and specific stroke chronicity and severity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. A COMPARISON OF UPPER-EXTREMITY REACTION FORCES BETWEEN THE YURCHENKO VAULT AND FLOOR EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Kirk Seeley

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities of high-level gymnasts during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault. A secondary purpose of this study was to compare reaction forces during the Yurchenko vault to reaction forces observed in a tumbling pass during the floor exercise. Ten high-level, female gymnasts volunteered to participate. Conditions of the independent variable were the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise; dependent variables were peak vertical and peak anterior-posterior reaction forces. Each participant performed three trials of both conditions with the trail hand contacting a force platform. Vertical and anterior-posterior reaction forces, normalized to body weight, were greater (p < 0.05 during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault (2.38 than during the floor exercise round-off (2.15. Vertical reaction forces during the round-off phase of the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise round-off are similar to reaction forces transmitted to upper extremities during other gymnastic skills and ground reaction forces transmitted to lower extremities while running and walking at various speeds. Results of this study reveal a need for further research considering methods aimed at reducing reaction forces transmitted to the upper extremities during the Yurchenko vault and floor exercise.

  18. Upper extremity cumulative trauma disorders in the makers of Maraş pounded ice cream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Bakan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Upper Extremity Cumulative Trauma Disorders(UE-CTD are among the major health problems affectingthe workers. The aim of this study was to investigateUE-CTD in the makers of Maras pounded ice cream(MMPICMethods: This study was conducted among 50 volunteerswho work as a MMPIC and 50 control in our downtownarea. During face-to-face conversion, the participantsfilled out a survey inquiring about age, duration ofwork (in years in job, daily working time, occupation withanother job, health history, and medication usage. Thesubjects were questioned regarding the musculoskeletalcomplaints within the last six months and upper bodyphysical examination was performed in all participants.Results: The study group was composed of males.The mean age of study group and control group were31.78±6.58 and 30.74±5.99 years (p=0.411, respectively.The mean duration of work in pounded ice creambusiness and the mean duration of work in control were11.64± 6.26 years and 10.68±5.48 years (p=0.417, respectively.The mean daily working time in the studygroup and in control group were 10.64±1.82 hours and11.12±1.62 hours (p= 0.168, respectively. Musculoskeletalcomplaints of the upper extremity were found in 52%of the study group, and 28% of the control group. Musculoskeletaldisease of upper extremity was found in 28% ofthe study group and in 12% of the control group. Upperextremity musculoskeletal system complaints and illnesswere difference statistically between the two groups (p=0.014; p= 0.046, respectively.Conclusion: UE-CTD was seen in the makers of poundedice cream and its prevalence was similar to the otherlaborers work in the areas needing repetitive arm andhand motion.Key words: Makers of Maras pounded ice cream, cumulativetrauma disorders, upper extremity problems

  19. Free style perforator based propeller flaps: Simple solutions for upper extremity reconstruction!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil Panse

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The introduction of perforator flaps by Koshima et al. was met with much animosity in the plastic surgery fraternity. The safety concerns of these flaps following the intentional twist of the perforators have prevented widespread adoption of this technique. Use of perforator based propeller flaps in the lower extremity is gradually on the rise, but their use in upper extremity reconstruction is infrequently reported, especially in the Indian subcontinent. Materials and Methods: We present a retrospective series of 63 free style perforator flaps used for soft tissue reconstruction of the upper extremity from November 2008 to June 2013. Flaps were performed by a single surgeon for various locations and indications over the upper extremity. Patient demographics, surgical indication, defect features, complications and clinical outcome are evaluated and presented as an uncontrolled case series. Results: 63 free style perforator based propeller flaps were used for soft tissue reconstruction of 62 patients for the upper extremity from November 2008 to June 2013. Of the 63 flaps, 31 flaps were performed for trauma, 30 for post burn sequel, and two for post snake bite defects. We encountered flap necrosis in 8 flaps, of which there was complete necrosis in 4 flaps, and partial necrosis in four flaps. Of these 8 flaps, 7 needed a secondary procedure, and one healed secondarily. Although we had a failure rate of 12-13%, most of our failures were in the early part of the series indicative of a learning curve associated with the flap. Conclusion: Free style perforator based propeller flaps are a reliable option for coverage of small to moderate sized defects. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic IV.

  20. Upper extremity biomechanical model for evaluation of pediatric joint demands during wheelchair mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Graf, Adam; Krzak, Joseph; Vogel, Lawrence; Harris, Gerald F

    2012-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating upper extremity (UE) dynamics during pediatric wheelchair use are limited. We propose a new model to characterize UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair mobility. The bilateral model is comprised of the thorax, clavicle, scapula, upper arm, forearm, and hand segments. The modeled joints include: sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, glenohumeral, elbow and wrist. The model is complete and is currently undergoing pilot studies for clinical application. Results may provide considerable quantitative insight into pediatric UE joint dynamics to improve wheelchair prescription, training and long term care of children with orthopaedic disabilities.

  1. The first results of the development and implementation of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorobiev, A. A.; Krivonozhkina, P. S.; Zasypkina, O. A.; Andrewshenko, F. A.

    2015-11-01

    This research considers the first results of the development and implementation of the upper extremity exoskeleton "EXAR". Made anatomical parameterization developed the device the testing of the apparatus have been conducted in accordance with the bioethics regulations with the girl I. Sh. at the age of 4 years suffering the artrogryposis. The parameters of the exoskeleton "EXAR" selected according to our methods allowed us to conduct its use in the period of 4 months. There have been no defects at all. By the analysis of the first results of the passive upper limb skeleton EXAR development we should consider them as positive and worthy of the widespread adoption in the remedial practice.

  2. 强制性使用运动疗法对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能恢复的影响%The effects of constraint-induced movement therapy on upper extremity function in stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王刚; 张德清; 何建永; 徐玉华; 刘智权; 李东冬

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of constraint-induced movement therapy(CIMT)on upper extremity functional performance in sub-acute stroke patients.Methods Sixty stroke survivors were divided into a treatment group(n=30)and a control group(a=30).The treatment group received routine rehabilitation training for 4 weeks,followed by CIMT for two weeks;the control group received only routine rehabilitation training for six weeks.The Fugl-Meyer Assessment(FMA),upper extremity function test(UEFT),simple test for evaluating hand function(STEF)and modified Barthel Index(MBI)were used to assess motor function in the patients'upper extremities and their performance in the activities of daily living(ADL)before treatment,at the end of4 and 6 weeks of treatment,and 1 and 3 months after the end of the 6-week treatment. Results After six weeks of treatment,the patients in both groups were significantly improved in terms of FMA,UEFT,STEF and MBI scores compared with their results got before treatment,and the treatment group scored significantly higher on the UEFT,STEF and MBI scales compared with the control group. Conclusion CIMT can effectively improve upper extremity motor function and the ADL performance of patients with sub-acute stroke.Its effectiveness is superior to that of routine rehabilitation training.%目的 观察强制性使用运动疗法(CIMT)对亚急性期脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能恢复的影响.方法 将60例脑卒中偏瘫患者分为治疗组(n=30)和对照组(a=30),进行6周的康复治疗.2组患者均先进行常规康复训练,每日1次,每次45~60 min,每周训练6次.4周后治疗组改用CIMT治疗2周,对照组治疗保持不变.采用Fugl-Meyer运动量表(FMA)、上肢功能测验(UEFT)、简易上肢机能检查(STEF)和改良Barthel指数(MBI),于治疗前、治疗4周和6周后,以及治疗结束后1个月和3个月评定2组患者的上肢运动功能和日常生活活动能力,并进行比较.结果 2组治疗后不同时间段的上

  3. Upper extremity biomechanics of children with spinal cord injury during wheelchair mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnorenberg, Alyssa J; Slavens, Brooke A; Graf, Adam; Krzak, Joseph; Vogel, Lawrence; Harris, Gerald F

    2014-01-01

    While much work is being done evaluating the upper extremity joint dynamics of adult manual wheelchair propulsion, limited work has examined the pediatric population of manual wheelchair users. Our group used a custom pediatric biomechanical model to characterize the upper extremity joint dynamics of 12 children and adolescents with spinal cord injury (SCI) during wheelchair propulsion. Results show that loading appears to agree with that of adult manual wheelchair users, with the highest loading primarily seen at the glenohumeral joint. This is concerning due to the increased time of wheelchair use in the pediatric population and the impact of this loading during developmental years. This research may assist clinicians with improved mobility assessment methods, wheelchair prescription, training, and long-term care of children with orthopaedic disabilities.

  4. Effects of Increased Physiological Arousal on Upper Extremity Positional Awareness in Healthy Young Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Kovacs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of increased physiological arousal on the ability to perceive upper extremity positional awareness in healthy young adults. Approach: Thirty-eight participants were pre- and post-tested for upper extremity positional awareness using a manual kinesthesiometer. Participants in the experimental group underwent a combination of the Stroop color-word task and timed arithmetic problems to produce a state of physiological arousal. Heart rate and blood pressure measurements were taken during data collection to assess levels of physiological arousal. Pre-and post-test absolute error scores for each participant were compared. Results: ANCOVA revealed a significant time effect (pConclusion: The results suggested positional awareness is altered under a state of elevated physiological arousal and that these results may have significant implications for individuals performing various types of motor skills.

  5. The effects of music on pain perception of stroke patients during upper extremity joint exercises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soo Ji; Koh, Iljoo

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of music therapy on pain perception of stroke patients during upper extremity joint exercises. Ten stroke patients (1 male and 9 females) ranging in age from 61 to 73 participated in the study. Music conditions used in the study consisted of: (a) song, (b) karaoke accompaniment (same music to condition A except singers' voices), and (c) no music. Exercise movements in this study included hand, wrist, and shoulder joints. During the 8-week period music therapy sessions, subjects repeated 3 conditions according to the randomized orders and subjects rated their perceived pain on a scale immediately after each condition. The General Linear Model (GLM) Repeated Measures ANOVA revealed that there were no significant differences in pain rating across the three music conditions. However, positive affects and verbal responses, while performing upper extremity exercises with both music and karaoke accompaniment music, were observed using video observations.

  6. Cutaneous mucormycosis of the upper extremity in an immunocompetent host: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lineberry, Kyle D; Boettcher, Adam K; Blount, Andrew L; Burgess, Scott D

    2012-04-01

    Cutaneous mucormycosis, a relatively common infection in immunocompromised patients, remains rare in the immunocompetent patient outside the setting of major trauma. We report a case of an immunocompetent patient who developed left upper extremity Rhizopus infection following arterial puncture. Treatment included surgical debridement, liposomal amphotericin B, and hyperbaric oxygen wound therapy; the patient recovered fully. A review of the literature of cases of upper extremity Mucor infection is included for context. We feel that a high degree of suspicion for Mucor infection is warranted in patients with the described risk factors who do not respond to first-line antibiotics. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Finger muscle attachments for an OpenSim upper-extremity model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong Hwa Lee

    Full Text Available We determined muscle attachment points for the index, middle, ring and little fingers in an OpenSim upper-extremity model. Attachment points were selected to match both experimentally measured locations and mechanical function (moment arms. Although experimental measurements of finger muscle attachments have been made, models differ from specimens in many respects such as bone segment ratio, joint kinematics and coordinate system. Likewise, moment arms are not available for all intrinsic finger muscles. Therefore, it was necessary to scale and translate muscle attachments from one experimental or model environment to another while preserving mechanical function. We used a two-step process. First, we estimated muscle function by calculating moment arms for all intrinsic and extrinsic muscles using the partial velocity method. Second, optimization using Simulated Annealing and Hooke-Jeeves algorithms found muscle-tendon paths that minimized root mean square (RMS differences between experimental and modeled moment arms. The partial velocity method resulted in variance accounted for (VAF between measured and calculated moment arms of 75.5% on average (range from 48.5% to 99.5% for intrinsic and extrinsic index finger muscles where measured data were available. RMS error between experimental and optimized values was within one standard deviation (S.D of measured moment arm (mean RMS error = 1.5 mm < measured S.D = 2.5 mm. Validation of both steps of the technique allowed for estimation of muscle attachment points for muscles whose moment arms have not been measured. Differences between modeled and experimentally measured muscle attachments, averaged over all finger joints, were less than 4.9 mm (within 7.1% of the average length of the muscle-tendon paths. The resulting non-proprietary musculoskeletal model of the human fingers could be useful for many applications, including better understanding of complex multi-touch and gestural movements.

  8. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockage in Treatment of Upper Extremity Ischemic Disorder in Critically Ill Patient: A Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlkay Ceylan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Arterial catheterization, vasoactive agents, autonomic dysfunction and septic embolus may cause ischemia at distal ends of upper extremity in critically ill patients. Axillary brachial plexus blockage is highly reliable intervention when appropriate technique is used. Sympathetic blockage occurs after administration of local anesthetic drug and can resolve the circulatory disorder of extremity. We aimed to present two cases with ischemia of upper distal extremity that resolves after axillary brachial plexus blockage.

  9. Axillary Brachial Plexus Blockage in Treatment of Upper Extremity Ischemic Disorder in Critically Ill Patient: A Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    İlkay Ceylan; Nermin Kelebek Girgin; Mehmet Ali Kopan; Alp Gurbet

    2015-01-01

    Arterial catheterization, vasoactive agents, autonomic dysfunction and septic embolus may cause ischemia at distal ends of upper extremity in critically ill patients. Axillary brachial plexus blockage is highly reliable intervention when appropriate technique is used. Sympathetic blockage occurs after administration of local anesthetic drug and can resolve the circulatory disorder of extremity. We aimed to present two cases with ischemia of upper distal extremity that resolves after axillary ...

  10. Biomechanical Model for Evaluation of Pediatric Upper Extremity Joint Dynamics during Wheelchair Mobility

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric manual wheelchair users (MWU) require high joint demands on their upper extremity (UE) during wheelchair mobility, leading them to be at risk of developing pain and pathology. Studies have examined UE biomechanics during wheelchair mobility in the adult population; however, current methods for evaluating UE joint dynamics of pediatric MWU are limited. An inverse dynamics model is proposed to characterize three-dimensional UE joint kinematics and kinetics during pediatric wheelchair ...

  11. Myocutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Burnt Patient Led to Upper Extremity Amputation; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ayaz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that can implicate cranial sinuses, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Although it can occur in patients with competent and incompetent immunity such as patients with diabetes mellitus, lymphoma, leukemia and burns, but it has an aggressive, malignant and lethal course in patients with incompetent immunity. To enforce the importance of burn in patients with underlaying diseases such as diabetes, we are going to report a rare case of diabetic burnt patient complicated by right upper extremity myocutaneous mucormycosis. We selected this case to emphasis the importance of underlying disease (diabetes mellitus with cutaneous burn, aggressive treatment of fungal infection in these patients and referring such case to burn center to prevent catastrophic results. A 50-year-old woman was introduced to us after several days of medical and surgical care of right upper extremity and trunk split-thickness burn. Due to gross muscle necrosis of right upper extremity and poor general condition of the patient, she was taken to the operating room that led to right upper extremity amputation and several times of aggressive debridement to save her life. Pathologic report was indicative of mucormycosis. We can conclude from this case that: 1 Burn, even partially thickness and with little body surface area, should be referred to burn center for better care 2 No response to usual medical treatment should make us more sensitive to consider the unusual causes of infection such as fungi 3 Suspected dead tissues should be excised aggressively especially if suspiciousness to wound sepsis and fungal infection is present especially in an immunocompromised patient.

  12. [Gender determination based on osteometric characteristics of the upper and lower extremities by discriminant analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Sineva, I M

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the osteological collection of the Chair of Antropology of the Moscow State University. The results of measurement of length of long tubular bones and articular parts of scapula and pelvis were statistically treated. The complex of discriminant models calculated by the Fisher's method is recommended for the sex identification. The diagnostic accuracy is 74 - 83.5% (separated bones) and 85.7 - 95.2% (complex of bones of upper and lower extremities).

  13. Management of Intolerance to Casting the Upper Extremities in Claustrophobic Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Issei Nagura; Takako Kanatani; Masatoshi Sumi; Atsuyuki Inui; Yutaka Mifune; Takeshi Kokubu; Masahiro Kurosaka

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Some patients showed unusual responses to the immobilization without any objective findings with casts in upper extremities. We hypothesized their that intolerance with excessive anxiety to casts is due to claustrophobia triggered by cast immobilization. The aim of this study is to analyze the relevance of cast immobilization to the feeling of claustrophobia and discover how to handle them. Methods. There were nine patients who showed the caustrophobic symptoms with their casts....

  14. Upper extremity injury management by non-physician emergency practitioners in rural Uganda: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S. Frank

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: When compared to the standardised Quick DASH outcomes (no work limitation at 27.5 vs. work limited by injury at 52.6 the non-physician clinicians appear to be performing upper extremity repairs with good outcomes. The key variable to successful repair was the initial injury type. Although accommodations needed to be made to the standard Quick DASH protocol, the tool appears to be usable in non-traditional settings.

  15. Myocutaneous Mucormycosis in a Diabetic Burnt Patient Led to Upper Extremity Amputation; A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Mehdi; Moein, Reza

    2017-01-01

    Mucormycosis is a rare opportunistic fungal infection that can implicate cranial sinuses, brain, lungs, gastrointestinal tract and skin. Although it can occur in patients with competent and incompetent immunity such as patients with diabetes mellitus, lymphoma, leukemia and burns, but it has an aggressive, malignant and lethal course in patients with incompetent immunity. To enforce the importance of burn in patients with underlaying diseases such as diabetes, we are going to report a rare case of diabetic burnt patient complicated by right upper extremity myocutaneous mucormycosis. We selected this case to emphasis the importance of underlying disease (diabetes mellitus) with cutaneous burn, aggressive treatment of fungal infection in these patients and referring such case to burn center to prevent catastrophic results. A 50-year-old woman was introduced to us after several days of medical and surgical care of right upper extremity and trunk split-thickness burn. Due to gross muscle necrosis of right upper extremity and poor general condition of the patient, she was taken to the operating room that led to right upper extremity amputation and several times of aggressive debridement to save her life. Pathologic report was indicative of mucormycosis. We can conclude from this case that: 1) Burn, even partially thickness and with little body surface area, should be referred to burn center for better care 2) No response to usual medical treatment should make us more sensitive to consider the unusual causes of infection such as fungi 3) Suspected dead tissues should be excised aggressively especially if suspiciousness to wound sepsis and fungal infection is present especially in an immunocompromised patient.

  16. Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: Current Practice As a Guide for Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Mylene Schriner PhD, OTR/L; Janell Thome OTR/L; Monica Carrier OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and a top diagnosis for occupational therapy (OT) services among neurological conditions. Academic programs teach OT students neurological frames of reference (FORs) to provide a foundation for future practice. To meet accreditation standards, entry-level curricula must reflect current practice and evidence-based interventions. A survey of OT practitioners working in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation was conducted to investiga...

  17. Multidetector-row CT angiography of upper- and lower-extremity peripheral arteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willmann, J.K.; Wildermuth, S. [Inst. of Diagnostic Radiology, Univ. Hospital Zurich, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2005-11-15

    With the introduction of multidetector-row CT (MDCT) technology indications for MDCT angiography have expanded to include assessment of the peripheral arteries of the upper and lower extremities. Combined with patient- and scanner-adjusted CT data acquisition and contrast medium application strategies, an accurate and reliable evaluation of the peripheral arteries of the upper and lower extremities is possible. MDCT angiography is cost-effective and accurate for detection of arterial stenosis and occlusion in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). MDCT angiography allows postoperative assessment of peripheral arterial bypass grafts, including bypass graft stenosis and occlusion, as well as presence of aneurysms or arteriovenous fistulas. In addition, MDCT angiography is helpful in particular for visualization of arterial bypass grafts with a complicated extra-anatomical course. Furthermore, pre-operative peripheral vascular mapping can be performed by using MDCT angiography. Finally, due to the integration of MDCT scanners in many trauma centres, MDCT angiography is increasingly being used for assessment of traumatic arterial injuries. This article gives an overview of technical aspects of peripheral MDCT angiography, including scanning parameters, contrast medium application, image postprocessing and radiation exposure, and summarizes the most frequent acute and non-acute indications of MDCT angiography for assessment of the upper- and lower-extremity peripheral arteries. (orig.)

  18. Upper extremity peripheral neuropathies: role and impact of MR imaging on patient management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreisek, Gustav [University Hospital Zurich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, 5th Floor, Mount Sinai Hospital and the University Health Network, Toronto, ON (Canada); Burg, Doris [University Hospital Zurich (Academic Medical Center), Division for Plastic, Hand- and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Zurich (Switzerland); Studer, Ansgar [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Neurology, Zurich (Switzerland); Weishaupt, Dominik [University Hospital Zurich, Institute for Diagnostic Radiology, Department of Medical Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2008-09-15

    To investigate the role of MR imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of peripheral nerve lesions of the upper extremities and to assess its impact on the patient management. Fifty-one patients with clinical evidence of radial, median, and/or ulnar nerve lesions and unclear or ambiguous clinical findings had MRI of the upper extremity at 1.5 T. MR images and clinical data were reviewed by two blinded radiologists and a group of three clinical experts, respectively, with regard to radial, median, and/or ulnar nerve, as well as muscle abnormalities. MRI and clinical findings were correlated using Spearman's (p) rank correlation test. The impact of MRI on patient management was assessed by the group of experts and ranked as ''major,'' ''moderate,'' or ''no'' impact. The correlation of MRI and clinical findings was moderate for the assessment of the median/radial nerve and muscles (p=0.51/0.51/0.63, respectively) and weak for the ulnar nerve (p=0.40). The impact of MRI on patient management was assessed as ''major'' in 24/51 (47%), ''moderate'' in 19/51 (37%), and ''no'' in 8/51 (16%) patients. MRI in patients with upper extremity peripheral neuropathies and unclear or ambiguous clinical findings substantially influences the patient management. (orig.)

  19. Robots integrated with virtual reality simulations for customized motor training in a person with upper extremity hemiparesis: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluet, Gerard G; Merians, Alma S; Qiu, Qinyin; Lafond, Ian; Saleh, Soha; Ruano, Viviana; Delmonico, Andrea R; Adamovich, Sergei V

    2012-06-01

    A majority of studies examining repetitive task practice facilitated by robots for the treatment of upper extremity paresis utilize standardized protocols applied to large groups. Others utilize interventions tailored to patients but do not describe the clinical decision-making process utilized to develop and modify interventions. This case study describes a robot-based intervention customized to match the goals and clinical presentation of person with upper extremity hemiparesis secondary to stroke. The patient, P.M., was an 85-year-old man with left hemiparesis secondary to an intracerebral hemorrhage 5 years prior to examination. Outcomes were measured before and after a 1-month period of home therapy and after a 1-month robotic intervention. The intervention was designed to address specific impairments identified during his physical therapy examination. When necessary, activities were modified on the basis of response to the first week of treatment. P.M. trained in 12 sessions, using six virtually simulated activities. Modifications to original configurations of these activities resulted in performance improvements in five of these activities. P.M. demonstrated a 35-second improvement in Jebsen Test of Hand Function time and a 44-second improvement in Wolf Motor Function Test time subsequent to the robotic training intervention. Reaching kinematics, 24-hour activity measurement, and scores on the Hand and Activities of Daily Living scales of the Stroke Impact Scale all improved as well. A customized program of robotically facilitated rehabilitation was associated with short-term improvements in several measurements of upper extremity function in a patient with chronic hemiparesis.

  20. Robots integrated with virtual reality simulations for customized motor training in a person with upper extremity hemiparesis: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fluet, Gerard G.; Merians, Alma S.; Qiu, Qinyin; Lafond, Ian; Saleh, Soha; Ruano, Viviana; Delmonico, Andrea R.; Adamovich, Sergei V.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose A majority of studies examining repetitive task practice facilitated by robots for the treatment of upper extremity paresis utilize standardized protocols applied to large groups. Others utilize interventions tailored to patients but don't describe the clinical decision making process utilized to develop and modify interventions. This case report will describe a robot-based intervention customized to match the goals and clinical presentation of a gentleman with upper extremity hemiparesis secondary to stroke. Methods PM is an 85 year-old man with left hemiparesis secondary to an intracerebral hemorrhage five years prior to examination. Outcomes were measured before and after a one month period of home therapy and after a one month robotic intervention. The intervention was designed to address specific impairments identified during his PT examination. When necessary, activities were modified based on the patient's response to his first week of treatment. Outcomes PM trained twelve sessions using six virtually simulated activities. Modifications to original configurations of these activities resulted in performance improvements in five of these activities. PM demonstrated a 35 second improvement in Jebsen Test of Hand Function time and a 44 second improvement in Wolf Motor Function Test time subsequent to the robotic training intervention. Reaching kinematics, 24 hour activity measurement and the Hand and Activities of Daily Living scales of the Stroke Impact Scale all improved as well. Discussion A customized program of robotically facilitated rehabilitation resulted in large short-term improvements in several measurements of upper extremity function in a patient with chronic hemiparesis. PMID:22592063

  1. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20's. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20's.

  2. The Effect of Motor Feedback Training Combined with Constraint-Induced Movement Therapy on Upper Extremities Function of Patients After Stroke%运动反馈训练联合改良强制运动疗法对脑卒中上肢功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张朝霞; 麦王向; 叶正茂; 何海英; 高红英

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨运动反馈训练联合改良强制运动疗法对脑卒中上肢功能的影响。方法:前瞻性纳入2014年5月-2015年5月在广州市海珠区第一人民医院和广州医科大学附属第二医院接受康复治疗的脑卒中后偏瘫患者40例,随机分为改良强制性运动疗法(CIMT)组(改良CIMT组)及联合治疗组。每组20例。改良CIMT组患者采用改良强制性运动疗法治疗,联合治疗组在改良CIMT组的基础上联合运动反馈训练治疗。每次训练60 min,2次/d,5 d/周,共持续3周。对两组患者均于治疗前、治疗后分别进行WMFT评分、FMA-U评分及Barthel指数评定上肢运动功能及ADL能力。结果:治疗后两组患者WMFT评分、FMA-U评分及Barthel指数较治疗前均有明显改善,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01)。联合治疗组与改良CIMT组比较, WMFT评分、FMA-U评分及Barthel指数均显著提高(P<0.01)。结论:运动反馈训练联合改良强制运动疗法能进一步改善脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢功能及日常生活活动能力,该联合疗法值得临床推广应用。%Objective:To investigate the effect of motor feedback training combined with constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on upper extremities function of patients after stroke.Method:40 strokepatients were recruited. Cases were randomly divided into modified CIMT group (n=20) and combined therapy group (n=20) . The patients in modified CIMT group accepted modified constraint-induced movement therapy, the patients in combined therapy group accepted modified constraint-induced movement therapy and motor feedback training. The training schedule in both groups was last for 3 weeks. Upper-extremity motor ability was assessed with Wolf Motor Function Test(WMFT), Fugl-Meyer assessment of upper extremity (FMA-U) and Bathel Index (BI) of activities of daily living(ADL) before and after the therapy.Result:After therapy the WMFT, FMA-U and BI of both

  3. An accelerometry-based methodology for assessment of real-world bilateral upper extremity activity.

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    Ryan R Bailey

    Full Text Available The use of both upper extremities (UE is necessary for the completion of many everyday tasks. Few clinical assessments measure the abilities of the UEs to work together; rather, they assess unilateral function and compare it between affected and unaffected UEs. Furthermore, clinical assessments are unable to measure function that occurs in the real-world, outside the clinic. This study examines the validity of an innovative approach to assess real-world bilateral UE activity using accelerometry.Seventy-four neurologically intact adults completed ten tasks (donning/doffing shoes, grooming, stacking boxes, cutting playdough, folding towels, writing, unilateral sorting, bilateral sorting, unilateral typing, and bilateral typing while wearing accelerometers on both wrists. Two variables, the Bilateral Magnitude and Magnitude Ratio, were derived from accelerometry data to distinguish between high- and low-intensity tasks, and between bilateral and unilateral tasks. Estimated energy expenditure and time spent in simultaneous UE activity for each task were also calculated.The Bilateral Magnitude distinguished between high- and low-intensity tasks, and the Magnitude Ratio distinguished between unilateral and bilateral UE tasks. The Bilateral Magnitude was strongly correlated with estimated energy expenditure (ρ = 0.74, p<0.02, and the Magnitude Ratio was strongly correlated with time spent in simultaneous UE activity (ρ = 0.93, p<0.01 across tasks.These results demonstrate face validity and construct validity of this methodology to quantify bilateral UE activity during the performance of everyday tasks performed in a laboratory setting, and can now be used to assess bilateral UE activity in real-world environments.

  4. Gross motor ability predicts response to upper extremity rehabilitation in chronic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sarah Hulbert; Rafiei, Mohammad Hossein; Borstad, Alexandra; Adeli, Hojjat; Gauthier, Lynne V

    2017-08-30

    The majority of rehabilitation research focuses on the comparative effectiveness of different interventions in groups of patients, while much less is currently known regarding individual factors that predict response to rehabilitation. In a recent article, the authors presented a prognostic model to identify the sensorimotor characteristics predictive of the extent of motor recovery after Constraint-Induced Movement (CI) therapy amongst individuals with chronic mild-to-moderate motor deficit using the enhanced probabilistic neural network (EPNN). This follow-up paper examines which participant characteristics are robust predictors of rehabilitation response irrespective of the training modality. To accomplish this, EPNN was first applied to predict treatment response amongst individuals who received a virtual-reality gaming intervention (utilizing the same enrollment criteria as the prior study). The combinations of predictors that yield high predictive validity for both therapies, using their respective datasets, were then identified. High predictive classification accuracy was achieved for both the gaming (94.7%) and combined datasets (94.5%). Though CI therapy employed primarily fine-motor training tasks and the gaming intervention emphasized gross-motor practice, larger improvements in gross motor function were observed within both datasets. Poorer gross motor ability at pre-treatment predicted better rehabilitation response in both the gaming and combined datasets. The conclusion of this research is that for individuals with chronic mild-to-moderate upper extremity hemiparesis, residual deficits in gross motor function are highly responsive to motor restorative interventions, irrespective of the modality of training. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Kinematic Analysis of the Neck and Upper Extremities During Walking in Healthy Young Adults

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwon Son; Junghong Park; Seonghun Park

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to quantify the local stabilities of the neck and upper extremities (right/left shoulders and right/left elbows), and investigate differences between linear and nonlinear measurements of the associated joint motions and differences in the local stability between the upper and lower extremities. This attempt involves the calculation of a nonlinear parameter, Lyapunov Exponent (LE), and a linear parameter, Range of Motion (ROM), during treadmill walking in conjunction with a large population of healthy subjects. Joint motions of subjects were captured using a three-dimensional motion-capture system. Then mathematical chaos theory and the Rosenstein algorithm were employed to calculate LE of joints as the extent of logarithmic divergence between the neighboring state-space trajectories of flexion-extension angles. LEs computed over twenty males and twenty females were 0.037±0.023 for the neck, 0.043±0.021 for the right shoulder, 0.045±0.030 for the left shoulder, 0.032±0.021 for the right elbow, and 0.034±0.026 for the left elbow. Although statistically significant difference in the ROM was observed between all pairs of the neck and upper extremity joints, differences in the LE between all pairs of the joints as well as between males and females were not statistically significant. Between the upper and lower extremities, LEs of the neck, shoulder, and elbow were significantly smaller than those of the hip (~0.064) and the knee (~0.062). These results indicate that a statistical difference in the local stability between the upper extremity joints is not significant. However, the different result between the ROM and LE gives a strong rationale for applying both linear and nonlinear tools together to the evaluation of joint movement. The LEs of the joints calculated from a large population of healthy subjects could provide normative values for the associated joints and can be used to evaluate the recovery progress of patients with

  6. Effects of combined special education treatment and occupational therapy on upper extremities motor skills in adult patients with hemiplegia

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    Savković Nada

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Stroke is the most common single cause of severe and multiple physical disabilities, and rehabilitation that reduces functional deficits is the most effective treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of special education treatment as a supplement to occupational therapy on upper extremities motor skills in adult patients with post stroke hemiplegia. Methods. Standard education tests for motor function evaluation of the upper extremities: O`Connor, Ring and Hand grip test, were applied on a sample of 64 patients who were in the process of rehabilitation in the Clinic for Rehabilitation “Dr. Miroslav Zotović” in Belgrade. After the evaluation, all the participants were included in occupational therapy and divided in two intervention groups per 32 subjects each. The patients from the first experimental group received individually dosed special education treatment which was performed for at least 12 weeks as a supplement together with occupational therapy, while patients from the second experimental group were only in the process of occupational therapy without special education treatment. At the end of the study the same tests were used to re-evaluate the level of motor abilities of the patients in both groups. Results.The patients from the first experimental group with individually dosed special education treatment as a supplement showed significantly better scores after applying the treatment in all tested variables – explosive, static and dynamic muscular strength grip fist, as well as oculomotor skills at the level of the elbow and shoulder for both healthy and paretic hand. Conclusion. On the basis of the obtained results, it can be concluded that special education treatment added to occupational therapy lead to better performing of upper extremities motor skills and that it can be a good supplement to conventional occupational therapy methods and techniques.

  7. The effects of scapular taping on the surface electromyographic signal amplitude of shoulder girdle muscles during upper extremity elevation in individuals with suspected shoulder impingement syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkowitz, David M; Chaney, Casey; Stuckey, Sandra J; Vlad, Georgeanne

    2007-11-01

    Multifactorial, repeated-measures, within-subjects design. To investigate the immediate effects of scapular taping on surface electromyographic (EMG) signal amplitude of shoulder girdle muscles during upper extremity elevation in individuals with suspected shoulder impingement syndrome. Individuals with shoulder impingement syndrome may present with increased activity of the upper trapezius and inhibition of other shoulder muscles active during upper extremity elevation. Scapular taping is theorized to normalize shoulder girdle function during scapular upward rotation by decreasing upper trapezius activity and increasing the activity of the lower trapezius and other muscles. assessed for each muscle. Upper trapezius activity was significantly lower with tape during shelf task elevation (P = .002), especially above 90 degrees (Pmuscles for the shelf task. During shoulder abduction in the scapular plane, the main effect for upper trapezius showed a significant decrease of EMG signal amplitude (P = .047) for tape versus no tape, but no significant interactions were found among components of this activity, or for other muscles. Scapular taping decreased upper trapezius and increased lower trapezius activity in people with suspected shoulder impingement during a functional overhead-reaching task, and decreased upper trapezius activity during shoulder abduction in the scapular plane. Taping did not affect the other muscles under the loads tested, but it is possible that the activity of these muscles was not deficient at the time of testing.

  8. Role of Anomalous States of Upper Tropospheric Circulation on Extremely Dry and Wet Summer Monsoon Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S.; Koike, T.; Nishii, K.; Shrestha, M.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal changes in wind pattern, monsoon, sometimes result in severe droughts and intense flooding in many parts of the world including South Asian countries like Pakistan. The livelihood of a vast population in Pakistan depends on agriculture and land use is strongly influenced by water-based ecosystems that depend on the monsoon rains. Furthermore, climate change studies undertaken so far reveal that action is essential in order to prevent long term damage to water cycle and thus of great concern to the community and stakeholders. Pakistan Summer Monsoon (PSM) is affected by both the disturbances from the tropical and the extratropical regions; however there is lack of understanding of physical mechanisms of PSM compared to other regional studies i.e. Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) and South-East Asian Monsoon (SEAM). In our study, we applied heat and vorticity budgets, and wave train analysis to reveal the mechanisms of the extremely dry and wet PSM events associated with the anomalous upper tropospheric conditions. We found that the extremely dry (wet) PSM events were closely related with the anomalous cyclonic (anticyclonic) upper-tropospheric circulation around northwest of Pakistan, and mid-upper tropospheric cooling (warming) anomaly around Pakistan and to its north/northwest. We also found in addition to Rossby wave response due to the suppressed (enhanced) convective activities around monsoon regions, the midlatitude wave energy propagation emanating around cyclonic/anticyclonic anomaly around northwestern Atlantic, northeastern Atlantic, Europe or Mediterranean regions induced/reinforced/maintained the anomalous upper tropospheric cyclonic (anticyclonic) circulation around northwest of Pakistan during extremely dry (wet) PSM events. Therefore, devastating drought (flood) events over the PSM region resulting from weak (strong) convection anomalies are induced by both the tropical and extratropical processes.

  9. Reinforced Feedback in Virtual Environment for Rehabilitation of Upper Extremity Dysfunction after Stroke: Preliminary Data from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kiper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To study whether the reinforced feedback in virtual environment (RFVE is more effective than traditional rehabilitation (TR for the treatment of upper limb motor function after stroke, regardless of stroke etiology (i.e., ischemic, hemorrhagic. Design. Randomized controlled trial. Participants. Forty-four patients affected by stroke. Intervention. The patients were randomized into two groups: RFVE (N=23 and TR (N=21, and stratified according to stroke etiology. The RFVE treatment consisted of multidirectional exercises providing augmented feedback provided by virtual reality, while in the TR treatment the same exercises were provided without augmented feedbacks. Outcome Measures. Fugl-Meyer upper extremity scale (F-M UE, Functional Independence Measure scale (FIM, and kinematics parameters (speed, time, and peak. Results. The F-M UE (P=0.030, FIM (P=0.021, time (P=0.008, and peak (P=0.018, were significantly higher in the RFVE group after treatment, but not speed (P=0.140. The patients affected by hemorrhagic stroke significantly improved FIM (P=0.031, time (P=0.011, and peak (P=0.020 after treatment, whereas the patients affected by ischemic stroke improved significantly only speed (P=0.005 when treated by RFVE. Conclusion. These results indicated that some poststroke patients may benefit from RFVE program for the recovery of upper limb motor function. This trial is registered with NCT01955291.

  10. Dinamometria de preensão manual como parâmetro de avaliação funcional do membro superior de pacientes hemiparéticos por acidente vascular cerebral Handgrip dynamometry as a parameter of functional evaluation of the upper extremity hemiparetic after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Vinicius Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A força muscular é a valência física mais importante. É provável que exista correlação entre a força de preensão manual e outros testes para o membro superior afetado por um acidente vascular cerebral (AVC. O propósito deste estudo é analisar o valor preditivo da dinamometria de preensão manual (DPM para recuperação do membro superior parético por AVC. Foram avaliados 43 pacientes hemiparéticos pós-AVC (60,7 anos±12,1. Vários testes (Escala de movimento da mão (EMM, Estesiometria, Teste de caixa e blocos, 9 buracos e pinos, Escala de Ashworth modificada e Índice de Barthel foram relacionados com a DPM. Os resultados apontaram que a DPM apresenta boa correlação com EMM e, contrariamente, os testes de destreza manual, a sensibilidade e o índice de independência funcional não apresentaram valores significativos. A DPM é um teste rápido, fácil e acessível, e pode fazer parte dos protocolos de avaliação funcional do membro superior de pacientes hemiparéticos por AVC.Muscle strength is the most important physical valence. It is likely that there is a correlation between handgrip strength and other tests for the upper extremity affected by stroke. The purpose of this study is to analyze the predictive value of handgrip dynamometry (HD for upper limb recovery in stroke. Were studied 43 hemiparetic patients after stroke (60.7 years±12.1. Several tests (Hand moviment scale (HMS, Esthesiometry, Box and blocks test, 9 hole and peg test, Modified Ashworth scale and Barthel index were related to HD. The results showed that there is good correlation of the HD with HMS and, by contrast, the tests of manual dexterity, the sensitivity and index of functional independence showed no significant values. The HD is a quick, easy and affordable test, and can be part of protocols for functional evaluation of upper extremity of hemiparetic patients by stroke.

  11. EMG-Torque correction on Human Upper extremity using Evolutionary Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    JL, Veronica; Parasuraman, S.; Khan, M. K. A. Ahamed; Jeba DSingh, Kingsly

    2016-09-01

    There have been many studies indicating that control system of rehabilitative robot plays an important role in determining the outcome of the therapy process. Existing works have done the prediction of feedback signal in the controller based on the kinematics parameters and EMG readings of upper limb's skeletal system. Kinematics and kinetics based control signal system is developed by reading the output of the sensors such as position sensor, orientation sensor and F/T (Force/Torque) sensor and there readings are to be compared with the preceding measurement to decide on the amount of assistive force. There are also other works that incorporated the kinematics parameters to calculate the kinetics parameters via formulation and pre-defined assumptions. Nevertheless, these types of control signals analyze the movement of the upper limb only based on the movement of the upper joints. They do not anticipate the possibility of muscle plasticity. The focus of the paper is to make use of the kinematics parameters and EMG readings of skeletal system to predict the individual torque of upper extremity's joints. The surface EMG signals are fed into different mathematical models so that these data can be trained through Genetic Algorithm (GA) to find the best correlation between EMG signals and torques acting on the upper limb's joints. The estimated torque attained from the mathematical models is called simulated output. The simulated output will then be compared with the actual individual joint which is calculated based on the real time kinematics parameters of the upper movement of the skeleton when the muscle cells are activated. The findings from this contribution are extended into the development of the active control signal based controller for rehabilitation robot.

  12. 后颅窝扩大重建术促进Chiari畸形合并脊髓空洞症患者上下肢运动及感觉功能恢复%Restoration of motor and sensory functions of upper and lower extremities by posterior fossa reconstruction in patients with Chiari malformation combined with syringomyelia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵丽萍; 王丹玲; 石英

    2003-01-01

    目的观察后颅窝扩大重建术后 Chiari畸形合并脊髓空洞症患者上下肢运动及感觉功能的恢复情况,探讨此术式对 Chiari畸形合并脊髓空洞症脊髓功能恢复的作用.方法所有患者被分为两组:后颅窝扩大重建术组 (posterior fossa reconstruction,PFR组 )共 56例患者;后颅窝减压术组 (posterior fossa decompression,PFD组 )共 62例患者.定期随访.按 NCSS (Neurosurgical Cervical Spine Scale)定量分析上下肢运动及感觉障碍恢复情况,其结果作统计学分析.结果 PFR组的上、下肢和感觉功能的有效率分别为 76% ,71% ,70%; PFD组的上、下肢和感觉功能的有效率分别为 58% ,60% ,66%.两组上下肢及感觉障碍的有效率经χ 2检验差异无统计学意义.结论 PFR 能明显促进 Chiari畸形合并脊髓空洞症患者上下肢运动及感觉障碍的功能恢复.%Aim To explore effect of posterior fossa reconstruction on restoration of spinal cord function by observing the effect of posterior fossa reconstruction(PFR) on functional restoration of spine in patients with Chiari malformation and syringomyelia.Methods 118 patients with Chiari malformation and syringomyelia were divided into 2 groups: Posterior fossa reconstruction(PFR)group(56 patients) and Posterior fossa decompression(PFD)group(62 patients).All the patients were followed up at regular time.Quantitative analysis of the recovery of motor and sensory function in upper and lower extremities according to NCSS (Neurosurgical Cervical Spine Scale) in the two groups had been done. The results were statistically analysed.Results The efficiency rates of the motor function recovery in the upper and lower extremities and the recovery of the sensory disturbance were 76% ,71% ,70% respectively in PFR group and 58% ,60% ,66% in PFD group.The difference of the results in the two groups was not significant according to χ 2 test.Conclusion PFR can promote the recovery of motor and sensory functions of upper

  13. The WISTAH hand study: A prospective cohort study of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders

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    Garg Arun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few prospective cohort studies of distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders have been performed. Past studies have provided somewhat conflicting evidence for occupational risk factors and have largely reported data without adjustments for many personal and psychosocial factors. Methods/design A multi-center prospective cohort study was incepted to quantify risk factors for distal upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and potentially develop improved methods for analyzing jobs. Disorders to analyze included carpal tunnel syndrome, lateral epicondylalgia, medial epicondylalgia, trigger digit, deQuervain’s stenosing tenosynovitis and other tendinoses. Workers have thus far been enrolled from 17 different employment settings in 3 diverse US states and performed widely varying work. At baseline, workers undergo laptop administered questionnaires, structured interviews, two standardized physical examinations and nerve conduction studies to ascertain demographic, medical history, psychosocial factors and current musculoskeletal disorders. All workers’ jobs are individually measured for physical factors and are videotaped. Workers are followed monthly for the development of musculoskeletal disorders. Repeat nerve conduction studies are performed for those with symptoms of tingling and numbness in the prior six months. Changes in jobs necessitate re-measure and re-videotaping of job physical factors. Case definitions have been established. Point prevalence of carpal tunnel syndrome is a combination of paraesthesias in at least two median nerve-served digits plus an abnormal nerve conduction study at baseline. The lifetime cumulative incidence of carpal tunnel syndrome will also include those with a past history of carpal tunnel syndrome. Incident cases will exclude those with either a past history or prevalent cases at baseline. Statistical methods planned include survival analyses and logistic regression. Discussion A

  14. Contribution of kinesophobia and catastrophic thinking to upper-extremity-specific disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das De, Soumen; Vranceanu, Ana-Maria; Ring, David C

    2013-01-02

    Upper-extremity-specific disability correlates with mood and coping strategies. The aim of this study was to determine if two psychological factors, kinesiophobia (fear of movement) and perceived partner support, contribute significantly to variation in upper-extremity-specific disability in a model that included factors known to contribute to variation such as depression, pain anxiety, and catastrophic thinking. We performed an observational cross-sectional study of 319 patients who each had one of the following conditions: trigger finger (n = 94), carpal tunnel syndrome (n = 29), trapeziometacarpal arthrosis (n = 33), Dupuytren contracture (n = 31), de Quervain syndrome (n = 28), wrist ganglion cyst (n = 32), lateral epicondylosis (n = 41), and a fracture of the distal part of the radius treated nonoperatively six weeks previously (n = 31). Each patient completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire and questionnaires measuring symptoms of depression, pain anxiety, catastrophic thinking, kinesiophobia, and perceived level of support from a partner or significant other. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to determine significant independent predictors of the DASH score. Men had significantly lower (better) DASH scores than women (21 versus 31; p thinking (p thinking, and kinesiophobia and accounted for 55% of the variation. In this sample, kinesiophobia and catastrophic thinking were the most important predictors of upper-extremity-specific disability in a model that accounted for symptoms of depression, anxiety, and pathophysiology (diagnosis) and explained more than half of the variation in disability. Perceived partner support was not a significant factor. The consistent and predominant role of several modifiable psychological factors in disability suggests that patients may benefit from a multidisciplinary approach that optimizes mindset and coping strategies.

  15. Upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke: Facilitation of corticospinal excitability using virtual mirror paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Several experimental studies in stroke patients suggest that mirror therapy and various virtual reality programs facilitate motor rehabilitation. However, the underlying mechanisms for these therapeutic effects have not been previously described. Objectives We attempted to delineate the changes in corticospinal excitability when individuals were asked to exercise their upper extremity using a real mirror and virtual mirror. Moreover, we attempted to delineate the role of visual modulation within the virtual environment that affected corticospinal excitability in healthy subjects and stroke patients. Methods A total of 18 healthy subjects and 18 hemiplegic patients were enrolled into the study. Motor evoked potential (MEP)s from transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded in the flexor carpi radialis of the non-dominant or affected upper extremity using three different conditions: (A) relaxation; (B) real mirror; and (C) virtual mirror. Moreover, we compared the MEPs from the virtual mirror paradigm using continuous visual feedback or intermittent visual feedback. Results The rates of amplitude increment and latency decrement of MEPs in both groups were higher during the virtual mirror task than during the real mirror. In healthy subjects and stroke patients, the virtual mirror task with intermittent visual feedback significantly facilitated corticospinal excitability of MEPs compared with continuous visual feedback. Conclusion Corticospinal excitability was facilitated to a greater extent in the virtual mirror paradigm than in the real mirror and in intermittent visual feedback than in the continuous visual feedback, in both groups. This provides neurophysiological evidence supporting the application of the virtual mirror paradigm using various visual modulation technologies to upper extremity rehabilitation in stroke patients. PMID:23035951

  16. Upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke: Facilitation of corticospinal excitability using virtual mirror paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Youn

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several experimental studies in stroke patients suggest that mirror therapy and various virtual reality programs facilitate motor rehabilitation. However, the underlying mechanisms for these therapeutic effects have not been previously described. Objectives We attempted to delineate the changes in corticospinal excitability when individuals were asked to exercise their upper extremity using a real mirror and virtual mirror. Moreover, we attempted to delineate the role of visual modulation within the virtual environment that affected corticospinal excitability in healthy subjects and stroke patients. Methods A total of 18 healthy subjects and 18 hemiplegic patients were enrolled into the study. Motor evoked potential (MEPs from transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded in the flexor carpi radialis of the non-dominant or affected upper extremity using three different conditions: (A relaxation; (B real mirror; and (C virtual mirror. Moreover, we compared the MEPs from the virtual mirror paradigm using continuous visual feedback or intermittent visual feedback. Results The rates of amplitude increment and latency decrement of MEPs in both groups were higher during the virtual mirror task than during the real mirror. In healthy subjects and stroke patients, the virtual mirror task with intermittent visual feedback significantly facilitated corticospinal excitability of MEPs compared with continuous visual feedback. Conclusion Corticospinal excitability was facilitated to a greater extent in the virtual mirror paradigm than in the real mirror and in intermittent visual feedback than in the continuous visual feedback, in both groups. This provides neurophysiological evidence supporting the application of the virtual mirror paradigm using various visual modulation technologies to upper extremity rehabilitation in stroke patients.

  17. Upper extremity rehabilitation of stroke: facilitation of corticospinal excitability using virtual mirror paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Youn Joo; Park, Hae Kyung; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lim, Taeo; Ku, Jeonghun; Cho, Sangwoo; Kim, Sun I; Park, Eun Sook

    2012-10-04

    Several experimental studies in stroke patients suggest that mirror therapy and various virtual reality programs facilitate motor rehabilitation. However, the underlying mechanisms for these therapeutic effects have not been previously described. We attempted to delineate the changes in corticospinal excitability when individuals were asked to exercise their upper extremity using a real mirror and virtual mirror. Moreover, we attempted to delineate the role of visual modulation within the virtual environment that affected corticospinal excitability in healthy subjects and stroke patients. A total of 18 healthy subjects and 18 hemiplegic patients were enrolled into the study. Motor evoked potential (MEP)s from transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded in the flexor carpi radialis of the non-dominant or affected upper extremity using three different conditions: (A) relaxation; (B) real mirror; and (C) virtual mirror. Moreover, we compared the MEPs from the virtual mirror paradigm using continuous visual feedback or intermittent visual feedback. The rates of amplitude increment and latency decrement of MEPs in both groups were higher during the virtual mirror task than during the real mirror. In healthy subjects and stroke patients, the virtual mirror task with intermittent visual feedback significantly facilitated corticospinal excitability of MEPs compared with continuous visual feedback. Corticospinal excitability was facilitated to a greater extent in the virtual mirror paradigm than in the real mirror and in intermittent visual feedback than in the continuous visual feedback, in both groups. This provides neurophysiological evidence supporting the application of the virtual mirror paradigm using various visual modulation technologies to upper extremity rehabilitation in stroke patients.

  18. Subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity following penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tiong, W H C

    2009-02-01

    SUMMARY: Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema of the upper extremity, albeit rare, has to be borne in mind when treating patients with subcutaneous emphysema. The misdiagnosis of this condition as its serious infective counterpart often leads to unnecessary aggressive treatment. Noninfective subcutaneous emphysema often accompanies a patient who has no systemic symptoms of illness. Unfortunately, the distinction is not always easy especially when history of injury suggests involvement of an infective or reactive element. Penetrating blackthorn injury is common, especially in rural communities, and often occurs from farming or gardening activities. Blackthorn penetration can cause numerous tissue reactions once embedded under the skin and they are often contaminated with soil. Here we present, for the first time, a case where penetrating blackthorn injury to the wrist resulted in noninfective subcutaneous emphysema involving the whole upper limb and neck, and its subsequent management.

  19. Limb salvage surgery in a patient with macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving an entire upper extremity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Bo; ZHENG Long-po; CAI Zheng-dong

    2010-01-01

    @@ Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare form of congenital localized gigantism, which is characterized by slowly progressive overgrowth of the mesenchymal elements, especially the fibroadipose tissue,in a limb. Frequently, multiple contiguous digits are involved on the lateral side of the hand or the medial side of the foot. Overabundance of the fibroadipose tissue and osseous overgrowth are most remarkable at the distal ends of the extremity. Macrodystrophia lipomatosa involving an entire limb has been previously reported for only one case in a 45-year-old adult male;1 however, no details of treatment were described. Here, we present the first report of successful limb salvage surgery of macrodystrophia lipomatosa in an adolescent involving an entire upper extremity.

  20. The validity of the mangled extremity severity score in the assessment of upper limb injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togawa, S; Yamami, N; Nakayama, H; Mano, Y; Ikegami, K; Ozeki, S

    2005-11-01

    The Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) may be used to decide whether to perform amputation in patients with injuries involving a limb. A score of 7 points or higher indicates the need for amputation. We have treated three patients with a MESS of 7 points or higher, in two of which the injured limb was salvaged. This scoring system was originally devised to assess injuries to the lower limb. However, a MESS of 7 points as a justification for amputation does not appear appropriate when assessing injuries to the major vessels in the upper limb.

  1. Upper-Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis and Downhill Esophageal Varices Caused by Long-Term Pacemaker Implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basar, Nurcan; Cagli, Kumral; Basar, Omer; Sen, Nihat; Gurel, Ozgul Malcok; Akpinar, Ibrahim; Ozlu, Mehmet Fatih; Okten, Sarper

    2010-01-01

    Upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis is common after pacemaker or cardioverter-defibrillator implantation. Only 1% to 3% of patients with upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis become symptomatic. Downhill esophageal varices develop in the upper third of the esophagus as a result of the obstruction of the superior vena cava. Herein, we report the case of a 54-year-old man—a recipient of multiple implanted cardiac pacemakers—who presented with bilateral upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis. This severely symptomatic condition was complicated by very rare and life-threatening downhill varices of the upper esophagus, but without bleeding. To the best of our knowledge, this is the 1st report of this array of conditions. PMID:21224954

  2. Time Eigenstates for Potential Functions without Extremal Points

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    Gabino Torres-Vega

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In a previous paper, we introduced a way to generate a time coordinate system for classical and quantum systems when the potential function has extremal points. In this paper, we deal with the case in which the potential function has no extremal points at all, and we illustrate the method with the harmonic and linear potentials.

  3. Changes in upper-extremity muscle activities due to head position in subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jung Won; Son, Sung Min; Lee, Na Kyung

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated upper-extremity muscle activities in natural, ideal, and corrected head positions. [Subjects and Methods] Forty subjects with a forward head posture and rounded shoulder were recruited and randomly assigned to the natural head position group (n = 13), ideal head position group (n = 14), or corrected head position group (n = 13). Muscle activities were measured using a four-channel surface electromyography system at the sternocleidomastoideus, upper and lower trapezius, and serratus anterior muscles on the right side during an overhead reaching task. [Results] The muscle activities of the upper trapezius and serratus anterior differed significantly among head positions. Post hoc tests revealed significant differences between natural and ideal head positions, and natural and ideal head positions for both the upper trapezius and serratus anterior. [Conclusion] Recovery of normal upper trapezius and serratus anterior muscle functions plays an important role in correcting forward head posture and rounded shoulders.

  4. Computer game-based upper extremity training in the home environment in stroke persons: a single subject design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of the present study was to assess whether computer game-based training in the home setting in the late phase after stroke could improve upper extremity motor function. Methods Twelve subjects with prior stroke were recruited; 11 completed the study. Design The study had a single subject design; there was a baseline test (A1), a during intervention test (B) once a week, a post-test (A2) measured directly after the treatment phase, plus a follow-up (C) 16–18 weeks after the treatment phase. Information on motor function (Fugl-Meyer), grip force (GrippitR) and arm function in activity (ARAT, ABILHAND) was gathered at A1, A2 and C. During B, only Fugl-Meyer and ARAT were measured. The intervention comprised five weeks of game-based computer training in the home environment. All games were designed to be controlled by either the affected arm alone or by both arms. Conventional formulae were used to calculate the mean, median and standard deviations. Wilcoxon’s signed rank test was used for tests of dependent samples. Continuous data were analyzed by methods for repeated measures and ordinal data were analyzed by methods for ordered multinomial data using cumulative logistic models. A p-value of game time and changes in the outcomes investigated in this study. Conclusion The results indicate that computer game-based training could be a promising approach to improve upper extremity function in the late phase after stroke, since in this study, changes were achieved in motor function and activity capacity. PMID:24625289

  5. Effects of Constraint-induced Movement Therapy on Upper-extremity Function of Children with Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy%强制性使用运动疗法对偏瘫型脑瘫患儿上肢功能障碍的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁薇; 徐开寿; 何璐; 严晓华; 高春华

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of a modified version of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on upper-extremity function of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy. Methods:Forty-six children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were randomly allocated to constraint therapy group (n=23), and control group (n=23). The patients in both the groups received routine rehabilitation therapy, while the ones in the constraint therapy group was treated with CIMT additionally. All participants were measured by the modified Ashworth scale (MAS) and Carroll upper extremities functional test (UEFT) before and at the end of 4th and 8th week after the treatment. Results: There was a significant difference in MAS score between baseline and after 8 weeks' treatment in the constraint therapy group ( <0.05). When compared with the UEFT scores before treatment, the UEFT scores of both the groups were improved significantly ( <0.05). At the end of 4th and 8th week after the treatment, the UEFT scores in the constraint therapy group were significantly higher than those in the control group ( <0.05). Conclusion:CIMT can improve upper-extremity function of children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.%目的:观察强制性使用运动疗法(CIMT)对偏瘫型脑瘫患儿上肢功能障碍的疗效。方法:46例伴有上肢功能障碍的脑瘫患儿,随机分为治疗组和对照组各23例,2组均应用常规康复治疗,治疗组还应用CIMT。在治疗前、治疗4周和8周后分别采用改良Ashworth量表(MAS)评定上肢痉挛改善情况,应用Carroll上肢功能试验(UEFT)测试与日常生活活动有关的上肢运动功能。结果:治疗组患儿MAS得分在治疗8周与治疗前比较有改善,差异有统计学意义(<0.05)。2组UEFT评分在治疗4周、8周与治疗前比较提高,差异均有统计学意义(<0.05);在治疗4、8周,治疗组UEFT评分高于对照组,差异有统计学意义(<0.05)。结论:CIMT

  6. The Role of Imaging in Patient Selection, Preoperative Planning, and Postoperative Monitoring in Human Upper Extremity Allotransplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eira S.; Buck, David G.; Gorantla, Vijay S.; Losee, Joseph E.; Foust, Daniel E.; Britton, Cynthia A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the role of imaging in vascular composite allotransplantation based on one institution's experience with upper extremity allotransplant patients. Methods. The institutional review board approved this review of HIPAA-compliant patient data without the need for individual consent. A retrospective review was performed of imaging from 2008 to 2011 on individuals undergoing upper extremity transplantation. This demonstrated that, of the 19 patients initially considered, 5 patients with a mean age of 37 underwent transplantation. Reports were correlated clinically to delineate which preoperative factors lead to patient selection versus disqualification and what concerns dictated postoperative imaging. Findings were subdivided into musculoskeletal and vascular imaging criterion. Results. Within the screening phase, musculoskeletal exclusion criterion included severe shoulder arthropathy, poor native bone integrity, and marked muscular atrophy. Vascular exclusion criterion included loss of sufficient arterial or venous supply and significant distortion of the native vascular architecture. Postoperative imaging was used to document healing and hardware integrity. Postsurgical angiography and ultrasound were used to monitor for endothelial proliferation or thrombosis as signs of rejection and vascular complication. Conclusion. Multimodality imaging is an integral component of vascular composite allotransplantation surgical planning and surveillance to maximize returning form and functionality while minimizing possible complications. PMID:24800056

  7. The Role of Imaging in Patient Selection, Preoperative Planning, and Postoperative Monitoring in Human Upper Extremity Allotransplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eira S. Roth

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe the role of imaging in vascular composite allotransplantation based on one institution’s experience with upper extremity allotransplant patients. Methods. The institutional review board approved this review of HIPAA-compliant patient data without the need for individual consent. A retrospective review was performed of imaging from 2008 to 2011 on individuals undergoing upper extremity transplantation. This demonstrated that, of the 19 patients initially considered, 5 patients with a mean age of 37 underwent transplantation. Reports were correlated clinically to delineate which preoperative factors lead to patient selection versus disqualification and what concerns dictated postoperative imaging. Findings were subdivided into musculoskeletal and vascular imaging criterion. Results. Within the screening phase, musculoskeletal exclusion criterion included severe shoulder arthropathy, poor native bone integrity, and marked muscular atrophy. Vascular exclusion criterion included loss of sufficient arterial or venous supply and significant distortion of the native vascular architecture. Postoperative imaging was used to document healing and hardware integrity. Postsurgical angiography and ultrasound were used to monitor for endothelial proliferation or thrombosis as signs of rejection and vascular complication. Conclusion. Multimodality imaging is an integral component of vascular composite allotransplantation surgical planning and surveillance to maximize returning form and functionality while minimizing possible complications.

  8. The Vascularized Fibular Graft in the Pediatric Upper Extremity: A Durable, Biological Solution to Large Oncologic Defects

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    Nicki Zelenski

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal reconstruction after large tumor resection is challenging. The free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG offers the potential for rapid autograft incorporation as well as growing physeal transfer in pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed eleven pediatric patients treated with FVFG reconstructions of the upper extremity after tumor resection. Eight male and three female patients were identified, including four who underwent epiphyseal transfer. All eleven patients retained a functional salvaged limb. Nonunion and graft fracture were the most common complications relating to graft site (27%. Peroneal nerve palsy occurred in 4/11 patients, all of whom received epiphyseal transfer. Patients receiving epiphyseal transplant had a mean annual growth of 1.7 cm/year. Mean graft hypertrophy index increased by more than 10% in all cases. Although a high complication rate may be anticipated, the free vascularized fibula may be used to reconstruct large skeletal defects in the pediatric upper extremity after oncologic resection. Transferring the vascularized physis is a viable option when longitudinal growth is desired.

  9. The role of imaging in patient selection, preoperative planning, and postoperative monitoring in human upper extremity allotransplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Eira S; Buck, David G; Gorantla, Vijay S; Losee, Joseph E; Foust, Daniel E; Britton, Cynthia A

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To describe the role of imaging in vascular composite allotransplantation based on one institution's experience with upper extremity allotransplant patients. Methods. The institutional review board approved this review of HIPAA-compliant patient data without the need for individual consent. A retrospective review was performed of imaging from 2008 to 2011 on individuals undergoing upper extremity transplantation. This demonstrated that, of the 19 patients initially considered, 5 patients with a mean age of 37 underwent transplantation. Reports were correlated clinically to delineate which preoperative factors lead to patient selection versus disqualification and what concerns dictated postoperative imaging. Findings were subdivided into musculoskeletal and vascular imaging criterion. Results. Within the screening phase, musculoskeletal exclusion criterion included severe shoulder arthropathy, poor native bone integrity, and marked muscular atrophy. Vascular exclusion criterion included loss of sufficient arterial or venous supply and significant distortion of the native vascular architecture. Postoperative imaging was used to document healing and hardware integrity. Postsurgical angiography and ultrasound were used to monitor for endothelial proliferation or thrombosis as signs of rejection and vascular complication. Conclusion. Multimodality imaging is an integral component of vascular composite allotransplantation surgical planning and surveillance to maximize returning form and functionality while minimizing possible complications.

  10. Effect of a Task-Oriented Rehabilitation Program on Upper Extremity Recovery Following Motor Stroke: The ICARE Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstein, Carolee J; Wolf, Steven L; Dromerick, Alexander W; Lane, Christianne J; Nelsen, Monica A; Lewthwaite, Rebecca; Cen, Steven Yong; Azen, Stanley P

    2016-02-09

    Clinical trials suggest that higher doses of task-oriented training are superior to current clinical practice for patients with stroke with upper extremity motor deficits. To compare the efficacy of a structured, task-oriented motor training program vs usual and customary occupational therapy (UCC) during stroke rehabilitation. Phase 3, pragmatic, single-blind randomized trial among 361 participants with moderate motor impairment recruited from 7 US hospitals over 44 months, treated in the outpatient setting from June 2009 to March 2014. Structured, task-oriented upper extremity training (Accelerated Skill Acquisition Program [ASAP]; n = 119); dose-equivalent occupational therapy (DEUCC; n = 120); or monitoring-only occupational therapy (UCC; n = 122). The DEUCC group was prescribed 30 one-hour sessions over 10 weeks; the UCC group was only monitored, without specification of dose. The primary outcome was 12-month change in log-transformed Wolf Motor Function Test time score (WMFT, consisting of a mean of 15 timed arm movements and hand dexterity tasks). Secondary outcomes were change in WMFT time score (minimal clinically important difference [MCID] = 19 seconds) and proportion of patients improving ≥25 points on the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) hand function score (MCID = 17.8 points). Among the 361 randomized patients (mean age, 60.7 years; 56% men; 42% African American; mean time since stroke onset, 46 days), 304 (84%) completed the 12-month primary outcome assessment; in intention-to-treat analysis, mean group change scores (log WMFT, baseline to 12 months) were, for the ASAP group, 2.2 to 1.4 (difference, 0.82); DEUCC group, 2.0 to 1.2 (difference, 0.84); and UCC group, 2.1 to 1.4 (difference, 0.75), with no significant between-group differences (ASAP vs DEUCC: 0.14; 95% CI, -0.05 to 0.33; P = .16; ASAP vs UCC: -0.01; 95% CI, -0.22 to 0.21; P = .94; and DEUCC vs UCC: -0.14; 95% CI, -0.32 to 0.05; P = .15). Secondary outcomes for the ASAP

  11. Movement characteristics of upper extremity prostheses during basic goal-directed tasks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwsema, Hanneke; van der Sluis, Corry K.; Bongers, Raoul M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: After an upper limb amputation a prosthesis is often used to restore the functionality. However, the frequency of prostheses use is generally low. Movement kinematics of prostheses use might suggest origins of this low use. The aim of this study was to reveal movement patterns of prosthe

  12. Association between upper extremity musculoskeletal disorders and mental health status in office workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alavi, Seyedeh Shohreh; Makarem, Jalil; Abbasi, Mahya; Rahimi, Azin; Mehrdad, Ramin

    2016-09-27

    Musculoskeletal Disorders (MSDs) can lead to potential adverse consequences for individuals and their organizations, and in various research, its relationship to physical and mental health of workforce has been studied. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs of upper extremities among office workers and its association with mental health status. In this cross sectional study, 1488 out of 1630 office workers completed the Standardized Nordic Musculoskeletal Disorders Ques-tionnaire and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) (response rate = 91.3%). Upper extremity MSDs were reported in 410 (27.5%) office workers, including 269 (18.1%) shoulder, 79 (5.3%) elbow and 207 (13.9%) hand/wrist symptoms. Based on GHQ-28, 254 (17.1%) participants were found to be at risk of developing a psychiatric disorder that were observed in 26.7% of workers with MSDs symptoms. Shoulder (p MSDs were associated with poor mental health. Among the four GHQ-28 subscales (somatic symptoms, anxiety/insomnia, social dysfunction, and depression), anxiety/insomnia was strongly correlated with shoulders (P MSDs were more likely to be experiencing mental distress. This indicates a need for greater emphasis on preventive programs at workplace to support their psychological well-being.

  13. Computer work and musculoskeletal disorders of the neck and upper extremity: A systematic review

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    Veiersted Kaj Bo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review examines the evidence for an association between computer work and neck and upper extremity disorders (except carpal tunnel syndrome. Methods A systematic critical review of studies of computer work and musculoskeletal disorders verified by a physical examination was performed. Results A total of 22 studies (26 articles fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Results show limited evidence for a causal relationship between computer work per se, computer mouse and keyboard time related to a diagnosis of wrist tendonitis, and for an association between computer mouse time and forearm disorders. Limited evidence was also found for a causal relationship between computer work per se and computer mouse time related to tension neck syndrome, but the evidence for keyboard time was insufficient. Insufficient evidence was found for an association between other musculoskeletal diagnoses of the neck and upper extremities, including shoulder tendonitis and epicondylitis, and any aspect of computer work. Conclusions There is limited epidemiological evidence for an association between aspects of computer work and some of the clinical diagnoses studied. None of the evidence was considered as moderate or strong and there is a need for more and better documentation.

  14. Adaptive Control of a Wearable Exoskeleton for Upper-Extremity Neurorehabilitation

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    Sivakumar Balasubramanian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the implementation and testing of two adaptive controllers developed for a wearable, underactuated upper extremity therapy robot – RUPERT (Robotic Upper Extremity Repetitive Trainer. The controllers developed in this study were used to implement two adaptive robotic therapy modes – the adaptive co-operative mode and the adaptive active-assist mode – that are based on two different approaches for providing robotic assistance for task practice. The adaptive active-assist mode completes therapy tasks when a subject is unable to do so voluntarily. This robotic therapy mode is a novel implementation of the idea of an active-assist therapy mode; it utilizes the measure of a subject’s motor ability, along with their real-time movement kinematics to initiate robotic assistance at the appropriate time during a movement trial. The adaptive co-operative mode, on the other hand, is based on the idea of enabling task completion instead of completing the task for the subject. Both these therapy modes were designed to adapt to a stroke subject's motor ability, and thus encourage voluntary participation from the stroke subject. The two controllers were tested on three stroke subjects practicing robot-assisted reaching movements. The results from this testing demonstrate that an underactuated wearable exoskeleton, such as RUPERT, can be used for administering robot-assisted therapy, in a manner that encourages voluntary participation from the subject undergoing therapy.

  15. Upper Extremity Muscle Activation during Recovery of Reaching in Subjects with Post-stroke Hemiparesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Joanne M.; Dromerick, Alexander W.; Sahrmann, Shirley A.; Lang, Catherine E.

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate upper extremity muscle activation and recovery during the first few months after stroke. Methods Subjects with hemiparesis following stroke were studied performing a reaching task at an acute time point (mean = 9 days post-stroke) and then again at a subacute time point (mean = 109 days post-stroke). We recorded kinematics and electromyographic activity of 6 upper extremity muscles. Results At the acute time point, the hemiparetic group had delayed muscle onsets, lower modulation ratios, and higher relative levels of muscle activation (%MVIC) during reaching than controls. From the acute to the subacute time points, improvements were noted in all three variables. By the subacute phase, muscle onsets were similar to controls, while modulation ratios remained lower than controls and %MVIC showed a trend toward being greater in the hemiparetic group. Changes in muscle activation were differentially related to changes in reaching performance. Conclusions Our data show that improvements in muscle timing and decreases in the relative level of volitional activation may underlie improved reaching performance in the early months after stroke. Significance Given that stroke is one of the leading causes of persistent physical disability, it is important to understand how the ability to activate muscles changes during the early phases of recovery after injury. PMID:17097340

  16. Bioelectrical impedance analysis for severe stroke patients with upper extremity hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Chanuk; Kim, Jaehyung; Yang, Yeongae; Lee, Jinsu; Jeon, Gyerok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study is to analyze bioimpedance parameters and occupational assessment for severe stroke patients with upper extremity hemiplegia. [Subjects and Methods] Experimental subjects were 20 hemiplegic stroke patients receiving rehabilitation therapy between November to October, 2015. Prediction marker (PM), and phase angle (θ), a nd characteristic frequency (fc) were measured using bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (MultiScan 5000). Bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) was also obtained from the bioimpedance data. Then, these values were compared with occupational assessment tools. [Results] A significant differences in PM, θ, fc, and BIVA were observed between paretic region and non-paretic region of 5 severe stroke patients. These results were in good agreement with occupational assessment (pinch and hand grip strength, and ADL by MBI). [Conclusion] There were significant differences in impedance parameters between paretic region and non-paretic region of 5 severe stroke patients with upper extremity hemiplegia. Thus, the BIA could be useful tool for evaluating hemiplegic stroke patients receiving the rehabilitation therapy in the clinical application. PMID:27821919

  17. Wearing a Wetsuit Alters Upper Extremity Motion during Simulated Surfboard Paddling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A Nessler

    Full Text Available Surfers often wear wetsuits while paddling in the ocean. This neoprene covering may be beneficial to upper extremity movement by helping to improve proprioceptive acuity, or it may be detrimental by providing increased resistance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of wearing a wetsuit on muscle activation, upper extremity motion, heart rate, and oxygen consumption during simulated surfboard paddling in the laboratory. Twelve male, recreational surfers performed two paddling trials at a constant workload on a swim bench ergometer both with and without a wetsuit. Kinematic data and EMG were acquired from the right arm via motion capture, and oxygen consumption and heart rate were recorded with a metabolic cart and heart rate monitor. Wearing a wetsuit had no significant effect on oxygen consumption or heart rate. A significant increase in EMG activation was observed for the middle deltoid but not for any of the other shoulder muscle evaluated. Finally, approximate entropy and estimates of the maximum Lyapunov exponent increased significantly for vertical trajectory of the right wrist (i.e. stroke height when a wetsuit was worn. These results suggest that a 2mm wetsuit has little effect on the energy cost of paddling at lower workloads but does affect arm motion. These changes may be the result of enhanced proprioceptive acuity due to mechanical compression from the wetsuit.

  18. Assessing agreement of self-reported and observed physical exposures of the upper extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Ann Marie; Strickland, Jaime; Gardner, Bethany; Symanzik, Juergen; Evanoff, Bradley Allen

    2010-01-01

    Assessment of workplace physical exposures by self-reported questionnaires has logistical advantages in population studies, but is subject to exposure misclassification. This study measured agreement between eight self-reported and observer-rated physical exposures to the hands and wrists, and evaluated predictors of intermethod agreement. Workers (n = 341) from three occupational categories (clerical/technical, construction, and service) completed self-administered questionnaires and worksite assessments. Analyses compared self-reported and observed ratings using a weighted kappa coefficient. Personal and psychosocial factors, presence of upper extremity symptoms, andjob type were evaluated as predictors of agreement. Weighted kappa values were substantial for lifting (0.67) and holding vibrating tools (0.61), moderate for forceful grip (0.58), and fair to poor for all other exposures. Upper extremity symptoms did not predict greater disagreement between self-reported and observed exposures. Occupational category was the only significant predictor of inter-method agreement. Self-reported exposures may provide a useful estimate of some work exposures for population studies.

  19. Management of intolerance to casting the upper extremities in claustrophobic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagura, Issei; Kanatani, Takako; Sumi, Masatoshi; Inui, Atsuyuki; Mifune, Yutaka; Kokubu, Takeshi; Kurosaka, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    Some patients showed unusual responses to the immobilization without any objective findings with casts in upper extremities. We hypothesized their that intolerance with excessive anxiety to casts is due to claustrophobia triggered by cast immobilization. The aim of this study is to analyze the relevance of cast immobilization to the feeling of claustrophobia and discover how to handle them. There were nine patients who showed the caustrophobic symptoms with their casts. They were assesed whether they were aware of their claustrophobis themselves. Further we investigated the alternative immobilization to casts. Seven out of nine cases that were aware of their claustrophobic tendencies either were given removable splints initially or had the casts converted to removable splints when they exhibited symptoms. The two patients who were unaware of their latent claustrophobic tendencies were identified when they showed similar claustrophobic symptoms to the previous patients soon after short arm cast application. We replaced the casts with removable splints. This resolved the issue in all cases. We should be aware of the claustrophobia if patients showed unusual responses to the immobilization without any objective findings with casts in upper extremities, where removal splint is practical alternative to cast to continue the treatment successfully.

  20. Management of Intolerance to Casting the Upper Extremities in Claustrophobic Patients

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    Issei Nagura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Some patients showed unusual responses to the immobilization without any objective findings with casts in upper extremities. We hypothesized their that intolerance with excessive anxiety to casts is due to claustrophobia triggered by cast immobilization. The aim of this study is to analyze the relevance of cast immobilization to the feeling of claustrophobia and discover how to handle them. Methods. There were nine patients who showed the caustrophobic symptoms with their casts. They were assesed whether they were aware of their claustrophobis themselves. Further we investigated the alternative immobilization to casts. Results. Seven out of nine cases that were aware of their claustrophobic tendencies either were given removable splints initially or had the casts converted to removable splints when they exhibited symptoms. The two patients who were unaware of their latent claustrophobic tendencies were identified when they showed similar claustrophobic symptoms to the previous patients soon after short arm cast application. We replaced the casts with removable splints. This resolved the issue in all cases. Conclusions. We should be aware of the claustrophobia if patients showed unusual responses to the immobilization without any objective findings with casts in upper extremities, where removal splint is practical alternative to cast to continue the treatment successfully.

  1. Predictors of upper extremity discomfort: a longitudinal study of industrial and clerical workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Robert A; Franzblau, Alfred; Gell, Nancy; Ulin, Sheryl S; Armstrong, Thomas J

    2005-03-01

    Upper extremity discomfort associated with work activity is common with a prevalence of over 50% in many settings. This study followed a cohort of 501 active workers for an average of 5.4 years. Cases were defined as workers who were asymptomatic or had a low discomfort score of 1 or 2 at baseline testing and went on to report a discomfort score of 4 or above on a 10-point visual analog scale. This change is considered clinically significant. Controls had a low baseline discomfort score and continued to have a low discomfort rating throughout the study. The risk factors found to have the highest predictive value for identifying a person who is likely to develop a significant upper extremity discomfort rating included age over 40, a BMI over 28, a complaint of baseline discomfort, the severity of the baseline discomfort rating and a job that had a high hand activity level (based upon hand repetition and force). The risk profile identified both ergonomic and personal health factors as risks and both factors may be amenable to prevention strategies.

  2. Steroid injections in the upper extremity: experienced clinical opinion versus evidence-based practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Gary; Marshall, Astrid; Barron, O Alton; Catalano, Louis W; Glickel, Steven Z; Kuhn, Margaret

    2013-09-01

    A survey regarding upper-extremity steroid injection practices was distributed to all active members of the American Society for Surgery of the Hand (ASSH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) using SurveyMonkey. Response rates for the ASSH and ASES were 26% and 24%, respectively. The potency-adjusted dose of steroid injected for common hand and wrist injections ranged from 0.375 to 133.33 mg and for shoulder injections ranged from 0.375 to 250 mg. These ranges span 356-fold and 667-fold differences, respectively. Potency-adjusted doses differed significantly between steroid types for all injections evaluated in this study. American Society for Surgery of the Hand members gave significantly smaller doses of steroid for the glenohumeral and acromioclavicular joints than ASES members. Only 9% of respondents based injection practice on a scientific reference. Sixteen percent of ASSH and 31% of ASES respondents reported no specific rationale for their steroid injection practice; 78% of ASSH and 52% of ASES respondents attributed their rationale to some kind of instruction from their mentors or colleagues. Upper-extremity surgeons demonstrate substantial variability in their practice of steroid injections, with up to a 667-fold range in steroid dose. Experienced clinical opinion is the principal rationale for these injection practices; little rationale is based on formal scientific evidence.

  3. Upper Extremity Freezing and Dyscoordination in Parkinson’s Disease: Effects of Amplitude and Cadence Manipulations

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    April J. Williams

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Motor freezing, the inability to produce effective movement, is associated with decreasing amplitude, hastening of movement, and poor coordination. We investigated how manipulations of movement amplitude and cadence affect upper extremity (UE coordination as measured by the phase coordination index (PCI—only previously measured in gait—and freezing of the upper extremity (FO-UE in people with Parkinson's disease (PD who experience freezing of gait (PD + FOG, do not experience FOG (PD-FOG, and healthy controls. Methods. Twenty-seven participants with PD and 18 healthy older adults made alternating bimanual movements between targets under four conditions: Baseline; Fast; Small; SmallFast. Kinematic data were recorded and analyzed for PCI and FO-UE events. PCI and FO-UE were compared across groups and conditions. Correlations between UE PCI, gait PCI, FO-UE, and Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q were determined. Results. PD + FOG had poorer coordination than healthy old during SmallFast. UE coordination correlated with number of FO-UE episodes in two conditions and FOG-Q score in one. No differences existed between PD−/+FOG in coordination or number of FO-UE episodes. Conclusions. Dyscoordination and FO-UE can be elicited by manipulating cadence and amplitude of an alternating bimanual task. It remains unclear whether FO-UE and FOG share common mechanisms.

  4. Suitability of Hydraulic Disk Brakes for Passive Actuation of Upper-Extremity Rehabilitation Exoskeleton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arno H. A. Stienen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive, energy-dissipating actuators are promising for force-coordination training in stroke rehabilitation, as they are inherently safe and have a high torque-to-weight ratio. The goal of this study is to determine if hydraulic disk brakes are suitable to actuate an upper-extremity exoskeleton, for application in rehabilitation settings. Passive actuation with friction brakes has direct implications for joint control. Braking is always opposite to the movement direction. During standstill, the measured torque is equal to the torque applied by the human. During rotations, it is equal to the brake torque. Actively assisting movement is not possible, nor are energy-requiring virtual environments. The evaluated disk brake has a 20 Nm bandwidth (flat-spectrum, multi-sine of 10 Hz; sufficient for torques required for conventional therapy and simple, passive virtual environments. The maximum static output torque is 120 Nm, sufficient for isometric training of the upper extremity. The minimal impedance is close zero, with only the inertia of the device felt. In conclusion, hydraulic disk brakes are suitable for rehabilitation devices.

  5. Rehabilitation of the Upper Extremity after Stroke: Current Practice As a Guide for Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mylene Schriner PhD, OTR/L

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of disability in the United States and a top diagnosis for occupational therapy (OT services among neurological conditions. Academic programs teach OT students neurological frames of reference (FORs to provide a foundation for future practice. To meet accreditation standards, entry-level curricula must reflect current practice and evidence-based interventions. A survey of OT practitioners working in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation was conducted to investigate current clinical practice in a variety of treatment settings. Survey questions probed the use of motor rehabilitation techniques exclusive to one of six neurological FORs: Brunnstrom, Constraint-induced Movement Therapy, Neurodevelopmental Treatment, Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation, Rood, and Task-Oriented. Responses from 167 OT professionals indicated interventions representing all six FORs are currently being utilized in stroke rehabilitation. Techniques from the Task-Oriented and Neurodevelopmental Treatment approaches were used most frequently; however, the Rood–based techniques were used much less than interventions from the other FORs. No single neurological approach was found to dominate practice regardless of the number of years of experience in stroke rehabilitation or years since graduation from an entry-level program. A majority of participants appear to employ techniques from multiple approaches frequently, suggesting contemporary OT practice in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation is eclectic in nature.

  6. [Cervical epidural anesthesia for upper extremity surgery using three different formulations of local anesthetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara-López, Uriah; Bárcenas-Olivares, Juan; Gutiérrez-Sougarret, Bernardo; Aldrete, J Antonio; Olascoaga-Ortega, Gabriela

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the efficiency and safety of the cervical epidural blockade (CEB) in upper extremity surgery, using lidocaine 2%, bupivacaine 5% and a mixture of both local analgesics. Eighty five patients were submitted to upper limb surgery under CEB. They were assigned into one of three groups: group I received 100 mg of 2% lidocaine; group II received 30 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine, and group III received a mixture of 60 mg of 2% lidocaine and 15 mg of 0.5% bupivacaine. We evaluated their effects on vital signs, blockade quality, adverse effects, and patient comfort. Anesthesiologist and surgeon evaluated the technique as "good" in 80% of the patients. Significant differences were found for motor blockade. Group II developed complete motor block (100%). Observed adverse effects were vomiting in groups II and III and dural puncture was present in 6.7% of the cases in group II. This study confirms the safety of cervical epidural anesthesia for upper limb surgery using three different formulations of local anesthetics.

  7. Assessing upper limb function: transcultural adaptation and validation of the Portuguese version of the Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, João Paulo; Oliveira, Sandra; Páscoa Pinheiro, João; L Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Brachial hemiparesis is one of the most frequent sequelae of stroke, leading to important functional disability given the role of the upper limb in executing activities of daily living (ADL). The Stroke Upper Limb Capacity Scale (SULCS) is a stroke-specific assessment instrument that evaluates functional capacity of the upper limb based on the execution of 10 tasks. The objective of this study is the transcultural adaptation and psychometric validation of the Portuguese version of the SULCS. A Portuguese version of the SULCS was developed, using the process of forward-backward translation, after authorisation from the author of the original scale. Then, a multicentre study was conducted in Portuguese stroke patients (n = 122) to validate the psychometric properties of the instrument. The relationship between sociodemographic and clinical characteristics was used to test construct validity. The relationship between SULCS scores and other instruments was used to test criterion validity. Semantic and linguistic adaptation of the SULCS was executed without substantial issues and allowed the development of a Portuguese version. The application of this instrument suggested the existence of celling effect (19.7% of participants with maximum score). Reliability was demonstrated through the intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.98. As for construct validity, SULCS was sensible to muscle tonus and aphasia. SULCS classification impacted the scores of the Motor Evaluation Scale for Upper Extremity in Stroke (MESUPES) and the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS). The present version of SULCS shows valid and reliable cultural adaptation, with good reliability and stability.

  8. The correlation between stabbing-related upper extremity wounds and survival of stabbing victims with abdominal and thoracic injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenfeld, Michael; Peleg, Kobi; Givon, Adi; Kessel, Boris

    2017-07-01

    When treating patients with stab injuries of the torso, clinicians often lack timely information about the degree and nature of internal organ damage. An externally observable sign significantly associated with characteristics of torso injuries may therefore be useful for practitioners. One such potential sign is the presence of wounds to the hands, sometimes sustained during victims' attempt to defend themselves during the violent altercation. Thus, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the association between presence of upper extremity wounds and the severity of the thoracic and intra-abdominal injuries due to stabbing. This study was carried out retrospectively using data on 8714 patients with stabbing-related injuries from 19 trauma centers that participated in the Israeli National Trauma Registry (INTR) between January 1st1997 and December 31st 2013. Patients with wounds of upper extremities in addition to torso injuries (UE group) were compared to other patients with torso injuries (TO group) in terms of demographics, injury characteristics and clinical outcome. The compared groups were found to be homogeneous in terms of age and systolic blood pressure; the number of sustained torso injuries was also identical. The UE group comprised a slightly greater percentage of females, however both groups were predominantly male. Patients with upper extremity injuries had a lower proportion of internal organ damage (36% vs. 38.5%) and lower mortality (0.9% vs. 2%). The higher mortality of patients without upper extremity wounds remained significantly different even when adjusted by other epidemiological parameters (OR 2.46, 95% CI 1.33-5.08).The number of sustained upper extremity injuries was positively associated with deeper penetration of the torso by the stabbing instrument. Patients with stabbing-related upper extremity wounds had a significant survival advantage over patients without such injuries. However, a greater number of sustained upper extremity

  9. Constraint-induced movement therapy as a rehabilitation intervention for upper extremity in stroke patients: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoom, Mohammad; Hawamdeh, Mohannad; Hawamdeh, Ziad; Alwardat, Mohammad; Giordani, Laura; Bacciu, Serenella; Scarpini, Claudia; Foti, Calogero

    2016-09-01

    Constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) is a neurorehabilitation technique designed to improve upper extremity motor functions after stroke. This review aimed to investigate evidence of the effect of CIMT on upper extremity in stroke patients and to identify optimal methods to apply CIMT. Four databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINHAL, and PEDro) and reference lists of relevant articles and reviews were searched. Randomized clinical trials that studied the effect of CIMT on upper extremity outcomes in stroke patients compared with other rehabilitative techniques, usual care, or no intervention were included. Methodological quality was assessed using the PEDro score. The following data were extracted for each trial: patients' characteristics, sample size, eligibility criteria, protocols of CIMT and control groups, outcome measurements, and the PEDro score. A total of 38 trials were identified according to the inclusion criteria. The trials included were heterogeneous in CIMT protocols, time since stroke, and duration and frequency of treatment. The pooled meta-analysis of 36 trials found a heterogeneous significant effect of CIMT on upper extremity. There was no significant effect of CIMT at different durations of follow-up. The majority of included articles did not fulfill powered sample size and quality criteria. The effect of CIMT changed in terms of sample size and quality features of the articles included. These meta-analysis findings indicate that evidence for the superiority of CIMT in comparison with other rehabilitative interventions is weak. Information on the optimal dose of CIMT and optimal time to start CIMT is still limited.

  10. Force Myography for Monitoring Grasping in Individuals with Stroke with Mild to Moderate Upper-Extremity Impairments: A Preliminary Investigation in a Controlled Environment

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    Gautam P. Sadarangani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing research interest in technologies that can detect grasping, to encourage functional use of the hand as part of daily living, and thus promote upper-extremity motor recovery in individuals with stroke. Force myography (FMG has been shown to be effective for providing biofeedback to improve fine motor function in structured rehabilitation settings, involving isolated repetitions of a single grasp type, elicited at a predictable time, without upper-extremity movements. The use of FMG, with machine learning techniques, to detect and distinguish between grasping and no grasping, continues to be an active area of research, in healthy individuals. The feasibility of classifying FMG for grasp detection in populations with upper-extremity impairments, in the presence of upper-extremity movements, as would be expected in daily living, has yet to be established. We explore the feasibility of FMG for this application by establishing and comparing (1 FMG-based grasp detection accuracy and (2 the amount of training data necessary for accurate grasp classification, in individuals with stroke and healthy individuals. FMG data were collected using a flexible forearm band, embedded with six force-sensitive resistors (FSRs. Eight participants with stroke, with mild to moderate upper-extremity impairments, and eight healthy participants performed 20 repetitions of three tasks that involved reaching, grasping, and moving an object in different planes of movement. A validation sensor was placed on the object to label data as corresponding to a grasp or no grasp. Grasp detection performance was evaluated using linear and non-linear classifiers. The effect of training set size on classification accuracy was also determined. FMG-based grasp detection demonstrated high accuracy of 92.2% (σ = 3.5% for participants with stroke and 96.0% (σ = 1.6% for healthy volunteers using a support vector machine (SVM. The use of a training set that was 50

  11. [Tests of hand functionality in upper limb amputation with prosthesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzini, G; Orlandini, D; Moscato, T A; Nicita, D; Panigazzi, M

    2007-01-01

    The need for standardized instruments for clinical measurements has become pressing in the fields of occupational rehabilitation and ergonomics. This is particularly the case for instruments that allow a quantitative evaluation of upper limb function, and especially hand function in patients who have undergone an amputation and then application of an upper limb prosthesis. This study presents a review of the main tests used to evaluate hand function, with a critical analysis of their use in subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. The tests are divided into: tests to evaluate strength, tests to evaluate co-ordination and dexterity, tests of global or overall function, and tests proposed specifically for subjects with an upper limb prosthesis. Of the various tests presented, the authors give their preference to the Bimanual Functional Assessment, Abilhand and/or the ADL Questionnaire, because of the practical usefulness, clinimetric features, simplicity and ease of administration of these tests.

  12. Stiffness and ultimate load of osseointegrated prosthesis fixations in the upper and lower extremity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welke, Bastian; Hurschler, Christof; Föller, Marie; Schwarze, Michael; Calliess, Tilman

    2013-07-11

    Techniques for the skeletal attachment of amputation-prostheses have been developed over recent decades. This type of attachment has only been performed on a small number of patients. It poses various potential advantages compared to conventional treatment with a socket, but is also associated with an increased risk of bone or implant-bone interface fracture in the case of a fall. We therefore investigated the bending stiffness and ultimate bending moment of such devices implanted in human and synthetic bones. Eight human specimens and 16 synthetic models of the proximal femora were implanted with lower extremity prostheses and eight human specimens and six synthetic humeri were implanted with upper extremity prostheses. They were dissected according to typical amputation levels and underwent loading in a material testing machine in a four-point bending setup. Bending stiffness, ultimate bending moment and fracture modes were determined in a load to failure experiment. Additionally, axial pull-out was performed on eight synthetic specimens of the lower extremity. Maximum bending moment of the synthetic femora was 160.6±27.5 Nm, the flexural rigidity of the synthetic femora was 189.0±22.6 Nm2. Maximum bending moment of the human femora was 100.4±38.5 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 137.8±29.4 Nm2. The maximum bending moment of the six synthetic humeri was 104.9±19.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 63.7±3.6 Nm2. For the human humeri the maximum bending moment was 36.7±11.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity at was 43.7±10.5 Nm2. The maximum pull-out force for the eight synthetic femora was 3571±919 N. Significant differences were found between human and synthetic specimens of the lower and upper extremity regarding maximum bending moment, bending displacement and flexural rigidity. The results of this study are relevant with respect to previous finding regarding the load at the interfaces of osseointegrated prosthesis fixation devices and are crucial for the

  13. Emergency medicine task shifting: Quick dash outcome scores of upper extremity injury management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.S. Frank*

    2013-12-01

    Results and conclusions: There were a total of 25 initial candidates, of which only 17 were able to complete the survey. Using the Quick DASH Outcome Measure, our 17 patients had a mean score of 29.5 (range 5.0– 56.8. When compared to the standardized Quick DASH outcomes (no work limitation at 27.5 vs. work limited by injury at 52.6 the non-physician clinicians appear to be performing upper extremity repairs with good outcomes. The key variable to successful repair was the initial injury type. Although accommodations needed to be made to the standard Quick DASH protocol, the tool appears to be usable in non-traditional settings.

  14. Triangular interval syndrome: A differential diagnosis for upper extremity radicular pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Deepak

    2010-02-01

    This case report describes a 57-year-old female who experienced symptoms of scapular pain with pain radiating into the right upper extremity. Initial medical referral suggested, nerve entrapment of a cervical origin. However, the patient did not fit the clinical prediction rule for cervical radiculopathy. Radial nerve bias was positive without cervical provocation, with symptom reproduction at the lateral scapular area. Treatment addressed mechanical dysfunction at the triangular interval formed by the teres major and triceps, comprising manual therapy, neural mobilization, corrective exercise and pain modalities. Reduction in symptoms was observed with a decrease in right scapular and arm pain and improved radial nerve mobility. The triangular interval is described as a predominant contributor to the symptomatology secondary to entrapment and adverse neural tension of the radial nerve. The anatomical and physiological basis is enumerated.

  15. Lymphaticovenous bypass decreases pathologic skin changes in upper extremity breast cancer-related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrisi, Jeremy S; Joseph, Walter J; Ghanta, Swapna; Cuzzone, Daniel A; Albano, Nicholas J; Savetsky, Ira L; Gardenier, Jason C; Skoracki, Roman; Chang, David; Mehrara, Babak J

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in microsurgery such as lymphaticovenous bypass (LVB) have been shown to decrease limb volumes and improve subjective symptoms in patients with lymphedema. However, to date, it remains unknown if these procedures can reverse the pathological tissue changes associated with lymphedema. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze skin tissue changes in patients before and after LVB. Matched skin biopsy samples were collected from normal and lymphedematous limbs of 6 patients with unilateral breast cancer-related upper extremity lymphedema before and 6 months after LVB. Biopsy specimens were fixed and analyzed for inflammation, fibrosis, hyperkeratosis, and lymphangiogenesis. Six months following LVB, 83% of patients had symptomatic improvement in their lymphedema. Histological analysis at this time demonstrated a significant decrease in tissue CD4(+) cell inflammation in lymphedematous limb (but not normal limb) biopsies (pskin. These findings suggest that the some of the pathologic changes of lymphedema are reversible and may be related to lymphatic fluid stasis.

  16. Poststroke upper extremity rehabilitation: a review of robotic systems and clinical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Bambi R; McDowell, Sharon K; Worthen-Chaudhari, Lise C

    2007-01-01

    Although the use of robotic devices to address neuromuscular rehabilitative goals represents a promising technological advance in medical care, the large number of systems being developed and varying levels of clinical study of the devices make it difficult to follow and interpret the results in this new field. This article is a review of the current state-of-the-art in robotic applications in poststroke therapy for the upper extremity, written specifically to help clinicians determine the differences between various systems. We concentrate primarily on systems that have been tested clinically. Robotic systems are grouped by rehabilitation application (e.g., gross motor movement, bilateral training, etc.), and, where possible, the neurorehabilitation strategies employed by each system are described. We close with a discussion of the benefits and concerns of using robotics in rehabilitation and an indication of challenges that must be addressed for therapeutic robots to be applied practically in the clinic.

  17. Occupational performance, pain, and global quality of life in women with upper extremity fractures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dekkers, Merete Klindt; Nielsen, Tove Lise

    2010-01-01

    To examine pain, occupational performance problems, and quality of life (QoL) and possible associations between these variables, 41 elderly women with acute pain due to a fracture of the upper extremity were assessed with COPM, DASH, validated questions on pain, and a global question on Qo......L. The participants reported 802 performance problems: 38% within self-care, 52% within productivity, and 10% within leisure. Strength demanding bilateral activities in cleaning, hygiene, and cooking were most frequently reported. The median COPM performance and satisfaction scores were 2.8 and 3.4; the mean DASH...... score was 44.27. Pain frequency and intensity as well as QoL correlated moderately with the number of performance problems on the COPM. QoL was in general not very reduced and correlated only negligibly with pain. The DASH score correlated moderately with the total number of performance problems...

  18. On the assessment of coordination between upper extremities: towards a common language between rehabilitation engineers, clinicians and neuroscientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirota, Camila; Jansa, Jelka; Diaz, Javier; Balasubramanian, Sivakumar; Mazzoleni, Stefano; Borghese, N Alberto; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro

    2016-09-08

    Well-developed coordination of the upper extremities is critical for function in everyday life. Interlimb coordination is an intuitive, yet subjective concept that refers to spatio-temporal relationships between kinematic, kinetic and physiological variables of two or more limbs executing a motor task with a common goal. While both the clinical and neuroscience communities agree on the relevance of assessing and quantifying interlimb coordination, rehabilitation engineers struggle to translate the knowledge and needs of clinicians and neuroscientists into technological devices for the impaired. The use of ambiguous definitions in the scientific literature, and lack of common agreement on what should be measured, present large barriers to advancements in this area. Here, we present the different definitions and approaches to assess and quantify interlimb coordination in the clinic, in motor control studies, and by state-of-the-art robotic devices. We then propose a taxonomy of interlimb activities and give recommendations for future neuroscience-based robotic- and sensor-based assessments of upper limb function that are applicable to the everyday clinical practice. We believe this is the first step towards our long-term goal of unifying different fields and help the generation of more consistent and effective tools for neurorehabilitation.

  19. Health related quality of life and return to work after minor extremity injuries: A longitudinal study comparing upper versus lower extremity injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluys, Kerstin Prignitz; Shults, Justine; Richmond, Therese S

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the impact on health related quality of life (HRQL) during the first year after minor extremity injury and to determine whether there is a difference in recovery patterns and return to work between upper extremity injuries (UEI) and lower extremity injuries (LEI). A total of 181 adults' age 18 years or older randomly selected from patients admitted to an emergency department with minor injuries were studied. HRQL was measured using the Functional Status Questionnaire (FSQ) at 1-2 weeks, 3, 6, and 12-months post-injury. Pre-injury FSQ scores were measured retrospectively at admission. A quasi-least square (QLS) model was constructed to examine differences of FSQ scores at each measuring point for UEI and LEI. Fractures of the knee/lower leg (25%) were the most frequently injured body area. Slips or falls (57%) and traffic-related events (22%) were the most common injury causes. The mean ISS was 4.2 (SD 0.86). Both groups had significant declines in the FSQ scores physical and social functioning at 1-2 weeks after injury. Patients with UEI made larger improvements in the first 3 months post-injury versus patients with LEI whose improvements extended over the first 6 months. None of the groups reached the pre-injury FSQ scores during the first post-injury year except in the subscale work performance where UEI exceeded the pre-injury scores. At 12 months post-injury, significant lower FSQ scores remained in the LEI group compared to the UEI group in intermediate activities of daily living (p=0.036, d 0.4) and work performance (p=0.004, d 0.7). The return to work at 3 months and 12 months were 76% and 88% for UEI and 58% and 77% for LEI. No significant differences were found between groups in the FSQ scale mental health and social interaction. LEI had the highest impact on HRQL and return to work during the first year which exceeded the consequences of UEI. These findings contribute to the information about the consequences of injury in order to give

  20. Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) in the upper extremity: the future of outcomes reporting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhni, Eric C; Meadows, Molly; Hamamoto, Jason T; Higgins, John D; Romeo, Anthony A; Verma, Nikhil N

    2017-02-01

    Patient reported outcomes (PROs) serve an integral role in clinical research by helping to determine the impact of clinical care as experienced by the patient. With recent initiatives in health care policy and pay for performance, outcome reporting is now recognized as a policy-driven requirement in addition to a clinical research tool. For outcome measures to satisfy these regulatory requirements and provide value in understanding disease outcomes, they must be responsive and efficient. Recent research has uncovered certain concerns regarding traditional PROs in patients with upper extremity disability and injury. These include lack of consensus regarding selection of PROs for a given diagnoses, inconsistent techniques of administration of the same PROs, and the administrative burden to patients and providers of completing these forms. To address these limitations, emphasis has been placed on streamlining the outcomes reporting process, and, as a result, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) created the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). PROMIS forms were created to comprehensively and efficiently measure outcomes across multiple disease states, including orthopedics. These tools exist in computer adaptive testing and short forms with the intention of more efficiently measuring outcomes compared with legacy PROs. The goals of this review are to highlight the main components of PROMIS reporting tools and identify recent use of the scores in the upper extremity literature. The review will also highlight the research and health policy potentials and limitations of implementing PROMIS into everyday orthopedic practice. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Facilitating mathematics learning for students with upper extremity disabilities using touch-input system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kup-Sze; Chan, Tak-Yin

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using tablet device as user interface for students with upper extremity disabilities to input mathematics efficiently into computer. A touch-input system using tablet device as user interface was proposed to assist these students to write mathematics. User-switchable and context-specific keyboard layouts were designed to streamline the input process. The system could be integrated with conventional computer systems only with minor software setup. A two-week pre-post test study involving five participants was conducted to evaluate the performance of the system and collect user feedback. The mathematics input efficiency of the participants was found to improve during the experiment sessions. In particular, their performance in entering trigonometric expressions by using the touch-input system was significantly better than that by using conventional mathematics editing software with keyboard and mouse. The participants rated the touch-input system positively and were confident that they could operate at ease with more practice. The proposed touch-input system provides a convenient way for the students with hand impairment to write mathematics and has the potential to facilitate their mathematics learning. Implications for Rehabilitation Students with upper extremity disabilities often face barriers to learning mathematics which is largely based on handwriting. Conventional computer user interfaces are inefficient for them to input mathematics into computer. A touch-input system with context-specific and user-switchable keyboard layouts was designed to improve the efficiency of mathematics input. Experimental results and user feedback suggested that the system has the potential to facilitate mathematics learning for the students.

  2. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Phantom Limb Pain in Male Amputees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sacha B. Finn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available ObjectivePhantom limb pain (PLP is prevalent in patients post-amputation and is difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of mirror therapy in relieving PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees.MethodsFifteen participants from Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: mirror therapy (n = 9 or control (n = 6, covered mirror or mental visualization therapy. Participants were asked to perform 15 min of their assigned therapy daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was pain as measured using a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale.ResultsSubjects in the mirror therapy group had a significant decrease in pain scores, from a mean of 44.1 (SD = 17.0 to 27.5 (SD = 17.2 mm (p = 0.002. In addition, there was a significant decrease in daily time experiencing pain, from a mean of 1,022 (SD = 673 to 448 (SD = 565 minutes (p = 0.003. By contrast, the control group had neither diminished pain (p = 0.65 nor decreased overall time experiencing pain (p = 0.49. A pain decrement response seen by the 10th treatment session was predictive of final efficacy.ConclusionThese results confirm that mirror therapy is an effective therapy for PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees, reducing both severity and duration of daily episodes.RegistrationNCT0030144 ClinicalTrials.gov.

  3. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Mirror Therapy for Upper Extremity Phantom Limb Pain in Male Amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Sacha B; Perry, Briana N; Clasing, Jay E; Walters, Lisa S; Jarzombek, Sandra L; Curran, Sean; Rouhanian, Minoo; Keszler, Mary S; Hussey-Andersen, Lindsay K; Weeks, Sharon R; Pasquina, Paul F; Tsao, Jack W

    2017-01-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is prevalent in patients post-amputation and is difficult to treat. We assessed the efficacy of mirror therapy in relieving PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees. Fifteen participants from Walter Reed and Brooke Army Medical Centers were randomly assigned to one of two groups: mirror therapy (n = 9) or control (n = 6, covered mirror or mental visualization therapy). Participants were asked to perform 15 min of their assigned therapy daily for 5 days/week for 4 weeks. The primary outcome was pain as measured using a 100-mm Visual Analog Scale. Subjects in the mirror therapy group had a significant decrease in pain scores, from a mean of 44.1 (SD = 17.0) to 27.5 (SD = 17.2) mm (p = 0.002). In addition, there was a significant decrease in daily time experiencing pain, from a mean of 1,022 (SD = 673) to 448 (SD = 565) minutes (p = 0.003). By contrast, the control group had neither diminished pain (p = 0.65) nor decreased overall time experiencing pain (p = 0.49). A pain decrement response seen by the 10th treatment session was predictive of final efficacy. These results confirm that mirror therapy is an effective therapy for PLP in unilateral, upper extremity male amputees, reducing both severity and duration of daily episodes. NCT0030144 ClinicalTrials.gov.

  4. Upper Extremity Injured Workers Stratified by Current Work Status: An Examination of Health Characteristics, Work Limitations and Work Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Grant

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Upper extremity injured workers are an under-studied population. A descriptive comparison of workers with shoulder, elbow and hand injuries reporting to a Canadian Workplace Safety and Insurance Board (WSIB clinic was undertaken.Objective: To determine if differences existed between injury groups stratified by current work status.Methods: All WSIB claimants reporting to our upper extremity clinic between 2003 and 2008 were approached to participate in this descriptive study. 314 working and 146 non-working WSIB claimants completed the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (DASH; Short Form health survey (SF36; Worker’s Limitations Questionnaire and the Work Instability Scale. Various parametric and non-parametric analyses were used to assess significant differences between groups on demographic, work and health related variables.Results: Hand, followed by the shoulder and elbow were the most common site of injury. Most non-workers listed their current injury as the reason for being off work, and attempted to return to work once since their injury occurrence. Non-workers and a subset of workers at high risk for work loss showed significantly worse mental functioning. Workers identified physical demands as the most frequent injury-related on the job limitation. 60% of current workers were listed as low risk for work loss on the Work Instability Scale.Conclusions: Poorer mental functioning, being female and sustaining a shoulder injury were risk factors for work instability. Our cohort of injured non-workers were unable to return to work due to their current injury, reinforcing the need to advocate for modified duties, shorter hours and a work environment where stress and injury recurrence is reduced. Future studies examining pre-injury depression as a risk factor for prolonged work absences are warranted.

  5. Solar Wind Interaction with the Martian Upper Atmosphere at Early Mars/Extreme Solar Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, C.; Bougher, S. W.; Ma, Y.; Toth, G.; Lee, Y.; Nagy, A. F.; Tenishev, V.; Pawlowski, D. J.; Combi, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    The investigation of ion escape fluxes from Mars, resulting from the solar wind interaction with its upper atmosphere/ionosphere, is important due to its potential impact on the long-term evolution of Mars atmosphere (e.g., loss of water) over its history. In the present work, we adopt the 3-D Mars cold neutral atmosphere profiles (0 ~ 300 km) from the newly developed and validated Mars Global Ionosphere Thermosphere Model (M-GITM) and the 3-D hot oxygen profiles (100 km ~ 5 RM) from the exosphere Monte Carlo model Adaptive Mesh Particle Simulator (AMPS). We apply these 3-D model output fields into the 3-D BATS-R-US Mars multi-fluid MHD (MF-MHD) model (100 km ~ 20 RM) that can simulate the interplay between Mars upper atmosphere and solar wind by considering the dynamics of individual ion species. The multi-fluid MHD model solves separate continuity, momentum and energy equations for each ion species (H+, O+, O2+, CO2+). The M-GITM model together with the AMPS exosphere model take into account the effects of solar cycle and seasonal variations on both cold and hot neutral atmospheres. This feature allows us to investigate the corresponding effects on the Mars upper atmosphere ion escape by using a one-way coupling approach, i.e., both the M-GITM and AMPS model output fields are used as the input for the multi-fluid MHD model and the M-GITM is used as input into the AMPS exosphere model. In this study, we present M-GITM, AMPS, and MF-MHD calculations (1-way coupled) for 2.5 GYA conditions and/or extreme solar conditions for present day Mars (high solar wind velocities, high solar wind dynamic pressure, and high solar irradiance conditions, etc.). Present day extreme conditions may result in MF-MHD outputs that are similar to 2.5 GYA cases. The crustal field orientations are also considered in this study. By comparing estimates of past ion escape rates with the current ion loss rates to be returned by the MAVEN spacecraft (2013-2016), we can better constrain the

  6. The Flail and Pulseless Upper Limb: an Extreme Case of Traumatic Scapulo-thoracic Dissociation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria SW

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Scapulo-thoracic dissociation is an infrequent injury resulting from high energy trauma which is often associated with severe neurological and vascular injuries which may be unrecognised at the time of presentation. A 24 year-old female presented with bilateral rib fractures, pneumothorax, liver and kidney injuries following a road traffic accident. She also sustained fractures of her right scapula, odontoid, right transverse processes of the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae and a closed fracture of her right femur. Her right upper limb was later noted to be flail and pulseless, due to complete right brachial plexus injury, scapula-thoracic dissociation and subclavian artery avulsion. We managed the upper limb injuries non-operatively, and focused on resuscitation of the patient. Early exploration of the complete brachial plexus injury was not undertaken in spite of the possible associated poor functional outcome as there was no life-threatening indication.

  7. Gaming-based virtual reality therapy for the rehabilitation of upper extremity function after stroke%虚拟现实游戏训练对脑卒中患者偏瘫上肢功能恢复的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩晓晓; 柯将琼; 蒋松鹤; 张丹迎

    2016-01-01

    Fugl-Meyer Assessment for the Upper Extremities (FMA-UE),Brunnstrom staging and co-contraction ratios (CRs).Surface electromyogram signals from the biceps brachii and triceps brachii were also recorded during maximum isometric voluntary flexion and extension of the affected elbow.Results No significant differences in any of the measurements were observed between the 2 groups before or after the intervention.Both groups demonstrated significant increases in their average FMA-UE score,Brunnstrom staging and CRs.Conclusions Virtual reality gaming using a Wii controller is as effective as conventional therapy in enhancing upper extremity motor function and elbow flexion and extension after stroke.

  8. Climate variability and extreme drought in the upper Solimoes River (western Amazon Basin) : Understanding the exceptional 2010 drought

    OpenAIRE

    J. C. Espinoza; Ronchail, J.; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Junquas, C.; Vauchel, Philippe; Lavado, W.; Drapeau, G; Pombosa, R.

    2011-01-01

    This work provides an initial overview of climate features and their related hydrological impacts during the recent extreme droughts (1995, 1998, 2005 and 2010) in the upper Solimoes River (western Amazon), using comprehensive in situ discharge and rainfall datasets. The droughts are generally associated with positive SST anomalies in the tropical North Atlantic and weak trade winds and water vapor transport toward the upper Solimoes, which, in association with increased subsidence over centr...

  9. Intra-arterial Autologous Bone Marrow Cell Transplantation in a Patient with Upper-extremity Critical Limb Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madaric, Juraj, E-mail: jurmad@hotmail.com [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases (NUSCH) and Slovak Medical University, Department of Cardiology and Angiology (Slovakia); Klepanec, Andrej [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia); Mistrik, Martin [Clinic of Hematology and Transfusiology, Faculty Hospital (Slovakia); Altaner, Cestmir [Slovak Academy of Science, Institute of Experimental Oncology (Slovakia); Vulev, Ivan [National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Induction of therapeutic angiogenesis by autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation has been identified as a potential new option in patients with advanced lower-limb ischemia. There is little evidence of the benefit of intra-arterial cell application in upper-limb critical ischemia. We describe a patient with upper-extremity critical limb ischemia with digital gangrene resulting from hypothenar hammer syndrome successfully treated by intra-arterial autologous bone marrow mononuclear cell transplantation.

  10. Peripheral Neuropathies in Nonparetic Upper Extremities of Stroke Patients Induced by Excessive Use of a Walking Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozono, Koichiro; Hachisuka, Akiko; Wada, Futoshi; Hachisuka, Kenji

    2015-08-01

    Poststroke patients reportedly experience entrapment neuropathies in the nonparetic upper extremities, and the use of an assistive device for long periods may increase this risk. We examined nerve conduction velocities in hemiparetic patients and investigated the relationship between abnormal measurements and duration of walking. Twenty-eight male hemiparetic outpatients who used a cane or a crutch participated in this study. Clinical characteristics such as age, period of time from stroke onset, side and severity of paresis, activities of daily living, and basic ability to walk, as well as each patient's approximate number of hours walking per day, were collected. Electrophysiological evaluation was performed via nerve conduction studies of the median, ulnar, and radial nerves. The clinical features were compared between patients with and without peripheral neuropathies. Twelve patients (43%) had peripheral neuropathies involving a total of 15 nerves. There was no difference in age, duration of hemiparesis, side and severity of paresis, Barthel index, and Functional Ambulation Classification between the 2 groups. Abnormalities were absent in the patients who walked at or less than an hour but were present in 50% and 63.4% of patients with walking times of 1-2 hours and more than 2 hours, respectively. Excessive use of a T-cane or a Lofstrand crutch was hypothesized to induce entrapment neuropathies in the nonparetic upper extremity. To prevent these injuries, a well-balanced gait should be established to reduce the load on the walking device. Copyright © 2015 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. AN EXTREMAL REGION FOR UNIVALENT FUNCTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miodrag IOVANOV

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Let S be the class of functions f(z=z+22a z + …,f(0=0 , f′(0=1 which are regular andunivalent in the unit disk |z|0 we consider the equation:Re [( 2 2 x a f x ] 0 , f S , x 1,1 .Denote φ(x= Re [( 2 2 x a f x ].Because φ(0=0 and φ( a=0 it follows that there is y (-a,0 such that φ′( y=0 and z (0, a suchthat (z 0.The aim of this paper is to find min{y| φ′( y=0}and max{z| φ′( z=0}[3].If y and z is min{y| φ′(y=0}, respectively max{z| φ′(z=0} then for x z the equation φ′( x=0 doesnot have real roots. Since S is a compact class, there exists .This problem was first proposed by Petru T. Mocanu .We will determine by using the variational method ofSchiffer-Goluzin .

  12. Shoulder muscle recruitment patterns and related biomechanics during upper extremity sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escamilla, Rafael F; Andrews, James R

    2009-01-01

    Understanding when and how much shoulder muscles are active during upper extremity sports is helpful to physicians, therapists, trainers and coaches in providing appropriate treatment, training and rehabilitation protocols to these athletes. This review focuses on shoulder muscle activity (rotator cuff, deltoids, pectoralis major, latissimus dorsi, triceps and biceps brachii, and scapular muscles) during the baseball pitch, the American football throw, the windmill softball pitch, the volleyball serve and spike, the tennis serve and volley, baseball hitting, and the golf swing. Because shoulder electromyography (EMG) data are far more extensive for overhead throwing activities compared with non-throwing upper extremity sports, much of this review focuses on shoulder EMG during the overhead throwing motion. Throughout this review shoulder kinematic and kinetic data (when available) are integrated with shoulder EMG data to help better understand why certain muscles are active during different phases of an activity, what type of muscle action (eccentric or concentric) occurs, and to provide insight into the shoulder injury mechanism. Kinematic, kinetic and EMG data have been reported extensively during overhead throwing, such as baseball pitching and football passing. Because shoulder forces, torques and muscle activity are generally greatest during the arm cocking and arm deceleration phases of overhead throwing, it is believed that most shoulder injuries occur during these phases. During overhead throwing, high rotator cuff muscle activity is generated to help resist the high shoulder distractive forces approximately 80-120% bodyweight during the arm cocking and deceleration phases. During arm cocking, peak rotator cuff activity is 49-99% of a maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) in baseball pitching and 41-67% MVIC in football throwing. During arm deceleration, peak rotator cuff activity is 37-84% MVIC in baseball pitching and 86-95% MVIC in football

  13. Arm positions and movement analysis that are used on the upper extremity in Bolu women dances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Ötken

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Folk dances are the cultural products that are created by the people and transferred from generation to generation. These cultural products have a very rich variety that differs from region to region, in terms of style and type. These differences are tight-knit with the past, civilization level, beliefs and traditions of a society which creates every dance. These differences also reveal themselves on elements, such as the movement styles used during the dance, dance forms, the accompanying music, rhythm and costume. Thus, the differences that are seen on all of these factors appear as the dance richness. Being a part of this richness, Bolu women dances have a remarkable significance among the folk dances, as well.The process of recording and analyzing the movement scientifically has been made with a gradually increasing consciousness in also folk dances, just like in all other disciplines related to the body. Considering that our folk dances have been changing each passing day as a part of the tradition as well, it is inevitable to determine our existing dances in terms of all of the elements that constitute them and hand them down the next generations. Therefore, some of the women dances of the region of Bolu, Which is a small city in Turkey, will be discussed in terms of the factor of movement that constitutes the dance and examined in this article. The arm positions that are used on the upper extremity which is one of the main parts of the body in the dances of Adayolu, Men men, Karaköy Sekmesi, Ziller, Estireyim mi, Halimem, Değirmen and Ördek that are still being performed by women in the center and villages of Bolu, were determined through being assessed via some video images that are shot during various shows and competitions. These determined positions were exposed by digital camera records that were taken for this study one by one and the determined visual material was computerized with the help of various programs. After this phase

  14. Arm positions and movement analysis that are used on the upper extremity in Bolu women dances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihal Ötken

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Folk dances are the cultural products that are created by the people and transferred from generation to generation. These cultural products have a very rich variety that differ from region to region, in terms of style and type. These differences are tight-knit with the past, civilization level, beliefs and traditions of a society which creates every dance. These differences also reveal themselves on elements, such as the movement styles used during the dance, dance forms, the accompanying music, rhythm and costume. Thus, the differences that are seen on all of these factors appear as the dance richness. Being a part of this richness, Bolu women dances have a remarkable significance among the folk dances, as well. The process of recording and analysing the movement scientifically has been made with a gradually increasing consciousness in also folk dances, just like in all other disciplines related to the body. Considering that our folk dances have been changing each passing day as a part of the tradition as well, it is inevitable to determine our existing dances in terms of all of the elements that constitute them and hand them down the next generations. Therefore, some of the women dances of the region of Bolu, Which is a small city in Turkey, will be discussed in terms of the factor of movement that constitutes the dance and examined in this article. The arm positions that are used on the upper extremity which is one of the main parts of the body in the dances of Adayolu, Men men, Karaköy Sekmesi, Ziller, Estireyim mi, Halimem, Değirmen and Ördek that are still being performed by women in the center and villages of Bolu, were determined through being assessed via some video images that are shot during various shows and competitions. These determined positions were exposed by digital camera records that were taken for this study one by one and the determined visual material was computerized with the help of various programs. After this

  15. Evaluation of therapies of modified constraint-induced movement therapy, constraint-induced movement therapy and Bobath in the improvement of motor function in upper extremities in patients with apoplexy hemiparalysis%三种康复治疗对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢运动功能的改善情况

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王文清; 张欣; 李艳双; 姚艳华; 柴叶红; 王宏卫

    2010-01-01

    therapies( modified constraint-induced movement therapy (mCIMT), constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) and Bobath therapies)on the recovery of motor function in upper-extremities of patients with apoplexy hemiparalysis. Methods Fifty-seven patients with apoplexy hemiparalysis were randomly divided into CIMT treatment group ( n = 19), mCIMT group (n = 19) and Bobath group (n = 19). Patients in Bobath group exercised 2 h/d, 5 d/week for 6 weeks. CIMT group and mCIMT group had restriction of movement at the unimpaired upper extremity by placing it in a sling a whole day for training using impaired extremity. Patients in CIMT treatment group exercised 6 h/d,5 days a week for 2 weeks in a row; mCIMT treatment group exercised for 1 h/d, 3 days a week, and also exercised in daily life at least 2 hours every day, for ten consecutive weeks. The patients in all three groups were assessed for upper-extremities motor function using FMA of Fugl-Meyer, for recovery of upperextremities motor speed using STEF and for recovery of daily ability at respective time-points of pre-treatment and the second week, sixth week and tenth week of post-treatment. Results In 3 assessments in the 3 groups there was no obvious change before treatment, while the FMA score was 45. 2 ± 5.1 (F = 1. 107 ,P =0. 382), BI score was 63. 1 ± 10. 3 ( F = 0. 930, P = 0. 401 ), STEF score was 63.4 ± 8.6 ( F = 1. 843, P =0. 168). At the second week, sixth week and tenth week of the treatment, the difference of assessment in the three groups was significant. The improvement in CIMT group was better after 2 weeks treatment compared with Bobath and mCIMT group, while the Bobath group showed better results than mCIMT group did after 6 weeks treatment. After 10 weeks treatment, the FMA, STEF in mCIMT and CIMT groups were improved better than Bobath group, while the BI score in mCIMT group was better than that in Bobath and CIMT group. Conclusions The mCIMT and CIMT therapy are better in improving the upper limb

  16. Muscle activation patterns of the upper and lower extremity during the windmill softball pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary A; Keeley, David W

    2011-06-01

    Fast-pitch softball has become an increasingly popular sport for female athletes. There has been little research examining the windmill softball pitch in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the muscle activation patterns of 3 upper extremity muscles (biceps, triceps, and rhomboids [scapular stabilizers]) and 2 lower extremity muscles (gluteus maximus and medius) during the 5 phases of the windmill softball pitch. Data describing muscle activation were collected on 7 postpubescent softball pitchers (age 17.7 ± 2.6 years; height 169 ± 5.4 cm; mass 69.1 ± 5.4 kg). Surface electromyographic data were collected using a Myopac Jr 10-channel amplifier (RUN Technologies Scientific Systems, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) synchronized with The MotionMonitor™ motion capture system (Innovative Sports Training Inc, Chicago IL, USA) and presented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Gluteus maximus activity reached (196.3% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]), whereas gluteus medius activity was consistent during the single leg support of phase 3 (101.2% MVIC). Biceps brachii activity was greatest during phase 4 of the pitching motion. Triceps brachii activation was consistently >150% MVIC throughout the entire pitching motion, whereas the scapular stabilizers were most active during phase 2 (170.1% MVIC). The results of this study indicate the extent to which muscles are activated during the windmill softball pitch, and this knowledge can lead to the development of proper preventative and rehabilitative muscle strengthening programs. In addition, clinicians will be able to incorporate strengthening exercises that mimic the timing of maximal muscle activation most used during the windmill pitching phases.

  17. High-fidelity numerical modeling of the Upper Mississippi River under extreme flood condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosronejad, Ali; Le, Trung; DeWall, Petra; Bartelt, Nicole; Woldeamlak, Solomon; Yang, Xiaolei; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2016-12-01

    We present data-driven numerical simulations of extreme flooding in a large-scale river coupling coherent-structure resolving hydrodynamics with bed morphodynamics under live-bed conditions. The study area is a ∼ 3.2 km long and ∼ 300 m wide reach of the Upper Mississippi River, near Minneapolis MN, which contains several natural islands and man-made hydraulic structures. We employ the large-eddy simulation (LES) and bed-morphodynamic modules of the Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS-Rivers) model, a recently developed in-house code, to investigate the flow and bed evolution of the river during a 100-year flood event. The coupling of the two modules is carried out via a fluid-structure interaction approach using a nested domain approach to enhance the resolution of bridge scour predictions. We integrate data from airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR), sub-aqueous sonar apparatus on-board a boat and in-situ laser scanners to construct a digital elevation model of the river bathymetry and surrounding flood plain, including islands and bridge piers. A field campaign under base-flow condition is also carried out to collect mean flow measurements via Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to validate the hydrodynamic module of the VFS-Rivers model. Our simulation results for the bed evolution of the river under the 100-year flood reveal complex sediment transport dynamics near the bridge piers consisting of both scour and refilling events due to the continuous passage of sand dunes. We find that the scour depth near the bridge piers can reach to a maximum of ∼ 9 m. The data-driven simulation strategy we present in this work exemplifies a practical simulation-based-engineering-approach to investigate the resilience of infrastructures to extreme flood events in intricate field-scale riverine systems.

  18. Effect of Rehabilitation Nursing and Injection Therapy on the Promoting of Upper Extremity Motor Function in t he Hemiplegic Shoulder Pain Patient%康复护理配合局部注射对脑卒中偏瘫肩痛患者上肢功能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张云; 黄嘉

    2016-01-01

    目的:探讨康复护理结合肩周局部药物注射对脑卒中偏瘫肩痛患者上肢功能的影响。方法选取2012年1月-2014年8月该科住院治疗的脑卒中后偏瘫肩痛患者28例为治疗组,回顾性选取2011年1月-2012年4月该科住院治疗的脑卒中后偏瘫肩痛患者30例为对照组。对照组给予常规康复治疗。治疗组在常规康复治疗基础上,给予康复护理措施及肩周局部痛点药物注射。于治疗前、治疗3d、1周、4周时分别采取数字模拟疼痛评分( NRS)、Fugl-Meyer运动功能评分( FMA)、Barthel指数( ADL BI)、汉密尔顿抑郁评定量表( HAMD)对2组患者的上肢功能、ADL 能力、情绪进行评定。结果治疗前2组患者在NRS、FMA、MBI、HAMD评分之间比较,差异无统计学意义(P>0.05)。治疗后,2组患者NRS、FMA、MBI、HAMD评分均较治疗前有所改善(P<0.05),且治疗组均优于对照组(P<0.05)。2组患者的肩痛程度NRS积分低于治疗前(P<0.01),且治疗组3天及1周、4周时疼痛改善程度均优于对照组(P<0.05)。结论局部注射结合康复护理对脑卒中偏瘫肩痛患者上肢功能有一定的改善作用。%Objective To explore the effect of rehabilitation nursing and injection therapy of shoulder on the promo-ting of upper extremity motor function in the hemiplegic shoulder pain patients.Methods 28 cases of stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain which were selected from the inpatients ( from 2012to 2014 ) were divided into observation group . The other 30 cases of stroke patients with hemiplegic shoulder pain which were retrospectively selected from the inpatients ( from2011to 2012 ) were divided into control group.The control group was treated with conventional rehabilitation exercise program.The observation group was treated with rehabilitation nursing and injection therapy of the pain shoulder on the basis of conventional

  19. Randomized trial of a robotic assistive device for the upper extremity during early inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masiero, Stefano; Armani, Mario; Ferlini, Gregorio; Rosati, Giulio; Rossi, Aldo

    2014-05-01

    A recent Cochrane Review showed that early robotic training of the upper limb in stroke survivors can be more effective than other interventions when improving activities of daily living involving the arm function is the aim of therapy. We tested for efficacy of the study a protocol which involved the use of the NeReBot therapy in partial substitution of standard upper limb rehabilitation in post-acute stroke patients. In this dose-matched, randomized controlled clinical trial, 34 hemiparetic participants with movement against gravity in shoulder, elbow, and wrist muscle groups were enrolled within 15 days of the onset of stroke. All participants received a total daily rehabilitation treatment for 120 minutes, 5 days per week for 5 weeks. The control group received standard therapy for the upper limb. The experimental group received standard therapy (65% of exercise time) associated with robotic training (35% of exercise time). Muscle tone (Modified Ashworth Scale), strength (Medical Research Council), and synergism (Fugl-Meyer motor scores) were measured at impairment level, whereas dexterity (Box and Block Test and Frenchay Arm Test) and activities of daily living (Functional Independence Measure) were measured at activity level. All assessments were performed at baseline, at the end of therapy (time T1), at 3 months (time T2), and at 7 months (time T3) after entry. All between-group analyses were tested using nonparametric test with Bonferroni's adjustments for multiple testing. No significant between-group differences were found with respect to demographic characteristics, motor, dexterity, and ADLs at baseline, postintervention (T1) and at follow-up (T2 and T3). The robot therapy by NeReBot did not lead to better outcomes compared with conventional inpatient rehabilitation.

  20. Validity and intra- and interobserver reliability of an indirect volume measurements in patients with upper extremity lymphedema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.S.; Rietman, J.S.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Bosmans, J.C.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated a method of indirect volume measurement that utilized surface measurements and a simplified formula derived from the formula for a frustum (Sitzia's method) to determine limb volumes in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema of the upper extremity. Repeated measurements of up

  1. Do work-related factors affect care-seeking in general practice for back pain or upper extremity pain?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J. C.; Haahr, J. P.; Frost, P.

    2012-01-01

    . Repetitive work and psychosocial factors did not have any statistically significant impact on care-seeking for neither back pain nor upper extremity pain. CONCLUSION: Work-related factors such as heavy lifting do, to some extent, contribute to care-seeking with MP. We suggest that asking the patient about...

  2. Does Training of the Nondominant Upper Extremity Reduce the Surgeon's Muscular Strain During Laparoscopy?: Results From a Randomized Controlled Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieboer, T.E.; Massa, M.; Weinans, M.J.; Vierhout, M.E.; Kluivers, K.B.; Stegeman, D.F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In laparoscopy, suboptimal ergonomics frequently lead to morbidity for surgeons. Physical complaints are more commonly reported on the dominant upper extremity. This may be the consequence of challenging laparoscopic tasks being easier to perform with the dominant side. The authors hyp

  3. Stimulus-response characteristics of motor evoked potentials and silent periods in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.A. van; Anker, L.C.; Pasman, J.W.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare stimulus-response characteristics of both motor evoked potentials (MEP) and silent periods (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles. METHODS: Stimulus-response curves of MEPs and SPs were obtained from the biceps bra

  4. Validity and intra- and interobserver reliability of an indirect volume measurements in patients with upper extremity lymphedema

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.S.; Rietman, J.S.; Geertzen, J.H.B.; Bosmans, J.C.; Dijkstra, P.U.

    We investigated a method of indirect volume measurement that utilized surface measurements and a simplified formula derived from the formula for a frustum (Sitzia's method) to determine limb volumes in patients with breast cancer-related lymphedema of the upper extremity. Repeated measurements of

  5. ISAKOS upper extremity committee consensus statement on the need for diversification of the Rockwood classification for acromioclavicular joint injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Bak, Klaus;

    2014-01-01

    the coracoclavicular and AC ligaments. The ISAKOS Upper Extremity Committee has provided a more specific classification of shoulder pathologies to enhance the knowledge on and clinical approach to these injuries. We suggest the addition of grade IIIA and grade IIIB injuries to a modified Rockwood classification. Grade...

  6. SENSITIVITY OF COMPUTER ESTHESIOMETRY ON DISTAL PARTS OF THE UPPER EXTREMITIES AT PATIENTS WITH HEREDITARY NEUROPATHY CHARCOT-MARIE-TOOTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NATALIA SHNAYDER

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose: to define the diagnostic importance of computer esthesiometry for use in diagnostics of hereditary neuropathy with primary defeat of myelin sheath of peripheral nerves of the upper extremities. Materials and methods: 47 individuals in a condition of relative health (control group from 21 to 50 years, comparable group % 40 patients from 6 to 81 years, with hereditary neuropathy Charcot%Marie%Tooth (CMT. Vibrating sensitivity was investigated by means of computer vibrometer “Vibrotester MBN” VТ%02%1 (MBN, RF in a wide strip of frequencies of vibration (8, 16, 32, 64, 125, 250, 500 Hz. Statistical data processing of research was lead by means of programs STATISTICA v. 7.0 (StatSoft, USA. Results and discussion: We compared received corridors vibrating sensitivity on the upper extremities for healthy volunteers with those at patients with CMT. Statistically significant increase of vibration sensitivity thresholds in a wide range of vibration frequencies on upper extremities and at patients with CMT versus healthy volunteers is shown. Computer esthesiometry method demonstrates high sensitivity in diagnostics of hereditary neuropathy with primary damage of myelin sheath of peripheral nerves of upper extremities on an example of CMT.

  7. Stimulus-response characteristics of motor evoked potentials and silent periods in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijk, A.A. van; Anker, L.C.; Pasman, J.W.; Hendriks, J.C.M.; Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Geurts, A.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare stimulus-response characteristics of both motor evoked potentials (MEP) and silent periods (SP) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in proximal and distal upper-extremity muscles. METHODS: Stimulus-response curves of MEPs and SPs were obtained from the biceps bra

  8. Reliability of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test for Children with Cerebral Palsy Aged 2 to 12 Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorley, Megan; Lannin, Natasha; Cusick, Anne; Novak, Iona; Boyd, Roslyn

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate reliability of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) scores for children with cerebral palsy (CP) aged 2-12 years. Method: Thirty-one QUESTs from 24 children with CP were rated once by two raters and twice by one rater. Internal consistency of total scores, inter- and intra-rater reliability findings for total,…

  9. Upper extremity neurodynamic tests: range of motion asymmetry may not indicate impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covill, Laura G; Petersen, Shannon M

    2012-10-01

    Upper extremity (UE) neurodynamic tests are used to examine neural tissue in patients with neuro-musculoskeletal disorders. Although comparisons between involved and uninvolved limbs are made clinically, minimal data exist reflecting the normal variation between sides. The purpose of this study was to determine if within-subject differences exist between limbs in the UE component of neurodynamic tests of the median, radial, and ulnar nerves. Sixty-one healthy subjects were examined. Difference between limbs for the median nerve-biased test was significant (right=16.4° ± 11.4°, left=20.1° ± 13.7°; p=0.045). There was no significant difference between limbs for the radial or ulnar nerve-biased tests. Correlation between limbs was poor for all tests (median r(2) =0.14; radial r(2) =0.20; ulnar r(2) =0.13). Lower-bound scores were calculated to determine the amount of difference needed to consider asymmetry beyond measurement error; the scores for each neurodynamic test were as follows: median 27°, radial 20°, and ulnar 21°. The results of this study show that between-limb values have low correlation and that it may be normal for an individual to have range of motion differences between limbs with neurodynamic tests.

  10. Ergonomic task reduction prevents bone osteopenia in a rat model of upper extremity overuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbe, Mary F; Jain, Nisha X; Massicotte, Vicky S; Popoff, Steven N; Barr-Gillespie, Ann E

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of ergonomic workload reduction of switching rats from a high repetition high force (HRHF) lever pulling task to a reduced force and reach rate task for preventing task-induced osteopenic changes in distal forelimb bones. Distal radius and ulna trabecular structure was examined in young adult rats performing one of three handle-pulling tasks for 12 wk: (1) HRHF, (2) low repetition low force (LRLF); or (3) HRHF for 4 wk and than LRLF thereafter (HRHF-to-LRLF). Results were compared to age-matched controls rats. Distal forelimb bones of 12-wk HRHF rats showed increased trabecular resorption and decreased volume, as control rats. HRHF-to-LRLF rats had similar trabecular bone quality as control rats; and decreased bone resorption (decreased trabecular bone volume and serum CTX1), increased bone formation (increased mineral apposition, bone formation rate, and serum osteocalcin), and decreased osteoclasts and inflammatory cytokines, than HRHF rats. Thus, an ergonomic intervention of HRHF-to-LRLF prevented loss of trabecular bone volume occurring with prolonged performance of a repetitive upper extremity task. These findings support the idea of reduced workload as an effective approach to management of work-related musculoskeletal disorders, and begin to define reach rate and load level boundaries for such interventions.

  11. MR Imaging of the cervical cord in juvenile amyotrophy of distal upper extremity.

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    Biondi, A; Dormont, D; Weitzner, I; Bouche, P; Chaine, P; Bories, J

    1989-01-01

    We report the MR studies of the cervical cord in seven patients presenting juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity. This illness, also known as monomelic amyotrophy or benign focal amyotrophy, is distinct from the other motor neuron diseases. Seen in young males, it is characterized by muscular atrophy of the hand, and usually of the forearm, most often unilateral. The underlying process, of unknown origin, affects the anterior horn cells in the lower cervical cord. The gradual onset of purely motor disturbances may mimic early amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This latter diagnosis may be excluded because of clinical stabilization and lack of pyramidal tract involvement. In our series, five MR studies were positive. In three cases we were able to demonstrate focal and unilateral atrophy in the lower cervical cord limited to the anterior horn region. Morphologic MR findings correlated with clinical and electromyographic features. In two other cases the MR-clinical correlation was more complex. No pathologic MR signal was detected on either T1- or T2-weighted images. Although the diagnosis of monomelic muscular atrophy is based on neurologic and neurophysiologic data, MR provides confirmatory evidence as well as useful information contributing to an understanding of this disease.

  12. The effects of rear-wheel camber on the kinematics of upper extremity during wheelchair propulsion

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    Tsai Chung-Ying

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rear-wheel camber, defined as the inclination of the rear wheels, is usually used in wheelchair sports, but it is becoming increasingly employed in daily propulsion. Although the rear-wheel camber can increase stability, it alters physiological performance during propulsion. The purpose of the study is to investigate the effects of rear-wheel cambers on temporal-spatial parameters, joint angles, and propulsion patterns. Methods Twelve inexperienced subjects (22.3±1.6 yr participated in the study. None had musculoskeletal disorders in their upper extremities. An eight-camera motion capture system was used to collect the three-dimensional trajectory data of markers attached to the wheelchair-user system during propulsion. All participants propelled the same wheelchair, which had an instrumented wheel with cambers of 0°, 9°, and 15°, respectively, at an average velocity of 1 m/s. Results The results show that the rear-wheel camber significantly affects the average acceleration, maximum end angle, trunk movement, elbow joint movement, wrist joint movement, and propulsion pattern. The effects are especially significant between 0° and 15°. For a 15° camber, the average acceleration and joint peak angles significantly increased (p Conclusions The rear-wheel camber affects propulsion patterns and joint range of motion. When choosing a wheelchair with camber adjustment, the increase of joint movements and the base of support should be taken into consideration.

  13. Bone multicentric epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the lower and upper extremities with pulmonary metastases: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, HUA; FU, YANBIAO; YE, ZHAOMING

    2015-01-01

    The present study reports a rare case of bone multicentric epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EH) involving the upper and lower extremities simultaneously, with visceral involvement of the lung. Osteolytic lesions were first identified in the right distal femur and proximal tibia. Slight increased radionuclide uptake was observed in the right shoulder joint on bone scintigraphy, however, this was ignored, as no clinical symptoms were present. The patient was initially misdiagnosed with multifocal chondroblastoma, and an extra-articular curettage of lesions was performed in the proximal tibia and medial femoral condyle, which was filled with bone cement. The histopathological diagnosis was corrected post-operatively following immunohistochemical analysis, which indicated EH, and subsequently, an amputation of the right leg at thigh level was performed. In addition, multiple lytic lesions in the right shoulder joint and pulmonary metastases were identified on whole-body radiological examination. Radiotherapy was administered to the right shoulder joint, however, the patient refused chemotherapy or further surgery. At 15 months after the initial surgery, the patient currently remains alive. This case indicates that an improved understanding with regard to the clinical features of this disease may prevent misdiagnosis and improve EH treatment. PMID:26137035

  14. Video Recording With a GoPro in Hand and Upper Extremity Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vara, Alexander D; Wu, John; Shin, Alexander Y; Sobol, Gregory; Wiater, Brett

    2016-10-01

    Video recordings of surgical procedures are an excellent tool for presentations, analyzing self-performance, illustrating publications, and educating surgeons and patients. Recording the surgeon's perspective with high-resolution video in the operating room or clinic has become readily available and advances in software improve the ease of editing these videos. A GoPro HERO 4 Silver or Black was mounted on a head strap and worn over the surgical scrub cap, above the loupes of the operating surgeon. Five live surgical cases were recorded with the camera. The videos were uploaded to a computer and subsequently edited with iMovie or the GoPro software. The optimal settings for both the Silver and Black editions, when operating room lights are used, were determined to be a narrow view, 1080p, 60 frames per second (fps), spot meter on, protune on with auto white balance, exposure compensation at -0.5, and without a polarizing lens. When the operating room lights were not used, it was determined that the standard settings for a GoPro camera were ideal for positioning and editing (4K, 15 frames per second, spot meter and protune off). The GoPro HERO 4 provides high-quality, the surgeon perspective, and a cost-effective video recording of upper extremity surgical procedures. Challenges include finding the optimal settings for each surgical procedure and the length of recording due to battery life limitations.

  15. 不对称性等速肌力训练对恢复期偏瘫患者上肢运动功能的影响%Effect of Asymmetry Isokinetic Muscle Strength Exercise for Motor Function of Upper Extremity in Chronic Stroke Patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱燕; 丁莹; 强乙; 吴云鹏; 秦蓓瑛

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the therapeutic effects of asymmetry isokinetic muscle strength exercise for upper extremity motor function of stroke patients with hemiplegia and to compare the effects of asymmetry isokinetic muscle strength exercise with conventional rehabilitation.Methods: Fifty stroke patients with hemiplegia were divided into experimental group and control group, 25 cases in each group.The control group was treated with conventional rehabilitation, and the experimental group received asymmetry isokinetic muscle strength exercise (i.e.elbow flexion, 210°/s× 10, elbow extension 60°/s× 10, 3-4 cycles a day, 3 times every week) for 4 weeks in addition to the conventional rehabilitation.The Biodex multi-joint system Ⅲ, Fugl-Meyer assessment scale and Modified Ashworth Scale were used in two groups before and after treatment.Results: The experimental group got improvement both in isokinetic muscle strength and Fugl-Meyer assessment scale score as compared with the control group (P<0.05).Besides, the Modified Ashworth Scale score was not increased in both two groups.Conclusion: Asymmetry isokinetic muscle strength exercise could be used to train upper extremity of hemiplegic patients.%目的:研究不对称性等速肌力训练结合促通技术对脑卒中偏瘫患者上肢运动功能障碍的作用.方法:恢复期脑卒中偏瘫患者50例,随机分为A、B 2组各25例,均给予神经促通技术及有氧运动训练;A组配合不对称性等速肌力训练,即屈肘角速度为210°/s,伸肘角速度为60°/ s,10个肘屈伸动作为一轮,每日3~4轮,每周3次.治疗前后使用BIODEX Ⅲ等速仪检测2组患者肘屈伸的各生物力学指标;Fugl-Meyer量表(FMA)及改良Ashworth痉挛量表评分评定患侧上肢运动功能及肌张力.结果:经过4周治疗后,各生物力学指标2组均有改善,A组明显优于B组(P<0.05);FMA积分,2组均较治疗前明显提高,A组高于B组(均P<0.05);改良Ashworth痉挛量表评分,2

  16. Upper extremity sarcoma: impact of current practice guidelines and controversies on reconstructive approaches

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    Dobke Marek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goals of sarcoma management include both a cure and the functional preservation of involved tissues and adjacent critical structures with common opinions favoring immediate reconstruction. The question arises whether these goals are contradictory. This paper discusses the question based on the experience of 28 patients with different types of extremity sarcoma, with 24 surgically treated by the University of California San Diego (UCSD orthopedic and plastic surgery team (2011–2016 and the collection of evidence from published practice guidelines, reviews, case studies, and clinical trials. Included are the impact of limb-sparing and functional reconstructive concepts, efforts regarding the adequacy of surgical margins, and the rationale of immediate versus delayed reconstructive approaches, and the disease-free status of sarcoma management.

  17. Giving Them a Hand: Wearing a Myoelectric Elbow-Wrist-Hand Orthosis Reduces Upper Extremity Impairment in Chronic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Heather T; Page, Stephen J; Persch, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    To determine the immediate effect of a portable, myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis on paretic upper extremity (UE) impairment in chronic, stable, moderately impaired stroke survivors. Observational cohort study. Outpatient rehabilitation clinic. Participants exhibiting chronic, moderate, stable, poststroke, UE hemiparesis (N=18). Subjects were administered a battery of measures testing UE impairment and function. They then donned a fabricated myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis and were again tested on the same battery of measures while wearing the device. The primary outcome measure was the UE Section of the Fugl-Meyer Scale. Subjects were also administered a battery of functional tasks and the Box and Block (BB) test. Subjects exhibited significantly reduced UE impairment while wearing the myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis (FM: t17=8.56, P<.0001) and increased quality in performing all functional tasks while wearing the myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis, with 3 subtasks showing significant increases (feeding [grasp]: z=2.251, P=.024; feeding [elbow]: z=2.966, P=.003; drinking [grasp]: z=3.187, P=.001). Additionally, subjects showed significant decreases in time taken to grasp a cup (z=1.286, P=.016) and increased gross manual dexterity while wearing a myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis (BB test: z=3.42, P<.001). Results suggest that UE impairment, as measured by the Fugl-Meyer Scale, is significantly reduced when donning a myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis, and these changes exceeded the Fugl-Meyer Scale's clinically important difference threshold. Further, utilization of a myoelectric elbow-wrist-hand orthosis significantly increased gross manual dexterity and performance of certain functional tasks. Future work will integrate education sessions to increase subjects' ability to perform multijoint functional movements and attain consistent functional changes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Potential compensation of hydrological extremes in headwaters: case study of upper Vltava River basin, Šumava Mts., Czechia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocum, Jan; Janský, Bohumír.; Česák, Julius

    2010-05-01

    Increasing frequency of catastrophic flash floods and extreme droughts in recent years results in an urgent need of solving of flood protection questions and measures leading to discharge increase in dry periods. Flattening of discharge call for the use of untraditional practices as a suitable complement to classical engineering methods. These measures could be represented by gradual increase of river catchment retention capacity in headstream areas. Very favorable conditions for this research solution are concentrated to the upper part of Otava River basin (Vltava River left tributary, Šumava Mts., southwestern Czechia) representing the core zone of a number of extreme floods in Central Europe and the area with high peat land proportion. A number of automatic ultrasound and hydrostatic pressure water level gauges, climatic stations and precipitation gauges and utilization of modern equipment and methods were used in chosen experimental catchments to assess the landscape retention potential and to find out rainfall-runoff relations in this area. Successively, the detailed analysis of peat land hydrological function was carried out. The peat bogs influence on runoff conditions were assessed by thorough comparison of runoff regimes in subcatchments with different peat land proportion. The peat bog influence on hydrological process can be considered also with respect to its affecting of water quality. Therefore, hydrological monitoring was completed by ion, carbon (TOC) and oxygen isotopes balance observing within periods of high or low discharges in order to precise runoff phases separation by means of anion deficiency. Pedological survey of different soil types and textures was carried out to precise the estimation of its water capacity. Detailed analyses of extreme runoff ascending and descending phases and minimum discharges in profiles closing several subcatchments with different physical-geographic conditions show higher peak flow frequency and their shorter

  19. Evaluation of the JACO robotic arm: clinico-economic study for powered wheelchair users with upper-extremity disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheu, Veronique; Frappier, Julie; Archambault, Philippe S; Routhier, François

    2011-01-01

    Many activities of daily living, such as picking up glasses, holding a fork or opening a door, which most people do without thinking, can become insurmountable for people who have upper extremity disabilities. The alternative to asking for human help is to use some assistive devices to compensate their loss of mobility; however, many of those devices are limited in terms of functionality. Robotics may provide a better approach for the development of assistive devices, by allowing greater functionality. In this paper, we present results of a study (n=31) which objectives were to evaluate the efficacy of a new joystick-controlled seven-degree of freedom robotic manipulator and assess its potential economic benefits. Results show that JACO is easy to use as the majority of the participants were able to accomplish the testing tasks on their first attempt. The economic model results inferred that the use of the JACO arm system could potentially reduce caregiving time by 41%. These study results are expected to provide valuable data for interested parties, such as individuals with disabilities, their family or caregivers. © 2011 IEEE

  20. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Aquatic exercise and lower-extremity function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, M C; Nicholson, C; Binder, H; White, P H

    1991-06-01

    This pilot study investigates the effects of aquatic therapeutic exercise on lower-extremity range of motion, gait, balance, and functional mobility in children with juvenile arthritis. Eleven patients, aged 4-13, with lower-extremity joint involvement, diagnosed as functional class I-III, completed a 6-week program of aquatic exercise aimed at increasing lower-extremity range of motion and strength. Despite the small sample size and short duration of the study program, significant improvement was noted in external and internal hip rotation, bilaterally (p Aquatic exercises performed in a group setting can serve as an enjoyable and beneficial part of therapy for children with arthritis. Further investigation is recommended to determine fully the effects of aquatic therapeutic exercise on mobility and fitness in children with juvenile arthritis.

  1. Acute deep venous thrombosis of the upper extremity as demonstrated by scintigraphy with {sup 99m}Tc-apcitide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunzinger, A.; Piswanger-Soelkner, J.; Lipp, R. [Medical Univ. Graz (Austria). Div. of Nuclear Medicine; Hafner, F.; Brodmann, M. [Medical Univ. Graz (Austria). Div. of Angiology

    2008-07-01

    With an incidence of 0.7% inhabitants per year, acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a common occurrence (20). Its incidence in the upper extremities, however, is not as precisely known; the literature reports that 1% to 10% of all DVT cases involve the upper limbs. Acute DVT of upper limb is mainly iatro-genic following interventions like implantation of pacemakers or central venous catheters, and is more likely to occur in obese patients or those with malignant diseases. Life-threatening pulmonary embolism (PE) may occur if acute DVT remains undetected. The presented case report demonstrates the feasibility of {sup 9}9mTc-apcitide scintigraphy for diagnosis of acute DVT of the upper limb and exclusion of PE in a single examination.

  2. Validation of a mechanism to balance exercise difficulty in robot-assisted upper-extremity rehabilitation after stroke

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    Zimmerli Lukas

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The motivation of patients during robot-assisted rehabilitation after neurological disorders that lead to impairments of motor functions is of great importance. Due to the increasing number of patients, increasing medical costs and limited therapeutic resources, clinicians in the future may want patients to practice their movements at home or with reduced supervision during their stay in the clinic. Since people only engage in an activity and are motivated to practice if the outcome matches the effort at which they perform, an augmented feedback application for rehabilitation should take the cognitive and physical deficits of patients into account and incorporate a mechanism that is capable of balancing i.e. adjusting the difficulty of an exercise in an augmented feedback application to the patient's capabilities. Methods We propose a computational mechanism based on Fitts' Law that balances i.e. adjusts the difficulty of an exercise for upper-extremity rehabilitation. The proposed mechanism was implemented into an augmented feedback application consisting of three difficulty conditions (easy, balanced, hard. The task of the exercise was to reach random targets on the screen from a starting point within a specified time window. The available time was decreased with increasing condition difficulty. Ten subacute stroke patients were recruited to validate the mechanism through a study. Cognitive and motor functions of patients were assessed using the upper extremity section of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the modified Ashworth scale as well as the Addenbrookes cognitive examination-revised. Handedness of patients was obtained using the Edinburgh handedness inventory. Patients' performance during the execution of the exercises was measured twice, once for the paretic and once for the non-paretic arm. Results were compared using a two-way ANOVA. Post hoc analysis was performed using a Tukey HSD with a significance level of p Results

  3. Robot-aided assessment of lower extremity functions: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggioni, S.; Melendez-Calderon, A.; Asseldonk, van E.H.F.; Klamroth-Marganska, V.; Lünenburger, L.; Riener, R.; Kooij, van der H.

    2016-01-01

    The assessment of sensorimotor functions is extremely important to understand the health status of a patient and its change over time. Assessments are necessary to plan and adjust the therapy in order to maximize the chances of individual recovery. Nowadays, however, assessments are seldom used in c

  4. Double muscle transfer for upper extremity reconstruction following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, K; Kuwata, N; Muramatsu, K; Hottori, Y; Kawai, S

    1999-11-01

    Recent interest in reconstruction of the upper limb following brachial plexus injuries has focused on the restoration of prehension following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. The authors use free muscle transfers for reconstruction of the upper limb to resolve the difficult problems in complete avulsion of the brachial plexus. This article describes the authors' updated technique--the double free muscle procedure. Reconstruction of prehension to achieve independent voluntary finger and elbow flexion and extension by the use of double free muscle and multiple nerve transfers following complete avulsion of the brachial plexus (nerve roots C5 to T1) is presented. The procedure involves transferring the first free muscle, neurotized by the spinal accessory nerve for elbow flexion and finger extension, a second free muscle transfer reinnervated by the fifth and sixth intercostal nerves for finger flexion, and neurotization of the triceps brachii via its motor nerve by the third and fourth intercostal motor nerves to extend and stabilize the elbow. Restoration of hand sensibility is obtained via the suturing of sensory rami from the intercostal nerves to the median nerve. Secondary reconstruction, including arthrodesis of the carpometacarpal joint of the thumb and glenohumeral joint, and tenolysis of the transferred muscle and distal tendons, improve the functional outcome. Based on the long-term result, selection of the patient, donor muscle, and donor motor nerve were indicated. Most patients were able to achieve prehensile functions such as holding a can and lifting a heavy box. This double free muscle transfer has provided prehension for patients with complete avulsion of the brachial plexus and has given them new hope to be able to use their otherwise useless limbs.

  5. Accelerometer measurement of upper extremity movement after stroke: a systematic review of clinical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorkõiv, Marika; Rodgers, Helen; Price, Christopher I

    2014-10-09

    The aim of this review was to identify and summarise publications, which have reported clinical applications of upper limb accelerometry for stroke within free-living environments and make recommendations for future studies. Data was searched from MEDLINE, Scopus, IEEExplore and Compendex databases. The final search was 31st October 2013. Any study was included which reported clinical assessments in parallel with accelerometry in a free-living hospital or home setting. Study quality is reflected by participant numbers, methodological approach, technical details of the equipment used, blinding of clinical measures, whether safety and compliance data was collected. First author screened articles for inclusion and inclusion of full text articles and data extraction was confirmed by the third author. Out of 1375 initial abstracts, 8 articles were included. All participants were stroke patients. Accelerometers were worn for either 24 hours or 3 days. Data were collected as summed acceleration counts over a specified time or as the duration of active/inactive periods. Activity in both arms was reported by all studies and the ratio of impaired to unimpaired arm activity was calculated in six studies. The correlation between clinical assessments and accelerometry was tested in five studies and significant correlations were found. The efficacy of a rehabilitation intervention was assessed using accelerometry by three studies: in two studies both accelerometry and clinical test scores detected a post-treatment difference but in one study accelerometry data did not change despite clinical test scores showing motor and functional improvements. Further research is needed to understand the additional value of accelerometry as a measure of upper limb use and function in a clinical context. A simple and easily interpretable accelerometry approach is required.

  6. Testing the concurrent validity of a naturalistic upper extremity reaching task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, S Y; Hengge, C R

    2016-01-01

    Point-to-point reaching has been widely used to study upper extremity motor control. We have been developing a naturalistic reaching task that adds tool manipulation and object transport to this established paradigm. The purpose of this study was to determine the concurrent validity of a naturalistic reaching task in a sample of healthy adults. This task was compared to the criterion measure of standard point-to-point reaching. Twenty-eight adults performed unconstrained out-and-back movements in three different directions relative to constant start location along midline using their nondominant arm. In the naturalistic task, participants manipulated a tool to transport objects sequentially between physical targets anchored to the planar workspace. In the standard task, participants moved a digital cursor sequentially between virtual targets, veridical to the planar workspace. In both tasks, the primary measure of performance was trial time, which indicated the time to complete 15 reaches (five cycles of three reaches/target). Two other comparator tasks were also designed to test concurrent validity when components of the naturalistic task were added to the standard task. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients indicated minimal relationship between the naturalistic and standard tasks due to differences in progressive task difficulty. Accounting for this yielded a moderate linear relationship, indicating concurrent validity. The comparator tasks were also related to both the standard and naturalistic task. Thus, the principles of motor control and learning that have been established by the wealth of point-to-point reaching studies can still be applied to the naturalistic task to a certain extent.

  7. Frequency of Painful Shoulder Limitation of Motion after Long Casting of Upper Extremity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Yavarikia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was determination of frequency of painful reduced shoulder motion after long casting of upper extremity and its relation with age , sex and education . The present work was a descriptive analytic prospective study and included 388 patients who referred to Mobasher hospital of Hamadan during 2001. The selected patients in recurrent referring to orthopedic department were classified to 10 age groups and were examined by researcher in 1 , 1.5 and 3 months after treatment and data was collected in check list. The primary data were analyzed with 2 & Anova by employing EPI 6. Out of 388 studied patients 73.5% after 3 months had no mobility limitation and 26.5% had some limitation. There was significant statistical difference in limitation of abduction shoulder joint movement after 1 , 1.5 and 3 months after treatment among 10 different age groups (P<0.05. Mobility limitation of internal rotation after 3 months in 74 cases (19.1%(P=0.0001. Final mobility limitation in 59.5% of female patients and 40.5% of male patients(P=0.001. Mobility limitation in 54.1% of illiterate people , 24.5% under high school diploma and 21.4% high school diploma and higher. Painful limitation of motion in 50-80 year aged is most frequent, then early mobility and physiotherapy in this age range is indicated. There is significant relation between sex and frozen shoulder and it is more common in females also in illiterate people.

  8. Evaluation of upper extremity robot-assistances in subacute and chronic stroke subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Robotic systems are becoming increasingly common in upper extremity stroke rehabilitation. Recent studies have already shown that the use of rehabilitation robots can improve recovery. This paper evaluates the effect of different modes of robot-assistances in a complex virtual environment on the subjects' ability to complete the task as well as on various haptic parameters arising from the human-robot interaction. Methods The MIMICS multimodal system that includes the haptic robot HapticMaster and a dynamic virtual environment is used. The goal of the task is to catch a ball that rolls down a sloped table and place it in a basket above the table. Our study examines the influence of catching assistance, pick-and-place movement assistance and grasping assistance on the catching efficiency, placing efficiency and on movement-dependant parameters: mean reaching forces, deviation error, mechanical work and correlation between the grasping force and the load force. Results The results with groups of subjects (23 subacute hemiparetic subjects, 10 chronic hemiparetic subjects and 23 control subjects) showed that the assistance raises the catching efficiency and pick-and-place efficiency. The pick-and-place movement assistance greatly limits the movements of the subject and results in decreased work toward the basket. The correlation between the load force and the grasping force exists in a certain phase of the movement. The results also showed that the stroke subjects without assistance and the control subjects performed similarly. Conclusions The robot-assistances used in the study were found to be a possible way to raise the catching efficiency and efficiency of the pick-and-place movements in subacute and chronic subjects. The observed movement parameters showed that robot-assistances we used for our virtual task should be improved to maximize physical activity. PMID:20955566

  9. Sonographic and Clinical Features of Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critical Care Patients

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    Michael Blaivas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background-Aim. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT is an increasingly recognized problem in the critically ill. We sought to identify the prevalence of and risk factors for UEDVT, and to characterize sonographically detected thrombi in the critical care setting. Patients and Methods. Three hundred and twenty patients receiving a subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheter (CVC were included. When an UEDVT was detected, therapeutic anticoagulation was started. Additionally, a standardized ultrasound scan was performed to detect the extent of the thrombus. Images were interpreted offline by two independent readers. Results. Thirty-six (11.25% patients had UEDVT and a complete scan was performed. One (2.7% of these patients died, and 2 had pulmonary embolism (5.5%. Risk factors associated with UEDVT were presence of CVC [(odds ratio (OR 2.716, P=0.007], malignancy (OR 1.483, P=0.036, total parenteral nutrition (OR 1.399, P=0.035, hypercoagulable state (OR 1.284, P=0.045, and obesity (OR 1.191, P=0.049. Eight thrombi were chronic, and 28 were acute. We describe a new sonographic sign which characterized acute thrombosis: a double hyperechoic line at the interface between the thrombus and the venous wall; but its clinical significance remains to be defined. Conclusion. Presence of CVC was a strong predictor for the development of UEDVT in a cohort of critical care patients; however, the rate of subsequent PE and related mortality was low.

  10. Hormonal and neuromuscular responses to mechanical vibration applied to upper extremity muscles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Di Giminiani

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the acute residual hormonal and neuromuscular responses exhibited following a single session of mechanical vibration applied to the upper extremities among different acceleration loads. METHODS: Thirty male students were randomly assigned to a high vibration group (HVG, a low vibration group (LVG, or a control group (CG. A randomized double-blind, controlled-parallel study design was employed. The measurements and interventions were performed at the Laboratory of Biomechanics of the University of L'Aquila. The HVG and LVG participants were exposed to a series of 20 trials ×10 s of synchronous whole-body vibration (WBV with a 10-s pause between each trial and a 4-min pause after the first 10 trials. The CG participants assumed an isometric push-up position without WBV. The outcome measures were growth hormone (GH, testosterone, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during bench-press, maximal voluntary isometric contraction during handgrip, and electromyography root-mean-square (EMGrms muscle activity (pectoralis major [PM], triceps brachii [TB], anterior deltoid [DE], and flexor carpi radialis [FCR]. RESULTS: The GH increased significantly over time only in the HVG (P = 0.003. Additionally, the testosterone levels changed significantly over time in the LVG (P = 0.011 and the HVG (P = 0.001. MVC during bench press decreased significantly in the LVG (P = 0.001 and the HVG (P = 0.002. In the HVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the TB (P = 0.006 muscle. In the LVG, the EMGrms decreased significantly in the DE (P = 0.009 and FCR (P = 0.006 muscles. CONCLUSION: Synchronous WBV acutely increased GH and testosterone serum concentrations and decreased the MVC and their respective maximal EMGrms activities, which indicated a possible central fatigue effect. Interestingly, only the GH response was dependent on the acceleration with respect to the subjects' responsiveness.

  11. Ulnar nerve excursion and strain at the elbow and wrist associated with upper extremity motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, T W; Glowczewskie, F; Cowin, D; Wheeler, D L

    2001-07-01

    Significant excursion of the ulnar nerve is required for unimpeded upper extremity motion. This study evaluated the excursion necessary to accommodate common motions of daily living and associated strain on the ulnar nerve. The 2 most common sites of nerve entrapment, the cubital tunnel and the entrance of Guyon's canal, were studied. Five fresh-frozen, thawed transthoracic cadaver specimens (10 arms) were dissected and the nerve was exposed at the elbow and wrist only enough to be marked with a microsuture. Excursion was measured with a laser mounted on a Vernier caliper fixed to the bone and aligned in the direction of nerve motion. A Microstrain (Burlington, VT) DVRT strain device was applied to the nerve at both the elbow and wrist. Nerve excursion associated with motion of the shoulder, elbow, wrist, and fingers (measured by goniometer) was measured at the wrist and elbow. An average of 4.9 mm ulnar nerve excursion was required at the elbow to accommodate shoulder motion from 30 degrees to 110 degrees of abduction, and 5.1 mm was needed for elbow motion from 10 degrees to 90 degrees. When the wrist was moved from 60 degrees of extension to 65 degrees of flexion, 13.6 mm excursion of the ulnar nerve was required at the wrist. When all the motions of the wrist, fingers, elbow, and shoulder were combined, 21.9 mm of ulnar nerve excursion was required at the elbow and 23.2 mm at the wrist. Ulnar nerve strain of 15% or greater was experienced at the elbow with elbow flexion and at the wrist with wrist extension and radial deviation. Any factor that limits excursion at these sites could result in repetitive traction of the nerve and possibly play a role in the pathophysiology of cubital tunnel syndrome or ulnar neuropathy at Guyon's canal.

  12. Upper Limb Assessment in Tetraplegia: Clinical, Functional and Kinematic Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacho, Enio Walker Azevedo; de Oliveira, Roberta; Ortolan, Rodrigo L.; Varoto, Renato; Cliquet, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to correlate clinical and functional evaluations with kinematic variables of upper limp reach-to-grasp movement in patients with tetraplegia. Twenty chronic patients were selected to perform reach-to-grasp kinematic assessment using a target placed at a distance equal to the arm's length. Kinematic variables (hand peak…

  13. Determination of interventions for upper extremity tactile impairment in children with cerebral palsy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Megan L; Russo, Remo; Moseley, G Lorimer; Johnston, Leanne M

    2014-09-01

    This study reviewed interventions suitable for treating tactile dysfunction in children with cerebral palsy (CP). A systematic review was conducted of six databases, searched for population: ('brain injury' OR 'cerebral palsy' OR 'stroke' OR 'cerebrovascular accident') and intervention: ('tactile' OR 'sensation'). Inclusion criteria were: (1) published after 1950 in English; (2) participants older than 4 years with brain injury; (3) upper limb intervention; and (4) examined tactile registration or perception. Of 2938 studies identified, 30 met the inclusion criteria. Results from included studies indicated that tactile function improved in adults with stroke after transfer enhanced training (t[47]=2.75, p=0.004), stimulus specific training (ptherapy (F=5.71, p=0.028), mirror therapy (F=7.7, p=0.009), and functional deafferentation using an anaesthetic cream (t=3.76; pchildren with CP. Research is required to develop tactile interventions for children with CP that integrate methodology from effective approaches for adults after stroke. Stimulus specific training, transfer enhanced training, and mirror therapy are promising. Other approaches are less suitable for children because of invasiveness (electrical stimulation), safety (ice therapy), or limitation of bimanual function (eutectic mixture of local anaesthetics, pneumatic cuff). © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Maturational Sequence of Growth in Upper Extremity Dimensions among Garhwali and Jaunsari Rajput Females of Dehradun, Uttarakhand

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    Archana Kharyal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study attempts to evaluate the progression of maturation in the three sub-segments (upper arm, forearm and hand length of the upper extremity among pre-adolescent and adolescent females of a tribal group and a non tribal group sharing common environment. A total of 1319 females (664 Garhwali and 655 Jaunsari Rajput in the age range of 8 to 18 years have been measured for upper arm length, forearm length, hand length and stature, following standard techniques recommended by Weiner and Lourie (1969. Analysis of data clearly reveals the existence of both cephalo- caudal and caudo- cephalic directions of maturation. The existence of multiple gradients is also observed at different age groups within the sub-segments of upper extremity in both the populations. At 16 years, the upper arm length and at 17 years the forearm length among the Garhwali females have attained complete maturation, while in Jaunsari females the forearm length and hand length achieve complete maturation at 17 years.

  15. Portable Myoelectric Brace Use Increases Upper Extremity Recovery and Participation But Does Not Impact Kinematics in Chronic, Poststroke Hemiparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willigenburg, Nienke W; McNally, Michael P; Hewett, Timothy E; Page, Stephen J

    2017-01-01

    The authors examined the efficacy of an 8-week regimen combining repetitive task-specific practice (RTP) with a myoelectric brace (RTP+Myomo) on paretic upper extremity (UE; use in valued activities, perceived recovery, and reaching kinematics) in 12 subjects (4 men; M age = 53.5 years; mean time poststroke = 61.7 months). Seven subjects were administered RTP+Myomo therapy, and 5 were administered RTP only. Both groups participated in individualized, 45-min therapy sessions occurring 3 days/week over an 8-week period. The arm, hand ability, activities of daily living, and perceptions of recovery subscales of the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), as well as UE reaching kinematics, assessed before and after the intervention. Subjects in the RTP+Myomo group showed greater improvements on all SIS subscales, with the recovery scale reaching statistical significance (p = .03). Subjects in the RTP-only group showed a greater increase in hand velocity in the reach up task (p = .02), but no changes were observed in the range of shoulder flexion or elbow extension during reaching. None of the changes in kinematic outcome measures significantly correlated with any of the changes in SIS subscales. RTP integrating myoelectric bracing may be more beneficial than RTP only in improving self-reported function and perceptions of overall recovery. The authors observed no changes in the range of elbow extension, and no relationship between self-reported improvements and changes in reaching kinematics.

  16. Bootstrapping conformal field theories with the extremal functional method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Showk, Sheer; Paulos, Miguel F

    2013-12-13

    The existence of a positive linear functional acting on the space of (differences between) conformal blocks has been shown to rule out regions in the parameter space of conformal field theories (CFTs). We argue that at the boundary of the allowed region the extremal functional contains, in principle, enough information to determine the dimensions and operator product expansion (OPE) coefficients of an infinite number of operators appearing in the correlator under analysis. Based on this idea we develop the extremal functional method (EFM), a numerical procedure for deriving the spectrum and OPE coefficients of CFTs lying on the boundary (of solution space). We test the EFM by using it to rederive the low lying spectrum and OPE coefficients of the two-dimensional Ising model based solely on the dimension of a single scalar quasiprimary--no Virasoro algebra required. Our work serves as a benchmark for applications to more interesting, less known CFTs in the near future.

  17. Vascular injuries of the upper extremity Lesões vasculares de membros superiores

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    Raafat Shalabi

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study analyzes the causes of injuries, presentations, surgical approaches, outcome and complications of vascular trauma of the upper limbs, in spite of limited hospital resources. METHODS: A 5-year retrospective analysis. From 01/01/2001 to 31/12/2005, 165 patients were operated for vascular injuries at King Fahd Hospital, Medina, Saudi Arabia. Of all peripheral vascular trauma patients (115, upper limb trauma was present in 58. Diagnosis was made by physical examination and hand-held Doppler alone or in combination with Doppler scan/angiography. Primary vascular repair was performed whenever possible; otherwise, the interposition vein graft was used. Fasciotomy was considered when required. Patients with unsalvageable lower extremity injury requiring primary amputation were excluded from the study. RESULTS: Fifty patients were male (86% and eight were female (14%, aged between 2.5-55 years (mean 23 years. Mean duration of presentation was 8 h after the injury. The most common etiological factor was road traffic accidents, accounting for 50.5% in the blunt trauma group and 33% among all penetrating and stab wound injuries. Incidence of concomitant orthopedic injuries was very high in our study (51%. The brachial artery was the most affected (51%. Interposition vein grafts were used in 53% of the cases. Limb salvage rate was 100%. CONCLUSION: Patients who suffer vascular injuries of the upper extremities should be transferred to vascular surgery centers as soon as possible. Decisive management of peripheral vascular trauma will maximize patient survival and limb salvage. Priorities must be established in the management of associated injuries, and delay must be avoided when ischemic changes are present.OBJETIVO: Este estudo analisa as causas de lesões, apresentação, abordagens cirúrgicas, desfechos e complicações do trauma vascular de membros superiores, apesar de recursos hospitalares limitados. MÉTODOS: An

  18. EEG-Triggered Functional Electrical Stimulation Therapy for Restoring Upper Limb Function in Chronic Stroke with Severe Hemiplegia

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    Cesar Marquez-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the therapeutic effects of integrating brain-computer interfacing technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore upper limb reaching movements in a 64-year-old man with severe left hemiplegia following a hemorrhagic stroke he sustained six years prior to this study. He completed 40 90-minute sessions of functional electrical stimulation therapy using a custom-made neuroprosthesis that facilitated 5 different reaching movements. During each session, the participant attempted to reach with his paralyzed arm repeatedly. Stimulation for each of the movement phases (e.g., extending and retrieving the arm was triggered when the power in the 18 Hz–28 Hz range (beta frequency range of the participant’s EEG activity, recorded with a single electrode, decreased below a predefined threshold. The function of the participant’s arm showed a clinically significant improvement in the Fugl-Meyer Assessment Upper Extremity (FMA-UE subscore (6 points as well as moderate improvement in Functional Independence Measure Self-Care subscore (7 points. The changes in arm’s function suggest that the combination of BCI technology and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary motor function in individuals with chronic hemiplegia which results in severe upper limb deficit (FMA-UE ≤ 15, a population that does not benefit from current best-practice rehabilitation interventions.

  19. Combination transcranial direct current stimulation and virtual reality therapy for upper extremity training in patients with subacute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook Joung; Chun, Min Ho

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effects of combination cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and virtual reality (VR) therapy for upper extremity (UE) training in patients with subacute stroke. Pilot randomized controlled trial. Patients were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: group A received cathodal tDCS, group B received VR, and group C received combination therapy (cathodal tDCS was simultaneously applied during VR therapy). University hospital. Patients (N=59) with impaired unilateral UE motor function after stroke. Fifteen sessions of treatment over a 3-week period. The Modified Ashworth Scale, manual muscle test (MMT), Manual Function Test (MFT), Fugl-Meyer Scale (FMS), and Box and Block Test were used to assess UE function. To evaluate activities of daily living, the Korean-Modified Barthel Index (K-MBI) was used. All outcomes were measured before and immediately after treatment. After treatment, all groups demonstrated significant improvements in MMT, MFT, FMS, and K-MBI scores. The change in MFT and FMS scores was different between the 3 groups. Post hoc analysis revealed that the improvement of MFT and FMS scores in group C was significantly higher than those of the other 2 groups. In the present pilot study, the combination of brain stimulation using tDCS and peripheral arm training using VR could facilitate a stronger beneficial effect on UE impairment than using each intervention alone. This combination therapy might be a helpful method to enhance recovery of the paretic UE in patients with stroke. Copyright © 2014 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Motor And Sensory Effects Of Ipsilesional Upper Extremity Hypothermia And Contralesional Sensory Training For Chronic Stroke Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, de, M.; Nubia Maria; Menegatti; Karina Candido; Yu; Erica; Sacomoto; Natalia Yumi; Oberg; Telma Dagmar; Honorato; Donizeti Cesar

    2016-01-01

    As hypothermia by immersion can reduce the sensory nerve conduction velocity, this study hypothesized that the reduction of sensory input to the ipsilesional upper extremity (UE) using cryotherapy would reduce the inhibitory activity of the contralesional hemisphere in chronic stroke subjects. Objective: In this study, hypothermia was applied by immersing the ipsilesional UE in association with sensory training of the contralesional UE of stroke patients to assess the immediate (e.g. sensorim...

  1. Computer-Aided Treatment Design of a Distal Upper Extremity Soft Tissue Tumor with Electron Beam Radiotherapy

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    Li, Chun; Crawford, Susan; Mundt, A.J.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2015-01-15

    We present here a novel approach for the planning and treatment of a distal upper extremity soft tissue tumor. Utilizing computed tomography (CT) based electron dose calculations, a customized compensating wax bolus was designed in order to deliver sufficient dose coverage to the tumor volume while sparing the draining lymphatics of the patient’s hand and digits. A clinical case is presented as well as the design and construction of the compensator. Outcome and clinical implications are discussed.

  2. Upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders: Prevalence and associated ergonomic factors in an electronic assembly factory

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    Somthus Pullopdissakul

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives:To determine the magnitude, distribution and associated ergonomic factors of upper extremities musculoskeletal disorders (UEMSD among workers of electronic assembly in Thailand. Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. 591 of 853 workers in an electronic and electrical appliance assembly factory in Bangkok, Thailand, participated in this study. A self-administered questionnaire consisting of demographic data and ergonomic factors was collected from October 2010 to January 2011. Clinical examination of each worker was performed by an occupational physician. The criteria for diagnosis of UEMSD came as a result of a consensus reached by a group of orthopedists. The associated factors were analyzed using a multiple logistic regression. Results: The point prevalence of clinically diagnosed UEMSD was as follows: radial styloid tenosynovitis - 13.03% (95% CI: 10.31-15.75, trigger finger - 9.48% (95% CI: 7.11-11.84, carpal tunnel syndrome - 8.12% (95% CI: 5.91-10.33, lateral epicondylitis - 3.38% (95% CI: 1.92-4.85, and medial epicondylitis - 1.69% (95% CI: 0.65-2.73, respectively. The adjusted odds ratio with statistical significance associated with UEMSD was as follows: high force of wrist - 1.78 (95% CI: 1.06-2.99, awkward posture of wrist - 2.37 (95% CI: 1.28-4.37 and contact stress at wrists - 1.75 (95% CI: 1.02-3.00 to develop radial styloid tenosynovitis. For trigger finger, the ratios were awkward posture of fingers - 2.09 (95% CI: 1.12-3.90 and contact stress on finger - 1.86 (95% CI: 1.04-3.34. For medial epicondylitis, it was an awkward posture of using elbows - 3.14 (95% CI: 1.10-8.95. However, this study did not find any associations between repetitive motion and any UEMSD. Conclusions: UEMSD are most commonly found in electronic assembly workers. The relevant parties should provide comprehensive ergonomic resolution for these workers.

  3. Presentation, clinical features, and results of intervention in upper extremity fibromuscular dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nancy; Sharma, Aditya; West, Jonathan K; Serhal, Maya; Brinza, Ellen; Gornik, Heather L; Kim, Esther S H

    2017-08-01

    We present a case series of upper extremity fibromuscular dysplasia (UE FMD) consisting of 22 patients from two tertiary referral centers focusing on clinical presentation, diagnostic findings, and interventional outcomes. FMD is a noninflammatory, nonatherosclerotic arteriopathy that has a predisposition for middle-aged women. Involvement of the UE is thought to be rare. Patients with UE FMD can present with claudication or ischemia, or they can be incidentally diagnosed. The treatment approach is dictated by clinical presentation. Data were collected of patients with UE FMD evaluated at two centers. Demographic data, presenting UE symptoms, UE arteries involved, FMD type, diagnostic method, physical examination findings, management, and outcomes were included. Twenty-two patients (29 limbs) were diagnosed with UE FMD. The brachial artery was most commonly involved (89.7% of affected limbs). More than half of limbs (n = 15 of 29 limbs [51.7%]) were asymptomatic, and of those who presented with symptoms, the most common symptoms were ischemic fingers or hand (31% of all affected limbs) and hand or arm claudication (27.6% of all affected limbs). UE FMD was noted on catheter angiography in 58.6% (n = 17 of 29 limbs), duplex ultrasound in 41.4% (n = 12 of 29 limbs), and computed tomography angiography in 27.6% (n = 8 of 29 limbs). Of the symptomatic limbs (n = 14), the majority were treated solely with medical therapy as the first intervention (57.1%). For symptomatic limbs treated with vascular intervention (n = 5), angioplasty was most commonly performed. Only 4 of the 14 limbs (28.6%) had complete symptomatic relief after the initial first intervention, in which 2 limbs were treated with medical therapy, 1 limb underwent angioplasty, and 1 limb had resolution of symptoms despite deferment of any therapy. Of the 10 limbs with residual symptoms after the first intervention, 6 limbs underwent a second intervention: angioplasty in 2 limbs initially treated

  4. ACUTE EFFECTS OF STATIC STRETCHING, DYNAMIC EXERCISES, AND HIGH VOLUME UPPER EXTREMITY PLYOMETRIC ACTIVITY ON TENNIS SERVE PERFORMANCE

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    Ertugrul Gelen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the acute effects of static stretching; dynamic exercises and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity on tennis serve performance. Twenty-six elite young tennis players (15.1 ± 4.2 years, 167.9 ± 5.8 cm and 61.6 ± 8.1 kg performed 4 different warm-up (WU routines in a random order on non-consecutive days. The WU methods consisted of traditional WU (jogging, rally and serve practice (TRAD; traditional WU and static stretching (TRSS; traditional WU and dynamic exercise (TRDE; and traditional WU and high volume upper extremity plyometric activity (TRPLYP. Following each WU session, subjects were tested on a tennis serve ball speed test. TRAD, TRSS, TRDE and TRPLYO were compared by repeated measurement analyses of variance and post-hoc comparisons. In this study a 1 to 3 percent increase in tennis serve ball speed was recorded in TRDE and TRPLYO when compared to TRAD (p 0.05. ICCs for ball speed showed strong reliability (0.82 to 0.93 for the ball speed measurements.The results of this study indicate that dynamic and high volume upper extremity plyometric WU activities are likely beneficial to serve speed of elite junior tennis players.

  5. Comparison of Lower and Upper Extremity Strength of Individuals with Down Syndrome in Terms of Age Groups and Gender

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    Gonca Ince

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare lower and upper extremity strength of individuals with Down syndrome in terms of age and gender. Nineteen females (52.8% and 17 males (47.2% individuals with Down syndrome (Trisomy 21 type who continue special education and rehabilitation centers participated in the study. The average age of participants was 21.25±6.25 years, average height: 152.18±8.01cm, body weight average: 65.60±18.28kg. There was no statistically significant difference between lower and upper extremity results of Down's syndrome patients (p <0.05. In terms of gender, (Female: 15.8±5.6, male: 11.9 ± 4.8, p=0.03 it were found to be statistically better than boys in terms of horizontal jump (female: 71.7±20.5, male: 55.12±19.7, p=0.02 and vertical jump. As a result, lower and upper extremity strength in different age groups of individuals was found to be similar. However, it can be said that girls with Down syndrome have better explosive strength than men.

  6. Upper Extremity Motor Learning among Individuals with Parkinson's Disease: A Meta-Analysis Evaluating Movement Time in Simple Tasks

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    K. Felix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor learning has been found to occur in the rehabilitation of individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD. Through repetitive structured practice of motor tasks, individuals show improved performance, confirming that motor learning has probably taken place. Although a number of studies have been completed evaluating motor learning in people with PD, the sample sizes were small and the improvements were variable. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to determine the ability of people with PD to learn motor tasks. Studies which measured movement time in upper extremity reaching tasks and met the inclusion criteria were included in the analysis. Results of the meta-analysis indicated that people with PD and neurologically healthy controls both demonstrated motor learning, characterized by a decrease in movement time during upper extremity movements. Movement time improvements were greater in the control group than in individuals with PD. These results support the findings that the practice of upper extremity reaching tasks is beneficial in reducing movement time in persons with PD and has important implications for rehabilitation.

  7. Axillary nerve block in comparison with intravenous midazolam/fentanyl for painless reduction of upper extremity fractures.

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    Hossein Alimohammadi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The painful nature of fractures has made it inevitable to use various anesthetic techniques to reduce or immobilize fractured parts. In the present study, axillary nerve block was compared with intravenous midazolam/fentanyl to induce anesthesia for Painless Reduction of Upper Extremity Fractures. The subjects in the present clinical trial consisted of 60 patients with upper extremity fractures. They were randomly divided into two equal groups of intravenous sedation (IVS with midazolam/fentanyl and axillary nerve block (ANB. Rate of anesthesia induction, recovery time, and pain intensities at baseline, during the procedure and at the end of the procedure were recorded in both groups. Data was analyzed and compared between the two groups with SPSS 18 statistical software using appropriate tests. Demographic data, vital signs and means of pain intensities at the beginning of the procedure were equal in the two groups. In the IVS group, the overall duration of the procedure was shorter with more rapid onset of anesthesia (P<0.05. In contrast, the recovery time was much shorter in the ANB group (P<0.001. No life or organ threatening complications were observed in the two groups. Axillary nerve block can be considered an appropriate substitute for intravenous sedation in painful procedures of the upper extremity.

  8. Vascular injuries after minor blunt upper extremity trauma: pitfalls in the recognition and diagnosis of potential "near miss" injuries

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    Bravman Jonathan T

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low energy trauma to the upper extremity is rarely associated with a significant vascular injury. Due to the low incidence, a high level of suspicion combined with appropriate diagnostic algorithms are mandatory for early recognition and timely management of these potentially detrimental injuries. Methods Review of the pertinent literature, supported by the presentation of two representative "near miss" case examples. Results A major diagnostic pitfall is represented by the insidious presentation of significant upper extremity arterial injuries with intact pulses and normal capillary refill distal to the injury site, due to collateral perfusion. Thus, severe vascular injuries may easily be missed or neglected at the upper extremity, leading to a long-term adverse outcome with the potential need for a surgical amputation. Conclusion The present review article provides an outline of the diagnostic challenges related to these rare vascular injuries and emphasizes the necessity for a high level of suspicion, even in the absence of a significant penetrating or high-velocity trauma mechanism.

  9. Two-point discrimination of the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ja-Pung; Kim, Soon-Hee; An, Ho-Jung; Moon, Ok-Gon; Choi, Jung-Hyun; Yun, Young-Dae; Park, Joo-Hyun; Min, Kyoung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The present study attempted to measure two-point discrimination in the upper extremities of healthy Koreans in their 20’s. [Subjects and Methods] Using a three-point esthesiometer, we conducted an experiment with a group of 256 college students (128 male and 128 female), attending N University in Chonan, Republic of Korea. [Results] Females showed two-point discrimination at a shorter distance than males at the following points: (i) 5 cm above the elbow joint, the middle part, and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the anterior upper arm; (ii) 5 cm above the elbow joint and 5 cm below the shoulder joint of the posterior upper arm; (iii) 5 cm above the front of the wrist joint of the forearm; 5 cm below the elbow joint, the palmar part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the thumb, the dorsal part of the distal interphalangeal joint of the middle and little fingers. It was also found that females showed greater two-point discrimination than males in distal regions rather than proximal regions. [Conclusion] The findings of this study will help establish normal values for two-point discrimination of upper extremities of young Koreans in their 20’s. PMID:27134375

  10. Comparative study of the effect of taping on scapular stability and upper limb function in recovering hemiplegics with scapular weakness

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    Dhwanit Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemiplegia is the commonest form of paralysis, involving arm, leg and sometimes the face on one side of the body. Shoulder girdle in chronic hemiplegic suffers from two sorts of problems (a spasticity of elevators and retractors, which pull the scapula into a fixed elevated and retracted position. (b weakness of the opposite group of scapular muscles, i.e., depressors and protectors. This leads to instability of the scapulothoracic joint resulting in impaired functional use of the upper limb, taping is a method of maintaining orientation of the scapula by means of proprioceptive biofeedback to the patient. Aim of this study is to check the effect of taping on scapular stability and upper limb function in recovering hemiplegics. Objectives of the Study: (1 To study the effect of taping on functional performance of the hemiplegic upper extremity. (2 To compare the effect of taping combined with physiotherapeutic exercises v/s physiotherapeutic exercises alone on functional independence of the hemiplegic upper extremity. Subjects: All the 37 chronic hemiplegic patients with scapular weakness were taken and divided into two groups: Group A (Experimental group and Group B (Control group. Materials and Methods: All the 37 chronic hemiplegic patients were evaluated by Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale for hemiplegic upper extremity before starting the treatment. Group A patients received scapular taping combined with physiotherapeutic exercises and Group B patients received only physiotherapeutic exercises for the period of 2 weeks. After 2 weeks both Group A and B patients were re-evaluated on Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale for hemiplegic upper extremity. Results: There was a significant improvement between the pre- and post-treatment scores of Group A patients on the Fugl Meyer Physical Performance Assessment Scale of hemiplegic upper extremity, whereas Group B patients score on the same scale was

  11. Upper-division student difficulties with the Dirac delta function

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    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2015-01-01

    The Dirac delta function is a standard mathematical tool that appears repeatedly in the undergraduate physics curriculum in multiple topical areas including electrostatics, and quantum mechanics. While Dirac delta functions are often introduced in order to simplify a problem mathematically, students still struggle to manipulate and interpret them. To characterize student difficulties with the delta function at the upper-division level, we examined students' responses to traditional exam questions and a standardized conceptual assessment, and conducted think-aloud interviews. Our analysis was guided by an analytical framework that focuses on how students activate, construct, execute, and reflect on the Dirac delta function in the context of problem solving in physics. Here, we focus on student difficulties using the delta function to express charge distributions in the context of junior-level electrostatics. Common challenges included: invoking the delta function spontaneously, translating a description of a c...

  12. A five-year review of management of upper-extremity arterial injuries at an urban level I trauma center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Randall W; Skytta, Carla K; Shah, Kaushal J; Hartman, Jodi F; Wright, Michelle L

    2012-07-01

    Upper-extremity arterial injuries are relatively uncommon, but they may significantly impact patient outcome. Management of these injuries was reviewed to determine incidence, assess the current management strategy, and evaluate hospital outcome. Upper-extremity trauma patients presenting with arterial injury between January 2005 and July 2010 were included in this retrospective review. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic, injury, treatment, and outcome data. These variables also were compared between blunt and penetrating arterial injuries and between proximal and distal arterial injuries. During a 5.6-year period, 135 patients with 159 upper-extremity arterial injuries were admitted, yielding an incidence of 0.74% among trauma admissions. The majority of patients (78.5%) suffered concomitant upper-extremity injuries. The most common injury mechanism was laceration by glass (26.4%). Arterial injuries were categorized into 116 penetrating (73.0%) and 43 blunt (27.0%) mechanisms. Arterial distribution involved was as follows: 13 axillary (8.2%), 40 brachial (25.2%), 52 radial (32.7%), 51 ulnar (32.1%), and 3 other (1.9%). The types of arterial injuries were as follows: 69 transection (43.4%), 68 laceration (42.8%), 16 occlusion (10.1%), 3 avulsion (1.9%), and 3 entrapment (1.9%). One patient (0.7%) required a primary above-elbow amputation. The majority of injuries (96.8%) receiving vascular management underwent surgical intervention--76 primary repair (49.7%), 41 ligation (26.8%), 31 bypass (20.3%), and 5 endovascular (3.3%). Conservative treatment was the primary strategy for five arterial injuries (3.3%). Of the patients receiving vascular intervention, three (2.2%) required major and three (2.2%) required minor amputations during hospitalization and no patients expired. The current multidisciplinary team management approach with prompt surgical management resulted in successful outcomes after upper-extremity arterial injuries. No outcome

  13. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shahram Nazerani; Hamed Vaseghi; Saied Hesami; Tina Nazerani

    2013-01-01

    Objective:Ectopic tissue transplantation is not a new idea.Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s.This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part,which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and returning it to its native place at a later date.In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure.Methods:Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure.The stump and amputated part are carefully debrided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap.The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting.Results:Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study.The overall success rate was about 70%,lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury.Although the functional recovery of these patients are very low,all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker.No patient could return to his previous job.Conclusion:Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed extremity or finger injuries.In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can.In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as punishment of either the God or the society,so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery.None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers.

  14. Ectopic major transplantation for salvage of upper and lower extremity amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazerani Shahram

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Ectopic tissue transplanta- tion is not a new idea. Godina and his colleagues pioneered this method in the 1980s. This method is a last resort method of preserving an amputated body part, which consists of banking the amputated segment in an ectopic area and re- turning it to its native place at a later date. In this article we present our experience with this demanding procedure. Methods: Debridement was the mainstay of this procedure. The stump and amputated part are carefully de- brided and the stump was either closed primarily or covered by a flap. The amputated part was transplanted to one of several banking sites in the body and at a later date it will be transferred to its native site in an elective setting. Results: Seven patients meeting the set criteria for ectopic transplantation were enrolled in this study. The over- all success rate was about 70%, lower than expected but these are cases of severe crush injury. Although the func- tional recovery of these patients are very low, all of the successful cases except one could find a job as a janitor or light manual worker. No patient could return to his previous job. Conclusion: Ectopic transplantation of body parts is an accepted method of treatment of severely crushed ex- tremity or finger injuries. In our country an amputee has very little chance of finding a job instead a disabled person can. In addition in Iran cultures amputation is seen as pu- nishment of either the God or the society, so it is not well accepted and many patients persist on saving the limb even with no functional recovery. None of our successful cases could return to his previous occupation but almost all of them could find a job as janitors or light manual workers. Key words: Replantation; Transplantation; Extremities; Amputation, traumatic

  15. Robot-aided assessment of lower extremity functions: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggioni, Serena; Melendez-Calderon, Alejandro; van Asseldonk, Edwin; Klamroth-Marganska, Verena; Lünenburger, Lars; Riener, Robert; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-08-02

    The assessment of sensorimotor functions is extremely important to understand the health status of a patient and its change over time. Assessments are necessary to plan and adjust the therapy in order to maximize the chances of individual recovery. Nowadays, however, assessments are seldom used in clinical practice due to administrative constraints or to inadequate validity, reliability and responsiveness. In clinical trials, more sensitive and reliable measurement scales could unmask changes in physiological variables that would not be visible with existing clinical scores.In the last decades robotic devices have become available for neurorehabilitation training in clinical centers. Besides training, robotic devices can overcome some of the limitations in traditional clinical assessments by providing more objective, sensitive, reliable and time-efficient measurements. However, it is necessary to understand the clinical needs to be able to develop novel robot-aided assessment methods that can be integrated in clinical practice.This paper aims at providing researchers and developers in the field of robotic neurorehabilitation with a comprehensive review of assessment methods for the lower extremities. Among the ICF domains, we included those related to lower extremities sensorimotor functions and walking; for each chapter we present and discuss existing assessments used in routine clinical practice and contrast those to state-of-the-art instrumented and robot-aided technologies. Based on the shortcomings of current assessments, on the identified clinical needs and on the opportunities offered by robotic devices, we propose future directions for research in rehabilitation robotics. The review and recommendations provided in this paper aim to guide the design of the next generation of robot-aided functional assessments, their validation and their translation to clinical practice.

  16. Deep vein thrombosis of upper extremities due to reactive thrombocytosis in septic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakti Bedanta Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep venous thrombosis (DVT is not an uncommon condition in the intensive care unit (ICU, and having high morbidity and mortality. Upper limb DVT also is increasingly being recognized as a clinical entity. The presence of the indwelling catheter in neck veins is a risk for developing venous thrombus, which may be further aggravated by presence of thrombocytosis. In ICU patients with sepsis, reactive thrombocytosis has been found during the recovery phase. Here, we are presenting two cases, having thrombocytosis and central venous catheter who developed upper limb DVT.

  17. The Psychometric Properties of a Modified Sit-to-Stand Test With Use of the Upper Extremities in Institutionalized Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Berre, Melanie; Apap, David; Babcock, Jade; Bray, Sarah; Gareau, Esther; Chassé, Kathleen; Lévesque, Nicole; Robbins, Shawn M

    2016-08-01

    Current sit-to-stand protocols do not permit use of upper extremities, limiting the protocols' utility for institutionalized older adults with diminished physical function. The objective of this study was to modify a 30-s sit-to-stand protocol to allow for arm use and to examine test-retest reliability and convergent validity; 54 institutionalized older adult men (age = 91 ± 3 year) performed the 30-s sit-to-stand twice within a span of 3 to 7 days. Results suggest good test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = .84) and convergent validity with the Timed Up and Go Test (r = -.62). This modified 30-s sit-to-stand can be used to assess physical function performance in institutionalized older adults and will ensure that individuals with lower physical function capacity can complete the test, thus eliminating the floor effect demonstrated with other sit-to-stand protocols.

  18. Upper-extremity and neck disorders associated with keyboard and mouse use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Stefano; Violante, Francesco S; Bonfiglioli, Roberta

    2015-01-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders are frequently related to computer use in the workplace. The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the evidence in the literature concerning the putative association between neck, shoulder, and upper-limb disorders and occupational exposure to use of a computer and its devices. We searched the scientific literature via PubMed, using specific search strategies, including substrings tailored to retrieve papers about: (1) occupational etiology; (2) computer use; and (3) different upper-limb disorders. We intended to include, in our evaluation, systematic reviews and relevant, informative papers published later on. We were able to retrieve 11 systematic reviews and 11 informative studies regarding neck, shoulder, and upper-limb disorders. There is limited/insufficient and/or inconsistent evidence indicating that computer work may be associated to neck, shoulder, or distal arm complaints. There is sufficient evidence indicating no association between carpal tunnel syndrome and computer work. There are no studies regarding the use of computers and some neck, shoulder, and upper-limb diseases, such as tennis elbow and trigger finger. Applying the general principles of ergonomics to computer work is probably the correct strategy to pursue, with the aim of maintaining office workers' well-being.

  19. Upper gastrointestinal function and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Reawika Chaikomin; Christopher K Rayner; Karen L Jones; Michael Horowitz

    2006-01-01

    Recent evidence has highlighted the impact of glycemic control on the incidence and progression of diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications, and on cardiovascular risk in the non-diabetic population.Postprandial blood glucose concentrations make a major contribution to overall glycemic control, and are determined in part by upper gastrointestinal function.Conversely, poor glycemic control has an acute,reversible effect on gastrointestinal motility. Insights into the mechanisms by which the gut contributes to glycemia have given rise to a number of novel dietary and pharmacological strategies designed to lower postprandial blood glucose concent rations.

  20. [Problems and techniques of functional rehabilitation of upper limb stump].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, G; Vitangeli, L; Assennato, P; Drommi, M

    1990-07-15

    The authors discuss problems and techniques of rehabilitation in subjects who have undergone upper limb amputation, as well as the requirements for good application of a prosthesis. Various types of prostheses are described: passive ones, those moved by the body and externally operated ones. The amputee undergoes three stages of rehabilitation: a general preparatory phase for maintenance of good joint function and muscle efficiency; a phase of specific rehabilitation with the help of electromyometry and an electronic training device for the use of the prosthesis, and finally individual and group exercises in laboratories with special facilities.

  1. Effect of shaping in constraint-induced movement therapy on motor function of upper extremity in chronic stroke patients%强制性使用运动疗法塑形技术对恢复期脑卒中上肢运动功能的康复作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贞兰; 刘福迁; 李贺

    2012-01-01

    objective: To explore the rehabilitation effect of shaping in constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) on motor function of upper extremity (UE) in chronic stroke patients.Method: Thirty chronic stroke patients, randomly divided into 3 groups: CIMT group(CI group), shaping group and occupational therapy group(OT group), 10 cases in each. CI group were treated with shaping(BT) + behavior technique+restraining in clinic and home; shaping group were treated with shaping+restraining in clinic; OT group were treated with OT + restraining in clinic. All groups were treated 3h/d, 5d/week 2weeks. Wolf motor function test (WMFT) was used to assess UE motor function, and motor activity log (MAL) was used to assess UE ability in activities of daily living(ADL). WMFT were measured pre-and post-treatment. MAL were measured pre-treat-ment and post-treatment 1 day, post-treatment 6 months and 12 months.Result: In all groups MAL improved post-treatment 1 day compared to pre-treatment(P 0.05) Within groups,CI group showed significant improvement of AL compared to shaping group and OT group (P 0.05). There was no improvement of WMFT in all groups pre- and post-treatment (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Efficacy of shaping is similar to that of OT on UE motor ability, but CIMT can improve motor ability of UE significantly and can keep the effect until post-treatment 12 months by shaping applied with BT together. The rehabilitation effect of BT in treatments for stroke patients should be emphasized.%目的:探讨强制性使用运动疗法塑形技术对恢复期脑卒中偏瘫上肢运动功能的影响.方法:恢复期脑卒中上肢运动功能障碍患者30例,随机分为3组:强制性使用运动疗法组(CIMT组)10例,塑形组10例,作业疗法组(OT组)10例.CIMT组采用塑形技术+行为技术+限制技术;塑形组采用塑形技术+限制技术;OT组采用作业疗法+限制技术.所有组连续康复治疗3h/d,5d/周,共2周.采用运动功能活动指数(MAL)评定患

  2. Predicting Functional Status Following Amputation After Lower Extremity Bypass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suckow, Bjoern D.; Goodney, Philip P.; Cambria, Robert A.; Bertges, Daniel J.; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Indes, Jeffrey E.; Schanzer, Andres; Stone, David H.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients who undergo lower extremity bypass (LEB) for critical limb ischemia ultimately require amputation. The functional outcome achieved by these patients after amputation is not well known. Therefore, we sought to characterize the functional outcome of patients who undergo amputation after LEB, and to describe the pre- and perioperative factors associated with independent ambulation at home after lower extremity amputation. Methods Within a cohort of 3,198 patients who underwent an LEB between January, 2003 and December, 2008, we studied 436 patients who subsequently received an above-knee (AK), below-knee (BK), or minor (forefoot or toe) ipsilateral or contralateral amputation. Our main outcome measure consisted of a “good functional outcome,” defined as living at home and ambulating independently. We calculated univariate and multivariate associations among patient characteristics and our main outcome measure, as well as overall survival. Results Of the 436 patients who underwent amputation within the first year following LEB, 224 of 436 (51.4%) had a minor amputation, 105 of 436 (24.1%) had a BK amputation, and 107 of 436 (24.5%) had an AK amputation. The majority of AK (75 of 107, 72.8%) and BK amputations (72 of 105, 70.6%) occurred in the setting of bypass graft thrombosis, whereas nearly all minor amputations (200 of 224, 89.7%) occurred with a patent bypass graft. By life-table analysis at 1 year, we found that the proportion of surviving patients with a good functional outcome varied by the presence and extent of amputation (proportion surviving with good functional outcome = 88% no amputation, 81% minor amputation, 55% BK amputation, and 45% AK amputation, p = 0.001). Among those analyzed at long-term follow-up, survival was slightly lower for those who had a minor amputation when compared with those who did not receive an amputation after LEB (81 vs. 88%, p = 0.02). Survival among major amputation patients did not significantly

  3. Bilateral macrodystrophia lipomatosa of the upper extremities with syndactyly and multiple lipomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Saskia; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Schut, Simone M.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2011-01-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare disease that causes congenital local gigantism of part of an extremity, which is characterised by an increase in all mesenchymal elements, particularly fibroadipose tissue. This is the first report to our knowledge of a case of histologically confirmed bilateral

  4. Magnetic resonance imaging of peripheral nerve tumours in the upper extremity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Jessica; Sandberg, Kristina; Søe Nielsen, Niels;

    2009-01-01

    extremity. Medical records of 19 patients (20 MRI examinations) with 29 histopathologically verified benign nerve tumours were examined retrospectively. In 12/20 cases MRI suggested a correct diagnosis of the type of nerve tumour. An additional 3/20 cases had an uncertain diagnosis, but nerve relations...

  5. A comparison of dependence function estimators in multivariate extremes

    KAUST Repository

    Vettori, Sabrina

    2017-05-11

    Various nonparametric and parametric estimators of extremal dependence have been proposed in the literature. Nonparametric methods commonly suffer from the curse of dimensionality and have been mostly implemented in extreme-value studies up to three dimensions, whereas parametric models can tackle higher-dimensional settings. In this paper, we assess, through a vast and systematic simulation study, the performance of classical and recently proposed estimators in multivariate settings. In particular, we first investigate the performance of nonparametric methods and then compare them with classical parametric approaches under symmetric and asymmetric dependence structures within the commonly used logistic family. We also explore two different ways to make nonparametric estimators satisfy the necessary dependence function shape constraints, finding a general improvement in estimator performance either (i) by substituting the estimator with its greatest convex minorant, developing a computational tool to implement this method for dimensions $$D\\\\ge 2$$D≥2 or (ii) by projecting the estimator onto a subspace of dependence functions satisfying such constraints and taking advantage of Bernstein–Bézier polynomials. Implementing the convex minorant method leads to better estimator performance as the dimensionality increases.

  6. 双侧上肢训练在脑卒中患者康复中的应用%Preliminary application of bilateral upper extremities training in rehabilitation of stroke patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雅丹; 胡昔权; 李奎; 陈颖蓓; 解东风

    2011-01-01

    目的:初步观察双侧上肢训练对上肢功能中度到重度残损的恢复期脑卒中患者的疗效.方法:48例上肢功能中度到重度残损的恢复期脑卒中患者随机分为双侧训练组(n=24)、对照组(n=24),前者接受双侧(患侧、健侧)上肢同向、节律运动的重复练习,后者接受常规上肢训练,即以患侧上肢为主的单侧训练.两组患者上肢训练的时间均为1h/d,5d/周,持续4周,其余康复治疗如运动疗法和日常生活活动训练等两组均相同.两组患者分别于治疗前、治疗后予以FMA上肢部分(FMA-UE)、MAS上肢部分和MBI评定.结果:两组患者治疗后FMA-UE、FMA上肢的近端部分(FMA-PUE)和远端部分(FMA-DUE)、MAS-UE及MBI的评分均较治疗前提高,治疗前、后各量表的评分差异具有显著性(P<0.05=;与对照组相比,双侧训练组患者FMA-UE、FMA-PUE的评分提高幅度更大(P<0.05).结论:对于上肢功能中度到重度残损的恢复期脑卒中患者,采用双侧上肢训练可以更好地改善其患侧上肢,尤其是上肢近端的运动功能.%Objective: To observe the effect of bilateral upper extremities training on upper extremities function of stroke patient in convalescent phase with moderate to severe upper extremity impairment.Method: Forty-eight subjects participated in the randomized, single-blind training study. Subjects in the bilateral training group (n=24) practiced bilateral upper extremities(affected and unaffected sides) symmetrical thythmic repetitive activities, and the control group (n=24) performed conventional upper extremities training, mainly affected upper extremity unilateral training. The program of upper extremities training for both groups were 1h per day, 5d per week for 4 weeks. Physical therapy and training of activities of daily living were the same in both groups.Fugl-Meyer assessment of upper extremity (FMA-UE), motor assessment scale of upper extremity (MAS-UE) and modified Barthel index

  7. Sensory reinnervation of free flaps in reconstruction of the breast and the upper and lower extremities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nektarios Sinis; Androniki Lamia; Helml Gudrun; Thomas Schoeller; Frank Werdin

    2012-01-01

    There is long-standing debate about sensate versus non-sensate free microvascular flaps among microsurgeons.The principle of connecting not only the vascular supply,but also sensitive nerves,in free tissue transfer is attractive.However,increased operating time and partial spontaneous innervation led to the common decision to restrict microsurgical tissue transfer to the vascular anastomosis and to leave the nerves "untreated".Nevertheless,in special cases such as breast reconstruction or extremity reconstruction,the question about sensory nerve coaptation of the flaps remains open.We present our experience with free microvascular tissue transfer for breast and extremity reconstruction and compare the data with previous literature and conclude that most free flap surgeries do not benefit from nerve coaptation.

  8. Effect of upper extremity proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation combined with elastic resistance bands on respiratory muscle strength: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme P. T. Areas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Elastic resistance bands (ERB combined with proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF are often used in resistance muscle training programs, which have potential effects on peripheral muscle strength. However, the effects of the combination of ERB and PNF on respiratory muscle strength warrant further investigation. OBJECTIVES: The assessment of the effects of PNF combined with ERB on respiratory muscle strength. METHOD: Twenty healthy, right-handed females were included. Subjects were randomized to either the resistance training program group (TG, n=10 or the control group (CG, n=10. Maximal expiratory pressure (MEP and inspiratory pressure (MIP were measured before and after four weeks of an upper extremity resistance training program. The training protocol consisted of upper extremity PNF combined with ERB, with resistance selected from 1 repetition maximum protocol. RESULTS: PNF combined with ERB showed significant increases in MIP and MEP (p<0.05. In addition, there were significant differences between the TG and CG regarding ∆MIP (p=0.01 and ∆MEP (p=0.04. CONCLUSIONS: PNF combined with ERB can have a positive impact on respiratory muscle strength. These results may be useful with respect to cardiopulmonary chronic diseases that are associated with reduced respiratory muscle strength.

  9. BCI-Triggered functional electrical stimulation therapy for upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Marquez-Chin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We present here the integration of brain-computer interfacing (BCI technology with functional electrical stimulation therapy to restore voluntary function. The system was tested with a single man with chronic (6 years severe left hemiplegia resulting from a stroke. The BCI, implemented as a simple “brain-switch” activated by power decreases in the 18 Hz – 28 Hz frequency range of the participant’s electroencephalograpic signals, triggered a neuroprosthesis designed to facilitate forward reaching, reaching to the mouth, and lateral reaching movements. After 40 90-minute sessions in which the participant attempted the reaching tasks repeatedly, with the movements assisted by the BCI-triggered neuroprosthesis, the participant’s arm function showed a clinically significant six point increase in the Fugl-Meyer Asessment Upper Extermity Sub-Score. These initial results suggest that the combined use of BCI and functional electrical stimulation therapy may restore voluntary reaching function in individuals with chronic severe hemiplegia for whom the rehabilitation alternatives are very limited.

  10. Distinctive metaphyseal chondrodysplasia with severe distal radius and ulna involvement (upper extremity mesomelia) and normal height.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera, Andrea; Camera, Gianni

    2003-10-01

    Metaphyseal chondrodysplasias (MCD) are skeletal disorders characterized by metaphyseal irregularities and, usually, by short stature. In MCD, wide heterogeneity exists with regard to clinical and radiological changes. We report on a patient with clinical and radiological findings of MCD who had coxa valga and normal height with metaphyseal involvement of the long bones. The short radii and ulnae showed a very severe change in their distal metaphyses, leading to mesomelic shortening confined to the upper limbs. Hematological, ophthalmological, and hearing examinations were normal. This type of MCD appears to represent a yet undescribed syndrome.

  11. Translating measurement findings into rehabilitation practice: An example using Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity with patients following stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig A. Velozo, PhD, OTR/L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Standardized assessments are critical for advancing clinical rehabilitation, yet assessment scores often provide little information for rehabilitation treatment planning. A keyform recovery map is an innovative way for a therapist to record patient responses to standardized assessment items. The form enables a therapist to view the specific items that a patient can or cannot perform. This information can assist a therapist in tailoring treatments to a patient’s individual ability level. We demonstrate how a keyform recovery map can be used to inform clinical treatment planning for individuals with stroke-related upper-limb motor impairment. A keyform map of poststroke upper-limb recovery defined by items of the Fugl-Meyer Assessment-Upper Extremity (FMA-UE was generated by a previously published Rasch analysis. Three individuals with stroke enrolled in a separate research study were randomly selected from each of the three impairment strata of the FMA-UE. Their performance on each item was displayed on the FMA-UE keyform. The forms directly connected qualitative descriptions of patients’ motor ability to assessment measures, thereby suggesting appropriate shorter and longer term rehabilitation goals. This study demonstrates how measurement theory can be used to translate a standardized assessment into a useful, evidence-based tool for making clinical practice decisions.

  12. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and deep-breathing exercises on upper extremity lymphedema in stroke patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Kim, Seong-Yeol; Jeong, Yeon-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of deep-breathing and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises on upper limb lymphedema in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study consisted of 10 patients with lymphedema that had occurred after stroke. Neurodevelopmental treatment was applied in the same manner as that used for the existing treatment. The subjects performed deep-breathing and stretching exercises three times per week for 4 weeks (12 sessions total). Body water volume in the upper limbs was measured before and after exercise by using an InBody S10 analyzer. [Results] Performance of deep-breathing and stretching exercises significantly reduced body water volume in both the affected and unaffected arms. The extracellular-to-total cellular fluid volume ratio in the affected arm improved to 0.379 after exercise, although this change was not significant. [Conclusion] The results of the present study show that deep-breathing and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises reduce upper extremity lymphedema in stroke patients. PMID:28174433

  13. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and deep-breathing exercises on upper extremity lymphedema in stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Woon Taek; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Kim, Seong-Yeol; Jeong, Yeon-Gyu

    2016-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of deep-breathing and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises on upper limb lymphedema in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study consisted of 10 patients with lymphedema that had occurred after stroke. Neurodevelopmental treatment was applied in the same manner as that used for the existing treatment. The subjects performed deep-breathing and stretching exercises three times per week for 4 weeks (12 sessions total). Body water volume in the upper limbs was measured before and after exercise by using an InBody S10 analyzer. [Results] Performance of deep-breathing and stretching exercises significantly reduced body water volume in both the affected and unaffected arms. The extracellular-to-total cellular fluid volume ratio in the affected arm improved to 0.379 after exercise, although this change was not significant. [Conclusion] The results of the present study show that deep-breathing and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching exercises reduce upper extremity lymphedema in stroke patients.

  14. Effects of low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and neuromuscular electrical stimulation on upper extremity motor recovery in the early period after stroke: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Aliye; Türe, Sabiha; Askin, Ayhan; Yardimci, Engin Ugur; Demirdal, Secil Umit; Kurt Incesu, Tülay; Tosun, Ozgur; Kocyigit, Hikmet; Akhan, Galip; Gelal, Fazıl Mustafa

    2017-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of inhibitory repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) on upper extremity motor function in patients with acute/subacute ischemic stroke. Twenty-five ischemic acute/subacute stroke subjects were enrolled in this randomized controlled trial. Experimental group 1 received low frequency (LF) rTMS to the primary motor cortex of the unaffected side + physical therapy (PT) including activities to improve strength, flexibility, transfers, posture, balance, coordination, and activities of daily living, mainly focusing on upper limb movements; experimental group 2 received the same protocol combined with NMES to hand extensor muscles; and the control group received only PT. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan was used to evaluate the activation or inhibition of the affected and unaffected primary motor cortex. No adverse effect was reported. Most of the clinical outcome scores improved significantly in all groups, however no statistically significant difference was found between groups due to the small sample sizes. The highest percent improvement scores were observed in TMS + NMES group (varying between 48 and 99.3%) and the lowest scores in control group (varying between 13.1 and 28.1%). Hand motor recovery was significant in both experimental groups while it did not change in control group. Some motor cortex excitability changes were also observed in fMRI. LF-rTMS with or without NMES seems to facilitate the motor recovery in the paretic hand of patients with acute/subacute ischemic stroke. TMS or the combination of TMS + NMES may be a promising additional therapy in upper limb motor training. Further studies with larger numbers of patients are needed to establish their effectiveness in upper limb motor rehabilitation of stroke.

  15. MR imaging findings of high-voltage electrical burns in the upper extremities: correlation with angiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Kang, Ik Won; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Min, Seon Jung; Han, You Mi (Dept. of Radiology, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Suh, Kyung Jin (Dept. of Radiology, Dongguk Univ. College of Medicine, Gyeongju Hospital, Gyeongju (Korea, Republic of)), email: kyungjin.suh@gmail.com; Choi, Min Ho (Dept. of Internal Medicine, Hallym Univ. College of Medicine, Hangang Sacred Heart Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-02-15

    Background: A high-voltage electrical burn is often associated with deep muscle injuries. Hidden, undetected deep muscle injuries have a tendency for progressive tissue necrosis, and this can lead to major amputations or sepsis. MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and it may aid in differentiating the areas of viable deep muscle from the areas of non-viable deep muscle. Purpose: To describe the MR imaging findings of a high-voltage electrical burn in the upper extremity with emphasis on the usefulness of the gadolinium-enhanced MRI and to compare the MR imaging findings with angiography. Material and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the imaging studies of six patients with high-voltage electrical burns who underwent both MRI and angiography at the burn center of our hospital from January 2005 to December 2009. The imaging features were evaluated for the involved locations, the MR signal intensity of the affected muscles, the MR enhancement pattern, the involved arteries and the angiographic findings (classified as normal, sluggish flow, stenosis or occlusion) of the angiography of the upper extremity. We assessed the relationship between the MR imaging findings and the angiographic findings. Results: The signal intensities of affected muscles were isointense or of slightly high signal intensity as compared with the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T1-weighted MR images. Affected muscles showed heterogenous high signal intensity relative to the adjacent unaffected skeletal muscle on the T2- weighted images. The gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images showed diffuse inhomogeneous enhancement or peripheral rim enhancement of the affected muscles. The angiographic findings of the arterial injuries showed complete occlusion in three patients, severe stenosis in two patients and sluggish flow in one patient. Of these, the five patients with complete occlusion or severe stenosis on angiography showed non-perfused and non-viable areas of edematous muscle on

  16. [Identification of male somatotype based on osteometric characteristics of the upper and lower extremities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zviagin, V N; Sineva, I M

    2009-01-01

    This osteologic study included examination of 101 skeletons from the collections of the Department of Anthropology, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, and Peter the Great Museum of Anthropology and Ethnography (Sankt-Peterburg). The results were compared with the data obtained by examining materials excavated from grave sites of an Yoshkar-Ola cemetery and from the Isupovo necropole (Kostroma) to evaluate the possibility of identifying human somatotypes from bone remains. Multidimensional discriminative analysis demonstrated that the equation derived by comparing characteristic signs of all long tubular bones of the extremities was of highest diagnostic value for the purpose of the study. Diagnostic equations are proposed for the identification of individual somatotypes based on the analysis of skeletal remains for the use in practical forensic medical examination.

  17. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 2. Drug and non-drug treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Evgenyevich Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST of the upper extremity (rotator cuff tendinitis, epicondylitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, trigger finger, carpal tunnel syndrome entails a combination of drug and nondrug therapies. The basic agents that have been proven to be efficacious in this pathology are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs and glucocorticosteroids (GCs. The paper considers the largest and known studies that are an evidence base for the expediency of using agents, such NSAIDs, local administration of GCs, hyaluronic acid, and plateletrich plasma, as well as different non-drug treatments, in RDJAST. The latter (physiotherapy, exercises, and rehabilitation programs should be regarded as a necessary component of the therapeutic process in patients with RDJAST-associated chronic pain. Preservation of obvious pain and impaired function despite medical therapy should be regarded as an indication for surgical treatment.

  18. Early retirement among Danish female cleaners and shop assistants according to work environment characteristics and upper extremity complaints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lone Donbæk; Bonde, Jens Peter Ellekilde; Christensen, Michael Victor

    2016-01-01

    -year cohort study with registry-based follow-up of 1430 female cleaners and 579 shop assistants. In subsequent analyses of female cleaners, disability pension and voluntary early retirement were modeled according to work characteristics and upper extremity complaints. RESULTS: The adjusted hazard rate......BACKGROUND: Studies have shown a negative social gradient in the incidence of early retirement. To prevent undesired early retirement, there is a need for knowledge of specific predictors in addition to social factors with a limited potential for change. The main purpose of this study...... was to examine musculoskeletal complaints and working conditions as predictors of early retirement among Danish female cleaners. METHODS: Using Cox regression with an adjustment for extraneous factors, we compared the risk of disability pension and retirement before the nominal retirement age (65 years) in an 11...

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in a juvenile type of distal and segmental muscular atrophy of the upper extremities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Uchino, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Yoshida, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Kira, J. [Dept. of Neurology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Masuda, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1994-04-01

    Eight patients with a juvenile type of distal and segmental muscular atrophy of the upper extremities (DSMA), a type of cervical flexion myelopathy, were evaluated using MR imaging. In the neutral position there was no spinal cord compression, but in flexion the spinal cord was displaced anteriorly and was compressed by the posterior surfaces or margins of the vertebrae and/or any herniated disks in all cases. In flexion, compression of the cord was exaggerated in seven patients by the anterior displacement of the posterior margin of the thecal sac, which was accompanied by dilated posterior internal vertebral veins. In patients suspected of having DSMA, MR images made in flexion are regarded essential for verifying the diagnosis. (orig.)

  20. Botulinum toxin in severe upper extremity spasticity among patients with traumatic brain injury: an open-labeled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablon, S A; Agana, B T; Ivanhoe, C B; Boake, C

    1996-10-01

    We studied the effect of botulinum toxin A (BTXA) among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and severe spasticity unresponsive to conservative management. Twenty-one consecutive adult patients with severe spasticity involving the wrist and finger flexor musculature were treated with BTXA injection (20 to 40 units per muscle) under EMG guidance. After injection, patients received passive range of motion (ROM) exercise, with modalities and casting as clinically indicated. Outcome measures, including wrist ROM and the modified Ashworth Scale (MAS), were assessed 2 to 4 weeks after injection. Among the respective acute and chronic groups, mean ROM improved 42.9 (p = 0.001) and 36.2 degrees (p < 0.001). Mean MAS rating improved 1.5 (p = 0.01) and 1.47 (p = 0.002) points. There were no significant adverse effects. BTXA, in conjunction with conventional modalities, significantly improves spasticity and ROM in the distal upper extremity musculature of patients with TBI.

  1. Minor rheumatology: Nonsystemic rheumatic disease of juxta-articular soft tissues of the upper extremity. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Karateev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic diseases of juxta-articular soft tissues (RDJAST (tendinitis, tenosynovitis, bursitis, etc. are one of the most common causes of disability and one the most common reasons for seeking medical advice. To manage patients with RDJAST is an important part of practising rheumatologists’ work. But unfortunately, the issues of diagnosis and therapy of this pathology have been relatively rarely discussed on the pages of Russian medical journals and at the scientific congresses and conferences of rheumatologists in recent years. This review is to refresh physicians’interest in this problem. Part 1 of this review briefly considers the general issues relating to the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and diagnosis of RDJAST of the upper extremity, such as rotator cuff tendinitis, lateral and medial epicondylitis, stenosing flexor tenosynovitis, de Quervain’s syndrome, and carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Effort Thrombosis of the Upper Extremities Related to an Arm Stretching Exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huey-Wen Liang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available “Effort” axillary-subclavian vein thrombosis (Paget-Schroetter syndrome is an uncommon deep venous thrombosis due to repetitive activity of the upper limbs. Most cases of this condition are related to strenuous or prolonged sport or occupational activities, while others are associated with endogenous or exogenous risk factors. We report the case of a 43-year-old, previously healthy, male who developed right axillary-subclavian venous thrombosis, which was possibly associated with an exercise involving arm extension and shaking in a posture of shoulder abduction and outstretched for 10 minutes on 2 consecutive days. The condition improved but returned with increased severity when he resumed the exercise after a 2-day break, when he presented with a swollen and bluish arm at the emergency department. Sonographic examination showed moderate thrombotic stenosis of the right axillary vein. Effort thrombosis was diagnosed after ruling out associated coagulopathy or concomitant malignancy. External compression of the accessory ribs or lymph nodes were not detected. He was treated with low molecular weight heparin, followed by oral anticoagulant therapy for 6 months. Only partial resolution of thrombosis was achieved after 6 months of anticoagulant therapy, but pulmonary embolism did not occur during 18 months of follow-up. This case illustrates that, although unusual, Paget-Schroetter syndrome can occur in a healthy patient as a result of mild to moderate exercise.

  3. The effect of visual field condition on kinetic in upper extremities and e.m.g in lower extremities while performing reaching in normal adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyekang; Kang, Youngeun; Yoo, Minah; Lee, Bomjin; Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Joongsook; Han, Dongwook; Oh, Taeyoung

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The aims of this study was to investigate mean velocity and angle of shoulder joint, activation of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius according to both eyes, dominant eye and non-dominant eye condition during reaching task in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] Our research recruited 24 participants (male 11, female 13) in Silla University. Participants were performed reaching out movement by conditions of both eye, dominants eye, non-dominants eye. The target was placed at 45 degree diagonal direction and distance far away 130% of their arm length. Kinetic analysis of the upper extremities was investigated by QUALISYS 3-dimensional motion analysis system. Muscle activation were measured by EMG during reaching tasks. The collected data were statistically processed using the SPSS for win version 20.0. [Results] There was a significant difference of shoulder joint velocity of flexion, abduction and internal rotation according to visual field condition during reaching tasks. There was no significant difference of shoulder joint angle and muscle activation according to visual field conditions during reaching tasks. [Conclusion] In conclusion, visual field has an influence on shoulder joint velocity. Therefore, the visual field may be to play an important role in reach performance. PMID:28210047

  4. Falling Down on the Job: Evaluation and Treatment of Fall Risk Among Older Adults With Upper Extremity Fragility Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Christine M; Colla, Carrie H; Carmichael, Donald; Tosteson, Anna N A; Tosteson, Tor D; Bell, John-Erik; Cantu, Robert V; Lurie, Jonathan D; Bynum, Julie P W

    2017-03-01

    Clinical practice guidelines recommend fall risk assessment and intervention for older adults who sustain a fall-related injury to prevent future injury and mobility decline. The aim of this study was to describe how often Medicare beneficiaries with upper extremity fracture receive evaluation and treatment for fall risk. Observational cohort. Participants were fee-for-service beneficiaries age 66 to 99 treated as outpatients for proximal humerus or distal radius/ulna ("wrist") fragility fractures. -Participants were studied using Carrier and Outpatient Hospital files. The proportion of patients evaluated or treated for fall risk up to 6 months after proximal humerus or wrist fracture from 2007-2009 was examined based on evaluation, treatment, and diagnosis codes. Time to evaluation and number of treatment sessions were calculated. Logistic regression was used to analyze patient characteristics that predicted receiving evaluation or treatment. Narrow (gait training) and broad (gait training or therapeutic exercise) definitions of service were used. There were 309,947 beneficiaries who sustained proximal humerus (32%) or wrist fracture (68%); 10.7% received evaluation or treatment for fall risk or gait issues (humerus: 14.2%; wrist: 9.0%). Using the broader definition, the percentage increased to 18.5% (humerus: 23.4%; wrist: 16.3%). Factors associated with higher likelihood of services after fracture were: evaluation or treatment for falls or gait prior to fracture, more comorbidities, prior nursing home stay, older age, humerus fracture (vs wrist), female sex, and white race. Claims analysis may underestimate physician and physical therapist fall assessments, but it is not likely to qualitatively change the results. A small proportion of older adults with upper extremity fracture received fall risk assessment and treatment. Providers and health systems must advance efforts to provide timely evidence-based management of fall risk in this population.

  5. Motor impairments related to brain injury timing in early hemiparesis. Part II: abnormal upper extremity joint torque synergies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukal-Moulton, Theresa; Krosschell, Kristin J; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah J; Dewald, Julius P A

    2014-01-01

    Extensive neuromotor development occurs early in human life, and the timing of brain injury may affect the resulting motor impairment. In Part I of this series, it was demonstrated that the distribution of weakness in the upper extremity depended on the timing of brain injury in individuals with childhood-onset hemiparesis. The goal of this study was to characterize how timing of brain injury affects joint torque synergies, or losses of independent joint control. Twenty-four individuals with hemiparesis were divided into 3 groups based on the timing of their injury: before birth (PRE-natal, n = 8), around the time of birth (PERI-natal, n = 8), and after 6 months of age (POST-natal, n = 8). Individuals with hemiparesis and 8 typically developing peers participated in maximal isometric shoulder, elbow, wrist, and finger torque generation tasks while their efforts were recorded by a multiple degree-of-freedom load cell. Motor output in 4 joints of the upper extremity was concurrently measured during 8 primary torque generation tasks to quantify joint torque synergies. There were a number of significant coupling patterns identified in individuals with hemiparesis that differed from the typically developing group. POST-natal differences were most noted in the coupling of shoulder abductors with elbow, wrist, and finger flexors, while the PRE-natal group demonstrated significant distal joint coupling with elbow flexion. The torque synergies measured provide indirect evidence for the use of bulbospinal pathways in the POST-natal group, while those with earlier injury may use relatively preserved ipsilateral corticospinal motor pathways.

  6. Complaints of Upper Extremity Numbness and Tingling Relieved With Dry Needling of the Teres Minor and Infraspinatus: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Elizabeth; Clewley, Derek; Koppenhaver, Shane

    2017-04-01

    Study Design Case report. Background Abnormal sensation, such as numbness or tingling, is traditionally thought to originate from neural compression. There is limited evidence to support reports of abnormal sensation arising from a trigger point. Case Description The patient was a 60-year-old woman with a primary complaint of right shoulder pain and secondary complaints of neck pain and right upper extremity numbness. Cervical spine neurological examination was unremarkable, and manual examination did not reproduce the patient's arm numbness or tingling symptoms. Compression of a trigger point in the infraspinatus and teres minor reproduced the patient's primary complaint of shoulder pain. The initial intervention included dry needling, which reproduced her upper extremity numbness. Subsequent treatment included manual therapy and exercise. Outcomes The patient was seen for a total of 3 visits, including the evaluation. Dry needling was utilized in 2 of her 3 visits. At discharge, she reported complete resolution of pain and altered sensation. Additionally, her scores on the Neck Disability Index, numeric pain-rating scale, and global rating of change exceeded the minimal clinically important difference. These outcomes were maintained at 2- and 12-month follow-up phone calls. Discussion This case report described the examination and use of dry needling in a case where the diagnosis was unclear. Clinicians may consider trigger point referral when examining patients with reports of abnormal sensation, especially when a more common cause cannot be identified. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 5. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(4):287-292. Epub 3 Mar 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7055.

  7. Neuromusculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities among drivers of all-terrain vehicles – a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Tohr

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to investigate whether professional drivers of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs with neck pain have a different array of neuromusculoskeletal disorders in the neck and upper extremities than a referent group with neck pain from the general population. It is hypothesized that exposure to shock-type vibration and unfavorable working postures in ATVs have the capacity to cause peripheral nervous lesions. Methods This study was based on a case series analyzed according to a case-case comparison design. The study population consisted of 60 male subjects, including professional drivers of forest machines (n = 15, snowmobiles (n = 15, snowgroomers (n = 15 and referents from the general population (n = 15 all of whom had reported neck pain in a questionnaire and underwent an extensive physical examination of the neck and upper extremities. Based on symptom history, symptoms and signs, and in some cases chemical, electroneurographical and radiological findings, subjects were classified as having a nociceptive or neuropathic disorder or a mix of these types. Results The occurrence of asymmetrical and focal neuropathies (peripheral nervous lesion, pure or in a mix with a nociceptive disorder was common among cases in the ATV driver groups (47%–79%. This contrasted with the referents that were less often classified as having asymmetrical and focal neuropathy (27%, but instead had more nociceptive disorders. The difference was most pronounced among drivers of snowgroomers, while drivers of forest machines were more frequently classified as having a nociceptive disorder originating in the muscles. Conclusion This study found a high prevalence of assymetrical and focal neuropathies among drivers with pain in the neck, operating various ATVs. It seems as if exposure to shock-type whole-body vibration (WBV and appurtenant unfavorable postures in ATVs may be associated to peripheral nervous lesions.

  8. Clinical effect of radiation synovectomy of the upper extremity joints: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zant, F.M. van der; Boer, R.O. [Hospital Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Alkmaar (Netherlands); Jahangier, Z.N.; Jacobs, J.W.G. [University Medical Center, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Moolenburgh, J.D.; Swen, W.A.A. [Hospital Medical Center Alkmaar, Department of Rheumatology, Alkmaar (Netherlands)

    2007-02-15

    To compare the clinical efficacy of radiosynoviorthesis (RSO) with intra-articular radionuclide plus glucocorticoid (GC) injection (group A) with that of placebo plus GC injection (group B) for the treatment of persistent synovitis in joints of the upper extremity. At baseline and at 6 and 12 months after intra-articular injection, six clinical parameters were scored. Changes in clinical values over time were summed to provide a change composite index (CCI), ranging from 0 (no effect) to 12 (maximal effect). A CCI {>=}6 was considered to indicate successful treatment. Differences in response rate and CCI between groups A and B were examined. Regression analyses were performed to explore whether baseline variables could predict therapeutic effect. Sixty-eight joints in 44 patients were treated. Six months after intra-articular injection, response rates (CCI {>=}6) were 69% (25/36) in group A and 29% (9/31) in group B (p=0.001). The mean CCIs {+-} standard deviation at 6 months were 6.7{+-}3.2 for group A and 3.3{+-}3.8 for group B (p=0.001). At 12 months the response rates were 69% (25/36) in group A and 32% (8/25) in group B (p=0.004). The mean CCIs at 12 months were 6.8{+-}3.3 for group A and 4.2{+-}4.7 for group B (p= 0.046). None of the baseline variables predicted the therapeutic effect. RSO (radionuclide plus GC) of upper extremity joints with immobilisation for 72 h shows a significantly better response rate than placebo plus GC in patients with persistent synovitis after at least one failed outpatient intra-articular GC injection. (orig.)

  9. A pilot study evaluating use of a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform for upper-extremity stroke assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a need to develop cost-effective, sensitive stroke assessment instruments. One approach is examining kinematic measures derived from goal-directed tasks, which can potentially be sensitive to the subtle changes in the stroke rehabilitation process. This paper presents the findings from a pilot study that uses a computer-assisted neurorehabilitation platform, interfaced with a conventional force-reflecting joystick, to examine the assessment capability of the system by various types of goal-directed tasks. Methods Both stroke subjects with hemiparesis and able-bodied subjects used the force-reflecting joystick to complete a suite of goal-directed tasks under various task settings. Kinematic metrics, developed for specific types of goal-directed tasks, were used to assess various aspects of upper-extremity motor performance across subjects. Results A number of metrics based on kinematic performance were able to differentiate subjects with different impairment levels, with metrics associated with accuracy, steadiness and speed consistency showing the best capability. Significant differences were also shown on these metrics between various force field settings. Conclusion The results support the potential of using UniTherapy software with a conventional joystick system as an upper-extremity assessment instrument. We demonstrated the ability of using various types of goal-directed tasks to distinguish between subjects with different impairment levels. In addition, we were able to show that different force fields have a significant effect on the performance across subjects with different impairment levels in the trajectory tracking task. These results provide motivation for studies with a larger sample size that can more completely span the impairment space, and can use insights presented here to refine considerations of various task settings so as to generalize and extend our conclusions.

  10. Accuracy and consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy in upper and lower extremity fracture treatment: A systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beerekamp, M.S.H., E-mail: m.s.beerekamp@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sulkers, George S.I., E-mail: georgesulkers@gmail.com [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Ubbink, Dirk T., E-mail: D.Ubbink@amc.nl [Department of Quality and Process Innovation, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Maas, Mario, E-mail: M.Maas@amc.nl [Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Schep, Niels W.L., E-mail: N.W.Schep@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Goslings, J. Carel, E-mail: J.C.Goslings@amc.nl [Trauma Unit, Department of Surgery, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aim of this systematic review was to compare the diagnostic accuracy, subjective image quality and clinical consequences of 3D-fluoroscopy with standard imaging modalities (2D-fluoroscopy, X-ray or CT) during reduction and fixation of intra-articular upper and lower extremity fractures. Methods: A systematic literature search was performed in MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane library. In total 673 articles were identified (up to March 2012). The 19 included studies described patients/cadavers with intra-articular upper/lower extremity fractures and compared 3D-fluoroscopy to standard imaging. The study was performed in accordance with the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS) guidelines. Diagnostic accuracy was defined by the quality of fracture reduction or implant position and, if possible, expressed as sensitivity and specificity; subjective image quality was determined by the quality of depiction of bone or implants; clinical consequences were defined as corrections in reduction or implant position following 3D-fluoroscopy. Results: Ten cadaver- and nine clinical studies were included. A meta-analysis was not possible, because studies used different scoring protocols to express diagnostic accuracy and reported incomplete data. Based on the individual studies, diagnostic accuracy of 3D-fluoroscopy was better than 2D-fluoroscopy and X-ray, but similar to CT-scanning. Subjective image quality of 3D-fluoroscopy was inferior compared to all other imaging modalities. In 11–40% of the operations additional corrections were performed after 3D-fluoroscopy, while the necessity for these corrections were not recognized based on 2D-fluoroscopic images. Conclusions: Although subjective image quality is rated inferior compared to other imaging modalities, intra-operative use of 3D-fluoroscopy is a helpful diagnostic tool for improving the quality of reduction and implant position in intra-articular fractures.

  11. Second-order complex linear differential equations with special functions or extremal functions as coefficients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiubi Wu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The classical problem of finding conditions on the entire coefficients A(z and B(z guaranteeing that all nontrivial solutions of $f''+A(zf'+B(zf=0$ are of infinite order is discussed. Two distinct approaches are used. In the first approach the coefficient A(z itself is a solution of a differential equation $w''+P(zw=0$, where P(z is a polynomial. This assumption yields stability on the behavior of A(z via Hille's classical method on asymptotic integration. In this case A(z is a special function of which the Airy integral is one example. The second approach involves extremal functions. It is assumed that either A(z is extremal for Yang's inequality or B(z is extremal for Denjoy's conjecture. A combination of these two approaches is also discussed.

  12. Effect of horizontal position of the computer keyboard on upper extremity posture and muscular load during computer work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotani, K; Barrero, L H; Lee, D L; Dennerlein, J T

    2007-09-01

    The distance of the keyboard from the edge of a work surface has been associated with hand and arm pain; however, the variation in postural and muscular effects with the horizontal position have not been explicitly explored in previous studies. It was hypothesized that the wrist approaches more of a neutral posture as the keyboard distance from the edge of table increases. In a laboratory setting, 20 adults completed computer tasks using four workstation configurations: with the keyboard at the edge of the work surface (NEAR), 8 cm from the edge and 15 cm from the edge, the latter condition also with a pad that raised the work surface proximal to the keyboard (FWP). Electrogoniometers and an electromagnetic motion analysis system measured wrist and upper arm postures and surface electromyography measured muscle activity of two forearm and two shoulder muscles. Wrist ulnar deviation decreased by 50% (4 degrees ) as the keyboard position moved away from the user. Without a pad, wrist extension increased by 20% (4 degrees ) as the keyboard moved away but when the pad was added, wrist extension did not differ from that in the NEAR configuration. Median values of wrist extensor muscle activity decreased by 4% maximum voluntary contraction for the farthest position with a pad (FWP). The upper arm followed suit: flexion increased while abduction and internal rotation decreased as the keyboard was positioned further away from the edge of the table. In order to achieve neutral postures of the upper extremity, the keyboard position in the horizontal plane has an important role and needs to be considered within the context of workstation designs and interventions.

  13. Mirror Electromyografic Activity in the Upper and Lower Extremity: A Comparison between Endurance Athletes and Non-Athletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Maudrich

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available During unimanual motor tasks, muscle activity may not be restricted to the contracting muscle, but rather occurs involuntarily in the contralateral resting limb, even in healthy individuals. This phenomenon has been referred to as mirror electromyographic activity (MEMG. To date, the physiological (non-pathological form of MEMG has been observed predominately in upper extremities (UE, while remaining sparsely described in lower extremities (LE. Accordingly, evidence regarding the underlying mechanisms and modulation capability of MEMG, i.e., the extent of MEMG in dependency of exerted force during unilateral isometric contractions are insufficiently investigated in terms of LE. Furthermore, it still remains elusive if and how MEMG is affected by long-term exercise training. Here, we provide novel quantitative evidence for physiological MEMG in homologous muscles of LE (tibialis anterior (TA, rectus femoris (RF during submaximal unilateral dorsiflexion in healthy young adults. Furthermore, endurance athletes (EA, n = 11 show a higher extent of MEMG in LE compared to non-athletes (NA, n = 11 at high force demands (80% MVC, maximum voluntary contraction. While the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of MEMG still remain elusive, our study indicates, at least indirectly, that sport-related long-term training might affect the amount of MEMG during strong isometric contractions specifically in trained limbs. To support this assumption of exercise-induced limb-specific MEMG modulation, future studies including different sports disciplines with contrasting movement patterns and parameters should additionally be performed.

  14. Rehabilitation plus OnabotulinumtoxinA Improves Motor Function over OnabotulinumtoxinA Alone in Post-Stroke Upper Limb Spasticity: A Single-Blind, Randomized Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deidre Devier

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: OnabotulinumtoxinA (BoNT-A can temporarily decrease spasticity following stroke, but whether there is an associated improvement in upper limb function is less clear. This study measured the benefit of adding weekly rehabilitation to a background of BoNT-A treatments for chronic upper limb spasticity following stroke. Methods: This was a multi-center clinical trial. Thirty-one patients with post-stroke upper limb spasticity were treated with BoNT-A. They were then randomly assigned to 24 weeks of weekly upper limb rehabilitation or no rehabilitation. They were injected up to two times, and followed for 24 weeks. The primary outcome was change in the Fugl–Meyer upper extremity score, which measures motor function, sensation, range of motion, coordination, and speed. Results: The ‘rehab’ group significantly improved on the Fugl–Meyer upper extremity score (Visit 1 = 60, Visit 5 = 67 while the ‘no rehab’ group did not improve (Visit 1 = 59, Visit 5 = 59; p = 0.006. This improvement was largely driven by the upper extremity “movement” subscale, which showed that the ‘rehab’ group was improving (Visit 1 = 33, Visit 5 = 37 while the ‘no rehab’ group remained virtually unchanged (Visit 1 = 34, Visit 5 = 33; p = 0.034. Conclusions: Following injection of BoNT-A, adding a program of rehabilitation improved motor recovery compared to an injected group with no rehabilitation.

  15. Influence of augmented feedback on learning upper extremity tasks after stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molier, B.I.

    2012-01-01

    With upcoming innovative technologies more possibilities arise in the application of augmented feedback in rehabilitation therapy of the hemiparetic arm after stroke. The effect of different aspects and types of augmented feedback on motor functions and motor activities of the hemiparetic arm after

  16. Effect of a robotic rehabilitation device on upper limb function in a sub-acute cervical spinal cord injury population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zariffa, José; Kapadia, Naaz; Kramer, John L K; Taylor, Philippa; Alizadeh-Meghrazi, Milad; Zivanovic, Vera; Willms, Rhonda; Townson, Andrea; Curt, Armin; Popovic, Milos R; Steeves, John D

    2011-01-01

    Robotic rehabilitation devices have been suggested as a tool to increase the amount of rehabilitation delivered after a neurological injury. Clinical robotic rehabilitation studies of the upper extremity have generally focused on stroke survivors. We present the results of a multi-center pilot study where an upper-limb robotic rehabilitation device (Armeo Spring®, Hocoma AG) was incorporated into the rehabilitation program of 12 subjects with sub-acute cervical spinal cord injury (motor level C4-C6, AIS A-D). Outcomes were measured using two tests of upper extremity function: ARAT and GRASSP. The change in scores for the arm receiving the Armeo training were not statistically significant when compared to the arm not receiving the Armeo training at discharge from therapy and over follow up assessments (8.7 +/- 2.9 compared to 7.4 +/- 2.5 for ARAT at discharge, p = 0.98, and 13.0 +/- 3.2 compared to 13.3 +/- 3.3 for GRASSP at discharge, p = 0.69). Nevertheless, subjects with some minimal (partial) hand function at baseline had a significantly larger increase in GRASSP scores than subjects with no minimal hand function preserved at baseline (19.3 +/- 2.4 compared to 6.6 +/- 4.7, p = 0.02). This suggests that the initial functional capabilities of patients can influence the benefits measured after robotic rehabilitation training and heterogeneous subject populations should be avoided in early phase studies. © 2011 IEEE

  17. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of somatosensorial evoked potentials of upper extremities in cervical intervertebral disc herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umur, Ahmet Sukru; Selcuki, Mehmet; Selcuki, Deniz; Temiz, Cuneyt; Akbasak, Aytac

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to determine the dysfunction caused by existing pathological condition in structures involved in the transfer of sensory functions of the neural system in cervical disc herniation, and to establish whether or not the level and degree of this anatomical damage can be anticipated by SEP (Somatosensorial Evoked Potentials). We compared the obtained SEP values for statistical significance using the Friedman Variation Analysis. In parameters with statistical significance, the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test was used to identify when significant improvements occurred. The study found that the statistical data of the latency of the N14 wave originating from the dorsal column nuclei of the medulla spinalis and dorsal column gray matter improved (p < 0.05) in the postoperative period compared with the preoperative values. Using the Wilcoxon Signed Rank test, we studied postoperative months separately in regard to the difference in the latency of the N14 wave, and found the statistically significant improvement to be marked particularly in months 3 and 6 postoperatively (p < 0.05). In conclusion, we suggest that SEP is a useful tool to check the functional condition of the dorsal spinal column. The benefit of the SEP utilization is the ability to determine the severity of the pathological condition preoperatively and follow the patient's functional postoperative improvement.

  18. Voice-Activated Lightweight Reacher to Assist with Upper Extremity Movement Limitations: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Umer; Conti, Gerry E; Erlandson, Robert F; Ellis, Richard D; Brown, Vince; Pandya, Abhilash K

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was to design a functional and user-friendly reacher for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Engineering advancements have taken assistive robotics to new dimensions. Technologies such as wheelchair robotics and myo-electronically controlled systems have opened up a wide range of new applications to assist people with physical disabilities. Similarly, exo-skeletal limbs and body suits have provided new foundations from which technologies can aid function. Unfortunately, these devices have issues of usability, weight, and discomfort with donning. The Smart Assistive Reacher Arm (SARA) system, developed in this research, is a voice-activated, lightweight, mobile device that can be used when needed. SARA was built to help overcome daily reach challenges faced by individuals with limited arm and hand movement capability, such as people with cervical level 5-6 (C5-6) SCI. This article shows that a functional reacher arm with voice control can be beneficial for this population. Comparison study with healthy participants and an SCI participant shows that, when using SARA, a person with SCI can perform simple reach and grasp tasks independently, without someone else's help. This suggests that the interface is intuitive and can be easily used to a high level of proficiency by a SCI individual.

  19. Sensory deficits in ipsilesional upper-extremity in chronic stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Núbia Maria Freire Vieira Lima

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate somatosensory deficits in the ipsilesional wrist and hand in chronic stroke patients and correlate these deficits with contralesional sensorimotor dysfunctions, functional testing, laterality and handedness.Methods Fifty subjects (twenty-two healthy volunteers and twenty-eight stroke patients underwent evaluation with Semmes-Weinstein monofilaments, the sensory and motor Fugl-Meyer Assessment, the Nottingham Sensory Assessment in both wrists and hands and functional tests.Results Twenty-five patients had sensory changes in the wrist and hand contralateral to the stroke, and eighteen patients (64% had sensory deficits in the ipsilesional wrist and hand. The most significant ipsilesional sensory loss was observed in the left-handed patients. We found that the patients with brain damage in the right hemisphere had better scores for ipsilesional tactile sensation.Conclusions A reduction in ipsilesional conscious proprioception, tactile or thermal sensation was found in stroke subjects. Right hemisphere damage and right-handed subjects had better scores in ipsilesional tactile sensation.

  20. Feedback-Mediated Upper Extremities Exercise: Increasing Patient Motivation in Poststroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša D. Popović

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This proof-of-concept study investigated whether feedback-mediated exercise (FME of the affected arm of hemiplegic patients increases patient motivation and promotes greater improvement of motor function, compared to no-feedback exercise (NFE. Method. We developed a feedback-mediated treatment that uses gaming scenarios and allows online and offline monitoring of both temporal and spatial characteristics of planar movements. Twenty poststroke hemiplegic inpatients, randomly assigned to the FME and NFE group, received therapy five days a week for three weeks. The outcome measures were evaluated from the following: (1 the modified drawing test (mDT, (2 received therapy time—RTT, and (3 intrinsic motivation inventory—IMI. Results. The FME group patients showed significantly higher improvement in the speed metric (P<0.01, and smoothness metric (P<0.01, as well as higher RTT (P<0.01. Significantly higher patient motivation is observed in the FME group (interest/enjoyment subscale (P<0.01 and perceived competence subscale (P<0.01. Conclusion. Prolonged endurance in training and greater improvement in certain areas of motor function, as well as very high patient motivation and strong positive impressions about the treatment, suggest the positive effects of feedback-mediated treatment and its high level of acceptance by patients.

  1. Comparison between Steroid Injection and Stretching Exercise on the Scalene of Patients with Upper Extremity Paresthesia: Randomized Cross-Over Study

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yong Wook; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Park, Yongbum; Chang, Won Hyuk; Lee, Sang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To compare the therapeutic effects on upper extremity paresthesia of intra-muscular steroid injections into the scalene muscle with those of stretching exercise only. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with upper extremity paresthesia who met the criteria were recruited to participate in this single-blind, crossover study. Fourteen of 20 patients were female. The average age was 45.0±10.5 years and duration of symptom was 12.2±8.7 months. Each participant completed one injection an...

  2. Retrograde Tempofilter II{sup TM} Placement within the Superior Vena Cava in a Patient with Acute Upper Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis: the Filter Stands on Its Head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim, Nam Yeol [The Armed Forces Yangju Hospital, Yangju (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Nam Kyu; Lim, Jae Hoon; Kim, Jae Kyu [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15

    The Tempofilter II is a widely used temporary vena cava filter. Its unique design, which includes a long tethering catheter with a subcutaneous anchor, facilitates the deployment and retrieval of the device. Despite this, the Tempofi lter II has been used only in the inferior vena cava of patients with lower extremity deep venous thrombosis. In this article, we present a case of superior vena cava filtering using the Tempofilter II in patients with upper extremity deep venous thrombosis

  3. Optimal dimensional synthesis of a symmetrical five-bar planar upper-extremity neuromotor device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jianshe; Li, Mingxiang; Allison, Garry; Cui, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Individuals with hemiplegia suffer from impaired arm movements that appear as a marked change in arm stiffness. A quantitative measure of arm stiffness would characterize rehabilitation therapy effectively, while little mechanism is designed to implement the function. A symmetrical five-bar linkage consisting of two revolute joints and three prismatic joints is presented. Inverse kinematics and forward kinematics are obtained first. Then inverse singularities and direct singularities of the mechanism are gained. The global stiffness index is defined based on the results of kinematics analysis. Finally, optimal dimensional synthesis of the mechanism in terms of maximum stiffness is conducted by genetic algorithms. The calculation results show that with the length of both the two linkage a=830 mm, the interacting angle of the two guides 2 δ=4.48 radian, and the maximum range of displacement of the two carriers d max=940 mm, the mechanism achieves highest rigidity and its workspace is singularity-free, which covers the human left and right arm range of motion. The proposed novel mechanism featuring high rigidity and a singularity-free workspace can provide rehabilitation training, also solve the problem of quantitative measure of arm stiffness.

  4. Optimal Dimensional Synthesis of a Symmetrical Five-Bar Planar Upper-Extremity Neuromotor Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jianshe; LI Mingxiang; ALLISON Garry; CUI Lei

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with hemiplegia suffer from impaired arm movements that appear as a marked change in arm stiffness. A quantitative measure of arm stiffness would characterize rehabilitation therapy effectively, while little mechanism is designed to implement the function. A symmetrical five-bar linkage consisting of two revolute joints and three prismatic joints is presented. Inverse kinematics and forward kinematics are obtained first. Then inverse singularities and direct singularities of the mechanism are gained. The global stiffness index is defined based on the results of kinematics analysis. Finally, optimal dimensional synthesis of the mechanism in terms of maximum stiffness is conducted by genetic algorithms. The calculation results show that with the length of both the two linkage a=830 mm, the interacting angle of the two guides 2δ=4.48 radian, and the maximum range of displacement of the two carriers dmax=940 mm, the mechanism achieves highest rigidity and its workspace is singularity-free, which covers the human left and right arm range of motion. The proposed novel mechanism featuring high rigidity and a singularity-free workspace can provide rehabilitation training, also solve the problem of quantitative measure of arm stiffness.

  5. EFFECTIVENESS OF THE MOTOR RELEARNING APPROACH IN PROMOTING PHYSICAL FUNCTION OF THE UPPER LIMB AFTER A STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneel Kumar Immadi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:More than decades Stroke is one of the most frequently occurring disabling disease in the world. Reduced upper extremity function affects the ability to perform activities of daily living, which is likely to reduce independence, function of upper extremity is more difficult than the lower extremity. It can seriously impact the progress of rehabilitation. Methods: 60 outpatients are identified irrespective of hemorrhagic or thrombotic stroke, among those 30 patients received 40 1-h sessions in eight weeks (5 days/week of conventional physiotherapy programme taken as group-A and another 30 patients were received 40 1-h sessions in eight weeks (5 days/week of Motor relearning programme taken as group-B. Results: After the treatment sessions Patients who received motor relearning programme showed significantly better functional ability when assessing their functional status by task oriented performance than the conventional physiotherapy programme in both outcome scoring values, mean age of the subject who participated in study is 51 years. FMA (n=30 post-test mean=32.27 GROUP-A post-test mean=43.80 GROUP-B T test value t = 5.3743, p- value= < 0.0001 WMFT (n=30 post-test mean=39.80 GROUP-A, post-test mean=71.45 GROUP-B T test value t = 10.3401, p- value= < 0.0001 Conclusion: Motor relearning programme is found to be effective than the conventional physical therapy programme for enhancing functional recovery of the upper limb in stroke patients.

  6. Neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord in the treatment of chronic intractable neck and upper extremity pain: a case series and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Kramer, Jeffery; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2007-03-01

    Electrical spinal neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord stimulation is currently used for treating chronic painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, peripheral ischemia, low back pain, and other conditions refractory to more conservative treatments. To date, there are very few published reports documenting the use of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of head/neck and upper limb pain. This paper reports a case series of 5 consecutive patients outlining the use of spinal cord stimulation to treat upper extremity pain. All subjects had previously undergone cervical fusion surgery to treat chronic neck and upper limb pain. Patients were referred following failure of the surgery to manage their painful conditions. Spinal cord stimulators were placed in the cervical epidural space through a thoracic needle placement. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to capture as much of the painful area(s) as possible. In total, 4 out of 5 patients moved to implantation. In all cases, patients reported significant (70-90%) reductions in pain, including axial neck pain and upper extremity pain. Interestingly, 2 patients with associated headache and lower extremity pain obtained relief after paresthesia-steering reportedly covered those areas. Moreover, 2 patients reported that cervical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved axial low back pain. Patients continue to report excellent pain relief up to 9 months following implantation. This case series documents the successful treatment of neck and upper extremity pain following unsuccessful cervical spine fusion surgery. Given this initial success, prospective, controlled studies are warranted to more adequately assess the long term utility and cost effectiveness of electrical neuromodulation treatment of chronic neck and upper extremity pain.

  7. Extreme Associated Functions: Optimally Linking Local Extremes to Large-scale Atmospheric Circulation Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Panja, Debabrata

    2007-01-01

    We present a new statistical method to optimally link local weather extremes to large-scale atmospheric circulation structures. The method is illustrated using July-August daily mean temperature at 2m height (T2m) time-series over the Netherlands and 500 hPa geopotential height (Z500) time-series over the Euroatlantic region of the ECMWF reanalysis dataset (ERA40). The method identifies patterns in the Z500 time-series that optimally describe, in a precise mathematical sense, the relationship with local warm extremes in the Netherlands. Two patterns are identified; the most important one corresponds to a blocking high pressure system leading to subsidence and calm, dry and sunny conditions over the Netherlands. The second one corresponds to a rare, easterly flow regime bringing warm, dry air into the region. The patterns are robust; they are also identified in shorter subsamples of the total dataset. The method is generally applicable and might prove useful in evaluating the performance of climate models in s...

  8. The effects of upper extremity task training with symmetric abdominal muscle contraction on trunk stability and balance in chronic stroke patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Je-Hyeok; Choi, Jong-Duk

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of upper extremity task training employing the bracing method on the trunk control and balance of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 46 stroke patients whose strokes had occurred six months or more prior to the study. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group underwent upper extremity task training with symmetric abdominal muscle contraction (bracing) applied. The other group simply underwent upper extremity task training, without bracing. [Results] The experimental group's Trunk Impairment Scale (TIS) significantly increased after the intervention, whereas the control group did not see any significant difference. There was significant improvement in balance after the intervention in both the experimental group and the control group. According to the between-group comparisons, the improvements in the experimental group were significantly greater in the control group, except in the Postural Assessment Scale (PASS). [Conclusion] Based on the results of this study, upper extremity task exercises with symmetric abdominal muscle contraction, conducted as part of adult hemiplegic patients' trunk stabilization exercises, can be applied to a diverse range of hemiplegic patients and implemented as an exercise program after discharge from hospital.

  9. Test-retest and inter- and intrareliability of the quality of the upper-extremity skills test in preschool-age children with cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haga, Nienke; van der Heijden-Maessen, Helene C.; van Hoorn, Jessika F.; Boonstra, Antje; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the test-retest, inter-, and intraobserver reliability of the Quality of Upper Extremity Skills Test (QUEST) in young children with cerebral palsy (CP). Design: For test-retest reliability, a test-retest design was used; for the intra- and interobserver reliability, the

  10. Optimum interpulse interval for transcranial electrical train stimulation to elicit motor evoked potentials of maximal amplitude in both upper and lower extremity target muscles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hal, C.; Hoebink, E.; Polak, H. E.; Racz, I.; de Kleuver, M.; Journee, H. L.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the optimum interpulse interval (OIPI) for transcranial electrical train stimulation to elicit muscle motor evoked potentials (TES-MEP) with maximal amplitude in upper and lower extremities during intra-operative spinal cord monitoring. Methods: Intr

  11. Impact of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of neck and upper extremities on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. IJzelenberg (Wilhelmina); A. Burdorf (Alex)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: To describe the presence of musculoskeletal co-morbidity of the neck and upper extremities among industrial workers with low back pain, and to examine whether it has an impact on healthcare utilisation and sickness absence for low back pain. METHODS: A self admini

  12. Effectiveness of a feedback signal in a computer mouse on upper extremity musculoskeletal symptoms: a