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Sample records for functional ultrasound imaging

  1. Ultrasound strain imaging for quantification of tissue function: cardiovascular applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Korte, Chris L.; Lopata, Richard G. P.; Hansen, Hendrik H. G.

    2013-03-01

    With ultrasound imaging, the motion and deformation of tissue can be measured. Tissue can be deformed by applying a force on it and the resulting deformation is a function of its mechanical properties. Quantification of this resulting tissue deformation to assess the mechanical properties of tissue is called elastography. If the tissue under interrogation is actively deforming, the deformation is directly related to its function and quantification of this deformation is normally referred as `strain imaging'. Elastography can be used for atherosclerotic plaques characterization, while the contractility of the heart or skeletal muscles can be assessed with strain imaging. We developed radio frequency (RF) based ultrasound methods to assess the deformation at higher resolution and with higher accuracy than commercial methods using conventional image data (Tissue Doppler Imaging and 2D speckle tracking methods). However, the improvement in accuracy is mainly achieved when measuring strain along the ultrasound beam direction, so 1D. We further extended this method to multiple directions and further improved precision by using compounding of data acquired at multiple beam steered angles. In arteries, the presence of vulnerable plaques may lead to acute events like stroke and myocardial infarction. Consequently, timely detection of these plaques is of great diagnostic value. Non-invasive ultrasound strain compounding is currently being evaluated as a diagnostic tool to identify the vulnerability of plaques. In the heart, we determined the strain locally and at high resolution resulting in a local assessment in contrary to conventional global functional parameters like cardiac output or shortening fraction.

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures ... limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  3. Carotid Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Carotid Carotid ultrasound uses sound waves to produce ... limitations of Carotid Ultrasound Imaging? What is Carotid Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, ... through the blood vessels. top of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the ... of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ... usually stain or discolor clothing. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... not stain or discolor clothing. In some ultrasound studies, the transducer is attached to a probe and ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles or injections). Occasionally, an ultrasound exam may be temporarily uncomfortable, ... the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery General ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... attached to a probe and inserted into a natural opening in the body. These exams include: Transesophageal ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to ... type of examination you will have. For some scans your doctor may instruct you not to eat ...

  15. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdominal ultrasound is a scanning technique used to image the interior of the abdomen. Like the X-ray, MRI, ... it has its place as a diagnostic tool. Ultrasound scans use high frequency sound waves to produce ...

  16. Transvaginal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transvaginal ultrasound is a method of imaging the genital tract in females. A hand held probe is inserted directly ... vaginal cavity to scan the pelvic structures, while ultrasound pictures are viewed on a monitor. The test ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: ... Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? What is Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, ... through the blood vessels. top of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you ...

  1. Cavernosal nerve functionality evaluation after magnetic resonance imaging-guided transurethral ultrasound treatment of the prostate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Steffen Sammet; Ari Partanen; Ambereen Yousuf; Christina L Sammet; Emily V Ward; Craig Wardrip; Marek Niekrasz; Tatjana Antic; Aria Razmaria; Keyvan Farahani; Shunmugavelu Sokka; Gregory Karczmar; Aytekin Oto

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the feasibility of using therapeutic ultrasound as an alternative treatment option for organconfined prostate cancer. METHODS: In this study, a trans-urethral therapeutic ultrasound applicator in combination with 3T magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) guidance was used for realtime multi-planar MRI-based temperature monitoring and temperature feedback control of prostatic tissue thermal ablation in vivo. We evaluated the feasibility and safety of MRI-guided trans-urethral ultrasound to effectively and accurately ablate prostate tissue while minimizing the damage to surrounding tissues in eight canine prostates. MRI was used to plan sonications, monitor temperature changes during therapy, and to evaluate treatment outcome. Real-time temperature and thermal dose maps were calculated using the proton resonance frequency shift technique and were displayed as two-dimensional color-coded overlays on top of the anatomical images. After ultrasound treatment, an evaluation of the integrity of cavernosal nerves was performed during prostatectomy with a nerve stimulator that measured tumescence response quantitatively and indicated intact cavernous nerve functionality. Planned sonication volumes were visually correlated to MRI ablation volumes and corresponding histo-pathological sections after prostatectomy. RESULTS: A total of 16 sonications were performed in 8 canines. MR images acquired before ultrasound treatment were used to localize the prostate and to prescribe sonication targets in all canines. Temperature elevations corresponded within 1 degree of the targeted sonication angle, as well as with the width and length of the active transducer elements. The ultrasound treatment procedures were automatically interrupted when the temperature in the target zone reached 56 ℃. In all canines erectile responses were evaluated with a cavernous nerve stimulator post-treatment and showed a tumescence response after stimulation with an electric current. These

  2. Ultrasound contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranquart, F; Arditi, M; Bettinger, T; Frinking, P; Hyvelin, J M; Nunn, A; Pochon, S; Tardy, I

    2014-11-01

    Ultrasound is a real-time imaging technique which is widely used in many clinical applications for its capacity to provide anatomic information with high spatial and temporal resolution. The advent of ultrasound contrast agents in combination with contrast-specific imaging modes has given access to perfusion assessments at an organ level, leading to an improved diagnostic accuracy. More recently, the development of biologically-targeted ultrasound contrast agents has expanded the role of ultrasound even further into molecular imaging applications. Ultrasound molecular imaging can be used to visualize the expression of intravascular markers, and to assess their local presence over time and/or during therapeutic treatment. Major applications are in the field of inflammation and neoangiogenesis due to the strictly intravascular presence of microbubbles. Various technologies have been investigated for attaching the targeting moiety to the shell from simple biotin-avidin constructs to more elaborated insertion within the shell through attachment to PEG residues. This important improvement has allowed a clinical translation of initial pre-clinical investigations, opening the way for an early detection and an accurate characterization of lesions in patients. The combination of anatomic, functional and molecular information/data provided by contrast ultrasound is a powerful tool which is still in its infancy due to the lack of agents suitable for clinical use. The advantages of ultrasound techniques combined with the molecular signature of lesions will represent a significant advance in imaging in the field of personalized medicine. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate ... for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the ultrasound equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  9. Renal Function and Ultrasound Imaging in Elderly Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Zanoli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated in elderly subjects (a the ability of GFR formulas to discriminate chronic kidney disease (CKD, (b the correlation between renal morphology and function, and (c the usefulness of combined r-US and GFR formulas to detect CKD. A total of 72 patients were enrolled (mean age 80 ± 7 years, male sex 44%, serum creatinine 0.98 ± 0.42 mg/dL, and CKD 57%. Cockcroft-Gault showed the highest sensitivity (78% and specificity (94% for CKD and was correlated with kidney volume (R=0.68, P<0.001. All formulas failed to provide a reliable estimate of GFR. In multivariate analysis, Cockcroft-Gault < 52 mL/min and kidney sinus section area < 28 cm2 showed the highest accuracy for the identification of CKD subjects (AUC 0.90, P<0.001. MDRD and CKD-EPI differed significantly for GFR ≥90 mL/min. Conclusions. Cockcroft-Gault < 52 mL/min was able to discriminate subjects with CKD but all formulas failed to provide a reliable estimate of GFR. The combined use of r-US and Cockcroft-Gault formula improved the ability to discriminate CKD in elderly subjects.

  10. Ultrasound focusing images in superlattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narita, Michiko; Tanaka, Yukihiro; Tamura, Shin-ichiro [Department of Applied Physics, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    2002-03-04

    We study theoretically ultrasound focusing in periodic multilayered structures, or superlattices, by solving the wave equation with the Green function method and calculating the transmitted ultrasound amplitude images of both the longitudinal and transverse modes. The constituent layers assumed are elastically isotropic but the periodically stacked structure is anisotropic. Thus anisotropy of ultrasound propagation is predicted even at low frequencies and it is enhanced significantly at higher frequencies due to the zone-folding effect of acoustic dispersion relations. An additional effect studied is the interference of ultrasound (known as the internal diffraction), which can be recognized when the propagation distance is comparable to the ultrasound wavelength. Numerical examples are developed for millimetre-scale Al/polymer multilayers used recently for imaging experiment with surface acoustic waves. (author)

  11. Ultrasound skin imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfageme Roldán, F

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of high-frequency ultrasound waves with the skin provides the basis for noninvasive, fast, and accessible diagnostic imaging. This tool is increasingly used in skin cancer and inflammatory conditions as well as in cosmetic dermatology. This article reviews the basic principles of skin ultrasound and its applications in the different areas of dermatology.

  12. A textural approach based on Gabor functions for texture edge detection in ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C M; Lu, H H; Han, K C

    2001-04-01

    Edge detection is an important, but difficult, step in quantitative ultrasound (US) image analysis. In this paper, we present a new textural approach for detecting a class of edges in US images; namely, the texture edges with a weak regional mean gray-level difference (RMGD) between adjacent regions. The proposed approach comprises a vision model-based texture edge detector using Gabor functions and a new texture-enhancement scheme. The experimental results on the synthetic edge images have shown that the performances of the four tested textural and nontextural edge detectors are about 20%-95% worse than that of the proposed approach. Moreover, the texture enhancement may improve the performance of the proposed texture edge detector by as much as 40%. The experiments on 20 clinical US images have shown that the proposed approach can find reasonable edges for real objects of interest with the performance of 0.4 +/- 0.08 in terms of the Pratt's figure.

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... are sometimes the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... General ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and congenital vascular malformations reduced or absent blood ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... time, rather than as a color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that ... speed and direction of blood flow through a blood vessel. Power Doppler is a newer technique that is ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Appendicitis Images related to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo. ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is performed to evaluate ... for ultrasound examinations. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  11. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation

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    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.edu

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Ultrasound molecular imaging is a highly sensitive modality. • A clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent has entered first in human clinical trials. • Several new potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging are being explored. - Abstract: Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  12. Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim Løkke

    2006-01-01

    The paper describes the use of synthetic aperture (SA) imaging in medical ultrasound. SA imaging is a radical break with today's commercial systems, where the image is acquired sequentially one image line at a time. This puts a strict limit on the frame rate and the possibility of acquiring...... a sufficient amount of data for high precision flow estimation. These constrictions can be lifted by employing SA imaging. Here data is acquired simultaneously from all directions over a number of emissions, and the full image can be reconstructed from this data. The talk will demonstrate the many benefits...... of SA imaging. Due to the complete data set, it is possible to have both dynamic transmit and receive focusing to improve contrast and resolution. It is also possible to improve penetration depth by employing codes during ultrasound transmission. Data sets for vector flow imaging can be acquired using...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  15. Quantitative ultrasound in cancer imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feleppa, Ernest J; Mamou, Jonathan; Porter, Christopher R; Machi, Junji

    2011-02-01

    Ultrasound is a relatively inexpensive, portable, and versatile imaging modality that has a broad range of clinical uses. It incorporates many imaging modes, such as conventional gray-scale "B-mode" imaging to display echo amplitude in a scanned plane; M-mode imaging to track motion at a given fixed location over time; duplex, color, and power Doppler imaging to display motion in a scanned plane; harmonic imaging to display nonlinear responses to incident ultrasound; elastographic imaging to display relative tissue stiffness; and contrast-agent imaging with simple contrast agents to display blood-filled spaces or with targeted agents to display specific agent-binding tissue types. These imaging modes have been well described in the scientific, engineering, and clinical literature. A less well-known ultrasonic imaging technology is based on quantitative ultrasound (QUS), which analyzes the distribution of power as a function of frequency in the original received echo signals from tissue and exploits the resulting spectral parameters to characterize and distinguish among tissues. This article discusses the attributes of QUS-based methods for imaging cancers and providing improved means of detecting and assessing tumors. The discussion will include applications to imaging primary prostate cancer and metastatic cancer in lymph nodes to illustrate the methods. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. QUANTIFICATION OF RIGHT VENTRICULAR FUNCTION IN ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT USING ULTRASOUND-BASED STRAIN RATE IMAGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Xiang-chun; SUN Kun; ZHANG Yu-qi; HUANG Mei-rong; GAO Wei; ZHANG Zhi-fang; SHEN Rong; CHEN Shu-bao

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the validation of ultrasound-based strain rate imaging in the quantitative assessment of right ventricular (RV) function in atrial septal defect (ASD). Methods Tissue Doppler images (TDI) of RV longitudinal and short axes were recorded from the apical 4-chamber view and the subcostal short-axis view in 18 normal controls, 28 children with ASD and 14 children after Amplazter closure of ASD respectively. Peak systolic velocities (V), peak systolic strain rates (SR), peak systolic strains (S) at the basal segment, middle segment of RV lateral wall and the basal septum from the longitudinal axis, the middle segment of RV free wall from the short axis were quantitatively measured using QLAB TM tissue velocity quantification software system respectively. Peak dp/dt from the RV isovolumic contraction determined during the right cardiac catheterization in 28 ASD patients was used as the gold standard of RV contractility. Peak systolic indices were compared against max dp/dt by linear correlation. Results Peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall from the longitudinal axis increased significantly in 28 ASD patients.Peak systolic indices at the basal septum also increased in patient group, but not significantly. Significant decreases in peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall were observed after the Amplatzer closure in 14 ASD patients. There was no significant difference at the middle segment of RV free wall from the short axis between patient group and normal control. A strong correlation was found between max dp/dt and peak systolic indices at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall (P<0.05). Conclusion Ultrasound-based strain rate imaging can assess quantitatively RV function in CHD. Peak systolic strains determined at the basal and middle segments of RV lateral wall are strong noninvasive indices of RV contractility.

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles or injections). Occasionally, an ultrasound exam may be temporarily uncomfortable, ... the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × Image Gallery Pediatric ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... kidneys bladder testicles ovaries uterus Abdominal ultrasound images can be used to help diagnose appendicitis in children. ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Abdominal ultrasound imaging is ... Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging can ...

  20. 3D functional ultrasound imaging of the cerebral visual system in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesnik, Marc; Blaize, Kevin; Deffieux, Thomas; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Sahel, José-Alain; Fink, Mathias; Picaud, Serge; Tanter, Mickaël

    2017-02-03

    3D functional imaging of the whole brain activity during visual task is a challenging task in rodents due to the complex tri-dimensional shape of involved brain regions and the fine spatial and temporal resolutions required to reveal the visual tract. By coupling functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging with a translational motorized stage and an episodic visual stimulation device, we managed to accurately map and to recover the activity of the visual cortices, the Superior Colliculus (SC) and the Lateral Geniculate Nuclei (LGN) in 3D. Cerebral Blood Volume (CBV) responses during visual stimuli were found to be highly correlated with the visual stimulus time profile in visual cortices (r=0.6), SC (r=0.7) and LGN (r=0.7). These responses were found dependent on flickering frequency and contrast, and optimal stimulus parameters for largest CBV increases were obtained. In particular, increasing the flickering frequency higher than 7Hz revealed a decrease of visual cortices response while the SC response was preserved. Finally, cross-correlation between CBV signals exhibited significant delays (d=0.35s +/-0.1s) between blood volume response in SC and visual cortices in response to our visual stimulus. These results emphasize the interest of fUS imaging as a whole brain neuroimaging modality for brain vision studies in rodent models.

  1. Recursive ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for recursive ultrasound imaging is presented. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created at every pulse emission. In receive, parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data is added to the previously...

  2. Recursive ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    A method and an apparatus for recursive ultrasound imaging is presented. The method uses a Synthetic Transmit Aperture, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created at every pulse emission. In receive, parallel beam forming is implemented. The beam formed RF data is added to the previously...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound ... procedure requires little to no special preparation. Your doctor will instruct you on how to prepare, including ...

  4. Transcranial functional ultrasound imaging of the brain using microbubble-enhanced ultrasensitive Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errico, Claudia; Osmanski, Bruno-Félix; Pezet, Sophie; Couture, Olivier; Lenkei, Zsolt; Tanter, Mickael

    2016-01-01

    Functional ultrasound (fUS) is a novel neuroimaging technique, based on high-sensitivity ultrafast Doppler imaging of cerebral blood volume, capable of measuring brain activation and connectivity in rodents with high spatiotemporal resolution (100μm, 1ms). However, the skull attenuates acoustic waves, so fUS in rats currently requires craniotomy or a thinned-skull window. Here we propose a non-invasive approach by enhancing the fUS signal with a contrast agent, inert gas microbubbles. Plane-wave illumination of the brain at high frame rate (500Hz compounded sequence with three tilted plane waves, PRF=1500Hz with a 128 element 15MHz linear transducer), yields highly-resolved neurovascular maps. We compared fUS imaging performance through the intact skull bone (transcranial fUS) versus a thinned-skull window in the same animal. First, we show that the vascular network of the adult rat brain can be imaged transcranially only after a bolus intravenous injection of microbubbles, which leads to a 9dB gain in the contrast-to-tissue ratio. Next, we demonstrate that functional increase in the blood volume of the primary sensory cortex after targeted electrical-evoked stimulations of the sciatic nerve is observable transcranially in presence of contrast agents, with high reproducibility (Pearson's coefficient ρ=0.7±0.1, p=0.85). Our work demonstrates that the combination of ultrafast Doppler imaging and injection of contrast agent allows non-invasive functional brain imaging through the intact skull bone in rats. These results should ease non-invasive longitudinal studies in rodents and open a promising perspective for the adoption of highly resolved fUS approaches for the adult human brain.

  5. Ultrasound Imaging Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    texture mapping hardware," IEEE Tranactions on Information Technology in Biomedicine, Submitted. [14] C.R. Castro Pareja , J.M. Jagadeesh and R. Shekhar...modulation in real-time three-dimensional sparse synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging systems "* Carlos R. Castro Pareja , Masters of Science, The Ohio...C.R. Castro Pareja , "An architecture for real-time image registration," M.S. Thesis, The Ohio State University, March 2002. 14. C.R. Castro Pareja , R

  6. Clinically low-risk prostate cancer: evaluation with transrectal doppler ultrasound and functional magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Inês Novis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To evaluate transrectal ultrasound, amplitude Doppler ultrasound, conventional T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging, spectroscopy and dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging in localizing and locally staging low-risk prostate cancer. INTRODUCTION: Prostate cancer has been diagnosed at earlier stages and the most accepted classification for low-risk prostate cancer is based on clinical stage T1c or T2a, Gleason score <6, and prostate-specific antigen (PSA <10 ng/ml. METHODS: From 2005 to 2006, magnetic resonance imaging was performed in 42 patients, and transrectal ultrasound in 26 of these patients. Seven patients were excluded from the study. Mean patient age was 64.94 years and mean serum PSA was 6.05 ng/ml. The examinations were analyzed for tumor identification and location in prostate sextants, detection of extracapsular extension, and seminal vesicle invasion, using surgical pathology findings as the gold standard. RESULTS: Sixteen patients (45.7% had pathologically proven organ-confined disease, 11 (31.4% had positive surgical margin, 8 (28.9% had extracapsular extension, and 3 (8.6% presented with extracapsular extension and seminal vesicle invasion. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV, negative predictive value (NPV and accuracy values for localizing low-risk prostate cancer were 53.1%, 48.3%, 63.4%, 37.8% and 51.3% for transrectal ultrasound; 70.4%, 36.2%, 65.1%, 42.0% and 57.7% for amplitude Doppler ultrasound; 71.5%, 58.9%, 76.6%, 52.4% and 67.1% for magnetic resonance imaging; 70.4%, 58.7%, 78.4%, 48.2% and 66.7% for magnetic resonance spectroscopy; 67.2%, 65.7%, 79.3%, 50.6% and 66.7% for dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy values for detecting extracapsular extension were 33.3%, 92%, 14.3%, 97.2% and 89.7% for transrectal ultrasound and 50.0%, 77.6%, 13.7%, 95.6% and 75.7% for magnetic resonance imaging

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... children. Except for traumatic injury, appendicitis is the most common reason for emergency abdominal surgery. Ultrasound imaging ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ionizing radiation, has no known harmful effects, and is particularly ... an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the internal ... of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging ... depends on the type of examination. For some scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2017 Radiological ...

  15. Cardiological Ultrasound Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijssen, J.M.; Korte, C.L. de

    2014-01-01

    This review paper is intended for the interested outsider of the field of echocardiography and it presents a short introduction into the numerous ultrasound (US) methods and techniques for anatomical and functional diagnosis of the heart. The basic techniques are generally used for some time already

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  17. Handheld probe integrating laser diode and ultrasound transducer array for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual modality imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daoudi, K.; Berg, van den P.J.; Rabot, O.; Kohl, A.; Tisserand, S.; Brands, P.J.; Steenbergen, W.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound and photoacoustics can be utilized as complementary imaging techniques to improve clinical diagnoses. Photoacoustics provides optical contrast and functional information while ultrasound provides structural and anatomical information. As of yet, photoacoustic imaging uses large and expens

  18. Analysis of 2-d ultrasound cardiac strain imaging using joint probability density functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chi; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-06-01

    Ultrasound frame rates play a key role for accurate cardiac deformation tracking. Insufficient frame rates lead to an increase in signal de-correlation artifacts resulting in erroneous displacement and strain estimation. Joint probability density distributions generated from estimated axial strain and its associated signal-to-noise ratio provide a useful approach to assess the minimum frame rate requirements. Previous reports have demonstrated that bi-modal distributions in the joint probability density indicate inaccurate strain estimation over a cardiac cycle. In this study, we utilize similar analysis to evaluate a 2-D multi-level displacement tracking and strain estimation algorithm for cardiac strain imaging. The effect of different frame rates, final kernel dimensions and a comparison of radio frequency and envelope based processing are evaluated using echo signals derived from a 3-D finite element cardiac model and five healthy volunteers. Cardiac simulation model analysis demonstrates that the minimum frame rates required to obtain accurate joint probability distributions for the signal-to-noise ratio and strain, for a final kernel dimension of 1 λ by 3 A-lines, was around 42 Hz for radio frequency signals. On the other hand, even a frame rate of 250 Hz with envelope signals did not replicate the ideal joint probability distribution. For the volunteer study, clinical data was acquired only at a 34 Hz frame rate, which appears to be sufficient for radio frequency analysis. We also show that an increase in the final kernel dimensions significantly affect the strain probability distribution and joint probability density function generated, with a smaller effect on the variation in the accumulated mean strain estimated over a cardiac cycle. Our results demonstrate that radio frequency frame rates currently achievable on clinical cardiac ultrasound systems are sufficient for accurate analysis of the strain probability distribution, when a multi-level 2-D

  19. Non-linear Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang

    without iteration steps. The ASA is implemented in combination with Field II and extended to simulate the pulsed ultrasound fields. The simulated results from a linear array transducer are made by the ASA based on Field II, and by a released non-linear simulation program- Abersim, respectively....... The calculation speed of the ASA is increased approximately by a factor of 140. For the second harmonic point spread function the error of the full width is 1.5% at -6 dB and 6.4% at -12 dB compared to Abersim. To further investigate the linear and non-linear ultrasound fields, hydrophone measurements.......3% relative to the measurement from a 1 inch diameter transducer. A preliminary study for harmonic imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) has been demonstrated. A wire phantom underwater measurement is made by an experimental synthetic aperture real-time ultrasound scanner (SARUS...

  20. Interventional guidance for cardiac resynchronization therapies: merging anatomic X-ray imaging with functional ultrasound imaging based on mutually-shared landmarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzke, R.; Shechter, G.; Gutierrez, L.; Chan, R.C. [Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Tournoux, F.; Singh, J.; Picard, M. [Dept. of Cardiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States); Brink, B. v.d.; Boomen, R. v.d. [Philips Medical System, Best (Netherlands); Gerard, O. [Philips Medical Systems, Paris (France)

    2007-06-15

    Detailed knowledge of cardiac anatomy and function is required for complex cardiac electrophysiology interventions. Cardiac resynchronization therapies (CRT), for example, requires information about coronary venous anatomy for left ventricular lead placement. In CRT, heart failure patients are equipped with dual-chamber pacemakers in order to improve cardiac output and heart failure symptoms. Cardiac function is mainly assessed with Ultrasound imaging. Fusion of complementary information from X-ray and ultrasound is an essential step towards fully utilizing all available information for CRT guidance. We present an approach for fusion of anatomical information (coronary vein structure) from X-ray with functional information (left ventricular deformation and dynamics) from ultrasound. We propose an image-based fusion approach based on mutually-shared landmarks which enable registration of both imaging spaces without the need for external tracking. (orig.)

  1. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...... processing scheme. The suggested estimator can take into account the dispersive attenuation, the temporal and spatial variation of the pulse, and the change in reflection strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Details of the algorithm and the estimation of parameters to be used are given. The performance...

  2. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging: Moving Towards Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging. PMID:25851932

  3. Ultrasound molecular imaging: Moving toward clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Elkacem, Lotfi; Bachawal, Sunitha V; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-09-01

    Ultrasound is a widely available, cost-effective, real-time, non-invasive and safe imaging modality widely used in the clinic for anatomical and functional imaging. With the introduction of novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents, another dimension of ultrasound has become a reality: diagnosing and monitoring pathological processes at the molecular level. Most commonly used ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents are micron sized, gas-containing microbubbles functionalized to recognize and attach to molecules expressed on inflamed or angiogenic vascular endothelial cells. There are several potential clinical applications currently being explored including earlier detection, molecular profiling, and monitoring of cancer, as well as visualization of ischemic memory in transient myocardial ischemia, monitoring of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease, and assessment of arteriosclerosis. Recently, a first clinical grade ultrasound contrast agent (BR55), targeted at a molecule expressed in neoangiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2; VEGFR2) has been introduced and safety and feasibility of VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound imaging is being explored in first inhuman clinical trials in various cancer types. This review describes the design of ultrasound molecular imaging contrast agents, imaging techniques, and potential future clinical applications of ultrasound molecular imaging.

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  8. Reflections on ultrasound image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alison Noble, J

    2016-10-01

    Ultrasound (US) image analysis has advanced considerably in twenty years. Progress in ultrasound image analysis has always been fundamental to the advancement of image-guided interventions research due to the real-time acquisition capability of ultrasound and this has remained true over the two decades. But in quantitative ultrasound image analysis - which takes US images and turns them into more meaningful clinical information - thinking has perhaps more fundamentally changed. From roots as a poor cousin to Computed Tomography (CT) and Magnetic Resonance (MR) image analysis, both of which have richer anatomical definition and thus were better suited to the earlier eras of medical image analysis which were dominated by model-based methods, ultrasound image analysis has now entered an exciting new era, assisted by advances in machine learning and the growing clinical and commercial interest in employing low-cost portable ultrasound devices outside traditional hospital-based clinical settings. This short article provides a perspective on this change, and highlights some challenges ahead and potential opportunities in ultrasound image analysis which may both have high impact on healthcare delivery worldwide in the future but may also, perhaps, take the subject further away from CT and MR image analysis research with time.

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... also used to: guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which needles are used to sample cells ...

  10. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... may also be saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a ... the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ... heart failure, and to assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound of the heart is commonly called an “ ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and ovaries. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as ... tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... help guide biopsies, diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, ... a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following illness. Ultrasound is used to help physicians ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose heart conditions, and assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ... heart failure, and to assess damage after a heart attack. Ultrasound of the heart is commonly called an “ ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a ... the scan begins. top of page What does the equipment look like? Ultrasound scanners consist of a ...

  1. Advanced 3-D Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten Fischer

    to produce high quality 3-D images. Because of the large matrix transducers with integrated custom electronics, these systems are extremely expensive. The relatively low price of ultrasound scanners is one of the factors for the widespread use of ultrasound imaging. The high price tag on the high quality 3-D......The main purpose of the PhD project was to develop methods that increase the 3-D ultrasound imaging quality available for the medical personnel in the clinic. Acquiring a 3-D volume gives the medical doctor the freedom to investigate the measured anatomy in any slice desirable after the scan has...... been completed. This allows for precise measurements of organs dimensions and makes the scan more operator independent. Real-time 3-D ultrasound imaging is still not as widespread in use in the clinics as 2-D imaging. A limiting factor has traditionally been the low image quality achievable using...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear picture of the internal organs and blood vessels ... Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a clear picture of the internal organs and blood vessels within your child’s abdomen. Ultrasound does not use ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that ...

  4. Ultrasound Imaging and its modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Modern medical ultrasound scanners are used for imaging nearly all soft tissue structures in the body. The anatomy can be studied from gray-scale B-mode images, where the reflectivity and scattering strength of the tissues are displayed. The imaging is performed in real time with 20 to 100 images...

  5. Left Ventricular Longitudinal Function Assessed by Speckle Tracking Ultrasound from a Single Apical Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bagger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transthoracic ultrasonography of the heart is valuable in monitoring and treatment of critically ill patients. Speckle tracking ultrasound (STU has proven valid in estimating left ventricular systolic deformation. The aims of the study were to compare conventional and automated STU and to determine whether left ventricular systolic deformation could be estimated from one single imaging plane. Methods. 2D-echocardiography cine-loops were obtained from 20 patients for off-line speckle tracking analysis, consisting of manually tracing of the endocardial border (conventional method or automatically drawn boundaries (automated method. Results. We found a bias of 0,6 (95% CI −2.2−3.3 for global peak systolic strain comparing the automated and the conventional method. Comparing global peak systolic strain of apical 4-chamber cine-loops with averaged Global Peak Strain obtained from apical 4, 2 and long axis cine-loops, showed a bias of 0.1 (95% CI −3.9−4.0. The agreement between subcostal 4-chamber and apical 4-chamber global peak systolic strain was 4.4 (95% CI −3.7−12.5. Conclusion. We found good agreement between the conventional and the automated method. STU applied to single apical 4-chamber cine-loops is in excellent agreement with overall averaged global peak systolic strain, while subcostal 4-chamber cine-loops proved less compliant with speckle tracking ultrasound.

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ... extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the returning echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible on a video display screen ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. A follow-up examination may also be necessary ...

  9. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques (fusion imaging).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandulescu, Daniela Larisa; Dumitrescu, Daniela; Rogoveanu, Ion; Saftoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-07

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate non-invasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location, size, and morphology. Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), and/or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] and molecular (single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography) imaging modalities. One example is real-time virtual sonography, which combines ultrasound (grayscale, colour Doppler, or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging) with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI. The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence, direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities, more precise monitoring of interventional procedures, and reduced radiation exposure.

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive ( ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the object is as well as the object's size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid ... ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, and vessels or ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements into an array of ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s internal organs ... used to help physicians evaluate symptoms such as: pain swelling infection Ultrasound is a useful way of ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to best travel ...

  19. Ultrasound in pregnancy (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ultrasound has become a standard procedure used during pregnancy. It can demonstrate fetal growth and can detect increasing ... abnormalities, hydrocephalus, anencephaly, club feet, and other ... does not produce ionizing radiation and is considered ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that allows the physician to see and evaluate ... a blood vessel. Power Doppler is a newer technique that is more sensitive than color Doppler and ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the ... probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back and a ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... organs and to examine a baby in pregnant women and the brain and hips in infants. It’s ... Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a woman's vagina to view the uterus and ovaries. top ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may be asked to wear a gown. ... I prepare? You should wear comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for your ultrasound exam. You may need to ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  6. Ultrasound imaging using coded signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios

    Modulated (or coded) excitation signals can potentially improve the quality and increase the frame rate in medical ultrasound scanners. The aim of this dissertation is to investigate systematically the applicability of modulated signals in medical ultrasound imaging and to suggest appropriate...... methods for coded imaging, with the goal of making better anatomic and flow images and three-dimensional images. On the first stage, it investigates techniques for doing high-resolution coded imaging with improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to conventional imaging. Subsequently it investigates how...... coded excitation can be used for increasing the frame rate. The work includes both simulated results using Field II, and experimental results based on measurements on phantoms as well as clinical images. Initially a mathematical foundation of signal modulation is given. Pulse compression based...

  7. Ultrasound Imaging Velocimetry: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poelma, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Whole-field velocity measurement techniques based on ultrasound imaging (a.k.a. `ultrasound imaging velocimetry' or `echo-PIV') have received significant attention from the fluid mechanics community in the last decade, in particular because of their ability to obtain velocity fields in flows that elude characterisation by conventional optical methods. In this review, an overview is given of the history, typical components and challenges of these techniques. The basic principles of ultrasound image formation are summarised, as well as various techniques to estimate flow velocities; the emphasis is on correlation-based techniques. Examples are given for a wide range of applications, including in vivo cardiovascular flow measurements, the characterisation of sediment transport and the characterisation of complex non-Newtonian fluids. To conclude, future opportunities are identified. These encompass not just optimisation of the accuracy and dynamic range, but also extension to other application areas.

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  9. Ultrasound Imaging in Teaching Cardiac Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Christopher D.; Montgomery, Laura E. A.; Quinn, Joe G.; Roe, Sean M.; Stewart, Michael T.; Tansey, Etain A.

    2016-01-01

    This laboratory session provides hands-on experience for students to visualize the beating human heart with ultrasound imaging. Simple views are obtained from which students can directly measure important cardiac dimensions in systole and diastole. This allows students to derive, from first principles, important measures of cardiac function, such…

  10. Adaptive Beamforming for Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund

    This dissertation investigates the application of adaptive beamforming for medical ultrasound imaging. The investigations have been concentrated primarily on the Minimum Variance (MV) beamformer. A broadband implementation of theMV beamformer is described, and simulated data have been used...... to demonstrate the performance. The MV beamformer has been applied to different sets of ultrasound imaging sequences; synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and plane wave ultrasound imaging. And an approach for applying MV optimized apodization weights on both the transmitting and the receiving apertures...

  11. Hybrid ultrasound imaging techniques(fusion imaging)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela Larisa Sandulescu; Daniela Dumitrescu; Ion Rogoveanu; Adrian Saftoiu

    2011-01-01

    Visualization of tumor angiogenesis can facilitate noninvasive evaluation of tumor vascular characteristics to supplement the conventional diagnostic imaging goals of depicting tumor location,size,and morphology.Hybrid imaging techniques combine anatomic [ultrasound,computed tomography(CT),and/or magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)] and molecular(single photon emission CT and positron emission tomography)imaging modalities.One example is real-time virtual sonography,which combines ultrasound(grayscale,colour Doppler,or dynamic contrast harmonic imaging)with contrast-enhanced CT/MRI.The benefits of fusion imaging include an increased diagnostic confidence,direct comparison of the lesions using different imaging modalities,more precise monitoring of interventional procedures,and reduced radiation exposure.

  12. Nonlinear intravascular ultrasound contrast imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.

    2006-01-01

    Nonlinear contrast agent imaging with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is investigated using a prototype IVUS system and an experimental small bubble contrast agent. The IVUS system employed a mechanically scanned single element transducer and was operated at a 20 MHz transmit frequency (F20) for

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  16. Image processing in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    as a double blinded study. The result of the pre-clinical trialmotivated for a larger scale clinical trial. Each of the two clinical trials were performed in collaboration with Copenhagen University Hospital, Rigshospitalet, and Copenhagen University, Department of Biostatistic. Evaluations were performed...... by medical doctors and experts in ultrasound, using the developed Image Quality assessment program (IQap). The study concludes that the image quality in terms of spatial resolution, contrast and unwanted artifacts is statistically better using SASB imaging than conventional imaging. The third and final...

  17. Resolution enhancement in medical ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploquin, Marie; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Image resolution enhancement is a problem of considerable interest in all medical imaging modalities. Unlike general purpose imaging or video processing, for a very long time, medical image resolution enhancement has been based on optimization of the imaging devices. Although some recent works purport to deal with image postprocessing, much remains to be done regarding medical image enhancement via postprocessing, especially in ultrasound imaging. We face a resolution improvement issue in the case of medical ultrasound imaging. We propose to investigate this problem using multidimensional autoregressive (AR) models. Noting that the estimation of the envelope of an ultrasound radio frequency (RF) signal is very similar to the estimation of classical Fourier-based power spectrum estimation, we theoretically show that a domain change and a multidimensional AR model can be used to achieve super-resolution in ultrasound imaging provided the order is estimated correctly. Here, this is done by means of a technique that simultaneously estimates the order and the parameters of a multidimensional model using relevant regression matrix factorization. Doing so, the proposed method specifically fits ultrasound imaging and provides an estimated envelope. Moreover, an expression that links the theoretical image resolution to both the image acquisition features (such as the point spread function) and a postprocessing feature (the AR model) order is derived. The overall contribution of this work is threefold. First, it allows for automatic resolution improvement. Through a simple model and without any specific manual algorithmic parameter tuning, as is used in common methods, the proposed technique simply and exclusively uses the ultrasound RF signal as input and provides the improved B-mode as output. Second, it allows for the a priori prediction of the improvement in resolution via the knowledge of the parametric model order before actual processing. Finally, to achieve the

  18. Recursive Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a new imaging method, applicable for both 2D and 3D imaging. It is based on Synthetic Transmit Aperture Focusing, but unlike previous approaches a new frame is created after every pulse emission. The elements from a linear transducer array emit pulses one after another. The sa...

  19. Compressive Deconvolution in Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhouye; Basarab, Adrian; Kouamé, Denis

    2016-03-01

    The interest of compressive sampling in ultrasound imaging has been recently extensively evaluated by several research teams. Following the different application setups, it has been shown that the RF data may be reconstructed from a small number of measurements and/or using a reduced number of ultrasound pulse emissions. Nevertheless, RF image spatial resolution, contrast and signal to noise ratio are affected by the limited bandwidth of the imaging transducer and the physical phenomenon related to US wave propagation. To overcome these limitations, several deconvolution-based image processing techniques have been proposed to enhance the ultrasound images. In this paper, we propose a novel framework, named compressive deconvolution, that reconstructs enhanced RF images from compressed measurements. Exploiting an unified formulation of the direct acquisition model, combining random projections and 2D convolution with a spatially invariant point spread function, the benefit of our approach is the joint data volume reduction and image quality improvement. The proposed optimization method, based on the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers, is evaluated on both simulated and in vivo data.

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... In most cases, barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a ... or certain joints, other imaging modalities such as MRI are typically used. top of page This page ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. It is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation ... imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of the body. It is used to help diagnose the causes of pain, swelling and infection in the body’s ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of ... Preparation for the procedure will depend on the type of examination you will have. For some scans ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of ... The transducer sends out inaudible, high—frequency sound waves into the body and then listens for the ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on the examination table, the radiologist (a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations) or sonographer will apply a warm water-based gel to the area of the body ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. In some ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. After you are positioned on the examination table, the radiologist (a physician specifically trained to supervise and interpret radiology examinations) or sonographer will apply a warm water-based gel to the area of the body ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × ... Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From (your name): Your e-mail ...

  13. Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Gammelmark, Kim; Pedersen, Morten

    2004-01-01

    with high precision, and the imaging is easily extended to real-time 3D scanning. This paper presents the work done at the Center for Fast Ultrasound Imaging in the area of SA imaging. Three areas that benefit from SA imaging are described. Firstly a preliminary in-vivo evaluation comparing conventional B......Synthetic Aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging is a relatively new and unexploited imaging technique. The images are perfectly focused both in transmit and receive, and have a better resolution and higher dynamic range than conventional ultrasound images. The blood flow can be estimated from SA images...

  14. Standards of ultrasound imaging of the adrenal glands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał Z. Słapa

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal glands are paired endocrine glands located over the upper renal poles. Adrenal pathologies have various clinical presentations. They can coexist with the hyperfunction of individual cortical zones or the medulla, insuffi ciency of the adrenal cortex or retained normal hormonal function. The most common adrenal masses are tumors incidentally detected in imaging examinations (ultrasound, tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, referred to as incidentalomas. They include a range of histopathological entities but cortical adenomas without hormonal hyperfunction are the most common. Each abdominal ultrasound scan of a child or adult should include the assessment of the suprarenal areas. If a previously non-reported, incidental solid focal lesion exceeding 1 cm (incidentaloma is detected in the suprarenal area, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging should be conducted to confi rm its presence and for differentiation and the tumor functional status should be determined. Ultrasound imaging is also used to monitor adrenal incidentaloma that is not eligible for a surgery. The paper presents recommendations concerning the performance and assessment of ultrasound examinations of the adrenal glands and their pathological lesions. The article includes new ultrasound techniques, such as tissue harmonic imaging, spatial compound imaging, three-dimensional ultrasound, elastography, contrast-enhanced ultrasound and parametric imaging. The guidelines presented above are consistent with the recommendations of the Polish Ultrasound Society.

  15. Coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound correlation and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Fei; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2014-09-01

    Both photoacoustics and ultrasound have been researched extensively but separately. In this letter, we report an initial study on the coherent correlation between pulsed photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave. By illuminating an object with a pulsed laser and external ultrasound sequentially, both the endogenous photoacoustic wave and pulse-echo ultrasound wave are received and coherently correlated, demonstrating enhanced signal-to-noise ratio. Image contrast of the proposed coherent photoacoustic-ultrasound imaging is also demonstrated to be improved significantly on vessel-mimicking phantom, due to fusion of the optical absorption and ultrasound reflection contrasts by coherent correlation of either conventional laser-induced photoacoustic imaging or pulse-echo ultrasound imaging separately.

  16. Ultrasound assessment of endothelial function in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikko J Järvisalo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Mikko J Järvisalo1,2, Olli T Raitakari21Department of Internal Medicine, Satakunta Central Hospital, Pori, Finland; 2Department of Clinical Physiology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, FinlandAbstract: Although the clinical complications of atherosclerosis arise from developed lesions in old age, the atherosclerotic disease is a lifelong process with roots in childhood. Endothelial dysfunction is currently considered an early stage in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, which precedes the formation of structural atherosclerotic changes. Improvements in noninvasive imaging modalities, mainly in ultrasound imaging, have made it possible to assess the endothelial health of asymptomatic children with or without cardiovascular risk factors. By using noninvasive ultrasound for endothelial function, important insights have been gained into the early stages of atherosclerosis and the effects of cardiovascular risk factors on vasculature in childhood. The ultrasound test of endothelial function is affordable, available, and safe and may be considered a potent aid in clinical risk stratification of children at high risk for subsequent clinical atherosclerosis in adulthood. At present, this methodology serves only research purposes, as many issues including reproducibility and normal values for healthy children need to be solved before clinical use can be considered. In adults, however, recent studies have shown that attenuated endothelial function predicts the occurrence of future cardiovascular events.Keywords: atherosclerosis, endothelial dysfunction, ultrasound imaging, childhood vasculature

  17. Medical Imaging with Ultrasound: Some Basic Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, R.

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are medical applications of ultrasound. The physics of the wave nature of ultrasound including its propagation and production, return by the body, spatial and contrast resolution, attenuation, image formation using pulsed echo ultrasound techniques, measurement of velocity and duplex scanning are described. (YP)

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ... pain from the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, your child may actually hear pulse- ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  20. Intravascular ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frijlink, Martijn E; Goertz, David E; van Damme, Luc C A; Krams, Rob; van der Steen, Antonius F W

    2006-10-01

    Tissue harmonic imaging (THI) has been shown to increase image quality of medical ultrasound in the frequency range from 2 to 10 MHz and might, therefore, also be used to improve image quality in intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). In this study we constructed a prototype IVUS system that could operate in both fundamental frequency and second harmonic imaging modes. This system uses a conventional, continuously rotating, single-element IVUS catheter and was operated in fundamental 20 MHz, fundamental 40 MHz, and harmonic 40 MHz modes (transmit 20 MHz, receive 40 MHz). Hydrophone beam characterization measurements demonstrated the build-up of a second harmonic signal as a function of increasing pressure. Imaging experiments were conducted in both a tissue-mimicking phantom and in an atherosclerotic animal model in vivo. Acquisitions of fundamental 20 and 40 MHz and second harmonic acquisitions resulted in cross sections of the phantom and a rabbit aorta. The harmonic results of the imaging experiments showed the feasibility of intravascular THI with a conventional IVUS catheter both in a phantom and in vivo. The harmonic acquisitions also showed the potential of THI to reduce image artifacts compared to fundamental imaging.

  1. An autotuning respiration compensation system based on ultrasound image tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chia-Chun; Chuang, Ho-Chiao; Teng, Kuan-Ting; Hsu, Hsiao-Yu; Tien, Der-Chi; Wu, Chih-Jen; Jeng, Shiu-Chen; Chiou, Jeng-Fong

    2016-11-22

    waves, the correlation between the target displacement on the ultrasound images and the actual target displacement was around 97%, and all of the compensation rates exceeded 94% after activating the RCS. Furthermore, the diaphragm movements on the ultrasound images of three patients could be captured by our image tracking technique. The test results show that our algorithm could achieve precise point locking and tracking functions on the diaphragm. This study has demonstrated the feasibility of the proposed ultrasound image tracking technique combined with the RCS for compensating for organ displacements caused by respiratory motion.This study has shown that the proposed ultrasound image tracking technique combined with the RCS can provide real-time compensation of respiratory motion during radiation therapy, without increasing the overall treatment time. In addition, the system has modest space requirements and is easy to operate.

  2. Fast and automatic ultrasound simulation from CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Weijian; Yang, Jian; Liu, Yue; Wang, Yongtian

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  3. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijian Cong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of ultrasound from a CT image. A multiscale method is developed to enhance tubular structures so as to simulate the blood flow. The acoustic response of common tissues is generated by weighted integration of adjacent regions on the ultrasound propagation path in the CT image, from which parameters, including attenuation, reflection, scattering, and noise, are estimated simultaneously. The thin-plate spline interpolation method is employed to transform the simulation image between polar and rectangular coordinate systems. The Kaiser window function is utilized to produce integration and radial blurring effects of multiple transducer elements. Experimental results show that the developed method is very fast and effective, allowing realistic ultrasound to be fast generated. Given that the developed method is fully automatic, it can be utilized for ultrasound guided navigation in clinical practice and for training purpose.

  4. Image-guided endobronchial ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, William E.; Zang, Xiaonan; Cheirsilp, Ronnarit; Byrnes, Patrick; Kuhlengel, Trevor; Bascom, Rebecca; Toth, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    Endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) is now recommended as a standard procedure for in vivo verification of extraluminal diagnostic sites during cancer-staging bronchoscopy. Yet, physicians vary considerably in their skills at using EBUS effectively. Regarding existing bronchoscopy guidance systems, studies have shown their effectiveness in the lung-cancer management process. With such a system, a patient's X-ray computed tomography (CT) scan is used to plan a procedure to regions of interest (ROIs). This plan is then used during follow-on guided bronchoscopy. Recent clinical guidelines for lung cancer, however, also dictate using positron emission tomography (PET) imaging for identifying suspicious ROIs and aiding in the cancer-staging process. While researchers have attempted to use guided bronchoscopy systems in tandem with PET imaging and EBUS, no true EBUS-centric guidance system exists. We now propose a full multimodal image-based methodology for guiding EBUS. The complete methodology involves two components: 1) a procedure planning protocol that gives bronchoscope movements appropriate for live EBUS positioning; and 2) a guidance strategy and associated system graphical user interface (GUI) designed for image-guided EBUS. We present results demonstrating the operation of the system.

  5. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part II: Parallel Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.;

    2016-01-01

    ultrasound imaging for studying brain function in animals. The paper explains the underlying acquisition and estimation methods for fast 2-D and 3-D velocity imaging and gives a number of examples. Future challenges and the potentials of parallel acquisition systems for flow imaging are also discussed....

  6. Synthetic aperture tissue and flow ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav

    them: the use of sparse one- and two-dimensional arrays; the use of multiple elements in transmit to create virtual sources of ultrasound; the use of virtual sources of ultrasound to improve the resolution of the images in the elevation plane; the use of temporal and spatial encoding to increase...... imaging applied to medical ultrasound. It is divided into two major parts: tissue and blood flow imaging. Tissue imaging using synthetic aperture algorithms has been investigated for about two decades, but has not been implemented in medical scanners yet. Among the other reasons, the conventional scanning...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may also be saved. Doppler ultrasound, a special application of ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations are ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... located within a child's abdomen. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of a child's abdominal ultrasound ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be guided by ultrasound, are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the ... in which needles are used to extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound ...

  13. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a type of imaging. It uses high-frequency sound waves to look at organs and ... liver, and other organs. During pregnancy, doctors use ultrasound to view the fetus. Unlike x-rays, ultrasound ...

  14. Ultrasound Imaging of Cystic Nephroma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Greco

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic nephroma is a rare, benign multicystic lesion of the kidney. This tumor occurs both in children and in adults. In children, it is highly prevalent in males; in adults, it is more frequent in women. The term “cystic nephroma” represents two apparently different entities: pediatric cystic nephroma, a benign form thought to originate from metanephric tissue, and adult cystic nephroma, considered as a lesion of mixed epithelial stromal tumor. The clinical presentation may be a palpable mass or nonspecific symptoms such as abdominal pain, hematuria, and urinary tract infections. In this review, we summarize the ultrasound imaging features of cystic nephroma and describe the characteristics of the most common renal cystic lesions and the differential diagnosis of cystic nephroma with other renal cystic lesions.

  15. Evaluation of Right Ventricular Global Longitudinal Function in Patients with Tetralogy of Fallot by Two-dimensional Ultrasound Speckle Tracking Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李玉曼; 谢明星; 王新房; 吕清; 卢晓芳; 杨亚利; 马红; 方凌云; 张静; 李卫芹

    2010-01-01

    Quantification of right ventricular(RV)volume and function remains a challenge because of RV complex geometry by conventional echocardiography.The purpose of this study was to assess RV global longitudinal function in patients with tetralogy of Fallot(TOF)by 2-dimensional ultrasound speckle tracking imaging(STI).Thirty-eight patients with TOF were enrolled in this study and divided into child group(n=25)and adult group(n=13)according to age.Thirty-eight age-and sex-matched normal subjects were selected as c...

  16. Simulation of ultrasound backscatter images from fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, An Hoai; Stage, Bjarne; Hemmsen, Martin Christian

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work is to investigate ultrasound (US) backscatter in the MHz range from fis to develop a realistic and reliable simulation model. The long term objective of the work is to develop the needed signal processing for fis species differentiation using US. In in-vitro experiments...... is 10 MHz and the Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) at the focus point is 0.54 mm in the lateral direction. The transducer model in Field II was calibrated using a wire phantom to validate the simulated point spread function. The inputs to the simulation were the CT image data of the fis converted...

  17. Graphene Oxide and Gadolinium-Chelate Functionalized Poly(lactic acid) Nanocapsules Encapsulating Perfluorooctylbromide for Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Bimodal Imaging Guided Photothermal Ablation of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenglin; Ke, Hengte; Wang, Jinrui; Miao, Zhaohua; Yue, Xiuli

    2016-03-01

    This paper successfully fabricated a novel multifunctional theranostic agent (PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs) by loading perfluorooctylbromide (PFOB) into poly(lactic acid) (PLA) nanocapsules (NCs) followed by surface functionalization with graphene oxide (GO) and gadolinium-chelate (Gd-DTPA). It was found that the resulting nanoagent could serve as a contrast agent simultaneously to enhance ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Benefiting from the strong absorption in the near infrared (NIR) region, the nanocapsules could efficiently kill cancer cells under NIR laser irradiation. Thus, such a single theranostic agent with the combination of realtime US imaging and high-resolution MR imaging could achieve great therapeutic effectiveness without systemic damage to the body. In addition, the cytotoxicity assay on HUVEC cells revealed a good biocompatibility of PFOB@PLA/GO/Gd-DTPA NCs, showing that the versatile nanocapsule system may hold great potential as an effective nanoplatform for contrast enhanced imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  18. Functional ultrasound imaging reveals different odor-evoked patterns of vascular activity in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmanski, B F; Martin, C; Montaldo, G; Lanièce, P; Pain, F; Tanter, M; Gurden, H

    2014-07-15

    Topographic representation of the outside world is a key feature of sensory systems, but so far it has been difficult to define how the activity pattern of the olfactory information is distributed at successive stages in the olfactory system. We studied odor-evoked activation patterns in the main olfactory bulb and the anterior piriform cortex of rats using functional ultrasound (fUS) imaging. fUS imaging is based on the use of ultrafast ultrasound scanners and detects variations in the local blood volume during brain activation. It makes deep brain imaging of ventral structures, such as the piriform cortex, possible. Stimulation with two different odors (hexanal and pentylacetate) induced the activation of odor-specific zones that were spatially segregated in the main olfactory bulb. Interestingly, the same odorants triggered the activation of the entire anterior piriform cortex, in all layers, with no distinguishable odor-specific areas detected in the power Doppler images. These fUS imaging results confirm the spatial distribution of odor-evoked activity in the main olfactory bulb, and furthermore, they reveal the absence of such a distribution in the anterior piriform cortex at the macroscopic scale in vivo.

  19. 3D ultrasound imaging in image-guided intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Aaron; Bax, Jeff; Neshat, Hamid; Cool, Derek; Kakani, Nirmal; Romagnoli, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging is used extensively in diagnosis and image-guidance for interventions of human diseases. However, conventional 2D ultrasound suffers from limitations since it can only provide 2D images of 3-dimensional structures in the body. Thus, measurement of organ size is variable, and guidance of interventions is limited, as the physician is required to mentally reconstruct the 3-dimensional anatomy using 2D views. Over the past 20 years, a number of 3-dimensional ultrasound imaging approaches have been developed. We have developed an approach that is based on a mechanical mechanism to move any conventional ultrasound transducer while 2D images are collected rapidly and reconstructed into a 3D image. In this presentation, 3D ultrasound imaging approaches will be described for use in image-guided interventions.

  20. Linear description of ultrasound imaging systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    These notes have been prepared for the international summer school on advanced ultrasound imaging sponsored by The Danish Research Academy. The notes should be read in conjunction with the notes prepared by Anderson and Trahey1. The intended audience is Ph.D. students working in medical ultrasound...

  1. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...

  2. Virtual ultrasound sources in high-resolution ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    beamforming procedure for 3D ultrasound imaging. The position of the virtual source, and the created waveform are investigated with simulation, and with pulse-echo measurements. There is good agreement between the estimated wavefront and the theoretically tted one. Several examples of the use of virtual...

  3. Handheld probe integrating laser diode and ultrasound transducer array for ultrasound/photoacoustic dual modality imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoudi, K; van den Berg, P J; Rabot, O; Kohl, A; Tisserand, S; Brands, P; Steenbergen, W

    2014-10-20

    Ultrasound and photoacoustics can be utilized as complementary imaging techniques to improve clinical diagnoses. Photoacoustics provides optical contrast and functional information while ultrasound provides structural and anatomical information. As of yet, photoacoustic imaging uses large and expensive systems, which limits their clinical application and makes the combination costly and impracticable. In this work we present and evaluate a compact and ergonomically designed handheld probe, connected to a portable ultrasound system for inexpensive, real-time dual-modality ultrasound/photoacoustic imaging. The probe integrates an ultrasound transducer array and a highly efficient diode stack laser emitting 130 ns pulses at 805 nm wavelength and a pulse energy of 0.56 mJ, with a high pulse repetition frequency of up to 10 kHz. The diodes are driven by a customized laser driver, which can be triggered externally with a high temporal stability necessary to synchronize the ultrasound detection and laser pulsing. The emitted beam is collimated with cylindrical micro-lenses and shaped using a diffractive optical element, delivering a homogenized rectangular light intensity distribution. The system performance was tested in vitro and in vivo by imaging a human finger joint.

  4. Deconvolution of in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1990-01-01

    In an ultrasound image, the influence of the pulse and attenuation should be removed from the picture in order to display a more consistent and uniform image. The author describes an algorithm to remove the influence of the attenuated pulse on the image. The algorithm takes into account the varying...

  5. Image and Signal Processing in Intravascular Ultrasound

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W. Li (Wenguang)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractIntravascular ultrasound (rvUS) is a new imaging mOdality providing real-time, crosssectional, high-resolution images of the arterial lumen and vessel wall. In contrast to conventional x-ray angiography that only displays silhouette views of the vessel lumen, IVUS imaging permits visuali

  6. Programmable Real-time Clinical Photoacoustic and Ultrasound Imaging System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeesu; Park, Sara; Jung, Yuhan; Chang, Sunyeob; Park, Jinyong; Zhang, Yumiao; Lovell, Jonathan F; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-10-12

    Photoacoustic imaging has attracted interest for its capacity to capture functional spectral information with high spatial and temporal resolution in biological tissues. Several photoacoustic imaging systems have been commercialized recently, but they are variously limited by non-clinically relevant designs, immobility, single anatomical utility (e.g., breast only), or non-programmable interfaces. Here, we present a real-time clinical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system which consists of an FDA-approved clinical ultrasound system integrated with a portable laser. The system is completely programmable, has an intuitive user interface, and can be adapted for different applications by switching handheld imaging probes with various transducer types. The customizable photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging system is intended to meet the diverse needs of medical researchers performing both clinical and preclinical photoacoustic studies.

  7. Multifunctional ultrasound contrast agents for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Jin, Yushen; Dai, Zhifei

    2014-05-21

    Among all the imaging techniques, ultrasound imaging has a unique advantage due to its features of real-time, low cost, high safety, and portability. Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have been widely used to enhance ultrasonic signals. One of the most exciting features of UCAs for use in biomedicine is the possibility of easily putting new combinations of functional molecules into microbubbles (MBs), which are the most routinely used UCAs. Various therapeutic agents and medical nanoparticles (quantum dots, gold, Fe3O4, etc.) can be loaded into ultrasound-responsive MBs. Hence, UCAs can be developed as multifunctional agents that integrate capabilities for early detection and diagnosis and for imaging guided therapy of various diseases. The current review will focus on such state-of-the-art UCA platforms that have been exploited for multimodal imaging and for imaging guided photothermal therapy.

  8. Ultrasound triggered, image guided, local drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Roel; Moonen, Chrit T W

    2010-11-20

    Ultrasound allows the deposition of thermal and mechanical energies deep inside the human body in a non-invasive way. Ultrasound can be focused within a region with a diameter of about 1mm. The bio-effects of ultrasound can lead to local tissue heating, cavitation, and radiation force, which can be used for 1) local drug release from nanocarriers circulating in the blood, 2) increased extravasation of drugs and/or carriers, and 3) enhanced diffusivity of drugs. When using nanocarriers sensitive to mechanical forces (the oscillating ultrasound pressure waves) and/or sensitive to temperature, the content of the nanocarriers can be released locally. Thermo-sensitive liposomes have been suggested for local drug release in combination with local hyperthermia more than 25 years ago. Microbubbles may be designed specifically to enhance cavitation effects. Real-time imaging methods, such as magnetic resonance, optical and ultrasound imaging have led to novel insights and methods for ultrasound triggered drug delivery. Image guidance of ultrasound can be used for: 1) target identification and characterization; 2) spatio-temporal guidance of actions to release or activate the drugs and/or permeabilize membranes; 3) evaluation of bio-distribution, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics; and 4) physiological read-outs to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy.

  9. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  10. Opto-acoustic breast imaging with co-registered ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalev, Jason; Clingman, Bryan; Herzog, Don; Miller, Tom; Stavros, A. Thomas; Oraevsky, Alexander; Kist, Kenneth; Dornbluth, N. Carol; Otto, Pamela

    2014-03-01

    We present results from a recent study involving the ImagioTM breast imaging system, which produces fused real-time two-dimensional color-coded opto-acoustic (OA) images that are co-registered and temporally inter- leaved with real-time gray scale ultrasound using a specialized duplex handheld probe. The use of dual optical wavelengths provides functional blood map images of breast tissue and tumors displayed with high contrast based on total hemoglobin and oxygen saturation of the blood. This provides functional diagnostic information pertaining to tumor metabolism. OA also shows morphologic information about tumor neo-vascularity that is complementary to the morphological information obtained with conventional gray scale ultrasound. This fusion technology conveniently enables real-time analysis of the functional opto-acoustic features of lesions detected by readers familiar with anatomical gray scale ultrasound. We demonstrate co-registered opto-acoustic and ultrasonic images of malignant and benign tumors from a recent clinical study that provide new insight into the function of tumors in-vivo. Results from the Feasibility Study show preliminary evidence that the technology may have the capability to improve characterization of benign and malignant breast masses over conventional diagnostic breast ultrasound alone and to improve overall accuracy of breast mass diagnosis. In particular, OA improved speci city over that of conventional diagnostic ultrasound, which could potentially reduce the number of negative biopsies performed without missing cancers.

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors and congenital vascular malformations reduced or absent blood ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  16. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... scans, your doctor may ask you to withhold food and drink for several hours before your child's ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  17. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  18. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  19. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to best travel ...

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the ... probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back and a ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. Your child should wear loose, comfortable clothing and may be asked to wear a gown. ... child should be dressed in comfortable, loose-fitting clothing for an ultrasound exam. Other preparation depends on ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of an ... sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide the ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are used to sample cells from organs for laboratory testing help detect the presence and cause of ... extract sample cells from an abnormal area for laboratory testing. Ultrasound may also be used to guide ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  7. Nonlinear ultrasound imaging of nanoscale acoustic biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maresca, David; Lakshmanan, Anupama; Lee-Gosselin, Audrey; Melis, Johan M.; Ni, Yu-Li; Bourdeau, Raymond W.; Kochmann, Dennis M.; Shapiro, Mikhail G.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used to probe the mechanical structure of tissues and visualize blood flow. However, the ability of ultrasound to observe specific molecular and cellular signals is limited. Recently, a unique class of gas-filled protein nanostructures called gas vesicles (GVs) was introduced as nanoscale (˜250 nm) contrast agents for ultrasound, accompanied by the possibilities of genetic engineering, imaging of targets outside the vasculature and monitoring of cellular signals such as gene expression. These possibilities would be aided by methods to discriminate GV-generated ultrasound signals from anatomical background. Here, we show that the nonlinear response of engineered GVs to acoustic pressure enables selective imaging of these nanostructures using a tailored amplitude modulation strategy. Finite element modeling predicted a strongly nonlinear mechanical deformation and acoustic response to ultrasound in engineered GVs. This response was confirmed with ultrasound measurements in the range of 10 to 25 MHz. An amplitude modulation pulse sequence based on this nonlinear response allows engineered GVs to be distinguished from linear scatterers and other GV types with a contrast ratio greater than 11.5 dB. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this nonlinear imaging strategy in vitro, in cellulo, and in vivo.

  8. Sampling system for in vivo ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jorgen Arendt; Mathorne, Jan

    1991-01-01

    Newly developed algorithms for processing medical ultrasound images use the high frequency sampled transducer signal. This paper describes demands imposed on a sampling system suitable for acquiring such data and gives details about a prototype constructed. It acquires full clinical images...

  9. Respiration correction by clustering in ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Chen, Xi; Ding, Mingyue; Sang, Nong

    2016-03-01

    Respiratory motion is a challenging factor for image acquisition, image-guided procedures and perfusion quantification using contrast-enhanced ultrasound in the abdominal and thoracic region. In order to reduce the influence of respiratory motion, respiratory correction methods were investigated. In this paper we propose a novel, cluster-based respiratory correction method. In the proposed method, we assign the image frames of the corresponding respiratory phase using spectral clustering firstly. And then, we achieve the images correction automatically by finding a cluster in which points are close to each other. Unlike the traditional gating method, we don't need to estimate the breathing cycle accurate. It is because images are similar at the corresponding respiratory phase, and they are close in high-dimensional space. The proposed method is tested on simulation image sequence and real ultrasound image sequence. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method in quantitative and qualitative.

  10. A new architecture for fast ultrasound imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruza, J. F. [Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información ' ' Torres Quevedo' ' Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Camacho, J.; Moreno, J. M.; Medina, L. [Instituto de Tecnologías Físicas y de la Información Torres Quevedo Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC), Serrano 144, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-02-18

    Some ultrasound imaging applications require high frame rate, for example 3D imaging and automated inspections of large components. Being the signal-processing throughput of the system the main bottleneck, parallel beamforming is required to achieve hundreds to thousands of images per second. Simultaneous A-scan line beamforming in all active channels is required to reach the intended high frame rate. To this purpose, a new parallel beamforming architecture that exploits the currently available processing resources available in state-of-the-art FPGAs is proposed. The work aims to get the optimal resource usage, high scalability and flexibility for different applications. To achieve these goals, the basic beamforming function is reformulated to be adapted to the DSP-cell architecture of state-of-the-art FPGAs. This allows performing simultaneous dynamic focusing on multiple A-scan lines. Some realistic examples are analyzed, evaluating resource requirements and maximum operating frequency. For example, a 128-channel system, with 128 scan lines and acquiring at 20 MSPS, can be built with 4 mid-range FPGAs, achieving up to 18000 frames per second, just limited by the maximum PRF. The gold standard Synthetic Transmit Aperture method (also called Total Focusing Method) can be carried out in real time at a processing rate of 140 high-resolution images per second (16 cm depth on steel)

  11. Micromachined Integrated Transducers for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Mette Funding

    The purpose of this project is to develop capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for medical imaging. Medical ultrasound transducers used today are fabricated using piezoelectric materials and bulk processing. To fabricate transducers capable of delivering a higher imaging...... project and collaboration with a lot of partners to improve medical ultrasound imaging. The focus in this part of the project is to design, fabricate and characterize 1D CMUT arrays. Two versions of 1D transducers are made, one at Stanford University and one at DTU. Electrical and acoustical...... resolution it is however necessary to develop new fabrication methods that allows fabrication of transducer elements with smaller dimensions. By using microfabrication technology it is possible to push the dimensions down and provide higher design flexibility. This project is part of a large ultrasound...

  12. Ultrasound imaging in lower limb prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Tania; Solomonidis, Stephan; Sandham, William; Spence, William

    2002-03-01

    The biomechanical interaction between the residual limb and the prosthetic socket determines the quality of fit of the socket in lower limb prosthetics. An understanding of this interaction and the development of quantitative measures to predict the quality of fit of the socket are important for optimal socket design. Finite-element modeling is used widely for biomechanical modeling of the limb/socket interaction and requires information on the internal and external geometry of the residual limb. Volumetric imaging methods such as X-ray computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have been used to obtain residual limb shape information. Of these modalities, ultrasound has been introduced most recently and its development for visualization in prosthetics is the least mature. This paper reviews ultrasound image acquisition and processing methods as they have been applied in lower limb prosthetics.

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the probe through ... during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) ...

  14. Vascular ultrasound for atherosclerosis imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.L. de Korte (Chris); H.H.G. Hansen (Hendrik); A.F.W. van der Steen (Ton)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractCardiovascular disease is a leading cause of death in the Western world. Therefore, detection and quantification of atherosclerotic disease is of paramount importance to monitor treatment and possible prevention of acute events. Vascular ultrasound is an excellent technique to assess the

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... children. It is also valuable for evaluating the brain, spinal cord and hip joints in newborns and infants. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  16. Dual-Modality PET/Ultrasound imaging of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Moses, William W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I.C.

    2005-11-11

    Functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)will detect malignant tumors in the prostate and/or prostate bed, as well as possibly help determine tumor ''aggressiveness''. However, the relative uptake in a prostate tumor can be so great that few other anatomical landmarks are visible in a PET image. Ultrasound imaging with a transrectal probe provides anatomical detail in the prostate region that can be co-registered with the sensitive functional information from the PET imaging. Imaging the prostate with both PET and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) will help determine the location of any cancer within the prostate region. This dual-modality imaging should help provide better detection and treatment of prostate cancer. LBNL has built a high performance positron emission tomograph optimized to image the prostate.Compared to a standard whole-body PET camera, our prostate-optimized PET camera has the same sensitivity and resolution, less backgrounds and lower cost. We plan to develop the hardware and software tools needed for a validated dual PET/TRUS prostate imaging system. We also plan to develop dual prostate imaging with PET and external transabdominal ultrasound, in case the TRUS system is too uncomfortable for some patients. We present the design and intended clinical uses for these dual imaging systems.

  17. A Targeting Microbubble for Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Shue-Min Yeh

    Full Text Available Microbubbles conjugated with targeting ligands are used as contrast agents for ultrasound molecular imaging. However, they often contain immunogenic (streptavidin, which impedes application in humans. Although targeting bubbles not employing the biotin-(streptavidin conjugation chemistry have been explored, only a few reached the stage of ultrasound imaging in vivo, none were reported/evaluated to show all three of the following properties desired for clinical applications: (i low degree of non-specific bubble retention in more than one non-reticuloendothelial tissue; (ii effective for real-time imaging; and (iii effective for acoustic quantification of molecular targets to a high degree of quantification. Furthermore, disclosures of the compositions and methodologies enabling reproduction of the bubbles are often withheld.To develop and evaluate a targeting microbubble based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry for ultrasound molecular imaging.Microbubbles with a previously unreported generic (non-targeting components composition were grafted with anti-E-selectin F(ab'2 using maleimide-thiol conjugation, to produce E-selectin targeting microbubbles. The resulting targeting bubbles showed high specificity to E-selectin in vitro and in vivo. Non-specific bubble retention was minimal in at least three non-reticuloendothelial tissues with inflammation (mouse heart, kidneys, cremaster. The bubbles were effective for real-time ultrasound imaging of E-selectin expression in the inflamed mouse heart and kidneys, using a clinical ultrasound scanner. The acoustic signal intensity of the targeted bubbles retained in the heart correlated strongly with the level of E-selectin expression (|r|≥0.8, demonstrating a high degree of non-invasive molecular quantification.Targeting microbubbles for ultrasound molecular imaging, based on maleimide-thiol conjugation chemistry and the generic composition described, may possess properties (i-(iii desired for

  18. Using ultrasound Nakagami imaging to assess liver fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Chih; Lin, Jen-Jen; Shu, Yu-Chen; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Chang, King-Jen; Chang, Chien-Cheng; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2012-02-01

    This study explored the feasibility of using the ultrasound Nakagami image to assess the degree of liver fibrosis in rats. The rat has been widely used as a model in investigations of liver fibrosis. Ultrasound grayscale imaging makes it possible to observe fibrotic rat livers in real time. Statistical analysis of the envelopes of signals backscattered from rat livers may provide useful clues about the degree of liver fibrosis. The Nakagami-model-based image has been shown to be useful for characterizing scatterers in tissues by reflecting the echo statistics, and hence the Nakagami image may serve as a functional imaging tool for quantifying rat liver fibrosis. To validate this idea, fibrosis was induced in each rat liver (n=21) by an intraperitoneal injection of 0.5% dimethylnitrosamine. Livers were excised from rats for in vitro ultrasound scanning using a single-element transducer. The backscattered-signal envelopes of the acquired raw ultrasound signals were used for Nakagami imaging. The Metavir score determined by a pathologist was used to histologically quantify the degree of liver fibrosis. It was found that the Nakagami image could be used to distinguish different degrees of liver fibrosis in rats, since the average Nakagami parameter increased from 0.55 to 0.83 as the fibrosis score increased from 0 (i.e., normal) to 4. This correlation may be due to liver fibrosis in rats involving an increase in the concentration of local scatterers and the appearance of the periodic structures or clustering of scatterers that would change the backscattering statistics. The current findings indicate that the ultrasound Nakagami image has great potential as a functional imaging tool to complement the use of the conventional B-scan in animal studies of liver fibrosis.

  19. Guideline report. Medical ultrasound imaging: progress and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, M

    1989-01-01

    Utilization of medical ultrasound has expanded rapidly during the past several years. In 1988, sales of ultrasound equipment will approach $600 million, which is higher than any other individual imaging modality, including the most capital intensive, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and cath lab angiography. This growth would have been difficult to predict previously, since ultrasound appeared to be a relatively mature imaging modality not too long ago. There are several reasons for this growth. Technological developments have been quite rapid; ultrasound has become easier to use, image quality has improved dramatically, and diagnostic accuracy has been enhanced. There has been a proliferation of new equipment at all ends of the price spectrum, allowing the user a wide choice in instrument performance, multi-function capabilities, and automated features to increase patient throughput. The DRG environment and the prospect for more pre-admission tests have also been a stimulus. Hospital buying activity has expanded, and many more ultrasound exams are now being conducted on an outpatient basis. Sales to freestanding imaging centers and individual physicians have similarly increased. The hospital user is willing to pay a large premium for advanced technical performance and is prepared to retire or replace older technology in less than three years. This replacement cycle is much shorter than the four to five year period which existed prior to 1985. By comparison, some of the more traditional imaging areas, such as radiology, have replacement rates of eight to ten years. The reason for early replacement is obvious. Ultrasound exams in hospitals generate revenues at a rate that justifies the purchase of the most advanced equipment. It also improves the referral rate and positions the hospital as a high quality provider. Even with low utilization rates, an ultrasound instrument can normally pay for itself in less than one year of regular

  20. Tissue Harmonic Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    , and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technol- ogy 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and pen- etration. In-vivo scans were also......Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue har- monic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a compar- ative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined...... with THI improves the image qual- ity compared to DRF-THI. The major benet of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for oine evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods...

  1. Musculoskeletal ultrasound: elbow imaging and procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kenneth S; Rosas, Humberto G; Craig, Joseph G

    2010-09-01

    Elbow injuries, both acute and chronic sports-related cases, have increased over the last decade. With one in every four members of a household participating in sports, both clinics and radiology departments are seeing more patients with elbow pain. High-resolution ultrasound is well suited for evaluating the elbow. Ultrasound is growing in popularity and fast becoming another modality that the radiologist can use to help diagnose elbow pathology. With advancing transducer technology and accessibility, ultrasound offers focused and real-time high-resolution imaging of tendons, ligaments, and nerve structures. Its advantages include the use of safe nonionizing radiation, accessibility, and cost effectiveness. Another unique advantage is its ability for dynamic assessment of tendon and ligament structures such as in cases of partial tears of the medial ulnar collateral ligament or ulnar nerve dislocation. It is also easy to assess the contralateral side as a control. Ultrasound is also useful in therapeutic guided injections for its multiplanar capability and clear visualization of major vessels and nerves. We discuss the unique application of ultrasound in evaluating common elbow pathology and in advanced ultrasound-guided treatments such as dextrose prolotherapy and platelet-rich plasma.

  2. Methods and systems for producing compounded ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed is a method for producing compounded ultrasound images by beamforming a first and a second low-resolution image using data from a first ultrasound emission, beamforming a third and a fourth low-resolution image using data from a second ultrasound emission, summing said first and said...

  3. Fast simulation of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2000-01-01

    Realistic B-mode and flow images can be simulated with scattering maps based on optical, CT, or MR images or parametric flow models. The image simulation often includes using 200,000 to 1 million point scatterers. One image line typically takes 1800 seconds to compute on a state-of-the-art PC, an...

  4. High definition ultrasound imaging for battlefield medical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwok, K.S.; Morimoto, A.K.; Kozlowski, D.M.; Krumm, J.C.; Dickey, F.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rogers, B; Walsh, N. [Texas Univ. Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    1996-06-23

    A team has developed an improved resolution ultrasound system for low cost diagnostics. This paper describes the development of an ultrasound based imaging system capable of generating 3D images showing surface and subsurface tissue and bone structures. We include results of a comparative study between images obtained from X-Ray Computed Tomography (CT) and ultrasound. We found that the quality of ultrasound images compares favorably with those from CT. Volumetric and surface data extracted from these images were within 7% of the range between ultrasound and CT scans. We also include images of porcine abdominal scans from two different sets of animal trials.

  5. Spatial filters for focusing ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gori, Paola

    2001-01-01

    . A new method for making spatial matched filter focusing of RF ultrasound data is proposed based on the spatial impulse response description of the imaging. The response from a scatterer at any given point in space relative to the transducer can be calculated, and this gives the spatial matched filter...

  6. Transducer for harmonic intravascular ultrasound imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Hendrik J.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; Droog, E.J.; Goertz, David E.; Blacquiere, Gerrit; Gisolf, Anton; de Jong, N.; van der Steen, Antonius F.W.

    2005-01-01

    A recent study has shown the feasibility of tissue harmonic imaging (THI) using an intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) transducer. This correspondence describes the design, fabrication, and characterization of a THI-optimized piezoelectric transducer with oval aperture of 0.75 mm by 1 mm. The transducer

  7. Ultrasound Imaging Methods for Breast Cancer Detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozmen, N.

    2014-01-01

    The main focus of this thesis is on modeling acoustic wavefield propagation and implementing imaging algorithms for breast cancer detection using ultrasound. As a starting point, we use an integral equation formulation, which can be used to solve both the forward and inverse problems. This thesis c

  8. Lesion Contrast Enhancement in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stetson, Paul F.; Sommer, F.G.; Macovski, A.

    1997-01-01

    Methods for improving the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of low-contrast lesions in medical ultrasound imaging are described. Differences in the frequency spectra and amplitude distributions of the lesion and its surroundings can be used to increase the CNR of the lesion relative to the background...

  9. Nanobubbles for enhanced ultrasound imaging of tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin T

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tinghui Yin1*, Ping Wang1*, Rongqin Zheng1, Bowen Zheng1, Du Cheng2, Xinling Zhang1, Xintao Shuai21Department of Medical Ultrasonic, Third Affiliated Hospital, 2PCFM Laboratory of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, People's Republic of China*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: The fabrication and initial applications of nanobubbles (NBs have shown promising results in recent years. A small particle size is a basic requirement for ultrasound contrast-enhanced agents that penetrate tumor blood vessel pores to allow for targeted imaging and therapy. However, the nanoscale size of the particles used has the disadvantage of weakening the imaging ability of clinical diagnostic ultrasound. In this work, we fabricated a lipid NBs contrast-enhanced ultrasound agent and evaluated its passive targeting ability in vivo. The results showed that the NBs were small (436.8 ± 5.7 nm, and in vitro ultrasound imaging suggested that the ultrasonic imaging ability is comparable to that of microbubbles (MBs. In vivo experiments confirmed the ability of NBs to passively target tumor tissues. The NBs remained in the tumor area for a longer period because they exhibited enhanced permeability and retention. Direct evidence was obtained by direct observation of red fluorescence-dyed NBs in tumor tissue using confocal laser scanning microscopy. We have demonstrated the ability to fabricate NBs that can be used for the in vivo contrast-enhanced imaging of tumor tissue and that have potential for drug/gene delivery.Keywords: phospholipids, ultrasound, contrast agent, tumor-targeted

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you ... not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic ...

  11. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you! Do you have a personal story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery ... reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America ( ...

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also can be used to guide procedures such ... of a testicle limiting proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare? Your ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also can be used to guide procedures such ... of a testicle limiting proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare for ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... real-time images, images that are renewed continuously, it also can be used to guide procedures such ... of a testicle limiting proper blood flow into it. top of page How should we prepare? Your ...

  15. Molecular and functional ultrasound imaging in differently aggressive breast cancer xenografts using two novel ultrasound contrast agents (BR55 and BR38).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzyl, Jessica; Lederle, Wiltrud; Rix, Anne; Grouls, Christoph; Tardy, Isabelle; Pochon, Sibylle; Siepmann, Monica; Penzkofer, Tobias; Schneider, Michel; Kiessling, Fabian; Palmowski, Moritz

    2011-09-01

    To characterise clinically translatable long-circulating (BR38) and VEGFR2-targeted (BR55) microbubbles (MB) and to assess their ability to discriminate breast cancer models with different aggressiveness. The circulation characteristics of BR38 and BR55 were investigated in healthy mice. The relative blood volume (rBV) of MDA-MB-231 (n = 5) or MCF-7 (n = 6) tumours was determined using BR38. In the same tumours in-vivo binding specificity of BR55 was tested and VEGFR2 expression assessed. Data validation included quantitative immunohistological analysis. BR38 had a longer blood half-life than BR55 (>600 s vs. 218 s). BR38-enhanced ultrasound showed greater vascularisation in MDA-MB-231 tumours (p = 0.022), which was in line with immunohistology (p = 0.033). In-vivo competitive binding experiments proved the specificity of BR55 to VEGFR2 (p = 0.027). Binding of BR55 was significantly higher in MDA-MB-231 than in MCF-7 tumours (p = 0.049), which corresponded with the VEGFR2 levels found histologically (p = 0.015). However, differences became smaller when normalising the levels of BR55 to the rBV. BR38 and BR55 are well suited to characterising and distinguishing breast cancers with different angiogenesis and aggressiveness. Long-circulating BR38 MB allow extensive 3-dimensional examinations of larger or several organs. BR55 accumulation faithfully reflects the VEGFR2 status in tumours and depicts even small differences in angiogenesis.

  16. An intelligent nanotheranostic agent for targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging, and imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound synergistic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Chen, Hangrong; Zhang, Kun; Ma, Ming; Li, Faqi; Zeng, Deping; Zheng, Shuguang; Chen, Yu; Jiang, Lixin; Xu, Huixiong; Shi, Jianlin

    2014-04-09

    A novel multifunctional nanotheranostic agent with targeting, redox-responsive ultrasound imaging and ultrasound imaging-guided high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy (MSNC-PEG-HA(SS)-PFH, abbreviated as MPH(SS)-PFH) capabilities is developed. The redox-responsive guest molecule release and ultrasound imaging functions can be both integrated in such a "smart" theranostic agent, which is accomplished by the redox-triggered transition from the crosslinking state to retrocrosslinking state of the grafted polyethylene glycol-disulfide hyaluronic acid molecules on the particle surface when reaching a reducing environment in vitro. More importantly, under the tailored ultrasound imaging guiding, in vivo Hela tumor-bearing nude mice can be thoroughly and spatial-accurately ablated during HIFU therapy, due to the targeted accumulation, responsive ultrasound imaging guidance and the synergistic ablation functions of nanotheranostic agent MPH(SS)-PFH in the tumors. This novel multifunctional nano-platform can serve as a promising candidate for further studies on oncology therapy, due to its high stability, responsive and indicative ultrasound imaging of tumors, and enhanced HIFU therapeutic efficiency and spatial accuracy under ultrasound-guidance.

  17. Method and system to synchronize acoustic therapy with ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Neil (Inventor); Bailey, Michael R. (Inventor); Hossack, James (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Interference in ultrasound imaging when used in connection with high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is avoided by employing a synchronization signal to control the HIFU signal. Unless the timing of the HIFU transducer is controlled, its output will substantially overwhelm the signal produced by ultrasound imaging system and obscure the image it produces. The synchronization signal employed to control the HIFU transducer is obtained without requiring modification of the ultrasound imaging system. Signals corresponding to scattered ultrasound imaging waves are collected using either the HIFU transducer or a dedicated receiver. A synchronization processor manipulates the scattered ultrasound imaging signals to achieve the synchronization signal, which is then used to control the HIFU bursts so as to substantially reduce or eliminate HIFU interference in the ultrasound image. The synchronization processor can alternatively be implemented using a computing device or an application-specific circuit.

  18. 3D ultrasound imaging for prosthesis fabrication and diagnostic imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, A.K.; Bow, W.J.; Strong, D.S. [and others

    1995-06-01

    The fabrication of a prosthetic socket for a below-the-knee amputee requires knowledge of the underlying bone structure in order to provide pressure relief for sensitive areas and support for load bearing areas. The goal is to enable the residual limb to bear pressure with greater ease and utility. Conventional methods of prosthesis fabrication are based on limited knowledge about the patient`s underlying bone structure. A 3D ultrasound imaging system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The imaging system provides information about the location of the bones in the residual limb along with the shape of the skin surface. Computer assisted design (CAD) software can use this data to design prosthetic sockets for amputees. Ultrasound was selected as the imaging modality. A computer model was developed to analyze the effect of the various scanning parameters and to assist in the design of the overall system. The 3D ultrasound imaging system combines off-the-shelf technology for image capturing, custom hardware, and control and image processing software to generate two types of image data -- volumetric and planar. Both volumetric and planar images reveal definition of skin and bone geometry with planar images providing details on muscle fascial planes, muscle/fat interfaces, and blood vessel definition. The 3D ultrasound imaging system was tested on 9 unilateral below-the- knee amputees. Image data was acquired from both the sound limb and the residual limb. The imaging system was operated in both volumetric and planar formats. An x-ray CT (Computed Tomography) scan was performed on each amputee for comparison. Results of the test indicate beneficial use of ultrasound to generate databases for fabrication of prostheses at a lower cost and with better initial fit as compared to manually fabricated prostheses.

  19. Real-time image fusion involving diagnostic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, Caroline; Săftoiu, Adrian; Gruionu, Lucian G;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our article is to give an overview of the current and future possibilities of real-time image fusion involving ultrasound. We present a review of the existing English-language peer-reviewed literature assessing this technique, which covers technical solutions (for ultrasound...... and endoscopic ultrasound), image fusion in several anatomic regions, and electromagnetic needle tracking....

  20. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear ...

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... imaging of the abdomen is a safe, noninvasive test that uses sound waves to produce a clear ...

  2. Molecular ultrasound imaging: current status and future directions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshpande, N. [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Needles, A. [Visualsonics, Toronto (Canada); Willmann, J.K., E-mail: willmann@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2010-07-15

    Targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound (molecular ultrasound) is an emerging imaging strategy that combines ultrasound technology with novel molecularly-targeted ultrasound contrast agents for assessing biological processes at the molecular level. Molecular ultrasound contrast agents are nano- or micro-sized particles that are targeted to specific molecular markers by adding high-affinity binding ligands onto the surface of the particles. Following intravenous administration, these targeted ultrasound contrast agents accumulate at tissue sites overexpressing specific molecular markers, thereby enhancing the ultrasound imaging signal. High spatial and temporal resolution, real-time imaging, non-invasiveness, relatively low costs, lack of ionising irradiation and wide availability of ultrasound systems are advantages compared to other molecular imaging modalities. In this article we review current concepts and future directions of molecular ultrasound imaging, including different classes of molecular ultrasound contrast agents, ongoing technical developments of pre-clinical and clinical ultrasound systems, the potential of molecular ultrasound for imaging different diseases at the molecular level, and the translation of molecular ultrasound into the clinic.

  3. WE-B-210-02: The Advent of Ultrafast Imaging in Biomedical Ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanter, M. [Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique (France)

    2015-06-15

    In the last fifteen years, the introduction of plane or diverging wave transmissions rather than line by line scanning focused beams has broken the conventional barriers of ultrasound imaging. By using such large field of view transmissions, the frame rate reaches the theoretical limit of physics dictated by the ultrasound speed and an ultrasonic map can be provided typically in tens of micro-seconds (several thousands of frames per second). Interestingly, this leap in frame rate is not only a technological breakthrough but it permits the advent of completely new ultrasound imaging modes, including shear wave elastography, electromechanical wave imaging, ultrafast doppler, ultrafast contrast imaging, and even functional ultrasound imaging of brain activity (fUltrasound) introducing Ultrasound as an emerging full-fledged neuroimaging modality. At ultrafast frame rates, it becomes possible to track in real time the transient vibrations – known as shear waves – propagating through organs. Such “human body seismology” provides quantitative maps of local tissue stiffness whose added value for diagnosis has been recently demonstrated in many fields of radiology (breast, prostate and liver cancer, cardiovascular imaging, …). Today, Supersonic Imagine company is commercializing the first clinical ultrafast ultrasound scanner, Aixplorer with real time Shear Wave Elastography. This is the first example of an ultrafast Ultrasound approach surpassing the research phase and now widely spread in the clinical medical ultrasound community with an installed base of more than 1000 Aixplorer systems in 54 countries worldwide. For blood flow imaging, ultrafast Doppler permits high-precision characterization of complex vascular and cardiac flows. It also gives ultrasound the ability to detect very subtle blood flow in very small vessels. In the brain, such ultrasensitive Doppler paves the way for fUltrasound (functional ultrasound imaging) of brain activity with unprecedented

  4. Ultrasound Speckle Tracking Imaging Contributes to Early Diagnosis of Impaired Left Ventricular Systolic Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong MA; Mingxing XIE; Jing WANG; Qing LU; Xinfang WANG; Xiaofang LU; Yali YANG; Lijun HU

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the value of ultrasound speckle tracking imaging (STI) in the assessment of the short-axis and long-axis systolic function of the left ventricle (LV) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), 100 subjects with normal ejection fraction were studied, including 41 patients with DM only (DM group), 22 patients with both DM and left ventricular hypertrophy (DH group),and 37 healthy subjects (control group). Left ventricle systolic function in the long axis defined as longitudinal strain, and that in the short axis defined as radial strain, apical and basal LV rotations,and LV twist were assessed respectively. The results showed that average peak strain in the long axis at basal, middle and apical levels, and global peak strain were significantly decreased in the patient groups when compared with the control group (P0.05). Apical and basal LV rotations, and LV twist were greater in the patient groups than in the control group (P<0.01 for each). Basal LV rotation and LV twist were greater in DH group than those in DM group (P<0.01). It was concluded that STI may be used to identify early abnormalities in patients with type 2 DM that have normal left ventricular systolic function.

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... imaging can also: help a physician determine the source of abdominal pain, such as gallstones, kidney stones, ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  6. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ... improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of ...

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to have your child drink several glasses of water, depending on the child's size, two hours prior ... improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments and procedures may vary by geographic region. Discuss the fees associated with your prescribed procedure with your doctor, the ...

  9. Ultrasound Imaging of the Pelvic Floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Daniel E; Quiroz, Lieschen H

    2016-03-01

    This article discusses the background and appraisal of endoluminal ultrasound of the pelvic floor. It provides a detailed anatomic assessment of the muscles and surrounding organs of the pelvic floor. Different anatomic variability and pathology, such as prolapse, fecal incontinence, urinary incontinence, vaginal wall cysts, synthetic implanted material, and pelvic pain, are easily assessed with endoluminal vaginal ultrasound. With pelvic organ prolapse in particular, not only is the prolapse itself seen but the underlying cause related to the anatomic and functional abnormalities of the pelvic floor muscle structures are also visualized.

  10. Enhanced ultrasound for advanced diagnostics, ultrasound tomography for volume limb imaging and prosthetic fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Brian W.

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasound imaging methods hold the potential to deliver low-cost, high-resolution, operator-independent and nonionizing imaging systems - such systems couple appropriate algorithms with imaging devices and techniques. The increasing demands on general practitioners motivate us to develop more usable and productive diagnostic imaging equipment. Ultrasound, specifically freehand ultrasound, is a low cost and safe medical imaging technique. It doesn't expose a patient to ionizing radiation. Its safety and versatility make it very well suited for the increasing demands on general practitioners, or for providing improved medical care in rural regions or the developing world. However it typically suffers from sonographer variability; we will discuss techniques to address user variability. We also discuss our work to combine cylindrical scanning systems with state of the art inversion algorithms to deliver ultrasound systems for imaging and quantifying limbs in 3-D in vivo. Such systems have the potential to track the progression of limb health at a low cost and without radiation exposure, as well as, improve prosthetic socket fitting. Current methods of prosthetic socket fabrication remain subjective and ineffective at creating an interface to the human body that is both comfortable and functional. Though there has been recent success using methods like magnetic resonance imaging and biomechanical modeling, a low-cost, streamlined, and quantitative process for prosthetic cup design and fabrication has not been fully demonstrated. Medical ultrasonography may inform the design process of prosthetic sockets in a more objective manner. This keynote talk presents the results of progress in this area.

  11. Ultrasound for molecular imaging and therapy in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kaneko, Osamu F; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, molecularly-targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (ultrasound molecular imaging) has attracted significant attention in preclinical research of cancer diagnostic and therapy. Potential applications for ultrasound molecular imaging run the gamut from early detection and characterization of malignancies to monitoring treatment responses and guiding therapies. There may also be a role for ultrasound contrast agents for improved delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs and gene th...

  12. Fast and Automatic Ultrasound Simulation from CT Images

    OpenAIRE

    Weijian Cong; Jian Yang; Yue Liu; Yongtian Wang

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound is currently widely used in clinical diagnosis because of its fast and safe imaging principles. As the anatomical structures present in an ultrasound image are not as clear as CT or MRI. Physicians usually need advance clinical knowledge and experience to distinguish diseased tissues. Fast simulation of ultrasound provides a cost-effective way for the training and correlation of ultrasound and the anatomic structures. In this paper, a novel method is proposed for fast simulation of...

  13. Coded excitation for ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jaehee; Kim, Sangwon; Sohn, Hak-Yeol; Song, Tai-Kyong; Yoo, Yang Mo

    2010-05-01

    Coded excitation can improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in ultrasound tissue harmonic imaging (THI). However, it could suffer from the increased sidelobe artifact caused by incomplete pulse compression due to the spectral overlap between the fundamental and harmonic components of ultrasound signal after nonlinear propagation in tissues. In this paper, three coded tissue harmonic imaging (CTHI) techniques based on bandpass filtering, power modulation and pulse inversion (i.e., CTHI-BF, CTHI-PM, and CTHI-PI) were evaluated by measuring the peak range sidelobe level (PRSL) with varying frequency bandwidths. From simulation and in vitro studies, the CTHI-PI outperforms the CTHI-BF and CTHI-PM methods in terms of the PRSL, e.g., -43.5dB vs. -24.8dB and -23.0dB, respectively. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. An open access thyroid ultrasound image database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza, Lina; Vargas, Carlos; Narváez, Fabián.; Durán, Oscar; Muñoz, Emma; Romero, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Computer aided diagnosis systems (CAD) have been developed to assist radiologists in the detection and diagnosis of abnormalities and a large number of pattern recognition techniques have been proposed to obtain a second opinion. Most of these strategies have been evaluated using different datasets making their performance incomparable. In this work, an open access database of thyroid ultrasound images is presented. The dataset consists of a set of B-mode Ultrasound images, including a complete annotation and diagnostic description of suspicious thyroid lesions by expert radiologists. Several types of lesions as thyroiditis, cystic nodules, adenomas and thyroid cancers were included while an accurate lesion delineation is provided in XML format. The diagnostic description of malignant lesions was confirmed by biopsy. The proposed new database is expected to be a resource for the community to assess different CAD systems.

  15. Hot topics in biomedical ultrasound: ultrasound therapy and its integration with ultrasonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everbach, E. Carr

    2005-09-01

    Since the development of biomedical ultrasound imaging from sonar after WWII, there has been a clear divide between ultrasonic imaging and ultrasound therapy. While imaging techniques are designed to cause as little change as possible in the tissues through which ultrasound propagates, ultrasound therapy typically relies upon heating or acoustic cavitation to produce a desirable therapeutic effect. Concerns over the increasingly high acoustic outputs of diagnostic ultrasound scanners prompted the adoption of the Mechanical Index (MI) and Thermal Index (TI) in the early 1990s. Therapeutic applications of ultrasound, meanwhile, have evolved from deep tissue heating in sports medicine to include targeted drug delivery, tumor and plaque ablation, cauterization via high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and accelerated dissolution of blood clots. The integration of ultrasonic imaging and therapy in one device is just beginning, but the promise of improved patient outcomes is balanced by regulatory and practical impediments.

  16. 40 MHz high-frequency ultrafast ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Pei-Yu; Peng, Po-Hsun; Lee, Po-Yang

    2017-06-01

    Ultrafast high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging based on coherent-plane-wave compounding has been developed for many biomedical applications. Most coherent-plane-wave compounding systems typically operate at 3-15 MHz, and the image resolution for this frequency range is not sufficient for visualizing microstructure tissues. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to implement a high-frequency ultrafast ultrasound imaging operating at 40 MHz. The plane-wave compounding imaging and conventional multifocus B-mode imaging were performed using the Field II toolbox of MATLAB in simulation study. In experiments, plane-wave compounding images were obtained from a 256 channel ultrasound research platform with a 40 MHz array transducer. All images were produced by point-spread functions and cyst phantoms. The in vivo experiment was performed from zebrafish. Since high-frequency ultrasound exhibits a lower penetration, chirp excitation was applied to increase the imaging depth in simulation. The simulation results showed that a lateral resolution of up to 66.93 μm and a contrast of up to 56.41 dB were achieved when using 75-angles plane waves in compounding imaging. The experimental results showed that a lateral resolution of up to 74.83 μm and a contrast of up to 44.62 dB were achieved when using 75-angles plane waves in compounding imaging. The dead zone and compounding noise are about 1.2 mm and 2.0 mm in depth for experimental compounding imaging, respectively. The structure of zebrafish heart was observed clearly using plane-wave compounding imaging. The use of fewer than 23 angles for compounding allowed a frame rate higher than 1000 frames per second. However, the compounding imaging exhibits a similar lateral resolution of about 72 μm as the angle of plane wave is higher than 10 angles. This study shows the highest operational frequency for ultrafast high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  17. Noninvasive Label-Free Detection of Micrometastases in the Lymphatics with Ultrasound-Guided Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Imaging of Anatomical and Functional Indicators of Lymph Node Metastasis,” Biomedical Engineering Society Annual Meeting...imaging system that will detect functional changes associated with lymph node metastasis in breast cancer patients. Our efforts in the first year have...imaging can be used to guide dissection . We have also successfully integrated a programmable ultrasound machine (Verasonics Vantage) and tunable pulsed

  18. Pulse sequences for uniform perfluorocarbon droplet vaporization and ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, C; Sheeran, P S; Rojas, J D; Dayton, P A

    2014-09-01

    Phase-change contrast agents (PCCAs) consist of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets that can be vaporized into gas-filled microbubbles by pulsed ultrasound waves at diagnostic pressures and frequencies. These activatable contrast agents provide benefits of longer circulating times and smaller sizes relative to conventional microbubble contrast agents. However, optimizing ultrasound-induced activation of these agents requires coordinated pulse sequences not found on current clinical systems, in order to both initiate droplet vaporization and image the resulting microbubble population. Specifically, the activation process must provide a spatially uniform distribution of microbubbles and needs to occur quickly enough to image the vaporized agents before they migrate out of the imaging field of view. The development and evaluation of protocols for PCCA-enhanced ultrasound imaging using a commercial array transducer are described. The developed pulse sequences consist of three states: (1) initial imaging at sub-activation pressures, (2) activating droplets within a selected region of interest, and (3) imaging the resulting microbubbles. Bubble clouds produced by the vaporization of decafluorobutane and octafluoropropane droplets were characterized as a function of focused pulse parameters and acoustic field location. Pulse sequences were designed to manipulate the geometries of discrete microbubble clouds using electronic steering, and cloud spacing was tailored to build a uniform vaporization field. The complete pulse sequence was demonstrated in the water bath and then in vivo in a rodent kidney. The resulting contrast provided a significant increase (>15 dB) in signal intensity.

  19. Integrated ultrasound and gamma imaging probe for medical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pani, R.; Pellegrini, R.; Cinti, M. N.; Polito, C.; Orlandi, C.; Fabbri, A.; De Vincentis, G.

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, integrated multi-modality systems have been developed, aimed at improving the accuracy of medical diagnosis correlating information from different imaging techniques. In this contest, a novel dual modality probe is proposed, based on an ultrasound detector integrated with a small field of view single photon emission gamma camera. The probe, dedicated to visualize small organs or tissues located at short depths, performs dual modality images and permits to correlate morphological and functional information. The small field of view gamma camera consists of a continuous NaI:Tl scintillation crystal coupled with two multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. Both detectors were characterized in terms of position linearity and spatial resolution performances in order to guarantee the spatial correspondence between the ultrasound and the gamma images. Finally, dual-modality images of custom phantoms are obtained highlighting the good co-registration between ultrasound and gamma images, in terms of geometry and image processing, as a consequence of calibration procedures.

  20. Discrete echo signal modeling of ultrasound imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Zhang, Cishen

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, a discrete model representing the pulse-tissue interaction in the medical ultrasound scanning and imaging process is developed. The model is based on discretizing the acoustical wave equation and is in terms of convolution between the input ultrasound pulses and the tissue mass density variation. Such a model can provide a useful means for ultrasound echo signal processing and imaging. Most existing models used for ultrasound imaging are based on frequency domain transform. A disadvantage of the frequency domain transform is that it is only applicable to shift-invariant models. Thus it has ignored the shift-variant nature of the original acoustic wave equation where the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions are spatial-variant factors. The discretized frequency domain model also obscures the compressibility and mass density representations of the tissue, which may mislead the physical understanding and interpretation of the image obtained. Moreover, only the classical frequency domain filtering methods have been applied to the frequency domain model for acquiring some tissue information from the scattered echo signals. These methods are non-parametric and require a prior knowledge of frequency spectra of the transmitted pulses. Our proposed model technique will lead to discrete, multidimensional, shift-variant and parametric difference or convolution equations with the transmitted pulse pressure as the input, the measurement data of the echo signals as the output, and functions of the tissue compressibility and mass density distributions as shift-variant parameters that can be readily identified from input-output measurements. The proposed model represents the entire multiple scattering process, and hence overcomes the key limitation in the current ultrasound imaging methods.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be turned to either side to improve the quality of the images. A clear water-based gel is applied to the area of the body being studied to help the transducer make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  2. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... supervise and interpret radiology examinations, will analyze the images and send a signed report to your primary care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  3. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) ... depend on the type of examination. Ask your doctor if there are specific instructions for eating and ...

  4. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. In some ... a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  5. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Images × ... Recommend RadiologyInfo to a friend Send to (friend's e-mail address): From (your name): Your e-mail ...

  6. Tissue harmonic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Rasmussen, Joachim Hee; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-10-01

    Synthetic aperture sequential beamforming (SASB) and tissue harmonic imaging (THI) are combined to improve the image quality of medical ultrasound imaging. The technique is evaluated in a comparative study against dynamic receive focusing (DRF). The objective is to investigate if SASB combined with THI improves the image quality compared to DRF-THI. The major benefit of SASB is a reduced bandwidth between the probe and processing unit. A BK Medical 2202 Ultraview ultrasound scanner was used to acquire beamformed RF data for offline evaluation. The acquisition was made interleaved between methods, and data were recorded with and without pulse inversion for tissue harmonic imaging. Data were acquired using a Sound Technology 192 element convex array transducer from both a wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom to investigate spatial resolution and penetration. In vivo scans were also performed for a visual comparison. The spatial resolution for SASB-THI is on average 19% better than DRI-THI, and the investigation of penetration showed equally good signal-to-noise ratio. In vivo B-mode scans were made and compared. The comparison showed that SASB-THI reduces the artifact and noise interference and improves image contrast and spatial resolution.

  7. Improvement of ultrasound speckle image velocimetry using image enhancement techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Eunseop; Nam, Kweon-Ho; Paeng, Dong-Guk; Lee, Sang Joon

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-based techniques have been developed and widely used in noninvasive measurement of blood velocity. Speckle image velocimetry (SIV), which applies a cross-correlation algorithm to consecutive B-mode images of blood flow has often been employed owing to its better spatial resolution compared with conventional Doppler-based measurement techniques. The SIV technique utilizes speckles backscattered from red blood cell (RBC) aggregates as flow tracers. Hence, the intensity and size of such speckles are highly dependent on hemodynamic conditions. The grayscale intensity of speckle images varies along the radial direction of blood vessels because of the shear rate dependence of RBC aggregation. This inhomogeneous distribution of echo speckles decreases the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of a cross-correlation analysis and produces spurious results. In the present study, image-enhancement techniques such as contrast-limited adaptive histogram equalization (CLAHE), min/max technique, and subtraction of background image (SB) method were applied to speckle images to achieve a more accurate SIV measurement. A mechanical sector ultrasound scanner was used to obtain ultrasound speckle images from rat blood under steady and pulsatile flows. The effects of the image-enhancement techniques on SIV analysis were evaluated by comparing image intensities, velocities, and cross-correlation maps. The velocity profiles and wall shear rate (WSR) obtained from RBC suspension images were compared with the analytical solution for validation. In addition, the image-enhancement techniques were applied to in vivo measurement of blood flow in human vein. The experimental results of both in vitro and in vivo SIV measurements show that the intensity gradient in heterogeneous speckles has substantial influence on the cross-correlation analysis. The image-enhancement techniques used in this study can minimize errors encountered in ultrasound SIV measurement in which RBCs are used as flow

  8. with Ultrasound Color Doppler Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Takayama

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Color Doppler imaging (CDI can be used to noninvasively create images of human blood vessels and quantitatively evaluate blood flow in real-time. The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of acupuncture on the blood flow of the peripheral, mesenteric, and retrobulbar arteries by CDI. Statistical significance was defined as P values less than 0.05. Blood flow in the radial and brachial arteries was significantly lower during needle stimulation on LR3 than before in healthy volunteers, but was significantly higher after needle stimulation than before. LR3 stimulation also resulted in a significant decrease in the vascular resistance of the short posterior ciliary artery and no significant change of blood flow through the superior mesenteric artery (SMA during acupuncture. In contrast, ST36 stimulation resulted in a significant increase in blood flow through the SMA and no significant change in the vascular resistance of the retrobulbar arteries. Additionally, acupuncture at previously determined acupoints in patients with open-angle glaucoma led to a significant reduction in the vascular resistance of the central retinal artery and short posterior ciliary artery. Our results suggest that acupuncture can affect blood flow of the peripheral, mesenteric, and retrobulbar arteries, and CDI can be useful to evaluate hemodynamic changes by acupuncture.

  9. Harmonic ultrasound imaging using synthetic aperture sequential beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    A method includes generating an ultrasound image based on the harmonic components in the received echoes using multi-stage beam forming and data generated therefrom. An ultrasound imaging system (100, 200) includes a transducer array (108) including a plurality of transducer elements configured...... to emit ultrasound signals and receive echoes generated in response to the emitted ultrasound signals. The ultrasound imaging system further includes transmit circuitry (1 10) that generates a set of pulses that actuate a set of the plurality of transducer elements to emit ultrasound signals....... The ultrasound imaging system further includes receive circuitry (1 12), including a first beam former (122) configured to process the second harmonic signal components extracted from the received echo signals, generating intermediate scan lines. Memory (126) stores the generated intermediate scan lines...

  10. Ultrasound triggered image-guided drug delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, Marcel R. [Philips Research Europe, Biomolecular Engineering, HTC11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Muenster, Albert Schweitzerstrasse 33, 48149 Muenster (Germany)], E-mail: marcel.bohmer@philips.com; Klibanov, Alexander L. [Cardiovascular Division, Department of Medicine, Cobb Hall, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Hospital Drive, Cobb Hall RM 1026, Charlottesville, VA 22908-158 (United States); Tiemann, Klaus [Department of Cardiology and Angiology, University Hospital Muenster, Albert Schweitzerstrasse 33, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Hall, Christopher S. [Philips Research North America, Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy, 345 Scarborough Road, Briarcliff Manor, NY 10510 (United States); Gruell, Holger; Steinbach, Oliver C. [Philips Research Europe, Biomolecular Engineering, HTC11, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15

    The integration of therapeutic interventions with diagnostic imaging has been recognized as one of the next technological developments that will have a major impact on medical treatments. Important advances in this field are based on a combination of progress in guiding and monitoring ultrasound energy, novel drug classes becoming available, the development of smart delivery vehicles, and more in depth understanding of the mechanisms of the cellular and molecular basis of diseases. Recent research demonstrates that both pressure sensitive and temperature sensitive delivery systems hold promise for local treatment. The use of ultrasound for the delivery of drugs has been demonstrated in particular the field of cardiology and oncology for a variety of therapeutics ranging from small drug molecules to biologics and nucleic acids.

  11. APES Beamforming Applied to Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomberg, Ann E. A.; Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Recently, adaptive beamformers have been introduced to medical ultrasound imaging. The primary focus has been on the minimum variance (MV) (or Capon) beamformer. This work investigates an alternative but closely related beamformer, the Amplitude and Phase Estimation (APES) beamformer. APES offers...... added robustness at the expense of a slightly lower resolution. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of the APES beamformer on medical imaging data, since correct amplitude estimation often is just as important as spatial resolution. In our simulations we have used a 3.5 MHz, 96...... element linear transducer array. When imaging two closely spaced point targets, APES displays nearly the same resolution as the MV, and at the same time improved amplitude control. When imaging cysts in speckle, APES offers speckle statistics similar to that of the DAS, without the need for temporal...

  12. Image reconstruction for robot assisted ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalamifar, Fereshteh; Zhang, Haichong K.; Rahmim, Arman; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-04-01

    An investigation of several image reconstruction methods for robot-assisted ultrasound (US) tomography setup is presented. In the robot-assisted setup, an expert moves the US probe to the location of interest, and a robotic arm automatically aligns another US probe with it. The two aligned probes can then transmit and receive US signals which are subsequently used for tomographic reconstruction. This study focuses on reconstruction of the speed of sound. In various simulation evaluations as well as in an experiment with a millimeter-range inaccuracy, we demonstrate that the limited data provided by two probes can be used to reconstruct pixel-wise images differentiating between media with different speeds of sound. Combining the results of this investigation with the developed robot-assisted US tomography setup, we envision feasibility of this setup for tomographic imaging in applications beyond breast imaging, with potentially significant efficacy in cancer diagnosis.

  13. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation to aid breast cancer image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L

    2016-02-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  14. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm;

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological...

  15. Ultrasound transducer selection in clinical imaging practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Thomas L; Lewin, Peter A

    2013-04-01

    Many types of medical ultrasound transducers are used in clinical practice. They operate at different center frequencies, have different physical dimensions, footprints, and shapes, and provide different image formats. However, little information is available about which transducers are most appropriate for a given application, and the purpose of this article is to address this deficiency. Specifically, the relationship between the transducer, imaging format, and clinical applications is discussed, and systematic selection criteria that allow matching of transducers to specific clinical needs are presented. These criteria include access to and coverage of the region of interest, maximum scan depth, and coverage of essential diagnostic modes required to optimize a patient's diagnosis. Three comprehensive figures organize and summarize the imaging planes, scanning modes, and types of diagnostic transducers to facilitate their selection in clinical diagnosis.

  16. Distal fibula fracture diagnosed with ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardouni, Joseph R

    2012-10-01

    The patient was a 31-year-old man serving in a military special forces unit at a remote location. He presented to a physical therapist with a chief complaint of worsening right lateral ankle pain that limited his ability to bear weight. Because the patient met the Ottawa ankle rules and there was concern for a fracture, radiographs were indicated. However, the nearest facility with radiographic capabilities was only available through air medical evacuation. Therefore, the physical therapist assessed the patient's ankle with an onsite portable ultrasound imaging unit, which demonstrated cortical irregularity along the distal fibula.

  17. Co-registration of ultrasound and frequency-domain photoacoustic radar images and image improvement for tumor detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovlo, Edem; Lashkari, Bahman; Choi, Sung soo Sean; Mandelis, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    This paper demonstrates the co-registration of ultrasound (US) and frequency domain photoacoustic radar (FD-PAR) images with significant image improvement from applying image normalization, filtering and amplification techniques. Achieving PA imaging functionality on a commercial Ultrasound instrument could accelerate clinical acceptance and use. Experimental results presented demonstrate live animal testing and show enhancements in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast and spatial resolution. The co-registered image produced from the US and phase PA images, provides more information than both images independently.

  18. Ultrasound - Scrotum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Scrotum Ultrasound imaging of the scrotum uses sound ... of Ultrasound Imaging of the Scrotum? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Scrotum? Ultrasound imaging of the ...

  19. Development of a Hybrid Magnetic Resonance and Ultrasound Imaging System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Sherwood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A system which allows magnetic resonance (MR and ultrasound (US image data to be acquired simultaneously has been developed. B-mode and Doppler US were performed inside the bore of a clinical 1.5 T MRI scanner using a clinical 1–4 MHz US transducer with an 8-metre cable. Susceptibility artefacts and RF noise were introduced into MR images by the US imaging system. RF noise was minimised by using aluminium foil to shield the transducer. A study of MR and B-mode US image signal-to-noise ratio (SNR as a function of transducer-phantom separation was performed using a gel phantom. This revealed that a 4 cm separation between the phantom surface and the transducer was sufficient to minimise the effect of the susceptibility artefact in MR images. MR-US imaging was demonstrated in vivo with the aid of a 2 mm VeroWhite 3D-printed spherical target placed over the thigh muscle of a rat. The target allowed single-point registration of MR and US images in the axial plane to be performed. The system was subsequently demonstrated as a tool for the targeting and visualisation of high intensity focused ultrasound exposure in the rat thigh muscle.

  20. Consider ultrasound first for imaging the female pelvis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacerraf, Beryl R; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Bromley, Bryann; Goldstein, Steven R; Groszmann, Yvette; Shipp, Thomas D; Timor-Tritsch, Ilan E

    2015-04-01

    Ultrasound technology has evolved dramatically in recent years and now includes applications such as 3-dimensional volume imaging, real-time evaluation of pelvic organs (simultaneous with the physical examination), and Doppler blood flow mapping without the need for contrast, which makes ultrasound imaging unique for imaging the female pelvis. Among the many cross-sectional imaging techniques, we should use the most informative, less invasive, and less expensive modality to avoid radiation when possible. Hence, ultrasound imaging should be the first imaging modality used in women with pelvic symptoms.

  1. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Neural Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Kevin R.

    Molecular imaging is a form of nanotechnology that enables the noninvasive examination of biological processes in vivo. Radiopharmaceutical agents are used to selectively target biochemical markers, which permits their detection and evaluation. Early visualization of molecular variations indicative of pathophysiological processes can aid in patient diagnoses and management decisions. Molecular imaging is performed by introducing molecular probes into the body. Molecular probes are often contrast agents that have been nanoengineered to selectively target and tether to molecules, enabling their radiologic identification. Ultrasound contrast agents have been demonstrated as an effective method of detecting perfusion at the tissue level. Through a nanoengineering process, ultrasound contrast agents can be targeted to specific molecules, thereby extending ultrasound's capabilities from the tissue to molecular level. Molecular ultrasound, or targeted contrast enhanced ultrasound (TCEUS), has recently emerged as a popular molecular imaging technique due to its ability to provide real-time anatomical and functional information in the absence of ionizing radiation. However, molecular ultrasound represents a novel form of molecular imaging, and consequently remains largely preclinical. A review of the TCEUS literature revealed multiple preclinical studies demonstrating its success in detecting inflammation in a variety of tissues. Although, a gap was identified in the existing evidence, as TCEUS effectiveness for detection of neural inflammation in the spinal cord was unable to be uncovered. This gap in knowledge, coupled with the profound impacts that this TCEUS application could have clinically, provided rationale for its exploration, and use as contributory evidence for the molecular ultrasound body of literature. An animal model that underwent a contusive spinal cord injury was used to establish preclinical evidence of TCEUS to detect neural inflammation. Imaging was

  2. Geometric distortion of area in medical ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, T.; Tong, J.; Ward, B.; Parker, N. G.

    2017-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners are typically calibrated to a speed of sound corresponding to the soft tissue average of 1540 m s-1. In regions of different sound speed, for example, organs and tumours, the B-mode image becomes geometrically distorted from the true tissue cross-section, due to refraction and the misrepresentation of length. A ray model is developed to predict this distortion for a generalized two-dimensional object with atypical speed of sound, and verified against ultrasound images of a test object. We quantify the areal image distortion as a function of the key dependencies, including the speed of sound mismatch, the scanning format, the object size and its elongation. Our findings show that the distortion of area can be significant, even for relatively small speed of sound mismatches. For example, a 5% speed mismatch typically leads to a 10 - 20% distortion in area. These findings have implications for the accuracy of ultrasound-based evaluation of area and volume.

  3. PORTAL VEIN THROMBOSIS-ULTRASOUND IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trajkovska Meri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Portal venous system, apart from the main portal vein, includes its tributaries: superior and inferior mesenteric vein, as well as splenic vein, so the term portal venous thrombosis encompasses a broad spectrum of pathological conditions. Usually, one or more causative factors can be recognized, either local endothelial/ flow disturbances, or systemic inherited /acquired conditions. Portal vein thrombosis can be associated with benign or malignant disorders. Weather we are speaking about acute or chronic thrombosis, the clinical presentation is different. Acute thrombosis can be presented in a wide range, from mild abdominal discomfort to a state of intestinal ischemia and life-threatening infarction. Chronic thrombosis is usually recognized when variceal bleeding or other symptoms of portal hypertension express. Fast and accurate diagnosis sometimes is a life-saving procedure, especially in acute vascular alterations. Recently, due to the improvement of imaging procedures the number of patients with diagnosed portal vein thrombosis is increasingly growing. With a negative predictive value of 98% color Doppler ultrasound is considered as imaging modality of choice in detecting portal vein thrombosis. Based on large studies it is presumed that overall risk of getting portal vein thrombosis during lifetime is 1% in general population, but much bigger 5%-15% in cirrhotic patients. Existence of specific ultrasound criteria, if fulfilled, has ensured that diagnosis of portal vein thrombosis is fast and non-invasive. Procedure is convenient for the patient and healthcare providers, and above all, allows prompt treatment preventing further deterioration.

  4. Ultrasound: A novel tool for airway imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharthkumar Bhikhabhai Parmar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The scope of ultrasound is emerging in medical science, particularly outside traditional areas of radiology practice. Aims: We designed this study to evaluate feasibility of bedside sonography as a tool for airway assessment and to describe sonographic anatomy of airway. Settings and Design: A prospective, clinical study. Materials and Methods: We included 100 adult, healthy volunteers of either sex to undergo airway imaging systemically starting from floor of the mouth to the sternal notch in anterior aspect of neck by sonography. Results: We could visualize mandible and hyoid bone as a bright hyperechoic structure with hypoechoic acoustic shadow underneath. Epiglottis, thyroid cartilage, cricoid cartilage, and tracheal rings appeared hypoechoic. Vocal cords were visualized through thyroid cartilage. Interface between air and mucosa lining the airway produced a bright hyperechoic linear appearance. Artifacts created by intraluminal air prevented visualization of posterior pharynx, posterior commissure, and posterior wall of trachea. Conclusions: Ultrasound is safe, quick, noninvasive, repeatable, and bedside tool to assess the airway and can provide real-time dynamic images relevant for several aspects of airway management.

  5. Ultrasound-aided high-resolution biophotonic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong V.

    2003-10-01

    We develop novel biophotonic imaging for early-cancer detection, a grand challenge in cancer research, using nonionizing electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves. Unlike ionizing x-ray radiation, nonionizing electromagnetic waves such as optical waves are safe for biomedical applications and reveal new contrast mechanisms and functional information. For example, our spectroscopic oblique-incidence reflectometry can detect skin cancers based on functional hemoglobin parameters and cell nuclear size with 95% accuracy. Unfortunately, electromagnetic waves in the nonionizing spectral region do not penetrate biological tissue in straight paths as do x-rays. Consequently, high-resolution tomography based on nonionizing electromagnetic waves alone, as demonstrated by our Mueller optical coherence tomography, is limited to superficial tissue imaging. Ultrasonic imaging, on the contrary, furnishes good imaging resolution but has poor contrast in early-stage tumors and has strong speckle artifacts as well. We developed ultrasound-mediated imaging modalities by combining electromagnetic and ultrasonic waves synergistically. The hybrid modalities yield speckle-free electromagnetic-contrast at ultrasonic resolution in relatively large biological tissue. In ultrasound-modulated (acousto)-optical tomography, a focused ultrasonic wave encodes diffuse laser light in scattering biological tissue. In photo-acoustic (thermo-acoustic) tomography, a low-energy laser (RF) pulse induces ultrasonic waves in biological tissue due to thermoelastic expansion.

  6. SQL based cardiovascular ultrasound image classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandagopalan, S; Suryanarayana, Adiga B; Sudarshan, T S B; Chandrashekar, Dhanalakshmi; Manjunath, C N

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel method to analyze and classify the cardiovascular ultrasound echocardiographic images using Naïve-Bayesian model via database OLAP-SQL. Efficient data mining algorithms based on tightly-coupled model is used to extract features. Three algorithms are proposed for classification namely Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Discrete variables (NBCD) with SQL, NBCD with OLAP-SQL, and Naïve-Bayesian Classifier for Continuous variables (NBCC) using OLAP-SQL. The proposed model is trained with 207 patient images containing normal and abnormal categories. Out of the three proposed algorithms, a high classification accuracy of 96.59% was achieved from NBCC which is better than the earlier methods.

  7. Window-modulated compounding Nakagami imaging for ultrasound tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Zhou, Zhuhuang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Lee, Yu-Hsin

    2014-08-01

    Ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging is a useful tool for tissue characterization. Previous literature has suggested using a square with side lengths corresponding to 3 times the transducer pulse length as the minimum window for constructing the Nakagami image. This criterion does not produce sufficiently smooth images for the Nakagami image to characterize homogeneous tissues. To improve image smoothness, we proposed window-modulated compounding (WMC) Nakagami imaging based on summing and averaging the Nakagami images formed using sliding windows with varying window side lengths from 1 to N times the transducer pulse length in 1 pulse length step. Simulations (the number densities of scatterers: 2-16 scatterers/mm(2)) and experiments on fully developed speckle phantoms (the scatterer diameters: 20-106 μm) were conducted to suggest an appropriate number of frames N and to evaluate the image smoothness and resolution by analyzing the full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the parameter distribution and the widths of the image autocorrelation function (ACF), respectively. In vivo ultrasound measurements on rat livers without and with cirrhosis were performed to validate the practical performance of the WMC Nakagami image in tissue characterization. The simulation results showed that using a range of N from 7 to 10 as the number of frames for image compounding reduces the estimation error to less than 5%. Based on this criterion, the Nakagami parameter obtained from the WMC Nakagami image increased from 0.45 to 0.95 after increasing the number densities of scatterers from 2 to 16 scatterers/mm(2). The FWHM of the parameter distribution (bins=40) was 13.5±1.4 for the Nakagami image and 9.1±1.43 for the WMC Nakagami image, respectively (p-valueNakagami and WMC Nakagami images were 454±5.36 and 458±4.33, respectively (p-value>.05). In the phantom experiments, we also found that the FWHM of the parameter distribution for the WMC Nakagami image was smaller than that

  8. Interference-free ultrasound imaging during HIFU therapy, using software tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaezy, Shahram (Inventor); Held, Robert (Inventor); Sikdar, Siddhartha (Inventor); Managuli, Ravi (Inventor); Zderic, Vesna (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a method for obtaining a composite interference-free ultrasound image when non-imaging ultrasound waves would otherwise interfere with ultrasound imaging. A conventional ultrasound imaging system is used to collect frames of ultrasound image data in the presence of non-imaging ultrasound waves, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). The frames are directed to a processor that analyzes the frames to identify portions of the frame that are interference-free. Interference-free portions of a plurality of different ultrasound image frames are combined to generate a single composite interference-free ultrasound image that is displayed to a user. In this approach, a frequency of the non-imaging ultrasound waves is offset relative to a frequency of the ultrasound imaging waves, such that the interference introduced by the non-imaging ultrasound waves appears in a different portion of the frames.

  9. Novel contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging in prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeenge, M.; Mischi, M.; Laguna Pes, M.P.; de la Rosette, J.J.M.C.H.; Wijkstra, H.

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this paper were to present the current status of contrast-enhanced transrectal ultrasound imaging and to discuss the latest achievements and techniques now under preclinical testing. Although grayscale transrectal ultrasound is the standard method for prostate imaging, it lacks accur

  10. A Guide to Analysing Tongue Motion from Ultrasound Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Maureen

    2005-01-01

    This paper is meant to be an introduction to and general reference for ultrasound imaging for new and moderately experienced users of the instrument. The paper consists of eight sections. The first explains how ultrasound works, including beam properties, scan types and machine features. The second section discusses image quality, including the…

  11. CS-based fast ultrasound imaging with improved FISTA algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jie; He, Yugao; Shi, Guangming; Han, Tingyu

    2015-08-01

    In ultrasound imaging system, the wave emission and data acquisition is time consuming, which can be solved by adopting the plane wave as the transmitted signal, and the compressed sensing (CS) theory for data acquisition and image reconstruction. To overcome the very high computation complexity caused by introducing CS into ultrasound imaging, in this paper, we propose an improvement of the fast iterative shrinkage-thresholding algorithm (FISTA) to achieve the fast reconstruction of the ultrasound imaging, in which a modified setting is done with the parameter of step size for each iteration. Further, the GPU strategy is designed for the proposed algorithm, to guarantee the real time implementation of imaging. The simulation results show that the GPU-based image reconstruction algorithm can achieve the fast ultrasound imaging without damaging the quality of image.

  12. Musculoskeletal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Musculoskeletal Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System? Ultrasound is safe ...

  13. Hip Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Hip Ultrasound Hip ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures ... of Ultrasound Imaging of the Hip? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Hip? Ultrasound images of the ...

  14. Plane Wave Medical Ultrasound Imaging Using Adaptive Beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the adaptive, minimum variance (MV) beamformer is applied to medical ultrasound imaging. The Significant resolution and contrast gain provided by the adaptive, minimum variance (MV) beamformer, introduces the possibility of plane wave (PW) ultrasound imaging. Data is obtained using...... Field H and a 7 MHz, 128-elements, linear array transducer with lambda/2-spacing. MV is compared to the conventional delay-and-sum (DS) beamformer with Boxcar and Hanning weights. Furthermore, the PW images are compared to the a conventional ultrasound image, obtained from a linear scan sequence...

  15. Despeckle filtering for ultrasound imaging and video II selected applications

    CERN Document Server

    Loizou, Christos P

    2015-01-01

    In ultrasound imaging and video visual perception is hindered by speckle multiplicative noise that degrades the quality. Noise reduction is therefore essential for improving the visual observation quality or as a pre-processing step for further automated analysis, such as image/video segmentation, texture analysis and encoding in ultrasound imaging and video. The goal of the first book (book 1 of 2 books) was to introduce the problem of speckle in ultrasound image and video as well as the theoretical background, algorithmic steps, and the MatlabTM for the following group of despeckle filters:

  16. Intravascular Ultrasound Image Segmentation Using Morphological Snakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Mohamed Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available From the first use of the technics of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS as an imaging technique for the coronary artery system at the 70th century until now , the segmentation of the arterial wall boundaries still an important problem . Much research has been done to give better segmentation result for better diagnostics , evaluation and therapy planning. In this paper we present a new segmentation technics based on Morphological Snakes which developed by Luis Álvarez used for the first time for IVUS segmentation. It is a simple , fast and stable approach of snakes evolution algorithm. Results are presented and discussed in order to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach in IVUS segmentation.

  17. Hunger Games: Interactive Ultrasound Imaging for Learning Gastrointestinal Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafer, Ilana; Rennie, William; Noor, Ali; Pellerito, John S

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasound is playing an increasingly important role in medical student education. Although most uses of ultrasound have focused on learning purely anatomic relationships or augmentation of the physical examination, there is little documentation of the value of ultrasound as a learning tool regarding physiology alone or in association with anatomy. We devised an interactive learning session for first-year medical students using ultrasound to combine both anatomic and physiologic principles as an integration of gastrointestinal and vascular function. The incorporation of our activity, The Hunger Games, provides the foundation for a powerful integration tool for medical student education. © 2016 by the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine.

  18. Theranostic Multilayer Capsules for Ultrasound Imaging and Guided Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Ratnayaka, Sithira; Alford, Aaron; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Liu, Fei; Xue, Bing; Hoyt, Kenneth; Kharlampieva, Eugenia

    2017-03-28

    Despite the accessibility of ultrasound, the clinical potential of ultrasound-active theranostic agents has not been fully realized because it requires combining sufficient imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, and ultrasound-triggered release in one entity. We report on theranostic polymer microcapsules composed of hydrogen-bonded multilayers of tannic acid and poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone) that produce high imaging contrast and deliver the anticancer drug doxorubicin upon low-power diagnostic or high-power therapeutic ultrasound irradiation. These capsules exhibit excellent imaging contrast in both brightness and harmonic modes and show prolonged contrast over six months, unlike commercially available microbubbles. We also demonstrate low-dose gradual and high-dose fast release of doxorubicin from the capsules by diagnostic (∼100 mW/cm(2)) and therapeutic (>10 W/cm(2)) ultrasound irradiation, respectively. We show that the imaging contrast of the capsules can be controlled by varying the number of layers, polymer type (relatively rigid tannic acid versus more flexible poly(methacrylic acid)), and polymer molecular weight. In vitro studies demonstrate that 50% doxorubicin release from ultrasound-treated capsules induces 97% cytotoxicity to MCF-7 human cancer cells, while no cytotoxicity is found without the treatment. Considering the strong ultrasound imaging contrast, high encapsulation efficiency, biocompatibility, and tunable drug release, these microcapsules can be used as theranostic agents for ultrasound-guided chemotherapy.

  19. Development of catheters for combined intravascular ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpiouk, Andrei B.; Wang, Bo; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2009-02-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis is a complex disease accompanied by the development of plaques in the arterial wall. Since the vulnerability of the plaques depends on their composition, the appropriate treatment of the arteriosclerosis requires a reliable characterization of the plaques' geometry and content. The intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging is capable of providing structural details of the plaques as well as some functional information. In turn, more functional information about the same plaques can be obtained from intravascular photoacoustic (IVPA) images since the optical properties of the plaque's components differ from that of their environment. The combined IVUS/IVPA imaging is capable of simultaneously detecting and differentiating the plaques, thus determining their vulnerability. The potential of combined IVUS/IVPA imaging has already been demonstrated in phantoms and ex-vivo experiments. However, for in-vivo or clinical imaging, an integrated IVUS/IVPA catheter is required. In this paper, we introduce two prototypes of integrated IVUS/IVPA catheters for in-vivo imaging based on a commercially available single-element IVUS imaging catheter. The light delivery systems are developed using multimode optical fibers with custom-designed distal tips. Both prototypes were tested and compared using an arterial mimicking phantom. The advantages and limitations of both designs are discussed. Overall, the results of our studies suggest that both designs of integrated IVUS/IVPA catheter have a potential for in-vivo IVPA/IVUS imaging of atherosclerotic plaques.

  20. Ultrasound elasticity imaging using Golay code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound elasticity imaging is becoming a new diagnostic tool for clinicians to detect lesions or cancers in tissues. In this paper, Golay code is applied to elasticity imaging to improve its quality. Phase-zero algorithm is employed as the displacement estimator, and the amplitude modulation correction location estimate method is used as the location estimator. We compared the performance of Golay code and the conventional short pulse in simulation method. The simulation results demonstrate that Golay code can achieve higher elastographic signal-to-noise ratio (SNRe than the short pulse in low echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR conditions, because the eSNR gain with Golay code increases the accuracy of the displacement estimates. However, in high eSNR conditions, Golay code performs worse than the short pulse, because the range sidelobe level of Golay code will decrease the SNRe and the performance of Golay code depends mainly on its range sidelobe level in high eSNR conditions. Therefore, the optimal conditions for Goaly code to be used in elasticity imaging are the low eSNR, great depth or high attenuation conditions.

  1. Sources of image degradation in fundamental and harmonic ultrasound imaging using nonlinear, full-wave simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinton, Gianmarco F; Trahey, Gregg E; Dahl, Jeremy J

    2011-04-01

    A full-wave equation that describes nonlinear propagation in a heterogeneous attenuating medium is solved numerically with finite differences in the time domain (FDTD). This numerical method is used to simulate propagation of a diagnostic ultrasound pulse through a measured representation of the human abdomen with heterogeneities in speed of sound, attenuation, density, and nonlinearity. Conventional delay-andsum beamforming is used to generate point spread functions (PSF) that display the effects of these heterogeneities. For the particular imaging configuration that is modeled, these PSFs reveal that the primary source of degradation in fundamental imaging is reverberation from near-field structures. Reverberation clutter in the harmonic PSF is 26 dB higher than the fundamental PSF. An artificial medium with uniform velocity but unchanged impedance characteristics indicates that for the fundamental PSF, the primary source of degradation is phase aberration. An ultrasound image is created in silico using the same physical and algorithmic process used in an ultrasound scanner: a series of pulses are transmitted through heterogeneous scattering tissue and the received echoes are used in a delay-and-sum beamforming algorithm to generate images. These beamformed images are compared with images obtained from convolution of the PSF with a scatterer field to demonstrate that a very large portion of the PSF must be used to accurately represent the clutter observed in conventional imaging. © 2011 IEEE

  2. Hybrid photoacoustic - ultrasound transmission parameter imaging in a miniature photoacoustic imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manohar, Srirang; Willemink, Rene; van Hespen, Johannes C.G.; van Leeuwen, Ton

    2008-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging is based on detecting laser pulse induced ultrasound transients from absorbing structures in tissue. The technique combines the advantages of a high optical absorption exhibited by tumors for example with the high resolution possible with ultrasound. A conventional

  3. Modified Method for Denoising the Ultrasound Images by Wavelet Thresholding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Vishwa

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Medical practitioners are increasingly using digital images during disease diagnosis. Several state-of-the-art medical equipment are producing images of different organs, which are used during various stages of analysis. Examples of such equipment include MRI, CT, ultrasound and X-Ray. In medical image processing, image denoising has become a very essential exercise all through the diagnosis as Ultrasound images are normally affected by speckle noise. The noise in the image has two negative outcomes, the first being the degradation of the image quality and the second and more important, obscures important information required for accurate diagnosis.Arbitration between the perpetuation of useful diagnostic information and noise suppression must be treasured in medical images. In general we rely on the intervention of a proficient to control the quality of processed images. In certain cases, for instance in Ultrasound images, the noise can suppress the information which is valuable for the general practitioner. Consequently medical images can be very inconsistent, and it is crucial to operate case to case. This paper presents a wavelet-based thresholding scheme for noise suppression in Ultrasound images and provides the knowledge about adaptive and anisotropic diffusion techniques for speckle noise removal from different types of images, like Ultrasound.

  4. Ultrasound imaging for quantitative measurement of immersed plastic waste particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanaee, S.A.; Bakker, M.C.M.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasound imaging techniques are proposed for measuring the shape and thickness of immersed waste particles (10-20 mm size) using a linear sensor array from a fixed position. For these purposes both the front and back surface of a particle needs to be reconstructed. Raw ultrasound pulse-echo and pl

  5. Effects of Non-Elevation-Focalized Linear Array Transducer on Ultrasound Plane-Wave Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Congzhi Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plane-wave ultrasound imaging (PWUS has become an important method of ultrasound imaging in recent years as its frame rate has exceeded 10,000 frames per second, allowing ultrasound to be used for two-dimensional shear wave detection and functional brain imaging. However, compared to the traditional focusing and scanning method, PWUS images always suffer from a degradation of lateral resolution and contrast. To improve the image quality of PWUS, many different beamforming algorithms have been proposed and verified. Yet the influence of transducer structure is rarely studied. For this paper, the influence of using an acoustic lens for PWUS was evaluated. Two linear array transducers were fabricated. One was not self-focalized in the elevation direction (non-elevation-focalized transducer, NEFT; the other one was a traditional elevation-focalized transducer (EFT. An initial simulation was conducted to show the influence of elevation focusing. Then the images obtained with NEFT on a standard ultrasound imaging phantom were compared with those obtained with EFT. It was demonstrated that, in a relatively deep region, the contrast of an NEFT image is better than that of an EFT image. These results indicate that a more sophisticated design of ultrasound transducer would further improve the image quality of PWUS.

  6. Multilayer Array Transducer for Nonlinear Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Neil R.; Kaczkowski, Peter J.; Li, Tong; Gross, Dan; Postlewait, Steven M.; Curra, Francesco P.

    2011-09-01

    The properties of nonlinear acoustic wave propagation are known to be able to improve the resolution of ultrasound imaging, and could be used to dynamically estimate the physical properties of tissue. However, transducers capable of launching a wave that becomes nonlinear through propagation do not typically have the necessary bandwidth to detect the higher harmonics. Here we present the design and characterization of a novel multilayer transducer for high intensity transmit and broadband receive. The transmit layer was made from a narrow-band, high-power piezoceramic (PZT), with nominal frequency of 2.0 MHz, that was diced into an array of 32 elements. Each element was 0.300 mm wide and 6.3 mm in elevation, and with a pitch of 0.400 mm the overall aperture width was 12.7 mm. A quarter-wave matching layer was attached to the PZT substrate to improve transmit efficiency and bandwidth. The overlaid receive layer was made from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) that had gold metalization on one side. A custom two-sided flex circuit routed electrical connections to the PZT elements and patterned the PVDF elements; the PZT and PVDF elements had identical apertures. A low viscosity and electrically nonconductive epoxy was used for all adhesion layers. Characterization of electrical parameters and acoustic output were performed per standard methods, where transmit and receive events were driven by a software-controlled ultrasound engine. Echo data, collected from ex vivo tissue and digitized at 45 MS/s, exhibited frequency content up to the 4th harmonic of the 2 MHz transmit frequency.

  7. Application of tissue characterization in intravascular ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, William L.; Fitzgerald, Peter J.; Yock, Paul G.

    1994-05-01

    Current intravascular ultrasound imaging technology is able to determine the extent and distribution of pathologic processes within the vessel wall, but is not highly sensitive in discriminating between certain types of tissue. `Tissue characterization' refers to a set of computer-based techniques that utilize features of the ultrasound signal beyond basic amplitude to help define the composition of the tissue of interest. This technique involves quantitative analysis of the ultrasound signals reflected from tissue before these signals pass through the processing steps in the ultrasound instrument.

  8. Ultrasound Images of the Tongue: A Tutorial for Assessment and Remediation of Speech Sound Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jonathan L; McAllister Byun, Tara; Boyce, Suzanne E; Hamilton, Sarah; Tiede, Mark; Phillips, Emily; Rivera-Campos, Ahmed; Whalen, Douglas H

    2017-01-03

    Diagnostic ultrasound imaging has been a common tool in medical practice for several decades. It provides a safe and effective method for imaging structures internal to the body. There has been a recent increase in the use of ultrasound technology to visualize the shape and movements of the tongue during speech, both in typical speakers and in clinical populations. Ultrasound imaging of speech has greatly expanded our understanding of how sounds articulated with the tongue (lingual sounds) are produced. Such information can be particularly valuable for speech-language pathologists. Among other advantages, ultrasound images can be used during speech therapy to provide (1) illustrative models of typical (i.e. "correct") tongue configurations for speech sounds, and (2) a source of insight into the articulatory nature of deviant productions. The images can also be used as an additional source of feedback for clinical populations learning to distinguish their better productions from their incorrect productions, en route to establishing more effective articulatory habits. Ultrasound feedback is increasingly used by scientists and clinicians as both the expertise of the users increases and as the expense of the equipment declines. In this tutorial, procedures are presented for collecting ultrasound images of the tongue in a clinical context. We illustrate these procedures in an extended example featuring one common error sound, American English /r/. Images of correct and distorted /r/ are used to demonstrate (1) how to interpret ultrasound images, (2) how to assess tongue shape during production of speech sounds, (3), how to categorize tongue shape errors, and (4), how to provide visual feedback to elicit a more appropriate and functional tongue shape. We present a sample protocol for using real-time ultrasound images of the tongue for visual feedback to remediate speech sound errors. Additionally, example data are shown to illustrate outcomes with the procedure.

  9. Real-time in vivo photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolkman, Roy G.M.; Brands, Peter J.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Leeuwen, van Ton G.

    2008-01-01

    A real-time photoacoustic imaging system is designed and built. This system is based on a commercially available ultrasound imaging system. It can achieve a frame rate of 8 frames/sec. Vasculature in the hand of a human volunteer is imaged, and the resulting photoacoustic image is combined with the

  10. Proceedings: Beyond Ultrasound First Forum on improving the quality of ultrasound imaging in obstetrics and gynecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benacerraf, Beryl R; Minton, Katherine K; Benson, Carol B; Bromley, Bryann S; Coley, Brian D; Doubilet, Peter M; Lee, Wesley; Maslak, Samuel H; Pellerito, John S; Perez, James J; Savitsky, Eric; Scarborough, Norman A; Wax, Joseph; Abuhamad, Alfred Z

    2017-07-06

    The Beyond Ultrasound First Forum was conceived to increase awareness that the quality of obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound can be improved, and is inconsistent throughout the country, likely due to multiple factors, including the lack of a standardized curriculum and competency assessment in ultrasound teaching. The forum brought together representatives from many professional associations; the imaging community including radiology, obstetrics and gynecology, and emergency medicine among others; in addition to government agencies, insurers, industry, and others with common interest in obstetric and gynecologic ultrasound. This group worked together in focus sessions aimed at developing solutions on how to standardize and improve ultrasound training at the resident level and beyond. A new curriculum and competency assessment program for teaching residents (obstetrics and gynecology, radiology, and any other specialty doing obstetrics and gynecology ultrasound) was presented, and performance measures of ultrasound quality in clinical practice were discussed. The aim of this forum was to increase and unify the quality of ultrasound examinations in obstetrics and gynecology with the ultimate goal of improving patient safety and quality of clinical care. This report describes the proceedings of this conference including possible approaches to resident teaching and means to improve the inconsistent quality of ultrasound examinations performed today. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Quality Improvement of Liver Ultrasound Images Using Fuzzy Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Azadeh; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Radmard, Amir Reza; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Liver ultrasound images are so common and are applied so often to diagnose diffuse liver diseases like fatty liver. However, the low quality of such images makes it difficult to analyze them and diagnose diseases. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to improve the contrast and quality of liver ultrasound images. Methods: In this study, a number of image contrast enhancement algorithms which are based on fuzzy logic were applied to liver ultrasound images - in which the view of kidney is observable - using Matlab2013b to improve the image contrast and quality which has a fuzzy definition; just like image contrast improvement algorithms using a fuzzy intensification operator, contrast improvement algorithms applying fuzzy image histogram hyperbolization, and contrast improvement algorithms by fuzzy IF-THEN rules. Results: With the measurement of Mean Squared Error and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio obtained from different images, fuzzy methods provided better results, and their implementation - compared with histogram equalization method - led both to the improvement of contrast and visual quality of images and to the improvement of liver segmentation algorithms results in images. Conclusion: Comparison of the four algorithms revealed the power of fuzzy logic in improving image contrast compared with traditional image processing algorithms. Moreover, contrast improvement algorithm based on a fuzzy intensification operator was selected as the strongest algorithm considering the measured indicators. This method can also be used in future studies on other ultrasound images for quality improvement and other image processing and analysis applications. PMID:28077898

  12. Quality Improvement of Liver Ultrasound Images Using Fuzzy Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayani, Azadeh; Langarizadeh, Mostafa; Radmard, Amir Reza; Nejad, Ahmadreza Farzaneh

    2016-12-01

    Liver ultrasound images are so common and are applied so often to diagnose diffuse liver diseases like fatty liver. However, the low quality of such images makes it difficult to analyze them and diagnose diseases. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to improve the contrast and quality of liver ultrasound images. In this study, a number of image contrast enhancement algorithms which are based on fuzzy logic were applied to liver ultrasound images - in which the view of kidney is observable - using Matlab2013b to improve the image contrast and quality which has a fuzzy definition; just like image contrast improvement algorithms using a fuzzy intensification operator, contrast improvement algorithms applying fuzzy image histogram hyperbolization, and contrast improvement algorithms by fuzzy IF-THEN rules. With the measurement of Mean Squared Error and Peak Signal to Noise Ratio obtained from different images, fuzzy methods provided better results, and their implementation - compared with histogram equalization method - led both to the improvement of contrast and visual quality of images and to the improvement of liver segmentation algorithms results in images. Comparison of the four algorithms revealed the power of fuzzy logic in improving image contrast compared with traditional image processing algorithms. Moreover, contrast improvement algorithm based on a fuzzy intensification operator was selected as the strongest algorithm considering the measured indicators. This method can also be used in future studies on other ultrasound images for quality improvement and other image processing and analysis applications.

  13. Ultrasound Imaging of the Musculoskeletal System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Cristi R

    2016-05-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasound is a rapidly growing field within veterinary medicine. Ultrasound for musculoskeletal disorders has been commonly used in equine and human medicine and is becoming more commonly performed in small animal patients due to the increase in the recognition of soft tissue injuries. Ultrasound is widely available, cost-effective, but technically difficult to learn. Advantages of musculoskeletal ultrasound are the opposite limb is commonly used for comparison to evaluate symmetry of the tendinous structures and the ease of repeat examinations to assess healing. The article discusses the major areas of shoulder, stifle, iliopsoas, gastrocnemius, and musculoskeletal basics.

  14. Obstetrical Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Obstetric Ultrasound Obstetric ultrasound uses sound waves to produce pictures ... limitations of Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? What is Obstetrical Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves ... the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and ...

  16. Ultrasound imaging of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craig, J.G.; Holsbeek, M.T. van [Div. of Musculoskeletal Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit MI (United States); Gauthier, T.P.; Cook, W.J. [Philips Ultrasound, Bothell WA (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Sports-related injuries of the musculoskeletal system affect millions of individuals every year. Integrating high-frequency Tissue Harmonic Imaging ultrasound with MRI and CT gives the greatest opportunity for diagnosing specific injuries. (orig.)

  17. Subharmonic Contrast Intravascular Ultrasound for Vasa Vasorum Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goertz, David E.; Frijlink, Martijn E.; Tempel, Dennie; Bhagwandas, Vijay; Gisolf, Andries; Krams, Robert; Jong, de Nico; Steen, van der Antonius F.W.

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of subharmonic contrast intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) imaging was investigated using a prototype nonlinear IVUS system and the commercial contrast agent Definity™. The system employed a mechanically scanned commercial catheter with a custom transducer element fabricated to have sen

  18. Three-dimensional ultrasound imaging of the prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Aaron; Downey, Donal B.

    1999-05-01

    Ultrasonography, a widely used imaging modality for the diagnosis and staging of many diseases, is an important cost- effective technique, however, technical improvements are necessary to realize its full potential. Two-dimensional viewing of 3D anatomy, using conventional ultrasonography, limits our ability to quantify and visualize most diseases, causing, in part, the reported variability in diagnosis and ultrasound guided therapy and surgery. This occurs because conventional ultrasound images are 2D, yet the anatomy is 3D; hence the diagnostician must integrate multiple images in his mind. This practice is inefficient, and may lead to operator variability and incorrect diagnoses. In addition, the 2D ultrasound image represents a single thin plane at some arbitrary angle in the body. It is difficult to localize and reproduce the image plane subsequently, making conventional ultrasonography unsatisfactory for follow-up studies and for monitoring therapy. Our efforts have focused on overcoming these deficiencies by developing 3D ultrasound imaging techniques that can acquire B-mode, color Doppler and power Doppler images. An inexpensive desktop computer is used to reconstruct the information in 3D, and then is also used for interactive viewing of the 3D images. We have used 3D ultrasound images for the diagnosis of prostate cancer, carotid disease, breast cancer and liver disease and for applications in obstetrics and gynecology. In addition, we have also used 3D ultrasonography for image-guided minimally invasive therapeutic applications of the prostate such as cryotherapy and brachytherapy.

  19. Development of a PET-Transrectal Ultrasound Prostate Imaging System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Jennifer S.; Peng, Qiyu.; Moses, William W.; Reutter, Bryan W.; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. Chow

    2011-06-01

    Multimodality imaging has an increasing role in the management of a large number of diseases, particularly if both functional and structural information are acquired and accurately registered. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) imaging is currently an integral part of prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment procedures, providing high-resolution anatomical detail of the prostate region. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging with 11C-choline is a sensitive functional imaging technique that can identify biochemical states associated with prostate cancer. We believe that merging these prostate imaging technologies will help identify the location and aggressiveness of prostate cancer. We envision using dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging to guide biopsy, guide treatment procedures, and detect local recurrence earlier than is currently possible. Hence, we have developed a dual PET-TRUS prostate imaging system and protocol designed to allow accurate 3-D image registration. We have evaluated this PET-TRUS system by performing dual PET-TRUS imaging of custom phantoms. We describe here our dual-modality imaging system, custom phantoms and phantom study results. We also discuss our investigation of the PET-TRUS registration accuracy. We measure an average PET-TRUS registration error for our phantom studies of 2.1 ±1.7 mm in the x direction, 1.9 ±1.6 mm in the y direction, and 0.6 ±0.2 mm in the z direction. This registration accuracy is sufficient for some clinical applications such as biopsy guidance and early detection of recurrence.

  20. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  1. Ultrasound image velocimetry for rheological measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurung, A.; Haverkort, J. W.; Drost, S.; Norder, B.; Westerweel, J.; Poelma, C.

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound image velocimetry (UIV) allows for the non-intrusive measurement of a wide range of flows without the need for optical transparency. In this study, we used UIV to measure the local velocity field of a model drilling fluid that exhibits yield stress flow behavior. The radial velocity profile was used to determine the yield stress and the Herschel-Bulkley model flow index n and the consistency index k. Reference data were obtained using the conventional offline Couette rheometry. A comparison showed reasonable agreement between the two methods. The discrepancy in model parameters could be attributed to inherent differences between the methods, which cannot be captured by the three-parameter model used. Overall, with a whole flow field measurement technique such as UIV, we were able to quantify the complex rheology of a model drilling fluid. These preliminary results show that UIV can be used as a non-intrusive diagnostic for in situ, real-time measurement of complex opaque flow rheology.

  2. Modeling log-compressed ultrasound images for radio frequency signal recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabra, José; Sanches, João

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm for recovering the radio frequency (RF) signal provided by the ultrasound probe from the log-compressed ultrasound images displayed in ultrasound equipment. Commercial ecographs perform nonlinear image compression to reduce the dynamic range of the Ultrasound (US) signal in order to improve image visualization. Moreover, the clinician may adjust other parameters, such as brightness, gain and contrast, to improve image quality of a given anatomical detail. These operations significantly change the statistical distribution of the original RF raw signal, which is assumed, based on physical considerations on the signal formation process, to be Rayleigh distributed. Therefore, the image pixels are no longer Rayleigh distributed and the RF signal is not usually available in the common ultrasound equipment. For statistical data processing purposes, more important than having "good looking" images, it is important to have realistic models to describe the data. In this paper, a nonlinear compression parametric function is used to model the pre-processed image in order to recover the original RF image as well the contrast and brightness parameters. Tests using synthetic and real data and statistical measures such as the Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Kullback-Leibler divergences are used to assess the results. It is shown that the proposed estimation model clearly represents better the observed data than by taking the general assumption of the data being modeled by a Rayleigh distribution.

  3. Application of reinforcement learning for segmentation of transrectal ultrasound images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tizhoosh Hamid R

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among different medical image modalities, ultrasound imaging has a very widespread clinical use. But, due to some factors, such as poor image contrast, noise and missing or diffuse boundaries, the ultrasound images are inherently difficult to segment. An important application is estimation of the location and volume of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound (TRUS images. For this purpose, manual segmentation is a tedious and time consuming procedure. Methods We introduce a new method for the segmentation of the prostate in transrectal ultrasound images, using a reinforcement learning scheme. This algorithm is used to find the appropriate local values for sub-images and to extract the prostate. It contains an offline stage, where the reinforcement learning agent uses some images and manually segmented versions of these images to learn from. The reinforcement agent is provided with reward/punishment, determined objectively to explore/exploit the solution space. After this stage, the agent has acquired knowledge stored in the Q-matrix. The agent can then use this knowledge for new input images to extract a coarse version of the prostate. Results We have carried out experiments to segment TRUS images. The results demonstrate the potential of this approach in the field of medical image segmentation. Conclusion By using the proposed method, we can find the appropriate local values and segment the prostate. This approach can be used for segmentation tasks containing one object of interest. To improve this prototype, more investigations are needed.

  4. Ultrasound imaging in urogynecology – state of the art 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Bogusiewicz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of ultrasound imaging in urogynecology is not clearly defined. Despite significant developments in visualization techniques and interpretation of images, pelvic ultrasound is still more a tool for research than for clinical practice. Structures of the lower genitourinary tract and pelvic floor can be visualized from different approaches: transperineal, introital, transvaginal, abdominal or endoanal. According to contemporary guidelines and recommendations, the role of ultrasound in urogynecology is limited to the measurement of post-void residue. However, in many instances, including planning and audit of surgical procedures, management of recurrences or complications, ultrasound may be proposed as the initial examination of choice. Ultrasound may be used for assessment of bladder neck mobility before anti-incontinence procedures. On rare occasions it is helpful in recognition of pathologies mimicking vaginal prolapse such as vaginal cyst, urethral diverticula or rectal intussusception. In patients subjected to suburethral slings, causes of surgery failure or postsurgical voiding dysfunctions can be revealed by imaging. Many reports link the location of a tape close to the bladder neck to unfavorable outcomes of sling surgery. Some postoperative complications, such as urinary retention, mesh malposition, hematoma, or urinary tract injury, can be diagnosed by ultrasound. On the other hand, the clinical value of some applications of ultrasound in urogynecology, for example measurement of the bladder wall thickness as a marker of detrusor overactivity, has not been proved.

  5. Multispectral photoacoustic imaging of nerves with a clinical ultrasound system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, Jean Martial; West, Simeon; Beard, Paul C.; Desjardins, Adrien E.

    2014-03-01

    Accurate and efficient identification of nerves is of great importance during many ultrasound-guided clinical procedures, including nerve blocks and prostate biopsies. It can be challenging to visualise nerves with conventional ultrasound imaging, however. One of the challenges is that nerves can have very similar appearances to nearby structures such as tendons. Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of near-infrared optical spectroscopy for differentiating nerves and adjacent tissues, as this modality can be sensitive to optical absorption of lipids that are present in intra- and extra-neural adipose tissue and in the myelin sheaths. These studies were limited to point measurements, however. In this pilot study, a custom photoacoustic system with a clinical ultrasound imaging probe was used to acquire multi-spectral photoacoustic images of nerves and tendons from swine ex vivo, across the wavelength range of 1100 to 1300 nm. Photoacoustic images were processed and overlaid in colour onto co-registered conventional ultrasound images that were acquired with the same imaging probe. A pronounced optical absorption peak centred at 1210 nm was observed in the photoacoustic signals obtained from nerves, and it was absent in those obtained from tendons. This absorption peak, which is consistent with the presence of lipids, provides a novel image contrast mechanism to significantly enhance the visualization of nerves. In particular, image contrast for nerves was up to 5.5 times greater with photoacoustic imaging (0.82 +/- 0.15) than with conventional ultrasound imaging (0.148 +/- 0.002), with a maximum contrast of 0.95 +/- 0.02 obtained in photoacoustic mode. This pilot study demonstrates the potential of photoacoustic imaging to improve clinical outcomes in ultrasound-guided interventions in regional anaesthesia and interventional oncology.

  6. Three dimensional (3d) transverse oscillation vector velocity ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (300) includes a transducer array (302) with a two- dimensional array of transducer elements configured to transmit an ultrasound signal and receive echoes, transmit circuitry (304) configured to control the transducer array to transmit the ultrasound signal so...... as to traverse a field of view, and receive circuitry (306) configured to receive a two dimensional set of echoes produced in response to the ultrasound signal traversing structure in the field of view, wherein the structure includes flowing structures such as flowing blood cells, organ cells etc. A beamformer...... (312) configured to beamform the echoes, and a velocity processor (314) configured to separately determine a depth velocity component, a transverse velocity component and an elevation velocity component, wherein the velocity components are determined based on the same transmitted ultrasound signal...

  7. Scatterer reconstruction and parametrization of homogeneous tissue for ultrasound image simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattausch, Oliver; Goksel, Orcun

    2015-01-01

    Numerical simulation of ultrasound images can facilitate the training of sonographers. A realistic appearance of simulated ultrasonic speckle is essential for a plausible ultrasound simulation. An efficient and realistic model for ultrasonic speckle is the convolution of the ultrasound point-spread function with a parametrized distribution of point scatterers. Nevertheless, for a given arbitrary tissue, such scatterer distributions that would generate a realistic image are not known a priori, and currently there is no principled method to extract such scatterer patterns for given target tissues to be simulated. In this paper we propose to solve the inverse problem, in which an underlying scatterer map for a given sample ultrasound image is estimated. From such scatterer maps, it is also shown that a parametrization distribution model can be built, using which other instances of the same tissue can be simulated by feeding into a standard speckle generation method. This enables us to synthesize images of different tissue types from actual ultrasound images to be used in simulations with arbitrary view angles and transducer settings. We show in numerical and physical tissue-mimicking phantoms and actual physical tissue that the appearance of the synthesized images closely match the real images.

  8. In Vivo Real Time Volumetric Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouzari, Hamed; Rasmussen, Morten Fischer; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2015-01-01

    . This paper investigates the in vivo applicability and sensitivity of volumetric SA imaging. Utilizing the transmit events to generate a set of virtual point sources, a frame rate of 25 Hz for a 90° x 90° field-of-view was achieved. Data were obtained using a 3.5 MHz 32 x 32 elements 2-D phased array......Synthetic aperture (SA) imaging can be used to achieve real-time volumetric ultrasound imaging using 2-D array transducers. The sensitivity of SA imaging is improved by maximizing the acoustic output, but one must consider the limitations of an ultrasound system, both technical and biological...... transducer connected to the experimental scanner (SARUS). Proper scaling is applied to the excitation signal such that intensity levels are in compliance with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations for in vivo ultrasound imaging. The measured Mechanical Index and spatial-peak- temporal...

  9. Imaging the hip joint in osteoarthritis: A place for ultrasound?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudula, S N

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis has traditionally been imaged with conventional radiographs; this has been regarded as the reference technique in osteoarthritis for a long time. However, in recent years, innovative imaging techniques such as ultrasonography have been used to obtain a better understanding of this disease. This is mainly due to tremendous technical advances and progressive developments of ultrasound equipment occurring over the past decade. Ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be a valuable imaging technique in the diagnosis and management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. Application of this imaging methodology for osteoarthritis has improved the understanding of the disease process and may aid in the assessment of the efficacy of future therapies. The execution of ultrasound-guided procedures with safety and reliability has a relevant significance in patient management of osteoarthritis of the hip joint. This paper reviews the use of ultrasound as an imaging technique for the evaluation and treatment of osteoarthritis hip joint.

  10. Towards 3D ultrasound image based soft tissue tracking: a transrectal ultrasound prostate image alignment system

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Michael; Daanen, Vincent; Troccaz, Jocelyne

    2007-01-01

    The emergence of real-time 3D ultrasound (US) makes it possible to consider image-based tracking of subcutaneous soft tissue targets for computer guided diagnosis and therapy. We propose a 3D transrectal US based tracking system for precise prostate biopsy sample localisation. The aim is to improve sample distribution, to enable targeting of unsampled regions for repeated biopsies, and to make post-interventional quality controls possible. Since the patient is not immobilized, since the prostate is mobile and due to the fact that probe movements are only constrained by the rectum during biopsy acquisition, the tracking system must be able to estimate rigid transformations that are beyond the capture range of common image similarity measures. We propose a fast and robust multi-resolution attribute-vector registration approach that combines global and local optimization methods to solve this problem. Global optimization is performed on a probe movement model that reduces the dimensionality of the search space a...

  11. Optimizing MR imaging-guided navigation for focused ultrasound interventions in the brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, B.; Martin, E.; Bauer, R.; O'Gorman, R.

    2017-03-01

    MR imaging during transcranial MR imaging-guided Focused Ultrasound surgery (tcMRIgFUS) is challenging due to the complex ultrasound transducer setup and the water bolus used for acoustic coupling. Achievable image quality in the tcMRIgFUS setup using the standard body coil is significantly inferior to current neuroradiologic standards. As a consequence, MR image guidance for precise navigation in functional neurosurgical interventions using tcMRIgFUS is basically limited to the acquisition of MR coordinates of salient landmarks such as the anterior and posterior commissure for aligning a stereotactic atlas. Here, we show how improved MR image quality provided by a custom built MR coil and optimized MR imaging sequences can support imaging-guided navigation for functional tcMRIgFUS neurosurgery by visualizing anatomical landmarks that can be integrated into the navigation process to accommodate for patient specific anatomy.

  12. Ultrasound, normal placenta - Braxton Hicks (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performed at 17 weeks gestation. It shows the placenta during a normal (Braxton Hicks) contraction. Throughout the ... contracts to facilitate better blood flow through the placenta and the fetus. In this ultrasound, the placenta ...

  13. Ultrasound, color - normal umbilical cord (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a normal color Doppler ultrasound of the umbilical cord performed at 30 weeks gestation. The cord is ... the cord, two arteries and one vein. The umbilical cord is connected to the placenta, located in the ...

  14. High-resolution imaging with a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system: a phantom study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lianjie; Labyed, Yassin; Simonetti, Francesco; Williamson, Michael; Rosenberg, Robert; Heintz, Philip; Sandoval, Daniel

    2011-03-01

    It is difficult for ultrasound to image small targets such as breast microcalcifications. Synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging has recently developed as a promising tool to improve the capabilities of medical ultrasound. We use two different tissueequivalent phantoms to study the imaging capabilities of a real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound system for imaging small targets. The InnerVision ultrasound system DAS009 is an investigational system for real-time synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. We use the system to image the two phantoms, and compare the images with those obtained from clinical scanners Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. Our results show that synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging produces images with higher resolution and less image artifacts than Acuson Sequoia 512 and Siemens S2000. In addition, we study the effects of sound speed on synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging and demonstrate that an accurate sound speed is very important for imaging small targets.

  15. Methods for segmenting curved needles in ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazawa, Stephen H; Ebrahimi, Richelle; Chuang, Jason; Rohling, Robert N; Salcudean, Septimiu E

    2006-06-01

    Ultrasound-guided percutaneous needle insertions are widely used techniques in current clinical practice. Some of these procedures have a high degree of difficulty because of poor observability of the needle in the ultrasound image. There have been recent efforts to improve guidance by computer assisted needle detection. These software techniques are often limited by not representing needle curvature. We present two methods to detect the needle in 2D ultrasound that specifically address needle curvature. Firstly, we demonstrate a real-time needle segmentation algorithm based on the Hough transform which detects the needle and represents its curved shape. Secondly, we demonstrate how a new coordinate transformation can transform detection of a curved needle to a linear fit. These methods are demonstrated on ultrasound and photographic images.

  16. Experimental validation of a convolution- based ultrasound image formation model using a planar arrangement of micrometer-scale scatterers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyöngy, Miklós; Makra, Ákos

    2015-06-01

    The shift-invariant convolution model of ultrasound is widely used in the literature, for instance to generate fast simulations of ultrasound images. However, comparison of the resulting simulations with experiments is either qualitative or based on aggregate descriptors such as envelope statistics or spectral components. In the current work, a planar arrangement of 49-μm polystyrene microspheres was imaged using macrophotography and a 4.7-MHz ultrasound linear array. The macrophotograph allowed estimation of the scattering function (SF) necessary for simulations. Using the coefficient of determination R(2) between real and simulated ultrasound images, different estimates of the SF and point spread function (PSF) were tested. All estimates of the SF performed similarly, whereas the best estimate of the PSF was obtained by Hanningwindowing the deconvolution of the real ultrasound image with the SF: this yielded R(2) = 0.43 for the raw simulated image and R(2) = 0.65 for the envelope-detected ultrasound image. R(2) was highly dependent on microsphere concentration, with values of up to 0.99 for regions with scatterers. The results validate the use of the shift-invariant convolution model for the realistic simulation of ultrasound images. However, care needs to be taken in experiments to reduce the relative effects of other sources of scattering such as from multiple reflections, either by increasing the concentration of imaged scatterers or by more careful experimental design.

  17. Implementation of Synthetic Aperture Imaging in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Kortbek, Jacob; Nikolov, Svetoslav

    2010-01-01

    The main advantage of medical ultrasound imaging is its real time capability, which makes it possible to visualize dynamic structures in the human body. Real time synthetic aperture imaging puts very high demands on the hardware, which currently cannot be met. A method for reducing the number...... of calculations and still retain the many advantages of SA imaging is described. It consists of a dual stage beamformer, where the first can be a simple fixed focus analog beamformer and the second an ordinary digital ultrasound beamformer. The performance and constrictions of the approach is described....

  18. Surveillance of hemodialysis vascular access with ultrasound vector flow imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Andreas H.; Olesen, Jacob B.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.; Rix, Marianne; Jensen, Jørgen A.; Nielsen, Michael B.

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was prospectively to monitor the volume flow in patients with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with the angle independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging (VFI). Volume flow values were compared with Ultrasound dilution technique (UDT). Hemodialysis patients need a well-functioning vascular access with as few complications as possible and preferred vascular access is an AVF. Dysfunction due to stenosis is a common complication, and regular monitoring of volume flow is recommended to preserve AVF patency. UDT is considered the gold standard for volume flow surveillance, but VFI has proven to be more precise, when performing single repeated instantaneous measurements. Three patients with AVF were monitored with UDT and VFI monthly for five months. A commercial ultrasound scanner with a 9 MHz linear array transducer with integrated VFI was used to obtain data. UDT values were obtained with Transonic HD03 Flow-QC Hemodialysis Monitor. Three independent measurements at each scan session were obtained with UDT and VFI each month. Average deviation of volume flow between UDT and VFI was 25.7 % (Cl: 16.7% to 34.7%) (p= 0.73). The standard deviation for all patients, calculated from the mean variance of each individual scan sessions, was 199.8 ml/min for UDT and 47.6 ml/min for VFI (p = 0.002). VFI volume flow values were not significantly different from the corresponding estimates obtained using UDT, and VFI measurements were more precise than UDT. The study indicates that VFI can be used for surveillance of volume flow.

  19. Intrasplenic masses of ``preserved`` functioning splenic tissue in sickle cell disease: correlation of imaging findings (CT, ultrasound, MRI, and nuclear scintigraphy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, T.L. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Berdon, W.E. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Haller, J.O. [Department of Radiology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Ruzal-Shapiro, C. [Department of Radiology, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, 3959 Broadway, BHN 3-318, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Hurlet-Jenson, A. [Department of Pediatrics, Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Babies and Children`s Hospital of New York, New York (United States)

    1996-09-01

    Purpose. We studied six patients with sickle cell disease (SSD), five homozygous for sickle cell anemia and one with sickle beta-thalassemia, in whom rounded intrasplenic masses proved to be preserved functioning splenic tissue. Materials and methods. Available images including computed tomography, ultrasonography, bone scans (Tc-99m MDP), liver spleen scans (Tc-99m sulfur colloid), and MRI were evaluated. Results. The masses were low density on CT (in an otherwise calcified spleen), hypoechoic relative to the echogenic spleen on US, and had the imaging characteristics of normal spleen on MRI. They failed to accumulate Tc-99m MDP but did demonstrate uptake of Tc-99m sulfur colloid. Conclusion. In a patient with SSD and intrasplenic masses, proper correlation of multiple imaging modalities will establish the diagnosis of functioning splenic tissue and avoid mistaken diagnosis of splenic abscess or infarction. (orig.). With 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Space-time encoding for high frame rate ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Thanssis; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2002-01-01

    Frame rate in ultrasound imaging can be dramatically increased by using sparse synthetic transmit aperture (STA) beamforming techniques. The two main drawbacks of the method are the low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and the motion artifacts, that degrade the image quality. In this paper we propose ...

  1. Imaging patients with renal colic-consider ultrasound first

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicolau, Carlos; Claudon, Michel; Derchi, Lorenzo E;

    2015-01-01

    stones. However, ultrasound (US) should be considered as the primary imaging technique. It is a reproducible, non-invasive and non-expensive imaging technique, achieving accurate diagnosis in most cases without the need for radiation. Diagnosis is based on the presence of ureteral stones, but indirect...

  2. State of the art cranial ultrasound imaging in neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Camfferman, Fleur A; Leijser, Lara M; Govaert, Paul; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Cranial ultrasound (CUS) is a reputable tool for brain imaging in critically ill neonates. It is safe, relatively cheap and easy to use, even when a patient is unstable. In addition it is radiation-free and allows serial imaging. CUS possibilities have steadily expanded. However, in many neonatal in

  3. Optical Molecular Imaging of Ultrasound-mediated Drug Delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derieppe, M.P.P.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this PhD project was to develop optical molecular imaging methods to study drug delivery facilitated by ultrasound waves (US) and hyperthermia. Fibered confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), together with dedicated image analysis, was used in vitro on a cell monolayer, and in vivo at

  4. Ultrasound contrast-agent improves imaging of lower limb occlusive disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Jensen, F

    2003-01-01

    to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA).......to evaluate if ultrasound contrast-agent infusion could improve duplex-ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and increase the agreement with digital subtraction arteriography (DSA)....

  5. Cardiac activation mapping using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Ragnar; Witte, Russell S; Jia, Congxian; Huang, Sheng-Wen; Kim, Kang; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2009-03-01

    We describe the first mapping of biological current in a live heart using ultrasound current source density imaging (UCSDI). Ablation procedures that treat severe heart arrhythmias require detailed maps of the cardiac activation wave. The conventional procedure is time-consuming and limited by its poor spatial resolution (5-10 mm). UCSDI can potentially improve on existing mapping procedures. It is based on a pressure-induced change in resistivity known as the acousto-electric (AE) effect, which is spatially confined to the ultrasound focus. Data from 2 experiments are presented. A 540 kHz ultrasonic transducer (f/# = 1, focal length = 90 mm, pulse repetition frequency = 1600 Hz) was scanned over an isolated rabbit heart perfused with an excitation-contraction decoupler to reduce motion significantly while retaining electric function. Tungsten electrodes inserted in the left ventricle recorded simultaneously the AE signal and the low-frequency electrocardiogram (ECG). UCSDI displayed spatial and temporal patterns consistent with the spreading activation wave. The propagation velocity estimated from UCSDI was 0.25 +/- 0.05 mm/ms, comparable to the values obtained with the ECG signals. The maximum AE signal-to-noise ratio after filtering was 18 dB, with an equivalent detection threshold of 0.1 mA/ cm(2). This study demonstrates that UCSDI is a potentially powerful technique for mapping current flow and biopotentials in the heart.

  6. Real Time Deconvolution of In-Vivo Ultrasound Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    The axial resolution in medical ultrasound is directly linked to the emitted ultrasound frequency, which, due to tissue attenuation, is selected based on the depth of scanning. The resolution is etermined by the transducers impulse response, which limits the attainable resolution to be between one...... using averaging over several RF lines. In vivo data from a 3 MHz mechanically rotating probe is used and the received signal is sampled at 20 MHz and 12 bits. In-vivo data acquired from a 16th week old fetus is used along with a scan from the liver and right kidney of a 27 years old male. The axial...... resolution has been determined from the in-vivo liver image using the auto-covariance function. From the envelope of the estimated pulse the axial resolution at Full-Width-Half-Max is 0.581 mm corresponding to 1.13 l at 3 MHz. The algorithm increases the resolution to 0.116 mm or 0.227 l corresponding...

  7. Estimation of velocity vectors in synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Oddershede, Niels

    2006-01-01

    A method for determining both velocity magnitude and angle in a synthetic aperture ultrasound system is described. The approach uses directional beamforming along the flow direction and cross-correlation to determine velocity magnitude. The angle of the flow is determined from the maximum...... of the visually determined flow angle. The standard deviation of these estimates was below 2.7 deg. Full color flow maps from different parts of the cardiac cycle are presented, including vector arrows indicating both estimated flow direction and velocity magnitude....... normalized correlation calculated as a function of angle. This assumes the flow direction is within the imaging plane. Simulations of the angle estimation method show both biases and standard deviations of the flow angle estimates below 3 deg for flow angles from 20 deg to 90 deg (transverse flow...

  8. Envelope based nonlinear blind deconvolution approach for ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.T. Chira

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The resolution of ultrasound medical images is yet an important problem despite of the researchers efforts. In this paper we presents a nonlinear blind deconvolution to eliminate the blurring effect based on the measured radio-frequency signal envelope. This algorithm is executed in two steps. Firslty we make an estimation for Point Spread Function (PSF and, secondly we use the estimated PSF to remove, iteratively their effect. The proposed algorithm is a greedy algorithm, called also matching pursuit or CLEAN. The use of this algorithm is motivated beacause theorically it avoid the so called inverse problem, which usually needs regularization to obtain an optimal solution. The results are presented using 1D simulated signals in term of visual evaluation and nMSE in comparison with the two most kwown regularisation solution methods for least square problem, Thikonov regularization or l2-norm and Total Variation or l1 norm.

  9. Automated 3D ultrasound image segmentation for assistant diagnosis of breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxin; Gu, Peng; Lee, Won-Mean; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.; Du, Sidan; Yuan, Jie; Wang, Xueding; Carson, Paul L.

    2016-04-01

    Segmentation of an ultrasound image into functional tissues is of great importance to clinical diagnosis of breast cancer. However, many studies are found to segment only the mass of interest and not all major tissues. Differences and inconsistencies in ultrasound interpretation call for an automated segmentation method to make results operator-independent. Furthermore, manual segmentation of entire three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound volumes is time-consuming, resource-intensive, and clinically impractical. Here, we propose an automated algorithm to segment 3D ultrasound volumes into three major tissue types: cyst/mass, fatty tissue, and fibro-glandular tissue. To test its efficacy and consistency, the proposed automated method was employed on a database of 21 cases of whole breast ultrasound. Experimental results show that our proposed method not only distinguishes fat and non-fat tissues correctly, but performs well in classifying cyst/mass. Comparison of density assessment between the automated method and manual segmentation demonstrates good consistency with an accuracy of 85.7%. Quantitative comparison of corresponding tissue volumes, which uses overlap ratio, gives an average similarity of 74.54%, consistent with values seen in MRI brain segmentations. Thus, our proposed method exhibits great potential as an automated approach to segment 3D whole breast ultrasound volumes into functionally distinct tissues that may help to correct ultrasound speed of sound aberrations and assist in density based prognosis of breast cancer.

  10. Ultrasound imaging beyond the vasculature with new generation contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Reshani H; Hernandez, Christopher; Zhou, Haoyan; Kota, Pavan; Burke, Alan; Exner, Agata A

    2015-01-01

    Current commercially available ultrasound contrast agents are gas-filled, lipid- or protein-stabilized microbubbles larger than 1 µm in diameter. Because the signal generated by these agents is highly dependent on their size, small yet highly echogenic particles have been historically difficult to produce. This has limited the molecular imaging applications of ultrasound to the blood pool. In the area of cancer imaging, microbubble applications have been constrained to imaging molecular signatures of tumor vasculature and drug delivery enabled by ultrasound-modulated bubble destruction. Recently, with the rise of sophisticated advancements in nanomedicine, ultrasound contrast agents, which are an order of magnitude smaller (100-500 nm) than their currently utilized counterparts, have been undergoing rapid development. These agents are poised to greatly expand the capabilities of ultrasound in the field of targeted cancer detection and therapy by taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon of many tumors and can extravasate beyond the leaky tumor vasculature. Agent extravasation facilitates highly sensitive detection of cell surface or microenvironment biomarkers, which could advance early cancer detection. Likewise, when combined with appropriate therapeutic agents and ultrasound-mediated deployment on demand, directly at the tumor site, these nanoparticles have been shown to contribute to improved therapeutic outcomes. Ultrasound's safety profile, broad accessibility and relatively low cost make it an ideal modality for the changing face of healthcare today. Aided by the multifaceted nano-sized contrast agents and targeted theranostic moieties described herein, ultrasound can considerably broaden its reach in future applications focused on the diagnosis and staging of cancer.

  11. Ultrasound and fluoroscopic images fusion by autonomous ultrasound probe detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountney, Peter; Ionasec, Razvan; Kaizer, Markus; Mamaghani, Sina; Wu, Wen; Chen, Terrence; John, Matthias; Boese, Jan; Comaniciu, Dorin

    2012-01-01

    New minimal-invasive interventions such as transcatheter valve procedures exploit multiple imaging modalities to guide tools (fluoroscopy) and visualize soft tissue (transesophageal echocardiography (TEE)). Currently, these complementary modalities are visualized in separate coordinate systems and on separate monitors creating a challenging clinical workflow. This paper proposes a novel framework for fusing TEE and fluoroscopy by detecting the pose of the TEE probe in the fluoroscopic image. Probe pose detection is challenging in fluoroscopy and conventional computer vision techniques are not well suited. Current research requires manual initialization or the addition of fiducials. The main contribution of this paper is autonomous six DoF pose detection by combining discriminative learning techniques with a fast binary template library. The pose estimation problem is reformulated to incrementally detect pose parameters by exploiting natural invariances in the image. The theoretical contribution of this paper is validated on synthetic, phantom and in vivo data. The practical application of this technique is supported by accurate results (< 5 mm in-plane error) and computation time of 0.5s.

  12. Rayleigh-maximum-likelihood bilateral filter for ultrasound image enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Wu, Jun; Miao, Aimin; Yu, Pengfei; Chen, Jianhua; Zhang, Yufeng

    2017-04-17

    Ultrasound imaging plays an important role in computer diagnosis since it is non-invasive and cost-effective. However, ultrasound images are inevitably contaminated by noise and speckle during acquisition. Noise and speckle directly impact the physician to interpret the images and decrease the accuracy in clinical diagnosis. Denoising method is an important component to enhance the quality of ultrasound images; however, several limitations discourage the results because current denoising methods can remove noise while ignoring the statistical characteristics of speckle and thus undermining the effectiveness of despeckling, or vice versa. In addition, most existing algorithms do not identify noise, speckle or edge before removing noise or speckle, and thus they reduce noise and speckle while blurring edge details. Therefore, it is a challenging issue for the traditional methods to effectively remove noise and speckle in ultrasound images while preserving edge details. To overcome the above-mentioned limitations, a novel method, called Rayleigh-maximum-likelihood switching bilateral filter (RSBF) is proposed to enhance ultrasound images by two steps: noise, speckle and edge detection followed by filtering. Firstly, a sorted quadrant median vector scheme is utilized to calculate the reference median in a filtering window in comparison with the central pixel to classify the target pixel as noise, speckle or noise-free. Subsequently, the noise is removed by a bilateral filter and the speckle is suppressed by a Rayleigh-maximum-likelihood filter while the noise-free pixels are kept unchanged. To quantitatively evaluate the performance of the proposed method, synthetic ultrasound images contaminated by speckle are simulated by using the speckle model that is subjected to Rayleigh distribution. Thereafter, the corrupted synthetic images are generated by the original image multiplied with the Rayleigh distributed speckle of various signal to noise ratio (SNR) levels and

  13. Cumulative phase delay imaging - A new contrast enhanced ultrasound modality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demi, Libertario, E-mail: l.demi@tue.nl; Sloun, Ruud J. G. van; Mischi, Massimo [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Wijkstra, Hessel [Lab. of Biomedical Diagnostics, Dept. of Electrical Eng., Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Urology Dept., University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-10-28

    Recently, a new acoustic marker for ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental pressure wave field components is in fact observable for ultrasound propagating through UCAs. This phenomenon is absent in the case of tissue nonlinearity and is dependent on insonating pressure and frequency, UCA concentration, and propagation path length through UCAs. In this paper, ultrasound images based on this marker are presented. The ULA-OP research platform, in combination with a LA332 linear array probe (Esaote, Firenze Italy), were used to image a gelatin phantom containing a PVC plate (used as a reflector) and a cylindrical cavity measuring 7 mm in diameter (placed in between the observation point and the PVC plate). The cavity contained a 240 µL/L SonoVueO{sup ®} UCA concentration. Two insonating frequencies (3 MHz and 2.5 MHz) were used to scan the gelatine phantom. A mechanical index MI = 0.07, measured in water at the cavity location with a HGL-0400 hydrophone (Onda, Sunnyvale, CA), was utilized. Processing the ultrasound signals backscattered from the plate, ultrasound images were generated in a tomographic fashion using the filtered back-projection method. As already observed in previous studies, significantly higher CPD values are measured when imaging at a frequency of 2.5 MHz, as compared to imaging at 3 MHz. In conclusion, these results confirm the applicability of the discussed CPD as a marker for contrast imaging. Comparison with standard contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging modalities will be the focus of future work.

  14. Non-negative constraint for image-based breathing gating in ultrasound hepatic perfusion data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaizhi; Ding, Mingyue; Chen, Xi; Deng, Wenjie; Zhang, Zhijun

    2015-12-01

    Images acquired during free breathing using contrast enhanced ultrasound hepatic perfusion imaging exhibits a periodic motion pattern. It needs to be compensated for if a further accurate quantification of the hepatic perfusion analysis is to be executed. To reduce the impact of respiratory motion, image-based breathing gating algorithm was used to compensate the respiratory motion in contrast enhanced ultrasound. The algorithm contains three steps of which respiratory kinetics extracted, image subsequences determined and image subsequences registered. The basic performance of the algorithm was to extract the respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences accurately. In this paper, we treated the kinetics extracted model as a non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) problem. We extracted the respiratory kinetics of the ultrasound hepatic perfusion image sequences by non-negative matrix factorization (NMF). The technique involves using the NMF objective function to accurately extract respiratory kinetics. It was tested on simulative phantom and used to analyze 6 liver CEUS hepatic perfusion image sequences. The experimental results show the effectiveness of our proposed method in quantitative and qualitative.

  15. Texture analysis and classification of ultrasound liver images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuang; Peng, Yuhua; Guo, Huizhi; Liu, Weifeng; Gao, Tianxin; Xu, Yuanqing; Tang, Xiaoying

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound as a noninvasive imaging technique is widely used to diagnose liver diseases. Texture analysis and classification of ultrasound liver images have become an important research topic across the world. In this study, GLGCM (Gray Level Gradient Co-Occurrence Matrix) was implemented for texture analysis of ultrasound liver images first, followed by the use of GLCM (Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix) at the second stage. Twenty two features were obtained using the two methods, and seven most powerful features were selected for classification using BP (Back Propagation) neural network. Fibrosis was divided into five stages (S0-S4) in this study. The classification accuracies of S0-S4 were 100%, 90%, 70%, 90% and 100%, respectively.

  16. A PDE based Method for Speckle Reduction of Log-compressed Ultrasound Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Huang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Speckle noise is widely existence in coherent imaging systems, such as synthetic aperture radar, sonar, ultrasound and laser imaging, and is commonly described as signal correlated. In this paper, we focus on speckle reduction problem in real ultrasound image. Unlike traditional anisotropic diffusion methods usually taking image gradient as a diffusion index, in this paper, we present a new texture based anisotropic diffusion method for speckle reduction in real ultrasound image. The results comparing our new method with other well known methods on both synthetic images and real ultrasound images are reported to show the superiority of our method in keeping important features of real ultrasound images.

  17. Broadband Minimum Variance Beamforming for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-01-01

    to the ultrasound data. As the error increases, it is seen that the MV beamformer is not as robust compared with the DS beamformer with boxcar an Harming weights. Nevertheless, it is noted that the DS does not outperform the MV beamformer. For errors of 2% and 4% of the correct value, the FWHM are {0.81, 1.25, 0...

  18. Electrical impedance tomography imaging using a priori ultrasound data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani Manuchehr

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different imaging systems (e.g. electrical, magnetic, and ultrasound rely on a wide variety of physical properties, and the datasets obtained from such systems provide only partial information about the unknown true state. One approach is to choose complementary imaging systems, and to combine the information to achieve a better representation. Methods This paper discusses the combination of ultrasound and electrical impedance tomography (EIT information. Ultrasound reflection signals are good at locating sharp acoustic density changes associated with the boundaries of objects. Some boundaries, however, may be indeterminable due to masking from intermediate boundaries or because they are outside the ultrasound beam. Conversely, the EIT data contains relatively low-quality information, but it includes the whole region enclosed by the electrodes. Results Results are shown from a narrowband level-set method applied to 2D and 3D EIT incorporating limited angle ultrasound time of flight data. Conclusion The EIT reconstruction is shown to be faster and more accurate using the additional edge information from both one and four transducer ultrasound systems.

  19. Hybrid multispectral optoacoustic and ultrasound tomography for morphological and physiological brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olefir, Ivan; Merčep, Elena; Burton, Neal C.; Ovsepian, Saak V.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2016-08-01

    Expanding usage of small animal models in biomedical research necessitates development of technologies for structural, functional, or molecular imaging that can be readily integrated in the biological laboratory. Herein, we consider dual multispectral optoacoustic (OA) and ultrasound tomography based on curved ultrasound detector arrays and describe the performance achieved for hybrid morphological and physiological brain imaging of mice in vivo. We showcase coregistered hemodynamic parameters resolved by OA tomography under baseline conditions and during alterations of blood oxygen saturation. As an internal reference, we provide imaging of abdominal organs. We illustrate the performance advantages of hybrid curved detector ultrasound and OA tomography and discuss immediate and long-term implications of our findings in the context of animal and human studies.

  20. Effect of Enhancement Technique on Nonuniform and Uniform Ultrasound Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Lehana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of adequate scientific resources in the area of medical sciences sometimes leads to improper diagnosis of diseases and hence the treatments of such diseases are affected badly. However, with the advancement of technology, the complicacy of various malfunctions inside the human body reduces. Ultrasound imaging is one of the biomedical scanning techniques that let the pathologist make comment reasonably and accurately on the disease or irregularity seen in the scan while low imaging quality lets the diagnosis go wrong. Even a little distortion can route the pathologist away from the main cause of the disease. In this research work, the enhancement of dark ultrasound images has been done. An algorithm is developed using enhancement technique for nonuniform and uniform dark images. Finally, we compared the quality of the processed and unprocessed images. Both ETNUD and mean and median filtering techniques were used for image analysis.

  1. Nonlinear optical microscopy and ultrasound imaging of human cervical structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Lisa M.; Feltovich, Helen; Carlson, Lindsey C.; Hall, Gunnsteinn; Campagnola, Paul J.; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Hall, Timothy J.

    2013-03-01

    The cervix softens and shortens as its collagen microstructure rearranges in preparation for birth, but premature change may lead to premature birth. The global preterm birth rate has not decreased despite decades of research, likely because cervical microstructure is poorly understood. Our group has developed a multilevel approach to evaluating the human cervix. We are developing quantitative ultrasound (QUS) techniques for noninvasive interrogation of cervical microstructure and corroborating those results with high-resolution images of microstructure from second harmonic generation imaging (SHG) microscopy. We obtain ultrasound measurements from hysterectomy specimens, prepare the tissue for SHG, and stitch together several hundred images to create a comprehensive view of large areas of cervix. The images are analyzed for collagen orientation and alignment with curvelet transform, and registered with QUS data, facilitating multiscale analysis in which the micron-scale SHG images and millimeter-scale ultrasound data interpretation inform each other. This novel combination of modalities allows comprehensive characterization of cervical microstructure in high resolution. Through a detailed comparative study, we demonstrate that SHG imaging both corroborates the quantitative ultrasound measurements and provides further insight. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of specific microstructural cervical change in pregnancy should lead to novel approaches to the prevention of preterm birth.

  2. Experience With Intravascular Ultrasound Imaging Of Human Atherosclerotic Arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallery, John A.; Gessert, James M.; Maciel, Mario; Tobis, John M.; Griffith, James M.; Berns, Michael W.; Henry, Walter L.

    1989-08-01

    Normal human arteries have a well-defined structure on intravascular images. The intima appears very thin and is most likely represented by a bright reflection arising from the internal elastic lamina. The smooth muscle tunica media is echo-lucent on the ultrasound image and appears as a dark band separating the intima from the adventitia. The adventitia is a brightly reflective layer of variable thickness. The thickness of the intima, and therefore of the atherosclerotic plaque can be accurately measured from the ultrasound images and correlates well with histology. Calcification within the wall of arteries is seen as bright echo reflection with shadowing of the peripheral wall. Fibrotic regions are highly reflective but do not shadow. Necrotic liquid regions within advanced atherosclerotic plaques are seen on ultrasound images as large lucent zones surrounded by echogenic tissue. Imaging can be performed before and after interventional procedures, such as laser angioplasty, balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. Intravascular ultrasound appears to provide an imaging modality for identifying the histologic characteristics of diseased arteries and for quantifying plaque thickness. It might be possible to perform such quantification to evaluate the results of interventional procedures.

  3. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-04-13

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity are valuable in determining moderate to severe CKD. The value of shear wave velocity in

  4. Adaptive Receive and Transmit Apodization for Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Austeng, Andreas; Synnevåg, Johan-Fredrik

    2009-01-01

    This paper suggests a framework for utilizing adaptive, data-dependent apodization weights on both the receiving and transmitting aperture for Synthetic Aperture (SA) ultrasound imaging. The suggested approach is based on the Minimum Variance (MV) beamformer and consists of two steps. A set...... emission images before summation. The method is investigated using simulated SA ultrasound data obtained using Field II. Data of 13 point targets distributed at depths from 40 mm to 70 mm, and a 5.5 MHz, 64-element linear array transducer have been used. The investigation has shown that the introduction...

  5. Advances in transrectal ultrasound imaging of the prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Robert A; Halpern, Ethan J

    2007-08-01

    Grayscale imaging of the prostate is the basic method for diagnostic evaluation and biopsy guidance. Doppler imaging may improve sensitivity for detection of prostate cancer. Microbubble contrast agents represent a major advance to more selectively demonstrate neovascular flow within the prostate. Recently, real-time elastography has been introduced to improve detection of cancer based upon changes in tissue stiffness. As diagnostic methods improve, the ultimate hope is to eliminate biopsy in patients without cancer. New ultrasound-based treatment systems, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound ablative therapy for prostate cancer, may someday allow diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer to be completed in one sitting.

  6. Regularized Image Reconstruction for Ultrasound Attenuation Transmission Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Peterlik

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper is focused on ultrasonic transmission tomography as a potential medical imaging modality, namely for breast cancer diagnosis. Ultrasound attenuation coefficient is one of the tissue parameters which are related to the pathological tissue state. A technique to reconstruct images of attenuation distribution is presented. Furthermore, an alternative to the commonly used filtered backprojection or algebraic reconstruction techniques is proposed. It is based on regularization of the image reconstruction problem which imposes smoothness in the resulting images while preserving edges. The approach is analyzed on synthetic data sets. The results show that it stabilizes the image restoration by compensating for main sources of estimation errors in this imaging modality.

  7. New prototype neuronavigation system based on preoperative imaging and intraoperative freehand ultrasound: system description and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Laurence; Del Maestro, Rolando F; Petrecca, Kevin; Kochanowska, Anna; Drouin, Simon; Yan, Charles X B; Janke, Andrew L; Chen, Sean Jy-Shyang; Collins, D Louis

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this report is to present IBIS (Interactive Brain Imaging System) NeuroNav, a new prototype neuronavigation system that has been developed in our research laboratory over the past decade that uses tracked intraoperative ultrasound to address surgical navigation issues related to brain shift. The unique feature of the system is its ability, when needed, to improve the initial patient-to-preoperative image alignment based on the intraoperative ultrasound data. Parts of IBIS Neuronav source code are now publicly available on-line. Four aspects of the system are characterized in this paper: the ultrasound probe calibration, the temporal calibration, the patient-to-image registration and the MRI-ultrasound registration. In order to characterize its real clinical precision and accuracy, the system was tested in a series of adult brain tumor cases. Three metrics were computed to evaluate the precision and accuracy of the ultrasound calibration. 1) Reproducibility: 1.77 mm and 1.65 mm for the bottom corners of the ultrasound image, 2) point reconstruction precision 0.62-0.90 mm: and 3) point reconstruction accuracy: 0.49-0.74 mm. The temporal calibration error was estimated to be 0.82 ms. The mean fiducial registration error (FRE) of the homologous-point-based patient-to-MRI registration for our clinical data is 4.9 ± 1.1 mm. After the skin landmark-based registration, the mean misalignment between the ultrasound and MR images in the tumor region is 6.1 ± 3.4 mm. The components and functionality of a new prototype system are described and its precision and accuracy evaluated. It was found to have an accuracy similar to other comparable systems in the literature.

  8. Ultrasound versus high field magnetic resonance imaging in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, York Kiat; Østergaard, Mikkel; Bird, Paul;

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade there have been significant advances in the field of musculoskeletal imaging, especially in the application of ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to the management of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Both modalities offer significant advantages over the previous...... standards of clinical examination and radiography, and allow direct visualisation of both joint inflammation and structural damage. Although measuring similar pathology, each of these imaging tools has its own benefits and limitations; understanding these will help researchers and clinicians to determine...

  9. Measuring Femoral Torsion In Vivo Using Freehand 3-D Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passmore, Elyse; Pandy, Marcus G; Graham, H Kerr; Sangeux, Morgan

    2016-02-01

    Despite variation in bone geometry, muscle and joint function is often investigated using generic musculoskeletal models. Patient-specific bone geometry can be obtained from computerised tomography, which involves ionising radiation, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which is costly and time consuming. Freehand 3-D ultrasound provides an alternative to obtain bony geometry. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy and repeatability of 3-D ultrasound in measuring femoral torsion. Measurements of femoral torsion were performed on 10 healthy adults using MRI and 3-D ultrasound. Measurements of femoral torsion from 3-D ultrasound were, on average, smaller than those from MRI (mean difference = 1.8°; 95% confidence interval: -3.9°, 7.5°). MRI and 3-D ultrasound had Bland and Altman repeatability coefficients of 3.1° and 3.7°, respectively. Accurate measurements of femoral torsion were obtained with 3-D ultrasound offering the potential to acquire patient-specific bone geometry for musculoskeletal modelling. Three-dimensional ultrasound is non-invasive and relatively inexpensive and can be integrated into gait analysis.

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  11. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, ... through the blood vessels. top of page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, ...

  12. Ultrasound - Breast

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Breast Ultrasound imaging of the breast uses sound waves ... the Breast? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Breast? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  16. Imaging Performance of Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W. Lenox

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QTUS is a tomographic transmission ultrasound modality that is capable of generating 3D speed-of-sound maps of objects in the field of view. It performs this measurement by propagating a plane wave through the medium from a transmitter on one side of a water tank to a high resolution receiver on the opposite side. This information is then used via inverse scattering to compute a speed map. In addition, the presence of reflection transducers allows the creation of a high resolution, spatially compounded reflection map that is natively coregistered to the speed map. A prototype QTUS system was evaluated for measurement and geometric accuracy as well as for the ability to correctly determine speed of sound.

  17. Perfusion imaging with non-contrast ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tierney, Jaime E.; Dumont, Douglas M.; Byram, Brett C.

    2016-04-01

    A Doppler ultrasound clutter filter that enables estimation of low velocity blood flow could considerably improve ultrasound as a tool for clinical diagnosis and monitoring, including for the evaluation of vascular diseases and tumor perfusion. Conventional Doppler ultrasound is currently used for visualizing and estimating blood flow. However, conventional Doppler is limited by frame rate and tissue clutter caused by involuntary movement of the patient or sonographer. Spectral broadening of the clutter due to tissue motion limits ultrasound's ability to detect blood flow less than about 5mm/s at an 8MHz center frequency. We propose a clutter filtering technique that may increase the sensitivity of Doppler measurements to at least as low as 0.41mm/s. The proposed filter uses an adaptive demodulation scheme that decreases the bandwidth of the clutter. To test the performance of the adaptive demodulation method at removing sonographer hand motion, six volunteer subjects acquired data from a basic quality assurance phantom. Additionally, to test initial in vivo feasibility, an arterial occlusion reactive hyperemia study was performed to assess the efficiency of the proposed filter at preserving signals from blood velocities 2mm/s or greater. The hand motion study resulted in initial average bandwidths of 577Hz (28.5mm/s), which were decreased to 7.28Hz (0.36mm/s) at -60 dB at 3cm using our approach. The in vivo power Doppler study resulted in 15.2dB and 0.15dB dynamic ranges between the lowest and highest blood flow time points for the proposed filter and conventional 50Hz high pass filter, respectively.

  18. Mirizzi Syndrome with Endoscopic Ultrasound Image

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 1 Mirizzi syndrome diagnosed on endoscopic ultrasound. He presented with acute onset of jaundice, malaise, dark urine over 3-4 days, and was found to have obstructive jaundice on lab testing. CT scan of the abdomen showed intrahepatic biliary ductal dilation, a 1.5 cm common bile duct (CBD) above the pancreas, and possible stones in the CBD, but no masses. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) by a community gastroenterologist ...

  19. Ultrasound window-modulated compounding Nakagami imaging: Resolution improvement and computational acceleration for liver characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hsiang-Yang; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Chen, Chiung-Nien; Ho, Ming-Chih; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound Nakagami imaging is an attractive method for visualizing changes in envelope statistics. Window-modulated compounding (WMC) Nakagami imaging was reported to improve image smoothness. The sliding window technique is typically used for constructing ultrasound parametric and Nakagami images. Using a large window overlap ratio may improve the WMC Nakagami image resolution but reduces computational efficiency. Therefore, the objectives of this study include: (i) exploring the effects of the window overlap ratio on the resolution and smoothness of WMC Nakagami images; (ii) proposing a fast algorithm that is based on the convolution operator (FACO) to accelerate WMC Nakagami imaging. Computer simulations and preliminary clinical tests on liver fibrosis samples (n=48) were performed to validate the FACO-based WMC Nakagami imaging. The results demonstrated that the width of the autocorrelation function and the parameter distribution of the WMC Nakagami image reduce with the increase in the window overlap ratio. One-pixel shifting (i.e., sliding the window on the image data in steps of one pixel for parametric imaging) as the maximum overlap ratio significantly improves the WMC Nakagami image quality. Concurrently, the proposed FACO method combined with a computational platform that optimizes the matrix computation can accelerate WMC Nakagami imaging, allowing the detection of liver fibrosis-induced changes in envelope statistics. FACO-accelerated WMC Nakagami imaging is a new-generation Nakagami imaging technique with an improved image quality and fast computation.

  20. A MNCIE method for registration of ultrasound images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Jing; WANG Qiang; SHEN Yi

    2007-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of registration of ultrasound images is presented, using a concept of Nonlinear Correlation Information Entropy (NCIE) as the matching criterion. The proposed method applies NCIE to measure the correlation degree between the image intensities of corresponding voxel in the floating and reference images. Registration is achieved by adjustment of the relative position until NCIE between the images is maximized. However, unlike mutual information (MI), NCIE varies in the closed interval [0, 1 ], and around the extremum it varies sharply, which makes it possible that thresholds of NCIE can be used to boost the search for the registration transformation. Using this feature of NCIE, we combine the downhill simplex searching algorithm to register the ultrasound images. The simulations are conducted to testify the effectiveness and rapidity of the proposed registration method, in which the ultrasound floating images are aligned to the reference images with required registration accuracy. Moreover, the NCIE based method can overcome local minima problem by setting thresholds and can take care of the differences in contrast between the floating and reference images.

  1. Ultrasound elastography for imaging tendons and muscles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Drakonaki

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound elastography is a recently developed ultrasound-based method which allows the qualitative or quantitative evaluation of the mechanical properties of tissue. Strain (compression ultrasound elastography is the commonest technique performed by ap‑ plying mild compression with the hand-held transducer to create real-time strain dis‑ tribution maps, which are color-coded and superimposed on the B-mode images. There is increasing evidence that ultrasound elastography can be used in the investigation of muscle, tendon and soft tissue disease in the clinical practice, as a supplementary tool to conventional ultrasound examination. Based on preliminary data, potential clinical appli‑ cations include early diagnosis, staging, and guiding interventions musculotendinous and neuromuscular disease as well as monitoring disease during rehabilitation. Ultrasound elastography could also be used for research into the biomechanics and pathophysiology of musculotendinous disease. Despite the great interest in the technique, there is still limited evidence in the literature and there are several technical issues which limit the reproducibility of the method, including differences in quantification methods, artefacts, limitations and variation in the application of the technique by different users. This re‑ view presents the published evidence on musculoskeletal applications of strain elastogra‑ phy, discusses the technical issues and future perspectives of this method and emphasizes the need for standardization and further research.

  2. A Methodology for Anatomic Ultrasound Image Diagnostic Quality Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lange, Theis; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm

    2017-01-01

    is valuable in the continuing process of method optimization and guided development of new imaging methods. It includes a three phased study plan covering from initial prototype development to clinical assessment. Recommendations to the clinical assessment protocol, software, and statistical analysis......This paper discusses methods for assessment of ultrasound image quality based on our experiences with evaluating new methods for anatomic imaging. It presents a methodology to ensure a fair assessment between competing imaging methods using clinically relevant evaluations. The methodology...... to properly reveal the clinical value. The paper exemplifies the methodology using recent studies of Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamforming tissue harmonic imaging....

  3. Fiber-Laser-Based Ultrasound Sensor for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Wang, Lidai; Bai, Xue; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, especially for intravascular and endoscopic applications, requires ultrasound probes with miniature size and high sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new photoacoustic sensor based on a small-sized fiber laser. Incident ultrasound waves exert pressures on the optical fiber laser and induce harmonic vibrations of the fiber, which is detected by the frequency shift of the beating signal between the two orthogonal polarization modes in the fiber laser. This ultrasound sensor presents a noise-equivalent pressure of 40 Pa over a 50-MHz bandwidth. We demonstrate this new ultrasound sensor on an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope. The axial and lateral resolutions are 48 μm and 3.3 μm. The field of view is up to 1.57 mm2. The sensor exhibits strong resistance to environmental perturbations, such as temperature changes, due to common-mode cancellation between the two orthogonal modes. The present fiber laser ultrasound sensor offers a new tool for all-optical photoacoustic imaging.

  4. Fiber-Laser-Based Ultrasound Sensor for Photoacoustic Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yizhi; Jin, Long; Wang, Lidai; Bai, Xue; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2017-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, especially for intravascular and endoscopic applications, requires ultrasound probes with miniature size and high sensitivity. In this paper, we present a new photoacoustic sensor based on a small-sized fiber laser. Incident ultrasound waves exert pressures on the optical fiber laser and induce harmonic vibrations of the fiber, which is detected by the frequency shift of the beating signal between the two orthogonal polarization modes in the fiber laser. This ultrasound sensor presents a noise-equivalent pressure of 40 Pa over a 50-MHz bandwidth. We demonstrate this new ultrasound sensor on an optical-resolution photoacoustic microscope. The axial and lateral resolutions are 48 μm and 3.3 μm. The field of view is up to 1.57 mm2. The sensor exhibits strong resistance to environmental perturbations, such as temperature changes, due to common-mode cancellation between the two orthogonal modes. The present fiber laser ultrasound sensor offers a new tool for all-optical photoacoustic imaging. PMID:28098201

  5. Mechanical scanning in intravascular ultrasound imaging: Artifacts and driving mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. ten Hoff (H.); E.J. Gussenhoven (Elma); C.M. Korbijn (Carin); F. Mastik (Frits); C.T. Lancée (Charles); N. Bom (Klaas)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Currently, intravascular ultrasound (US) imaging catheters are developed and produced to provide a complementary diagnostic method in the treatment of blood vessel obstructive disease. Typical catheter dimensions are a diameter of 1–2.5 mm and a length of 1–1.5 m. A real-time

  6. Fourier beamformation of multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimirad, Elahe; Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando; Mahloojifar, Ali

    2015-01-01

    A new Fourier beamformation (FB) algorithm is presented for multistatic synthetic aperture ultrasound imaging. It can reduce the number of computations by a factor of 20 compared to conventional Delay-and-Sum (DAS) beamformers. The concept is based on the wavenumber algorithm from radar and sonar...

  7. Imaging blood’s velocity using synthetic aperture ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Li, Ye

    2012-01-01

    The blood velocity vector can be estimated using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound by using short emission sequences. The whole image region is insonified and the flow can be tracked in all directions continuously. This is a major advantage compared to commercial systems, since...

  8. Microwave thermal imaging of scanned focused ultrasound heating: animal experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian; Meaney, Paul M.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Geimer, Shireen D.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2011-03-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) uses focused ultrasound beams to ablate localized tumors noninvasively. Multiple clinical trials using HIFU treatment of liver, kidney, breast, pancreas and brain tumors have been conducted, while monitoring the temperature distribution with various imaging modalities such as MRI, CT and ultrasound. HIFU has achieved only minimal acceptance partially due to insufficient guidance from the limited temperature monitoring capability and availability. MR proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift thermometry is currently the most effective monitoring method; however, it is insensitive in temperature changes in fat, susceptible to motion artifacts, and is high cost. Exploiting the relationship between dielectric properties (i.e. permittivity and conductivity) and tissue temperature, in vivo dielectric property distributions of tissue during heating were reconstructed with our microwave tomographic imaging technology. Previous phantom studies have demonstrated sub-Celsius temperature accuracy and sub-centimeter spatial resolution in microwave thermal imaging. In this paper, initial animal experiments have been conducted to further investigate its potential. In vivo conductivity changes inside the piglet's liver due to focused ultrasound heating were observed in the microwave images with good correlation between conductivity changes and temperature.

  9. A hybrid algorithm for speckle noise reduction of ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Karamjeet; Ranade, Sukhjeet Kaur; Singh, Chandan

    2017-09-01

    Medical images are contaminated by multiplicative speckle noise which significantly reduce the contrast of ultrasound images and creates a negative effect on various image interpretation tasks. In this paper, we proposed a hybrid denoising approach which collaborate the both local and nonlocal information in an efficient manner. The proposed hybrid algorithm consist of three stages in which at first stage the use of local statistics in the form of guided filter is used to reduce the effect of speckle noise initially. Then, an improved speckle reducing bilateral filter (SRBF) is developed to further reduce the speckle noise from the medical images. Finally, to reconstruct the diffused edges we have used the efficient post-processing technique which jointly considered the advantages of both bilateral and nonlocal mean (NLM) filter for the attenuation of speckle noise efficiently. The performance of proposed hybrid algorithm is evaluated on synthetic, simulated and real ultrasound images. The experiments conducted on various test images demonstrate that our proposed hybrid approach outperforms the various traditional speckle reduction approaches included recently proposed NLM and optimized Bayesian-based NLM. The results of various quantitative, qualitative measures and by visual inspection of denoise synthetic and real ultrasound images demonstrate that the proposed hybrid algorithm have strong denoising capability and able to preserve the fine image details such as edge of a lesion better than previously developed methods for speckle noise reduction. The denoising and edge preserving capability of hybrid algorithm is far better than existing traditional and recently proposed speckle reduction (SR) filters. The success of proposed algorithm would help in building the lay foundation for inventing the hybrid algorithms for denoising of ultrasound images. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Imaging the premature brain: ultrasound or MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Benders, Manon J.N.L.; Groenendaal, Floris [UMC Utrecht, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, PO Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-09-15

    Neuroimaging of preterm infants has become part of routine clinical care, but the question is often raised on how often cranial ultrasound should be done and whether every high risk preterm infant should at least have one MRI during the neonatal period. An increasing number of centres perform an MRI either at discharge or around term equivalent age, and a few centres have access to a magnet in or adjacent to the neonatal intensive care unit and are doing sequential MRIs. In this review, we try to discuss when best to perform these two neuroimaging techniques and the additional information each technique may provide. (orig.)

  11. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Eric M; Moore, Michael J; Kolios, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  12. High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging of single cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M. Strohm

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available High resolution ultrasound and photoacoustic images of stained neutrophils, lymphocytes and monocytes from a blood smear were acquired using a combined acoustic/photoacoustic microscope. Photoacoustic images were created using a pulsed 532 nm laser that was coupled to a single mode fiber to produce output wavelengths from 532 nm to 620 nm via stimulated Raman scattering. The excitation wavelength was selected using optical filters and focused onto the sample using a 20× objective. A 1000 MHz transducer was co-aligned with the laser spot and used for ultrasound and photoacoustic images, enabling micrometer resolution with both modalities. The different cell types could be easily identified due to variations in contrast within the acoustic and photoacoustic images. This technique provides a new way of probing leukocyte structure with potential applications towards detecting cellular abnormalities and diseased cells at the single cell level.

  13. Experimental ultrasound system for real-time synthetic imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Holm, Ole; Jensen, Lars Joost

    1999-01-01

    Digital signal processing is being employed more and more in modern ultrasound scanners. This has made it possible to do dynamic receive focusing for each sample and implement other advanced imaging methods. The processing, however, has to be very fast and cost-effective at the same time. Dedicated...... chips are used in order to do real time processing. This often makes it difficult to implement radically different imaging strategies on one platform and makes the scanners less accessible for research purposes. Here flexibility is the prime concern, and the storage of data from all transducer elements......-element ultrasound transducers, and to enable real-time or near realtime processing of the acquired data. The system will be capable of performing the processing for the currently available imaging methods, and will make it possible to perform initial trials in a clinical environment with new imaging modalities...

  14. Contrast ultrasound molecular imaging of inflammation in cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Jonathan R

    2009-11-01

    The cellular immune response plays an important role in almost every major form of cardiovascular disease. The ability to image the key aspects of the immune response in the clinical setting could be used to improve diagnostic information, to provide important prognostic or risk information, and to customize therapy according to disease phenotype. Accordingly, targeted imaging probes for assessing inflammation have been developed for essentially all forms of medical imaging. Molecular imaging of inflammation with contrast ultrasound relies on the detection of targeted microbubble or other gas-filled particle contrast agents. These agents are confined to the vascular space and, hence, have been targeted to either activated leucocytes or endothelial cell adhesion molecules that are upregulated in inflammation and mediate leucocyte recruitment and adhesion. This review focuses on the inflammation-targeting strategies for ultrasound contrast agents and how they have been matched to cardiovascular disease states such as myocardial ischaemia, infarction, atherosclerosis, transplant rejection, and arteriogenesis.

  15. Update on Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Ultrasound Evaluation of Crohn’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deepak, Parakkal; Kolbe, Amy B.; Fidler, Jeff L.; Fletcher, Joel G.; Knudsen, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) and abdominal ultrasound are integral parts of multimodality assessments for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Applications include assessing Crohn’s disease (CD) extent and severity, differentiating CD from ulcerative colitis, detecting CD complications, evaluating response to therapy, and demonstrating postoperative recurrence. Magnetic resonance imaging protocols are being developed that may reduce or eliminate the need for intravenous contrast agents and better differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic strictures. MRE scoring systems have been created to objectively quantify disease activity and response to therapy. By utilizing advanced sonographic imaging techniques, including ultrasound contrast and Doppler assessments, the role of abdominal ultrasonography in the evaluation and management of CD continues to expand. Abdominal ultrasound may function as a low-cost, point-of care assessment tool, especially in CD restricted to the terminal ileum and ileocolic anastomosis. PMID:27231453

  16. Development of Ultrasound Tomography for Breast Imaging: Technical Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duric, N; Littrup, P; Babkin, A; Chambers, D; Azevedo, S; Arkady, K; Pevzner, R; Tokarev, M; Holsapple, E

    2004-09-30

    Ultrasound imaging is widely used in medicine because of its benign characteristics and real-time capabilities. Physics theory suggests that the application of tomographic techniques may allow ultrasound imaging to reach its full potential as a diagnostic tool allowing it to compete with other tomographic modalities such as X-ray CT and MRI. This paper describes the construction and use of a prototype tomographic scanner and reports on the feasibility of implementing tomographic theory in practice and the potential of US tomography in diagnostic imaging. Data were collected with the prototype by scanning two types of phantoms and a cadaveric breast. A specialized suite of algorithms was developed and utilized to construct images of reflectivity and sound speed from the phantom data. The basic results can be summarized as follows: (1) A fast, clinically relevant US tomography scanner can be built using existing technology. (2) The spatial resolution, deduced from images of reflectivity, is 0.4 mm. The demonstrated 10 cm depth-of-field is superior to that of conventional ultrasound and the image contrast is improved through the reduction of speckle noise and overall lowering of the noise floor. (3) Images of acoustic properties such as sound speed suggest that it is possible to measure variations in the sound speed of 5 m/s. An apparent correlation with X-ray attenuation suggests that the sound speed can be used to discriminate between various types of soft tissue. (4) Ultrasound tomography has the potential to improve diagnostic imaging in relation to breast cancer detection.

  17. Experimental ultrasound system for real-time synthetic imaging

    OpenAIRE

    1999-01-01

    Digital signal processing is being employed more and more in modern ultrasound scanners. This has made it possible to do dynamic receive focusing for each sample and implement other advanced imaging methods. The processing, however, has to be very fast and cost-effective at the same time. Dedicated chips are used in order to do real time processing. This often makes it difficult to implement radically different imaging strategies on one platform and makes the scanners less accessible for rese...

  18. Improving image reconstruction of bioluminescence imaging using a priori information from ultrasound imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayet, Baptiste; Ahmad, Junaid; Taylor, Shelley L.; Hill, Philip J.; Dehghani, Hamid; Morgan, Stephen P.

    2017-03-01

    Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) is a commonly used imaging modality in biology to study cancer in vivo in small animals. Images are generated using a camera to map the optical fluence emerging from the studied animal, then a numerical reconstruction algorithm is used to locate the sources and estimate their sizes. However, due to the strong light scattering properties of biological tissues, the resolution is very limited (around a few millimetres). Therefore obtaining accurate information about the pathology is complicated. We propose a combined ultrasound/optics approach to improve accuracy of these techniques. In addition to the BLI data, an ultrasound probe driven by a scanner is used for two main objectives. First, to obtain a pure acoustic image, which provides structural information of the sample. And second, to alter the light emission by the bioluminescent sources embedded inside the sample, which is monitored using a high speed optical detector (e.g. photomultiplier tube). We will show that this last measurement, used in conjunction with the ultrasound data, can provide accurate localisation of the bioluminescent sources. This can be used as a priori information by the numerical reconstruction algorithm, greatly increasing the accuracy of the BLI image reconstruction as compared to the image generated using only BLI data.

  19. Ultrasound contrast agent fabricated from microbubbles containing instant adhesives, and its ultrasound imaging ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuta, T.; Tamakawa, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Non-invasive surgery techniques and drug delivery system with acoustic characteristics of ultrasound contrast agent have been studied intensively in recent years. Ultrasound contrast agent collapses easily under the blood circulating and the ultrasound irradiating because it is just a stabilized bubble without solid-shell by surface adsorption of surfactant or lipid. For improving the imaging stability, we proposed the fabrication method of the hollow microcapsule with polymer shell, which can be fabricated just blowing vapor of commonly-used instant adhesive (Cyanoacrylate monomer) into water as microbubbles. Therefore, the cyanoacrylate vapor contained inside microbubble initiates polymerization on the gasliquid interface soon after microbubbles are generated in water. Consequently, hollow microspheres coated by cyanoacrylate thin film are generated. In this report, we revealed that diameter distributions of microbubbles and microcapsules were approximately same and most of them were less than 10 μm, that is, smaller than blood capillary. In addition, we also revealed that hollow microcapsules enhanced the acoustic signal especially in the harmonic contrast imaging and were broken or agglomerated under the ultrasound field. As for the yield of hollow microcapsules, we revealed that sodium dodecyl sulfate addition to water phase instead of deoxycolic acid made the fabrication yield increased.

  20. Imaging of common bile duct by linear endoscopic ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malay; Sharma; Amit; Pathak; Abid; Shoukat; Chittapuram; Srinivasan; Rameshbabu; Akash; Ajmera; Zeeshn; Ahamad; Wani; Praveer; Rai

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of common bile duct(CBD) can be done by many techniques. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography is considered the gold standard for imaging of CBD. A standard technique of imaging of CBD by endoscopic ultrasound(EUS) has not been specifically described. The available descriptions mention different stations of imaging from the stomach and duodenum. The CBD lies closest to duodenum and choice of imaging may be restricted to duodenum for many operators. Generally most operators prefer multi station imaging during EUS and the choice of selecting the initial station varies from operator to operator. Detailed evaluation of CBD is frequently the main focus of imaging during EUS and in such situations multi station imaging with a high-resolution ultrasound scanner may provide useful information. Examination of the CBD is one of the primary indications for doing an EUS and it can be done from five stations:(1) the fundus of stomach;(2) body of stomach;(3) duodenal bulb;(4) descending duodenum; and(5) antrum. Following down the upper 1/3rd of CBD can do imaging of entire CBD from the liver window and following up the lower 1/3rd of CBD can do imaging of entire CBD from the pancreatic window. This article aims at simplifying the techniques of imaging of CBD by linear EUS.

  1. Clutter filter design for ultrasound color flow imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjaerum, Steinar; Torp, Hans; Kristoffersen, Kjell

    2002-02-01

    For ultrasound color flow images with high quality, it is important to suppress the clutter signals originating from stationary and slowly moving tissue sufficiently. Without sufficient clutter rejection, low velocity blood flow cannot be measured, and estimates of higher velocities will have a large bias. The small number of samples available (8 to 16) makes clutter filtering in color flow imaging a challenging problem. In this paper, we review and analyze three classes of filters: finite impulse response (FIR), infinite impulse response (IIR), and regression filters. The quality of the filters was assessed based on the frequency response, as well as on the bias and variance of a mean blood velocity estimator using an autocorrelation technique. For FIR filters, the frequency response was improved by allowing a non-linear phase response. By estimating the mean blood flow velocity from two vectors filtered in the forward and backward direction, respectively, the standard deviation was significantly lower with a minimum phase filter than with a linear phase filter. For IIR filters applied to short signals, the transient part of the output signal is important. We analyzed zero, step, and projection initialization, and found that projection initialization gave the best filters. For regression filters, polynomial basis functions provide effective clutter suppression. The best filters from each of the three classes gave comparable bias and variance of the mean blood velocity estimates. However, polynomial regression filters and projection-initialized IIR filters had a slightly better frequency response than could be obtained with FIR filters.

  2. Automated Hierarchical Time Gain Compensation for In Vivo Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Martins, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Time gain compensation (TGC) is essential to ensure the optimal image quality of the clinical ultrasound scans. When large fluid collections are present within the scan plane, the attenuation distribution is changed drastically and TGC compensation becomes challenging. This paper presents...... tissue and the ultrasound signal strength. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 44 in vivo abdominal movie sequences each containing 15 frames. Matching pairs of in vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed AHTGC were visualized side by side and evaluated by two radiologists...

  3. Minimum Variance Beamforming for High Frame-Rate Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holfort, Iben Kraglund; Gran, Fredrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of adaptive beamforming in medical ultrasound imaging. A minimum variance (MV) approach for near-field beamforming of broadband data is proposed. The approach is implemented in the frequency domain, and it provides a set of adapted, complex apodization...... weights for each frequency sub-band. As opposed to the conventional, Delay and Sum (DS) beamformer, this approach is dependent on the specific data. The performance of the proposed MV beamformer is tested on simulated synthetic aperture (SA) ultrasound data, obtained using Field II. For the simulations...

  4. Surveillance of Hemodialysis Vascular Access with Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Olesen, Jacob Bjerring; Lindskov Hansen, Kristoffer;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was prospectively to monitor the volume flow in patients with arteriovenous fistula (AVF) with the angle independent ultrasound technique Vector Flow Imaging (VFI). Volume flow values were compared with Ultrasound dilution technique (UDT). Hemodialysis patients need a well...... obtained with Transonic HD03 Flow-QC Hemodialysis Monitor. Three independent measurements at each scan session were obtained with UDT and VFI each month. Average deviation of volume flow between UDT and VFI was 25.7 % (Cl: 16.7% to 34.7%) (p= 0.73). The standard deviation for all patients, calculated from...

  5. Potential of coded excitation in medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misaridis, Athanasios; Gammelmark, Kim; Jørgensen, C. H.

    2000-01-01

    Improvement in SNR and/or penetration depth can be achieved in medical ultrasoundby using long coded waveforms, in a similar manner as in radars or sonars.However, the time-bandwidth product (TB) improvement, and thereby SNRimprovement is considerably lower in medical ultrasound, due...... codes have a larger bandwidth than the transducerin a typical medical ultrasound system can drive, a more careful code designhas been proven essential. Simulation results are also presented forcomparison.This paper presents an improved non-linear FM signal appropriatefor ultrasonic applications. The new....... The range sidelobes, at thesame time, are well beyond the typical dynamic range of an ultrasound image.The energy of the sidelobe region is also reduced by lowering the distantsidelobes caused by the ripples of the spectrum's amplitude. The compressedsignal-to-noise ratio loss is only -...dB. The effect...

  6. Study of Ultrasound Imaging Technique for Diagnosing Osteoporosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. J.; Han, S. M. [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. H.; Lee, M. R. [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-08-15

    Ultrasonic has been proposed as an attractive means of detecting bone loss. There have been several commercial ultrasound devices developed for measuring the heel to predict fracture at other bones. However, these devices select only single point of heel bone as measurement site. It causes poor assessment of bone quality due to the error of transducer positioning. In an effort to improve current ultrasound systems, we evaluated the linear scanning method which provides better prediction of bone quality and an accurate image of bone shape. The system used in this study biaxially scans a heel bone using automated linear scanning technique. The results demonstrated that the values of ultrasound parameters varied with different positions within bone specimen. It has been also found that the linear scanning method could better predict bone quality, eliminating the error of transducer positioning

  7. Calibration of three-dimensional ultrasound images for image-guided radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouchet, Lionel G. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). E-mail: bouchet at neurosurgery.ufl.edu; Bova, Francis J.; Friedman, William A. [Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Meeks, Sanford L.; Buatti, John M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States); Goodchild, Gordon [Medtronic Surgical Navigation Technologies, Broomfield, CO (United States)

    2001-02-01

    A new technique of patient positioning for radiotherapy/radiosurgery of extracranial tumours using three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound images has been developed. The ultrasound probe position is tracked within the treatment room via infrared light emitting diodes (IRLEDs) attached to the probe. In order to retrieve the corresponding room position of the ultrasound image, we developed an initial ultrasound probe calibration technique for both 2D and 3D ultrasound systems. This technique is based on knowledge of points in both room and image coordinates. We first tested the performance of three algorithms in retrieving geometrical transformations using synthetic data with different noise levels. Closed form solution algorithms (singular value decomposition and Horn's quaternion algorithms) were shown to outperform the Hooke and Jeeves iterative algorithm in both speed and accuracy. Furthermore, these simulations show that for a random noise level of 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 mm, the number of points required for a transformation accuracy better than 1 mm is 25, 100, 200 and 500 points respectively. Finally, we verified the tracking accuracy of this system using a specially designed ultrasound phantom. Since ultrasound images have a high noise level, we designed an ultrasound phantom that provides a large number of points for the calibration. This tissue equivalent phantom is made of nylon wires, and its room position is optically tracked using IRLEDs. By obtaining multiple images through the nylon wires, the calibration technique uses an average of 300 points for 3D ultrasound volumes and 200 for 2D ultrasound images, and its stability is very good for both rotation (standard deviation: 0.4 deg.) and translation (standard deviation: 0.3 mm) transformations. After this initial calibration procedure, the position of any voxel in the ultrasound image volume can be determined in world space, thereby allowing real-time image guidance of therapeutic procedures. Finally, the

  8. Deconvolution of In Vivo Ultrasound B-Mode Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Stage, Bjarne; Mathorne, Jan;

    1993-01-01

    the transducer. Using pulse and covariance estimators makes the approach self-calibrating, as all parameters for the procedure are estimated from the patient under investigation. An example of use on a clinical, in-vivo image is given. A 2 × 2 cm region of the portal vein in a liver is deconvolved. An increase......An algorithm for deconvolution of medical ultrasound images is presented. The procedure involves estimation of the basic one-dimensional ultrasound pulse, determining the ratio of the covariance of the noise to the covariance of the reflection signal, and finally deconvolution of the rf signal from...... in axial resolution by a factor of 2.4 is obtained. The procedure can also be applied to whole images, when it is ensured that the rf signal is properly measured. A method for doing that is outlined....

  9. Liver ultrasound image classification by using fractal dimension of edge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Moraru, Luminita

    2012-08-01

    Medical ultrasound image edge detection is an important component in increasing the number of application of segmentation, and hence it has been subject of many studies in the literature. In this study, we have classified the liver ultrasound images (US) combining Canny and Sobel edge detectors with fractal analysis in order to provide an indicator about of the US images roughness. We intend to provide a classification rule of the focal liver lesions as: cirrhotic liver, liver hemangioma and healthy liver. For edges detection the Canny and Sobel operators were used. Fractal analyses have been applied for texture analysis and classification of focal liver lesions according to fractal dimension (FD) determined by using the Box Counting method. To assess the performance and accuracy rate of the proposed method the contrast-to-noise (CNR) is analyzed.

  10. Wideband Optical Detector of Ultrasound for Medical Imaging Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Amir; Kellnberger, Stephan; Omar, Murad; Razansky, Daniel; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    Optical sensors of ultrasound are a promising alternative to piezoelectric techniques, as has been recently demonstrated in the field of optoacoustic imaging. In medical applications, one of the major limitations of optical sensing technology is its susceptibility to environmental conditions, e.g. changes in pressure and temperature, which may saturate the detection. Additionally, the clinical environment often imposes stringent limits on the size and robustness of the sensor. In this work, the combination of pulse interferometry and fiber-based optical sensing is demonstrated for ultrasound detection. Pulse interferometry enables robust performance of the readout system in the presence of rapid variations in the environmental conditions, whereas the use of all-fiber technology leads to a mechanically flexible sensing element compatible with highly demanding medical applications such as intravascular imaging. In order to achieve a short sensor length, a pi-phase-shifted fiber Bragg grating is used, which acts as a resonator trapping light over an effective length of 350 µm. To enable high bandwidth, the sensor is used for sideway detection of ultrasound, which is highly beneficial in circumferential imaging geometries such as intravascular imaging. An optoacoustic imaging setup is used to determine the response of the sensor for acoustic point sources at different positions. PMID:24895083

  11. An FPGA-based ultrasound imaging system using capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lawrence L P; Chen, Albert I; Logan, Andrew S; Yeow, John T W

    2012-07-01

    We report the design and experimental results of a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based real-time ultrasound imaging system that uses a 16-element phased-array capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer fabricated using a fusion bonding process. The imaging system consists of the transducer, discrete analog components situated on a custom-made circuit board, the FPGA, and a monitor. The FPGA program consists of five functional blocks: a main counter, transmit and receive beamformer, receive signal pre-processing, envelope detection, and display. No dedicated digital signal processor or personal computer is required for the imaging system. An experiment is carried out to obtain the sector B-scan of a 4-wire target. The ultrasound imaging system demonstrates the possibility of an integrated system-in-a-package solution.

  12. PSF dedicated to estimation of displacement vectors for tissue elasticity imaging with ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebgott, Herve; Wilhjelm, Jens E.; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    of the phase of the complex cross-correlation between signals extracted from the lateral direction of the ultrasound RF image. For precise displacement estimation, a linearity of the phase slope is needed as well as a high phase slope. Consequently, a particular point spread function (PSF) dedicated......This paper investigates a new approach devoted to displacement vector estimation in ultrasound imaging. The main idea is to adapt the image formation to a given displacement estimationmethod to increase the precision of the estimation. The displacement is identified as the zero crossing...... tracking technique is also presented. The lateral oscillations improve both the speckle tracking estimation and our 2-D estimation method. Using our dedicated images, the precision of the estimation is improved by reducing the standard deviation of the lateral displacement error by a factor of 2...

  13. MIIP: a web-based platform for medical image interpretation training and evaluation focusing on ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindseth, Frank; Nordrik Hallan, Marte; Schiller Tønnessen, Martin; Smistad, Erik; Vâpenstad, Cecilie

    2017-03-01

    Introduction: Medical imaging technology has revolutionized health care over the past 30 years. This is especially true for ultrasound, a modality that an increasing amount of medical personal is starting to use. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a platform for improving medical image interpretation skills regardless of time and space and without the need for expensive imaging equipment or a patient to scan. Methods, results and conclusions: A stable web application with the needed functionality for image interpretation training and evaluation has been implemented. The system has been extensively tested internally and used during an international course in ultrasound-guided neurosurgery. The web application was well received and got very good System Usability Scale (SUS) scores.

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ...

  15. Objective breast tissue image classification using Quantitative Transmission ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Bilal; Klock, John; Wiskin, James; Lenox, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QT) is a powerful and emerging imaging paradigm which has the potential to perform true three-dimensional image reconstruction of biological tissue. Breast imaging is an important application of QT and allows non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging of whole breasts in vivo. Here, we report the first demonstration of breast tissue image classification in QT imaging. We systematically assess the ability of the QT images’ features to differentiate between normal breast tissue types. The three QT features were used in Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers, and classification of breast tissue as either skin, fat, glands, ducts or connective tissue was demonstrated with an overall accuracy of greater than 90%. Finally, the classifier was validated on whole breast image volumes to provide a color-coded breast tissue volume. This study serves as a first step towards a computer-aided detection/diagnosis platform for QT.

  16. Validity of Estimation of Pelvic Floor Muscle Activity from Transperineal Ultrasound Imaging in Men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan E Stafford

    Full Text Available To investigate the relationship between displacement of pelvic floor landmarks observed with transperineal ultrasound imaging and electromyography of the muscles hypothesised to cause the displacements.Three healthy men participated in this study, which included ultrasound imaging of the mid-urethra, urethra-vesical junction, ano-rectal junction and bulb of the penis. Fine-wire electromyography electrodes were inserted into the puborectalis and bulbocavernosus muscles and a transurethral catheter electrode recorded striated urethral sphincter electromyography. A nasogastric sensor recorded intra-abdominal pressure. Tasks included submaximal and maximal voluntary contractions, and Valsalva. The relationship between each of the parameters measured from ultrasound images and electromyography or intra-abdominal pressure amplitudes was described with nonlinear regression.Strong, non-linear relationships were calculated for each predicted landmark/muscle pair for submaximal contractions (R2-0.87-0.95. The relationships between mid-urethral displacement and striated urethral sphincter electromyography, and bulb of the penis displacement and bulbocavernosus electromyography were strong during maximal contractions (R2-0.74-0.88. Increased intra-abdominal pressure prevented shortening of puborectalis, which resulted in weak relationships between electromyography and anorectal and urethravesical junction displacement during all tasks.Displacement of landmarks in transperineal ultrasound imaging provides meaningful measures of activation of individual pelvic floor muscles in men during voluntary contractions. This method may aid assessment of muscle function or feedback for training.

  17. The effect of vascular curvature on three-dimensional reconstruction of intravascular ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiet, S P; Vonesh, M J; Waligora, M J; Kane, B J; McPherson, D D

    1996-01-01

    To characterize the effect of vessel curvature on the geometric accuracy of conventional three-dimensional reconstruction (3DR) algorithms for intravascular ultrasound image data. A common method of 3DR for intravascular ultrasound image data involves geometric reassembly and volumetric interpolation of a spatially related sequence of tomographic cross sections generated by an ultrasound catheter withdrawn at a constant rate through a vascular segment of interest. The resulting 3DR is displayed as a straight segment, with inherent vascular curvature neglected. Most vascular structures, however, are not straight but curved to some degree. For this reason, vascular curvature may influence the accuracy of computer-generated 3DR. We collected image data using three different intravascular ultrasound catheters (2.9 Fr, 4.3 Fr, 8.0 Fr) during a constant-rate pullback of 1 mm/sec through tubing of known diameter with imposed radii of curvature ranging from 2 to 10 cm. Image data were also collected from straight tubing. Image data were digitized at 1.0-mm intervals through a length of 25 mm. Two passes through each radius of curvature were performed with each intravascular ultrasound catheter. 3DR lumen volume for each radius of curvature was compared to that theoretically expected from a straight cylindrical segment. Differences between 3DR lumen volume of theoretical versus curved (actual) tubes were quantified as absolute percentage error and categorized as a function of curvature. Tubing deformation error was quantified by quantitative coronary angiography (QCA). Volumetric errors ranged from 1% to 35%, with an inverse relationship demonstrated between 3DR lumen volume and segmental radius of curvature. Higher curvatures (r curvatures (r > 6.0 cm). This trend was exhibited for all three catheters and was shown to be independent of tubing deformation artifacts. QCA-determined percentage diameter stenosis indicated no deformation error as a function of curvature. Total

  18. Development of an Anthropomorphic Breast Phantom for Combined PET, B-Mode Ultrasound and Elastographic Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Dang, J; Tavernier, S; Lasaygues, P; Mensah, S; Zhang, D C; Auffray, E; Frisch, B; Varela, J; Wan, M X; Felix, N

    2011-01-01

    Combining the advantages of different imaging modalities leads to improved clinical results. For example, ultrasound provides good real-time structural information without any radiation and PET provides sensitive functional information. For the ongoing ClearPEM-Sonic project combining ultrasound and PET for breast imaging, we developed a dual-modality PET/Ultrasound (US) phantom. The phantom reproduces the acoustic and elastic properties of human breast tissue and allows labeling the different tissues in the phantom with different concentrations of FDG. The phantom was imaged with a whole-body PET/CT and with the Supersonic Imagine Aixplorer system. This system allows both B-mode US and shear wave elastographic imaging. US elastography is a new imaging method for displaying the tissue elasticity distribution. It was shown to be useful in breast imaging. We also tested the phantom with static elastography. A 6D magnetic positioning system allows fusing the images obtained with the two modalities. ClearPEM-Soni...

  19. Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liebgott, Herve; Molares, Alfonso Rodriguez; Cervenansky, F.

    2016-01-01

    for this effect, but comparing the different methods is difficult due to the lack of appropriate tools. PICMUS, the Plane-Wave Imaging Challenge in Medical Ultrasound aims to provide these tools. This paper describes the PICMUS challenge, its motivation, implementation, and metrics.......Plane-Wave imaging enables very high frame rates, up to several thousand frames per second. Unfortunately the lack of transmit focusing leads to reduced image quality, both in terms of resolution and contrast. Recently, numerous beamforming techniques have been proposed to compensate...

  20. Ultrasound introscopic image quantitative characteristics for medical diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novoselets, Mikhail K.; Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Gridko, Alexander N.; Tcheban, Anatoliy K.

    1993-09-01

    The results on computer aided extraction of quantitative characteristics (QC) of ultrasound introscopic images for medical diagnosis are presented. Thyroid gland (TG) images of Chernobil Accident sufferers are considered. It is shown that TG diseases can be associated with some values of selected QCs of random echo distribution in the image. The possibility of these QCs usage for TG diseases recognition in accordance with calculated values is analyzed. The role of speckle noise elimination in the solution of the problem on TG diagnosis is considered too.

  1. Research interface for experimental ultrasound imaging - the CFU grabber project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mads Møller; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    system RASMUS. Furthermore precise scanner settings are stored for inter- and intra-observer studies. The resulting images are used for clinical evaluation. Method and materials The ultrasound scanners research interface is connected to a graphical grabber card in a Windows PC (Grabber PC). The grabber...... PC aquires pre processed data from the scanner in real time. Further post processing is required to create the final images. In house software (CFU Grabber tool) was developed to review and store the pre processed data. Using MatLab image processing with a new post post processing method the final...

  2. Stable phantom materials for ultrasound and optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrelli, Luciana C.; Pelissari, Pedro I. B. G. B.; Deana, Alessandro M.; Carneiro, Antonio A. O.; Pavan, Theo Z.

    2017-01-01

    Phantoms mimicking the specific properties of biological tissues are essential to fully characterize medical devices. Water-based materials are commonly used to manufacture phantoms for ultrasound and optical imaging techniques. However, these materials have disadvantages, such as easy degradation and low temporal stability. In this study, we propose an oil-based new tissue-mimicking material for ultrasound and optical imaging, with the advantage of presenting low temporal degradation. A styrene-ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) copolymer in mineral oil samples was made varying the SEBS concentration between 5%-15%, and low-density polyethylene (LDPE) between 0%-9%. Acoustic properties, such as the speed of sound and the attenuation coefficient, were obtained using frequencies ranging from 1-10 MHz, and were consistent with that of soft tissues. These properties were controlled varying SEBS and LDPE concentration. To characterize the optical properties of the samples, the diffuse reflectance and transmittance were measured. Scattering and absorption coefficients ranging from 400 nm-1200 nm were calculated for each compound. SEBS gels are a translucent material presenting low optical absorption and scattering coefficients in the visible region of the spectrum, but the presence of LDPE increased the turbidity. Adding LDPE increased the absorption and scattering of the phantom materials. Ultrasound and photoacoustic images of a heterogeneous phantom made of LDPE/SEBS containing a spherical inclusion were obtained. Annatto dye was added to the inclusion to enhance the optical absorbance. The results suggest that copolymer gels are promising for ultrasound and optical imaging, making them also potentially useful for photoacoustic imaging.

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland ... of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  5. Parametric Beamformer for Synthetic Aperture Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Tomov, Borislav Gueorguiev; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2006-01-01

    . The beamformer consists of a number of identical beamforming blocks, each processing data from several channels and producing part of the image. A number of these blocks can be accommodated in a modern field-programmable gate array device (FPGA), and a whole synthetic aperture system can be implemented using......In this paper a parametric beamformer, which can handle all imaging modalities including synthetic aperture imaging, is presented. The image lines and apodization coefficients are specified parametrically, and the lines can have arbitrary orientation and starting point in 3D coordinates...... several FPGAs. For the current implementation, the input data is sampled at 4 times the center frequency of the excitation pulse and is match-filtered in the frequency domain. In-phase and quadrature data are beamformed with a sub-sample precision of the focusing delays of 1/16th of the sampling period...

  6. Patient viewing of the ultrasound image prior to abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimport, Katrina; Upadhyay, Ushma D; Foster, Diana G; Gatter, Mary; Weitz, Tracy A

    2013-11-01

    Little research has investigated women's interest in and factors associated with viewing their ultrasound image in abortion care. Using medical records for all abortion care visits in 2011 (n = 15,575) at an urban abortion provider, we determined the proportion of women who chose to view by sociodemographic and pregnancy-related characteristics. We used bivariate and multivariable mixed-effects logistic regression models to examine associations between individual-level factors and the decision to view. A total of 42.6% of women chose to view. Identifying as nonwhite, being under age 25, being at or below the federal poverty level, and having medium or low decision certainty about the abortion were associated with increased odds of viewing. Being age 30 and over, having previously been pregnant and being more than 9 weeks gestation were associated with decreased odds of viewing. Many women seeking abortion care want to view their ultrasound image when offered the opportunity. © 2013.

  7. Model-Based Reconstructive Elasticity Imaging Using Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salavat R. Aglyamov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Elasticity imaging is a reconstructive imaging technique where tissue motion in response to mechanical excitation is measured using modern imaging systems, and the estimated displacements are then used to reconstruct the spatial distribution of Young's modulus. Here we present an ultrasound elasticity imaging method that utilizes the model-based technique for Young's modulus reconstruction. Based on the geometry of the imaged object, only one axial component of the strain tensor is used. The numerical implementation of the method is highly efficient because the reconstruction is based on an analytic solution of the forward elastic problem. The model-based approach is illustrated using two potential clinical applications: differentiation of liver hemangioma and staging of deep venous thrombosis. Overall, these studies demonstrate that model-based reconstructive elasticity imaging can be used in applications where the geometry of the object and the surrounding tissue is somewhat known and certain assumptions about the pathology can be made.

  8. Prototype of a rectal wall ultrasound image analysis system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Di; Ng, Wan S.; Abeyratne, Udantha R.; Tsang, Charles B.

    2002-05-01

    This paper presents a software system prototype for rectal wall ultrasound image processing, image display and 3D reconstruction and visualization of the rectal wall structure, which is aimed to help surgeons cope with large quantities of rectal wall ultrasound images. On the core image processing algorithm part, a novel multigradient field active contour model proposed by authors is used to complete the multi-layer boundary detection of the rectal wall. A novel unifying active contour model, which combines region information, gradient information and contour's internal constraint, is developed for tumor boundary detection. The region statistical information is described accurately by Gaussian Mixture Model, whose parameter solution is computed by Expectation-Maximization algorithm. The whole system is set up on Java platform. Java JAI technology is used for 2D image display, Java3D technology is employed for 3D reconstruction and visualization. The system prototype is currently composed of three main modules: image processing, image display and 3D visualization.

  9. Comparison of mouse mammary gland imaging techniques and applications: Reflectance confocal microscopy, GFP Imaging, and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotarla Ion

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetically engineered mouse models of mammary gland cancer enable the in vivo study of molecular mechanisms and signaling during development and cancer pathophysiology. However, traditional whole mount and histological imaging modalities are only applicable to non-viable tissue. Methods We evaluated three techniques that can be quickly applied to living tissue for imaging normal and cancerous mammary gland: reflectance confocal microscopy, green fluorescent protein imaging, and ultrasound imaging. Results In the current study, reflectance confocal imaging offered the highest resolution and was used to optically section mammary ductal structures in the whole mammary gland. Glands remained viable in mammary gland whole organ culture when 1% acetic acid was used as a contrast agent. Our application of using green fluorescent protein expressing transgenic mice in our study allowed for whole mammary gland ductal structures imaging and enabled straightforward serial imaging of mammary gland ducts in whole organ culture to visualize the growth and differentiation process. Ultrasound imaging showed the lowest resolution. However, ultrasound was able to detect mammary preneoplastic lesions 0.2 mm in size and was used to follow cancer growth with serial imaging in living mice. Conclusion In conclusion, each technique enabled serial imaging of living mammary tissue and visualization of growth and development, quickly and with minimal tissue preparation. The use of the higher resolution reflectance confocal and green fluorescent protein imaging techniques and lower resolution ultrasound were complementary.

  10. Investigation and Assessment of Disorder of Ultrasound B-mode Images

    CERN Document Server

    Rawat, Vidhi; shrimali, Vibhakar

    2010-01-01

    Digital image plays a vital role in the early detection of cancers, such as prostate cancer, breast cancer, lungs cancer, cervical cancer. Ultrasound imaging method is also suitable for early detection of the abnormality of fetus. The accurate detection of region of interest in ultrasound image is crucial. Since the result of reflection, refraction and deflection of ultrasound waves from different types of tissues with different acoustic impedance. Usually, the contrast in ultrasound image is very low and weak edges make the image difficult to identify the fetus region in the ultrasound image. So the analysis of ultrasound image is more challenging one. We try to develop a new algorithmic approach to solve the problem of non clarity and find disorder of it. Generally there is no common enhancement approach for noise reduction. This paper proposes different filtering techniques based on statistical methods for the removal of various noise. The quality of the enhanced images is measured by the statistical quant...

  11. Beef quality parameters estimation using ultrasound and color images

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Jose Luis; Piquerez, Martín; Pujadas, Leonardo; Armstrong,Eileen; Alicia FERNÁNDEZ; Lecumberry, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Beef quality measurement is a complex task with high economic impact. There is high interest in obtaining an automatic quality parameters estimation in live cattle or post mortem. In this paper we set out to obtain beef quality estimates from the analysis of ultrasound (in vivo) and color images (post mortem), with the measurement of various parameters related to tenderness and amount of meat: rib eye area, percentage of intramuscular fat and backfat thickness or subcutaneous fat. ...

  12. Beef quality parameters estimation using ultrasound and color images

    OpenAIRE

    Nunes, Jose Luis; Piquerez, Mart?n; Pujadas, Leonardo; Armstrong,Eileen; Fern?ndez, Alicia; Lecumberry, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Beef quality measurement is a complex task with high economic impact. There is high interest in obtaining an automatic quality parameters estimation in live cattle or post mortem. In this paper we set out to obtain beef quality estimates from the analysis of ultrasound (in vivo) and color images (post mortem), with the measurement of various parameters related to tenderness and amount of meat: rib eye area, percentage of intramuscular fat and backfat thickness or subcutaneous fat. ...

  13. WE-AB-206-01: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagzebski, J

    2016-06-01

    The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound and to provide updates in ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The first half of this workshop will include two presentations reviewing diagnostic ultrasound QA/QC and ACR ultrasound accreditation requirements. The second half of the workshop will include live demonstrations of basic QC tests. An array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be available for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations and on-site instructors. The targeted attendees are medical physicists in diagnostic imaging.

  14. Quantitative Measurements using Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-01-01

    Duplex Vector Flow Imaging (VFI) imaging is introduced as a replacement for spectral Doppler, as it automatically can yield fully quantitative flow estimates without angle correction. Continuous VFI data over 9 s for 10 pulse cycles were acquired by a 3 MHz convex probe connected to the SARUS......L/stroke (true: 1.15 mL/stroke, bias: 12.2%). Measurements down to 160 mm were obtained with a relative standard deviation and bias of less than 10% for the lateral component for stationary, parabolic flow. The method can, thus, find quantitative velocities, angles, and volume flows at sites currently...

  15. Adaptive clutter rejection for ultrasound color Doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Yang Mo; Managuli, Ravi; Kim, Yongmin

    2005-04-01

    We have developed a new adaptive clutter rejection technique where an optimum clutter filter is dynamically selected according to the varying clutter characteristics in ultrasound color Doppler imaging. The selection criteria have been established based on the underlying clutter characteristics (i.e., the maximum instantaneous clutter velocity and the clutter power) and the properties of various candidate clutter filters (e.g., projection-initialized infinite impulse response and polynomial regression). We obtained an average improvement of 3.97 dB and 3.27 dB in flow signal-to-clutter-ratio (SCR) compared to the conventional and down-mixing methods, respectively. These preliminary results indicate that the proposed adaptive clutter rejection method could improve the sensitivity and accuracy in flow velocity estimation for ultrasound color Doppler imaging. For a 192 x 256 color Doppler image with an ensemble size of 10, the proposed method takes only 57.2 ms, which is less than the acquisition time. Thus, the proposed method could be implemented in modern ultrasound systems, while providing improved clutter rejection and more accurate velocity estimation in real time.

  16. Dual-Frequency Piezoelectric Transducers for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heath Martin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For many years, ultrasound has provided clinicians with an affordable and effective imaging tool for applications ranging from cardiology to obstetrics. Development of microbubble contrast agents over the past several decades has enabled ultrasound to distinguish between blood flow and surrounding tissue. Current clinical practices using microbubble contrast agents rely heavily on user training to evaluate degree of localized perfusion. Advances in separating the signals produced from contrast agents versus surrounding tissue backscatter provide unique opportunities for specialized sensors designed to image microbubbles with higher signal to noise and resolution than previously possible. In this review article, we describe the background principles and recent developments of ultrasound transducer technology for receiving signals produced by contrast agents while rejecting signals arising from soft tissue. This approach relies on transmitting at a low-frequency and receiving microbubble harmonic signals at frequencies many times higher than the transmitted frequency. Design and fabrication of dual-frequency transducers and the extension of recent developments in transducer technology for dual-frequency harmonic imaging are discussed.

  17. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  18. Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Human CD276 Expression-Modulated Murine Ovarian Cancer Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Amelie M.; Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Drescher, Charles W.; Pysz, Marybeth A.; Willmann, Jürgen K.; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop a mouse ovarian cancer model that allows modulating the expression levels of human vascular targets in mouse xenograft tumors and to test whether expression of CD276 during tumor angiogenesis can be visualized by molecularly targeted ultrasound in vivo. Materials and Methods CD276-expressing MS-1 mouse endothelial cells were engineered and used for co-injection with 2008 human ovarian cancer cells for subcutaneous xenograft tumor induction in 15 nude mice. Fourteen control mice were injected with 2008 cells only. After confirming their binding specificity in flow chamber cell attachment studies, anti CD276 antibody-functionalized contrast microbubbles were used for in vivo CD276-targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound imaging. Results CD276-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P=0.006) in mixed MS1/2008 tumors compared to control tumors. Compared to control microbubbles the ultrasound signal using CD276-targeted microbubbles was significantly higher (P=0.002) and blocking with purified anti-CD276 antibody significantly decreased (P=0.0096) the signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors. Immunofluorescence analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed higher quantitative immunofluorescence signal in mixed MS-1/2008 tumors than in control 2008 only tumors, but showed not significantly different (P=0.54) microvessel density. Conclusion Our novel small animal model allows for modulating the expression of human tumor-associated vascular endothelial imaging targets in a mouse host and these expression differences can be visualized non-invasively by ultrasound molecular imaging. The animal model can be applied to other human vascular targets and may facilitate the preclinical development of new imaging probes such as microbubbles targeted at human vascular markers not expressed in mice. PMID:24389327

  19. Liver fibrosis identification based on ultrasound images captured under varied imaging protocols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Gui-tao; SHI Peng-fei; HU Bing

    2005-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound is a useful and noninvasive method in clinical medicine. Although due to its qualitative, subjective and experience-based nature, ultrasound image interpretation can be influenced by image conditions such as scanning frequency and machine settings. In this paper, a novel method is proposed to extract the liver features using the joint features of fractal dimension and the entropies of texture edge co-occurrence matrix based on ultrasound images, which is not sensitive to changes in emission frequency and gain. Then, Fisher linear classifier and support vector machine are employed to test a group of99 in-vivo liver fibrosis images from 18 patients, as well as other 273 liver images from 18 normal human volunteers.

  20. Simulation of High Quality Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Kortbek, Jacob; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates if the influence on image quality using physical transducers can be simulated with an sufficient accuracy to reveal system performance. The influence is investigated in a comparative study between Synthetic Aperture Sequential Beamformation (SASB) and Dynamic Receive Focus...

  1. Photoacoustic image reconstruction from ultrasound post-beamformed B-mode image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K.; Guo, Xiaoyu; Kang, Hyun Jae; Boctor, Emad M.

    2016-03-01

    A requirement to reconstruct photoacoustic (PA) image is to have a synchronized channel data acquisition with laser firing. Unfortunately, most clinical ultrasound (US) systems don't offer an interface to obtain synchronized channel data. To broaden the impact of clinical PA imaging, we propose a PA image reconstruction algorithm utilizing US B-mode image, which is readily available from clinical scanners. US B-mode image involves a series of signal processing including beamforming, followed by envelope detection, and end with log compression. Yet, it will be defocused when PA signals are input due to incorrect delay function. Our approach is to reverse the order of image processing steps and recover the original US post-beamformed radio-frequency (RF) data, in which a synthetic aperture based PA rebeamforming algorithm can be further applied. Taking B-mode image as the input, we firstly recovered US postbeamformed RF data by applying log decompression and convoluting an acoustic impulse response to combine carrier frequency information. Then, the US post-beamformed RF data is utilized as pre-beamformed RF data for the adaptive PA beamforming algorithm, and the new delay function is applied by taking into account that the focus depth in US beamforming is at the half depth of the PA case. The feasibility of the proposed method was validated through simulation, and was experimentally demonstrated using an acoustic point source. The point source was successfully beamformed from a US B-mode image, and the full with at the half maximum of the point improved 3.97 times. Comparing this result to the ground-truth reconstruction using channel data, the FWHM was slightly degraded with 1.28 times caused by information loss during envelope detection and convolution of the RF information.

  2. Refraction Correction in 3D Transcranial Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Brooks D.; Smith, Stephen W.

    2014-01-01

    We present the first correction of refraction in three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound imaging using an iterative approach that traces propagation paths through a two-layer planar tissue model, applying Snell’s law in 3D. This approach is applied to real-time 3D transcranial ultrasound imaging by precomputing delays offline for several skull thicknesses, allowing the user to switch between three sets of delays for phased array imaging at the push of a button. Simulations indicate that refraction correction may be expected to increase sensitivity, reduce beam steering errors, and partially restore lost spatial resolution, with the greatest improvements occurring at the largest steering angles. Distorted images of cylindrical lesions were created by imaging through an acrylic plate in a tissue-mimicking phantom. As a result of correcting for refraction, lesions were restored to 93.6% of their original diameter in the lateral direction and 98.1% of their original shape along the long axis of the cylinders. In imaging two healthy volunteers, the mean brightness increased by 8.3% and showed no spatial dependency. PMID:24275538

  3. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  4. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  5. In-vivo synthetic aperture flow imaging in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2003-01-01

    .2% and a mean relative bias of 3.4% using 24 pulse emissions at a flow angle of 45 degrees. The 24 emissions can be used for making a full-color flow map image. An in-vivo image of How in the carotid artery for a 29-year-old male also is presented. The full image is acquired using 24 emissions.......A new method for acquiring flow images using synthetic aperture techniques in medical ultrasound is presented. The new approach makes it possible to have a continuous acquisition of flow data throughout the whole image simultaneously, and this can significantly improve blood velocity estimation....... Any type of filter can be used for discrimination between tissue and blood flow without initialization, and the number of lines used for velocity estimation is limited only by the nonstationarity of the flow. The new approach is investigated through both simulations and measurements. A flow rig...

  6. A Methodology for Anatomic Ultrasound Image Diagnostic Quality Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Lange, Theis; Brandt, Andreas Hjelm; Nielsen, Michael Bachmann; Jensen, Jorgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the methods for the assessment of ultrasound image quality based on our experiences with evaluating new methods for anatomic imaging. It presents a methodology to ensure a fair assessment between competing imaging methods using clinically relevant evaluations. The methodology is valuable in the continuing process of method optimization and guided development of new imaging methods. It includes a three phased study plan covering from initial prototype development to clinical assessment. Recommendations to the clinical assessment protocol, software, and statistical analysis are presented. Earlier uses of the methodology has shown that it ensures validity of the assessment, as it separates the influences between developer, investigator, and assessor once a research protocol has been established. This separation reduces confounding influences on the result from the developer to properly reveal the clinical value. This paper exemplifies the methodology using recent studies of synthetic aperture sequential beamforming tissue harmonic imaging.

  7. Adaptive texture filtering for defect inspection in ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmola, Carl; Segal, Andrew C.; Lovewell, Brian; Nash, Charles

    1993-05-01

    The use of ultrasonic imaging to analyze defects and characterize materials is critical in the development of non-destructive testing and non-destructive evaluation (NDT/NDE) tools for manufacturing. To develop better quality control and reliability in the manufacturing environment advanced image processing techniques are useful. For example, through the use of texture filtering on ultrasound images, we have been able to filter characteristic textures from highly-textured C-scan images of materials. The materials have highly regular characteristic textures which are of the same resolution and dynamic range as other important features within the image. By applying texture filters and adaptively modifying their filter response, we have examined a family of filters for removing these textures.

  8. Material characterization and defect inspection in ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmola, Carl; Segal, Andrew C.; Lovewell, Brian; Mahdavieh, Jacob; Ross, Joseph; Nash, Charles

    1992-08-01

    The use of ultrasonic imaging to analyze defects and characterize materials is critical in the development of non-destructive testing and non-destructive evaluation (NDT/NDE) tools for manufacturing. To develop better quality control and reliability in the manufacturing environment advanced image processing techniques are useful. For example, through the use of texture filtering on ultrasound images, we have been able to filter characteristic textures from highly textured C-scan images of materials. The materials have highly regular characteristic textures which are of the same resolution and dynamic range as other important features within the image. By applying texture filters and adaptively modifying their filter response, we have examined a family of filters for removing these textures.

  9. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Encoding in Medical Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gran, Fredrik

    2005-01-01

    In this dissertation two methods for spatio-temporal encoding in medical ultrasound imaging are investigated. The first technique is based on a frequency division approach. Here, the available spectrum of the transducer is divided into a set of narrow bands. A waveform is designed for each band...... the signal to noise ratio and simultaneously the penetration depth so that the medical doctor can image deeper lying structures. The method is tested both experimentally and in simulation and has also evaluated for the purpose of blood flow estimation. The work presented is based on four papers which...

  11. Robust Microbubble Tracking for Super Resolution Imaging in Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, kristoffer B; Villagómez-Hoyos, Carlos A; Brasen, Jens Christian

    2016-01-01

    Currently ultrasound resolution is limited by diffraction to approximately half the wavelength of the sound wave employed. In recent years, super resolution imaging techniques have overcome the diffraction limit through the localization and tracking of a sparse set of microbubbles through...... the vasculature. However, this has only been performed on fixated tissue, limiting its clinical application. This paper proposes a technique for making super resolution images on non-fixated tissue by first compensating for tissue movement and then tracking the individual microbubbles. The experiment is performed...

  12. New image contrast method in magnetic resonance imaging via ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radicke, Marcus, E-mail: radicke@hiskp.uni-bonn.de; Engelbertz, Andre; Habenstein, Bernd; Lewerenz, Meinert; Oehms, Ole [University of Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik (Germany); Trautner, Peter; Weber, Bernd [Life and Brain Research Center, Department Neurocognition (Germany); Wrede, Sarah; Maier, Karl [University of Bonn, Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen-und Kernphysik (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    When applied to a sample, ultrasound (US) gives rise to a displacement of tissue and a flow in a liquid due to the acoustic radiation pressure. These movements depend on the viscoelastic properties of the sample and can be visualized precisely with an MRI scanner using diffusion- sensitive pulse sequences. In this paper, measurements will be presented, which show the visualization of the US under variation of its parameters in different liquids and in tissue.

  13. Comparison of algorithms for ultrasound image segmentation without ground truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Karan; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    Image segmentation is a pre-requisite to medical image analysis. A variety of segmentation algorithms have been proposed, and most are evaluated on a small dataset or based on classification of a single feature. The lack of a gold standard (ground truth) further adds to the discrepancy in these comparisons. This work proposes a new methodology for comparing image segmentation algorithms without ground truth by building a matrix called region-correlation matrix. Subsequently, suitable distance measures are proposed for quantitative assessment of similarity. The first measure takes into account the degree of region overlap or identical match. The second considers the degree of splitting or misclassification by using an appropriate penalty term. These measures are shown to satisfy the axioms of a quasi-metric. They are applied for a comparative analysis of synthetic segmentation maps to show their direct correlation with human intuition of similar segmentation. Since ultrasound images are difficult to segment and usually lack a ground truth, the measures are further used to compare the recently proposed spectral clustering algorithm (encoding spatial and edge information) with standard k-means over abdominal ultrasound images. Improving the parameterization and enlarging the feature space for k-means steadily increased segmentation quality to that of spectral clustering.

  14. Feature selection applied to ultrasound carotid images segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Samanta; Molinari, Filippo; Balestra, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    The automated tracing of the carotid layers on ultrasound images is complicated by noise, different morphology and pathology of the carotid artery. In this study we benchmarked four methods for feature selection on a set of variables extracted from ultrasound carotid images. The main goal was to select those parameters containing the highest amount of information useful to classify the pixels in the carotid regions they belong to. Six different classes of pixels were identified: lumen, lumen-intima interface, intima-media complex, media-adventitia interface, adventitia and adventitia far boundary. The performances of QuickReduct Algorithm (QRA), Entropy-Based Algorithm (EBR), Improved QuickReduct Algorithm (IQRA) and Genetic Algorithm (GA) were compared using Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs). All methods returned subsets with a high dependency degree, even if the average classification accuracy was about 50%. Among all classes, the best results were obtained for the lumen. Overall, the four methods for feature selection assessed in this study return comparable results. Despite the need for accuracy improvement, this study could be useful to build a pre-classifier stage for the optimization of segmentation performance in ultrasound automated carotid segmentation.

  15. Non-contact biomedical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Guy; Gauthier, Bruno; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The detection of ultrasound in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) usually relies on ultrasonic transducers in contact with the biological tissue through a coupling medium. This is a major drawback for important potential applications such as surgery. Here we report the use of a remote optical method, derived from industrial laser-ultrasonics, to detect ultrasound in tissues. This approach enables non-contact PAT (NCPAT) without exceeding laser exposure safety limits. The sensitivity of the method is based on the use of suitably shaped detection laser pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer in differential configuration. Reliable image reconstruction is obtained by measuring remotely the surface profile of the tissue with an optical coherence tomography system. The proposed method also allows non-contact ultrasound imaging (US) by applying a second reconstruction algorithm to the data acquired for NCPAT. Endogenous and exogenous inclusions exhibiting optical and acoustic contrasts were detected ex vivo in chicken breast and calf brain specimens. Inclusions down to 0.3 mm in size were detected at depths exceeding 1 cm. The method could expand the scope of photoacoustic and US to in-vivo biomedical applications where contact is impractical.

  16. Localized Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound Surgery Targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-01-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired RF signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed in order to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions as compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude. PMID:21683514

  17. Non-contact biomedical photoacoustic and ultrasound imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Guy; Gauthier, Bruno; Blouin, Alain; Monchalin, Jean-Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The detection of ultrasound in photoacoustic tomography (PAT) usually relies on ultrasonic transducers in contact with the biological tissue through a coupling medium. This is a major drawback for important potential applications such as surgery. Here we report the use of a remote optical method, derived from industrial laser-ultrasonics, to detect ultrasound in tissues. This approach enables non-contact PAT (NCPAT) without exceeding laser exposure safety limits. The sensitivity of the method is based on the use of suitably shaped detection laser pulses and a confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer in differential configuration. Reliable image reconstruction is obtained by measuring remotely the surface profile of the tissue with an optical coherence tomography system. The proposed method also allows non-contact ultrasound imaging (US) by applying a second reconstruction algorithm to the data acquired for NCPAT. Endogenous and exogenous inclusions exhibiting optical and acoustic contrasts were detected ex vivo in chicken breast and calf brain specimens. Inclusions down to 0.3 mm in size were detected at depths exceeding 1 cm. The method could expand the scope of photoacoustic and US to in-vivo biomedical applications where contact is impractical.

  18. Fast Vascular Ultrasound Imaging With Enhanced Spatial Resolution and Background Rejection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Zion, Avinoam; Tremblay-Darveau, Charles; Solomon, Oren; Adam, Dan; Eldar, Yonina C

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound super-localization microscopy techniques presented in the last few years enable non-invasive imaging of vascular structures at the capillary level by tracking the flow of ultrasound contrast agents (gas microbubbles). However, these techniques are currently limited by low temporal resolution and long acquisition times. Super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI) is a fluorescence microscopy technique enabling sub-diffraction limit imaging with high temporal resolution by calculating high order statistics of the fluctuating optical signal. The aim of this work is to achieve fast acoustic imaging with enhanced resolution by applying the tools used in SOFI to contrast-enhance ultrasound (CEUS) plane-wave scans. The proposed method was tested using numerical simulations and evaluated using two in-vivo rabbit models: scans of healthy kidneys and VX-2 tumor xenografts. Improved spatial resolution was observed with a reduction of up to 50% in the full width half max of the point spread function. In addition, substantial reduction in the background level was achieved compared to standard mean amplitude persistence images, revealing small vascular structures within tumors. The scan duration of the proposed method is less than a second while current super-localization techniques require acquisition duration of several minutes. As a result, the proposed technique may be used to obtain scans with enhanced spatial resolution and high temporal resolution, facilitating flow-dynamics monitoring. Our method can also be applied during a breath-hold, reducing the sensitivity to motion artifacts.

  19. Efficient scatter model for simulation of ultrasound images from computed tomography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amato, J. P.; Lo Vercio, L.; Rubi, P.; Fernandez Vera, E.; Barbuzza, R.; Del Fresno, M.; Larrabide, I.

    2015-12-01

    Background and motivation: Real-time ultrasound simulation refers to the process of computationally creating fully synthetic ultrasound images instantly. Due to the high value of specialized low cost training for healthcare professionals, there is a growing interest in the use of this technology and the development of high fidelity systems that simulate the acquisitions of echographic images. The objective is to create an efficient and reproducible simulator that can run either on notebooks or desktops using low cost devices. Materials and methods: We present an interactive ultrasound simulator based on CT data. This simulator is based on ray-casting and provides real-time interaction capabilities. The simulation of scattering that is coherent with the transducer position in real time is also introduced. Such noise is produced using a simplified model of multiplicative noise and convolution with point spread functions (PSF) tailored for this purpose. Results: The computational efficiency of scattering maps generation was revised with an improved performance. This allowed a more efficient simulation of coherent scattering in the synthetic echographic images while providing highly realistic result. We describe some quality and performance metrics to validate these results, where a performance of up to 55fps was achieved. Conclusion: The proposed technique for real-time scattering modeling provides realistic yet computationally efficient scatter distributions. The error between the original image and the simulated scattering image was compared for the proposed method and the state-of-the-art, showing negligible differences in its distribution.

  20. Functional imaging and endoscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo Zhang; Hai-Feng Liu

    2011-01-01

    The emergence of endoscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal diseases and the treatment of gastrointestinal diseases has brought great changes.The mere observation of anatomy with the imaging mode using modern endoscopy has played a significant role in this regard.However,increasing numbers of endoscopies have exposed additional deficiencies and defects such as anatomically similar diseases.Endoscopy can be used to examine lesions that are difficult to identify and diagnose.Early disease detection requires that substantive changes in biological function should be observed,but in the absence of marked morphological changes,endoscopic detection and diagnosis are difficult.Disease detection requires not only anatomic but also functional imaging to achieve a comprehensive interpretation and understanding.Therefore,we must ask if endoscopic examination can be integrated with both anatomic imaging and functional imaging.In recent years,as molecular biology and medical imaging technology have further developed,more functional imaging methods have emerged.This paper is a review of the literature related to endoscopic optical imaging methods in the hopes of initiating integration of functional imaging and anatomical imaging to yield a new and more effective type of endoscopy.

  1. Acoustic structure quantification by using ultrasound Nakagami imaging for assessing liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Tai, Dar-In; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wang, Chiao-Yin; Ma, Hsiang-Yang

    2016-09-08

    Acoustic structure quantification (ASQ) is a recently developed technique widely used for detecting liver fibrosis. Ultrasound Nakagami parametric imaging based on the Nakagami distribution has been widely used to model echo amplitude distribution for tissue characterization. We explored the feasibility of using ultrasound Nakagami imaging as a model-based ASQ technique for assessing liver fibrosis. Standard ultrasound examinations were performed on 19 healthy volunteers and 91 patients with chronic hepatitis B and C (n = 110). Liver biopsy and ultrasound Nakagami imaging analysis were conducted to compare the METAVIR score and Nakagami parameter. The diagnostic value of ultrasound Nakagami imaging was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. The Nakagami parameter obtained through ultrasound Nakagami imaging decreased with an increase in the METAVIR score (p Nakagami imaging is a model-based ASQ technique that can be beneficial for the clinical diagnosis of early liver fibrosis.

  2. Ultrasound imaging and evaluation of lesion induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Hui; WAN Mingxi; JIANG Yifeng; WANG Supin

    2006-01-01

    The present study was to investigate the differential imaging method for detecting HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound)-induced lesions and the estimation of variation of attenuation for lesion evaluation with log spectral difference algorithm. Experiment results of bovine muscle and liver in vitro were acquired. Several algorithms for lesion detection - Absolute Difference (AD), Sum Absolute Differences (SAD) and Sum Squared Differences (SSD) - were analyzed with several window sizes and threshold values. Then three attenuation parameters were compared to evaluate the degree of tissue damage. It was found that variation of the mean attenuation △(α) was an effective parameter to evaluate lesions.

  3. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzini, D.; Viti, J.; Tortoli, P.; Verweij, M.D.; De Jong, N.; Vos, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the third or higher

  4. Ultrasound contrast agent imaging: Real-time imaging of the superharmonics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peruzzini, D.; J. Viti (Jacopo); P. Tortoli (Piero); M.D. Verweij (Martin D.); N. de Jong (Nico); H.J. Vos (Rik)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently, in medical ultrasound contrast agent (UCA) imaging the second harmonic scattering of the microbubbles is regularly used. This scattering is in competition with the signal that is caused by nonlinear wave propagation in tissue. It was reported that UCA imaging based on the

  5. Automated quality assessment in three-dimensional breast ultrasound images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, Julia; Diez, Yago; Oliver, Arnau; Martí, Robert; van Zelst, Jan; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Mourri, Ahmed Bensouda; Gregori, Johannes; Günther, Matthias

    2016-04-01

    Automated three-dimensional breast ultrasound (ABUS) is a valuable adjunct to x-ray mammography for breast cancer screening of women with dense breasts. High image quality is essential for proper diagnostics and computer-aided detection. We propose an automated image quality assessment system for ABUS images that detects artifacts at the time of acquisition. Therefore, we study three aspects that can corrupt ABUS images: the nipple position relative to the rest of the breast, the shadow caused by the nipple, and the shape of the breast contour on the image. Image processing and machine learning algorithms are combined to detect these artifacts based on 368 clinical ABUS images that have been rated manually by two experienced clinicians. At a specificity of 0.99, 55% of the images that were rated as low quality are detected by the proposed algorithms. The areas under the ROC curves of the single classifiers are 0.99 for the nipple position, 0.84 for the nipple shadow, and 0.89 for the breast contour shape. The proposed algorithms work fast and reliably, which makes them adequate for online evaluation of image quality during acquisition. The presented concept may be extended to further image modalities and quality aspects.

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe ... transducer into the body. top of page How is the procedure performed? In men, the prostate gland ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and organs ... of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or sonography , ...

  8. Acoustic characterization of ultrasound contrast microbubbles and echogenic liposomes: Applications to imaging and drug-delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Shirshendu

    Micron- to nanometer - sized ultrasound agents, like encapsulated microbubbles and echogenic liposomes (ELIPs), are being actively developed for possible clinical implementations in diagnostic imaging and ultrasound mediated drug/gene delivery. The primary objective of this thesis is to characterize the acoustic behavior of and the ultrasound-mediated contents release from these contrast agents for developing multi-functional ultrasound contrast agents. Subharmonic imaging using contrast microbubbles can improve image quality by providing a higher signal to noise ratio. However, the design and development of contrast microbubbles with favorable subharmonic behavior requires accurate mathematical models capable of predicting their nonlinear dynamics. To this goal, 'strain-softening' viscoelastic interfacial models of the encapsulation were developed and subsequently utilized to simulate the dynamics of encapsulated microbubbles. A hierarchical two-pronged approach of modeling --- a model is applied to one set of experimental data to obtain the model parameters (material characterization), and then the model is validated against a second independent experiment --- is demonstrated in this thesis for two lipid coated (SonazoidRTM and DefinityRTM) and a few polymer (polylactide) encapsulated microbubbles. The proposed models were successful in predicting several experimentally observed behaviors e.g., low subharmonic thresholds and "compression-only" radial oscillations. Results indicate that neglecting the polydisperse size distribution of contrast agent suspensions, a common practice in the literature, can lead to inaccurate results. In vitro experimental investigation of the dependence of subharmonic response from these microbubbles on the ambient pressure is also in conformity with the recent numerical investigations, showing both increase or decrease under appropriate excitation conditions. Experimental characterization of the ELIPs and polymersomes was performed

  9. Determination of fish gender using fractal analysis of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McEvoy, Fintan J.; Tomkiewicz, Jonna; Støttrup, Josianne;

    2009-01-01

    The gender of cod Gadus morhua can be determined by considering the complexity in their gonadal ultrasonographic appearance. The fractal dimension (DB) can be used to describe this feature in images. B-mode gonadal ultrasound images in 32 cod, where gender was known, were collected. Fractal...... by subjective analysis alone. The mean (and standard deviation) of the fractal dimension DB for male fish was 1.554 (0.073) while for female fish it was 1.468 (0.061); the difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). The area under the ROC curve was 0.84 indicating the value of fractal analysis in gender...... result. Fractal analysis is useful for gender determination in cod. This or a similar form of analysis may have wide application in veterinary imaging as a tool for quantification of complexity in images...

  10. Thermographic image reconstruction using ultrasound reconstruction from virtual waves

    CERN Document Server

    Burgholzer, Peter; Gruber, Jürgen; Mayr, Günther

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of subsurface features from ultrasound signals measured on the surface is widely used in medicine and non-destructive testing. In this work, we introduce a concept how to use image reconstruction methods known from ultrasonic imaging for thermographic signals, i.e. on the measured temperature evolution on a sample surface. Before using these imaging methods a virtual signal is calculated by applying a transformation to the measured temperature evolution. The virtual signal is calculated locally for every detection point and has the same initial temperature distribution as the measured signal, but is a solution of the wave equation. The introduced transformation can be used for every shape of the detection surface and in every dimension. It describes all the irreversibility of the heat diffusion, which is responsible that the spatial resolution gets worse with increasing depth. Up to now, for thermographic imaging mostly one-dimensional methods, e.g., for depth-profiling were used, which are sui...

  11. High Resolution Depth-Resolved Imaging From Multi-Focal Images for Medical Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamantis, Konstantinos; Dalgarno, Paul A.; Greenaway, Alan H.

    2015-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging technique providing subdiffraction limit axial resolution for point sources is proposed. It is based on simultaneously acquired multi-focal images of the same object, and on the image metric of sharpness. The sharpness is extracted by image data and presents higher values...... for in-focus images. The technique is derived from biological microscopy and is validated here with simulated ultrasound data. A linear array probe is used to scan a point scatterer phantom that moves in depth with a controlled step. From the beamformed responses of each scatterer position the image...... calibration curves combined with the use of a maximum-likelihood algorithm is then able to estimate, with high precision, the depth location of any emitter fron each single image. Estimated values are compared with the ground truth demonstrating that an accuracy of 28.6 µm (0.13λ) is achieved for a 4 mm depth...

  12. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Ni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (CaP is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8. Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r2 = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P < .001. The application of 3D ultrasound imaging proved to be a useful imaging modality in monitoring tumor growth in an orthotopic mouse model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  13. Measurement of temperature decrease caused by blood flow in focused ultrasound irradiation by thermal imaging method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Takenobu; Hatano, Yuichi; Mori, Yashunori; Shen, Rakushin; Endoh, Nobuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this study, to estimate the local temperature changes caused by a thick blood vessel, the temperature distribution in a tissue phantom with a thick blood vessel during focused ultrasound irradiation was measured by a thermal imaging method. The blood flow rate in the simulated blood vessel was varied and the relationship between flow rate and temperature decrease was examined. The phantom using the thermal imaging method is divided into two parts, and the increases in temperature distribution as a function of blood flow rate are measured using a thermocamera under constant ultrasound irradiation. The irradiation conditions of ultrasound waves were a central frequency of 1 MHz, a wave number length of 200 cycles, and a duty ratio of 0.2. The irradiation duration was 5 min, and the ultrasound intensity I SPTA was 36 W/cm2. The amount of temperature decrease caused by the cooling effect of blood flow increased with the blood flow rate and it became constant at a certain threshold of blood flow rate. The threshold of blood flow rate is about 250 ml/min.

  14. A Dual-Modality System for Both Multi-Color Ultrasound-Switchable Fluorescence and Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandukuri, Jayanth; Yu, Shuai; Cheng, Bingbing; Bandi, Venugopal; D’Souza, Francis; Nguyen, Kytai T.; Hong, Yi; Yuan, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Simultaneous imaging of multiple targets (SIMT) in opaque biological tissues is an important goal for molecular imaging in the future. Multi-color fluorescence imaging in deep tissues is a promising technology to reach this goal. In this work, we developed a dual-modality imaging system by combining our recently developed ultrasound-switchable fluorescence (USF) imaging technology with the conventional ultrasound (US) B-mode imaging. This dual-modality system can simultaneously image tissue acoustic structure information and multi-color fluorophores in centimeter-deep tissue with comparable spatial resolutions. To conduct USF imaging on the same plane (i.e., x-z plane) as US imaging, we adopted two 90°-crossed ultrasound transducers with an overlapped focal region, while the US transducer (the third one) was positioned at the center of these two USF transducers. Thus, the axial resolution of USF is close to the lateral resolution, which allows a point-by-point USF scanning on the same plane as the US imaging. Both multi-color USF and ultrasound imaging of a tissue phantom were demonstrated. PMID:28165390

  15. Despeckle filtering for ultrasound imaging and video, v.I algorithms and software

    CERN Document Server

    Loizou, Christos P

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that speckle is a multiplicative noise that degrades image and video quality and the visual expert's evaluation in ultrasound imaging and video. This necessitates the need for robust despeckling image and video techniques for both routine

  16. Venous Ultrasound (Extremities)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Venous (Extremities) Venous ultrasound uses sound waves to ... limitations of Venous Ultrasound Imaging? What is Venous Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ...

  17. Automated detection of cardiac phase from intracoronary ultrasound image sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Dong, Yi; Li, Mengchan

    2015-01-01

    Intracoronary ultrasound (ICUS) is a widely used interventional imaging modality in clinical diagnosis and treatment of cardiac vessel diseases. Due to cyclic cardiac motion and pulsatile blood flow within the lumen, there exist changes of coronary arterial dimensions and relative motion between the imaging catheter and the lumen during continuous pullback of the catheter. The action subsequently causes cyclic changes to the image intensity of the acquired image sequence. Information on cardiac phases is implied in a non-gated ICUS image sequence. A 1-D phase signal reflecting cardiac cycles was extracted according to cyclical changes in local gray-levels in ICUS images. The local extrema of the signal were then detected to retrieve cardiac phases and to retrospectively gate the image sequence. Results of clinically acquired in vivo image data showed that the average inter-frame dissimilarity of lower than 0.1 was achievable with our technique. In terms of computational efficiency and complexity, the proposed method was shown to be competitive when compared with the current methods. The average frame processing time was lower than 30 ms. We effectively reduced the effect of image noises, useless textures, and non-vessel region on the phase signal detection by discarding signal components caused by non-cardiac factors.

  18. Processed images in human perception: A case study in ultrasound breast imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yap, Moi Hoon [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FH09, Ergonomics and Safety Research Institute, Holywell Park (United Kingdom)], E-mail: M.H.Yap@lboro.ac.uk; Edirisinghe, Eran [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, FJ.05, Garendon Wing, Holywell Park, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Bez, Helmut [Department of Computer Science, Loughborough University, Room N.2.26, Haslegrave Building, Loughborough University, Loughborough LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    Two main research efforts in early detection of breast cancer include the development of software tools to assist radiologists in identifying abnormalities and the development of training tools to enhance their skills. Medical image analysis systems, widely known as Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CADx) systems, play an important role in this respect. Often it is important to determine whether there is a benefit in including computer-processed images in the development of such software tools. In this paper, we investigate the effects of computer-processed images in improving human performance in ultrasound breast cancer detection (a perceptual task) and classification (a cognitive task). A survey was conducted on a group of expert radiologists and a group of non-radiologists. In our experiments, random test images from a large database of ultrasound images were presented to subjects. In order to gather appropriate formal feedback, questionnaires were prepared to comment on random selections of original images only, and on image pairs consisting of original images displayed alongside computer-processed images. We critically compare and contrast the performance of the two groups according to perceptual and cognitive tasks. From a Receiver Operating Curve (ROC) analysis, we conclude that the provision of computer-processed images alongside the original ultrasound images, significantly improve the perceptual tasks of non-radiologists but only marginal improvements are shown in the perceptual and cognitive tasks of the group of expert radiologists.

  19. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  20. Dual-/tri-apodization techniques for high frequency ultrasound imaging: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jin Ho; Jeong, Jong Seob

    2014-10-11

    In the ultrasound B-mode (Brightness-mode) imaging, high side-lobe level reduces contrast to noise ratio (CNR). A linear apodization scheme by using the window function can suppress the side-lobe level while the main-lobe width is increased resulting in degraded lateral resolution. In order to reduce the side-lobe level without sacrificing the main-lobe width, a non-linear apodization method has been suggested. In this paper, we computationally evaluated the performance of the non-linear apodization method such as dual-/tri-apodization focusing on the high frequency ultrasound image. The rectangular, Dolph-Chebyshev, and Kaiser window functions were employed to implement dual-/tri-apodization algorithms. The point and cyst target simulations were conducted by using a dedicated ultrasound simulation tool called Field-II. The center frequency of the simulated linear array transducer was 40 MHz and the total number of elements was 128. The performance of dual-/tri-apodization was compared with that of the rectangular window function focusing on the side-lobe level and the main-lobe widths (at -6 dB and -35 dB). In the point target simulation, the main-lobe widths of the dual-/tri-apodization were very similar to that of the rectangular window, and the side-lobe levels of the dual-/tri-apodization were more suppressed by 9~10 dB. In the cyst target simulation, CNR values of the dual-/tri-apodization were improved by 41% and 51%, respectively. The performance of the non-linear apodization was numerically investigated. In comparison with the rectangular window function, the non-linear apodization method such as dual- and tri-apodization had low side-lobe level without sacrificing the main-lobe width. Thus, it can be a potential way to increase CNR maintaining the main-lobe width in the high frequency ultrasound imaging.

  1. Areal distortion of ultrasound images due to speed of sound variations

    CERN Document Server

    Bland, T; Ward, B; Parker, N G

    2015-01-01

    Medical ultrasound scanners are typically calibrated to the soft tissue average of 1540 m s$^{-1}$. In regions of different sound speed, for example, organs and tumours, the $B$-scan image then becomes a distortion of the true tissue cross-section, due to the misrepresentation of length and refraction. To quantify this distortion we develop a general geometric ray model for an object with an atypical speed of sound embedded in an ambient medium. We analyse the ensuing area distortion for circular and elliptical objects, mapping it out as a function of the key parameters, including the speed of sound mismatch, the object size and its elongation. We find that the area distortion can become significant, even for small-scale speed of sound mismatches. Our findings are verified by ultrasound imaging of a test object.

  2. Ultrasound imaging of oxidative stress in vivo with chemically-generated gas microbubbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perng, John Kangchun; Lee, Seungjun; Kundu, Kousik; Caskey, Charles F; Knight, Sarah F; Satir, Sarp; Ferrara, Katherine W; Taylor, W Robert; Degertekin, F Levent; Sorescu, Daniel; Murthy, Niren

    2012-09-01

    Ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs) have tremendous potential for in vivo molecular imaging because of their high sensitivity. However, the diagnostic potential of UCAs has been difficult to exploit because current UCAs are based on pre-formed microbubbles, which can only detect cell surface receptors. Here, we demonstrate that chemical reactions that generate gas forming molecules can be used to perform molecular imaging by ultrasound in vivo. This new approach was demonstrated by imaging reactive oxygen species in vivo with allylhydrazine, a liquid compound that is converted into nitrogen and propylene gas after reacting with radical oxidants. We demonstrate that allylhydrazine encapsulated within liposomes can detect a 10 micromolar concentration of radical oxidants by ultrasound, and can image oxidative stress in mice, induced by lipopolysaccharide, using a clinical ultrasound system. We anticipate numerous applications of chemically-generated microbubbles for molecular imaging by ultrasound, given ultrasound's ability to detect small increments above the gas saturation limit, its spatial resolution and widespread clinical use.

  3. Ultrafast Ultrasound Imaging of Ocular Anatomy and Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urs, Raksha; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Silverman, Ronald H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Ophthalmic ultrasound imaging is currently performed with mechanically scanned single-element probes. These probes have limited capabilities overall and lack the ability to image blood flow. Linear-array systems are able to detect blood flow, but these systems exceed ophthalmic acoustic intensity safety guidelines. Our aim was to implement and evaluate a new linear-array–based technology, compound coherent plane-wave ultrasound, which offers ultrafast imaging and depiction of blood flow at safe acoustic intensity levels. Methods We compared acoustic intensity generated by a 128-element, 18-MHz linear array operated in conventionally focused and plane-wave modes and characterized signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and lateral resolution. We developed plane-wave B-mode, real-time color-flow, and high-resolution depiction of slow flow in postprocessed data collected continuously at a rate of 20,000 frames/s. We acquired in vivo images of the posterior pole of the eye by compounding plane-wave images acquired over ±10° and produced images depicting orbital and choroidal blood flow. Results With the array operated conventionally, Doppler modes exceeded Food and Drug Administration safety guidelines, but plane-wave modalities were well within guidelines. Plane-wave data allowed generation of high-quality compound B-mode images, with SNR increasing with the number of compounded frames. Real-time color-flow Doppler readily visualized orbital blood flow. Postprocessing of continuously acquired data blocks of 1.6-second duration allowed high-resolution depiction of orbital and choroidal flow over the cardiac cycle. Conclusions Newly developed high-frequency linear arrays in combination with plane-wave techniques present opportunities for the evaluation of ocular anatomy and blood flow, as well as visualization and analysis of other transient phenomena such as vessel wall motion over the cardiac cycle and saccade-induced vitreous motion. PMID:27428169

  4. Monitoring Prostate Tumor Growth in an Orthotopic Mouse Model Using Three-Dimensional Ultrasound Imaging Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jie; Cozzi, Paul; Hung, Tzong-Tyng; Hao, Jingli; Graham, Peter; Li, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed and the second leading cause of death from cancer in males in USA. Prostate orthotopic mouse model has been widely used to study human CaP in preclinical settings. Measurement of changes in tumor size obtained from noninvasive diagnostic images is a standard method for monitoring responses to anticancer modalities. This article reports for the first time the usage of a three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound system equipped with photoacoustic (PA) imaging in monitoring longitudinal prostate tumor growth in a PC-3 orthotopic NODSCID mouse model (n = 8). Two-dimensional and 3D modes of ultrasound show great ability in accurately depicting the size and shape of prostate tumors. PA function on two-dimensional and 3D images showed average oxygen saturation and average hemoglobin concentration of the tumor. Results showed a good fit in representative exponential tumor growth curves (n = 3; r(2) = 0.948, 0.955, and 0.953, respectively) and a good correlation of tumor volume measurements performed in vivo with autopsy (n = 8, r = 0.95, P model, with advantages such as high contrast, uncomplicated protocols, economical equipment, and nonharmfulness to animals. PA mode also enabled display of blood oxygenation surrounding the tumor and tumor vasculature and angiogenesis, making 3D ultrasound imaging an ideal tool for preclinical cancer research.

  5. The role of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the diagnosis of childhood febrile urinary tract infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    İlarslan, Nisa Eda Çullas; Fitöz, Ömer Suat; Öztuna, Derya Gökmen; Küçük, Nuriye Özlem; Yalçınkaya, Fatma Fatoş

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed the ability of tissue harmonic imaging ultrasound combined with power Doppler ultrasound in the detection of childhood febrile urinary tract infections in comparison with the gold...

  6. Fabrication of Two Flow Phantoms for Doppler Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaowei; Kenwright, David A; Wang, Shiying; Hossack, John A; Hoskins, Peter R

    2017-01-01

    Flow phantoms are widely used in studies associated with Doppler ultrasound measurements, acting as an effective experimental validation system in cardiovascular-related research and in new algorithm/instrumentation development. The development of materials that match the acoustic and mechanical properties of the vascular system is of great interest while designing flow phantoms. Although recipes that meet the flow phantom standard defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission 61685 are already available in the literature, the standard procedure for material preparations and phantom fabrications has not been well established. In this paper, two types of flow phantoms, with and without blood vessel mimic, are described in detail in terms of the material preparation and phantom fabrication. The phantom materials chosen for the two phantoms are from published phantom studies, and their physical properties have been investigated previously. Both the flow phantoms have been scanned by ultrasound scanners and images from different modes are presented. These phantoms may be used in the validation and characterization of Doppler ultrasound measurements in blood vessels with a diameter above 1 mm.

  7. Minimum training requirement in ultrasound imaging of peripheral arterial disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiberg, J P; Hansen, M A; Grønvall Rasmussen, J B

    2008-01-01

    To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease.......To demonstrate the minimum training requirement when performing ultrasound of peripheral arterial disease....

  8. Beamforming Scheme for 2D Displacement Estimation in Ultrasound Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Delachartre

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available We propose a beamforming scheme for ultrasound imaging leading to the generation of two sets of images, one with oscillations only in the axial direction and one with oscillations only in the lateral direction. Applied to tissue elasticity imaging, this leads to the development of a specific displacement estimation technique that is capable of accurate estimation of two components of the displacement. The mean standard deviation for the axial displacement estimates is 0.0219 times the wavelength of the axial oscillations λz, and for the lateral estimates, it is equal to 0.0164 times the wavelength of the lateral oscillations λx. The method is presented and its feasibility is clearly established by a simulation work.

  9. Real-Time Classification of Hand Motions Using Ultrasound Imaging of Forearm Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhlaghi, Nima; Baker, Clayton A; Lahlou, Mohamed; Zafar, Hozaifah; Murthy, Karthik G; Rangwala, Huzefa S; Kosecka, Jana; Joiner, Wilsaan M; Pancrazio, Joseph J; Sikdar, Siddhartha

    2016-08-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been the predominant method for sensing electrical activity for a number of applications involving muscle-computer interfaces, including myoelectric control of prostheses and rehabilitation robots. Ultrasound imaging for sensing mechanical deformation of functional muscle compartments can overcome several limitations of sEMG, including the inability to differentiate between deep contiguous muscle compartments, low signal-to-noise ratio, and lack of a robust graded signal. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of real-time graded control using a computationally efficient method to differentiate between complex hand motions based on ultrasound imaging of forearm muscles. Dynamic ultrasound images of the forearm muscles were obtained from six able-bodied volunteers and analyzed to map muscle activity based on the deformation of the contracting muscles during different hand motions. Each participant performed 15 different hand motions, including digit flexion, different grips (i.e., power grasp and pinch grip), and grips in combination with wrist pronation. During the training phase, we generated a database of activity patterns corresponding to different hand motions for each participant. During the testing phase, novel activity patterns were classified using a nearest neighbor classification algorithm based on that database. The average classification accuracy was 91%. Real-time image-based control of a virtual hand showed an average classification accuracy of 92%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using ultrasound imaging as a robust muscle-computer interface. Potential clinical applications include control of multiarticulated prosthetic hands, stroke rehabilitation, and fundamental investigations of motor control and biomechanics.

  10. Automated Hierarchical Time Gain Compensation for In Vivo Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Martins, Bo;

    2015-01-01

    in terms of image quality. Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate whether radiologists preferred the processed sequences or the unprocessed data. The results indicate that the average visual analogue scale (VAS) is positive ( p-value: 2.34 × 10−13) and estimated to be 1.01 (95% CI: 0.85; 1...... tissue and the ultrasound signal strength. The proposed algorithm was applied to a set of 44 in vivo abdominal movie sequences each containing 15 frames. Matching pairs of in vivo sequences, unprocessed and processed with the proposed AHTGC were visualized side by side and evaluated by two radiologists...

  11. Feature statistic analysis of ultrasound images of liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shuqin; Ding, Mingyue; Zhang, Songgeng

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, a specific feature analysis of liver ultrasound images including normal liver, liver cancer especially hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and other hepatopathy is discussed. According to the classification of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), primary carcinoma is divided into four types. 15 features from single gray-level statistic, gray-level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM), and gray-level run-length matrix (GLRLM) are extracted. Experiments for the discrimination of each type of HCC, normal liver, fatty liver, angioma and hepatic abscess have been conducted. Corresponding features to potentially discriminate them are found.

  12. Imaging feedback of histotripsy treatments using ultrasound shear wave elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yin; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Fowlkes, J Brian; Cain, Charles A

    2012-06-01

    Histotripsy is a cavitation-based ultrasound therapy that mechanically fractionates soft solid tissues into fluid-like homogenates. This paper investigates the feasibility of imaging the tissue elasticity change during the histotripsy process as a tool to provide feedback for the treatments. The treatments were performed on agar tissue phantoms and ex vivo kidneys using 3-cycle ultrasound pulses delivered by a 750-kHz therapeutic array at peak negative/positive pressure of 17/108 MPa and a repetition rate of 50 Hz. Lesions with different degrees of damage were created with increasing numbers of therapy pulses from 0 to 2000 pulses per treatment location. The elasticity of the lesions was measured with ultrasound shear wave elastography, in which a quasi-planar shear wave was induced by acoustic radiation force generated by the therapeutic array, and tracked with ultrasound imaging at 3000 frames per second. Based on the shear wave velocity calculated from the sequentially captured frames, the Young's modulus was reconstructed. Results showed that the lesions were more easily identified on the shear wave velocity images than on B-mode images. As the number of therapy pulses increased from 0 to 2000 pulses/location, the Young's modulus decreased exponentially from 22.1 ± 2.7 to 2.1 ± 1.1 kPa in the tissue phantoms (R2 = 0.99, N = 9 each), and from 33.0 ± 7.1 to 4.0 ± 2.5 kPa in the ex vivo kidneys (R2 = 0.99, N = 8 each). Correspondingly, the tissues transformed from completely intact to completely fractionated as examined via histology. A good correlation existed between the lesions' Young's modulus and the degree of tissue fractionation as examined with the percentage of remaining structurally intact cell nuclei (R2 = 0.91, N = 8 each). These results indicate that lesions produced by histotripsy can be detected with high sensitivity using shear wave elastography. Because the decrease in the tissue elasticity corresponded well with the morphological and

  13. Calibration of ultrasound backscatter temperature imaging for high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Ter Haar, Gail; Morris, Hugh; Coussios, Constantin; Friend, Peter; Bamber, Jeffrey

    2013-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) is rapidly gaining acceptance as a non-invasive method for soft tissue tumor ablation, but improvements in the methods of treatment delivery, planning and monitoring are still required. Backscatter temperature imaging (BTI) uses ultrasound to visualize heating-induced echo strain and may be used to indicate the position of the HIFU focal region using low-power "sub-lesioning" exposure. The technique may also provide a quantitative tool for assessing the efficacy of treatment delivery if apparent strain measurements can be related to the underlying temperature rise. To obtain temperature estimates from strain measurements, the relationship between these variables has to be either measured or otherwise assumed from previous calibrations in similar tissues. This article describes experimental measurements aimed at deriving the relationship between temperature rise and apparent strain in the laboratory environment using both ex vivo bovine liver tissue samples and normothermically perfused porcine livers. A BTI algorithm was applied to radiofrequency ultrasound echo data acquired from a clinical ultrasound scanner (Z.One, Zonare Medical Systems, Mountain View, CA, USA) where the imaging probe was aligned with the focal region of a HIFU transducer. Temperature measurements were obtained using needle thermocouples implanted in the liver tissue. A series of "non-ablative" HIFU exposures giving peak temperatures below 10°C were made in three separate ex vivo bovine livers, yielding an average strain/temperature coefficient of 0.126 ± 0.088 percentage strain per degree Celsius. In the perfused porcine livers at a starting temperature of 38°C (normal body temperature) the strain/temperature coefficients were found to be 0.040 ± 0.029 percentage strain per degree Celsius. The uncertainty in these results is directly linked to the precision of the strain measurement, as well as the naturally occurring variance between different

  14. Stolt's f-k migration for plane wave ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Damien; Le Tarnec, Louis; Muth, Stéphan; Montagnon, Emmanuel; Porée, Jonathan; Cloutier, Guy

    2013-09-01

    Ultrafast ultrasound is an emerging modality that offers new perspectives and opportunities in medical imaging. Plane wave imaging (PWI) allows one to attain very high frame rates by transmission of planar ultrasound wave-fronts. As a plane wave reaches a given scatterer, the latter becomes a secondary source emitting upward spherical waves and creating a diffraction hyperbola in the received RF signals. To produce an image of the scatterers, all the hyperbolas must be migrated back to their apexes. To perform beamforming of plane wave echo RFs and return high-quality images at high frame rates, we propose a new migration method carried out in the frequency-wavenumber (f-k) domain. The f-k migration for PWI has been adapted from the Stolt migration for seismic imaging. This migration technique is based on the exploding reflector model (ERM), which consists in assuming that all the scatterers explode in concert and become acoustic sources. The classical ERM model, however, is not appropriate for PWI. We showed that the ERM can be made suitable for PWI by a spatial transformation of the hyperbolic traces present in the RF data. In vitro experiments were performed to outline the advantages of PWI with Stolt's f-k migration over the conventional delay-and-sum (DAS) approach. The Stolt's f-k migration was also compared with the Fourier-based method developed by J.-Y. Lu. Our findings show that multi-angle compounded f-k migrated images are of quality similar to those obtained with a stateof- the-art dynamic focusing mode. This remained true even with a very small number of steering angles, thus ensuring a highly competitive frame rate. In addition, the new FFT-based f-k migration provides comparable or better contrast-to-noise ratio and lateral resolution than the Lu's and DAS migration schemes. Matlab codes for the Stolt's f-k migration for PWI are provided.

  15. Reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images based on Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toonkum, Pollakrit; Suwanwela, Nijasri C; Chinrungrueng, Chedsada

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound reconstruction algorithm for generation of 3D images from a series of two-dimensional (2D) B-scans acquired in the mechanical linear scanning framework. Unlike most existing 3D ultrasound reconstruction algorithms, which have been developed and evaluated in the freehand scanning framework, the new algorithm has been designed to capitalize the regularity pattern of the mechanical linear scanning, where all the B-scan slices are precisely parallel and evenly spaced. The new reconstruction algorithm, referred to as the Cyclic Regularized Savitzky-Golay (CRSG) filter, is a new variant of the Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing filter. The CRSG filter has been improved upon the original SG filter in two respects: First, the cyclic indicator function has been incorporated into the least square cost function to enable the CRSG filter to approximate nonuniformly spaced data of the unobserved image intensities contained in unfilled voxels and reduce speckle noise of the observed image intensities contained in filled voxels. Second, the regularization function has been augmented to the least squares cost function as a mechanism to balance between the degree of speckle reduction and the degree of detail preservation. The CRSG filter has been evaluated and compared with the Voxel Nearest-Neighbor (VNN) interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Speckle Reduction (ASR) filter, the VNN interpolation post-processed by the Adaptive Weighted Median (AWM) filter, the Distance-Weighted (DW) interpolation, and the Adaptive Distance-Weighted (ADW) interpolation, on reconstructing a synthetic 3D spherical image and a clinical 3D carotid artery bifurcation in the mechanical linear scanning framework. This preliminary evaluation indicates that the CRSG filter is more effective in both speckle reduction and geometric reconstruction of 3D ultrasound images than the other methods. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. First-harmonic sensitivity functions for a linearised diffusion model of ultrasound-modulated optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Samuel; Arridge, Simon R.; Leung, Terence S.

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-modulated optical tomography is an emerging biomedical imaging modality which uses the spatially localised acoustically-driven modulation of coherent light as a probe of the structure and optical properties of biological tissues. In this work we model the first-harmonic flux generated by the coupled physics using a simple linearised diffusion-style forward model. We derive analytical expressions for the sensitivity of this measurement type with respect to the optical absorption and scattering coefficients. These correlation measurement density functions can be employed as part of an image-reconstruction procedure capable of reconstructing quantitative images of the optical properties of a medium under investigation.

  17. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  18. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  19. Speckle reduction for medical ultrasound images with an expectation-maximization framework

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Tao; WANG Yuanyuan; GUO Yi

    2011-01-01

    In view of inherent speckle noise in medical images, a speckle reduction method was proposed based on an expectation-maximization (EM) framework. First, the real component of the in-phase/quadrature (I/Q) ultrasound image is extracted. Then, it is used to blindly estimate the point spread function (PSF) of the imaging system. Finally, based on the EM framework, an iterative algorithm alternating between the Wiener Filter and the anisotropic diffusion (AD) is exploited to produce despeckled images. The comparison experiment is carried out on both simulated and in vivo ultrasound images. It is shown that, with respect to the I/Q image, the proposed method averagely improves the speckle-signal-to-noise ratio (S-SNR) and the edge preservation index (β) of images by the factor of 1.94 and 7.52. Meanwhile, it averagely reduces the normalized mean-squared error (NMSE) by the factor of 3.95. The simulation and in vivo results indicates that the proposed method has a better overall performance than exited ones.

  20. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging for inflammatory arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guan; Chamberland, David; Girish, Gandikota; Wang, Xueding

    2014-03-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, affecting 46 million of the population in the U.S. Rendering new optical contrast in articular tissues at high spatial and temporal resolution, emerging photoacoustic imaging (PAI) combined with more established ultrasound (US) imaging technologies provides unique opportunities for diagnosis and treatment monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. In addition to capturing peripheral bone and soft tissue images, PAI has the capability to quantify hemodynamic properties including regional blood oxygenation and blood volume, both abnormal in synovial tissues affected by arthritis. Therefore, PAI, especially when performed together with US, should be of considerable help for further understanding the pathophysiology of arthritis as well as assisting in therapeutic decisions, including assessing the efficacy of new pharmacological therapies. In this paper, we will review our recent work on the development of PAI for application to the diagnostic imaging and therapeutic monitoring of inflammatory arthritis. We will present the imaging results from a home-built imaging system and another one based on a commercial US. The performance of PAI in evaluating pharmacological therapy on animal model of arthritis will be shown. Moreover, our resent work on PAI and US dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints in vivo will also be presented.