WorldWideScience

Sample records for functional protein dynamics

  1. Proteins with Novel Structure, Function and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Recently, a small enzyme that ligates two RNA fragments with the rate of 10(exp 6) above background was evolved in vitro (Seelig and Szostak, Nature 448:828-831, 2007). This enzyme does not resemble any contemporary protein (Chao et al., Nature Chem. Biol. 9:81-83, 2013). It consists of a dynamic, catalytic loop, a small, rigid core containing two zinc ions coordinated by neighboring amino acids, and two highly flexible tails that might be unimportant for protein function. In contrast to other proteins, this enzyme does not contain ordered secondary structure elements, such as alpha-helix or beta-sheet. The loop is kept together by just two interactions of a charged residue and a histidine with a zinc ion, which they coordinate on the opposite side of the loop. Such structure appears to be very fragile. Surprisingly, computer simulations indicate otherwise. As the coordinating, charged residue is mutated to alanine, another, nearby charged residue takes its place, thus keeping the structure nearly intact. If this residue is also substituted by alanine a salt bridge involving two other, charged residues on the opposite sides of the loop keeps the loop in place. These adjustments are facilitated by high flexibility of the protein. Computational predictions have been confirmed experimentally, as both mutants retain full activity and overall structure. These results challenge our notions about what is required for protein activity and about the relationship between protein dynamics, stability and robustness. We hypothesize that small, highly dynamic proteins could be both active and fault tolerant in ways that many other proteins are not, i.e. they can adjust to retain their structure and activity even if subjected to mutations in structurally critical regions. This opens the doors for designing proteins with novel functions, structures and dynamics that have not been yet considered.

  2. Functional Dynamics and Proton Transfer in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxer, Steven

    2014-03-01

    Internal proton transfer between an enzyme and substrate is a common feature of many enzyme mechanisms. Likewise, internal proton transfer between the chromophore of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and amino acids on the inside of the beta barrel are important both in the ground and excited state. I will discuss an interesting connection between the proton transfer dynamics in GFP and those in an enzyme, ketosteroid isomerase (KSI), bound to substrate analogs. In both cases there is a tug of war between the protein and bound substrate analog or chromophore that depends on their affinities for a proton and which can be tuned either by changing the substrate/chromophore or the protein. This can be observed in the ground state by optical methods (absorption and IR) as well as by nmr, or in the excited state by time-resolved fluorescence or visible pump-IR probe measurements. In both cases the proton dynamics have important functional consequences.

  3. Dynamical properties and functions of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Miyazawa, Tatsuo

    1982-01-01

    The advantages of nuclear magnetic resonance analyses for studying conformations and dynamical properties of protein molecules in aqueous solution are reviewed. For erabutoxin b, a short neurotoxin, and for α-cobratoxin, a long neurotoxin, th e local environments and proximity relations of amino acid residues have been elucidated. The conformations of these molecules in neutral aqueous solution are different, in part, from those in crystal. From the analyses of the deuterium exchange rates of amide protons, the long neurotoxins are found to be less flexible than short neurotoxins, corresponding to the lower dissociation/association rates of long toxins for acetylcholin receptor proteins. (author)

  4. Fast dynamics perturbation analysis for prediction of protein functional sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohn Judith D

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present a fast version of the dynamics perturbation analysis (DPA algorithm to predict functional sites in protein structures. The original DPA algorithm finds regions in proteins where interactions cause a large change in the protein conformational distribution, as measured using the relative entropy Dx. Such regions are associated with functional sites. Results The Fast DPA algorithm, which accelerates DPA calculations, is motivated by an empirical observation that Dx in a normal-modes model is highly correlated with an entropic term that only depends on the eigenvalues of the normal modes. The eigenvalues are accurately estimated using first-order perturbation theory, resulting in a N-fold reduction in the overall computational requirements of the algorithm, where N is the number of residues in the protein. The performance of the original and Fast DPA algorithms was compared using protein structures from a standard small-molecule docking test set. For nominal implementations of each algorithm, top-ranked Fast DPA predictions overlapped the true binding site 94% of the time, compared to 87% of the time for original DPA. In addition, per-protein recall statistics (fraction of binding-site residues that are among predicted residues were slightly better for Fast DPA. On the other hand, per-protein precision statistics (fraction of predicted residues that are among binding-site residues were slightly better using original DPA. Overall, the performance of Fast DPA in predicting ligand-binding-site residues was comparable to that of the original DPA algorithm. Conclusion Compared to the original DPA algorithm, the decreased run time with comparable performance makes Fast DPA well-suited for implementation on a web server and for high-throughput analysis.

  5. Dynamic circadian protein-protein interaction networks predict temporal organization of cellular functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Wallach

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Essentially all biological processes depend on protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Timing of such interactions is crucial for regulatory function. Although circadian (~24-hour clocks constitute fundamental cellular timing mechanisms regulating important physiological processes, PPI dynamics on this timescale are largely unknown. Here, we identified 109 novel PPIs among circadian clock proteins via a yeast-two-hybrid approach. Among them, the interaction of protein phosphatase 1 and CLOCK/BMAL1 was found to result in BMAL1 destabilization. We constructed a dynamic circadian PPI network predicting the PPI timing using circadian expression data. Systematic circadian phenotyping (RNAi and overexpression suggests a crucial role for components involved in dynamic interactions. Systems analysis of a global dynamic network in liver revealed that interacting proteins are expressed at similar times likely to restrict regulatory interactions to specific phases. Moreover, we predict that circadian PPIs dynamically connect many important cellular processes (signal transduction, cell cycle, etc. contributing to temporal organization of cellular physiology in an unprecedented manner.

  6. Pipeline for inferring protein function from dynamics using coarse-grained molecular mechanics forcefield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadra, Pratiti; Pal, Debnath

    2017-04-01

    Dynamics is integral to the function of proteins, yet the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation as a technique remains under-explored for molecular function inference. This is more important in the context of genomics projects where novel proteins are determined with limited evolutionary information. Recently we developed a method to match the query protein's flexible segments to infer function using a novel approach combining analysis of residue fluctuation-graphs and auto-correlation vectors derived from coarse-grained (CG) MD trajectory. The method was validated on a diverse dataset with sequence identity between proteins as low as 3%, with high function-recall rates. Here we share its implementation as a publicly accessible web service, named DynFunc (Dynamics Match for Function) to query protein function from ≥1 µs long CG dynamics trajectory information of protein subunits. Users are provided with the custom-developed coarse-grained molecular mechanics (CGMM) forcefield to generate the MD trajectories for their protein of interest. On upload of trajectory information, the DynFunc web server identifies specific flexible regions of the protein linked to putative molecular function. Our unique application does not use evolutionary information to infer molecular function from MD information and can, therefore, work for all proteins, including moonlighting and the novel ones, whenever structural information is available. Our pipeline is expected to be of utility to all structural biologists working with novel proteins and interested in moonlighting functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Dynamic changes in protein functional linkage networks revealed by integration with gene expression data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhada R Hegde

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Response of cells to changing environmental conditions is governed by the dynamics of intricate biomolecular interactions. It may be reasonable to assume, proteins being the dominant macromolecules that carry out routine cellular functions, that understanding the dynamics of protein:protein interactions might yield useful insights into the cellular responses. The large-scale protein interaction data sets are, however, unable to capture the changes in the profile of protein:protein interactions. In order to understand how these interactions change dynamically, we have constructed conditional protein linkages for Escherichia coli by integrating functional linkages and gene expression information. As a case study, we have chosen to analyze UV exposure in wild-type and SOS deficient E. coli at 20 minutes post irradiation. The conditional networks exhibit similar topological properties. Although the global topological properties of the networks are similar, many subtle local changes are observed, which are suggestive of the cellular response to the perturbations. Some such changes correspond to differences in the path lengths among the nodes of carbohydrate metabolism correlating with its loss in efficiency in the UV treated cells. Similarly, expression of hubs under unique conditions reflects the importance of these genes. Various centrality measures applied to the networks indicate increased importance for replication, repair, and other stress proteins for the cells under UV treatment, as anticipated. We thus propose a novel approach for studying an organism at the systems level by integrating genome-wide functional linkages and the gene expression data.

  8. The dynamic mechanism of presenilin-function: Sensitive gate dynamics and loop unplugging control protein access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somavarapu, Arun Kumar; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2016-01-01

    . Dynamically, these features seem linked. The long-range sensitivity of this gate-plug system to subtle conformational changes can explain why so many PSEN1 mutants cause disease. Reduced access and imprecise substrate cleavage associated with impaired gate-plug dynamics is directly illustrated by the effect......-plug mechanism is relevant for designing PSEN1 modulating therapies for treatment of Alzheimer's disease within both the amyloid/γ-secretase hypothesis and within the PSEN1 loss of function paradigm....

  9. Develop Infrared Structural Biology for Probing Structural Dynamics of Protein Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Aihua; Kang, Zhouyang; Causey, Oliver; Liu, Charle

    2015-03-01

    Protein functions are carried out through a series of structural transitions. Lack of knowledge on functionally important structural motions of proteins impedes our understanding of protein functions. Infrared structural biology is an emerging technology with powerful applications for protein structural dynamics. One key element of infrared structural biology is the development of vibrational structural marker (VSM) database library that translates infrared spectroscopic signals into specific structural information. We report the development of VSM for probing the type, geometry and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of buried COO- side chains of Asp and Glu in proteins. Quantum theory based first principle computational studies combined with bioinformatic hydrogen bond analysis are employed in this study. We will discuss the applications of VSM in mechanistic studies of protein functions. Infrared structural biology is expected to emerge as a powerful technique for elucidating the functional mechanism of a broad range of proteins, including water soluble and membrane proteins. This work is supported by OCAST HR10-078 and NSF DBI1338097.

  10. Shedding light on protein folding, structural and functional dynamics by single molecule studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavishi, Krutika; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2014-01-01

    The advent of advanced single molecule measurements unveiled a great wealth of dynamic information revolutionizing our understanding of protein dynamics and behavior in ways unattainable by conventional bulk assays. Equipped with the ability to record distribution of behaviors rather than the mean...... property of a population, single molecule measurements offer observation and quantification of the abundance, lifetime and function of multiple protein states. They also permit the direct observation of the transient and rarely populated intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out...

  11. Shedding Light on Protein Folding, Structural and Functional Dynamics by Single Molecule Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krutika Bavishi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The advent of advanced single molecule measurements unveiled a great wealth of dynamic information revolutionizing our understanding of protein dynamics and behavior in ways unattainable by conventional bulk assays. Equipped with the ability to record distribution of behaviors rather than the mean property of a population, single molecule measurements offer observation and quantification of the abundance, lifetime and function of multiple protein states. They also permit the direct observation of the transient and rarely populated intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out in non-synchronized ensemble measurements. Single molecule studies have thus provided novel insights about how the dynamic sampling of the free energy landscape dictates all aspects of protein behavior; from its folding to function. Here we will survey some of the state of the art contributions in deciphering mechanisms that underlie protein folding, structural and functional dynamics by single molecule fluorescence microscopy techniques. We will discuss a few selected examples highlighting the power of the emerging techniques and finally discuss the future improvements and directions.

  12. Conformational dynamics of human protein kinase CK2α and its effect on function and inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Ashutosh; Hirota, Tsuyoshi; Irle, Stephan; Tama, Florence

    2018-03-01

    Protein kinase, casein kinase II (CK2), is ubiquitously expressed and highly conserved protein kinase that shows constitutive activity. It phosphorylates a diverse set of proteins and plays crucial role in several cellular processes. The catalytic subunit of this enzyme (CK2α) shows remarkable flexibility as evidenced in numerous crystal structures determined till now. Here, using analysis of multiple crystal structures and long timescale molecular dynamics simulations, we explore the conformational flexibility of CK2α. The enzyme shows considerably higher flexibility in the solution as compared to that observed in crystal structure ensemble. Multiple conformations of hinge region, located near the active site, were observed during the dynamics. We further observed that among these multiple conformations, the most populated conformational state was inadequately represented in the crystal structure ensemble. The catalytic spine, was found to be less dismantled in this state as compared to the "open" hinge/αD state crystal structures. The comparison of dynamics in unbound (Apo) state and inhibitor (CX4945) bound state exhibits inhibitor induced suppression in the overall dynamics of the enzyme. This is especially true for functionally important glycine-rich loop above the active site. Together, this work gives novel insights into the dynamics of CK2α in solution and relates it to the function. This work also explains the effect of inhibitor on the dynamics of CK2α and paves way for development of better inhibitors. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Combining protein sequence, structure, and dynamics: A novel approach for functional evolution analysis of PAS domain superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zheng; Zhou, Hongyu; Tao, Peng

    2018-02-01

    PAS domains are widespread in archaea, bacteria, and eukaryota, and play important roles in various functions. In this study, we aim to explore functional evolutionary relationship among proteins in the PAS domain superfamily in view of the sequence-structure-dynamics-function relationship. We collected protein sequences and crystal structure data from RCSB Protein Data Bank of the PAS domain superfamily belonging to three biological functions (nucleotide binding, photoreceptor activity, and transferase activity). Protein sequences were aligned and then used to select sequence-conserved residues and build phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional structure alignment was also applied to obtain structure-conserved residues. The protein dynamics were analyzed using elastic network model (ENM) and validated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The result showed that the proteins with same function could be grouped by sequence similarity, and proteins in different functional groups displayed statistically significant difference in their vibrational patterns. Interestingly, in all three functional groups, conserved amino acid residues identified by sequence and structure conservation analysis generally have a lower fluctuation than other residues. In addition, the fluctuation of conserved residues in each biological function group was strongly correlated with the corresponding biological function. This research suggested a direct connection in which the protein sequences were related to various functions through structural dynamics. This is a new attempt to delineate functional evolution of proteins using the integrated information of sequence, structure, and dynamics. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  14. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  15. Quantification of functional dynamics of membrane proteins reconstituted in nanodiscs membranes by single turnover functional readout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moses, Matias Emil; Hedegård, Per; Hatzakis, Nikos

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool to study the individual behavior of biomolecules, revolutionizing our understanding of biological processes. Their ability to measure the distribution of behaviors, instead of the average behavior, allows the direct observation and quan......Single-molecule measurements are emerging as a powerful tool to study the individual behavior of biomolecules, revolutionizing our understanding of biological processes. Their ability to measure the distribution of behaviors, instead of the average behavior, allows the direct observation...... and quantification of the activity, abundance, and lifetime of multiple states and transient intermediates in the energy landscape that are typically averaged out in nonsynchronized ensemble measurements. Studying the function of membrane proteins at the single-molecule level remains a formidable challenge......, and to date there is limited number of available functional assays. In this chapter, we describe in detail our recently developed methodology to reconstitute membrane proteins such as the integral membrane protein cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase on membrane systems such as Nanodiscs and study their functional...

  16. Changes in protein structure and dynamics as a function of hydration from 1H second moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakova, Galina; Goddard, Yanina A.; Korb, Jean-Pierre; Bryant, Robert G.

    2007-12-01

    We report the proton second moment obtained directly from the Free Induction Decay (FID) of the NMR signal of variously hydrated bovine serum albumin (BSA) and hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and from the width of the NMR Z-spectrum of the cross-linked protein gels of different concentrations. The second moment of the proteins decreases in a continuous stepwise way as a function of increasing water content, which suggests that the structural and dynamical changes occur in small incremental steps. Although the second moment is dominated by the short range distances of nearest neighbors, the changes in the second moment show that the protein structure becomes more open with increasing hydration level. A difference between the apparent liquid content of the sample as found from decomposition of the FID and the analytically determined water content demonstrates that water absorbed in the early stages of hydration is motionally immobilized and magnetically indistinguishable from rigid protein protons while at high hydration levels some protein side-chain protons move rapidly contributing to liquid-like component of the NMR signal.

  17. Development of massive multilevel molecular dynamics simulation program, Platypus (PLATform for dYnamic Protein Unified Simulation), for the elucidation of protein functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Yu; Nakata, Kazuto; Yonezawa, Yasushige; Nakamura, Haruki

    2016-05-05

    A massively parallel program for quantum mechanical-molecular mechanical (QM/MM) molecular dynamics simulation, called Platypus (PLATform for dYnamic Protein Unified Simulation), was developed to elucidate protein functions. The speedup and the parallelization ratio of Platypus in the QM and QM/MM calculations were assessed for a bacteriochlorophyll dimer in the photosynthetic reaction center (DIMER) on the K computer, a massively parallel computer achieving 10 PetaFLOPs with 705,024 cores. Platypus exhibited the increase in speedup up to 20,000 core processors at the HF/cc-pVDZ and B3LYP/cc-pVDZ, and up to 10,000 core processors by the CASCI(16,16)/6-31G** calculations. We also performed excited QM/MM-MD simulations on the chromophore of Sirius (SIRIUS) in water. Sirius is a pH-insensitive and photo-stable ultramarine fluorescent protein. Platypus accelerated on-the-fly excited-state QM/MM-MD simulations for SIRIUS in water, using over 4000 core processors. In addition, it also succeeded in 50-ps (200,000-step) on-the-fly excited-state QM/MM-MD simulations for the SIRIUS in water. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Incorporating modeling and simulations in undergraduate biophysical chemistry course to promote understanding of structure-dynamics-function relationships in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and simulations. In particular, modern computational tools are employed to elucidate the relationship between structure, dynamics, and function in proteins. Computer-based laboratory protocols that we introduced in three modules allow students to visualize the secondary, super-secondary, and tertiary structures of proteins, analyze non-covalent interactions in protein-ligand complexes, develop three-dimensional structural models (homology model) for new protein sequences and evaluate their structural qualities, and study proteins' intrinsic dynamics to understand their functions. In the fourth module, students are assigned to an authentic research problem, where they apply their laboratory skills (acquired in modules 1-3) to answer conceptual biophysical questions. Through this process, students gain in-depth understanding of protein dynamics-the missing link between structure and function. Additionally, the requirement of term papers sharpens students' writing and communication skills. Finally, these projects result in new findings that are communicated in peer-reviewed journals. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Biophysical approaches to G protein-coupled receptors: Structure, function and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, André; Turcatti, Gerardo

    1999-05-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) represent a large family of drug targets for which there is no high-resolution structural information. In order to understand the mechanisms of ligand recognition and receptor activation, there is a strong need for novel biophysical methods. In this Perspective we provide an overview of recent experimental approaches used to explore the molecular architecture and dynamics of GPCR and their interactions with ligands and G proteins using biophysical, non-crystallographic, methods.

  20. Functions and Dynamics of DNA Repair Proteins in Mitosis and Meiosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Uringa

    2005-01-01

    textabstractMy PhD project encompassed studies on the functions of several different proteins, all involved in DNA repair, in somatic and germ-line cells. Hr6b and Rad18Sc are involved in a DNA repair mechanism called ‘Replicative Damage Bypass’ (RDB), and function as ubiquitin conjugating

  1. Functional aspects of protein flexibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2009-01-01

    . The thermodynamics involved are reviewed, and examples of structure-function studies involving experimentally determined flexibility descriptions are presented. While much remains to be understood about protein flexibility, it is clear that it is encoded within their amino acid sequence and should be viewed......Proteins are dynamic entities, and they possess an inherent flexibility that allows them to function through molecular interactions within the cell, among cells and even between organisms. Appreciation of the non-static nature of proteins is emerging, but to describe and incorporate...... this into an intuitive perception of protein function is challenging. Flexibility is of overwhelming importance for protein function, and the changes in protein structure during interactions with binding partners can be dramatic. The present review addresses protein flexibility, focusing on protein-ligand interactions...

  2. LINE-1 protein localization and functional dynamics during the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Paolo; Wudzinska, Aleksandra; Sun, Xiaoji; Andrade, Joshua; Nayak, Shruti; Kahler, David J; Badri, Sana; LaCava, John; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Yun, Chi Y; Fenyö, David; Boeke, Jef D

    2018-01-08

    LINE-1/L1 retrotransposon sequences comprise 17% of the human genome. Among the many classes of mobile genetic elements, L1 is the only autonomous retrotransposon that still drives human genomic plasticity today. Through its co-evolution with the human genome, L1 has intertwined itself with host cell biology. However, a clear understanding of L1's lifecycle and the processes involved in restricting its insertion and intragenomic spread remains elusive. Here we identify modes of L1 proteins' entrance into the nucleus, a necessary step for L1 proliferation. Using functional, biochemical, and imaging approaches, we also show a clear cell cycle bias for L1 retrotransposition that peaks during the S phase. Our observations provide a basis for novel interpretations about the nature of nuclear and cytoplasmic L1 ribonucleoproteins (RNPs) and the potential role of DNA replication in L1 retrotransposition. © 2018, Mita et al.

  3. Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy for monitoring protein dynamics exemplified by functional studies of Ras protein bound to a lipid bilayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kötting, Carsten; Güldenhaupt, Jörn; Gerwert, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The first time resolved FTIR investigation of a GTPase reaction of a protein anchored at a single lipid bilayer. Display Omitted Highlights: ► FTIR difference spectroscopy monitors protein dynamics with atomic detail. ► ATR–FTIR allows the measurement of a monolayer sample. ► Membrane proteins can be investigated near physiological conditions. ► The hydrolysis reaction of Ras was investigated in this condition for the first time. - Abstract: Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy is a valuable tool for monitoring the dynamics of protein reactions and interactions. Absorbance changes can be monitored with time resolutions down to nanoseconds and followed for time periods that range over nine orders of magnitude. Membrane proteins bound to solid supported lipid bilayers can be investigated in near physiological conditions with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. Here, we review the basics of time-resolved FTIR with a focus on Ras, a GTPase that is mutated in 25% of human tumors. We show the first time-resolved measurements of membrane anchored Ras and observed the switching between its activated and its inactivated state. We compared those measurements with measurements of the truncated Ras in solution. We found that both the kinetics and the functional groups involved were very similar. This suggested that the membrane did not have a major influence on the hydrolysis reaction.

  4. Analysing the Effect of Mutation on Protein Function and Discovering Potential Inhibitors of CDK4: Molecular Modelling and Dynamics Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagasundaram N

    Full Text Available The cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4-cyclin D1 complex plays a crucial role in the transition from the G1 phase to S phase of the cell cycle. Among the CDKs, CDK4 is one of the genes most frequently affected by somatic genetic variations that are associated with various forms of cancer. Thus, because the abnormal function of the CDK4-cyclin D1 protein complex might play a vital role in causing cancer, CDK4 can be considered a genetically validated therapeutic target. In this study, we used a systematic, integrated computational approach to identify deleterious nsSNPs and predict their effects on protein-protein (CDK4-cyclin D1 and protein-ligand (CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. This analysis resulted in the identification of possible inhibitors of mutant CDK4 proteins that bind the conformations induced by deleterious nsSNPs. Using computational prediction methods, we identified five nsSNPs as highly deleterious: R24C, Y180H, A205T, R210P, and R246C. From molecular docking and molecular dynamic studies, we observed that these deleterious nsSNPs affected CDK4-cyclin D1 and CDK4-flavopiridol interactions. Furthermore, in a virtual screening approach, the drug 5_7_DIHYDROXY_ 2_ (3_4_5_TRI HYDROXYPHENYL _4H_CHROMEN_ 4_ONE displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations R24C or R246C, the drug diosmin displayed good binding affinity for the protein with the mutation Y180H, and the drug rutin displayed good binding affinity for proteins with the mutations A205T and R210P. Overall, this computational investigation of the CDK4 gene highlights the link between genetic variation and biological phenomena in human cancer and aids in the discovery of molecularly targeted therapies for personalized treatment.

  5. DMPD: G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macrophages. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17456803 G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signaling in macropha...2007 Apr 24. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and signali...ng in macrophages. PubmedID 17456803 Title G-protein-coupled receptor expression, function, and sign

  6. DMPD: Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17667936 Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins... (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins. ...PubmedID 17667936 Title Structure, function and regulation of the Toll/IL-1 receptor adaptor proteins

  7. Topological, functional, and dynamic properties of the protein interaction networks rewired by benzo(a)pyrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ba, Qian [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Li, Junyang; Huang, Chao [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Jingquan; Chu, Ruiai [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Wu, Yongning, E-mail: wuyongning@cfsa.net.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: huiwang@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Food Safety Research, Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Key Laboratory of Food Safety Risk Assessment, Ministry of Health, Beijing (China); School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, Shanghai (China)

    2015-03-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene is a common environmental and foodborne pollutant that has been identified as a human carcinogen. Although the carcinogenicity of benzo(a)pyrene has been extensively reported, its precise molecular mechanisms and the influence on system-level protein networks are not well understood. To investigate the system-level influence of benzo(a)pyrene on protein interactions and regulatory networks, a benzo(a)pyrene-rewired protein interaction network was constructed based on 769 key proteins derived from more than 500 literature reports. The protein interaction network rewired by benzo(a)pyrene was a scale-free, highly-connected biological system. Ten modules were identified, and 25 signaling pathways were enriched, most of which belong to the human diseases category, especially cancer and infectious disease. In addition, two lung-specific and two liver-specific pathways were identified. Three pathways were specific in short and medium-term networks (< 48 h), and five pathways were enriched only in the medium-term network (6 h–48 h). Finally, the expression of linker genes in the network was validated by Western blotting. These findings establish the overall, tissue- and time-specific benzo(a)pyrene-rewired protein interaction networks and provide insights into the biological effects and molecular mechanisms of action of benzo(a)pyrene. - Highlights: • Benzo(a)pyrene induced scale-free, highly-connected protein interaction networks. • 25 signaling pathways were enriched through modular analysis. • Tissue- and time-specific pathways were identified.

  8. Structure/Function Analysis of Protein-Protein Interactions and Role of Dynamic Motions in Mercuric Ion Reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Susan M.

    2005-05-18

    This report summarizes the activities and findings of our structure/function studies of the bacterial detoxification enzyme mercuric ion reductase. The objectives of the work were to obtain crystal structure information for the catalytic core of this enzyme, use the information to investigate the importance of specific parts of the enzyme to its function, and investigate the role of one domain of the enzyme in its function within cells. We describe the accomplishments towards these goals including many structures of the wild type and mutant forms of the enzyme that highlight its interactions with its Hg(II) substrate, elucidation of the role of the N-terminal domain in vitro and in vivo, and elucidation of the roles of at two conserved residues in the core in the mechanism of catalysis.

  9. Membrane protein nanoclustering as a functional unit of immune cells : from nanoscopy to single molecule dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Torreño Piña, Juan Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Premi Extraordinari de Doctorat, promoció 2014-2015. Àmbit de Ciències State-of-the-art biophysical techniques featuring high temporal and spatial resolution have allowed for the first time the direct visualization of individual transmembrane proteins on the cell membrane. These techniques have revealed that a large amount of molecular components of the cell membrane do not organize in a random manner but they rather grouped together forming so-called clusters at the nanoscale. Moreover, t...

  10. Direct observation of hierarchical protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowski, Józef R.; Halse, Meghan E.; Blackledge, Martin; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-05-01

    One of the fundamental challenges of physical biology is to understand the relationship between protein dynamics and function. At physiological temperatures, functional motions arise from the complex interplay of thermal motions of proteins and their environments. Here, we determine the hierarchy in the protein conformational energy landscape that underlies these motions, based on a series of temperature-dependent magic-angle spinning multinuclear nuclear-magnetic-resonance relaxation measurements in a hydrated nanocrystalline protein. The results support strong coupling between protein and solvent dynamics above 160 kelvin, with fast solvent motions, slow protein side-chain motions, and fast protein backbone motions being activated consecutively. Low activation energy, small-amplitude local motions dominate at low temperatures, with larger-amplitude, anisotropic, and functionally relevant motions involving entire peptide units becoming dominant at temperatures above 220 kelvin.

  11. Comparative proteomics reveal diverse functions and dynamic changes of Bombyx mori silk proteins spun from different development stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoming; Zhao, Ping; Wang, Chen; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Jianping; Wang, Xin; Lin, Ying; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-11-01

    Silkworms (Bombyx mori) produce massive amounts of silk proteins to make cocoons during the final stages of larval development. Although the major components, fibroin and sericin, have been the focus for a long time, few researchers have realized the complexity of the silk proteome. We collected seven kinds of silk fibers spun by silkworm larvae at different developmental stages: the silks spun by new hatched larvae, second instar day 0 larvae, third instar day 0 larvae, fourth instar day 0 larvae, and fourth instar molting larvae, the scaffold silk used to attach the cocoon to the substrate and the cocoon silk. Analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identified 500 proteins from the seven silks. In addition to the expected fibroins, sericins, and some known protease inhibitors, we also identified further protease inhibitors, enzymes, proteins of unknown function, and other proteins. Unsurprisingly, our quantitative results showed fibroins and sericins were the most abundant proteins in all seven silks. Except for fibroins and sericins, protease inhibitors, enzymes, and proteins of unknown function were more abundant than other proteins. We found significant change in silk protein compositions through development, being consistent with their different biological functions and complicated formation.

  12. Inactivation of Tor proteins affects the dynamics of endocytic proteins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tor2 is an activator of the Rom2/Rho1 pathway that regulates -factor internalization. Since the recruitment of endocytic proteins such as actin-binding proteins and the amphiphysins precedes the internalization of -factor, we hypothesized that loss of Tor function leads to an alteration in the dynamics of the endocytic ...

  13. Molecular dynamics and docking simulation of a natural variant of Activated Protein C with impaired protease activity: implications for integrin-mediated antiseptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ursi, Pasqualina; Orro, Alessandro; Morra, Giulia; Moscatelli, Marco; Trombetti, Gabriele; Milanesi, Luciano; Rovida, Ermanna

    2015-01-01

    Activated Protein C (APC) is a multifunctional serine protease, primarily known for its anticoagulant function in the coagulation system. Several studies have already elucidated its role in counteracting apoptosis and inflammation in cells, while significant effort is still ongoing for defining its involvement in sepsis. Earlier literature has shown that the antiseptic function of APC is mediated by its binding to leukocyte integrins, which is due to the presence of the integrin binding motif Arg-Gly-Asp at the N-terminus of the APC catalytic chain. Many natural mutants have been identified in patients with Protein C deficiency diagnosis including a variant of specificity pocket (Gly216Asp). In this work, we present a molecular model of the complex of APC with αVβ3 integrin obtained by protein-protein docking approach. A computational analysis of this variant is hereby presented, based on molecular dynamics and docking simulations, aiming at investigating the effects of the Gly216Asp mutation on the protein conformation and inferring its functional implications. Our study shows that such mutation is likely to impair the protease activity while preserving the overall protein fold. Moreover, superposition of the integrin binding motifs in wild-type and mutant forms suggests that the interaction with integrin can still occur and thus the mutant is likely to retain its antiseptic function related to the neutrophyl integrin binding. Therapeutic applications could result in this APC mutant which retains antiseptic function without anticoagulant side effects.

  14. DMPD: Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) 2, a protein with multiple functions. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ns. Rico-Bautista E, Flores-Morales A, Fernandez-Perez L. Cytokine Growth Factor Rev. 2006 Dec;17(6):431-9. ...SOCS) 2, a protein with multiple functions. Authors Rico-Bautista E, Flores-Morales A, Fernandez-Perez L. Pu

  15. Analyzing Protein Dynamics Using Dimensionality Reduction

    OpenAIRE

    Eryol, Atahan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis investigates dimensionality reduction for analyzing the dynamics ofprotein simulations, particularly disordered proteins which do not fold into a xedshape but are thought to perform their functions through their movements. Ratherthan analyze the movement of the proteins in 3D space, we use dimensionalityreduction to project the molecular structure of the proteins into a target space inwhich each structure is represented as a point. All that is needed to do this arethe pairwise dis...

  16. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-based network analysis reveal structural and functional aspects of G-protein coupled receptor dimer interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltoumas, Fotis A.; Theodoropoulou, Margarita C.; Hamodrakas, Stavros J.

    2016-06-01

    A significant amount of experimental evidence suggests that G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) do not act exclusively as monomers but also form biologically relevant dimers and oligomers. However, the structural determinants, stoichiometry and functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. In this study we attempted to evaluate the nature and dynamics of GPCR oligomeric interactions. A representative set of GPCR homodimers were studied through Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics simulations, combined with interface analysis and concepts from network theory for the construction and analysis of dynamic structural networks. Our results highlight important structural determinants that seem to govern receptor dimer interactions. A conserved dynamic behavior was observed among different GPCRs, including receptors belonging in different GPCR classes. Specific GPCR regions were highlighted as the core of the interfaces. Finally, correlations of motion were observed between parts of the dimer interface and GPCR segments participating in ligand binding and receptor activation, suggesting the existence of mechanisms through which dimer formation may affect GPCR function. The results of this study can be used to drive experiments aimed at exploring GPCR oligomerization, as well as in the study of transmembrane protein-protein interactions in general.

  17. Protein Functionalized Nanodiamond Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu YL

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Various nanoscale elements are currently being explored for bio-applications, such as in bio-images, bio-detection, and bio-sensors. Among them, nanodiamonds possess remarkable features such as low bio-cytotoxicity, good optical property in fluorescent and Raman spectra, and good photostability for bio-applications. In this work, we devise techniques to position functionalized nanodiamonds on self-assembled monolayer (SAMs arrays adsorbed on silicon and ITO substrates surface using electron beam lithography techniques. The nanodiamond arrays were functionalized with lysozyme to target a certain biomolecule or protein specifically. The optical properties of the nanodiamond-protein complex arrays were characterized by a high throughput confocal microscope. The synthesized nanodiamond-lysozyme complex arrays were found to still retain their functionality in interacting with E. coli.

  18. Functional System Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligterink, N.E.

    2007-01-01

    Functional system dynamics is the analysis, modelling, and simulation of continuous systems usually described by partial differential equations. From the infinite degrees of freedom of such systems only a finite number of relevant variables have to be chosen for a practical model description. The

  19. Functional Aspects of the Solution Structure and Dynamics of PAF, a Highly Stable Antifungal Protein from Penicillium chrysogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batta, Gyula; Barna, Teréz; Gáspári, Zoltán; Sándor, Szabolcs; Kövér, Katalin E.; Binder, Ulrike; Sarg, Bettina; Kaiserer, Lydia; Chhillar, Anil Kumar; Eigentler, Andrea; Leiter, Éva; Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Pócsi, István; Lindner, Herbert; Marx, Florentine

    2015-01-01

    Summary PAF is a promising antimycotic without toxic effects on mammalian cells and therefore may be a drug candidate against the often lethal Aspergillus infections in human. The pathogenesis of PAF on sensitive fungi involves G-protein coupled signaling followed by apoptosis. Here, the solution structure of this small, cationic, antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum is determined by solution NMR. We proved that PAF belongs to the SCOP fold class of its closest homologue AFP from Aspergillus giganteus. PAF comprises five β—strands forming two orthogonally packed β—sheets sharing a common interface. The ambiguity in the assignment of two disulfide bonds of three was investigated by NMR dynamics combined with restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The clue could not be resolved: two ensembles with different disulfide patterns and the one with no S-S bond exhibit essentially the same fold. 15N relaxation dispersion and interference experiments did not reveal disulfide bond rearrangements via slow exchange. The measured order parameters and the 3.0 ns correlation time is appropriate for a compact monomeric protein of this size. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that the highly conserved and positively charged lysine-rich domain region on the surface enhances the toxicity of PAF. However, the efficacy of the OB fold is reduced in PAF compared to AFP, due to less solvent exposed aromatic regions explaining the absence of chitobiose binding. The present work lends further support to the understanding of the documented substantial differences between the mode of action of two highly homologous antifungal proteins. PMID:19459942

  20. Relating protein functional diversity to cell type number identifies genes that determine dynamic aspects of chromatin organisation as potential contributors to organismal complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Cardoso, Daniela; Sharpe, Colin

    2017-01-01

    Organismal complexity broadly relates to the number of different cell types within an organism and generally increases across a phylogeny. Whilst gene expression will underpin organismal complexity, it has long been clear that a simple count of gene number is not a sufficient explanation. In this paper, we use open-access information from the Ensembl databases to quantify the functional diversity of human genes that are broadly involved in transcription. Functional diversity is described in terms of the numbers of paralogues, protein isoforms and structural domains for each gene. The change in functional diversity is then calculated for up to nine orthologues from the nematode worm to human and correlated to the change in cell-type number. Those with the highest correlation are subject to gene ontology term enrichment and interaction analyses. We found that a range of genes that encode proteins associated with dynamic changes to chromatin are good candidates to contribute to organismal complexity.

  1. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    molecule and potential drug. [Jha P and Kotwal G J 2003 Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug; J. Biosci. 28 265–271]. 1. Introduction. The pathogen-host interaction is a dynamic phenomenon which involves generation of defense mechanism by host and its evasion by ...

  2. Dynamics of hydration water and coupled protein sidechains around a polymerase protein surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yangzhong; Yang, Yi; Wang, Lijuan; Zhong, Dongping

    2017-09-01

    Water-protein coupled interactions are essential to the protein structural stability, flexibility and dynamic functions. The ultimate effects of the hydration dynamics on the protein fluctuations remain substantially unexplored. Here, we investigated the dynamics of both hydration water and protein sidechains at 13 different sites around the polymerase β protein surface using a tryptophan scan with femtosecond spectroscopy. Three types of hydration-water relaxations and two types of protein sidechain motions were determined, reflecting a highly dynamic water-protein interactions fluctuating on the picosecond time scales. The hydration-water dynamics dominate the coupled interactions with higher flexibility.

  3. A dynamic C-terminal segment in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Mn/Fe R2lox protein can adopt a helical structure with possible functional consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Charlotta S; Berthold, Catrine L; Högbom, Martin

    2012-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis R2-like ligand-binding oxidase (MtR2lox) belongs to a recently discovered group of proteins that are homologous to the ribonucleotide reductase R2 proteins. MtR2lox carries a heterodinuclear Mn/Fe cofactor and, unlike R2 proteins, a large ligand-binding cavity. A unique tyrosine-valine cross link is also found in the vicinity of the active site. To date, all known structures of R2 and R2lox proteins show a disordered C-terminal segment. Here, we present two new crystal forms of MtR2lox, revealing an ordered helical C-terminal. The ability of alternating between an ordered and disordered state agrees well with bioinformatic analysis of the protein sequence. Interestingly, ordering of the C-terminal helix shields a large positively charged patch on the protein surface, potentially used for interaction with other cellular components. We hypothesize that the dynamic C-terminal segment may be involved in control of protein function in vivo. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  4. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heremans K.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  5. Dynamics of a Highly Flexible Protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lisbeth

    Protein dynamics are important for protein function. Especially, dynamics plays an important role in ligand-binding where the induced fit and conformational selection binding mechanisms represent the extremes in a continuum of dynamic mechanisms. The difference between the mechanisms lies......-resolution structures of NCBD in complex with four binding partners are currently known and while three of them are practically identical and resemble the major conformation in the unbound ensemble, one shows NCBD adopting an alternative and markedly different conformation. The mechanisms underlying this conformational...... malleability are the subject of this defense. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, the dynamics of NCBD have been investigated on timescales ranging from picoseconds to milliseconds using relaxation dispersion experiments, residual dipolar couplings and methyl group deuterium relaxation. From...

  6. Structural and dynamical features of protein P7 from bacteriophage phi12: Insights into a functional role in the cystoviral polymerase complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Ertan

    Cystoviruses are a class of enveloped double-stranded RNA viruses that use a multi-protein polymerase complex (PX) to replicate and transcribe the viral genome. The cystoviral PX, that is amenable to in vitro and in vivo manipulation, comprises a unique model system for similar polymerase machinery. Containing three segmented double stranded RNA genome, the cystoviral PX is a simplified model for the polymerase machinery in more complex RNA viruses like reoviruses sharing structural and functional similarities at the level of the constituent proteins. Though the structures of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and ATPase components of the cystoviral PX are known and their functional behaviors understood to a large extent, no atomic-resolution structural information is available for the major capsid protein P1 that defines the overall structure and symmetry of the viral capsid, and the essential protein P7. Towards obtaining a complete structural and functional understanding of the cystoviral PX, we have obtained the structure of P7 from the cystovirus o12 at a resolution of 1.8 A. The N-terminal core region (1-129) of P7 forms a novel homodimeric alphabeta-fold with structural similarities with BRCT domains implicated in multiple protein-protein interactions in DNA repair proteins. Our results combined with the known role of P7 in stabilizing the nucleation complex during capsid assembly hints towards its participation in key protein-protein interactions within the cystoviral PX. Additionally, we have found through solution NMR studies that the C-terminal tail of P7 (130-169) that is essential for virus viability, though highly disordered, contains a nascent helix. We demonstrate through NMR-based titrations, that P7 is capable of interacting with RNA. We find that both the N-terminal core and the dynamic C-terminus tail of P7 play a role in RNA recognition leading to a significant reduction of the degree of disorder in the C-terminal tail. Given the

  7. Functional Importance of Mobile Ribosomal Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chun Chang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the dynamic motions and peptidyl transferase activity seem to be embedded in the rRNAs, the ribosome contains more than 50 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins, whose functions remain largely elusive. Also, the precise forms of some of these r-proteins, as being part of the ribosome, are not structurally solved due to their high flexibility, which hinders the efforts in their functional elucidation. Owing to recent advances in cryo-electron microscopy, single-molecule techniques, and theoretical modeling, much has been learned about the dynamics of these r-proteins. Surprisingly, allosteric regulations have been found in between spatially separated components as distant as those in the opposite sides of the ribosome. Here, we focus on the functional roles and intricate regulations of the mobile L1 and L12 stalks and L9 and S1 proteins. Conformational flexibility also enables versatile functions for r-proteins beyond translation. The arrangement of r-proteins may be under evolutionary pressure that fine-tunes mass distributions for optimal structural dynamics and catalytic activity of the ribosome.

  8. Conformational dynamics data bank: a database for conformational dynamics of proteins and supramolecular protein assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do-Nyun; Altschuler, Josiah; Strong, Campbell; McGill, Gaël; Bathe, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The conformational dynamics data bank (CDDB, http://www.cdyn.org) is a database that aims to provide comprehensive results on the conformational dynamics of high molecular weight proteins and protein assemblies. Analysis is performed using a recently introduced coarse-grained computational approach that is applied to the majority of structures present in the electron microscopy data bank (EMDB). Results include equilibrium thermal fluctuations and elastic strain energy distributions that identify rigid versus flexible protein domains generally, as well as those associated with specific functional transitions, and correlations in molecular motions that identify molecular regions that are highly coupled dynamically, with implications for allosteric mechanisms. A practical web-based search interface enables users to easily collect conformational dynamics data in various formats. The data bank is maintained and updated automatically to include conformational dynamics results for new structural entries as they become available in the EMDB. The CDDB complements static structural information to facilitate the investigation and interpretation of the biological function of proteins and protein assemblies essential to cell function.

  9. D19S Mutation of the Cationic, Cysteine-Rich Protein PAF: Novel Insights into Its Structural Dynamics, Thermal Unfolding and Antifungal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderegger, Christoph; Fizil, Ádám; Burtscher, Laura; Hajdu, Dorottya; Muñoz, Alberto; Gáspári, Zoltán; Read, Nick D; Batta, Gyula; Marx, Florentine

    2017-01-01

    The cysteine-rich, cationic, antifungal protein PAF is abundantly secreted into the culture supernatant of the filamentous Ascomycete Penicillium chrysogenum. The five β-strands of PAF form a compact β-barrel that is stabilized by three disulphide bonds. The folding of PAF allows the formation of four surface-exposed loops and distinct charged motifs on the protein surface that might regulate the interaction of PAF with the sensitive target fungus. The growth inhibitory activity of this highly stable protein against opportunistic fungal pathogens provides great potential in antifungal drug research. To understand its mode of action, we started to investigate the surface-exposed loops of PAF and replaced one aspartic acid at position 19 in loop 2 that is potentially involved in PAF active or binding site, with a serine (Asp19 to Ser19). We analysed the overall effects, such as unfolding, electrostatic changes, sporadic conformers and antifungal activity when substituting this specific amino acid to the fairly indifferent amino acid serine. Structural analyses revealed that the overall 3D solution structure is virtually identical with that of PAF. However, PAFD19S showed slightly increased dynamics and significant differences in the surface charge distribution. Thermal unfolding identified PAFD19S to be rather a two-state folder in contrast to the three-state folder PAF. Functional comparison of PAFD19S and PAF revealed that the exchange at residue 19 caused a dramatic loss of antifungal activity: the binding and internalization of PAFD19S by target cells was reduced and the protein failed to trigger an intracellular Ca2+ response, all of which are closely linked to the antifungal toxicity of PAF. We conclude that the negatively charged residue Asp19 in loop 2 is essential for full function of the cationic protein PAF.

  10. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  11. Contribution of phenylalanine side chain intercalation to the TATA-box binding protein-DNA interaction: molecular dynamics and dispersion-corrected density functional theory studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Manas; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2014-11-01

    Deformation of DNA takes place quite often due to binding of small molecules or proteins with DNA. Such deformation is significant due to minor groove binding and, besides electrostatic interactions, other non-covalent interactions may also play an important role in generating such deformation. TATA-box binding protein (TBP) binds to the minor groove of DNA at the TATA box sequence, producing a large-scale deformation in DNA and initiating transcription. In order to observe the interactions of protein residues with DNA in the minor groove that produce the deformation in the DNA structure, we carried out molecular dynamics simulations of the TBP-DNA system. The results reveal consistent partial intercalation of two Phe residues, distorting stacking interactions at two dinucleotide step sites. We carried out calculations based on dispersion-corrected density functional theory to understand the source of such stabilization. We observed favorable interaction energies between the Phe residues and the base pairs with which they interact. We suggest that salt-bridge interactions between the phosphate groups and Lys or Arg residues, along with the intercalation of Phe residues between two base pair stacks, stabilize the kinked and opened-up DNA conformation.

  12. Constraint theory and hierarchical protein dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, J C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States)

    2004-11-10

    The complexity and functionality of proteins requires that they occupy an exponentially small fraction of configuration space (perhaps 10{sup -300}). How did evolution manage to create such unlikely objects? Thorpe has solved the static half of this problem (known in protein chemistry as Levinthal's paradox) by observing that for stress-free chain segments the complexity of optimally constrained elastic networks scales not with expN (where N {approx} 100-1000 is the number of amino acids in a protein), but only with N. Newman's results for diffusion in N-dimensional spaces provide suggestive insights into the dynamical half of the problem. He showed that the distribution of residence (or pausing) time between sign reversals changes qualitatively at N {approx}40. The overall sign of a protein can be defined in terms of a product of curvature and hydrophobic(philic) character over all amino acid residues. This construction agrees with the sizes of the smallest known proteins and prions, and it suggests a universal clock for protein molecular dynamics simulations.

  13. Constraint theory and hierarchical protein dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, J C

    2004-01-01

    The complexity and functionality of proteins requires that they occupy an exponentially small fraction of configuration space (perhaps 10 -300 ). How did evolution manage to create such unlikely objects? Thorpe has solved the static half of this problem (known in protein chemistry as Levinthal's paradox) by observing that for stress-free chain segments the complexity of optimally constrained elastic networks scales not with expN (where N ∼ 100-1000 is the number of amino acids in a protein), but only with N. Newman's results for diffusion in N-dimensional spaces provide suggestive insights into the dynamical half of the problem. He showed that the distribution of residence (or pausing) time between sign reversals changes qualitatively at N ∼40. The overall sign of a protein can be defined in terms of a product of curvature and hydrophobic(philic) character over all amino acid residues. This construction agrees with the sizes of the smallest known proteins and prions, and it suggests a universal clock for protein molecular dynamics simulations

  14. DMPD: Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS/LBP complexes: a short review. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1373512 Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, therec....html) (.csml) Show Function of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-binding protein (LBP) and CD14, thereceptor for LPS.../LBP complexes: a short review. PubmedID 1373512 Title Function of lipopolysaccha

  15. A disorder-induced domino-like destabilization mechanism governs the folding and functional dynamics of the repeat protein IκBα.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Sivanandan

    Full Text Available The stability of the repeat protein IκBα, a transcriptional inhibitor in mammalian cells, is critical in the functioning of the NF-κB signaling module implicated in an array of cellular processes, including cell growth, disease, immunity and apoptosis. Structurally, IκBα is complex, with both ordered and disordered regions, thus posing a challenge to the available computational protocols to model its conformational behavior. Here, we introduce a simple procedure to model disorder in systems that undergo binding-induced folding that involves modulation of the contact map guided by equilibrium experimental observables in combination with an Ising-like Wako-Saitô-Muñoz-Eaton model. This one-step procedure alone is able to reproduce a variety of experimental observables, including ensemble thermodynamics (scanning calorimetry, pre-transitions, m-values and kinetics (roll-over in chevron plot, intermediates and their identity, and is consistent with hydrogen-deuterium exchange measurements. We further capture the intricate distance-dynamics between the domains as measured by single-molecule FRET by combining the model predictions with simple polymer physics arguments. Our results reveal a unique mechanism at work in IκBα folding, wherein disorder in one domain initiates a domino-like effect partially destabilizing neighboring domains, thus highlighting the effect of symmetry-breaking at the level of primary sequences. The offshoot is a multi-state and a dynamic conformational landscape that is populated by increasingly partially folded ensembles upon destabilization. Our results provide, in a straightforward fashion, a rationale to the promiscuous binding and short intracellular half-life of IκBα evolutionarily engineered into it through repeats with variable stabilities and expand the functional repertoire of disordered regions in proteins.

  16. Protein stability, flexibility and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teilum, Kaare; Olsen, Johan G; Kragelund, Birthe B

    2011-01-01

    Proteins rely on flexibility to respond to environmental changes, ligand binding and chemical modifications. Potentially, a perturbation that changes the flexibility of a protein may interfere with its function. Millions of mutations have been performed on thousands of proteins in quests...... for a delineation of the molecular details of their function. Several of these mutations interfered with the binding of a specific ligand with a concomitant effect on the stability of the protein scaffold. It has been ambiguous and not straightforward to recognize if any relationships exist between the stability...... of a protein and the affinity for its ligand. In this review, we present examples of proteins where changes in stability results in changes in affinity and of proteins where stability and affinity are uncorrelated. We discuss the possibility for a relationship between stability and binding. From the data...

  17. Incorporating Modeling and Simulations in Undergraduate Biophysical Chemistry Course to Promote Understanding of Structure-Dynamics-Function Relationships in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and…

  18. On the dynamical incompleteness of the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino-Buslje, Cristina; Monzon, Alexander Miguel; Zea, Diego Javier; Fornasari, María Silvina; Parisi, Gustavo

    2017-08-02

    Major scientific challenges that are beyond the capability of individuals need to be addressed by multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional consortia. Examples of these endeavours include the Human Genome Project, and more recently, the Structural Genomics (SG) initiative. The SG initiative pursues the expansion of structural coverage to include at least one structural representative for each protein family to derive the remaining structures using homology modelling. However, biological function is inherently connected with protein dynamics that can be studied by knowing different structures of the same protein. This ensemble of structures provides snapshots of protein conformational diversity under native conditions. Thus, sequence redundancy in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) (i.e. crystallization of the same protein under different conditions) is therefore an essential input contributing to experimentally based studies of protein dynamics and providing insights into protein function. In this work, we show that sequence redundancy, a key concept for exploring protein dynamics, is highly biased and fundamentally incomplete in the PDB. Additionally, our results show that dynamical behaviour of proteins cannot be inferred using homologous proteins. Minor to moderate changes in sequence can produce great differences in dynamical behaviour. Nonetheless, the structural and dynamical incompleteness of the PDB is apparently unrelated concepts in SG. While the first could be reversed by promoting the extension of the structural coverage, we would like to emphasize that further focused efforts will be needed to amend the incompleteness of the PDB in terms of dynamical information content, essential to fully understand protein function. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Water Dynamics in Protein Hydration Shells: The Molecular Origins of the Dynamical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Protein hydration shell dynamics play an important role in biochemical processes including protein folding, enzyme function, and molecular recognition. We present here a comparison of the reorientation dynamics of individual water molecules within the hydration shell of a series of globular proteins: acetylcholinesterase, subtilisin Carlsberg, lysozyme, and ubiquitin. Molecular dynamics simulations and analytical models are used to access site-resolved information on hydration shell dynamics and to elucidate the molecular origins of the dynamical perturbation of hydration shell water relative to bulk water. We show that all four proteins have very similar hydration shell dynamics, despite their wide range of sizes and functions, and differing secondary structures. We demonstrate that this arises from the similar local surface topology and surface chemical composition of the four proteins, and that such local factors alone are sufficient to rationalize the hydration shell dynamics. We propose that these conclusions can be generalized to a wide range of globular proteins. We also show that protein conformational fluctuations induce a dynamical heterogeneity within the hydration layer. We finally address the effect of confinement on hydration shell dynamics via a site-resolved analysis and connect our results to experiments via the calculation of two-dimensional infrared spectra. PMID:24479585

  20. A2 Milk Enhances Dynamic Muscle Function Following Repeated Sprint Exercise, a Possible Ergogenic Aid for A1-Protein Intolerant Athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Ben; Mitchell, Jade; Jackson, Matthew; Amirabdollahian, Farzad; Alizadehkhaiyat, Omid; Clifford, Tom

    2017-01-28

    Hyperaminoacidemia following ingestion of cows-milk may stimulate muscle anabolism and attenuate exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD). However, as dairy-intolerant athletes do not obtain the reported benefits from milk-based products, A2 milk may offer a suitable alternative as it lacks the A1-protein. This study aimed to determine the effect of A2 milk on recovery from a sports-specific muscle damage model. Twenty-one male team sport players were allocated to three independent groups: A2 milk ( n = 7), regular milk ( n = 7), and placebo (PLA) ( n = 7). Immediately following muscle-damaging exercise, participants consumed either A2 milk, regular milk or PLA (500 mL each). Visual analogue scale (muscle soreness), maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), countermovement jump (CMJ) and 20-m sprint were measured prior to and 24, 48, and 72 h post EIMD. At 48 h post-EIMD, CMJ and 20-m sprint recovered quicker in A2 (33.4 ± 6.6 and 3.3 ± 0.1, respectively) and regular milk (33.1 ± 7.1 and 3.3 ± 0.3, respectively) vs. PLA (29.2 ± 3.6 and 3.6 ± 0.3, respectively) ( p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, decrements in 48 h CMJ and 20-m sprint were minimised in A2 (by 7.2 and 5.1%, respectively) and regular milk (by 6.3 and 5.2%, respectively) vs. PLA. There was a trend for milk treatments to attenuate decrements in MVIC, however statistical significance was not reached ( p = 0.069). Milk treatments had no apparent effect on muscle soreness ( p = 0.152). Following muscle-damaging exercise, ingestion of 500 mL of A2 or regular milk can limit decrements in dynamic muscle function in male athletes, thus hastening recovery and improving subsequent performance. The findings propose A2 milk as an ergogenic aid following EIMD, and may offer an alternative to athletes intolerant to the A1 protein.

  1. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed...

  2. Structure and dynamics of photosynthetic proteins studied by neutron scattering and molecular dynamic simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellerue, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Understand the structure-dynamics-function relation in the case of proteins is essential. But few experimental techniques allow to have access to knowledge of fast internal movements of biological macromolecules. With the neutron scattering method, it has been possible to study the reorientation dynamics of side chains and of polypeptide skeleton for two proteins in terms of water or detergent and of temperature. With the use of the molecular dynamics method, essential for completing and interpreting the experimental data, it has been possible to assess the different contributions of the whole structure of proteins to the overall dynamics. It has been shown that the polypeptide skeleton presents an energy relaxation comparable to those of the side chains. Moreover, it has been explained that the protein dynamics can only be understood in terms of relaxation time distribution. (author) [fr

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of globular proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomdahl, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    Some ongoing work aimed at generalizing DAVYDOV's ideas to a real globular protein is described. So far, a computer code, GLOP, which calculates amide-I bond energy evolution on a globular protein has been developed and tested. The code is quite versatile and takes as input the coordinates of a protein. The full geometry of the molecule is then taken into account when the dipole-dipole interaction between peptide groups is calculated. The amide-I energy is coupled to one intramolecular excitation, but can without difficulty be extended to more or to include intermolecular excitations.

  4. Infrared Spectroscopy Measurements of Protein Dynamics and Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuse, Curtis W.; Hubbard, Joseph B.

    2011-03-01

    Infrared spectroscopy has long been used to deduce the concentration and secondary structures of proteins in a variety of static and time resolved applications. Our focus is on developing new infrared methods to compare the structure, dynamics and function of nearly identical protein samples, in different environments, to apply to the problem of identifying bio-similar protein therapeutics. We have developed an order parameter describing protein conformation variations around the average molecular values. By comparing our order parameter and amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange methods, we explore the relationship between protein stability and the dynamics of the protein conformational distribution. Examples include lysozyme and albumin in solution, cytochrome c interacting with lipid membranes of varying net-negative surface charge density, fibrinogen on different polymer surfaces and bacteriorhodopsin during its photocycle.

  5. Dynamics of DNA conformations and DNA-protein interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzler, R.; Ambjörnsson, T.; Lomholt, Michael Andersen

    2005-01-01

    denaturation (bubble breathing), deriving its dynamic response to external physical parameters and the DNA sequence in terms of the bubble relaxation time spectrum and the autocorrelation function of bubble breathing. The interaction with binding proteins that selectively bind to the DNA single strand exposed......Optical tweezers, atomic force microscopes, patch clamping, or fluorescence techniques make it possible to study both the equilibrium conformations and dynamics of single DNA molecules as well as their interaction with binding proteins. In this paper we address the dynamics of local DNA...... in a denaturation bubble are shown to involve an interesting competition of time scales, varying between kinetic blocking of protein binding up to full binding protein-induced denaturation of the DNA. We will also address the potential to use DNA physics for the design of nanosensors. Finally, we report recent...

  6. Hydrogen tunneling links protein dynamics to enzyme catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinman, Judith P; Kohen, Amnon

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between protein dynamics and function is a subject of considerable contemporary interest. Although protein motions are frequently observed during ligand binding and release steps, the contribution of protein motions to the catalysis of bond making/breaking processes is more difficult to probe and verify. Here, we show how the quantum mechanical hydrogen tunneling associated with enzymatic C-H bond cleavage provides a unique window into the necessity of protein dynamics for achieving optimal catalysis. Experimental findings support a hierarchy of thermodynamically equilibrated motions that control the H-donor and -acceptor distance and active-site electrostatics, creating an ensemble of conformations suitable for H-tunneling. A possible extension of this view to methyl transfer and other catalyzed reactions is also presented. The impact of understanding these dynamics on the conceptual framework for enzyme activity, inhibitor/drug design, and biomimetic catalyst design is likely to be substantial.

  7. Protein dynamics and the diversity of an antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E

    2012-08-03

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved.

  8. Protein Dynamics and the Diversity of an Antibody Response*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Ramkrishna; Yu, Wayne; Oda, Masayuki; Zimmermann, Jörg; Romesberg, Floyd E.

    2012-01-01

    The immune system is remarkable in its ability to produce antibodies (Abs) with virtually any specificity from a limited repertoire of germ line precursors. Although the contribution of sequence diversity to this molecular recognition has been studied for decades, recent models suggest that protein dynamics may also broaden the range of targets recognized. To characterize the contribution of protein dynamics to immunological molecular recognition, we report the sequence, thermodynamic, and time-resolved spectroscopic characterization of a panel of eight Abs elicited to the chromophoric antigen 8-methoxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (MPTS). Based on the sequence data, three of the Abs arose from unique germ line Abs, whereas the remaining five comprise two sets of siblings that arose by somatic mutation of a common precursor. The thermodynamic data indicate that the Abs recognize MPTS via a variety of mechanisms. Although the spectroscopic data reveal small differences in protein dynamics, the anti-MPTS Abs generally show similar levels of flexibility and conformational heterogeneity, possibly representing the convergent evolution of the dynamics necessary for function. However, one Ab is significantly more rigid and conformationally homogeneous than the others, including a sibling Ab from which it differs by only five somatic mutations. This example of divergent evolution demonstrates that point mutations are capable of fixing significant differences in protein dynamics. The results provide unique insight into how high affinity Abs may be produced that bind virtually any target and possibly, from a more general perspective, how new protein functions are evolved. PMID:22685303

  9. Low-Temperature Decoupling of Water and Protein Dynamics Measured by Neutron Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Antonio

    2017-10-05

    Water plays a major role in biosystems, greatly contributing to determine their structure, stability, and function. It is well known, for instance, that proteins require a minimum amount of water to be fully functional. Despite many years of intensive research, however, the detailed nature of protein-hydration water interactions is still partly unknown. The widely accepted "protein dynamical transition" scenario is based on perfect coupling between the dynamics of proteins and that of their hydration water, which has never been probed in depth experimentally. I present here high-resolution elastic neutron scattering measurements of the atomistic dynamics of lysozyme in water. The results show for the first time that the dynamics of proteins and of their hydration water are actually decoupled at low temperatures. This important result challenges the "protein dynamical transition" scenario and requires a new model to link protein dynamics to the dynamics of its hydration water.

  10. Using Fluorescent Protein Fusions to Study Protein Subcellular Localization and Dynamics in Plant Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yong; Gao, Caiji; Zhao, Qiong; Jiang, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Studies of protein subcellular localization and dynamics are helpful in understanding the cellular functions of proteins in an organism. In the past decade, the use of green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a fusion tag has dramatically extended our knowledge in this field. Transient expression and stable transformation of GFP-tagged proteins have been wildly used to study protein localization in vivo in different systems. Although GFP-based tags provide a fast and convenient way to characterize protein properties in living cells, several reports have demonstrated that GFP fusions might not accurately reflect the localization of the native protein as GFP tags may alter the protein properties. To facilitate proper usage of GFP tags in plant cell biology study, we describe detailed protocols to identify possible inhibitory effects of fluorescent tags on protein subcellular localization and to determine if a fluorescently tagged protein is localized to the correct subcellular compartment. Using Arabidopsis Endomembrane protein 12 (EMP12) as an example, we first show the possible inhibitory effect of GFP tags on proper protein localization and then describe the immunofluorescence labeling method to verify the correct localization of GFP fusion proteins. Next, a method is presented using the ImageJ program with the Pearson-Spearman correlation (PSC) colocalization plug-in for statistical quantification of colocalization ratios of two fluorophores. Finally we provide a detailed method for protein dynamics studies using spinning disk confocal microscopy in Arabidopsis cells.

  11. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  12. Accelerated molecular dynamics simulations of protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yinglong; Feixas, Ferran; Eun, Changsun; McCammon, J Andrew

    2015-07-30

    Folding of four fast-folding proteins, including chignolin, Trp-cage, villin headpiece and WW domain, was simulated via accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD). In comparison with hundred-of-microsecond timescale conventional molecular dynamics (cMD) simulations performed on the Anton supercomputer, aMD captured complete folding of the four proteins in significantly shorter simulation time. The folded protein conformations were found within 0.2-2.1 Å of the native NMR or X-ray crystal structures. Free energy profiles calculated through improved reweighting of the aMD simulations using cumulant expansion to the second-order are in good agreement with those obtained from cMD simulations. This allows us to identify distinct conformational states (e.g., unfolded and intermediate) other than the native structure and the protein folding energy barriers. Detailed analysis of protein secondary structures and local key residue interactions provided important insights into the protein folding pathways. Furthermore, the selections of force fields and aMD simulation parameters are discussed in detail. Our work shows usefulness and accuracy of aMD in studying protein folding, providing basic references in using aMD in future protein-folding studies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Is a malleable protein necessarily highly dynamic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Magnus; Poulsen, Flemming Martin; Teilum, Kaare

    2012-01-01

    core of NCBD in the ligand-free state and in a well-folded complex with the ligand activator for thyroid hormone and retinoid receptors using multiple NMR methods including methyl chemical shifts, coupling constants, and methyl order parameters. From all NMR measures, the aliphatic side chains...... in the hydrophobic core are slightly more dynamic in the free protein than in the complex, but have mobility comparable to the hydrophobic cores of average folded proteins. Urea titration monitored by NMR reveals that all parts of the protein, including the side-chain packing in the hydrophobic core, denatures...

  14. Polymer dynamics from synthetic polymers to proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    systems. We touch the role of topological confinement as expressed in the reptation model and discuss in some more detail processes limiting the confinement. In the second part we relate to some new developments concerning the measurement of large-scale internal dynamics of proteins by neutron spin echo. Keywords.

  15. Functional Foods Containing Whey Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whey proteins, modified whey proteins, and whey components are useful as nutrients or supplements for health maintenance. Extrusion modified whey proteins can easily fit into new products such as beverages, confectionery items (e.g., candies), convenience foods, desserts, baked goods, sauces, and in...

  16. Studying Membrane Protein Structure and Function Using Nanodiscs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huda, Pie

    The structure and dynamic of membrane proteins can provide valuable information about general functions, diseases and effects of various drugs. Studying membrane proteins are a challenge as an amphiphilic environment is necessary to stabilise the protein in a functionally and structurally relevant...... form. This is most typically achieved through the use of detergent based reconstitution systems. However, time and again such systems fail to provide a suitable environment causing aggregation and inactivation. Nanodiscs are self-assembled lipoproteins containing two membrane scaffold proteins...... and a lipid bilayer in defined nanometer size, which can act as a stabiliser for membrane proteins. This enables both functional and structural investigation of membrane proteins in a detergent free environment which is closer to the native situation. Understanding the self-assembly of nanodiscs is important...

  17. Enzymes: An integrated view of structure, dynamics and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Pratul K

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Microbes utilize enzymes to perform a variety of functions. Enzymes are biocatalysts working as highly efficient machines at the molecular level. In the past, enzymes have been viewed as static entities and their function has been explained on the basis of direct structural interactions between the enzyme and the substrate. A variety of experimental and computational techniques, however, continue to reveal that proteins are dynamically active machines, with various parts exhibiting internal motions at a wide range of time-scales. Increasing evidence also indicates that these internal protein motions play a role in promoting protein function such as enzyme catalysis. Moreover, the thermodynamical fluctuations of the solvent, surrounding the protein, have an impact on internal protein motions and, therefore, on enzyme function. In this review, we describe recent biochemical and theoretical investigations of internal protein dynamics linked to enzyme catalysis. In the enzyme cyclophilin A, investigations have lead to the discovery of a network of protein vibrations promoting catalysis. Cyclophilin A catalyzes peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization in a variety of peptide and protein substrates. Recent studies of cyclophilin A are discussed in detail and other enzymes (dihydrofolate reductase and liver alcohol dehydrogenase where similar discoveries have been reported are also briefly discussed. The detailed characterization of the discovered networks indicates that protein dynamics plays a role in rate-enhancement achieved by enzymes. An integrated view of enzyme structure, dynamics and function have wide implications in understanding allosteric and co-operative effects, as well as protein engineering of more efficient enzymes and novel drug design.

  18. Protein electron transfer: Dynamics and statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2013-07-01

    Electron transfer between redox proteins participating in energy chains of biology is required to proceed with high energetic efficiency, minimizing losses of redox energy to heat. Within the standard models of electron transfer, this requirement, combined with the need for unidirectional (preferably activationless) transitions, is translated into the need to minimize the reorganization energy of electron transfer. This design program is, however, unrealistic for proteins whose active sites are typically positioned close to the polar and flexible protein-water interface to allow inter-protein electron tunneling. The high flexibility of the interfacial region makes both the hydration water and the surface protein layer act as highly polar solvents. The reorganization energy, as measured by fluctuations, is not minimized, but rather maximized in this region. Natural systems in fact utilize the broad breadth of interfacial electrostatic fluctuations, but in the ways not anticipated by the standard models based on equilibrium thermodynamics. The combination of the broad spectrum of static fluctuations with their dispersive dynamics offers the mechanism of dynamical freezing (ergodicity breaking) of subsets of nuclear modes on the time of reaction/residence of the electron at a redox cofactor. The separation of time-scales of nuclear modes coupled to electron transfer allows dynamical freezing. In particular, the separation between the relaxation time of electro-elastic fluctuations of the interface and the time of conformational transitions of the protein caused by changing redox state results in dynamical freezing of the latter for sufficiently fast electron transfer. The observable consequence of this dynamical freezing is significantly different reorganization energies describing the curvature at the bottom of electron-transfer free energy surfaces (large) and the distance between their minima (Stokes shift, small). The ratio of the two reorganization energies

  19. Scaling laws and memory effects in the dynamics of liquids and proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneller, G.R.; Hinsen, K.; Sutmann, G.; Calandrini, V.

    2008-01-01

    Recent progress in the numerical calculation of memory functions from molecular dynamics simulations allowed gaining a deeper insight into the relaxation dynamics of liquids and proteins. The concept of memory functions goes back to the work of R. Zwanzig on the generalized Langevin equation, and it was the basis for the development of various dynamical models for liquids. We present briefly a method for the numerical calculation of memory functions, which is then applied to study their scaling behavior in normal and fractional Brownian dynamics. It has been shown recently that the model of fractional Brownian dynamics constitutes effectively a link between protein dynamics on the nanosecond time scale, which is accessible to molecular dynamics simulations and thermal neutron scattering, and the much longer time scale of functional protein dynamics, which can be studied by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

  20. Topology-function conservation in protein-protein interaction networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Darren; Yaveroğlu, Ömer Nebil; Malod-Dognin, Noël; Stojmirovic, Aleksandar; Pržulj, Nataša

    2015-05-15

    Proteins underlay the functioning of a cell and the wiring of proteins in protein-protein interaction network (PIN) relates to their biological functions. Proteins with similar wiring in the PIN (topology around them) have been shown to have similar functions. This property has been successfully exploited for predicting protein functions. Topological similarity is also used to guide network alignment algorithms that find similarly wired proteins between PINs of different species; these similarities are used to transfer annotation across PINs, e.g. from model organisms to human. To refine these functional predictions and annotation transfers, we need to gain insight into the variability of the topology-function relationships. For example, a function may be significantly associated with specific topologies, while another function may be weakly associated with several different topologies. Also, the topology-function relationships may differ between different species. To improve our understanding of topology-function relationships and of their conservation among species, we develop a statistical framework that is built upon canonical correlation analysis. Using the graphlet degrees to represent the wiring around proteins in PINs and gene ontology (GO) annotations to describe their functions, our framework: (i) characterizes statistically significant topology-function relationships in a given species, and (ii) uncovers the functions that have conserved topology in PINs of different species, which we term topologically orthologous functions. We apply our framework to PINs of yeast and human, identifying seven biological process and two cellular component GO terms to be topologically orthologous for the two organisms. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Dynamics of proteins aggregation. II. Dynamic scaling in confined media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Size; Shing, Katherine S.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, the second in a series devoted to molecular modeling of protein aggregation, a mesoscale model of proteins together with extensive discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the phenomenon in a confined medium. The medium, as a model of a crowded cellular environment, is represented by a spherical cavity, as well as cylindrical tubes with two aspect ratios. The aggregation process leads to the formation of β sheets and eventually fibrils, whose deposition on biological tissues is believed to be a major factor contributing to many neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis diseases. Several important properties of the aggregation process, including dynamic evolution of the total number of the aggregates, the mean aggregate size, and the number of peptides that contribute to the formation of the β sheets, have been computed. We show, similar to the unconfined media studied in Paper I [S. Zheng et al., J. Chem. Phys. 145, 134306 (2016)], that the computed properties follow dynamic scaling, characterized by power laws. The existence of such dynamic scaling in unconfined media was recently confirmed by experiments. The exponents that characterize the power-law dependence on time of the properties of the aggregation process in spherical cavities are shown to agree with those in unbounded fluids at the same protein density, while the exponents for aggregation in the cylindrical tubes exhibit sensitivity to the geometry of the system. The effects of the number of amino acids in the protein, as well as the size of the confined media, have also been studied. Similarities and differences between aggregation in confined and unconfined media are described, including the possibility of no fibril formation, if confinement is severe.

  2. Protein kinase substrate identification on functional protein arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Fang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over the last decade, kinases have emerged as attractive therapeutic targets for a number of different diseases, and numerous high throughput screening efforts in the pharmaceutical community are directed towards discovery of compounds that regulate kinase function. The emerging utility of systems biology approaches has necessitated the development of multiplex tools suitable for proteomic-scale experiments to replace lower throughput technologies such as mass spectroscopy for the study of protein phosphorylation. Recently, a new approach for identifying substrates of protein kinases has applied the miniaturized format of functional protein arrays to characterize phosphorylation for thousands of candidate protein substrates in a single experiment. This method involves the addition of protein kinases in solution to arrays of immobilized proteins to identify substrates using highly sensitive radioactive detection and hit identification algorithms. Results To date, the factors required for optimal performance of protein array-based kinase substrate identification have not been described. In the current study, we have carried out a detailed characterization of the protein array-based method for kinase substrate identification, including an examination of the effects of time, buffer compositions, and protein concentration on the results. The protein array approach was compared to standard solution-based assays for assessing substrate phosphorylation, and a correlation of greater than 80% was observed. The results presented here demonstrate how novel substrates for protein kinases can be quickly identified from arrays containing thousands of human proteins to provide new clues to protein kinase function. In addition, a pooling-deconvolution strategy was developed and applied that enhances characterization of specific kinase-substrate relationships and decreases reagent consumption. Conclusion Functional protein microarrays are an

  3. Origins of Protein Functions in Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelig, Burchard; Pohorille, Andrzej

    2011-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis and in vitro evolution of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions yet, important clues have been uncovered. In one example (Keefe and Szostak, 2001), novel ATP binding proteins were identified that appear to be unrelated in both sequence and structure to any known ATP binding proteins. One of these proteins was subsequently redesigned computationally to bind GTP through introducing several mutations that introduce targeted structural changes to the protein, improve its binding to guanine and prevent water from accessing the active center. This study facilitates further investigations of individual evolutionary steps that lead to a change of function in primordial proteins. In a second study (Seelig and Szostak, 2007), novel enzymes were generated that can join two pieces of RNA in a reaction for which no natural enzymes are known

  4. Year 2 Report: Protein Function Prediction Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C E

    2012-04-27

    Upon completion of our second year of development in a 3-year development cycle, we have completed a prototype protein structure-function annotation and function prediction system: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) platform (v.0.5). We have met our milestones for Years 1 and 2 and are positioned to continue development in completion of our original statement of work, or a reasonable modification thereof, in service to DTRA Programs involved in diagnostics and medical countermeasures research and development. The PFP platform is a multi-scale computational modeling system for protein structure-function annotation and function prediction. As of this writing, PFP is the only existing fully automated, high-throughput, multi-scale modeling, whole-proteome annotation platform, and represents a significant advance in the field of genome annotation (Fig. 1). PFP modules perform protein functional annotations at the sequence, systems biology, protein structure, and atomistic levels of biological complexity (Fig. 2). Because these approaches provide orthogonal means of characterizing proteins and suggesting protein function, PFP processing maximizes the protein functional information that can currently be gained by computational means. Comprehensive annotation of pathogen genomes is essential for bio-defense applications in pathogen characterization, threat assessment, and medical countermeasure design and development in that it can short-cut the time and effort required to select and characterize protein biomarkers.

  5. ProDy: protein dynamics inferred from theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakan, Ahmet; Meireles, Lidio M; Bahar, Ivet

    2011-06-01

    We developed a Python package, ProDy, for structure-based analysis of protein dynamics. ProDy allows for quantitative characterization of structural variations in heterogeneous datasets of structures experimentally resolved for a given biomolecular system, and for comparison of these variations with the theoretically predicted equilibrium dynamics. Datasets include structural ensembles for a given family or subfamily of proteins, their mutants and sequence homologues, in the presence/absence of their substrates, ligands or inhibitors. Numerous helper functions enable comparative analysis of experimental and theoretical data, and visualization of the principal changes in conformations that are accessible in different functional states. ProDy application programming interface (API) has been designed so that users can easily extend the software and implement new methods. ProDy is open source and freely available under GNU General Public License from http://www.csb.pitt.edu/ProDy/.

  6. Predicting protein function from biomedical text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal; Yoo, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    We propose a classifier system called PFPBT that predicts the functions of un-annotated proteins. PFPBT assigns an un-annotated protein p the functional category of annotated proteins that are semantically similar to p. Each protein p is represented by a vector of weights. Each weight reflects the significance of a molecule m in the biomedical abstracts associated with p. That is, each weight quantifies the likelihood of the association between m and p. This is because all proteins bind to other molecules, which are highly predictive of the functions of the proteins. Let S be the set of proteins that is semantically similar to an un-annotated protein p. p is annotated with the functional category f, if its occurrence probability in abstracts associated with S whose functional category is f is statistically significantly different than its occurrences in abstracts associated with S that belong to all other functional categories. PFPBT automatically extracts each co-occurrence of a protein-molecule pair that represents semantic relationship between the pair. We present novel semantic rules based on the syntactic structures of sentences for identifying the semantic relationships between each co-occurrence of a protein-molecule pair in a sentence. We evaluated PFPBT by comparing it experimentally with two systems. Results showed improvement.

  7. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Functional Link with Apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hidenori Otera; Katsuyoshi Mihara

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in a variety of physiologic processes, such as ATP production, lipid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and calcium buffering. The morphology of mitochondria changes dynamically due to their frequent fusion and division in response to cellular conditions, and these dynamics are an important constituent of apoptosis. The discovery of large GTPase family proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial f...

  8. Functional integral approach to classical statistical dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, R.V.

    1980-04-01

    A functional integral method is developed for the statistical solution of nonlinear stochastic differential equations which arise in classical dynamics. The functional integral approach provides a very natural and elegant derivation of the statistical dynamical equations that have been derived using the operator formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose

  9. Functional integral approach to classical statistical dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, R.V.

    1980-04-01

    A functional integral method is developed for the statistical solution of nonlinear stochastic differential equations which arise in classical dynamics. The functional integral approach provides a very natural and elegant derivation of the statistical dynamical equations that have been derived using the operator formalism of Martin, Siggia, and Rose.

  10. Text mining improves prediction of protein functional sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin M Verspoor

    Full Text Available We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites. The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA, which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions.

  11. Text mining improves prediction of protein functional sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verspoor, Karin M; Cohn, Judith D; Ravikumar, Komandur E; Wall, Michael E

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites). The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA), which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites) in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions.

  12. Text Mining Improves Prediction of Protein Functional Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohn, Judith D.; Ravikumar, Komandur E.

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach that integrates protein structure analysis and text mining for protein functional site prediction, called LEAP-FS (Literature Enhanced Automated Prediction of Functional Sites). The structure analysis was carried out using Dynamics Perturbation Analysis (DPA), which predicts functional sites at control points where interactions greatly perturb protein vibrations. The text mining extracts mentions of residues in the literature, and predicts that residues mentioned are functionally important. We assessed the significance of each of these methods by analyzing their performance in finding known functional sites (specifically, small-molecule binding sites and catalytic sites) in about 100,000 publicly available protein structures. The DPA predictions recapitulated many of the functional site annotations and preferentially recovered binding sites annotated as biologically relevant vs. those annotated as potentially spurious. The text-based predictions were also substantially supported by the functional site annotations: compared to other residues, residues mentioned in text were roughly six times more likely to be found in a functional site. The overlap of predictions with annotations improved when the text-based and structure-based methods agreed. Our analysis also yielded new high-quality predictions of many functional site residues that were not catalogued in the curated data sources we inspected. We conclude that both DPA and text mining independently provide valuable high-throughput protein functional site predictions, and that integrating the two methods using LEAP-FS further improves the quality of these predictions. PMID:22393388

  13. Sphingolipids in the function of G protein-coupled receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafurulla, Mohammad; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2015-09-15

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest and most diverse protein family in mammals and are involved in information transfer across cellular membranes. GPCRs are known to regulate multiple physiological functions and therefore represent major drug targets in all clinical areas. The fact that GPCRs are integral membrane proteins raises the possibility of their interaction with functionally important membrane lipids such as sphingolipids. Sphingolipids are essential membrane components and are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes. Interaction with sphingolipids could lead to modulation of GPCR structure and function. In this review, we highlight the role of sphingolipids in the function of GPCRs with specific examples. A comprehensive understanding of molecular events involved in GPCR-lipid interaction would provide better insight into GPCR function in health and disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondrial Dynamics: Functional Link with Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidenori Otera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria participate in a variety of physiologic processes, such as ATP production, lipid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and calcium buffering. The morphology of mitochondria changes dynamically due to their frequent fusion and division in response to cellular conditions, and these dynamics are an important constituent of apoptosis. The discovery of large GTPase family proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in apoptosis, has provided important clues to understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular apoptosis. In this paper, we briefly summarize current knowledge of the role of mitochondrial dynamics in apoptosis and cell pathophysiology in mammalian cells.

  15. Mitochondrial dynamics: functional link with apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otera, Hidenori; Mihara, Katsuyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in a variety of physiologic processes, such as ATP production, lipid metabolism, iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis, and calcium buffering. The morphology of mitochondria changes dynamically due to their frequent fusion and division in response to cellular conditions, and these dynamics are an important constituent of apoptosis. The discovery of large GTPase family proteins that regulate mitochondrial dynamics, together with novel insights into the role of mitochondrial fusion and fission in apoptosis, has provided important clues to understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular apoptosis. In this paper, we briefly summarize current knowledge of the role of mitochondrial dynamics in apoptosis and cell pathophysiology in mammalian cells.

  16. Velocity Gradient Power Functional for Brownian Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de las Heras, Daniel; Schmidt, Matthias

    2018-01-01

    We present an explicit and simple approximation for the superadiabatic excess (over ideal gas) free power functional, admitting the study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of overdamped Brownian many-body systems. The functional depends on the local velocity gradient and is systematically obtained from treating the microscopic stress distribution as a conjugate field. The resulting superadiabatic forces are beyond dynamical density functional theory and are of a viscous nature. Their high accuracy is demonstrated by comparison to simulation results.

  17. Dynamics and computation in functional shifts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Takashi

    2004-07-01

    We introduce a new type of shift dynamics as an extended model of symbolic dynamics, and investigate the characteristics of shift spaces from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation. This shift dynamics is called a functional shift, which is defined by a set of bi-infinite sequences of some functions on a set of symbols. To analyse the complexity of functional shifts, we measure them in terms of topological entropy, and locate their languages in the Chomsky hierarchy. Through this study, we argue that considering functional shifts from the viewpoints of both dynamics and computation gives us opposite results about the complexity of systems. We also describe a new class of shift spaces whose languages are not recursively enumerable.

  18. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  19. Dynamics of proteins and of their hydration layer studied by neutron scattering and additional biophysical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallat, Francois-Xavier

    2011-01-01

    This thesis work focused on the dynamics of proteins, surrounded by their hydration layer, a water shell around the protein vital for its biological function. Each of these components is accompanied by a specific dynamics which union reforms the complex energy landscape of the system. The joint implementation of selective deuteration, incoherent neutron scattering and tera-hertz spectroscopy allowed to explore the dynamics of proteins and that of the hydration shell. The influence of the folding state of protein on its dynamics has been studied by elastic neutron scattering. Globular proteins were less dynamic than its intrinsically disordered analogues. Themselves appear to be stiffer than non-physiological unfolded proteins. The oligomerization state and the consequences on the dynamics were investigated. Aggregates of a globular protein proved to be more flexible than the soluble form. In contrast, aggregates of a disordered protein showed lower average dynamics compared to the soluble form. These observations demonstrate the wide range of dynamics among the proteome. Incoherent neutron scattering experiences on the hydration layer of globular and disordered proteins have yielded information on the nature of water motion around these proteins. The measurements revealed the presence of translational motions concomitant with the onset of the transition dynamics of hydration layers, at 220 K. Measurements have also shown a stronger coupling between a disordered protein and its hydration water, compared to a globular protein and its hydration shell. The nature of the hydration layer and its influence on its dynamics has been explored with the use of polymers that mimic the water behavior and that act as a source of flexibility for the protein. Eventually, the dynamics of methyl groups involved in the dynamical changes observed at 150 and 220 K, was investigated. (author) [fr

  20. Protein dynamics by neutron scattering: The protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover in hydrated lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magazù, Salvatore; Migliardo, Federica; Benedetto, Antonio; Vertessy, Beata

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The role played by the instrumental energy resolution in neutron scattering is presented. • The effect of natural bioprotectants on protein dynamics is shown. • A connection between the protein dynamical transition and the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover is formulated. - Abstract: In this work Elastic Incoherent Neutron Scattering (EINS) results on lysozyme water mixtures in absence and in presence of bioprotectant systems are presented. The EINS data have been collected by using the IN13 and the IN10 spectrometers at the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL, Grenoble, France) allowing to evaluate the temperature behaviour of the mean square displacement and of the relaxation time for the investigated systems. The obtained experimental findings together with theoretical calculations allow to put into evidence the role played by the spectrometer resolution and to clarify the connexion between the registered protein dynamical transition, the system relaxation time, and the instrumental energy resolution

  1. Functions of intrinsic disorder in transmembrane proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Magnus; Kragelund, Birthe B.

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms. (3) Trafficking of membrane proteins. (4) Transient membrane associations. (5) Post-translational modifications most notably phosphorylation and (6) disorder-linked isoform dependent function. We finish the review by discussing the future challenges facing the membrane protein community regarding......Intrinsic disorder is common in integral membrane proteins, particularly in the intracellular domains. Despite this observation, these domains are not always recognized as being disordered. In this review, we will discuss the biological functions of intrinsically disordered regions of membrane...... proteins, and address why the flexibility afforded by disorder is mechanistically important. Intrinsically disordered regions are present in many common classes of membrane proteins including ion channels and transporters; G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and cytokine...

  2. Intricate knots in proteins: Function and evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Virnau

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Our investigation of knotted structures in the Protein Data Bank reveals the most complicated knot discovered to date. We suggest that the occurrence of this knot in a human ubiquitin hydrolase might be related to the role of the enzyme in protein degradation. While knots are usually preserved among homologues, we also identify an exception in a transcarbamylase. This allows us to exemplify the function of knots in proteins and to suggest how they may have been created.

  3. Dynamics of plant functional groups composition along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    elevation) gradients in the typical area of Yi-Luo River. Using community ecology techniques, these researchers examined the influences of elevation factors on plant functional group dynamics and population interactions along.

  4. Noninvasive measurement of dynamic correlation functions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Uhrich, P

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available )spin systems and arbitrary equilibrium or nonequilibrium initial states. Different choices of the coupling operator give access to the real and imaginary parts of the dynamic correlation function. This protocol reduces disturbances due to the early...

  5. Social Dynamics Management and Functional Behavioral Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David L.

    2018-01-01

    Managing social dynamics is a critical aspect of creating a positive learning environment in classrooms. In this paper three key interrelated ideas, reinforcement, function, and motivating operations, are discussed with relation to managing social behavior.

  6. Architectures and Functional Coverage of Protein-Protein Interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbag, Nurcan; Gursoy, Attila; Guney, Emre; Nussinov, Ruth; Keskin, Ozlem

    2008-01-01

    The diverse range of cellular functions is performed by a limited number of protein folds existing in nature. One may similarly expect that cellular functional diversity would be covered by a limited number of protein-protein interface architectures. Here, we present 8205 interface clusters, each representing unique interface architecture. This dataset of protein-protein interfaces is analyzed and compared with older datasets. We observe that the number of both biological and crystal interfaces increase significantly compared to the number of PDB entries. Further, we find that the number of distinct interface architectures grows at a much faster rate than the number of folds and is yet to level off. We further analyze the growth trend of the functional coverage by constructing functional interaction networks from interfaces. The functional coverage is also found to steadily increase. Interestingly, we also observe that despite the diversity of interface architectures, some are more favorable and frequently used, and of particular interest, those are the ones which are also preferred in single chains. PMID:18620705

  7. Understanding Microbial Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-11

    microbial communities: Function, structure and dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to...dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, University of Cambridge, United Kingdom, from August to December 2014. The programme involved over 150...Communities: Function, Structure and Dynamics’, at the Isaac Newton Institute, Cambridge University, UK, from 19th August 2014 – 19th December 2014

  8. Clinical applications of dynamic functional musculoskeletal ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petscavage-Thomas J

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jonelle Petscavage-Thomas Department of Radiology, Penn State Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, PA, USA Abstract: There is an increasing trend in medicine to utilize ultrasound for diagnosis of musculoskeletal pathology. Although magnetic resonance imaging provides excellent spatial resolution of musculoskeletal structures in multiple imaging planes and is generally the cross-sectional modality of choice, it does not provide dynamic functional assessment of muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Dynamic maneuvers with ultrasound provide functional data and have been shown to be accurate for diagnosis. Ultrasound is also less expensive, portable, and more readily available. This article will review the common snapping, impingement, and friction syndromes imaged with dynamic ultrasound. It will also discuss future areas of research, including musculoskeletal sonoelastography. Keywords: snapping, dynamic, ultrasound, functional, musculoskeletal

  9. ProteinAC: a frequency domain technique for analyzing protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt Varolgunes, Yasemin; Demir, Alper

    2018-03-01

    It is widely believed that the interactions of proteins with ligands and other proteins are determined by their dynamic characteristics as opposed to only static, time-invariant processes. We propose a novel computational technique, called ProteinAC (PAC), that can be used to analyze small scale functional protein motions as well as interactions with ligands directly in the frequency domain. PAC was inspired by a frequency domain analysis technique that is widely used in electronic circuit design, and can be applied to both coarse-grained and all-atom models. It can be considered as a generalization of previously proposed static perturbation-response methods, where the frequency of the perturbation becomes the key. We discuss the precise relationship of PAC to static perturbation-response schemes. We show that the frequency of the perturbation may be an important factor in protein dynamics. Perturbations at different frequencies may result in completely different response behavior while magnitude and direction are kept constant. Furthermore, we introduce several novel frequency dependent metrics that can be computed via PAC in order to characterize response behavior. We present results for the ferric binding protein that demonstrate the potential utility of the proposed techniques.

  10. Unraveling protein dynamics through fast spectral density mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ropars, Virginie; Bouguet-Bonnet, Sabine; Auguin, Daniel; Barthe, Philippe; Canet, Daniel; Roumestand, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Spectral density mapping at multiple NMR field strengths is probably the best method to describe the dynamical behavior of a protein in solution through the analysis of 15 N heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Nevertheless, such analyses are scarcely reported in the literature, probably because this method is excessively demanding in spectrometer measuring time. Indeed, when using n different magnetic fields and assuming the validity of the high frequency approximation, the discrete sampling of the spectral density function with 2n + 1 points needs the measurement of 3n 15 N heteronuclear relaxation measurements (nR 1 , nR 2 , and n 15 N{ 1 H}NOEs). Based on further approximations, we proposed a new strategy that allows us to describe the spectral density with n + 2 points, with the measurement of a total of n + 2 heteronuclear relaxation parameters. Applied to the dynamics analysis of the protein p13 MTCP1 at three different NMR fields, this approach allowed us to divide by nearly a factor of two the total measuring time, without altering further results obtained by the 'model free' analysis of the resulting spectral densities. Furthermore, simulations have shown that this strategy remains applicable to any low isotropically tumbling protein (τ c >3 ns), and is valid for the types of motion generally envisaged for proteins

  11. Automatic annotation of protein motif function with Gene Ontology terms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopalakrishnan Vanathi

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Conserved protein sequence motifs are short stretches of amino acid sequence patterns that potentially encode the function of proteins. Several sequence pattern searching algorithms and programs exist foridentifying candidate protein motifs at the whole genome level. However, amuch needed and importanttask is to determine the functions of the newly identified protein motifs. The Gene Ontology (GO project is an endeavor to annotate the function of genes or protein sequences with terms from a dynamic, controlled vocabulary and these annotations serve well as a knowledge base. Results This paperpresents methods to mine the GO knowledge base and use the association between the GO terms assigned to a sequence and the motifs matched by the same sequence as evidence for predicting the functions of novel protein motifs automatically. The task of assigning GO terms to protein motifsis viewed as both a binary classification and information retrieval problem, where PROSITE motifs are used as samples for mode training and functional prediction. The mutual information of a motif and aGO term association isfound to be a very useful feature. We take advantageof the known motifs to train a logistic regression classifier, which allows us to combine mutual information with other frequency-based features and obtain a probability of correctassociation. The trained logistic regression model has intuitively meaningful and logically plausible parameter values, and performs very well empirically according to our evaluation criteria. Conclusions In this research, different methods for automatic annotation of protein motifs have been investigated. Empirical result demonstrated that the methods have a great potential for detecting and augmenting information about thefunctions of newly discovered candidate protein motifs.

  12. Phytochemicals perturb membranes and promiscuously alter protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingólfsson, Helgi I; Thakur, Pratima; Herold, Karl F; Hobart, E Ashley; Ramsey, Nicole B; Periole, Xavier; de Jong, Djurre H; Zwama, Martijn; Yilmaz, Duygu; Hall, Katherine; Maretzky, Thorsten; Hemmings, Hugh C; Blobel, Carl; Marrink, Siewert J; Koçer, Armağan; Sack, Jon T; Andersen, Olaf S

    2014-08-15

    A wide variety of phytochemicals are consumed for their perceived health benefits. Many of these phytochemicals have been found to alter numerous cell functions, but the mechanisms underlying their biological activity tend to be poorly understood. Phenolic phytochemicals are particularly promiscuous modifiers of membrane protein function, suggesting that some of their actions may be due to a common, membrane bilayer-mediated mechanism. To test whether bilayer perturbation may underlie this diversity of actions, we examined five bioactive phenols reported to have medicinal value: capsaicin from chili peppers, curcumin from turmeric, EGCG from green tea, genistein from soybeans, and resveratrol from grapes. We find that each of these widely consumed phytochemicals alters lipid bilayer properties and the function of diverse membrane proteins. Molecular dynamics simulations show that these phytochemicals modify bilayer properties by localizing to the bilayer/solution interface. Bilayer-modifying propensity was verified using a gramicidin-based assay, and indiscriminate modulation of membrane protein function was demonstrated using four proteins: membrane-anchored metalloproteases, mechanosensitive ion channels, and voltage-dependent potassium and sodium channels. Each protein exhibited similar responses to multiple phytochemicals, consistent with a common, bilayer-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that many effects of amphiphilic phytochemicals are due to cell membrane perturbations, rather than specific protein binding.

  13. Water dynamics clue to key residues in protein folding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Meng; Zhu, Huaiqiu; Yao, Xin-Qiu; She, Zhen-Su

    2010-01-01

    A computational method independent of experimental protein structure information is proposed to recognize key residues in protein folding, from the study of hydration water dynamics. Based on all-atom molecular dynamics simulation, two key residues are recognized with distinct water dynamical behavior in a folding process of the Trp-cage protein. The identified key residues are shown to play an essential role in both 3D structure and hydrophobic-induced collapse. With observations on hydration water dynamics around key residues, a dynamical pathway of folding can be interpreted.

  14. Structure and function of nanoparticle-protein conjugates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubin-Tam, M-E; Hamad-Schifferli, K

    2008-01-01

    Conjugation of proteins to nanoparticles has numerous applications in sensing, imaging, delivery, catalysis, therapy and control of protein structure and activity. Therefore, characterizing the nanoparticle-protein interface is of great importance. A variety of covalent and non-covalent linking chemistries have been reported for nanoparticle attachment. Site-specific labeling is desirable in order to control the protein orientation on the nanoparticle, which is crucial in many applications such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer. We evaluate methods for successful site-specific attachment. Typically, a specific protein residue is linked directly to the nanoparticle core or to the ligand. As conjugation often affects the protein structure and function, techniques to probe structure and activity are assessed. We also examine how molecular dynamics simulations of conjugates would complete those experimental techniques in order to provide atomistic details on the effect of nanoparticle attachment. Characterization studies of nanoparticle-protein complexes show that the structure and function are influenced by the chemistry of the nanoparticle ligand, the nanoparticle size, the nanoparticle material, the stoichiometry of the conjugates, the labeling site on the protein and the nature of the linkage (covalent versus non-covalent)

  15. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    cytokine receptors is a common immune evasion strategy adopted by large DNA viruses like poxviruses. Poxviruses encode soluble proteins that are secreted from infected cells and function as soluble IFNγ receptor (IFNγR) which blocks IFN-γ activity. Poxviruses express four vTNFRs, which have different properties.

  16. Protein-protein interaction network-based detection of functionally similar proteins within species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Baoxing; Wang, Fen; Guo, Yang; Sang, Qing; Liu, Min; Li, Dengyun; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Deli

    2012-07-01

    Although functionally similar proteins across species have been widely studied, functionally similar proteins within species showing low sequence similarity have not been examined in detail. Identification of these proteins is of significant importance for understanding biological functions, evolution of protein families, progression of co-evolution, and convergent evolution and others which cannot be obtained by detection of functionally similar proteins across species. Here, we explored a method of detecting functionally similar proteins within species based on graph theory. After denoting protein-protein interaction networks using graphs, we split the graphs into subgraphs using the 1-hop method. Proteins with functional similarities in a species were detected using a method of modified shortest path to compare these subgraphs and to find the eligible optimal results. Using seven protein-protein interaction networks and this method, some functionally similar proteins with low sequence similarity that cannot detected by sequence alignment were identified. By analyzing the results, we found that, sometimes, it is difficult to separate homologous from convergent evolution. Evaluation of the performance of our method by gene ontology term overlap showed that the precision of our method was excellent. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Protein function prediction using neighbor relativity in protein-protein interaction network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, Sobhan; Rahgozar, Masoud; Rahimi, Amir

    2013-04-01

    There is a large gap between the number of discovered proteins and the number of functionally annotated ones. Due to the high cost of determining protein function by wet-lab research, function prediction has become a major task for computational biology and bioinformatics. Some researches utilize the proteins interaction information to predict function for un-annotated proteins. In this paper, we propose a novel approach called "Neighbor Relativity Coefficient" (NRC) based on interaction network topology which estimates the functional similarity between two proteins. NRC is calculated for each pair of proteins based on their graph-based features including distance, common neighbors and the number of paths between them. In order to ascribe function to an un-annotated protein, NRC estimates a weight for each neighbor to transfer its annotation to the unknown protein. Finally, the unknown protein will be annotated by the top score transferred functions. We also investigate the effect of using different coefficients for various types of functions. The proposed method has been evaluated on Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Homo sapiens interaction networks. The performance analysis demonstrates that NRC yields better results in comparison with previous protein function prediction approaches that utilize interaction network. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Predicting protein structure classes from function predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, I.; Rahnenfuhrer, J.; de Lichtenberg, Ulrik

    2004-01-01

    membership. Even for structural families of small size, family members receive significantly higher scores. For some examples, we show that the relevant functional features identified by this method are biologically meaningful. The proposed approach can be used to improve existing sequence......We introduce a new approach to using the information contained in sequence-to-function prediction data in order to recognize protein template classes, a critical step in predicting protein structure. The data on which our method is based comprise probabilities of functional categories; for given...... query sequences these probabilities are obtained by a neural net that has previously been trained on a variety of functionally important features. On a training set of sequences we assess the relevance of individual functional categories for identifying a given structural family. Using a combination...

  19. Determination of Dynamical Heterogeneity from Dynamic Neutron-Scattering of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vural, Derya; Smith, Jeremy C; Glyde, Henry R

    2018-03-23

    Motional displacements of hydrogen (H) in proteins can be measured using incoherent neutron-scattering methods. These displacements can also be calculated numerically using data from molecular dynamics simulations. An enormous amount of data on the average mean-square motional displacement (MSD) of H as a function of protein temperature, hydration, and other conditions has been collected. H resides in a wide spectrum of sites in a protein. Some H are tightly bound to molecular chains, and the H motion is dictated by that of the chain. Other H are quite independent. As a result, there is a distribution of motions and MSDs of H within a protein that is denoted dynamical heterogeneity. The goal of this paper is to incorporate a distribution of MSDs into models of the H incoherent intermediate scattering function, I(Q,t), that is calculated and observed. The aim is to contribute information on the distribution as well as on the average MSD from comparison of the models with simulations and experiment. For example, we find that simulations of I(Q,t) in lysozyme are well reproduced if the distribution of MSDs is bimodal with two broad peaks rather than a single broad peak. Copyright © 2018 Biophysical Society. All rights reserved.

  20. Incorporating functional inter-relationships into protein function prediction algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Vipin

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional classification schemes (e.g. the Gene Ontology that serve as the basis for annotation efforts in several organisms are often the source of gold standard information for computational efforts at supervised protein function prediction. While successful function prediction algorithms have been developed, few previous efforts have utilized more than the protein-to-functional class label information provided by such knowledge bases. For instance, the Gene Ontology not only captures protein annotations to a set of functional classes, but it also arranges these classes in a DAG-based hierarchy that captures rich inter-relationships between different classes. These inter-relationships present both opportunities, such as the potential for additional training examples for small classes from larger related classes, and challenges, such as a harder to learn distinction between similar GO terms, for standard classification-based approaches. Results We propose a method to enhance the performance of classification-based protein function prediction algorithms by addressing the issue of using these interrelationships between functional classes constituting functional classification schemes. Using a standard measure for evaluating the semantic similarity between nodes in an ontology, we quantify and incorporate these inter-relationships into the k-nearest neighbor classifier. We present experiments on several large genomic data sets, each of which is used for the modeling and prediction of over hundred classes from the GO Biological Process ontology. The results show that this incorporation produces more accurate predictions for a large number of the functional classes considered, and also that the classes benefitted most by this approach are those containing the fewest members. In addition, we show how our proposed framework can be used for integrating information from the entire GO hierarchy for improving the accuracy of

  1. Controlled Activation of Protein Rotational Dynamics Using Smart Hydrogel Tethering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beech, Brenda M.; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-05

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.

  2. Catalysis of protein folding by chaperones accelerates evolutionary dynamics in adapting cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Cetinbaş

    Full Text Available Although molecular chaperones are essential components of protein homeostatic machinery, their mechanism of action and impact on adaptation and evolutionary dynamics remain controversial. Here we developed a physics-based ab initio multi-scale model of a living cell for population dynamics simulations to elucidate the effect of chaperones on adaptive evolution. The 6-loci genomes of model cells encode model proteins, whose folding and interactions in cellular milieu can be evaluated exactly from their genome sequences. A genotype-phenotype relationship that is based on a simple yet non-trivially postulated protein-protein interaction (PPI network determines the cell division rate. Model proteins can exist in native and molten globule states and participate in functional and all possible promiscuous non-functional PPIs. We find that an active chaperone mechanism, whereby chaperones directly catalyze protein folding, has a significant impact on the cellular fitness and the rate of evolutionary dynamics, while passive chaperones, which just maintain misfolded proteins in soluble complexes have a negligible effect on the fitness. We find that by partially releasing the constraint on protein stability, active chaperones promote a deeper exploration of sequence space to strengthen functional PPIs, and diminish the non-functional PPIs. A key experimentally testable prediction emerging from our analysis is that down-regulation of chaperones that catalyze protein folding significantly slows down the adaptation dynamics.

  3. Aromatic interactions impact ligand binding and function at serotonin 5-HT2C G protein-coupled receptors: receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics results validated by experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova-Sintjago, Tania; Villa, Nancy; Fang, Lijuan; Booth, Raymond G.

    2014-02-01

    The serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) 5-HT2 G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family consists of types 2A, 2B, and 2C that share ∼75% transmembrane (TM) sequence identity. Agonists for 5-HT2C receptors are under development for psychoses; whereas, at 5-HT2A receptors, antipsychotic effects are associated with antagonists - in fact, 5-HT2A agonists can cause hallucinations and 5-HT2B agonists cause cardiotoxicity. It is known that 5-HT2A TM6 residues W6.48, F6.51, and F6.52 impact ligand binding and function; however, ligand interactions with these residues at the 5-HT2C receptor have not been reported. To predict and validate molecular determinants for 5-HT2C-specific activation, results from receptor homology modelling, ligand docking, and molecular dynamics simulation studies were compared with experimental results for ligand binding and function at wild type and W6.48A, F6.51A, and F6.52A point-mutated 5-HT2C receptors.

  4. Normal mode analysis as a method to derive protein dynamics information from the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wako, Hiroshi; Endo, Shigeru

    2017-12-01

    Normal mode analysis (NMA) can facilitate quick and systematic investigation of protein dynamics using data from the Protein Data Bank (PDB). We developed an elastic network model-based NMA program using dihedral angles as independent variables. Compared to the NMA programs that use Cartesian coordinates as independent variables, key attributes of the proposed program are as follows: (1) chain connectivity related to the folding pattern of a polypeptide chain is naturally embedded in the model; (2) the full-atom system is acceptable, and owing to a considerably smaller number of independent variables, the PDB data can be used without further manipulation; (3) the number of variables can be easily reduced by some of the rotatable dihedral angles; (4) the PDB data for any molecule besides proteins can be considered without coarse-graining; and (5) individual motions of constituent subunits and ligand molecules can be easily decomposed into external and internal motions to examine their mutual and intrinsic motions. Its performance is illustrated with an example of a DNA-binding allosteric protein, a catabolite activator protein. In particular, the focus is on the conformational change upon cAMP and DNA binding, and on the communication between their binding sites remotely located from each other. In this illustration, NMA creates a vivid picture of the protein dynamics at various levels of the structures, i.e., atoms, residues, secondary structures, domains, subunits, and the complete system, including DNA and cAMP. Comparative studies of the specific protein in different states, e.g., apo- and holo-conformations, and free and complexed configurations, provide useful information for studying structurally and functionally important aspects of the protein.

  5. The structure and function of endophilin proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Ole; Brodin, Lennart; Jung, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Members of the BAR domain protein superfamily are essential elements of cellular traffic. Endophilins are among the best studied BAR domain proteins. They have a prominent function in synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE), receptor trafficking and apoptosis, and in other processes that require remod...... remodeling of the membrane structure. Here, we discuss the role of endophilins in these processes and summarize novel insights into the molecular aspects of endophilin function. Also, we discuss phosphorylation of endophilins and how this and other mechanisms may contribute to disease....

  6. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  7. Functionality of system components: Conservation of protein function in protein feature space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    Many protein features useful for prediction of protein function can be predicted from sequence, including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization, and physical/chemical properties. We show here that such protein features are more conserved among orthologs than paralogs, indicating...... they are crucial for protein function and thus subject to selective pressure. This means that a function prediction method based on sequence-derived features may be able to discriminate between proteins with different function even when they have highly similar structure. Also, such a method is likely to perform...... well on organisms other than the one on which it was trained. We evaluate the performance of such a method, ProtFun, which relies on protein features as its sole input, and show that the method gives similar performance for most eukaryotes and performs much better than anticipated on archaea...

  8. Functionality of system components: Conservation of protein function in protein feature space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Ussery, David; Brunak, Søren

    2003-01-01

    well on organisms other than the one on which it was trained. We evaluate the performance of such a method, ProtFun, which relies on protein features as its sole input, and show that the method gives similar performance for most eukaryotes and performs much better than anticipated on archaea......Many protein features useful for prediction of protein function can be predicted from sequence, including posttranslational modifications, subcellular localization, and physical/chemical properties. We show here that such protein features are more conserved among orthologs than paralogs, indicating...... they are crucial for protein function and thus subject to selective pressure. This means that a function prediction method based on sequence-derived features may be able to discriminate between proteins with different function even when they have highly similar structure. Also, such a method is likely to perform...

  9. Enterovirus A71 Proteins: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Yuan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71 infection has grown to become a serious threat to global public health. It is one of the major causes of hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD in infants and young children. EV-A71 can also infect the central nervous system (CNS and induce diverse neurological complications, such as brainstem encephalitis, aseptic meningitis, and acute flaccid paralysis, or even death. Viral proteins play a crucial role in EV-A71 infection. Many recent studies have discussed the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins, and the findings reported will definitely aid the development of vaccines and therapeutic approaches. This article reviews the progress in the research on the structure and function of EV-A71 proteins. Available literature can provide a basis for studying the pathogenesis of EV-A71 infection in detail.

  10. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  11. Leucocyte Function in Protein Deficiency States

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Total proteins and serum albumin levels were correlated in each group, according to the following: (i) the total leucocyte count; (ii) the number of cells containing NBT; and (Ui) the number of cells ... show no increase in leucocyte count; however. their leucocytes ... could find no deficiency in intracellular leucocyte function ...

  12. The dynamic multisite interactions between two intrinsically disordered proteins

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Shaowen

    2017-05-11

    Protein interactions involving intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) comprise a variety of binding modes, from the well characterized folding upon binding to dynamic fuzzy complex. To date, most studies concern the binding of an IDP to a structured protein, while the Interaction between two IDPs is poorly understood. In this study, we combined NMR, smFRET, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to characterize the interaction between two IDPs, the C-terminal domain (CTD) of protein 4.1G and the nuclear mitotic apparatus (NuMA) protein. It is revealed that CTD and NuMA form a fuzzy complex with remaining structural disorder. Multiple binding sites on both proteins were identified by MD and mutagenesis studies. Our study provides an atomic scenario in which two IDPs bearing multiple binding sites interact with each other in dynamic equilibrium. The combined approach employed here could be widely applicable for investigating IDPs and their dynamic interactions.

  13. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weipeng eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm.

  14. Tet protein function during Drosophila development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available The TET (Ten-eleven translocation 1, 2 and 3 proteins have been shown to function as DNA hydroxymethylases in vertebrates and their requirements have been documented extensively. Recently, the Tet proteins have been shown to also hydroxylate 5-methylcytosine in RNA. 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmrC is enriched in messenger RNA but the function of this modification has yet to be elucidated. Because Cytosine methylation in DNA is barely detectable in Drosophila, it serves as an ideal model to study the biological function of 5hmrC. Here, we characterized the temporal and spatial expression and requirement of Tet throughout Drosophila development. We show that Tet is essential for viability as Tet complete loss-of-function animals die at the late pupal stage. Tet is highly expressed in neuronal tissues and at more moderate levels in somatic muscle precursors in embryos and larvae. Depletion of Tet in muscle precursors at early embryonic stages leads to defects in larval locomotion and late pupal lethality. Although Tet knock-down in neuronal tissue does not cause lethality, it is essential for neuronal function during development through its affects upon locomotion in larvae and the circadian rhythm of adult flies. Further, we report the function of Tet in ovarian morphogenesis. Together, our findings provide basic insights into the biological function of Tet in Drosophila, and may illuminate observed neuronal and muscle phenotypes observed in vertebrates.

  15. Comparison of the Internal Dynamics of Metalloproteases Provides New Insights on Their Function and Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique F Carvalho

    Full Text Available Metalloproteases have evolved in a vast number of biological systems, being one of the most diverse types of proteases and presenting a wide range of folds and catalytic metal ions. Given the increasing understanding of protein internal dynamics and its role in enzyme function, we are interested in assessing how the structural heterogeneity of metalloproteases translates into their dynamics. Therefore, the dynamical profile of the clan MA type protein thermolysin, derived from an Elastic Network Model of protein structure, was evaluated against those obtained from a set of experimental structures and molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. A close correspondence was obtained between modes derived from the coarse-grained model and the subspace of functionally-relevant motions observed experimentally, the later being shown to be encoded in the internal dynamics of the protein. This prompted the use of dynamics-based comparison methods that employ such coarse-grained models in a representative set of clan members, allowing for its quantitative description in terms of structural and dynamical variability. Although members show structural similarity, they nonetheless present distinct dynamical profiles, with no apparent correlation between structural and dynamical relatedness. However, previously unnoticed dynamical similarity was found between the relevant members Carboxypeptidase Pfu, Leishmanolysin, and Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A, despite sharing no structural similarity. Inspection of the respective alignments shows that dynamical similarity has a functional basis, namely the need for maintaining proper intermolecular interactions with the respective substrates. These results suggest that distinct selective pressure mechanisms act on metalloproteases at structural and dynamical levels through the course of their evolution. This work shows how new insights on metalloprotease function and evolution can be assessed with comparison schemes that

  16. Robust transient dynamics and brain functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovich, Mikhail I; Varona, Pablo

    2011-01-01

    In the last few decades several concepts of dynamical systems theory (DST) have guided psychologists, cognitive scientists, and neuroscientists to rethink about sensory motor behavior and embodied cognition. A critical step in the progress of DST application to the brain (supported by modern methods of brain imaging and multi-electrode recording techniques) has been the transfer of its initial success in motor behavior to mental function, i.e., perception, emotion, and cognition. Open questions from research in genetics, ecology, brain sciences, etc., have changed DST itself and lead to the discovery of a new dynamical phenomenon, i.e., reproducible and robust transients that are at the same time sensitive to informational signals. The goal of this review is to describe a new mathematical framework - heteroclinic sequential dynamics - to understand self-organized activity in the brain that can explain certain aspects of robust itinerant behavior. Specifically, we discuss a hierarchy of coarse-grain models of mental dynamics in the form of kinetic equations of modes. These modes compete for resources at three levels: (i) within the same modality, (ii) among different modalities from the same family (like perception), and (iii) among modalities from different families (like emotion and cognition). The analysis of the conditions for robustness, i.e., the structural stability of transient (sequential) dynamics, give us the possibility to explain phenomena like the finite capacity of our sequential working memory - a vital cognitive function -, and to find specific dynamical signatures - different kinds of instabilities - of several brain functions and mental diseases.

  17. Robust transient dynamics and brain functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail I Rabinovich

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades several concepts of Dynamical Systems Theory (DST have guided psychologists, cognitive scientists, and neuroscientists to rethink about sensory motor behavior and embodied cognition. A critical step in the progress of DST application to the brain (supported by modern methods of brain imaging and multi-electrode recording techniques has been the transfer of its initial success in motor behavior to mental function, i.e., perception, emotion, and cognition. Open questions from research in genetics, ecology, brain sciences, etc. have changed DST itself and lead to the discovery of a new dynamical phenomenon, i.e., reproducible and robust transients that are at the same time sensitive to informational signals. The goal of this review is to describe a new mathematical framework -heteroclinic sequential dynamics- to understand self-organized activity in the brain that can explain certain aspects of robust itinerant behavior. Specifically, we discuss a hierarchy of coarse-grain models of mental dynamics in the form of kinetic equations of modes. These modes compete for resources at three levels: (i within the same modality, (ii among different modalities from the same family (like perception, and (iii among modalities from different families (like emotion and cognition. The analysis of the conditions for robustness, i.e., the structural stability of transient (sequential dynamics, give us the possibility to explain phenomena like the finite capacity of our sequential working memory -a vital cognitive function-, and to find specific dynamical signatures -different kinds of instabilities- of several brain functions and mental diseases.

  18. Generating functional analysis of CDMA detection dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mimura, Kazushi [Faculty of Information Sciences, Hiroshima City University, Hiroshima 731-3194 (Japan); Okada, Masato [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-5861 (Japan); Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2005-11-18

    We investigate the detection dynamics of the parallel interference canceller (PIC) for code-division multiple-access (CDMA) multiuser detection, applied to a randomly spread, fully synchronous base-band uncoded CDMA channel model with additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) under perfect power control in the large-system limit. It is known that the predictions of the density evolution (DE) can fairly explain the detection dynamics only in the case where the detection dynamics converge. At transients, though, the predictions of DE systematically deviate from computer simulation results. Furthermore, when the detection dynamics fail to converge, the deviation of the predictions of DE from the results of numerical experiments becomes large. As an alternative, generating functional analysis (GFA) can take into account the effect of the Onsager reaction term exactly and does not need the Gaussian assumption of the local field. We present GFA to evaluate the detection dynamics of PIC for CDMA multiuser detection. The predictions of GFA exhibit good consistency with the computer simulation result for any condition, even if the dynamics fail to converge.

  19. Dynamic protein assembly by programmable DNA strand displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rebecca P.; Blackstock, Daniel; Sun, Qing; Chen, Wilfred

    2018-03-01

    Inspired by the remarkable ability of natural protein switches to sense and respond to a wide range of environmental queues, here we report a strategy to engineer synthetic protein switches by using DNA strand displacement to dynamically organize proteins with highly diverse and complex logic gate architectures. We show that DNA strand displacement can be used to dynamically control the spatial proximity and the corresponding fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two fluorescent proteins. Performing Boolean logic operations enabled the explicit control of protein proximity using multi-input, reversible and amplification architectures. We further demonstrate the power of this technology beyond sensing by achieving dynamic control of an enzyme cascade. Finally, we establish the utility of the approach as a synthetic computing platform that drives the dynamic reconstitution of a split enzyme for targeted prodrug activation based on the sensing of cancer-specific miRNAs.

  20. Protein dynamics governed by interfaces of high polarity and low packing density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Espinosa Angarica

    Full Text Available The folding pathway, three-dimensional structure and intrinsic dynamics of proteins are governed by their amino acid sequences. Internal protein surfaces with physicochemical properties appropriate to modulate conformational fluctuations could play important roles in folding and dynamics. We show here that proteins contain buried interfaces of high polarity and low packing density, coined as LIPs: Light Interfaces of high Polarity, whose physicochemical properties make them unstable. The structures of well-characterized equilibrium and kinetic folding intermediates indicate that the LIPs of the corresponding native proteins fold late and are involved in local unfolding events. Importantly, LIPs can be identified using very fast and uncomplicated computational analysis of protein three-dimensional structures, which provides an easy way to delineate the protein segments involved in dynamics. Since LIPs can be retained while the sequences of the interacting segments diverge significantly, proteins could in principle evolve new functional features reusing pre-existing encoded dynamics. Large-scale identification of LIPS may contribute to understanding evolutionary constraints of proteins and the way protein intrinsic dynamics are encoded.

  1. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griswold Karl E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. Results This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. Conclusions By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide

  2. Optimization algorithms for functional deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Zheng, Wei; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2010-04-09

    To develop protein therapeutics from exogenous sources, it is necessary to mitigate the risks of eliciting an anti-biotherapeutic immune response. A key aspect of the response is the recognition and surface display by antigen-presenting cells of epitopes, short peptide fragments derived from the foreign protein. Thus, developing minimal-epitope variants represents a powerful approach to deimmunizing protein therapeutics. Critically, mutations selected to reduce immunogenicity must not interfere with the protein's therapeutic activity. This paper develops methods to improve the likelihood of simultaneously reducing the anti-biotherapeutic immune response while maintaining therapeutic activity. A dynamic programming approach identifies optimal and near-optimal sets of conservative point mutations to minimize the occurrence of predicted T-cell epitopes in a target protein. In contrast with existing methods, those described here integrate analysis of immunogenicity and stability/activity, are broadly applicable to any protein class, guarantee global optimality, and provide sufficient flexibility for users to limit the total number of mutations and target MHC alleles of interest. The input is simply the primary amino acid sequence of the therapeutic candidate, although crystal structures and protein family sequence alignments may also be input when available. The output is a scored list of sets of point mutations predicted to reduce the protein's immunogenicity while maintaining structure and function. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach in a number of case study applications, showing that, in general, our best variants are predicted to be better than those produced by previous deimmunization efforts in terms of either immunogenicity or stability, or both factors. By developing global optimization algorithms leveraging well-established immunogenicity and stability prediction techniques, we provide the protein engineer with a mechanism for exploring the

  3. Discriminating lysosomal membrane protein types using dynamic neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Vijay; Gupta, Dwijendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    This work presents a dynamic artificial neural network methodology, which classifies the proteins into their classes from their sequences alone: the lysosomal membrane protein classes and the various other membranes protein classes. In this paper, neural networks-based lysosomal-associated membrane protein type prediction system is proposed. Different protein sequence representations are fused to extract the features of a protein sequence, which includes seven feature sets; amino acid (AA) composition, sequence length, hydrophobic group, electronic group, sum of hydrophobicity, R-group, and dipeptide composition. To reduce the dimensionality of the large feature vector, we applied the principal component analysis. The probabilistic neural network, generalized regression neural network, and Elman regression neural network (RNN) are used as classifiers and compared with layer recurrent network (LRN), a dynamic network. The dynamic networks have memory, i.e. its output depends not only on the input but the previous outputs also. Thus, the accuracy of LRN classifier among all other artificial neural networks comes out to be the highest. The overall accuracy of jackknife cross-validation is 93.2% for the data-set. These predicted results suggest that the method can be effectively applied to discriminate lysosomal associated membrane proteins from other membrane proteins (Type-I, Outer membrane proteins, GPI-Anchored) and Globular proteins, and it also indicates that the protein sequence representation can better reflect the core feature of membrane proteins than the classical AA composition.

  4. Study of the interaction of potassium ion channel protein with micelle by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shantappa, Anil; Talukdar, Keka

    2018-04-01

    Ion channels are proteins forming pore inside the body of all living organisms. This potassium ion channel known as KcsA channel and it is found in the each cell and nervous system. Flow of various ions is regulated by the function of the ion channels. The nerve ion channel protein with protein data bank entry 1BL8, which is basically an ion channel protein in Streptomyces Lividans and which is taken up to form micelle-protein system and the system is analyzed by using molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, ion channel pore is engineered by CHARMM potential and then Micelle-protein system is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation. For some specific micelle concentration, the protein unfolding is observed.

  5. Dynamic protein interaction modules in human hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hui; Lin, Chen-Ching; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Zhongming

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles have been frequently integrated with the human protein interactome to uncover functional modules under specific conditions like disease state. Beyond traditional differential expression analysis, differential co-expression analysis has emerged as a robust approach to reveal condition-specific network modules, with successful applications in a few human disease studies. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which is often interrelated with the Hepatitis C virus, typically develops through multiple stages. A comprehensive investigation of HCC progression-specific differential co-expression modules may advance our understanding of HCC's pathophysiological mechanisms. Compared with differentially expressed genes, differentially co-expressed genes were found more likely enriched with Hepatitis C virus binding proteins and cancer-mutated genes, and they were clustered more densely in the human reference protein interaction network. These observations indicated that a differential co-expression approach could outperform the standard differential expression network analysis in searching for disease-related modules. We then proposed a differential co-expression network approach to uncover network modules involved in HCC development. Specifically, we discovered subnetworks that enriched differentially co-expressed gene pairs in each HCC transition stage, and further resolved modules with coherent co-expression change patterns over all HCC developmental stages. Our identified network modules were enriched with HCC-related genes and implicated in cancer-related biological functions. In particular, APC and YWHAZ were highlighted as two most remarkable genes in the network modules, and their dynamic interaction partnership was resolved in HCC development. We demonstrated that integration of differential co-expression with the protein interactome could outperform the traditional differential expression approach in discovering network modules of human diseases

  6. Dynamic rheology of food protein networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small amplitude oscillatory shear analyses of samples containing protein are useful for determining the nature of the protein matrix without damaging it. Elastic modulus, viscous modulus, and loss tangent (the ratio of viscous modulus to elastic modulus) give information on the strength of the netw...

  7. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...

  8. The functional properties, modification and utilization of whey proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. G. Venter

    1986-03-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein has an excellent nutritional value and exhibits a functional potential. In comparison with certain other food proteins, the whey protein content of essential amino acids is extremely favourable for human consumption. Depending on the heat-treatment history thereof, soluble whey proteins with utilizable functional properties, apart from high biological value, true digestibility, protein efficiency ratio and nett protein utilization, can be recovered. Various technological and chemical recovery processes have been designed. Chemically and enzymatically modified whey protein is manufactured to obtain technological and functional advantages. The important functional properties of whey proteins, namely hydration, gelation, emulsifying and foaming properties, are reviewed.

  9. Protein dynamics in individual human cells: experiment and theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Aharon Cohen

    Full Text Available A current challenge in biology is to understand the dynamics of protein circuits in living human cells. Can one define and test equations for the dynamics and variability of a protein over time? Here, we address this experimentally and theoretically, by means of accurate time-resolved measurements of endogenously tagged proteins in individual human cells. As a model system, we choose three stable proteins displaying cell-cycle-dependant dynamics. We find that protein accumulation with time per cell is quadratic for proteins with long mRNA life times and approximately linear for a protein with short mRNA lifetime. Both behaviors correspond to a classical model of transcription and translation. A stochastic model, in which genes slowly switch between ON and OFF states, captures measured cell-cell variability. The data suggests, in accordance with the model, that switching to the gene ON state is exponentially distributed and that the cell-cell distribution of protein levels can be approximated by a Gamma distribution throughout the cell cycle. These results suggest that relatively simple models may describe protein dynamics in individual human cells.

  10. Effects of N-glycosylation on protein conformation and dynamics: Protein Data Bank analysis and molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hui Sun; Qi, Yifei; Im, Wonpil

    2015-03-09

    N-linked glycosylation is one of the most important, chemically complex, and ubiquitous post-translational modifications in all eukaryotes. The N-glycans that are covalently linked to proteins are involved in numerous biological processes. There is considerable interest in developments of general approaches to predict the structural consequences of site-specific glycosylation and to understand how these effects can be exploited in protein design with advantageous properties. In this study, the impacts of N-glycans on protein structure and dynamics are systematically investigated using an integrated computational approach of the Protein Data Bank structure analysis and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of glycosylated and deglycosylated proteins. Our study reveals that N-glycosylation does not induce significant changes in protein structure, but decreases protein dynamics, likely leading to an increase in protein stability. Overall, these results suggest not only a common role of glycosylation in proteins, but also a need for certain proteins to be properly glycosylated to gain their intrinsic dynamic properties.

  11. Detecting transitions in protein dynamics using a recurrence quantification analysis based bootstrap method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karain, Wael I

    2017-11-28

    Proteins undergo conformational transitions over different time scales. These transitions are closely intertwined with the protein's function. Numerous standard techniques such as principal component analysis are used to detect these transitions in molecular dynamics simulations. In this work, we add a new method that has the ability to detect transitions in dynamics based on the recurrences in the dynamical system. It combines bootstrapping and recurrence quantification analysis. We start from the assumption that a protein has a "baseline" recurrence structure over a given period of time. Any statistically significant deviation from this recurrence structure, as inferred from complexity measures provided by recurrence quantification analysis, is considered a transition in the dynamics of the protein. We apply this technique to a 132 ns long molecular dynamics simulation of the β-Lactamase Inhibitory Protein BLIP. We are able to detect conformational transitions in the nanosecond range in the recurrence dynamics of the BLIP protein during the simulation. The results compare favorably to those extracted using the principal component analysis technique. The recurrence quantification analysis based bootstrap technique is able to detect transitions between different dynamics states for a protein over different time scales. It is not limited to linear dynamics regimes, and can be generalized to any time scale. It also has the potential to be used to cluster frames in molecular dynamics trajectories according to the nature of their recurrence dynamics. One shortcoming for this method is the need to have large enough time windows to insure good statistical quality for the recurrence complexity measures needed to detect the transitions.

  12. A comparison of techniques for calculating protein essential dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aalten, D.M.F.; de Groot, B.L.; Findlay, J.B.C.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Amadei, A

    1997-01-01

    Recently the basic theory of essential dynamics, a method for extracting large concerted motions from protein molecular dynamics trajectories, was described. Here, we introduce and test new aspects. A method for diagonalizing large covariance matrices is presented. We show that it is possible to

  13. Modelling Protein Dynamics on the Microsecond Time Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siuda, Iwona Anna

    Recent years have shown an increase in coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulations, providing structural and dynamic details of large proteins and enabling studies of self-assembly of biological materials. It is not easy to acquire such data experimentally, and access is also still limited...... family....

  14. PCI-SS: MISO dynamic nonlinear protein secondary structure prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aboul-Magd Mohammed O

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the function of a protein is largely dictated by its three dimensional configuration, determining a protein's structure is of fundamental importance to biology. Here we report on a novel approach to determining the one dimensional secondary structure of proteins (distinguishing α-helices, β-strands, and non-regular structures from primary sequence data which makes use of Parallel Cascade Identification (PCI, a powerful technique from the field of nonlinear system identification. Results Using PSI-BLAST divergent evolutionary profiles as input data, dynamic nonlinear systems are built through a black-box approach to model the process of protein folding. Genetic algorithms (GAs are applied in order to optimize the architectural parameters of the PCI models. The three-state prediction problem is broken down into a combination of three binary sub-problems and protein structure classifiers are built using 2 layers of PCI classifiers. Careful construction of the optimization, training, and test datasets ensures that no homology exists between any training and testing data. A detailed comparison between PCI and 9 contemporary methods is provided over a set of 125 new protein chains guaranteed to be dissimilar to all training data. Unlike other secondary structure prediction methods, here a web service is developed to provide both human- and machine-readable interfaces to PCI-based protein secondary structure prediction. This server, called PCI-SS, is available at http://bioinf.sce.carleton.ca/PCISS. In addition to a dynamic PHP-generated web interface for humans, a Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP interface is added to permit invocation of the PCI-SS service remotely. This machine-readable interface facilitates incorporation of PCI-SS into multi-faceted systems biology analysis pipelines requiring protein secondary structure information, and greatly simplifies high-throughput analyses. XML is used to represent the input

  15. Default Mode Dynamics for Global Functional Integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatansever, Deniz; Menon, David K; Manktelow, Anne E; Sahakian, Barbara J; Stamatakis, Emmanuel A

    2015-11-18

    The default mode network (DMN) has been traditionally assumed to hinder behavioral performance in externally focused, goal-directed paradigms and to provide no active contribution to human cognition. However, recent evidence suggests greater DMN activity in an array of tasks, especially those that involve self-referential and memory-based processing. Although data that robustly demonstrate a comprehensive functional role for DMN remains relatively scarce, the global workspace framework, which implicates the DMN in global information integration for conscious processing, can potentially provide an explanation for the broad range of higher-order paradigms that report DMN involvement. We used graph theoretical measures to assess the contribution of the DMN to global functional connectivity dynamics in 22 healthy volunteers during an fMRI-based n-back working-memory paradigm with parametric increases in difficulty. Our predominant finding is that brain modularity decreases with greater task demands, thus adapting a more global workspace configuration, in direct relation to increases in reaction times to correct responses. Flexible default mode regions dynamically switch community memberships and display significant changes in their nodal participation coefficient and strength, which may reflect the observed whole-brain changes in functional connectivity architecture. These findings have important implications for our understanding of healthy brain function, as they suggest a central role for the DMN in higher cognitive processing. The default mode network (DMN) has been shown to increase its activity during the absence of external stimulation, and hence was historically assumed to disengage during goal-directed tasks. Recent evidence, however, implicates the DMN in self-referential and memory-based processing. We provide robust evidence for this network's active contribution to working memory by revealing dynamic reconfiguration in its interactions with other networks

  16. Dynamic properties of motor proteins with two subunits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeisky, Anatoly B; III, Hubert Phillips

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of motor protein molecules consisting of two subunits is investigated using simple discrete stochastic models. Exact steady-state analytical expressions are obtained for velocities and dispersions for any number of intermediate states and conformations between the corresponding binding states of proteins. These models enable us to provide a detailed description and comparison of two different mechanisms of the motion of motor proteins along the linear tracks: the hand-over-hand mechanism, when the motion of subunits alternate; and the inchworm mechanism, when one subunit is always trailing another one. It is shown that the proteins in the hand-over-hand mechanism move faster and fluctuate more than the molecules in the inchworm mechanism. The effect of external forces on dynamic properties of motor proteins is also discussed. Finally, a quantitative method, based on experimental observations for single motor proteins, is proposed for distinguishing between two mechanisms of motion

  17. Protein turnover analysis in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by dynamic SILAC, Topograph, and quantitative proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Han, Qiang-Qiang; Zhou, Mao-Tian; Chen, Xi; Guo, Lin

    2016-07-01

    Protein turnover affects protein abundance and phenotypes. Comprehensive investigation of protein turnover dynamics has the potential to provide substantial information about gene expression. Here we report a large-scale protein turnover study in Salmonella Typhimurium during infection by quantitative proteomics. Murine macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cells were infected with SILAC labeled Salmonella. Bacterial cells were extracted after 0, 30, 60, 120, and 240 min. Mass spectrometry analyses yielded information about Salmonella protein turnover dynamics and a software program named Topograph was used for the calculation of protein half lives. The half lives of 311 proteins from intracellular Salmonella were obtained. For bacteria cultured in control medium (DMEM), the half lives for 870 proteins were obtained. The calculated median of protein half lives was 69.13 and 99.30 min for the infection group and the DMEM group, respectively, indicating an elevated protein turnover at the initial stage of infection. Gene ontology analyses revealed that a number of protein functional groups were significantly regulated by infection, including proteins involved in ribosome, periplasmic space, cellular amino acid metabolic process, ion binding, and catalytic activity. The half lives of proteins involved in purine metabolism pathway were found to be significantly shortened during infection. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Dynamic protein complexes regulate NF-kappaB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, E; Krappmann, D

    2008-01-01

    NF-kappaB is a major regulator of the first-line defense against invading pathogens, antigen-specific adaptive immune responses or chemical stress. Stimulation either by extracellular ligands (e.g., inflammatory cytokines, microbial pathogens, peptide antigens) or by intracellular Stressors (e.g., genotoxic drugs) initiates signal-specific pathways that all converge at the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex, the gatekeeper for NF-kappaB activation. During recent years, considerable progress has been made in understanding the function of NF-kappaB in the regulation of cell growth, survival and apoptosis. In this review, we will focus on the regulation of large signaling complexes on the route to NF-kappaB. Recently published data demonstrate that the assembly, maintenance and activity of the IKK complex determine downstream activation of NF-kappaB. In addition, dynamic complexes upstream of IKK are formed in response to tumor necrosis factor (TNF), antigenic peptides or DNA-damaging agents. Clustering of signaling adaptors promotes the association and activation of ubiquitin ligases that trigger the conjugation of regulatory ubiquitin to target proteins. Ubiquitination serves as a platform to recruit the IKK complex and potentially other protein kinases to trigger IKK activation. These findings support a concept whereby protein complex assembly induces regulatory ubiquitination, which in turn recruits and activates protein kinases. Notably, the great interest in a detailed description of the mechanisms that regulate NF-kappaB activity stems from many observations that link dysregulated NF-kappaB signaling with the onset or progression of various diseases, including cancer, chronic inflammation, cardiovascular disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, the formation of large signaling clusters and regulatory ubiquitin chains represents promising targets for pharmacological intervention to modulate NF-kappaB signal transduction in disease.

  19. Coherent Protein Dynamics Explored at FELIX

    CERN Document Server

    Austin, Robert

    2004-01-01

    We have discovered that there exists a very narrow (less than 0.02 microns) wide resonance in the amide I band of myoglobin and photoactive yellow protein that can be driven to greater than 30% saturation using very narrow linewidth pump-probe spectroscopy at FELIX. The extraordinary narrowness of this transition and the extraordinary ease of saturation inplies that this band is highly anharmonic and decoupled from the other oscillators in the amide I band. We will present detailed measurments on this discovery and implications for energy flow in proteins.

  20. Polymer dynamics from synthetic polymers to proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Starting from the standard model of polymer motion - the Rouse model - we briefly present some key experimental results on the mesoscopic dynamics of polymer systems. We touch the role of topological confinement as expressed in the reptation model and discuss in some more detail processes limiting the confinement.

  1. UTILIZATION OF PLANT PROTEINS IN FUNCTIONAL NUTRITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Kulakov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of functional food products technology is considered to be a prospect way for creating new food products. Such products are known to be popular among consumers. Utilization of plant proteins allows to widen and improve food assortment and quality. The article represents a review of plant proteins utilization in production of functional food. For optimization of flour confectionery chemical composition the authors utilized a method of receipts modeling. Simulation of combined products is based on the principles of food combinatorics and aims to create recipes of new types of food products on basis of methods of mathematical optimization by reasonable selection of the basic raw materials, ingredients, food additives and dietary supplements, totality of which ensures formation desired organoleptic, physical and chemical properties product as well as a predetermined level of food, biological and energy value. Modeling process of combined products recipes includes the following three stages: preparation of input data for the design, formalization requirements for the composition and properties of raw ingredients and quality final product, process modeling; product design with desired structural properties.

  2. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Herceg

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fractionation techniques, it is possible to produce various whey - protein based products. The most important products based on the whey proteins are whey protein concentrates (WPC and whey protein isolates (WPI. The aim of this paper was to give comprehensive review of nutritional and functional properties of the most common used whey proteins (whey protein concentrate - WPC and whey protein isolate - WPI in the food industry.

  3. Engineering Escherichia coli for Functional Expression of Membrane Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ho, Franz Y; Poolman, Bert

    2015-01-01

    A major bottleneck in the characterization of membrane proteins is low yield of functional protein in recombinant expression. Microorganisms are widely used for recombinant protein production, because of ease of cultivation and high protein yield. However, the target proteins do not always obtain

  4. msiDBN: A Method of Identifying Critical Proteins in Dynamic PPI Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamics of protein-protein interactions (PPIs reveals the recondite principles of biological processes inside a cell. Shown in a wealth of study, just a small group of proteins, rather than the majority, play more essential roles at crucial points of biological processes. This present work focuses on identifying these critical proteins exhibiting dramatic structural changes in dynamic PPI networks. First, a comprehensive way of modeling the dynamic PPIs is presented which simultaneously analyzes the activity of proteins and assembles the dynamic coregulation correlation between proteins at each time point. Second, a novel method is proposed, named msiDBN, which models a common representation of multiple PPI networks using a deep belief network framework and analyzes the reconstruction errors and the variabilities across the time courses in the biological process. Experiments were implemented on data of yeast cell cycles. We evaluated our network construction method by comparing the functional representations of the derived networks with two other traditional construction methods. The ranking results of critical proteins in msiDBN were compared with the results from the baseline methods. The results of comparison showed that msiDBN had better reconstruction rate and identified more proteins of critical value to yeast cell cycle process.

  5. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  6. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in dynamic landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Ulrich; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2016-05-19

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) and its consequence for ecosystem services has predominantly been studied by controlled, short-term and small-scale experiments under standardized environmental conditions and constant community compositions. However, changes in biodiversity occur in real-world ecosystems with varying environments and a dynamic community composition. In this theme issue, we present novel research on BEF in such dynamic communities. The contributions are organized in three sections on BEF relationships in (i) multi-trophic diversity, (ii) non-equilibrium biodiversity under disturbance and varying environmental conditions, and (iii) large spatial and long temporal scales. The first section shows that multi-trophic BEF relationships often appear idiosyncratic, while accounting for species traits enables a predictive understanding. Future BEF research on complex communities needs to include ecological theory that is based on first principles of species-averaged body masses, stoichiometry and effects of environmental conditions such as temperature. The second section illustrates that disturbance and varying environments have direct as well as indirect (via changes in species richness, community composition and species' traits) effects on BEF relationships. Fluctuations in biodiversity (species richness, community composition and also trait dominance within species) can severely modify BEF relationships. The third section demonstrates that BEF at larger spatial scales is driven by different variables. While species richness per se and community biomass are most important, species identity effects and community composition are less important than at small scales. Across long temporal scales, mass extinctions represent severe changes in biodiversity with mixed effects on ecosystem functions. Together, the contributions of this theme issue identify new research frontiers and answer some open questions on BEF relationships

  7. Biodiversity and ecosystem functioning in dynamic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brose, Ulrich; Hillebrand, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning (BEF) and its consequence for ecosystem services has predominantly been studied by controlled, short-term and small-scale experiments under standardized environmental conditions and constant community compositions. However, changes in biodiversity occur in real-world ecosystems with varying environments and a dynamic community composition. In this theme issue, we present novel research on BEF in such dynamic communities. The contributions are organized in three sections on BEF relationships in (i) multi-trophic diversity, (ii) non-equilibrium biodiversity under disturbance and varying environmental conditions, and (iii) large spatial and long temporal scales. The first section shows that multi-trophic BEF relationships often appear idiosyncratic, while accounting for species traits enables a predictive understanding. Future BEF research on complex communities needs to include ecological theory that is based on first principles of species-averaged body masses, stoichiometry and effects of environmental conditions such as temperature. The second section illustrates that disturbance and varying environments have direct as well as indirect (via changes in species richness, community composition and species' traits) effects on BEF relationships. Fluctuations in biodiversity (species richness, community composition and also trait dominance within species) can severely modify BEF relationships. The third section demonstrates that BEF at larger spatial scales is driven by different variables. While species richness per se and community biomass are most important, species identity effects and community composition are less important than at small scales. Across long temporal scales, mass extinctions represent severe changes in biodiversity with mixed effects on ecosystem functions. Together, the contributions of this theme issue identify new research frontiers and answer some open questions on BEF relationships

  8. Protein Charge and Mass Contribute to the Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Protein-Protein Interactions in a Minimal Proteome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yu; Wang, Hong; Nussinov, Ruth; Ma, Buyong

    2013-01-01

    We constructed and simulated a ‘minimal proteome’ model using Langevin dynamics. It contains 206 essential protein types which were compiled from the literature. For comparison, we generated six proteomes with randomized concentrations. We found that the net charges and molecular weights of the proteins in the minimal genome are not random. The net charge of a protein decreases linearly with molecular weight, with small proteins being mostly positively charged and large proteins negatively charged. The protein copy numbers in the minimal genome have the tendency to maximize the number of protein-protein interactions in the network. Negatively charged proteins which tend to have larger sizes can provide large collision cross-section allowing them to interact with other proteins; on the other hand, the smaller positively charged proteins could have higher diffusion speed and are more likely to collide with other proteins. Proteomes with random charge/mass populations form less stable clusters than those with experimental protein copy numbers. Our study suggests that ‘proper’ populations of negatively and positively charged proteins are important for maintaining a protein-protein interaction network in a proteome. It is interesting to note that the minimal genome model based on the charge and mass of E. Coli may have a larger protein-protein interaction network than that based on the lower organism M. pneumoniae. PMID:23420643

  9. SNAP-25, a known presynaptic protein with emerging postsynaptic functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia eAntonucci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A hallmark of synaptic specializations is their dependence on highly organized complexes of proteins that interact with each other. The loss or modification of key synaptic proteins directly affects the properties of such networks, ultimately impacting synaptic function. SNAP-25 is a component of the SNARE complex, which is central to synaptic vesicle exocytosis, and, by directly interacting with different calcium channels subunits, it negatively modulates neuronal voltage-gated calcium channels, thus regulating intracellular calcium dynamics. The SNAP-25 gene has been associated with distinct brain diseases, including Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, indicating that the protein may act as a shared biological substrate among different synaptopathies. The mechanisms by which alterations in SNAP-25 may concur to these psychiatric diseases are still undefined, although alterations in neurotransmitter release have been indicated as potential causative processes. This review summarizes recent work showing that SNAP-25 not only controls exo/endocytic processes at the presynaptic terminal, but also regulates postsynaptic receptor trafficking, spine morphogenesis and plasticity, thus opening the possibility that SNAP-25 defects may contribute to psychiatric diseases by impacting not only presynaptic but also postsynaptic functions.

  10. Functional thermo-dynamics: a generalization of dynamic density functional theory to non-isothermal situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anero, Jesús G; Español, Pep; Tarazona, Pedro

    2013-07-21

    We present a generalization of Density Functional Theory (DFT) to non-equilibrium non-isothermal situations. By using the original approach set forth by Gibbs in his consideration of Macroscopic Thermodynamics (MT), we consider a Functional Thermo-Dynamics (FTD) description based on the density field and the energy density field. A crucial ingredient of the theory is an entropy functional, which is a concave functional. Therefore, there is a one to one connection between the density and energy fields with the conjugate thermodynamic fields. The connection between the three levels of description (MT, DFT, FTD) is clarified through a bridge theorem that relates the entropy of different levels of description and that constitutes a generalization of Mermin's theorem to arbitrary levels of description whose relevant variables are connected linearly. Although the FTD level of description does not provide any new information about averages and correlations at equilibrium, it is a crucial ingredient for the dynamics in non-equilibrium states. We obtain with the technique of projection operators the set of dynamic equations that describe the evolution of the density and energy density fields from an initial non-equilibrium state towards equilibrium. These equations generalize time dependent density functional theory to non-isothermal situations. We also present an explicit model for the entropy functional for hard spheres.

  11. SPECTRUS: A Dimensionality Reduction Approach for Identifying Dynamical Domains in Protein Complexes from Limited Structural Datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponzoni, Luca; Polles, Guido; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Micheletti, Cristian

    2015-08-04

    Identifying dynamical, quasi-rigid domains in proteins provides a powerful means for characterizing functionally oriented structural changes via a parsimonious set of degrees of freedom. In fact, the relative displacements of few dynamical domains usually suffice to rationalize the mechanics underpinning biological functionality in proteins and can even be exploited for structure determination or refinement purposes. Here we present SPECTRUS, a general scheme that, by solely using amino acid distance fluctuations, can pinpoint the innate quasi-rigid domains of single proteins or large complexes in a robust way. Consistent domains are usually obtained by using either a pair of representative structures or thousands of conformers. The functional insights offered by the approach are illustrated for biomolecular systems of very different size and complexity such as kinases, ion channels, and viral capsids. The decomposition tool is available as a software package and web server at spectrus.sissa.it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Collective dynamics of protein hydration water by brillouin neutron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchini, Andrea; Paciaroni, Alessandro; De Francesco, Alessio; Petrillo, Caterina; Sacchetti, Francesco

    2009-04-08

    By a detailed experimental study of THz dynamics in the ribonuclease protein, we could detect the propagation of coherent collective density fluctuations within the protein hydration shell. The emerging picture indicates the presence of both a dispersing mode, traveling with a speed greater than 3000 m/s, and a nondispersing one, characterized by an almost constant energy of 6-7 meV. In agreement with molecular dynamics simulations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 2002, 89, 275501], the features of the dispersion curves closely resemble those observed in pure liquid water [Phys. Rev. E: Stat. Phys., Plasmas, Fluids, Relat. Interdiscip. Top. 2004, 69, 061203]. On the contrary, the observed damping factors are much larger than in bulk water, with the dispersing mode becoming overdamped at Q = 0.6 A(-1) already. Such novel experimental findings are discussed as a dynamic signature of the disordering effect induced by the protein surface on the local structure of water.

  13. In silico functional elucidation of uncharacterized proteins of Chlamydia abortus strain LLG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gagandeep; Sharma, Dixit; Singh, Vikram; Rani, Jyoti; Marotta, Francessco; Kumar, Manoj; Mal, Gorakh; Singh, Birbal

    2017-03-01

    This study reports structural modeling, molecular dynamics profiling of hypothetical proteins in Chlamydia abortus genome database. The hypothetical protein sequences were extracted from C. abortus LLG Genome Database for functional elucidation using in silico methods. Fifty-one proteins with their roles in defense, binding and transporting other biomolecules were unraveled. Forty-five proteins were found to be nonhomologous to proteins present in hosts infected by C. abortus . Of these, 31 proteins were related to virulence. The structural modeling of two proteins, first, WP_006344020.1 (phosphorylase) and second, WP_006344325.1 (chlamydial protease/proteasome-like activity factor) were accomplished. The conserved active sites necessary for the catalytic function were analyzed. The finally concluded proteins are envisioned as possible targets for developing drugs to curtail chlamydial infections, however, and should be validated by molecular biological methods.

  14. Molecular Effects of Concentrated Solutes on Protein Hydration, Dynamics, and Electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abriata, Luciano A; Spiga, Enrico; Peraro, Matteo Dal

    2016-08-23

    Most studies of protein structure and function are performed in dilute conditions, but proteins typically experience high solute concentrations in their physiological scenarios and biotechnological applications. High solute concentrations have well-known effects on coarse protein traits like stability, diffusion, and shape, but likely also perturb other traits through finer effects pertinent at the residue and atomic levels. Here, NMR and molecular dynamics investigations on ubiquitin disclose variable interactions with concentrated solutes that lead to localized perturbations of the protein's surface, hydration, electrostatics, and dynamics, all dependent on solute size and chemical properties. Most strikingly, small polar uncharged molecules are sticky on the protein surface, whereas charged small molecules are not, but the latter still perturb the internal protein electrostatics as they diffuse nearby. Meanwhile, interactions with macromolecular crowders are favored mainly through hydrophobic, but not through polar, surface patches. All the tested small solutes strongly slow down water exchange at the protein surface, whereas macromolecular crowders do not exert such strong perturbation. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations predict that unspecific interactions slow down microsecond- to millisecond-timescale protein dynamics despite having only mild effects on pico- to nanosecond fluctuations as corroborated by NMR. We discuss our results in the light of recent advances in understanding proteins inside living cells, focusing on the physical chemistry of quinary structure and cellular organization, and we reinforce the idea that proteins should be studied in native-like media to achieve a faithful description of their function. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Probing simultaneously membrane dynamics and protein activity in suspended bilayers in a microfluidic format

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze Greiving-Stimberg, Verena Carolin; Bomer, Johan G.; de Boer, Hans L.; van den Berg, Albert; le Gac, Severine

    2014-01-01

    Membrane dynamics affect the structure and function of ion channels, a point that deserves more attention while studying membrane proteins. One important factor in the local lipidic environment of the ion channels, is the membrane fluidity which is directly connected to the free diffusion and

  16. Nutritional and functional properties of whey proteins concentrate and isolate

    OpenAIRE

    Zoran Herceg; Anet Režek

    2006-01-01

    Whey protein fractions represent 18 - 20 % of total milk nitrogen content. Nutritional value in addition to diverse physico - chemical and functional properties make whey proteins highly suitable for application in foodstuffs. In the most cases, whey proteins are used because of their functional properties. Whey proteins possess favourable functional characteristics such as gelling, water binding, emulsification and foaming ability. Due to application of new process techniques (membrane fract...

  17. Cardiac mitochondria exhibit dynamic functional clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Tobias Kurz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multi-oscillatory behavior of mitochondrial inner membrane potential ΔΨm in self-organized cardiac mitochondrial networks can be triggered by metabolic or oxidative stress. Spatio-temporal analyses of cardiac mitochondrial networks have shown that mitochondria are heterogeneously organized in synchronously oscillating clusters in which the mean cluster frequency and size are inversely correlated, thus suggesting a modulation of cluster frequency through local inter-mitochondrial coupling. In this study, we propose a method to examine the mitochondrial network's topology through quantification of its dynamic local clustering coefficients. Individual mitochondrial ΔΨm oscillation signals were identified for each cardiac myocyte and cross-correlated with all network mitochondria using previously described methods (Kurz et al., 2010. Time-varying inter-mitochondrial connectivity, defined for mitochondria in the whole network whose signals are at least 90% correlated at any given time point, allowed considering functional local clustering coefficients. It is shown that mitochondrial clustering in isolated cardiac myocytes changes dynamically and is significantly higher than for random mitochondrial networks that are constructed using the Erdös-Rényi model based on the same sets of vertices. The network's time-averaged clustering coefficient for cardiac myocytes was found to be 0.500 ± 0.051 (N=9 versus 0.061 ± 0.020 for random networks, respectively. Our results demonstrate that cardiac mitochondria constitute a network with dynamically connected constituents whose topological organization is prone to clustering. Cluster partitioning in networks of coupled oscillators has been observed in scale-free and chaotic systems and is therefore in good agreement with previous models of cardiac mitochondrial networks (Aon et al., 2008.

  18. Structure-Functional Basis of Ion Transport in Sodium–Calcium Exchanger (NCX Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshe Giladi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The membrane-bound sodium–calcium exchanger (NCX proteins shape Ca2+ homeostasis in many cell types, thus participating in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Determination of the crystal structure of an archaeal NCX (NCX_Mj paved the way for a thorough and systematic investigation of ion transport mechanisms in NCX proteins. Here, we review the data gathered from the X-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, hydrogen–deuterium exchange mass-spectrometry (HDX-MS, and ion-flux analyses of mutants. Strikingly, the apo NCX_Mj protein exhibits characteristic patterns in the local backbone dynamics at particular helix segments, thereby possessing characteristic HDX profiles, suggesting structure-dynamic preorganization (geometric arrangements of catalytic residues before the transition state of conserved α1 and α2 repeats at ion-coordinating residues involved in transport activities. Moreover, dynamic preorganization of local structural entities in the apo protein predefines the status of ion-occlusion and transition states, even though Na+ or Ca2+ binding modifies the preceding backbone dynamics nearby functionally important residues. Future challenges include resolving the structural-dynamic determinants governing the ion selectivity, functional asymmetry and ion-induced alternating access. Taking into account the structural similarities of NCX_Mj with the other proteins belonging to the Ca2+/cation exchanger superfamily, the recent findings can significantly improve our understanding of ion transport mechanisms in NCX and similar proteins.

  19. Role of protein dynamics in transmembrane receptor signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong; Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2018-01-01

    Cells are dependent on transmembrane receptors to communicate and transform chemical and physical signals into intracellular responses. Because receptors transport 'information', conformational changes and protein dynamics play a key mechanistic role. We here review examples where experiment...... and computation have been used to study receptor dynamics. Recent studies on three distinct classes of receptors (G-protein coupled receptors, ligand-gated ion-channels and single-pass receptors) are highlighted to show that conformational changes across a range of time-scales and length-scales are central...

  20. Instrumental resolution effects in neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2013-10-01

    In this study, the dynamics of Green Fluorescent protein (GFP) are analyzed using three neutron scattering spectrometers. We focus on the effect of instrumental energy resolution in the analysis of the elastic incoherent structure factor (EISF) and mean square displacement (MSD). This topic still remains a source of controversy. Our data clearly demonstrate the presence of the resolution effect in the dynamic transition for hydrated protein and the onset of translational motions in hydration water consistent with previous results from quasielastic neutron scattering. The 190 K onset of motions in hydration water observed at ∼1 ns is also consistent with a Tg of hydration water below 190 K.

  1. Structural dynamics of green fluorescent protein alone and fused with a single chain Fv protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hink, M.A.; Griep, R.A.; Borst, J.W.; Hoek, van A.; Eppink, M.H.M.; Schots, A.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2000-01-01

    Structural information on intracellular fusions of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) of the jellyfish Aequorea victoria with endogenous proteins is required as they are increasingly used in cell biology and biochemistry. We have investigated the dynamic properties of GFP alone and fused to a

  2. A sensitive fluorescent probe for the polar solvation dynamics at protein-surfactant interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priya; Choudhury, Susobhan; Singha, Subhankar; Jun, Yongwoong; Chakraborty, Sandipan; Sengupta, Jhimli; Das, Ranjan; Ahn, Kyo-Han; Pal, Samir Kumar

    2017-05-17

    Relaxation dynamics at the surface of biologically important macromolecules is important taking into account their functionality in molecular recognition. Over the years it has been shown that the solvation dynamics of a fluorescent probe at biomolecular surfaces and interfaces account for the relaxation dynamics of polar residues and associated water molecules. However, the sensitivity of the dynamics depends largely on the localization and exposure of the probe. For noncovalent fluorescent probes, localization at the region of interest in addition to surface exposure is an added challenge compared to the covalently attached probes at the biological interfaces. Here we have used a synthesized donor-acceptor type dipolar fluorophore, 6-acetyl-(2-((4-hydroxycyclohexyl)(methyl)amino)naphthalene) (ACYMAN), for the investigation of the solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. A significant structural rearrangement of a model histone protein (H1) upon interaction with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) as revealed from the circular dichroism (CD) studies is nicely corroborated in the solvation dynamics of the probe at the interface. The polarization gated fluorescence anisotropy of the probe compared to that at the SDS micellar surface clearly reveals the localization of the probe at the protein-surfactant interface. We have also compared the sensitivity of ACYMAN with other solvation probes including coumarin 500 (C500) and 4-(dicyanomethylene)-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylamino-styryl)-4H-pyran (DCM). In comparison to ACYMAN, both C500 and DCM fail to probe the interfacial solvation dynamics of a model protein-surfactant interface. While C500 is found to be delocalized from the protein-surfactant interface, DCM becomes destabilized upon the formation of the interface (protein-surfactant complex). The timescales obtained from this novel probe have also been compared with other femtosecond resolved studies and molecular dynamics simulations.

  3. Functionalization of protein crystals with metal ions, complexes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoshi; Maity, Basudev; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Self-assembled proteins have specific functions in biology. With inspiration provided by natural protein systems, several artificial protein assemblies have been constructed via site-specific mutations or metal coordination, which have important applications in catalysis, material and bio-supramolecular chemistry. Similar to natural protein assemblies, protein crystals have been recognized as protein assemblies formed of densely-packed monomeric proteins. Protein crystals can be functionalized with metal ions, metal complexes or nanoparticles via soaking, co-crystallization, creating new metal binding sites by site-specific mutations. The field of protein crystal engineering with metal coordination is relatively new and has gained considerable attention for developing solid biomaterials as well as structural investigations of enzymatic reactions, growth of nanoparticles and catalysis. This review highlights recent and significant research on functionalization of protein crystals with metal coordination and future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation as to the heart dynamics with the help of radio-cardiographic function analysis (RCF) and the alteration occuring under the influence of a protein-free extract from calf sera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluck, M.

    1980-01-01

    In our experiments the changes in the heart dynamics of healthy normal persons on exertion and of struma maligna patients in the hypothyroid substitution-free interval before iodine therapy were studied. With increasing stress significant increase was found in the minute output volume of the heart (HMV), the heart frequency (FR), and the output speed (SV/t) of the normal persons. At the same time, there was a significant decrease in the final-diastolic volume (EDV), the output time (ET) and the diastolic time (FT) the latter being most significant. SV, ET, and SV/t reached their values of the beginning 15 minutes after stress, while EDV, HMV, FR, and FT were still significantly changed at this time. Finally we can say that the results concerning changes in the heart dynamics on exertion which were obtained with the help of radiocardiographic functional analysis (RFC) agree well with those obtained by using their methods. When dealing with changes in the heart dynamics of struma maligna patients with a hypothyroid metabolic situation a significant increase in the SV and the SV/t was obtained while the frequency decreased significantly. The decrease in the frequency causes a clear but insignificant lengthening of the diastolic time. As for the HMV, a noticeable increase was found which was not significant. The EDV remained unchanged during the experiment. Altogether we can say that the heart dynamics is clearly improved by administering solcoseryl in case of a hypothyroid metabolic situation.

  5. Chromatin structure and dynamics in hot environments: architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases of thermophilic archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visone, Valeria; Vettone, Antonella; Serpe, Mario; Valenti, Anna; Perugino, Giuseppe; Rossi, Mosè; Ciaramella, Maria

    2014-09-25

    In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya) chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair). Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C), chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  6. Chromatin Structure and Dynamics in Hot Environments: Architectural Proteins and DNA Topoisomerases of Thermophilic Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Visone

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In all organisms of the three living domains (Bacteria, Archaea, Eucarya chromosome-associated proteins play a key role in genome functional organization. They not only compact and shape the genome structure, but also regulate its dynamics, which is essential to allow complex genome functions. Elucidation of chromatin composition and regulation is a critical issue in biology, because of the intimate connection of chromatin with all the essential information processes (transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Chromatin proteins include architectural proteins and DNA topoisomerases, which regulate genome structure and remodelling at two hierarchical levels. This review is focussed on architectural proteins and topoisomerases from hyperthermophilic Archaea. In these organisms, which live at high environmental temperature (>80 °C <113 °C, chromatin proteins and modulation of the DNA secondary structure are concerned with the problem of DNA stabilization against heat denaturation while maintaining its metabolic activity.

  7. Determining and comparing protein function in Bacterial genome sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesth, Tammi Camilla

    annotation of genes – the descriptions assigned to genes that describe the likely function of the encoded proteins. This process is limited by several factors, including the definition of a function which can be more or less specific as well as how many genes can actually be assigned a function based...... of proteins were clustered based on sequence domains so that each group represented a protein function. Each function was then modeled using Arti- ficial Neural Networks (ANN) and the model was evaluated based on its ability to identify true positives and negatives, that is proteins with or without...... the function of the model. The models were used to annotate a number of proteins without functional annotations and predicted functions for 98% of the genes. Evaluation of the precision of the method was performed, using data from the Critical Assessment of Functional Annotation (CAFA) project, and correct...

  8. Ligand-induced dynamical change of G-protein-coupled receptor revealed by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Utsab R.; Bhowmik, Debsindhu; Mamontov, Eugene; Chu, Xiang-Qiang

    Light activation of the visual G-protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin leads to the significant change in protein conformation and structural fluctuations, which further activates the cognate G-protein (transducin) and initiates the biological signaling. In this work, we studied the rhodopsin activation dynamics using state-of-the-art neutron scattering technique. Our quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) results revealed a broadly distributed relaxation rate of the hydrogen atom in rhodopsin on the picosecond to nanosecond timescale (beta-relaxation region), which is crucial for the protein function. Furthermore, the application of mode-coupling theory to the QENS analysis uncovers the subtle changes in rhodopsin dynamics due to the retinal cofactor. Comparing the dynamics of the ligand-free apoprotein, opsin versus the dark-state rhodopsin, removal of the retinal cofactor increases the relaxation time in the beta-relaxation region, which is due to the possible open conformation. Moreover, we utilized the concept of free-energy landscape to explain our results for the dark-state rhodopsin and opsin dynamics, which can be further applied to other GPCR systems to interpret various dynamic behaviors in ligand-bound and ligand-free protein.

  9. Hydration dynamics of protein molecules in aqueous solution: Unity ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Dielectric dispersion and NMRD experiments have revealed that a significant fraction of water molecules in the hydration shell of various proteins do not exhibit any slowing down of dynamics. This is usually attributed to the presence of the hydrophobic residues (HBR) on the surface, although HBRs alone ...

  10. The dynamics of fat, protein and sugar metabolism during walnut ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    Walnut (Juglans regia L.) is named the “super food” in the 21st century. In this study, the 9-year-old precocious walnut cultivar 'Xiangling' were used to exam the developmental process, and the dynamics of fat, protein and sugar content in the fruit, and the activities of enzymes related with sugar metabolism were further ...

  11. Modelling and simulation of biased agonism dynamics at a G protein-coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, L J; Mead, J; Frattini, E; Winfield, I; Ladds, G

    2018-04-07

    Theoretical models of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) concentration-response relationships often assume an agonist producing a single functional response via a single active state of the receptor. These models have largely been analysed assuming steady-state conditions. There is now much experimental evidence to suggest that many GPCRs can exist in multiple receptor conformations and elicit numerous functional responses, with ligands having the potential to activate different signalling pathways to varying extents-a concept referred to as biased agonism, functional selectivity or pluri-dimensional efficacy. Moreover, recent experimental results indicate a clear possibility for time-dependent bias, whereby an agonist's bias with respect to different pathways may vary dynamically. Efforts towards understanding the implications of temporal bias by characterising and quantifying ligand effects on multiple pathways will clearly be aided by extending current equilibrium binding and biased activation models to include G protein activation dynamics. Here, we present a new model of time-dependent biased agonism, based on ordinary differential equations for multiple cubic ternary complex activation models with G protein cycle dynamics. This model allows simulation and analysis of multi-pathway activation bias dynamics at a single receptor for the first time, at the level of active G protein (α GTP ), towards the analysis of dynamic functional responses. The model is generally applicable to systems with N G G proteins and N* active receptor states. Numerical simulations for N G =N * =2 reveal new insights into the effects of system parameters (including cooperativities, and ligand and receptor concentrations) on bias dynamics, highlighting new phenomena including the dynamic inter-conversion of bias direction. Further, we fit this model to 'wet' experimental data for two competing G proteins (G i and G s ) that become activated upon stimulation of the adenosine A 1

  12. COMPUTATIONAL APPROACHES FOR RATIONAL DESIGN OF PROTEINS WITH NOVEL FUNCTIONALITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Kumar Tiwari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Proteins are the most multifaceted macromolecules in living systems and have various important functions, including structural, catalytic, sensory, and regulatory functions. Rational design of enzymes is a great challenge to our understanding of protein structure and physical chemistry and has numerous potential applications. Protein design algorithms have been applied to design or engineer proteins that fold, fold faster, catalyze, catalyze faster, signal, and adopt preferred conformational states. The field of de novo protein design, although only a few decades old, is beginning to produce exciting results. Developments in this field are already having a significant impact on biotechnology and chemical biology. The application of powerful computational methods for functional protein designing has recently succeeded at engineering target activities. Here, we review recently reported de novo functional proteins that were developed using various protein design approaches, including rational design, computational optimization, and selection from combinatorial libraries, highlighting recent advances and successes.

  13. Functional analysis of thermostable proteins involved in carbohydrate metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akerboom, A.P.

    2007-01-01

    Thermostable proteins can resist temperature stress whilst keeping their integrity and functionality. In many cases, thermostable proteins originate from hyperthermophilic microorganisms that thrive in extreme environments. These systems are generally located close to geothermal (volcanic) activity,

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of protein folding and aggregation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng

    This thesis applies molecular dynamics simulations and statistical mechanics to study: (i) protein folding; and (ii) protein aggregation. Most small proteins fold into their native states via a first-order-like phase transition with a major free energy barrier between the folded and unfolded states. A set of protein conformations corresponding to the free energy barrier, Delta G >> kBT, are the folding transition state ensemble (TSE). Due to their evasive nature, TSE conformations are hard to capture (probability ∝ exp(-DeltaG/k BT)) and characterize. A coarse-grained discrete molecular dynamics model with realistic steric constraints is constructed to reproduce the experimentally observed two-state folding thermodynamics. A kinetic approach is proposed to identify the folding TSE. A specific set of contacts, common to the TSE conformations, is identified as the folding nuclei which are necessary to be formed in order for the protein to fold. Interestingly, the amino acids at the site of the identified folding nuclei are highly conserved for homologous proteins sharing the same structures. Such conservation suggests that amino acids that are important for folding kinetics are under selective pressure to be preserved during the course of molecular evolution. In addition, studies of the conformations close to the transition states uncover the importance of topology in the construction of order parameter for protein folding transition. Misfolded proteins often form insoluble aggregates, amyloid fibrils, that deposit in the extracellular space and lead to a type of disease known as amyloidosis. Due to its insoluble and non-crystalline nature, the aggregation structure and, thus the aggregation mechanism, has yet to be uncovered. Discrete molecular dynamics studies reveal an aggregate structure with the same structural signatures as in experimental observations and show a nucleation aggregation scenario. The simulations also suggest a generic aggregation mechanism

  15. Developing optimal non-linear scoring function for protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Changyu; Li, Xiang; Liang, Jie

    2004-11-22

    Motivation. Protein design aims to identify sequences compatible with a given protein fold but incompatible to any alternative folds. To select the correct sequences and to guide the search process, a design scoring function is critically important. Such a scoring function should be able to characterize the global fitness landscape of many proteins simultaneously. To find optimal design scoring functions, we introduce two geometric views and propose a formulation using a mixture of non-linear Gaussian kernel functions. We aim to solve a simplified protein sequence design problem. Our goal is to distinguish each native sequence for a major portion of representative protein structures from a large number of alternative decoy sequences, each a fragment from proteins of different folds. Our scoring function discriminates perfectly a set of 440 native proteins from 14 million sequence decoys. We show that no linear scoring function can succeed in this task. In a blind test of unrelated proteins, our scoring function misclassfies only 13 native proteins out of 194. This compares favorably with about three-four times more misclassifications when optimal linear functions reported in the literature are used. We also discuss how to develop protein folding scoring function.

  16. Gene Tagging Strategies To Assess Protein Expression, Localization, and Function in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanca, Oguz; Bellen, Hugo J.; Schnorrer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of gene function in complex organisms relies extensively on tools to detect the cellular and subcellular localization of gene products, especially proteins. Typically, immunostaining with antibodies provides these data. However, due to cost, time, and labor limitations, generating specific antibodies against all proteins of a complex organism is not feasible. Furthermore, antibodies do not enable live imaging studies of protein dynamics. Hence, tagging genes with standardized immunoepitopes or fluorescent tags that permit live imaging has become popular. Importantly, tagging genes present in large genomic clones or at their endogenous locus often reports proper expression, subcellular localization, and dynamics of the encoded protein. Moreover, these tagging approaches allow the generation of elegant protein removal strategies, standardization of visualization protocols, and permit protein interaction studies using mass spectrometry. Here, we summarize available genomic resources and techniques to tag genes and discuss relevant applications that are rarely, if at all, possible with antibodies. PMID:28978772

  17. Probabilistic protein function prediction from heterogeneous genome-wide data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Nariai

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Dramatic improvements in high throughput sequencing technologies have led to a staggering growth in the number of predicted genes. However, a large fraction of these newly discovered genes do not have a functional assignment. Fortunately, a variety of novel high-throughput genome-wide functional screening technologies provide important clues that shed light on gene function. The integration of heterogeneous data to predict protein function has been shown to improve the accuracy of automated gene annotation systems. In this paper, we propose and evaluate a probabilistic approach for protein function prediction that integrates protein-protein interaction (PPI data, gene expression data, protein motif information, mutant phenotype data, and protein localization data. First, functional linkage graphs are constructed from PPI data and gene expression data, in which an edge between nodes (proteins represents evidence for functional similarity. The assumption here is that graph neighbors are more likely to share protein function, compared to proteins that are not neighbors. The functional linkage graph model is then used in concert with protein domain, mutant phenotype and protein localization data to produce a functional prediction. Our method is applied to the functional prediction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes, using Gene Ontology (GO terms as the basis of our annotation. In a cross validation study we show that the integrated model increases recall by 18%, compared to using PPI data alone at the 50% precision. We also show that the integrated predictor is significantly better than each individual predictor. However, the observed improvement vs. PPI depends on both the new source of data and the functional category to be predicted. Surprisingly, in some contexts integration hurts overall prediction accuracy. Lastly, we provide a comprehensive assignment of putative GO terms to 463 proteins that currently have no assigned function.

  18. Dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins: covalently bound spin-labels at protein–protein interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Dzikovski, Boris G.; Pawsey, Shane; Caporini, Marc; Rosay, Melanie; Freed, Jack H.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that dynamic nuclear polarization of membrane proteins in lipid bilayers may be achieved using a novel polarizing agent: pairs of spin labels covalently bound to a protein of interest interacting at an intermolecular interaction surface. For gramicidin A, nitroxide tags attached to the N-terminal intermolecular interface region become proximal only when bimolecular channels forms in the membrane. We obtained signal enhancements of sixfold for the dimeric protein. The enhancement effect was comparable to that of a doubly tagged sample of gramicidin C, with intramolecular spin pairs. This approach could be a powerful and selective means for signal enhancement in membrane proteins, and for recognizing intermolecular interfaces

  19. Relativistic dynamics, Green function and pseudodifferential operators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio [National Institute of Plasma Physics (INFIP), Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires 1428 (Argentina); Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    The central role played by pseudodifferential operators in relativistic dynamics is known very well. In this work, operators like the Schrodinger one (e.g., square root) are treated from the point of view of the non-local pseudodifferential Green functions. Starting from the explicit construction of the Green (semigroup) theoretical kernel, a theorem linking the integrability conditions and their dependence on the spacetime dimensions is given. Relativistic wave equations with arbitrary spin and the causality problem are discussed with the algebraic interpretation of the radical operator and their relation with coherent and squeezed states. Also we perform by means of pure theoretical procedures (based in physical concepts and symmetry) the relativistic position operator which satisfies the conditions of integrability: it is a non-local, Lorentz invariant and does not have the same problems as the “local”position operator proposed by Newton and Wigner. Physical examples, as zitterbewegung and rogue waves, are presented and deeply analyzed in this theoretical framework.

  20. Structure, dynamics, and function of biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauenfelder, H.; Berendzen, J.R.; Garcia, A.; Gupta, G.; Olah, G.A.; Terwilliger, T.C.; Trewhella, J.; Wood, C.C.; Woodruff, W.H.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors enhanced Los Alamos' core competency in Bioscience and Biotechnology by building on present strengths in experimental techniques, theory, high-performance computing, modeling, and simulation applied to biomolecular structure, dynamics, and function. Specifically, the authors strengthened their capabilities in neutron/x-ray scattering, x-ray crystallography, NMR, laser, and optical spectroscopies. Initially they focused on supporting the Los alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in the design and implementation of new neutron scattering instrumentation, they developed new methods for analysis of scattering data, and they developed new projects to study the structures of biomolecular complexes. The authors have also worked to strengthen interactions between theory and experiment, and between the biological and physical sciences. They sponsored regular meetings of members from all interested LANL technical divisions, and supported two lecture series: ''Biology for Physicists'' and ''Issues in Modern Biology''. They also supported the formation of interdisciplinary/inter-divisional teams to develop projects in science-based bioremediation and an integrated structural biology resource. Finally, they successfully worked with a multidisciplinary team to put forward the Laboratory's Genome and Beyond tactical goal

  1. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected residue clusters may be

  2. Probing molecular mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone: biophysical modeling identifies key regulators of functional dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshuman Dixit

    Full Text Available Deciphering functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 chaperone machinery is an important objective in cancer biology aiming to facilitate discovery of targeted anti-cancer therapies. Despite significant advances in understanding structure and function of molecular chaperones, organizing molecular principles that control the relationship between conformational diversity and functional mechanisms of the Hsp90 activity lack a sufficient quantitative characterization. We combined molecular dynamics simulations, principal component analysis, the energy landscape model and structure-functional analysis of Hsp90 regulatory interactions to systematically investigate functional dynamics of the molecular chaperone. This approach has identified a network of conserved regions common to the Hsp90 chaperones that could play a universal role in coordinating functional dynamics, principal collective motions and allosteric signaling of Hsp90. We have found that these functional motifs may be utilized by the molecular chaperone machinery to act collectively as central regulators of Hsp90 dynamics and activity, including the inter-domain communications, control of ATP hydrolysis, and protein client binding. These findings have provided support to a long-standing assertion that allosteric regulation and catalysis may have emerged via common evolutionary routes. The interaction networks regulating functional motions of Hsp90 may be determined by the inherent structural architecture of the molecular chaperone. At the same time, the thermodynamics-based "conformational selection" of functional states is likely to be activated based on the nature of the binding partner. This mechanistic model of Hsp90 dynamics and function is consistent with the notion that allosteric networks orchestrating cooperative protein motions can be formed by evolutionary conserved and sparsely connected residue clusters. Hence, allosteric signaling through a small network of distantly connected

  3. Decomposition of overlapping protein complexes: A graph theoretical method for analyzing static and dynamic protein associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guimarães Katia S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cellular processes are carried out by multi-protein complexes, groups of proteins that bind together to perform a specific task. Some proteins form stable complexes, while other proteins form transient associations and are part of several complexes at different stages of a cellular process. A better understanding of this higher-order organization of proteins into overlapping complexes is an important step towards unveiling functional and evolutionary mechanisms behind biological networks. Results We propose a new method for identifying and representing overlapping protein complexes (or larger units called functional groups within a protein interaction network. We develop a graph-theoretical framework that enables automatic construction of such representation. We illustrate the effectiveness of our method by applying it to TNFα/NF-κB and pheromone signaling pathways. Conclusion The proposed representation helps in understanding the transitions between functional groups and allows for tracking a protein's path through a cascade of functional groups. Therefore, depending on the nature of the network, our representation is capable of elucidating temporal relations between functional groups. Our results show that the proposed method opens a new avenue for the analysis of protein interaction networks.

  4. Structure function relations in PDZ-domain-containing proteins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Manjunath

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... associated with autism spectrum disorders (Zeng et al. 2016a;. Monteiro and Feng 2017). Further, there are reports sup- porting the role of PDZ proteins in neuronal remodelling via the regulation of microtubule dynamics (Sweet et al. 2011;. Chen et al. 2014). Not all PDZ-domain-containing proteins.

  5. Unraveling the role of protein dynamics in dihydrofolate reductase catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Louis Y. P.; Javier Ruiz-Pernía, J.; Dawson, William M.; Roca, Maite; Loveridge, E. Joel; Glowacki, David R.; Harvey, Jeremy N.; Mulholland, Adrian J.; Tuñón, Iñaki; Moliner, Vicent; Allemann, Rudolf K.

    2013-01-01

    Protein dynamics have controversially been proposed to be at the heart of enzyme catalysis, but identification and analysis of dynamical effects in enzyme-catalyzed reactions have proved very challenging. Here, we tackle this question by comparing an enzyme with its heavy (15N, 13C, 2H substituted) counterpart, providing a subtle probe of dynamics. The crucial hydride transfer step of the reaction (the chemical step) occurs more slowly in the heavy enzyme. A combination of experimental results, quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations, and theoretical analyses identify the origins of the observed differences in reactivity. The generally slightly slower reaction in the heavy enzyme reflects differences in environmental coupling to the hydride transfer step. Importantly, the barrier and contribution of quantum tunneling are not affected, indicating no significant role for “promoting motions” in driving tunneling or modulating the barrier. The chemical step is slower in the heavy enzyme because protein motions coupled to the reaction coordinate are slower. The fact that the heavy enzyme is only slightly less active than its light counterpart shows that protein dynamics have a small, but measurable, effect on the chemical reaction rate. PMID:24065822

  6. Dynamic gastric digestion of a commercial whey protein concentrate†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralles, Beatriz; Del Barrio, Roberto; Cueva, Carolina; Recio, Isidra; Amigo, Lourdes

    2018-03-01

    A dynamic gastrointestinal simulator, simgi ® , has been applied to assess the gastric digestion of a whey protein concentrate. Samples collected from the outlet of the stomach have been compared to those resulting from the static digestion protocol INFOGEST developed on the basis of physiologically inferred conditions. Progress of digestion was followed by SDS-PAGE and LC-MS/MS. By SDS-PAGE, serum albumin and α-lactalbumin were no longer detectable at 30 and 60 min, respectively. On the contrary, β-lactoglobulin was visible up to 120 min, although in decreasing concentrations in the dynamic model due to the gastric emptying and the addition of gastric fluids. Moreover, β-lactoglobulin was partly hydrolysed by pepsin probably due to the presence of heat-denatured forms and the peptides released using both digestion models were similar. Under dynamic conditions, a stepwise increase in number of peptides over time was observed, while the static protocol generated a high number of peptides from the beginning of digestion. Whey protein digestion products using a dynamic stomach are consistent with those generated with the static protocol but the kinetic behaviour of the peptide profile emphasises the effect of the sequential pepsin addition, peristaltic shaking, and gastric emptying on protein digestibility. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Random heteropolymers preserve protein function in foreign environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panganiban, Brian; Qiao, Baofu; Jiang, Tao; DelRe, Christopher; Obadia, Mona M.; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Smith, Anton A. A.; Hall, Aaron; Sit, Izaac; Crosby, Marquise G.; Dennis, Patrick B.; Drockenmuller, Eric; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica; Xu, Ting

    2018-03-01

    The successful incorporation of active proteins into synthetic polymers could lead to a new class of materials with functions found only in living systems. However, proteins rarely function under the conditions suitable for polymer processing. On the basis of an analysis of trends in protein sequences and characteristic chemical patterns on protein surfaces, we designed four-monomer random heteropolymers to mimic intrinsically disordered proteins for protein solubilization and stabilization in non-native environments. The heteropolymers, with optimized composition and statistical monomer distribution, enable cell-free synthesis of membrane proteins with proper protein folding for transport and enzyme-containing plastics for toxin bioremediation. Controlling the statistical monomer distribution in a heteropolymer, rather than the specific monomer sequence, affords a new strategy to interface with biological systems for protein-based biomaterials.

  8. Conformational dynamics of amyloid proteins at the aqueous interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Matthew; Horst, Nathan; Aoki, Brendy; Malik, Saad; Soto, Patricia

    2013-03-01

    Amyloid proteins is a class of proteins that exhibit distinct monomeric and oligomeric conformational states hallmark of deleterious neurological diseases for which there are not yet cures. Our goal is to examine the extent of which the aqueous/membrane interface modulates the folding energy landscape of amyloid proteins. To this end, we probe the dynamic conformational ensemble of amyloids (monomer prion protein and Alzheimer's Ab protofilaments) interacting with model bilayers. We will present the results of our coarse grain molecular modeling study in terms of the existence of preferential binding spots of the amyloid to the bilayer and the response of the bilayer to the interaction with the amyloid. NSF Nebraska EPSCoR First Award

  9. Cloning and characterization of functional keratinassociated protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) 5-4 which belongs to keratin-associated protein (KRTAP) type 5 family has two major groups: high/ultrahigh cysteine (HS) and high glycine-tyrosine (HGT). Based on bioinformatic prediction, we experimentally cloned a fragment containingan open reading frame of 1849 bp from maize, ...

  10. Design and functionality of dense protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.

    2012-01-01

    Food products that contain high levels of protein can help to control food intake and to maintain a healthy body weight due to their strong satiating properties. They are also beneficial in the nutrition of elderly and commonly used in medical nutrition. Preparation of food products at high protein

  11. Dynamic Proteomic Characteristics and Network Integration Revealing Key Proteins for Two Kernel Tissue Developments in Popcorn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbin Dong

    Full Text Available The formation and development of maize kernel is a complex dynamic physiological and biochemical process that involves the temporal and spatial expression of many proteins and the regulation of metabolic pathways. In this study, the protein profiles of the endosperm and pericarp at three important developmental stages were analyzed by isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ labeling coupled with LC-MS/MS in popcorn inbred N04. Comparative quantitative proteomic analyses among developmental stages and between tissues were performed, and the protein networks were integrated. A total of 6,876 proteins were identified, of which 1,396 were nonredundant. Specific proteins and different expression patterns were observed across developmental stages and tissues. The functional annotation of the identified proteins revealed the importance of metabolic and cellular processes, and binding and catalytic activities for the development of the tissues. The whole, endosperm-specific and pericarp-specific protein networks integrated 125, 9 and 77 proteins, respectively, which were involved in 54 KEGG pathways and reflected their complex metabolic interactions. Confirmation for the iTRAQ endosperm proteins by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that 44.44% proteins were commonly found. However, the concordance between mRNA level and the protein abundance varied across different proteins, stages, tissues and inbred lines, according to the gene cloning and expression analyses of four relevant proteins with important functions and different expression levels. But the result by western blot showed their same expression tendency for the four proteins as by iTRAQ. These results could provide new insights into the developmental mechanisms of endosperm and pericarp, and grain formation in maize.

  12. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and density functional theory approaches to identify potential inhibitors of SIRT4 protein from Homo sapiens : a novel target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay K; Prabhu, Dhamodharan; Nachiappan, Mutharasappan; Biswal, Jayshree; Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman

    2017-11-01

    Type 2 diabetes is one of the biggest health challenges in the world and WHO projects it to be the 7th leading cause of death in 2030. It is a chronic condition affecting the way our body metabolizes sugar. Insulin resistance is high risk factor marked by expression of Lipoprotein Lipases and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor that predisposes to type 2 diabetes. AMP-dependent protein kinase in AMPK signaling pathway is a central sensor of energy status. Deregulation of AMPK signaling leads to inflammation, oxidative stress, and deactivation of autophagy which are implicated in pathogenesis of insulin resistance. SIRT4 protein deactivates AMPK as well as directly inhibits insulin secretion. SIRT4 overexpression leads to dyslipidimeia, decreased fatty acid oxidation, and lipogenesis which are the characteristic features of insulin resistance promoting type 2 diabetes. This makes SIRT4 a novel therapeutic target to control type 2 diabetes. Virtual screening and molecular docking studies were performed to obtain potential ligands. To further optimize the geometry of protein-ligand complexes Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking was performed. Binding Free Energy was calculated for the top three ligand molecules. In view of exploring the stereoelectronic features of the ligand, density functional theory approach was implemented at B3LYP/6-31G* level. 30 ns MD simulation studies of the protein-ligand complexes were done. The present research work proposes ZINC12421989 as potential inhibitor of SIRT4 with docking score (-7.54 kcal/mol), docking energy (-51.34 kcal/mol), binding free energy (-70.21 kcal/mol), and comparatively low energy gap (-0.1786 eV) for HOMO and LUMO indicating reactivity of the lead molecule.

  13. Trimethylamine-N-oxide: its hydration structure, surface activity, and biological function, viewed by vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Hunger, Johannes; Backus, Ellen H G; Mizukami, Wataru; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2017-03-08

    The osmolyte molecule trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) stabilizes the structure of proteins. As functional proteins are generally found in aqueous solutions, an important aspect of this stabilization is the interaction of TMAO with water. Here, we review, using vibrational spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations, recent studies on the structure and dynamics of TMAO with its surrounding water molecules. This article ends with an outlook on the open questions on TMAO-protein and TMAO-urea interactions in aqueous environments.

  14. Effects of molecular crowding on the dynamics of intrinsically disordered proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elio A Cino

    Full Text Available Inside cells, the concentration of macromolecules can reach up to 400 g/L. In such crowded environments, proteins are expected to behave differently than in vitro. It has been shown that the stability and the folding rate of a globular protein can be altered by the excluded volume effect produced by a high density of macromolecules. However, macromolecular crowding effects on intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs are less explored. These proteins can be extremely dynamic and potentially sample a wide ensemble of conformations under non-denaturing conditions. The dynamic properties of IDPs are intimately related to the timescale of conformational exchange within the ensemble, which govern target recognition and how these proteins function. In this work, we investigated the macromolecular crowding effects on the dynamics of several IDPs by measuring the NMR spin relaxation parameters of three disordered proteins (ProTα, TC1, and α-synuclein with different extents of residual structures. To aid the interpretation of experimental results, we also performed an MD simulation of ProTα. Based on the MD analysis, a simple model to correlate the observed changes in relaxation rates to the alteration in protein motions under crowding conditions was proposed. Our results show that 1 IDPs remain at least partially disordered despite the presence of high concentration of other macromolecules, 2 the crowded environment has differential effects on the conformational propensity of distinct regions of an IDP, which may lead to selective stabilization of certain target-binding motifs, and 3 the segmental motions of IDPs on the nanosecond timescale are retained under crowded conditions. These findings strongly suggest that IDPs function as dynamic structural ensembles in cellular environments.

  15. Protein Loop Dynamics Are Complex and Depend on the Motions of the Whole Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T. Zimmermann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the relationship between the motions of the same peptide loop segment incorporated within a protein structure and motions of free or end-constrained peptides. As a reference point we also compare against alanine chains having the same length as the loop. Both the analysis of atomic molecular dynamics trajectories and structure-based elastic network models, reveal no general dependence on loop length or on the number of solvent exposed residues. Rather, the whole structure affects the motions in complex ways that depend strongly and specifically on the tertiary structure of the whole protein. Both the Elastic Network Models and Molecular Dynamics confirm the differences in loop dynamics between the free and structured contexts; there is strong agreement between the behaviors observed from molecular dynamics and the elastic network models. There is no apparent simple relationship between loop mobility and its size, exposure, or position within a loop. Free peptides do not behave the same as the loops in the proteins. Surface loops do not behave as if they were random coils, and the tertiary structure has a critical influence upon the apparent motions. This strongly implies that entropy evaluation of protein loops requires knowledge of the motions of the entire protein structure.

  16. Single proteins that serve linked functions in intracellular and extracellular microenvironments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radisky, Derek C.; Stallings-Mann, Melody; Hirai, Yohei; Bissell, Mina J.

    2009-06-03

    Maintenance of organ homeostasis and control of appropriate response to environmental alterations requires intimate coordination of cellular function and tissue organization. An important component of this coordination may be provided by proteins that can serve distinct, but linked, functions on both sides of the plasma membrane. Here we present a novel hypothesis in which non-classical secretion can provide a mechanism through which single proteins can integrate complex tissue functions. Single genes can exert a complex, dynamic influence through a number of different processes that act to multiply the function of the gene product(s). Alternative splicing can create many different transcripts that encode proteins of diverse, even antagonistic, function from a single gene. Posttranslational modifications can alter the stability, activity, localization, and even basic function of proteins. A protein can exist in different subcellular localizations. More recently, it has become clear that single proteins can function both inside and outside the cell. These proteins often lack defined secretory signal sequences, and transit the plasma membrane by mechanisms separate from the classical ER/Golgi secretory process. When examples of such proteins are examined individually, the multifunctionality and lack of a signal sequence are puzzling - why should a protein with a well known function in one context function in such a distinct fashion in another? We propose that one reason for a single protein to perform intracellular and extracellular roles is to coordinate organization and maintenance of a global tissue function. Here, we describe in detail three specific examples of proteins that act in this fashion, outlining their specific functions in the extracellular space and in the intracellular space, and we discuss how these functions may be linked. We present epimorphin/syntaxin-2, which may coordinate morphogenesis of secretory organs (as epimorphin) with control of

  17. Markov dynamic models for long-timescale protein motion.

    KAUST Repository

    Chiang, Tsung-Han

    2010-06-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a well-established method for studying protein motion at the atomic scale. However, it is computationally intensive and generates massive amounts of data. One way of addressing the dual challenges of computation efficiency and data analysis is to construct simplified models of long-timescale protein motion from MD simulation data. In this direction, we propose to use Markov models with hidden states, in which the Markovian states represent potentially overlapping probabilistic distributions over protein conformations. We also propose a principled criterion for evaluating the quality of a model by its ability to predict long-timescale protein motions. Our method was tested on 2D synthetic energy landscapes and two extensively studied peptides, alanine dipeptide and the villin headpiece subdomain (HP-35 NleNle). One interesting finding is that although a widely accepted model of alanine dipeptide contains six states, a simpler model with only three states is equally good for predicting long-timescale motions. We also used the constructed Markov models to estimate important kinetic and dynamic quantities for protein folding, in particular, mean first-passage time. The results are consistent with available experimental measurements.

  18. JED: a Java Essential Dynamics Program for comparative analysis of protein trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Charles C; Singam, Ettayapuram Ramaprasad Azhagiya; Jacobs, Donald J

    2017-05-25

    statistics methods to perform comparative studies of essential dynamics over multiple proteins. For each protein, Cartesian coordinates or internal distance pairs can be employed over the entire structure or user-selected parts to quantify similarity/differences in mobility and correlations in dynamics to develop insight into protein structure/function relationships.

  19. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  20. Regulation, Signaling, and Physiological Functions of G-Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Alegre, Kamela O; Dey, Raja; Huang, Xin-Yun

    2016-09-25

    Heterotrimeric guanine-nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G-proteins) mainly relay the information from G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) on the plasma membrane to the inside of cells to regulate various biochemical functions. Depending on the targeted cell types, tissues, and organs, these signals modulate diverse physiological functions. The basic schemes of heterotrimeric G-proteins have been outlined. In this review, we briefly summarize what is known about the regulation, signaling, and physiological functions of G-proteins. We then focus on a few less explored areas such as the regulation of G-proteins by non-GPCRs and the physiological functions of G-proteins that cannot be easily explained by the known G-protein signaling pathways. There are new signaling pathways and physiological functions for G-proteins to be discovered and further interrogated. With the advancements in structural and computational biological techniques, we are closer to having a better understanding of how G-proteins are regulated and of the specificity of G-protein interactions with their regulators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Production of functional protein hydrolysates from Egyptian breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Production of functional protein hydrolysates from Egyptian breeds of soybean and lupin seeds. AA khalil, SS Mohamed, FS Taha, EN Karlsson. Abstract. Enzymatic hydrolysis is an agro-processing aid that can be utilized in order to improve nutritional quality of protein extracts from many sources. In this study, protein ...

  2. Protein mechanics: a route from structure to function

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    Why do proteins have such varied and complicated structures and how are these structures related to the functions that each protein must perform? Almost 50 years after the first protein structures were solved (Kendrew et al 1958; Perutz 1960), these questions are still very much part of molecular biology. While structures ...

  3. Quantitative protein localization signatures reveal an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loo, Lit-Hsin; Laksameethanasan, Danai; Tung, Yi-Ling

    2014-03-01

    Protein subcellular localization is a major determinant of protein function. However, this important protein feature is often described in terms of discrete and qualitative categories of subcellular compartments, and therefore it has limited applications in quantitative protein function analyses. Here, we present Protein Localization Analysis and Search Tools (PLAST), an automated analysis framework for constructing and comparing quantitative signatures of protein subcellular localization patterns based on microscopy images. PLAST produces human-interpretable protein localization maps that quantitatively describe the similarities in the localization patterns of proteins and major subcellular compartments, without requiring manual assignment or supervised learning of these compartments. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we show that PLAST is more accurate than existing, qualitative protein localization annotations in identifying known co-localized proteins. Furthermore, we demonstrate that PLAST can reveal protein localization-function relationships that are not obvious from these annotations. First, we identified proteins that have similar localization patterns and participate in closely-related biological processes, but do not necessarily form stable complexes with each other or localize at the same organelles. Second, we found an association between spatial and functional divergences of proteins during evolution. Surprisingly, as proteins with common ancestors evolve, they tend to develop more diverged subcellular localization patterns, but still occupy similar numbers of compartments. This suggests that divergence of protein localization might be more frequently due to the development of more specific localization patterns over ancestral compartments than the occupation of new compartments. PLAST enables systematic and quantitative analyses of protein localization-function relationships, and will be useful to elucidate protein

  4. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, A C C; Rabello, S

    2009-01-01

    We analyze large systems of interacting proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many-particle systems. Apart from protein production and removal, the most relevant microscopic processes in the proteome are complex formation and dissociation, and the microscopic degrees of freedom are the evolving concentrations of unbound proteins (in multiple post-translational states) and of protein complexes. Here we only include dimer-complexes, for mathematical simplicity, and we draw the network that describes which proteins are reaction partners from an ensemble of random graphs with an arbitrary degree distribution. We show how generating functional analysis methods can be used successfully to derive closed equations for dynamical order parameters, representing an exact macroscopic description of the complex formation and dissociation dynamics in the infinite system limit. We end this paper with a discussion of the possible routes towards solving the nontrivial order parameter equations, either exactly (in specific limits) or approximately.

  5. Alkylation damage by lipid electrophiles targets functional protein systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G; Ullery, Jody C; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A; Beavers, William N; Porter, Ned A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C

    2014-03-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions.

  6. Alkylation Damage by Lipid Electrophiles Targets Functional Protein Systems*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codreanu, Simona G.; Ullery, Jody C.; Zhu, Jing; Tallman, Keri A.; Beavers, William N.; Porter, Ned A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Zhang, Bing; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    Protein alkylation by reactive electrophiles contributes to chemical toxicities and oxidative stress, but the functional impact of alkylation damage across proteomes is poorly understood. We used Click chemistry and shotgun proteomics to profile the accumulation of proteome damage in human cells treated with lipid electrophile probes. Protein target profiles revealed three damage susceptibility classes, as well as proteins that were highly resistant to alkylation. Damage occurred selectively across functional protein interaction networks, with the most highly alkylation-susceptible proteins mapping to networks involved in cytoskeletal regulation. Proteins with lower damage susceptibility mapped to networks involved in protein synthesis and turnover and were alkylated only at electrophile concentrations that caused significant toxicity. Hierarchical susceptibility of proteome systems to alkylation may allow cells to survive sublethal damage while protecting critical cell functions. PMID:24429493

  7. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert

    2016-01-01

    Spatial memory depends on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to aging. This vulnerability has implications for the impairment of navigation capacities in older people, who may show a marked drop in performance of spatial tasks with advancing age. Contemporary understanding of long-term memory formation relies on molecular mechanisms underlying long-term synaptic plasticity. With memory acquisition, activity-dependent changes occurring in synapses initiate multiple signal transduction pathways enhancing protein turnover. This enhancement facilitates de novo synthesis of plasticity related proteins, crucial factors for establishing persistent long-term synaptic plasticity and forming memory engrams. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of memory traces formation; however, the identity of plasticity related proteins is still evasive. In this study, we investigated protein turnover in mouse hippocampus during long-term spatial memory formation using the reference memory version of radial arm maze (RAM) paradigm. We identified 1592 proteins, which exhibited a complex picture of expression changes during spatial memory formation. Variable linear decomposition reduced significantly data dimensionality and enriched three principal factors responsible for variance of memory-related protein levels at (1) the initial phase of memory acquisition (165 proteins), (2) during the steep learning improvement (148 proteins), and (3) the final phase of the learning curve (123 proteins). Gene ontology and signaling pathways analysis revealed a clear correlation between memory improvement and learning phase-curbed expression profiles of proteins belonging to specific functional categories. We found differential enrichment of (1) neurotrophic factors signaling pathways, proteins regulating synaptic transmission, and actin microfilament during the first day of the learning curve; (2) transcription and translation machinery, protein

  8. Dynamics of Hippocampal Protein Expression During Long-term Spatial Memory Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovok, Natalia; Nesher, Elimelech; Levin, Yishai; Reichenstein, Michal; Pinhasov, Albert; Michaelevski, Izhak

    2016-02-01

    Spatial memory depends on the hippocampus, which is particularly vulnerable to aging. This vulnerability has implications for the impairment of navigation capacities in older people, who may show a marked drop in performance of spatial tasks with advancing age. Contemporary understanding of long-term memory formation relies on molecular mechanisms underlying long-term synaptic plasticity. With memory acquisition, activity-dependent changes occurring in synapses initiate multiple signal transduction pathways enhancing protein turnover. This enhancement facilitates de novo synthesis of plasticity related proteins, crucial factors for establishing persistent long-term synaptic plasticity and forming memory engrams. Extensive studies have been performed to elucidate molecular mechanisms of memory traces formation; however, the identity of plasticity related proteins is still evasive. In this study, we investigated protein turnover in mouse hippocampus during long-term spatial memory formation using the reference memory version of radial arm maze (RAM) paradigm. We identified 1592 proteins, which exhibited a complex picture of expression changes during spatial memory formation. Variable linear decomposition reduced significantly data dimensionality and enriched three principal factors responsible for variance of memory-related protein levels at (1) the initial phase of memory acquisition (165 proteins), (2) during the steep learning improvement (148 proteins), and (3) the final phase of the learning curve (123 proteins). Gene ontology and signaling pathways analysis revealed a clear correlation between memory improvement and learning phase-curbed expression profiles of proteins belonging to specific functional categories. We found differential enrichment of (1) neurotrophic factors signaling pathways, proteins regulating synaptic transmission, and actin microfilament during the first day of the learning curve; (2) transcription and translation machinery, protein

  9. Dynamics of domain coverage of the protein sequence universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The currently known protein sequence space consists of millions of sequences in public databases and is rapidly expanding. Assigning sequences to families leads to a better understanding of protein function and the nature of the protein universe. However, a large portion of the current protein space remains unassigned and is referred to as its “dark matter”. Results Here we suggest that true size of “dark matter” is much larger than stated by current definitions. We propose an approach to reducing the size of “dark matter” by identifying and subtracting regions in protein sequences that are not likely to contain any domain. Conclusions Recent improvements in computational domain modeling result in a decrease, albeit slowly, in the relative size of “dark matter”; however, its absolute size increases substantially with the growth of sequence data. PMID:23157439

  10. A large-scale evaluation of computational protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radivojac, Predrag; Clark, Wyatt T; Oron, Tal Ronnen; Schnoes, Alexandra M; Wittkop, Tobias; Sokolov, Artem; Graim, Kiley; Funk, Christopher; Verspoor, Karin; Ben-Hur, Asa; Pandey, Gaurav; Yunes, Jeffrey M; Talwalkar, Ameet S; Repo, Susanna; Souza, Michael L; Piovesan, Damiano; Casadio, Rita; Wang, Zheng; Cheng, Jianlin; Fang, Hai; Gough, Julian; Koskinen, Patrik; Törönen, Petri; Nokso-Koivisto, Jussi; Holm, Liisa; Cozzetto, Domenico; Buchan, Daniel W A; Bryson, Kevin; Jones, David T; Limaye, Bhakti; Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, Sunitha K; Joshi, Rajendra; Chitale, Meghana; Kihara, Daisuke; Lisewski, Andreas M; Erdin, Serkan; Venner, Eric; Lichtarge, Olivier; Rentzsch, Robert; Yang, Haixuan; Romero, Alfonso E; Bhat, Prajwal; Paccanaro, Alberto; Hamp, Tobias; Kaßner, Rebecca; Seemayer, Stefan; Vicedo, Esmeralda; Schaefer, Christian; Achten, Dominik; Auer, Florian; Boehm, Ariane; Braun, Tatjana; Hecht, Maximilian; Heron, Mark; Hönigschmid, Peter; Hopf, Thomas A; Kaufmann, Stefanie; Kiening, Michael; Krompass, Denis; Landerer, Cedric; Mahlich, Yannick; Roos, Manfred; Björne, Jari; Salakoski, Tapio; Wong, Andrew; Shatkay, Hagit; Gatzmann, Fanny; Sommer, Ingolf; Wass, Mark N; Sternberg, Michael J E; Škunca, Nives; Supek, Fran; Bošnjak, Matko; Panov, Panče; Džeroski, Sašo; Šmuc, Tomislav; Kourmpetis, Yiannis A I; van Dijk, Aalt D J; ter Braak, Cajo J F; Zhou, Yuanpeng; Gong, Qingtian; Dong, Xinran; Tian, Weidong; Falda, Marco; Fontana, Paolo; Lavezzo, Enrico; Di Camillo, Barbara; Toppo, Stefano; Lan, Liang; Djuric, Nemanja; Guo, Yuhong; Vucetic, Slobodan; Bairoch, Amos; Linial, Michal; Babbitt, Patricia C; Brenner, Steven E; Orengo, Christine; Rost, Burkhard; Mooney, Sean D; Friedberg, Iddo

    2013-03-01

    Automated annotation of protein function is challenging. As the number of sequenced genomes rapidly grows, the overwhelming majority of protein products can only be annotated computationally. If computational predictions are to be relied upon, it is crucial that the accuracy of these methods be high. Here we report the results from the first large-scale community-based critical assessment of protein function annotation (CAFA) experiment. Fifty-four methods representing the state of the art for protein function prediction were evaluated on a target set of 866 proteins from 11 organisms. Two findings stand out: (i) today's best protein function prediction algorithms substantially outperform widely used first-generation methods, with large gains on all types of targets; and (ii) although the top methods perform well enough to guide experiments, there is considerable need for improvement of currently available tools.

  11. Temperature dependent conformation studies of Calmodulin Protein using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aneja, Sahil; Bhartiya, Vivek Kumar; Negi, Sunita

    2016-10-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) protein plays a very crucial role in the calcium signaling inside the eukaryotic cell structure [1, 2]. It can also bind to other proteins/targets and facilitate various activities inside the cell [3, 4]. Temperature dependent conformation changes in the CaM protein are studied with extensive molecular dynamics simulations. The quantitative comparison of simulation data with various forms of experimental results probing different aspects of the folding process can facilitate robust assessment of the accuracy of the calculations. It can also provide a detailed structural interpretation for the experimental observations as well as physical interpretation for theory behind different aspects of the experiment. Earlier these kinds of studies have been performed experimentally using fluorescence measurements as in [5]. The calcium bound form of CaM is observed to undergo a reversible conformation change in the range 295-301 K at calcium ion concentration 150 mM. The transition temperature was observed to depend on the calcium ion concentration of the protein. Leap-dynamics approach was used earlier to study the temperature dependent conformation change of CaM [6]. At 290 K, both the N- and C-lobes were stable, at 325 K, the C-lobe unfolds whereas at 360 both the lobes unfold [6]. In this work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of 100 ns each for the temperatures 325 K and 375 K on the apo form of CaM, 3CLN and 1CFD. A remarkable dependence of the temperature is observed on the overall dynamics of both the forms of the protein as reported in our earlier study [7, 8]. 1CFD shows a much flexible linker as compared to 3CLN whereas the overall dynamics of the lobes mainly N-lobe is observed to be more in later case. Salt bridge formation between the residues 2 (ASP) and 148 (LYS) leads to a more compact form of 1CFD at 325 K. The unfolding of the protein is observed to increase with the increase in the temperature similar to the earlier reported

  12. Small-molecule control of protein function through Staudinger reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ji; Liu, Qingyang; Morihiro, Kunihiko; Deiters, Alexander

    2016-11-01

    Using small molecules to control the function of proteins in live cells with complete specificity is highly desirable, but challenging. Here we report a small-molecule switch that can be used to control protein activity. The approach uses a phosphine-mediated Staudinger reduction to activate protein function. Genetic encoding of an ortho-azidobenzyloxycarbonyl amino acid using a pyrrolysyl transfer RNA synthetase/tRNACUA pair in mammalian cells enables the site-specific introduction of a small-molecule-removable protecting group into the protein of interest. Strategic placement of this group renders the protein inactive until deprotection through a bioorthogonal Staudinger reduction delivers the active wild-type protein. This developed methodology was applied to the conditional control of several cellular processes, including bioluminescence (luciferase), fluorescence (enhanced green fluorescent protein), protein translocation (nuclear localization sequence), DNA recombination (Cre) and gene editing (Cas9).

  13. Insights into biological information processing: structural and dynamical analysis of a human protein signalling network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuente, Alberto de la; Fotia, Giorgio; Maggio, Fabio; Mancosu, Gianmaria; Pieroni, Enrico [CRS4 Bioinformatica, Parco Tecnologico POLARIS, Ed.1, Loc Piscinamanna, Pula (Italy)], E-mail: alf@crs4.it

    2008-06-06

    We present an investigation on the structural and dynamical properties of a 'human protein signalling network' (HPSN). This biological network is composed of nodes that correspond to proteins and directed edges that represent signal flows. In order to gain insight into the organization of cell information processing this network is analysed taking into account explicitly the edge directions. We explore the topological properties of the HPSN at the global and the local scale, further applying the generating function formalism to provide a suitable comparative model. The relationship between the node degrees and the distribution of signals through the network is characterized using degree correlation profiles. Finally, we analyse the dynamical properties of small sub-graphs showing high correlation between their occurrence and dynamic stability.

  14. iTRAQ protein profile analysis of developmental dynamics in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jun; Zhang, Jianan; Wang, Fengmin; Wang, Jinghua; Zheng, Zhi; Yin, Changcheng; Chen, Hao; Shi, Ainong; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Pengyin; Zhang, Mengchen

    2017-01-01

    Zao5241 is an elite soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] line and backbone parent. In this study, we employed iTRAQ to analyze the proteomes and protein expression profiles of Zao5241 during leaf development. We identified 1,245 proteins in all experiments, of which only 45 had been previously annotated. Among overlapping proteins between three biological replicates, 598 proteins with 2 unique peptides identified were reliably quantified. The protein datasets were classified into 36 GO functional terms, and the photosynthesis term was most significantly enriched. A total of 113 proteins were defined as being differentially expressed during leaf development; 41 proteins were found to be differently expressed between two and four week old leaves, and 84 proteins were found to be differently expressed between two and six week old leaves, respectively. Cluster analysis of the data revealed dynamic proteomes. Proteins annotated as electron carrier activity were greatly enriched in the peak expression profiles, and photosynthesis proteins were negatively modulated along the whole time course. This dataset will serve as the foundation for a systems biology approach to understanding photosynthetic development.

  15. Prediction of protein function and pathways in the genome era.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabaldon, T.; Huynen, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    The growing number of completely sequenced genomes adds new dimensions to the use of sequence analysis to predict protein function. Compared with the classical knowledge transfer from one protein to a similar sequence (homology-based function prediction), knowledge about the corresponding genes in

  16. Liver Function Status in some Nigerian Children with Protein Energy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To ascertain functional status of the liver in Nigeria Children with Protein energy malnutrition. Materials and Methods: Liver function tests were performed on a total of 88 children with protein energy malnutrition (PEM). These were compared with 22 apparently well-nourished children who served as controls.

  17. The contact activation proteins: a structure/function overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, J. C.; McMullen, B. A.; Bouma, B. N.

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, extensive knowledge has been obtained on the structure/function relationships of blood coagulation proteins. In this overview, we present recent developments on the structure/function relationships of the contact activation proteins: factor XII, high molecular weight kininogen,

  18. BLANNOTATOR: enhanced homology-based function prediction of bacterial proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kankainen Matti

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated function prediction has played a central role in determining the biological functions of bacterial proteins. Typically, protein function annotation relies on homology, and function is inferred from other proteins with similar sequences. This approach has become popular in bacterial genomics because it is one of the few methods that is practical for large datasets and because it does not require additional functional genomics experiments. However, the existing solutions produce erroneous predictions in many cases, especially when query sequences have low levels of identity with the annotated source protein. This problem has created a pressing need for improvements in homology-based annotation. Results We present an automated method for the functional annotation of bacterial protein sequences. Based on sequence similarity searches, BLANNOTATOR accurately annotates query sequences with one-line summary descriptions of protein function. It groups sequences identified by BLAST into subsets according to their annotation and bases its prediction on a set of sequences with consistent functional information. We show the results of BLANNOTATOR's performance in sets of bacterial proteins with known functions. We simulated the annotation process for 3090 SWISS-PROT proteins using a database in its state preceding the functional characterisation of the query protein. For this dataset, our method outperformed the five others that we tested, and the improved performance was maintained even in the absence of highly related sequence hits. We further demonstrate the value of our tool by analysing the putative proteome of Lactobacillus crispatus strain ST1. Conclusions BLANNOTATOR is an accurate method for bacterial protein function prediction. It is practical for genome-scale data and does not require pre-existing sequence clustering; thus, this method suits the needs of bacterial genome and metagenome researchers. The method and a

  19. Dynamic Coupling and Allosteric Networks in the α Subunit of Heterotrimeric G Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Qiu; Malik, Rabia U; Griggs, Nicholas W; Skjærven, Lars; Traynor, John R; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaraj; Grant, Barry J

    2016-02-26

    G protein α subunits cycle between active and inactive conformations to regulate a multitude of intracellular signaling cascades. Important structural transitions occurring during this cycle have been characterized from extensive crystallographic studies. However, the link between observed conformations and the allosteric regulation of binding events at distal sites critical for signaling through G proteins remain unclear. Here we describe molecular dynamics simulations, bioinformatics analysis, and experimental mutagenesis that identifies residues involved in mediating the allosteric coupling of receptor, nucleotide, and helical domain interfaces of Gαi. Most notably, we predict and characterize novel allosteric decoupling mutants, which display enhanced helical domain opening, increased rates of nucleotide exchange, and constitutive activity in the absence of receptor activation. Collectively, our results provide a framework for explaining how binding events and mutations can alter internal dynamic couplings critical for G protein function. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Membrane Protein Production in Lactococcus lactis for Functional Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seigneurin-Berny, Daphne; King, Martin S; Sautron, Emiline; Moyet, Lucas; Catty, Patrice; André, François; Rolland, Norbert; Kunji, Edmund R S; Frelet-Barrand, Annie

    2016-01-01

    Due to their unique properties, expression and study of membrane proteins in heterologous systems remains difficult. Among the bacterial systems available, the Gram-positive lactic bacterium, Lactococcus lactis, traditionally used in food fermentations, is nowadays widely used for large-scale production and functional characterization of bacterial and eukaryotic membrane proteins. The aim of this chapter is to describe the different possibilities for the functional characterization of peripheral or intrinsic membrane proteins expressed in Lactococcus lactis.

  1. Heat-induced whey protein gels: protein-protein interactions and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havea, Palatasa; Watkinson, Philip; Kuhn-Sherlock, Barbara

    2009-02-25

    Heat-induced gelation (80 degrees C for 30 min or 85 degrees C for 60 min) of whey protein concentrate (WPC) solutions was studied using small deformation dynamic rheology, small and large deformation compression, and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The WPC solutions (15% w/w, pH 6.9) were prepared by dispersing WPC powder in water (control), 1% (w/w) sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solution, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) solution at a protein/NEM molar ratio of 1:1 or in 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT) solution. PAGE analyses showed that the heat treatment of control solutions contained both disulfide and non-covalent linkages between denatured protein molecules. Only disulfide linkages were formed in heated SDS-WPC solutions, whereas only non-covalent linkages were formed in DTT-WPC and NEM-WPC solutions during heating. In heated NEM-WPC solutions, the pre-existing disulfide linkages remained unaltered. Small deformation rheology measurements showed that the storage modulus (G') values, compared with those of the control WPC gels (approximately 14000 Pa), were 3 times less for the SDS-WPC gels (approximately 4000 Pa), double for the NEM-WPC gels (approximately 24000 Pa), and even higher for the DTT-WPC gels (approximately 30000 Pa). Compression tests suggested that the rubberiness (fracture strain) of the WPC gels increased as the degree of disulfide linkages within the gels increased, whereas the stiffness (modulus) of the gels increased as the degree of non-covalent associations among the denatured protein molecules increased.

  2. Functionalization of whey proteins by reactive supercritical fluid extrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanitta Ruttarattanamongkol

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Whey protein, a by-product from cheese-making, is often used in a variety of food formulations due to its unsurpassednutritional quality and inherent functional properties. However, the possibilities for the improvement and upgrading of wheyprotein utilization still need to be explored. Reactive supercritical fluid extrusion (SCFX is a novel technique that has beenrecently reported to successfully functionalize commercially available whey proteins into a product with enhanced functionalproperties. The specific goal of this review is to provide fundamental understanding of the reinforcement mechanism andprocessing of protein functionalization by reactive SCFX process. The superimposed extrusion variables and their interactionmechanism affect the physico-chemical properties of whey proteins. By understanding the structure, functional properties andprocessing relationships of such materials, the rational design criteria for novel functionalized proteins could be developedand effectively utilized in food systems.

  3. A survey of computational intelligence techniques in protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Arvind Kumar; Srivastava, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    During the past, there was a massive growth of knowledge of unknown proteins with the advancement of high throughput microarray technologies. Protein function prediction is the most challenging problem in bioinformatics. In the past, the homology based approaches were used to predict the protein function, but they failed when a new protein was different from the previous one. Therefore, to alleviate the problems associated with homology based traditional approaches, numerous computational intelligence techniques have been proposed in the recent past. This paper presents a state-of-the-art comprehensive review of various computational intelligence techniques for protein function predictions using sequence, structure, protein-protein interaction network, and gene expression data used in wide areas of applications such as prediction of DNA and RNA binding sites, subcellular localization, enzyme functions, signal peptides, catalytic residues, nuclear/G-protein coupled receptors, membrane proteins, and pathway analysis from gene expression datasets. This paper also summarizes the result obtained by many researchers to solve these problems by using computational intelligence techniques with appropriate datasets to improve the prediction performance. The summary shows that ensemble classifiers and integration of multiple heterogeneous data are useful for protein function prediction.

  4. The S100 proteins in epidermis: Topology and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśniak, Wiesława; Graczyk-Jarzynka, Agnieszka

    2015-12-01

    S100 proteins are small calcium binding proteins encoded by genes located in the epidermal differentiation complex (EDC). Differently to other proteins encoded by EDC genes, which are indispensable for normal epidermal differentiation, the role of S100 proteins in the epidermis remains largely unknown. Particular S100 proteins differ in their distribution in epidermal layers, skin appendages, melanocytes and Langerhans cells. Taking into account that each epidermal component consists of specialized cells with well-defined functions, such differential distribution may be indicative of the function of a given S100 protein. We used this criterion together with the survey of the current experimental data pertinent to epidermis to provide a fairly comprehensive view on the possible function of individual S100 proteins in this tissue. S100 proteins are differently expressed and, despite extensive structural homology, perform diverse functions in the epidermis. Certain S100 proteins probably ensure constant epidermal renewal and support wound healing while others act in epidermal differentiation or have a protective role. As their expression is differently affected in various skin pathologies, particular S100 proteins could be valuable diagnostic markers. S100 proteins seem to be important although not yet fully recognized epidermal constituents. Better understanding of their role in the epidermis might be helpful in designing therapies to various skin diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Protein Carbonylation and Adipocyte Mitochondrial Function*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M.; Hahn, Wendy S.; Stone, Matthew D.; Inda, Jacob J.; Droullard, David J.; Kuzmicic, Jovan P.; Donoghue, Margaret A.; Long, Eric K.; Armien, Anibal G.; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J.; Bernlohr, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte. PMID:22822087

  6. Protein carbonylation and adipocyte mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jessica M; Hahn, Wendy S; Stone, Matthew D; Inda, Jacob J; Droullard, David J; Kuzmicic, Jovan P; Donoghue, Margaret A; Long, Eric K; Armien, Anibal G; Lavandero, Sergio; Arriaga, Edgar; Griffin, Timothy J; Bernlohr, David A

    2012-09-21

    Carbonylation is the covalent, non-reversible modification of the side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues by lipid peroxidation end products such as 4-hydroxy- and 4-oxononenal. In adipose tissue the effects of such modifications are associated with increased oxidative stress and metabolic dysregulation centered on mitochondrial energy metabolism. To address the role of protein carbonylation in the pathogenesis of mitochondrial dysfunction, quantitative proteomics was employed to identify specific targets of carbonylation in GSTA4-silenced or overexpressing 3T3-L1 adipocytes. GSTA4-silenced adipocytes displayed elevated carbonylation of several key mitochondrial proteins including the phosphate carrier protein, NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 and 3, translocase of inner mitochondrial membrane 50, and valyl-tRNA synthetase. Elevated protein carbonylation is accompanied by diminished complex I activity, impaired respiration, increased superoxide production, and a reduction in membrane potential without changes in mitochondrial number, area, or density. Silencing of the phosphate carrier or NADH dehydrogenase 1α subcomplexes 2 or 3 in 3T3-L1 cells results in decreased basal and maximal respiration. These results suggest that protein carbonylation plays a major instigating role in cytokine-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction and may be linked to the development of insulin resistance in the adipocyte.

  7. A cumulant functional for static and dynamic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollett, Joshua W.; Hosseini, Hessam; Menzies, Cameron

    2016-01-01

    A functional for the cumulant energy is introduced. The functional is composed of a pair-correction and static and dynamic correlation energy components. The pair-correction and static correlation energies are functionals of the natural orbitals and the occupancy transferred between near-degenerate orbital pairs, rather than the orbital occupancies themselves. The dynamic correlation energy is a functional of the statically correlated on-top two-electron density. The on-top density functional used in this study is the well-known Colle-Salvetti functional. Using the cc-pVTZ basis set, the functional effectively models the bond dissociation of H 2 , LiH, and N 2 with equilibrium bond lengths and dissociation energies comparable to those provided by multireference second-order perturbation theory. The performance of the cumulant functional is less impressive for HF and F 2 , mainly due to an underestimation of the dynamic correlation energy by the Colle-Salvetti functional.

  8. Small-strain dynamic rheology of food protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunick, Michael H

    2011-03-09

    Small-amplitude oscillatory shear analyses of samples containing protein are useful for determining the nature of the protein matrix without damaging it. G' (elastic or storage modulus), G'' (viscous or loss modulus), and tan δ (loss tangent, the ratio of G'' to G') give information on the properties of the network. Strain, frequency, time, and temperature sweeps provide information on the linear viscoelastic region, structural assembly, and thermal characteristics. The gelation point may be determined by locating the time at which tan δ is independent of frequency or the temperature at which G' becomes greater than G''. The logarithm of η* (complex viscosity) may be plotted against the reciprocal of the absolute temperature, with the slope being proportional to the activation energy. Dynamic tests of protein-containing samples reveal a great deal about their rheological characteristics.

  9. Short-chained oligo(ethylene oxide)-functionalized gold nanoparticles: realization of significant protein resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn R; Sims, Christopher M; Wood, Imani T; Vanderah, David J; Walker, Marlon L

    2018-01-01

    Protein corona formed on nanomaterial surfaces play an important role in the bioavailability and cellular uptake of nanomaterials. Modification of surfaces with oligoethylene glycols (OEG) are a common way to improve the resistivity of nanomaterials to protein adsorption. Short-chain ethylene oxide (EO) oligomers have been shown to improve the protein resistance of planar Au surfaces. We describe the application of these EO oligomers for improved protein resistance of 30 nm spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Functionalized AuNPs were characterized using UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and zeta potential measurements. Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used for separation and quantitation of AuNPs and AuNP-protein mixtures. Specifically, nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM) was employed for the determination of equilibrium and rate constants for binding between citrate-stabilized AuNPs and two model proteins, lysozyme and fibrinogen. Semi-quantitative CE analysis was carried out for mixtures of EO-functionalized AuNPs and proteins, and results demonstrated a 2.5-fold to 10-fold increase in protein binding resistance to lysozyme depending on the AuNP surface functionalization and a 15-fold increase in protein binding resistance to fibrinogen for both EO oligomers examined in this study. Graphical abstract Using capillary electrophoresis, the addition of short-chained oligo(ethylene oxide) ligands to gold nanoparticles was shown to improve protein binding resistance up to 15-fold.

  10. Imaging cellular dynamics in vivo with multicolor fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    The new field of in vivo cell biology is being developed with multi-colored fluorescent proteins. With the use of fluorescent proteins, the behavior of individual cells can be visualized in the living animal. An example of the new cell biology is dual-color fluorescence imaging using red fluorescent protein (RFP)-expressing tumors transplanted in green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic mice. These models show with great clarity the details of the tumor-stroma cell-cell interaction especially tumor-induced angiogenesis, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, stromal fibroblasts and macrophages. Another example is the color-coding of cells with RFP or GFP such that both cell types and their interaction can be simultaneously visualized in vivo. Stem cells can also be visualized and tracked in vivo with fluorescent proteins. Mice, in which the regulatory elements of the stem-cell marker nestin drive GFP expression, can be used to visualize hair follicle stem cells including their ability to form hair follicles as well as blood vessels. Dual-color cells expressing GFP in the nucleus and RFP in the cytoplasm enable real-time visualization of nuclear-cytoplasm dynamics including cell cycle events and apoptosis. Dual-color cells also enable the in vivo imaging of cell and nuclear deformation as well as trafficking in capillaries in living animals. Multiple-color labeling of cells will enable multiple events to be simultaneously visualized in vivo including cell-cell interaction, gene expression, ion fluxes, protein and organelle trafficking, chromosome dynamics and numerous other processes currently still studied in vitro.

  11. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and ...

  12. Automated functional classification of experimental and predicted protein structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samudrala Ram

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins that are similar in sequence or structure may perform different functions in nature. In such cases, function cannot be inferred from sequence or structural similarity. Results We analyzed experimental structures belonging to the Structural Classification of Proteins (SCOP database and showed that about half of them belong to multi-functional fold families for which protein similarity alone is not adequate to assign function. We also analyzed predicted structures from the LiveBench and the PDB-CAFASP experiments and showed that accurate homology-based functional assignments cannot be achieved approximately one third of the time, when the protein is a member of a multi-functional fold family. We then conducted extended performance evaluation and comparisons on both experimental and predicted structures using our Functional Signatures from Structural Alignments (FSSA algorithm that we previously developed to handle the problem of classifying proteins belonging to multi-functional fold families. Conclusion The results indicate that the FSSA algorithm has better accuracy when compared to homology-based approaches for functional classification of both experimental and predicted protein structures, in part due to its use of local, as opposed to global, information for classifying function. The FSSA algorithm has also been implemented as a webserver and is available at http://protinfo.compbio.washington.edu/fssa.

  13. Functional characterization of Angptl4 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenstein, L.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Elevated plasma triglycerides (TG) are increasingly recognized as a risk factor for atherosclerosis. A new adipocytokine was discovered by several groups which is referred to as Angptl4 (Angiopoietin-like protein 4). Angptl4 was recently identified as a major determinant of plasma TG

  14. Molecular and functional characterization of MICAL proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Since their original identification in 2002, MICAL proteins have been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes including axon guidance, tight junction formation, spinal cord injury and cancer. MICALs mediate cell signaling via their unusual N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain

  15. Functional differences in yeast protein disulfide isomerases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, P; Westphal, V; Tachibana, C

    2001-01-01

    PDI1 is the essential gene encoding protein disulfide isomerase in yeast. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome, however, contains four other nonessential genes with homology to PDI1: MPD1, MPD2, EUG1, and EPS1. We have investigated the effects of simultaneous deletions of these genes. In several...

  16. Design and functionality of dense protein particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saglam, D.

    2012-01-01

    Food products that contain high levels of protein can help to control food intake and to maintain a healthy body weight due to their strong satiating properties. They are also beneficial in the nutrition of elderly and commonly used in medical nutrition. Preparation of food products at high

  17. Dynamics of adenylate cyclase regulation via heterotrimeric G-proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milde, Markus; Werthmann, Ruth C; von Hayn, Kathrin; Bünemann, Moritz

    2014-04-01

    A wide variety of G-protein-coupled receptors either activate or inhibit ACs (adenylate cyclases), thereby regulating cellular cAMP levels and consequently inducing proper physiological responses. Stimulatory and inhibitory G-proteins interact directly with ACs, whereas G(q)-coupled receptors exert their effects primarily via Ca2+. Using the FRET-based cAMP sensor Epac1 (exchange protein directly activated by cAMP 1)-cAMPS (adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate), we studied cAMP levels in single living VSMCs (vascular smooth muscle cells) or HUVECs (human umbilical vein endothelial cells) with subsecond temporal resolution. Stimulation of purinergic (VSMCs) or thrombin (HUVECs) receptors rapidly decreased cAMP levels in the presence of the β-adrenergic agonist isoprenaline via a rise in Ca2+ and subsequent inhibition of AC5 and AC6. Specifically in HUVECs, we observed that, in the continuous presence of thrombin, cAMP levels climbed slowly after the initial decline with a delay of a little less than 1 min. The underlying mechanism includes phospholipase A2 activity and cyclo-oxygenase-mediated synthesis of prostaglandins. We studied further the dynamics of the inhibition of ACs via G(i)-proteins utilizing FRET imaging to resolve interactions between fluorescently labelled G(i)-proteins and AC5. FRET between Gα(i1) and AC5 developed at much lower concentration of agonist compared with the overall G(i)-protein activity. We found the dissociation of Gα(i1) subunits and AC5 to occur slower than the G(i)-protein deactivation. This led us to the conclusion that AC5, by binding active Gα(i1), interferes with G-protein deactivation and reassembly and thereby might sensitize its own regulation.

  18. The Structure and Function of Non-Collagenous Bone Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Magnus; McQuillan, David J.

    1997-01-01

    The research done under the cooperative research agreement for the project titled 'The structure and function of non-collagenous bone proteins' represented the first phase of an ongoing program to define the structural and functional relationships of the principal noncollagenous proteins in bone. An ultimate goal of this research is to enable design and execution of useful pharmacological compounds that will have a beneficial effect in treatment of osteoporosis, both land-based and induced by long-duration space travel. The goals of the now complete first phase were as follows: 1. Establish and/or develop powerful recombinant protein expression systems; 2. Develop and refine isolation and purification of recombinant proteins; 3. Express wild-type non-collagenous bone proteins; 4. Express site-specific mutant proteins and domains of wild-type proteins to enhance likelihood of crystal formation for subsequent solution of structure.

  19. AVID: An integrative framework for discovering functional relationships among proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keating Amy E

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining the functions of uncharacterized proteins is one of the most pressing problems in the post-genomic era. Large scale protein-protein interaction assays, global mRNA expression analyses and systematic protein localization studies provide experimental information that can be used for this purpose. The data from such experiments contain many false positives and false negatives, but can be processed using computational methods to provide reliable information about protein-protein relationships and protein function. An outstanding and important goal is to predict detailed functional annotation for all uncharacterized proteins that is reliable enough to effectively guide experiments. Results We present AVID, a computational method that uses a multi-stage learning framework to integrate experimental results with sequence information, generating networks reflecting functional similarities among proteins. We illustrate use of the networks by making predictions of detailed Gene Ontology (GO annotations in three categories: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. Applied to the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, AVID provides 37,451 pair-wise functional linkages between 4,191 proteins. These relationships are ~65–78% accurate, as assessed by cross-validation testing. Assignments of highly detailed functional descriptors to proteins, based on the networks, are estimated to be ~67% accurate for GO categories describing molecular function and cellular component and ~52% accurate for terms describing biological process. The predictions cover 1,490 proteins with no previous annotation in GO and also assign more detailed functions to many proteins annotated only with less descriptive terms. Predictions made by AVID are largely distinct from those made by other methods. Out of 37,451 predicted pair-wise relationships, the greatest number shared in common with another method is 3,413. Conclusion AVID provides

  20. ESG: extended similarity group method for automated protein function prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitale, Meghana; Hawkins, Troy; Park, Changsoon; Kihara, Daisuke

    2009-07-15

    Importance of accurate automatic protein function prediction is ever increasing in the face of a large number of newly sequenced genomes and proteomics data that are awaiting biological interpretation. Conventional methods have focused on high sequence similarity-based annotation transfer which relies on the concept of homology. However, many cases have been reported that simple transfer of function from top hits of a homology search causes erroneous annotation. New methods are required to handle the sequence similarity in a more robust way to combine together signals from strongly and weakly similar proteins for effectively predicting function for unknown proteins with high reliability. We present the extended similarity group (ESG) method, which performs iterative sequence database searches and annotates a query sequence with Gene Ontology terms. Each annotation is assigned with probability based on its relative similarity score with the multiple-level neighbors in the protein similarity graph. We will depict how the statistical framework of ESG improves the prediction accuracy by iteratively taking into account the neighborhood of query protein in the sequence similarity space. ESG outperforms conventional PSI-BLAST and the protein function prediction (PFP) algorithm. It is found that the iterative search is effective in capturing multiple-domains in a query protein, enabling accurately predicting several functions which originate from different domains. ESG web server is available for automated protein function prediction at http://dragon.bio.purdue.edu/ESG/.

  1. Electrostatics of the protein-water interface and the dynamical transition in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Morozov, Alexander Y.

    2011-07-01

    Atomic displacements of hydrated proteins are dominated by phonon vibrations at low temperatures and by dissipative large-amplitude motions at high temperatures. A crossover between the two regimes is known as a dynamical transition. Recent experiments indicate a connection between the dynamical transition and the dielectric response of the hydrated protein. We analyze two mechanisms of the coupling between the protein atomic motions and the protein-water interface. The first mechanism considers viscoelastic changes in the global shape of the protein plasticized by its coupling to the hydration shell. The second mechanism involves modulations of the local motions of partial charges inside the protein by electrostatic fluctuations. The model is used to analyze mean-square displacements of iron of metmyoglobin reported by Mössbauer spectroscopy. We show that high displacement of heme iron at physiological temperatures is dominated by electrostatic fluctuations. Two onsets, one arising from the viscoelastic response and the second from electrostatic fluctuations, are seen in the temperature dependence of the mean-square displacements when the corresponding relaxation times enter the instrumental resolution window.

  2. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, Daniel M.; Kushwaha, Vandana S.; Denisov, Dmitry V.; Acar, Seyda; Nienhuis, Bernard; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Schall, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell’s cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models,

  3. Correlation imaging reveals specific crowding dynamics of kinesin motor proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, D.M.; Kushwaha, V.S.; Denisov, D.V.; Acar, S.; Nienhuis, B.; Peterman, E.J.G.; Schall, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell's cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models,

  4. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  5. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Merabet

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA, we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  6. F-BAR family proteins, emerging regulators for cell membrane dynamic changes-from structure to human diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Suxuan; Xiong, Xinyu; Zhao, Xianxian; Yang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Hong

    2015-05-09

    Eukaryotic cell membrane dynamics change in curvature during physiological and pathological processes. In the past ten years, a novel protein family, Fes/CIP4 homology-Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (F-BAR) domain proteins, has been identified to be the most important coordinators in membrane curvature regulation. The F-BAR domain family is a member of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain superfamily that is associated with dynamic changes in cell membrane. However, the molecular basis in membrane structure regulation and the biological functions of F-BAR protein are unclear. The pathophysiological role of F-BAR protein is unknown. This review summarizes the current understanding of structure and function in the BAR domain superfamily, classifies F-BAR family proteins into nine subfamilies based on domain structure, and characterizes F-BAR protein structure, domain interaction, and functional relevance. In general, F-BAR protein binds to cell membrane via F-BAR domain association with membrane phospholipids and initiates membrane curvature and scission via Src homology-3 (SH3) domain interaction with its partner proteins. This process causes membrane dynamic changes and leads to seven important cellular biological functions, which include endocytosis, phagocytosis, filopodium, lamellipodium, cytokinesis, adhesion, and podosome formation, via distinct signaling pathways determined by specific domain-binding partners. These cellular functions play important roles in many physiological and pathophysiological processes. We further summarize F-BAR protein expression and mutation changes observed in various diseases and developmental disorders. Considering the structure feature and functional implication of F-BAR proteins, we anticipate that F-BAR proteins modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes via transferring extracellular materials, regulating cell trafficking and mobility, presenting antigens, mediating extracellular matrix degradation, and transmitting

  7. Function and structure of GFP-like proteins in the protein data bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Wayne J-H; Alvarez, Samuel; Leroux, Ivan E; Shahid, Ramza S; Samma, Alex A; Peshkepija, Paola; Morgan, Alicia L; Mulcahy, Shawn; Zimmer, Marc

    2011-04-01

    The RCSB protein databank contains 266 crystal structures of green fluorescent proteins (GFP) and GFP-like proteins. This is the first systematic analysis of all the GFP-like structures in the pdb. We have used the pdb to examine the function of fluorescent proteins (FP) in nature, aspects of excited state proton transfer (ESPT) in FPs, deformation from planarity of the chromophore and chromophore maturation. The conclusions reached in this review are that (1) The lid residues are highly conserved, particularly those on the "top" of the β-barrel. They are important to the function of GFP-like proteins, perhaps in protecting the chromophore or in β-barrel formation. (2) The primary/ancestral function of GFP-like proteins may well be to aid in light induced electron transfer. (3) The structural prerequisites for light activated proton pumps exist in many structures and it's possible that like bioluminescence, proton pumps are secondary functions of GFP-like proteins. (4) In most GFP-like proteins the protein matrix exerts a significant strain on planar chromophores forcing most GFP-like proteins to adopt non-planar chromophores. These chromophoric deviations from planarity play an important role in determining the fluorescence quantum yield. (5) The chemospatial characteristics of the chromophore cavity determine the isomerization state of the chromophore. The cavities of highlighter proteins that can undergo cis/trans isomerization have chemospatial properties that are common to both cis and trans GFP-like proteins.

  8. Effects of protein separation conditions on the functional and thermal properties of canola protein isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamperi, Wajira A R; Wiesenborn, Dennis P; Chang, Sam K C; Pryor, Scott W

    2011-04-01

    Canola meal protein isolates were prepared from defatted canola meal flour using alkaline solubilization and acid precipitation. A central composite design was used to model 2nd-order response surfaces for the protein yield and the functional properties of protein isolates. The solubilization pH and precipitation pH were used as design factors. The models showed that the protein yield and functional properties of isolates, such as water absorption and fat absorption, were sensitive to both solubilization pH and precipitation pH, whereas the emulsification was sensitive to only solubilization pH. Gel electrophoresis analysis of protein fractions gave evidence to the compositional changes between proteins isolated under different conditions. Differences in glass transition temperatures suggest that proteins tend to be more denatured when solubilized at highly alkaline conditions. These conformational and compositional changes due to different protein separation conditions have contributed to the changes in functional properties of protein isolates.   Protein isolation conditions may be determined primarily through optimization of total protein yield. Improvements in protein functional properties may be achieved with a relatively small sacrifice in yield by altering isolation conditions.

  9. Improving protein function prediction methods with integrated literature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabow Aaron P

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Determining the function of uncharacterized proteins is a major challenge in the post-genomic era due to the problem's complexity and scale. Identifying a protein's function contributes to an understanding of its role in the involved pathways, its suitability as a drug target, and its potential for protein modifications. Several graph-theoretic approaches predict unidentified functions of proteins by using the functional annotations of better-characterized proteins in protein-protein interaction networks. We systematically consider the use of literature co-occurrence data, introduce a new method for quantifying the reliability of co-occurrence and test how performance differs across species. We also quantify changes in performance as the prediction algorithms annotate with increased specificity. Results We find that including information on the co-occurrence of proteins within an abstract greatly boosts performance in the Functional Flow graph-theoretic function prediction algorithm in yeast, fly and worm. This increase in performance is not simply due to the presence of additional edges since supplementing protein-protein interactions with co-occurrence data outperforms supplementing with a comparably-sized genetic interaction dataset. Through the combination of protein-protein interactions and co-occurrence data, the neighborhood around unknown proteins is quickly connected to well-characterized nodes which global prediction algorithms can exploit. Our method for quantifying co-occurrence reliability shows superior performance to the other methods, particularly at threshold values around 10% which yield the best trade off between coverage and accuracy. In contrast, the traditional way of asserting co-occurrence when at least one abstract mentions both proteins proves to be the worst method for generating co-occurrence data, introducing too many false positives. Annotating the functions with greater specificity is harder

  10. Laser induced temperature jump investigations of fast protein folding dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Linlin

    Protein folding has a large parameter space, diverse mechanism, and multipath kinetics. However, there are some common features many proteins share in their folding processes: all seem to fold at the rates much faster than the random conformation search, and all fold into the structures which have the highly regular motifs like alpha-helices, beta-sheets and turns. Understanding how fast proteins can fold is one of the central issues in solving the protein folding problem. Ultrafast folding kinetics had not been accessible until a few sub-millisecond probes were invented and applied lately. We constructed a laser induced temperature jump spectrometer which is a great utility in identifying the local structure and tertiary contact formation of proteins on the time scale from 10 -8 to 10-3 s with time resolution of 10 -9 s. With this spectrometer we studied the fast folding mini-protein, TrpCage and a few short stable beta-hairpins, the TrpZip series. Studying TrpCage was a major breakthrough it was a pioneer protein model which brought experiment and simulation very close: its structures measured by NMR and predicted by the molecular dynamics were amazingly alike. Our kinetic results showed that it folds in 4 mus at room temperature which turned out to be the fastest ever known for protein-like molecules. Also this folding time constant is consistent with what was later on simulated by distributed computation. TrpZips are among the smallest and stablest polypeptide chains which form secondary structures. They are slightly different from each other based on structural stability and by forming various types of beta-hairpins which are the minimum units of beta tertiary structure. The beta-hairpins form in the time range of 1--10 mus that confirms the theory that loop formation is controlled by the diffusion process (˜mus). We also investigated the kinetics of the protein chain collapse, a very controversial problem. By comparing the collapse of the foldable 104

  11. Distinct expression patterns of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine implicate functional diversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tufeng Chen

    Full Text Available ICK/MRK (intestinal cell kinase/MAK-related kinase, MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase, and MOK (MAPK/MAK/MRK-overlapping kinase are closely related serine/threonine protein kinases in the protein kinome. The biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of the ICK/MAK/MOK family are still largely elusive. Despite significant similarities in their catalytic domains, they diverge markedly in the sequence and structural organization of their C-terminal non-catalytic domains, raising the question as to whether they have distinct, overlapping, or redundant biological functions. In order to gain insights into their biological activities and lay a fundamental groundwork for functional studies, we investigated the spatio-temporal distribution patterns and the expression dynamics of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine. We found that ICK/MAK/MOK proteins display divergent expression patterns along the duodenum-to-colon axis and during postnatal murine development. Furthermore, they are differentially partitioned between intestinal epithelium and mesenchyme. A significant increase in the protein level of ICK, but not MAK, was induced in human primary colon cancer specimens. ICK protein level was up-regulated whereas MOK protein level was down-regulated in mouse intestinal adenomas as compared with their adjacent normal intestinal mucosa. These data suggest distinct roles for ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the regulation of intestinal neoplasia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the expressions of ICK/MAK/MOK proteins in the intestinal tract can be differentially and dynamically regulated, implicating a significant functional diversity within this group of protein kinases.

  12. Density functional approaches to nuclear dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Nakatsukasa, T.; Ebata, S.; Avogadro, P.; Guo, L.; Inakura, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2012-01-01

    We present background concepts of the nuclear density functional theory (DFT) and applications of the time-dependent DFT with the Skyrme energy functional for nuclear response functions. Practical methods for numerical applications of the time-dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov theory (TDHFB) are proposed; finite amplitude method and canonical-basis TDHFB. These approaches are briefly reviewed and some numerical applications are shown to demonstrate their feasibility.

  13. Tight junction-associated MARVEL proteins marveld3, tricellulin, and occludin have distinct but overlapping functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, David R; Marchiando, Amanda M; Zhang, Yong; Shen, Le; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Wang, Yingmin; Long, Manyuan; Turner, Jerrold R

    2010-04-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that occludin and tricellulin are important for tight junction barrier function, but in vivo data suggest that loss of these proteins can be overcome. The presence of a heretofore unknown, yet related, protein could explain these observations. Here, we report marvelD3, a novel tight junction protein that, like occludin and tricellulin, contains a conserved four-transmembrane MARVEL (MAL and related proteins for vesicle trafficking and membrane link) domain. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction; analysis of RNA and protein tissue distribution; immunofluorescent and electron microscopic examination of subcellular localization; characterization of intracellular trafficking, protein interactions, dynamic behavior, and siRNA knockdown effects; and description of remodeling after in vivo immune activation show that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin have distinct but overlapping functions at the tight junction. Although marvelD3 is able to partially compensate for occludin or tricellulin loss, it cannot fully restore function. We conclude that marvelD3, occludin, and tricellulin define the tight junction-associated MARVEL protein family. The data further suggest that these proteins are best considered as a group with both redundant and unique contributions to epithelial function and tight junction regulation.

  14. A local dynamic correlation function from inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueeney, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    Information about local and dynamic atomic correlations can be obtained from inelastic neutron scattering measurements by Fourier transform of the Q-dependent intensity oscillations at a particular frequency. A local dynamic structure function, S(r,ω), is defined from the dynamic scattering function, S(Q,ω), such that the elastic and frequency-integrated limits correspond to the average and instantaneous pair-distribution functions, respectively. As an example, S(r,ω) is calculated for polycrystalline aluminum in a model where atomic motions are entirely due to harmonic phonons

  15. A miniaturized technique for assessing protein thermodynamics and function using fast determination of quantitative cysteine reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isom, Daniel G; Marguet, Philippe R; Oas, Terrence G; Hellinga, Homme W

    2011-04-01

    Protein thermodynamic stability is a fundamental physical characteristic that determines biological function. Furthermore, alteration of thermodynamic stability by macromolecular interactions or biochemical modifications is a powerful tool for assessing the relationship between protein structure, stability, and biological function. High-throughput approaches for quantifying protein stability are beginning to emerge that enable thermodynamic measurements on small amounts of material, in short periods of time, and using readily accessible instrumentation. Here we present such a method, fast quantitative cysteine reactivity, which exploits the linkage between protein stability, sidechain protection by protein structure, and structural dynamics to characterize the thermodynamic and kinetic properties of proteins. In this approach, the reaction of a protected cysteine and thiol-reactive fluorogenic indicator is monitored over a gradient of temperatures after a short incubation time. These labeling data can be used to determine the midpoint of thermal unfolding, measure the temperature dependence of protein stability, quantify ligand-binding affinity, and, under certain conditions, estimate folding rate constants. Here, we demonstrate the fQCR method by characterizing these thermodynamic and kinetic properties for variants of Staphylococcal nuclease and E. coli ribose-binding protein engineered to contain single, protected cysteines. These straightforward, information-rich experiments are likely to find applications in protein engineering and functional genomics. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Protein Function Prediction Based on Sequence and Structure Information

    KAUST Repository

    Smaili, Fatima Z.

    2016-05-25

    The number of available protein sequences in public databases is increasing exponentially. However, a significant fraction of these sequences lack functional annotation which is essential to our understanding of how biological systems and processes operate. In this master thesis project, we worked on inferring protein functions based on the primary protein sequence. In the approach we follow, 3D models are first constructed using I-TASSER. Functions are then deduced by structurally matching these predicted models, using global and local similarities, through three independent enzyme commission (EC) and gene ontology (GO) function libraries. The method was tested on 250 “hard” proteins, which lack homologous templates in both structure and function libraries. The results show that this method outperforms the conventional prediction methods based on sequence similarity or threading. Additionally, our method could be improved even further by incorporating protein-protein interaction information. Overall, the method we use provides an efficient approach for automated functional annotation of non-homologous proteins, starting from their sequence.

  17. Targeting functional motifs of a protein family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadola, Pradeep; Deo, Nivedita

    2016-10-01

    The structural organization of a protein family is investigated by devising a method based on the random matrix theory (RMT), which uses the physiochemical properties of the amino acid with multiple sequence alignment. A graphical method to represent protein sequences using physiochemical properties is devised that gives a fast, easy, and informative way of comparing the evolutionary distances between protein sequences. A correlation matrix associated with each property is calculated, where the noise reduction and information filtering is done using RMT involving an ensemble of Wishart matrices. The analysis of the eigenvalue statistics of the correlation matrix for the β -lactamase family shows the universal features as observed in the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE). The property-based approach captures the short- as well as the long-range correlation (approximately following GOE) between the eigenvalues, whereas the previous approach (treating amino acids as characters) gives the usual short-range correlations, while the long-range correlations are the same as that of an uncorrelated series. The distribution of the eigenvector components for the eigenvalues outside the bulk (RMT bound) deviates significantly from RMT observations and contains important information about the system. The information content of each eigenvector of the correlation matrix is quantified by introducing an entropic estimate, which shows that for the β -lactamase family the smallest eigenvectors (low eigenmodes) are highly localized as well as informative. These small eigenvectors when processed gives clusters involving positions that have well-defined biological and structural importance matching with experiments. The approach is crucial for the recognition of structural motifs as shown in β -lactamase (and other families) and selectively identifies the important positions for targets to deactivate (activate) the enzymatic actions.

  18. Nonparametric modeling of dynamic functional connectivity in fmri data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Røge, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    dynamic changes. The existing approaches modeling dynamic connectivity have primarily been based on time-windowing the data and k-means clustering. We propose a nonparametric generative model for dynamic FC in fMRI that does not rely on specifying window lengths and number of dynamic states. Rooted......Dynamic functional connectivity (FC) has in recent years become a topic of interest in the neuroimaging community. Several models and methods exist for both functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG), and the results point towards the conclusion that FC exhibits...... in Bayesian statistical modeling we use the predictive likelihood to investigate if the model can discriminate between a motor task and rest both within and across subjects. We further investigate what drives dynamic states using the model on the entire data collated across subjects and task/rest. We find...

  19. Bilocal functional approach to dynamical symmetry breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebert, D.; Pervushin, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    The Abelian gauge theory of massless fermions (''quarks'') interacting with a massless neutral vector (''gluon'') field is considered. The Green two-particle functions of the quarks and vector gluons are computed. The graphical expression of the bilocal propagator and that of different terms in the expansion of path integrals for these functions are given

  20. Dynamics of plant functional groups composition along ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf/stem/fruit/total biomass of dominant and companion species in plant functional groups were calculated and the correlation between elevation and species biomass was analyzed. We showed that elevation was the most important environmental factor affecting the distribution pattern of biomass of plant functional groups ...

  1. Semigroups of transcendental entire functions and their dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DINESH KUMAR

    realm of semigroups of rational and transcendental entire functions. The seminal work in this direction was done by Hinkkanen and Martin [10] related to semigroups of rational functions. In their paper, they extended the classical theory of the dynamics associated to the iteration of a rational function of one complex variable ...

  2. Multiscale molecular dynamics simulations of membrane remodeling by Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs family proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Chan; Haohua, Wen; Lanyuan, Lu; Jun, Fan

    2016-01-01

    Membrane curvature is no longer thought of as a passive property of the membrane; rather, it is considered as an active, regulated state that serves various purposes in the cell such as between cells and organelle definition. While transport is usually mediated by tiny membrane bubbles known as vesicles or membrane tubules, such communication requires complex interplay between the lipid bilayers and cytosolic proteins such as members of the Bin/Amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) superfamily of proteins. With rapid developments in novel experimental techniques, membrane remodeling has become a rapidly emerging new field in recent years. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are important tools for obtaining atomistic information regarding the structural and dynamic aspects of biological systems and for understanding the physics-related aspects. The availability of more sophisticated experimental data poses challenges to the theoretical community for developing novel theoretical and computational techniques that can be used to better interpret the experimental results to obtain further functional insights. In this review, we summarize the general mechanisms underlying membrane remodeling controlled or mediated by proteins. While studies combining experiments and molecular dynamics simulations recall existing mechanistic models, concurrently, they extend the role of different BAR domain proteins during membrane remodeling processes. We review these recent findings, focusing on how multiscale molecular dynamics simulations aid in understanding the physical basis of BAR domain proteins, as a representative of membrane-remodeling proteins. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 21403182) and the Research Grants Council of Hong Kong, China (Grant No. CityU 21300014).

  3. Dynamic response function and large-amplitude dissipative collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xizhen; Zhuo Yizhong; Li Zhuxia; Sakata, Fumihiko.

    1993-05-01

    Aiming at exploring microscopic dynamics responsible for the dissipative large-amplitude collective motion, the dynamic response and correlation functions are introduced within the general theory of nuclear coupled-master equations. The theory is based on the microscopic theory of nuclear collective dynamics which has been developed within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) theory for disclosing complex structure of the TDHF-manifold. A systematic numerical method for calculating the dynamic response and correlation functions is proposed. By performing numerical calculation for a simple model Hamiltonian, it is pointed out that the dynamic response function gives an important information in understanding the large-amplitude dissipative collective motion which is described by an ensemble of trajectories within the TDHF-manifold. (author)

  4. GPCR-interacting proteins (GIPs): nature and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockaert, J; Roussignol, G; Bécamel, C; Gavarini, S; Joubert, L; Dumuis, A; Fagni, L; Marin, P

    2004-11-01

    The simplistic idea that seven transmembrane receptors are single monomeric proteins that interact with heterotrimeric G-proteins after agonist binding is definitively out of date. Indeed, GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors) are part of multiprotein networks organized around scaffolding proteins. These GIPs (GPCR-interacting proteins) are either transmembrane or cytosolic proteins. Proteomic approaches can be used to get global pictures of these 'receptosomes'. This approach allowed us to identify direct but also indirect binding partners of serotonin receptors. GIPs are involved in a wide range of functions including control of the targeting, trafficking and signalling of GPCRs. One of them, Shank, which is a secondary and tertiary partner of metabotropic and ionotropic glutamate receptors, respectively, can induce the formation of a whole functional glutamate 'receptosome' and the structure to which it is associated, the dendritic spine.

  5. Classification of sequence signatures: a guide to Hox protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabet, Samir; Hudry, Bruno; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Graba, Yacine

    2009-05-01

    Hox proteins are part of the conserved superfamily of homeodomain-containing transcription factors and play fundamental roles in shaping animal body plans in development and evolution. However, molecular mechanisms underlying their diverse and specific biological functions remain largely enigmatic. Here, we have analyzed Hox sequences from the main evolutionary branches of the Bilateria group. We have found that four classes of Hox protein signatures exist, which together provide sufficient support to explain how different Hox proteins differ in their control and function. The homeodomain and its surrounding sequences accumulate nearly all signatures, constituting an extended module where most of the information distinguishing Hox proteins is concentrated. Only a small fraction of these signatures has been investigated at the functional level, but these show that approaches relying on Hox protein alterations still have a large potential for deciphering molecular mechanisms of Hox differential control.

  6. A functional protein retention and release multilayer with high stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Kun; An, Qi; Zhang, Yihe

    2016-04-01

    Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by varying the number of capping layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein-loaded interfacial layers could not only be used to construct catalytic-active interfaces, but also be integrated as the power-generating unit to propel a macroscopic floating device.Effective and robust interfacial protein retention lies at the heart of the fabrication of protein-based functional interfaces, which is potentially applicable in catalysis, medical therapy, antifouling, and smart devices, but remains challenging due to the sensitive nature of proteins. This study reports a general protein retention strategy to spatial-temporally confine various types of proteins at interfacial regions. The proteins were preserved in mesoporous silica nanoparticles embedded in covalently woven multilayers. It is worth noting that the protein retention strategy effectively preserves the catalytic capabilities of the proteins, and the multilayer structure is robust enough to withstand the bubbling catalytic reactions and could be repeatedly used due to conservation of proteins. The spatiotemporal retention of proteins could be adjusted by

  7. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkun, Yaman; Gur, Mert

    2012-01-01

    A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD). In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG) protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD) which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  8. Combining optimal control theory and molecular dynamics for protein folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaman Arkun

    Full Text Available A new method to develop low-energy folding routes for proteins is presented. The novel aspect of the proposed approach is the synergistic use of optimal control theory with Molecular Dynamics (MD. In the first step of the method, optimal control theory is employed to compute the force field and the optimal folding trajectory for the Cα atoms of a Coarse-Grained (CG protein model. The solution of this CG optimization provides an harmonic approximation of the true potential energy surface around the native state. In the next step CG optimization guides the MD simulation by specifying the optimal target positions for the Cα atoms. In turn, MD simulation provides an all-atom conformation whose Cα positions match closely the reference target positions determined by CG optimization. This is accomplished by Targeted Molecular Dynamics (TMD which uses a bias potential or harmonic restraint in addition to the usual MD potential. Folding is a dynamical process and as such residues make different contacts during the course of folding. Therefore CG optimization has to be reinitialized and repeated over time to accomodate these important changes. At each sampled folding time, the active contacts among the residues are recalculated based on the all-atom conformation obtained from MD. Using the new set of contacts, the CG potential is updated and the CG optimal trajectory for the Cα atoms is recomputed. This is followed by MD. Implementation of this repetitive CG optimization-MD simulation cycle generates the folding trajectory. Simulations on a model protein Villin demonstrate the utility of the method. Since the method is founded on the general tools of optimal control theory and MD without any restrictions, it is widely applicable to other systems. It can be easily implemented with available MD software packages.

  9. The dynamic adjoint as a Green’s function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pázsit, I.; Dykin, V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlight: • The relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint function is discussed in two-group theory. • It is shown that the elements of the direct Greens’ function matrix are identical to those of the transpose of the adjoint Green’s function matrix, with an interchange of arguments. • It is also remarked how the dynamic adjoint function of van Dam can be given in terms of the direct Green’s function matrix. - Abstract: The concept of the dynamic adjoint was introduced by Hugo van Dam for calculating the in-core neutron noise in boiling water reactors in the mid-70’s. This successful approach found numerous applications for calculating the neutron noise in both PWRs and BWRs since then. Although the advantages and disadvantages of using the direct (forward) or the adjoint (backward) approach for the calculation of the neutron noise were analysed in a number of publications, the direct relationship between the forward Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint has not been discussed. On the other hand, in particle transport theory the relationship between the direct and adjoint Green’s function has been discussed in detail, in which Mike Williams has had many seminal contributions. In this note we analyse the relationship between the direct Green’s function and the dynamic adjoint in the spirit of Mike’s work in neutron transport and radiation damage theory. The paper is closed with some personal remarks and reminiscences.

  10. Structural and Function Prediction of Musa acuminata subsp. Malaccensis Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anum Munir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypothetical proteins (HPs are the proteins whose presence has been anticipated, yet in vivo function has not been built up. Illustrating the structural and functional privileged insights of these HPs might likewise prompt a superior comprehension of the protein-protein associations or networks in diverse types of life. Bananas (Musa acuminata spp., including sweet and cooking types, are giant perennial monocotyledonous herbs of the order Zingiberales, a sister grouped to the all-around considered Poales, which incorporate oats. Bananas are crucial for nourishment security in numerous tropical and subtropical nations and the most prominent organic product in industrialized nations. In the present study, the hypothetical protein of M. acuminata (Banana was chosen for analysis and modeling by distinctive bioinformatics apparatuses and databases. As indicated by primary and secondary structure analysis, XP_009393594.1 is a stable hydrophobic protein containing a noteworthy extent of α-helices; Homology modeling was done utilizing SWISS-MODEL server where the templates identity with XP_009393594.1 protein was less which demonstrated novelty of our protein. Ab initio strategy was conducted to produce its 3D structure. A few evaluations of quality assessment and validation parameters determined the generated protein model as stable with genuinely great quality. Functional analysis was completed by ProtFun 2.2, and KEGG (KAAS, recommended that the hypothetical protein is a transcription factor with cytoplasmic domain as zinc finger. The protein was observed to be vital for translation process, involved in metabolism, signaling and cellular processes, genetic information processing and Zinc ion binding. It is suggested that further test approval would help to anticipate the structures and functions of other uncharacterized proteins of different plants and living being.

  11. Quasi-elastic neutron scattering studies of protein dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rorschach, H.E.

    1993-01-01

    Results that shed new light on the study of protein dynamics were obtained by quasi-elastic neutron scattering. The triple axis instrument H-9 supplied by the cold source was used to perform a detailed study of the quasi-elastic spectrum and the Debye-Waller factor for trypsin in powder form, in solution, and in crystals. A preliminary study of myoglobin crystals was also done. A new way to view the results of quasi-elastic scattering experiments is sketched, and the data on trypsin are presented and analyze according to this new picture

  12. Nanoscopic dynamics of bicontinous microemulsions: effect of membrane associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V K; Hayes, Douglas G; Urban, Volker S; O'Neill, Hugh M; Tyagi, M; Mamontov, E

    2017-07-19

    Bicontinous microemulsions (BμE) generally consist of nanodomains formed by surfactant in a mixture of water and oil at nearly equal proportions and are potential candidates for the solubilization and purification of membrane proteins. Here we present the first time report of nanoscopic dynamics of surfactant monolayers within BμEs formed by the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) measured on the nanosecond to picosecond time scale using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). BμEs investigated herein consisted of middle phases isolated from Winsor-III microemulsion systems that were formed by mixing aqueous and oil solutions under optimal conditions. QENS data indicates that surfactants undergo two distinct motions, namely (i) lateral motion along the surface of the oil nanodomains and (ii) localized internal motion. Lateral motion can be described using a continuous diffusion model, from which the lateral diffusion coefficient is obtained. Internal motion of surfactant is described using a model which assumes that a fraction of the surfactants' hydrogens undergoes localized translational diffusion that could be considered confined within a spherical volume. The effect of cytochrome c, an archetypal membrane-associated protein known to strongly partition near the surfactant head groups in BμEs (a trend supported by small-angle X-ray scattering [SAXS] analysis), on the dynamics of BμE has also been investigated. QENS results demonstrated that cytochrome c significantly hindered both the lateral and the internal motions of surfactant. The lateral motion was more strongly affected: a reduction of the lateral diffusion coefficient by 33% was measured. This change is mainly attributable to the strong association of cytochrome c with oppositely charged SDS. In contrast, analysis of SAXS data suggested that thermal fluctuations (for a longer length and slower time scale compared to QENS) were increased upon incorporation of cytochrome c. This study

  13. Interpreting Dynamically-Averaged Scalar Couplings in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2005-01-01

    to be related to the torsion angles of the molecules. As the measured couplings are sensitive to thermal fluctuations, the parameters in the Karplus relationships are better derived from ensembles representing the distributions of dihedral angles present in solution, rather than from single conformations. We......The experimental determination of scalar three-bond coupling constants represents a powerful method to probe both the structure and dynamics of proteins. The detailed structural interpretation of such coupling constants is usually based on Karplus relationships, which allow the measured couplings...

  14. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents......In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...

  15. Semigroups of transcendental entire functions and their dynamics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DINESH KUMAR

    Abstract. We investigate the dynamics of semigroups of transcendental entire func- tions using Fatou–Julia theory. Several results of the dynamics associated with iteration of a transcendental entire function have been extended to transcendental semigroups. We provide some condition for connectivity of the Julia set of the ...

  16. Dynamic behavior of chemical reactivity indices in density functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dynamic behaviors of chemical concepts in density functional theory such as frontier orbitals (HOMO/LUMO), chemical potential, hardness, and electrophilicity index have been investigated in this work in the context of Bohn-Oppenheimer quantum molecular dynamics in association with molecular conformation changes.

  17. Prediction of human protein function according to Gene Ontology categories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Juhl; Gupta, Ramneek; Stærfeldt, Hans Henrik

    2003-01-01

    developed a method for prediction of protein function for a subset of classes from the Gene Ontology classification scheme. This subset includes several pharmaceutically interesting categories-transcription factors, receptors, ion channels, stress and immune response proteins, hormones and growth factors...

  18. Preparation of functional lupine protein fractions by dry separation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Berghout, J.A.M.; Goot, van der A.J.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2014-01-01

    Lupine protein concentrate is a promising ingredient that can be obtained by a combination of milling and air classification, generally called dry fractionation. This is a more sustainable route than conventional wet extraction and delivers a protein concentrate with native functional properties.

  19. Jatropha seed protein functional properties for technical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lestari, D.; Mulder, W.J.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha press cake, by-product after oil expression from Jatropha seeds, contains 24–28% protein on dry basis. Objectives of this research were to investigate functional properties, such as solubility, emulsifying, foaming, film forming, and adhesive properties, of Jatropha press cake proteins and

  20. Dry fractionation for production of functional pea protein concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pelgrom, P.J.M.; Vissers, A.M.; Boom, R.M.; Schutyser, M.A.I.

    2013-01-01

    Dry milling in combination with air classification was evaluated as an alternative to conventional wet extraction of protein from yellow field peas (Pisum sativum). Major advantages of dry fractionation are retention of native functionality of proteins and its lower energy and water use. Peas were

  1. Regulation of Cellular and Molecular Functions by Protein ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    critical role in the regulation of many cellular functions. Phosphorylation of proteins is carried out by a group of enzymes known as protein kinases which transfer terminal phosphate of. ATP (sometimes GTP) to the hydroxyl group of amino acids - serine, threonine and tyrosine. Phosphate group on these three hydroxy amino ...

  2. Investigating the dynamics of recombinant protein secretion from a microalgal host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauersen, Kyle J; Huber, Isabel; Wichmann, Julian; Baier, Thomas; Leiter, Andreas; Gaukel, Volker; Kartushin, Viktor; Rattenholl, Anke; Steinweg, Christian; von Riesen, Lena; Posten, Clemens; Gudermann, Frank; Lütkemeyer, Dirk; Mussgnug, Jan H; Kruse, Olaf

    2015-12-10

    Production of recombinant proteins with microalgae represents an alternative platform over plant- or bacterial-based expression systems for certain target proteins. Secretion of recombinant proteins allows accumulation of the target product physically separate from the valuable algal biomass. To date, there has been little investigation into the dynamics of recombinant protein secretion from microalgal hosts-the culture parameters that encourage secreted product accumulation and stability, while encouraging biomass production. In this work, the efficiency of recombinant protein production was optimized by adjusting cultivation parameters for a strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii previously engineered to secrete a functional recombinant Lolium perenne ice binding protein (LpIBP), which has applications as a frozen food texturing and cryopreservation additive, into its culture medium. Three media and several cultivation styles were investigated for effects on secreted LpIBP titres and culture growth. A combination of acetate and carbon dioxide feeding with illumination resulted in the highest overall biomass and recombinant protein titres up to 10mgL(-1) in the culture medium. Pure photoautotrophic production was possible using two media types, with recombinant protein accumulation in all cultivations correlating to culture cell density. Two different cultivation systems were used for scale-up to 10L cultivations, one of which produced yields of secreted recombinant protein up to 12mgL(-1) within six cultivation days. Functional ice recrystallization inhibition (IRI) of the LpIBP from total concentrated extracellular protein extracts was demonstrated in a sucrose solution used as a simplified ice cream model. IRI lasted up to 7 days, demonstrating the potential of secreted products from microalgae for use as food additives. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II.

  4. Novel mutation predicted to disrupt SGOL1 protein function | Gupta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in several other centromere proteins as done in SGOL1 and will be helpful to forecast their role in chromosomal instabilities and solid tumor formation. Keywords: SGOL1; Molecular Dynamics Simulation; Gromacs; PhD-SNP; SIFT; Polyphen; MutPred. The Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics (2013) 14, 149–155 ...

  5. Dynamic modular architecture of protein-protein interaction networks beyond the dichotomy of 'date' and 'party' hubs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao; Xu, Tao; Li, Yun; Wang, Kai

    2013-01-01

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks are dynamically organized as modules, and are typically described by hub dichotomy: 'party' hubs act as intramodule hubs and are coexpressed with their partners, yet 'date' hubs act as coordinators among modules and are incoherently expressed with their partners. However, there remains skepticism about the existence of hub dichotomy. Since different algorithms and data sets were used in previous studies to test the model of hub classification, the conclusions may be largely influenced by the potential inherent biases. In this study, we evaluated two data sets of yeast interactome, and systematically investigated the behavior of hubs from multiple perspectives including co-expression patterns, topological roles and functional classifications. Our results revealed consistency between the two data sets, confirming the presence of hub dichotomy. Furthermore, we analyzed a human interactome data set, and demonstrated that the modular architecture of the PPI networks was more complicated than hub dichotomy.

  6. Assessment of protein set coherence using functional annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carazo Jose M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis of large-scale experimental datasets frequently produces one or more sets of proteins that are subsequently mined for functional interpretation and validation. To this end, a number of computational methods have been devised that rely on the analysis of functional annotations. Although current methods provide valuable information (e.g. significantly enriched annotations, pairwise functional similarities, they do not specifically measure the degree of homogeneity of a protein set. Results In this work we present a method that scores the degree of functional homogeneity, or coherence, of a set of proteins on the basis of the global similarity of their functional annotations. The method uses statistical hypothesis testing to assess the significance of the set in the context of the functional space of a reference set. As such, it can be used as a first step in the validation of sets expected to be homogeneous prior to further functional interpretation. Conclusion We evaluate our method by analysing known biologically relevant sets as well as random ones. The known relevant sets comprise macromolecular complexes, cellular components and pathways described for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which are mostly significantly coherent. Finally, we illustrate the usefulness of our approach for validating 'functional modules' obtained from computational analysis of protein-protein interaction networks. Matlab code and supplementary data are available at http://www.cnb.csic.es/~monica/coherence/

  7. Structural and Functional Annotation of Hypothetical Proteins of O139

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Islam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In developing countries threat of cholera is a significant health concern whenever water purification and sewage disposal systems are inadequate. Vibrio cholerae is one of the responsible bacteria involved in cholera disease. The complete genome sequence of V. cholerae deciphers the presence of various genes and hypothetical proteins whose function are not yet understood. Hence analyzing and annotating the structure and function of hypothetical proteins is important for understanding the V. cholerae. V. cholerae O139 is the most common and pathogenic bacterial strain among various V. cholerae strains. In this study sequence of six hypothetical proteins of V. cholerae O139 has been annotated from NCBI. Various computational tools and databases have been used to determine domain family, protein-protein interaction, solubility of protein, ligand binding sites etc. The three dimensional structure of two proteins were modeled and their ligand binding sites were identified. We have found domains and families of only one protein. The analysis revealed that these proteins might have antibiotic resistance activity, DNA breaking-rejoining activity, integrase enzyme activity, restriction endonuclease, etc. Structural prediction of these proteins and detection of binding sites from this study would indicate a potential target aiding docking studies for therapeutic designing against cholera.

  8. Using PFP and ESG Protein Function Prediction Web Servers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qing; McGraw, Joshua; Khan, Ishita; Kihara, Daisuke

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating biological function of proteins is a fundamental problem in molecular biology and bioinformatics. Conventionally, protein function is annotated based on homology using sequence similarity search tools such as BLAST and FASTA. These methods perform well when obvious homologs exist for a query sequence; however, they will not provide any functional information otherwise. As a result, the functions of many genes in newly sequenced genomes are left unknown, which await functional interpretation. Here, we introduce two webservers for function prediction methods, which effectively use distantly related sequences to improve function annotation coverage and accuracy: Protein Function Prediction (PFP) and Extended Similarity Group (ESG). These two methods have been tested extensively in various benchmark studies and ranked among the top in community-based assessments for computational function annotation, including Critical Assessment of Function Annotation (CAFA) in 2010-2011 (CAFA1) and 2013-2014 (CAFA2). Both servers are equipped with user-friendly visualizations of predicted GO terms, which provide intuitive illustrations of relationships of predicted GO terms. In addition to PFP and ESG, we also introduce NaviGO, a server for the interactive analysis of GO annotations of proteins. All the servers are available at http://kiharalab.org/software.php .

  9. Dynamic radial distribution function from inelastic neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQueeney, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    A real-space, local dynamic structure function g(r,ω) is defined from the dynamic structure function S(Q,ω), which can be measured using inelastic neutron scattering. At any particular frequency ω, S(Q,ω) contains Q-dependent intensity oscillations which reflect the spatial distribution and relative displacement directions for the atoms vibrating at that frequency. Information about local and dynamic atomic correlations is obtained from the Fourier transform of these oscillations g(r,ω) at the particular frequency. g(r,ω) can be formulated such that the elastic and frequency-summed limits correspond to the average and instantaneous radial distribution function, respectively, and is thus called the dynamic radial distribution function. As an example, the dynamic radial distribution function is calculated for fcc nickel in a model which considers only the harmonic atomic displacements due to phonons. The results of these calculations demonstrate that the magnitude of the atomic correlations can be quantified and g(r,ω) is a well-defined correlation function. This leads to a simple prescription for investigating local lattice dynamics. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  10. Protein domain recurrence and order can enhance prediction of protein functions

    KAUST Repository

    Abdel Messih, Mario A.

    2012-09-07

    Motivation: Burgeoning sequencing technologies have generated massive amounts of genomic and proteomic data. Annotating the functions of proteins identified in this data has become a big and crucial problem. Various computational methods have been developed to infer the protein functions based on either the sequences or domains of proteins. The existing methods, however, ignore the recurrence and the order of the protein domains in this function inference. Results: We developed two new methods to infer protein functions based on protein domain recurrence and domain order. Our first method, DRDO, calculates the posterior probability of the Gene Ontology terms based on domain recurrence and domain order information, whereas our second method, DRDO-NB, relies on the nave Bayes methodology using the same domain architecture information. Our large-scale benchmark comparisons show strong improvements in the accuracy of the protein function inference achieved by our new methods, demonstrating that domain recurrence and order can provide important information for inference of protein functions. The Author(s) 2012. Published by Oxford University Press.

  11. CATH FunFHMMer web server: protein functional annotations using functional family assignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sayoni; Sillitoe, Ian; Lee, David; Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Ward, John; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-07-01

    The widening function annotation gap in protein databases and the increasing number and diversity of the proteins being sequenced presents new challenges to protein function prediction methods. Multidomain proteins complicate the protein sequence-structure-function relationship further as new combinations of domains can expand the functional repertoire, creating new proteins and functions. Here, we present the FunFHMMer web server, which provides Gene Ontology (GO) annotations for query protein sequences based on the functional classification of the domain-based CATH-Gene3D resource. Our server also provides valuable information for the prediction of functional sites. The predictive power of FunFHMMer has been validated on a set of 95 proteins where FunFHMMer performs better than BLAST, Pfam and CDD. Recent validation by an independent international competition ranks FunFHMMer as one of the top function prediction methods in predicting GO annotations for both the Biological Process and Molecular Function Ontology. The FunFHMMer web server is available at http://www.cathdb.info/search/by_funfhmmer. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Growing functional modules from a seed protein via integration of protein interaction and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrakopoulou Konstantina

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nowadays modern biology aims at unravelling the strands of complex biological structures such as the protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. A key concept in the organization of PPI networks is the existence of dense subnetworks (functional modules in them. In recent approaches clustering algorithms were applied at these networks and the resulting subnetworks were evaluated by estimating the coverage of well-established protein complexes they contained. However, most of these algorithms elaborate on an unweighted graph structure which in turn fails to elevate those interactions that would contribute to the construction of biologically more valid and coherent functional modules. Results In the current study, we present a method that corroborates the integration of protein interaction and microarray data via the discovery of biologically valid functional modules. Initially the gene expression information is overlaid as weights onto the PPI network and the enriched PPI graph allows us to exploit its topological aspects, while simultaneously highlights enhanced functional association in specific pairs of proteins. Then we present an algorithm that unveils the functional modules of the weighted graph by expanding a kernel protein set, which originates from a given 'seed' protein used as starting-point. Conclusion The integrated data and the concept of our approach provide reliable functional modules. We give proofs based on yeast data that our method manages to give accurate results in terms both of structural coherency, as well as functional consistency.

  13. Artificial membranes for membrane protein purification, functionality and structure studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Mayuriben J; Lousa, Carine De Marcos; Muench, Stephen P; Goldman, Adrian; Postis, Vincent L G

    2016-06-15

    Membrane proteins represent one of the most important targets for pharmaceutical companies. Unfortunately, technical limitations have long been a major hindrance in our understanding of the function and structure of such proteins. Recent years have seen the refinement of classical approaches and the emergence of new technologies that have resulted in a significant step forward in the field of membrane protein research. This review summarizes some of the current techniques used for studying membrane proteins, with overall advantages and drawbacks for each method. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  14. Epilogue: dynamic morphosyntax in Functional Discourse Grammar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García Velasco, D.; Hengeveld, K.; Mackenzie, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    This epilogue addresses the most important topics and challenges for the Morphosyntactic Level in Functional Discourse Grammar that have been raised in the articles in this Special Issue. We begin by exploring the differences between the Morphosyntactic Level in FDG and the treatment of

  15. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  16. Mining Temporal Protein Complex Based on the Dynamic PIN Weighted with Connected Affinity and Gene Co-Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xianjun Shen

    Full Text Available The identification of temporal protein complexes would make great contribution to our knowledge of the dynamic organization characteristics in protein interaction networks (PINs. Recent studies have focused on integrating gene expression data into static PIN to construct dynamic PIN which reveals the dynamic evolutionary procedure of protein interactions, but they fail in practice for recognizing the active time points of proteins with low or high expression levels. We construct a Time-Evolving PIN (TEPIN with a novel method called Deviation Degree, which is designed to identify the active time points of proteins based on the deviation degree of their own expression values. Owing to the differences between protein interactions, moreover, we weight TEPIN with connected affinity and gene co-expression to quantify the degree of these interactions. To validate the efficiencies of our methods, ClusterONE, CAMSE and MCL algorithms are applied on the TEPIN, DPIN (a dynamic PIN constructed with state-of-the-art three-sigma method and SPIN (the original static PIN to detect temporal protein complexes. Each algorithm on our TEPIN outperforms that on other networks in terms of match degree, sensitivity, specificity, F-measure and function enrichment etc. In conclusion, our Deviation Degree method successfully eliminates the disadvantages which exist in the previous state-of-the-art dynamic PIN construction methods. Moreover, the biological nature of protein interactions can be well described in our weighted network. Weighted TEPIN is a useful approach for detecting temporal protein complexes and revealing the dynamic protein assembly process for cellular organization.

  17. Are high-protein, vegetable-based diets safe for kidney function? A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Adam M; Treyzon, Leo; Li, Zhaoping

    2007-04-01

    In individuals with chronic kidney disease, high-protein diets have been shown to accelerate renal deterioration, whereas low-protein diets increase the risk of protein malnutrition. Vegetarian diets have been promoted as a way to halt progression of kidney disease while maintaining adequate nutrition. We review the literature to date comparing the effects of animal and vegetable protein on kidney function in health and disease. Diets with conventional amounts of protein, as well as high-protein diets, are reviewed. The literature shows that in short-term clinical trials, animal protein causes dynamic effects on renal function, whereas egg white, dairy, and soy do not. These differences are seen both in diets with conventional amounts of protein and those with high amounts of protein. The long-term effects of animal protein on normal kidney function are not known. Although data on persons with chronic kidney disease are limited, it appears that high intake of animal and vegetable proteins accelerates the underlying disease process not only in physiologic studies but also in short-term interventional trials. The long-term effects of high protein intake on chronic kidney disease are still poorly understood. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain the different effects of animal and vegetable proteins on normal kidney function, including differences in postprandial circulating hormones, sites of protein metabolism, and interaction with accompanying micronutrients.

  18. Integration of latex protein sequence data provides comprehensive functional overview of latex proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Won Kyong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Chu, Hyosub; Park, Sang-Ho; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2014-03-01

    The laticiferous system is one of the most important conduit systems in higher plants, which produces a milky-like sap known as latex. Latex contains diverse secondary metabolites with various ecological functions. To obtain a comprehensive overview of the latex proteome, we integrated available latex proteins sequences and constructed a comprehensive dataset composed of 1,208 non-redundant latex proteins from 20 various latex-bearing plants. The results of functional analyses revealed that latex proteins are involved in various biological processes, including transcription, translation, protein degradation and the plant response to environmental stimuli. The results of the comparative analysis showed that the functions of the latex proteins are similar to those of phloem, suggesting the functional conservation of plant vascular proteins. The presence of latex proteins in mitochondria and plastids suggests the production of diverse secondary metabolites. Furthermore, using a BLAST search, we identified 854 homologous latex proteins in eight plant species, including three latex-bearing plants, such as papaya, caster bean and cassava, suggesting that latex proteins were newly evolved in vascular plants. Taken together, this study is the largest and most comprehensive in silico analysis of the latex proteome. The results obtained here provide useful resources and information for characterizing the evolution of the latex proteome.

  19. Dynamics in protein powders on the nanosecond-picosecond time scale are dominated by localized motions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickels, Jonathan D; García Sakai, Victoria; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2013-10-03

    We present analysis of nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP) using neutron scattering data obtained on three spectrometers. GFP has a β-barrel structure that differs significantly from the structure of other globular proteins and is thought to result in a more rigid local environment. Despite this difference, our analysis reveals that the dynamics of GFP are similar to dynamics of other globular proteins such as lysozyme and myoglobin. We suggest that the same general concept of protein dynamics may be applicable to all these proteins. The dynamics of dry protein are dominated by methyl group rotations, while hydration facilitates localized diffusion-like motions in the protein. The latter has an extremely broad relaxation spectrum. The nanosecond-picosecond dynamics of both dry and hydrated GFP are localized to distances of ∼1-3.5 Å, in contrast to the longer range diffusion of hydration water.

  20. Analysis of oscillatory rocking curve by dynamical diffraction in protein crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryo; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Hirano, Keiichi; Kumasaka, Takashi; Kojima, Kenichi; Tachibana, Masaru

    2018-04-03

    High-quality protein crystals meant for structural analysis by X-ray diffraction have been grown by various methods. The observation of dynamical diffraction in protein crystals is an interesting topic because dynamical diffraction generally occurs in perfect crystals such as Si crystals. However, to our knowledge, there is no report yet on protein crystals showing clear dynamical diffraction. We wonder whether the perfection of protein crystals might still be low compared with that of high-quality Si crystals. Here, we present observations of the oscillatory profile of rocking curves for protein crystals such as glucose isomerase crystals. The oscillatory profiles are in good agreement with those predicted by the dynamical theory of diffraction. We demonstrate that dynamical diffraction occurs even in protein crystals. This suggests the possibility of the use of dynamical diffraction for the determination of the structure and charge density of proteins.

  1. Direct observation of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) protein dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuculis, Luke; Abil, Zhanar; Zhao, Huimin; Schroeder, Charles M.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we describe a single molecule assay to probe the site-search dynamics of transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins along DNA. In modern genetics, the ability to selectively edit the human genome is an unprecedented development, driven by recent advances in targeted nuclease proteins. Specific gene editing can be accomplished using TALE proteins, which are programmable DNA-binding proteins that can be fused to a nuclease domain. In this way, TALENs are a leading technology that has shown great success in the genomic editing of pluripotent stem cells. A major hurdle facing clinical implementation, however, is the potential for deleterious off-target binding events. For these reasons, a molecular-level understanding of TALE binding and target sequence search on DNA is essential. To this end, we developed a single-molecule fluorescence imaging assay that provides a first-of-its-kind view of the 1-D diffusion of TALE proteins along stretched DNA. Taken together with co-crystal structures of DNA-bound TALEs, our results suggest a rotationally-coupled, major groove tracking model for diffusion. We further report diffusion constants for TALE proteins as a function of salt concentration, consistent with previously described models of 1-D protein diffusion.

  2. Dynamic Lipid-dependent Modulation of Protein Topology by Post-translational Phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrac, Heidi; MacLean, David M; Karlstaedt, Anja; Taegtmeyer, Heinrich; Jayaraman, Vasanthi; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Dowhan, William

    2017-02-03

    Membrane protein topology and folding are governed by structural principles and topogenic signals that are recognized and decoded by the protein insertion and translocation machineries at the time of initial membrane insertion and folding. We previously demonstrated that the lipid environment is also a determinant of initial protein topology, which is dynamically responsive to post-assembly changes in membrane lipid composition. However, the effect on protein topology of post-assembly phosphorylation of amino acids localized within initially cytoplasmically oriented extramembrane domains has never been investigated. Here, we show in a controlled in vitro system that phosphorylation of a membrane protein can trigger a change in topological arrangement. The rate of change occurred on a scale of seconds, comparable with the rates observed upon changes in the protein lipid environment. The rate and extent of topological rearrangement were dependent on the charges of extramembrane domains and the lipid bilayer surface. Using model membranes mimicking the lipid compositions of eukaryotic organelles, we determined that anionic lipids, cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and membrane fluidity play critical roles in these processes. Our results demonstrate how post-translational modifications may influence membrane protein topology in a lipid-dependent manner, both along the organelle trafficking pathway and at their final destination. The results provide further evidence that membrane protein topology is dynamic, integrating for the first time the effect of changes in lipid composition and regulators of cellular processes. The discovery of a new topology regulatory mechanism opens additional avenues for understanding unexplored structure-function relationships and the development of optimized topology prediction tools. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Dynamic reorganization of intrinsic functional networks in the mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Joanes; Preti, Maria Giulia; Bolton, Thomas A W; Buerge, Michaela; Seifritz, Erich; Pryce, Christopher R; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Rudin, Markus

    2017-05-15

    Functional connectivity (FC) derived from resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) allows for the integrative study of neuronal processes at a macroscopic level. The majority of studies to date have assumed stationary interactions between brain regions, without considering the dynamic aspects of network organization. Only recently has the latter received increased attention, predominantly in human studies. Applying dynamic FC (dFC) analysis to mice is attractive given the relative simplicity of the mouse brain and the possibility to explore mechanisms underlying network dynamics using pharmacological, environmental or genetic interventions. Therefore, we have evaluated the feasibility and research potential of mouse dFC using the interventions of social stress or anesthesia duration as two case-study examples. By combining a sliding-window correlation approach with dictionary learning, several dynamic functional states (dFS) with a complex organization were identified, exhibiting highly dynamic inter- and intra-modular interactions. Each dFS displayed a high degree of reproducibility upon changes in analytical parameters and across datasets. They fluctuated at different degrees as a function of anesthetic depth, and were sensitive indicators of pathology as shown for the chronic psychosocial stress mouse model of depression. Dynamic functional states are proposed to make a major contribution to information integration and processing in the healthy and diseased brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Analysis of Uncertainty in Dynamic Processes Development of Banks Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei V. Korovyakovskii

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper offers the approach to measure of uncertainty estimation in dynamic processes of banks functioning, using statistic data of different banking operations indicators. To calculate measure of uncertainty in dynamic processes of banks functioning the phase images of relevant sets of statistic data are considered. Besides, it is shown that the form of phase image of the studied sets of statistic data can act as a basis of measure of uncertainty estimation in dynamic processes of banks functioning. The set of analytical characteristics are offered to formalize the form of phase image definition of the studied sets of statistic data. It is shown that the offered analytical characteristics consider inequality of changes in values of the studied sets of statistic data, which is one of the ways of uncertainty display in dynamic processes development. The invariant estimates of measure of uncertainty in dynamic processes of banks functioning, considering significant changes in absolute values of the same indicators for different banks were obtained. The examples of calculation of measure of uncertainty in dynamic processes of concrete banks functioning were cited.

  5. Analysis of substructural variation in families of enzymatic proteins with applications to protein function prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fofanov Viacheslav Y

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Structural variations caused by a wide range of physico-chemical and biological sources directly influence the function of a protein. For enzymatic proteins, the structure and chemistry of the catalytic binding site residues can be loosely defined as a substructure of the protein. Comparative analysis of drug-receptor substructures across and within species has been used for lead evaluation. Substructure-level similarity between the binding sites of functionally similar proteins has also been used to identify instances of convergent evolution among proteins. In functionally homologous protein families, shared chemistry and geometry at catalytic sites provide a common, local point of comparison among proteins that may differ significantly at the sequence, fold, or domain topology levels. Results This paper describes two key results that can be used separately or in combination for protein function analysis. The Family-wise Analysis of SubStructural Templates (FASST method uses all-against-all substructure comparison to determine Substructural Clusters (SCs. SCs characterize the binding site substructural variation within a protein family. In this paper we focus on examples of automatically determined SCs that can be linked to phylogenetic distance between family members, segregation by conformation, and organization by homology among convergent protein lineages. The Motif Ensemble Statistical Hypothesis (MESH framework constructs a representative motif for each protein cluster among the SCs determined by FASST to build motif ensembles that are shown through a series of function prediction experiments to improve the function prediction power of existing motifs. Conclusions FASST contributes a critical feedback and assessment step to existing binding site substructure identification methods and can be used for the thorough investigation of structure-function relationships. The application of MESH allows for an automated

  6. Ultrafast slaving dynamics at the protein-water interface studied with 2D-IR spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kubarych K. J.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of hen egg white lysozyme in D2O/glycerol mixtures is studied using two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. The hydration dynamics and the protein dynamics are studied simultaneously through vibrational probes attached to the protein surface.

  7. Structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malomo, Sunday A; He, Rong; Aluko, Rotimi E

    2014-08-01

    The effects of pH and protein concentration on some structural and functional properties of hemp seed protein isolate (HPI, 84.15% protein content) and defatted hemp seed protein meal (HPM, 44.32% protein content) were determined. The HPI had minimum protein solubility (PS) at pH 4.0, which increased as pH was decreased or increased. In contrast, the HPM had minimum PS at pH 3.0, which increased at higher pH values. Gel electrophoresis showed that some of the high molecular weight proteins (>45 kDa) present in HPM were not well extracted by the alkali and were absent or present in low ratio in the HPI polypeptide profile. The amino acid composition showed that the isolation process increased the Arg/Lys ratio of HPI (5.52%) when compared to HPM (3.35%). Intrinsic fluorescence and circular dichroism data indicate that the HPI proteins had a well-defined structure at pH 3.0, which was lost as pH value increased. The differences in structural conformation of HPI at different pH values were reflected as better foaming capacity at pH 3.0 when compared to pH 5.0, 7.0, and 9.0. At 10 and 25 mg/mL protein concentrations, emulsions formed by the HPM had smaller oil droplet sizes (higher quality), when compared to the HPI-formed emulsions. In contrast at 50 mg/mL protein concentration, the HPI-formed emulsions had smaller oil droplet sizes (except at pH 3.0). We conclude that the functional properties of hemp seed protein products are dependent on structural conformations as well as protein concentration and pH. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  8. JAFA: a protein function annotation meta-server

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friedberg, Iddo; Harder, Tim; Godzik, Adam

    2006-01-01

    With the high number of sequences and structures streaming in from genomic projects, there is a need for more powerful and sophisticated annotation tools. Most problematic of the annotation efforts is predicting gene and protein function. Over the past few years there has been considerable progress...... Annotations, or JAFA server. JAFA queries several function prediction servers with a protein sequence and assembles the returned predictions in a legible, non-redundant format. In this manner, JAFA combines the predictions of several servers to provide a comprehensive view of what are the predicted functions...

  9. Frontiers in Fluctuation Spectroscopy: Measuring protein dynamics and protein spatio-temporal connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digman, Michelle

    Fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy has evolved from single point detection of molecular diffusion to a family of microscopy imaging correlation tools (i.e. ICS, RICS, STICS, and kICS) useful in deriving spatial-temporal dynamics of proteins in living cells The advantage of the imaging techniques is the simultaneous measurement of all points in an image with a frame rate that is increasingly becoming faster with better sensitivity cameras and new microscopy modalities such as the sheet illumination technique. A new frontier in this area is now emerging towards a high level of mapping diffusion rates and protein dynamics in the 2 and 3 dimensions. In this talk, I will discuss the evolution of fluctuation analysis from the single point source to mapping diffusion in whole cells and the technology behind this technique. In particular, new methods of analysis exploit correlation of molecular fluctuations originating from measurement of fluctuation correlations at distant points (pair correlation analysis) and methods that exploit spatial averaging of fluctuations in small regions (iMSD). For example the pair correlation fluctuation (pCF) analyses done between adjacent pixels in all possible radial directions provide a window into anisotropic molecular diffusion. Similar to the connectivity atlas of neuronal connections from the MRI diffusion tensor imaging these new tools will be used to map the connectome of protein diffusion in living cells. For biological reaction-diffusion systems, live single cell spatial-temporal analysis of protein dynamics provides a mean to observe stochastic biochemical signaling in the context of the intracellular environment which may lead to better understanding of cancer cell invasion, stem cell differentiation and other fundamental biological processes. National Institutes of Health Grant P41-RRO3155.

  10. Dynamic control of function by light-driven molecular motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Thomas; Lubbe, Anouk S.; Stacko, Peter; Wezenberg, Sander J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2017-01-01

    The field of dynamic functional molecular systems has progressed enormously over the past few decades. By coupling the mechanical properties of molecular switches and motors to chemical and biological processes, exceptional control of function has been attained. Overcrowded alkene-based light-driven

  11. Measurement of dynamic efficiency: a directional distance function parametric approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serra, T.; Oude Lansink, A.G.J.M.; Stefanou, S.E.

    2011-01-01

    This research proposes a parametric estimation of the structural dynamic efficiency measures proposed by Silva and Oude Lansink (2009). Overall, technical and allocative efficiency measurements are derived based on a directional distance function and the duality between this function and the optimal

  12. Gauge fixing in the partition function for generalized quantum dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1998-01-01

    We discuss the problem of gauge fixing for the partition function in generalized quantum (or trace) dynamics, deriving analogs of the De Witt endash Faddeev endash Popov procedure and of the BRST invariance familiar in the functional integral context. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  13. Dynamics of functional indices of the liver in cholecystography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasyuk, M.N.; Yaremenko, V.D.; Kratinov, V.P.; Vorob'eva, L.A.

    1987-01-01

    During cholecytography with Boyden's cholekinetic breakfast patients with chronic cholecystitis showed disorders of the motor function of the gallbladder and also a pronounced dynamics of some most specific functional indices of the liver allowing a more accurate diagnosis of the presence of concomitant reactive hepatitis and adequate control of the efficacy of prophylactic and therapeutic measures

  14. Integration of structural dynamics and molecular evolution via protein interaction networks: a new era in genomic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Avishek; Butler, Brandon M; Kumar, Sudhir; Ozkan, S Banu

    2015-12-01

    Sequencing technologies are revealing many new non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs) in each personal exome. To assess their functional impacts, comparative genomics is frequently employed to predict if they are benign or not. However, evolutionary analysis alone is insufficient, because it misdiagnoses many disease-associated nsSNVs, such as those at positions involved in protein interfaces, and because evolutionary predictions do not provide mechanistic insights into functional change or loss. Structural analyses can aid in overcoming both of these problems by incorporating conformational dynamics and allostery in nSNV diagnosis. Finally, protein-protein interaction networks using systems-level methodologies shed light onto disease etiology and pathogenesis. Bridging these network approaches with structurally resolved protein interactions and dynamics will advance genomic medicine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dynamical density functional theory for dense atomic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archer, A J

    2006-01-01

    Starting from Newton's equations of motion, we derive a dynamical density functional theory (DDFT) applicable to atomic liquids. The theory has the feature that it requires as input the Helmholtz free energy functional from equilibrium density functional theory. This means that, given a reliable equilibrium free energy functional, the correct equilibrium fluid density profile is guaranteed. We show that when the isothermal compressibility is small, the DDFT generates the correct value for the speed of sound in a dense liquid. We also interpret the theory as a dynamical equation for a coarse grained fluid density and show that the theory can be used (making further approximations) to derive the standard mode coupling theory that is used to describe the glass transition. The present theory should provide a useful starting point for describing the dynamics of inhomogeneous atomic fluids

  16. Phylogenomic analysis reveals dynamic evolutionary history of the Drosophila heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 gene family.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia T Levine

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin is the gene-poor, satellite-rich eukaryotic genome compartment that supports many essential cellular processes. The functional diversity of proteins that bind and often epigenetically define heterochromatic DNA sequence reflects the diverse functions supported by this enigmatic genome compartment. Moreover, heterogeneous signatures of selection at chromosomal proteins often mirror the heterogeneity of evolutionary forces that act on heterochromatic DNA. To identify new such surrogates for dissecting heterochromatin function and evolution, we conducted a comprehensive phylogenomic analysis of the Heterochromatin Protein 1 gene family across 40 million years of Drosophila evolution. Our study expands this gene family from 5 genes to at least 26 genes, including several uncharacterized genes in Drosophila melanogaster. The 21 newly defined HP1s introduce unprecedented structural diversity, lineage-restriction, and germline-biased expression patterns into the HP1 family. We find little evidence of positive selection at these HP1 genes in both population genetic and molecular evolution analyses. Instead, we find that dynamic evolution occurs via prolific gene gains and losses. Despite this dynamic gene turnover, the number of HP1 genes is relatively constant across species. We propose that karyotype evolution drives at least some HP1 gene turnover. For example, the loss of the male germline-restricted HP1E in the obscura group coincides with one episode of dramatic karyotypic evolution, including the gain of a neo-Y in this lineage. This expanded compendium of ovary- and testis-restricted HP1 genes revealed by our study, together with correlated gain/loss dynamics and chromosome fission/fusion events, will guide functional analyses of novel roles supported by germline chromatin.

  17. The dynamics of protein hydration water: a quantitative comparison of molecular dynamics simulations and neutron-scattering experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarek, M; Tobias, D J

    2000-12-01

    We present results from an extensive molecular dynamics simulation study of water hydrating the protein Ribonuclease A, at a series of temperatures in cluster, crystal, and powder environments. The dynamics of protein hydration water appear to be very similar in crystal and powder environments at moderate to high hydration levels. Thus, we contend that experiments performed on powder samples are appropriate for discussing hydration water dynamics in native protein environments. Our analysis reveals that simulations performed on cluster models consisting of proteins surrounded by a finite water shell with free boundaries are not appropriate for the study of the solvent dynamics. Detailed comparison to available x-ray diffraction and inelastic neutron-scattering data shows that current generation force fields are capable of accurately reproducing the structural and dynamical observables. On the time scale of tens of picoseconds, at room temperature and high hydration, significant water translational diffusion and rotational motion occur. At low hydration, the water molecules are translationally confined but display appreciable rotational motion. Below the protein dynamical transition temperature, both translational and rotational motions of the water molecules are essentially arrested. Taken together, these results suggest that water translational motion is necessary for the structural relaxation that permits anharmonic and diffusive motions in proteins. Furthermore, it appears that the exchange of protein-water hydrogen bonds by water rotational/librational motion is not sufficient to permit protein structural relaxation. Rather, the complete exchange of protein-bound water molecules by translational displacement seems to be required.

  18. Proton Wire Dynamics in the Green Fluorescent Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinobu, Ai; Agmon, Noam

    2017-01-10

    Inside proteins, protons move on proton wires (PWs). Starting from the highest resolution X-ray structure available, we conduct a 306 ns molecular dynamics simulation of the (A-state) wild-type (wt) green fluorescent protein (GFP) to study how its PWs change with time. We find that the PW from the chromophore via Ser205 to Glu222, observed in all X-ray structures, undergoes rapid water molecule insertion between Ser205 and Glu222. Sometimes, an alternate Ser205-bypassing PW exists. Side chain rotations of Thr203 and Ser205 play an important role in shaping the PW network in the chromophore region. Thr203, with its bulkier side chain, exhibits slower transitions between its three rotameric states. Ser205 experiences more frequent rotations, slowing down when the Thr203 methyl group is close by. The combined states of both residues affect the PW probabilities. A random walk search for PWs from the chromophore reveals several exit points to the bulk, one being a direct water wire (WW) from the chromophore to the bulk. A longer WW connects the "bottom" of the GFP barrel with a "water pool" (WP1) situated below Glu222. These two WWs were not observed in X-ray structures of wt-GFP, but their analogues have been reported in related fluorescent proteins. Surprisingly, the high-resolution X-ray structure utilized herein shows that Glu222 is protonated at low temperatures. At higher temperatures, we suggest ion pairing between anionic Glu222 and a proton hosted in WP1. Upon photoexcitation, these two recombine, while a second proton dissociates from the chromophore and either exits the protein using the short WW or migrates along the GFP-barrel axis on the long WW. This mechanism reconciles the conflicting experimental and theoretical data on proton motion within GFP.

  19. A proteomics strategy to elucidate functional protein-protein interactions applied to EGF signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blagoev, B.; Kratchmarova, I.; Ong, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based proteomics can reveal protein-protein interactions on a large scale, but it has been difficult to separate background binding from functionally important interactions and still preserve weak binders. To investigate the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway, we em...

  20. Functional analysis of picornavirus 2B proteins: effects on calcium homeostasis and intracellular protein trafficking.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, A.S. de; Mattia, F.P. de; Dommelen, M.M.T.; Lanke, K.H.W.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Willems, P.H.G.M.; Kuppeveld, F.J.M. van

    2008-01-01

    The family Picornaviridae consists of a large group of plus-strand RNA viruses that share a similar genome organization. The nomenclature of the picornavirus proteins is based on their position in the viral RNA genome but does not necessarily imply a conserved function of proteins of different

  1. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aude Lafoux

    Full Text Available Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17-19 months of age. An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents.

  2. Soluble Milk Protein Supplementation with Moderate Physical Activity Improves Locomotion Function in Aging Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafoux, Aude; Baudry, Charlotte; Bonhomme, Cécile; Le Ruyet, Pascale; Huchet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Aging is associated with a loss of muscle mass and functional capacity. Present study was designed to compare the impact of specific dairy proteins on muscular function with or without a low-intensity physical activity program on a treadmill in an aged rat model. We investigated the effects of nutritional supplementation, five days a week over a 2-month period with a slow digestible protein, casein or fast digestible proteins, whey or soluble milk protein, on strength and locomotor parameters in sedentary or active aged Wistar RjHan rats (17-19 months of age). An extensive gait analysis was performed before and after protein supplementation. After two months of protein administration and activity program, muscle force was evaluated using a grip test, spontaneous activity using an open-field and muscular mass by specific muscle sampling. When aged rats were supplemented with proteins without exercise, only minor effects of different diets on muscle mass and locomotion were observed: higher muscle mass in the casein group and improvement of stride frequencies with soluble milk protein. By contrast, supplementation with soluble milk protein just after physical activity was more effective at improving overall skeletal muscle function in old rats compared to casein. For active old rats supplemented with soluble milk protein, an increase in locomotor activity in the open field and an enhancement of static and dynamic gait parameters compared to active groups supplemented with casein or whey were observed without any differences in muscle mass and forelimb strength. These results suggest that consumption of soluble milk protein as a bolus immediately after a low intensity physical activity may be a suitable nutritional intervention to prevent decline in locomotion in aged rats and strengthen the interest to analyze the longitudinal aspect of locomotion in aged rodents.

  3. Distinguishing between biochemical and cellular function: Are there peptide signatures for cellular function of proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shruti; Bhattacharyya, Kausik; Bakshi, Rachit; Narang, Ankita; Brahmachari, Vani

    2017-04-01

    The genome annotation and identification of gene function depends on conserved biochemical activity. However, in the cell, proteins with the same biochemical function can participate in different cellular pathways and cannot complement one another. Similarly, two proteins of very different biochemical functions are put in the same class of cellular function; for example, the classification of a gene as an oncogene or a tumour suppressor gene is not related to its biochemical function, but is related to its cellular function. We have taken an approach to identify peptide signatures for cellular function in proteins with known biochemical function. ATPases as a test case, we classified ATPases (2360 proteins) and kinases (517 proteins) from the human genome into different cellular function categories such as transcriptional, replicative, and chromatin remodelling proteins. Using publicly available tool, MEME, we identify peptide signatures shared among the members of a given category but not between cellular functional categories; for example, no motif sharing is seen between chromatin remodelling and transporter ATPases, similarly between receptor Serine/Threonine Kinase and Receptor Tyrosine Kinase. There are motifs shared within each category with significant E value and high occurrence. This concept of signature for cellular function was applied to developmental regulators, the polycomb and trithorax proteins which led to the prediction of the role of INO80, a chromatin remodelling protein, in development. This has been experimentally validated earlier for its role in homeotic gene regulation and its interaction with regulatory complexes like the Polycomb and Trithorax complex. Proteins 2017; 85:682-693. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Specific protein homeostatic functions of small heat-shock proteins increase lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Michel J; Carra, Serena; Kanon, Bart; Bosveld, Floris; Klauke, Karin; Sibon, Ody C M; Kampinga, Harm H

    2016-04-01

    During aging, oxidized, misfolded, and aggregated proteins accumulate in cells, while the capacity to deal with protein damage declines severely. To cope with the toxicity of damaged proteins, cells rely on protein quality control networks, in particular proteins belonging to the family of heat-shock proteins (HSPs). As safeguards of the cellular proteome, HSPs assist in protein folding and prevent accumulation of damaged, misfolded proteins. Here, we compared the capacity of all Drosophila melanogaster small HSP family members for their ability to assist in refolding stress-denatured substrates and/or to prevent aggregation of disease-associated misfolded proteins. We identified CG14207 as a novel and potent small HSP member that exclusively assisted in HSP70-dependent refolding of stress-denatured proteins. Furthermore, we report that HSP67BC, which has no role in protein refolding, was the most effective small HSP preventing toxic protein aggregation in an HSP70-independent manner. Importantly, overexpression of both CG14207 and HSP67BC in Drosophila leads to a mild increase in lifespan, demonstrating that increased levels of functionally diverse small HSPs can promote longevity in vivo. © 2015 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Evaluating Protein Structure and Dynamics Using Co-Solvents, Photochemical Triggers, and Site-Specific Spectroscopic Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaskharon, Rachel M.

    As ubiquitous and diverse biopolymers, proteins are dynamic molecules that are constantly engaging in inter- and intramolecular interactions responsible for their structure, fold, and function. Because of this, gaining a comprehensive understanding of the factors that control protein conformation and dynamics remains elusive as current experimental techniques often lack the ability to initiate and probe a specific interaction or conformational transition. For this reason, this thesis aims to develop methods to control and monitor protein conformations, conformational transitions, and dynamics in a site-specific manner, as well as to understand how specific and non-specific interactions affect the protein folding energy landscape. First, by using the co-solvent, trifluoroethanol (TFE), we show that the rate at which a peptide folds can be greatly impacted and thus controlled by the excluded volume effect. Secondly, we demonstrate the utility of several light-responsive molecules and reactions as methods to manipulate and investigate protein-folding processes. Using an azobenzene linker as a photo-initiator, we are able to increase the folding rate of a protein system by an order of magnitude by channeling a sub-population through a parallel, faster folding pathway. Additionally, we utilize a tryptophan-mediated electron transfer process to a nearby disulfide bond to strategically unfold a protein molecule with ultraviolet light. We also demonstrate the potential of two ruthenium polypyridyl complexes as ultrafast phototriggers of protein reactions. Finally, we develop several site-specific spectroscopic probes of protein structure and environment. Specifically, we demonstrate that a 13C-labeled aspartic acid residue constitutes a useful site-specific infrared probe for investigating salt-bridges and hydration dynamics of proteins, particularly in proteins containing several acidic amino acids. We also show that a proline-derivative, 4-oxoproline, possesses novel

  6. Subcellular localization and functional expression of the glycerol uptake protein 1 (GUP1) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae tagged with green fluorescent protein

    OpenAIRE

    Bleve, Gianluca; Zacheo, Giuseppe; Cappello, Maria Stella; Dellaglio, Franco; Grieco, Francesco

    2005-01-01

    GFP (green fluorescent protein) from Aequorea victoria was used as an in vivo reporter protein when fused to the N- and C-termini of the glycerol uptake protein 1 (Gup1p) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The subcellular localization and functional expression of biologically active Gup1–GFP chimaeras was monitored by confocal laser scanning and electron microscopy, thus supplying the first study of GUP1 dynamics in live yeast cells. The Gup1p tagged with GFP is a functional glycerol transporter lo...

  7. Mechanical, dynamic-mechanical and thermal properties of soy protein-based thermoplastics with potential biomedical applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaz, C.A.; Mano, J.F.; Fossen, M.; Tuil, van R.F.; Graaf, de L.A.; Reis, R.L.; Cunha, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this study the tensile and the dynamic-mechanical behavior of injection-molded samples of various soy protein thermoplastic compounds were evaluated as a function of the amount of glycerol, type and amount of ceramic reinforcement, and eventual incorporation of coupling agents. The incorporation

  8. Usher proteins in inner ear structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Zubair M; Frolenkov, Gregory I; Riazuddin, Saima

    2013-11-01

    Usher syndrome (USH) is a neurosensory disorder affecting both hearing and vision in humans. Linkage studies of families of USH patients, studies in animals, and characterization of purified proteins have provided insight into the molecular mechanisms of hearing. To date, 11 USH proteins have been identified, and evidence suggests that all of them are crucial for the function of the mechanosensory cells of the inner ear, the hair cells. Most USH proteins are localized to the stereocilia of the hair cells, where mechano-electrical transduction (MET) of sound-induced vibrations occurs. Therefore, elucidation of the functions of USH proteins in the stereocilia is a prerequisite to understanding the exact mechanisms of MET.

  9. Yellow Mealworm Protein for Food Purposes - Extraction and Functional Properties.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Zhao

    Full Text Available A protocol for extraction of yellow mealworm larvae proteins was established, conditions were evaluated and the resulting protein extract was characterised. The freeze-dried yellow mealworm larvae contained around 33% fat, 51% crude protein and 43% true protein on a dry matter basis. The true protein content of the protein extract was about 75%, with an extraction rate of 70% under optimised extraction conditions using 0.25 M NaOH, a NaOH solution:ethanol defatted worm ratio of 15:1 mL/g, 40°C for 1 h and extraction twice. The protein extract was a good source of essential amino acids. The lowest protein solubility in distilled water solution was found between pH 4 and 5, and increased with either increasing or decreasing pH. Lower solubility was observed in 0.5 M NaCl solution compared with distilled water. The rheological tests indicated that temperature, sample concentration, addition of salt and enzyme, incubation time and pH alterations influenced the elastic modulus of yellow mealworm protein extract (YMPE. These results demonstrate that the functional properties of YMPE can be modified for different food applications.

  10. Characterisation and functional properties of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) seed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Ali Abas; Sogi, Dalbir Singh; Singh, Preeti; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Shivhare, Uma S

    2011-01-15

    People in developing countries depend largely on non-conventional protein sources to augment the availability of proteins in their diets. Watermelon seed meal is reported to contain an adequate amount of nutritional proteins that could be extracted for use as nutritional ingredients in food products. Osborne classification showed that globulin was the major protein (≥500 g kg (-1)) present in watermelon seed meal, followed by albumin and glutelin. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that the polypeptides had low molecular weights ranging from 35 to 47 kDa. Isoelectric focusing revealed that the isoelectric point of most proteins was in the acidic range 4-6. These proteins are rich in aspartic acid, glutamic acid and serine. An increase in pH (5-9) significantly (P watermelon protein fractions respectively, while surface hydrophobicity ranged from 126.4 to 173.2 and from 125.8 to 169.3 respectively. The foaming and emulsifying properties of albumin were better than those of the other proteins studied. The good nutritional and functional properties of watermelon seed meal proteins suggest their potential use in food formulations. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Optimizing high performance computing workflow for protein functional annotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanberry, Larissa; Rekepalli, Bhanu; Liu, Yuan; Giblock, Paul; Higdon, Roger; Montague, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2014-09-10

    Functional annotation of newly sequenced genomes is one of the major challenges in modern biology. With modern sequencing technologies, the protein sequence universe is rapidly expanding. Newly sequenced bacterial genomes alone contain over 7.5 million proteins. The rate of data generation has far surpassed that of protein annotation. The volume of protein data makes manual curation infeasible, whereas a high compute cost limits the utility of existing automated approaches. In this work, we present an improved and optmized automated workflow to enable large-scale protein annotation. The workflow uses high performance computing architectures and a low complexity classification algorithm to assign proteins into existing clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. On the basis of the Position-Specific Iterative Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the algorithm ensures at least 80% specificity and sensitivity of the resulting classifications. The workflow utilizes highly scalable parallel applications for classification and sequence alignment. Using Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment supercomputers, the workflow processed 1,200,000 newly sequenced bacterial proteins. With the rapid expansion of the protein sequence universe, the proposed workflow will enable scientists to annotate big genome data.

  12. Yellow Mealworm Protein for Food Purposes - Extraction and Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xue; Vázquez-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Johansson, Daniel P.; Landberg, Rikard; Langton, Maud

    2016-01-01

    A protocol for extraction of yellow mealworm larvae proteins was established, conditions were evaluated and the resulting protein extract was characterised. The freeze-dried yellow mealworm larvae contained around 33% fat, 51% crude protein and 43% true protein on a dry matter basis. The true protein content of the protein extract was about 75%, with an extraction rate of 70% under optimised extraction conditions using 0.25 M NaOH, a NaOH solution:ethanol defatted worm ratio of 15:1 mL/g, 40°C for 1 h and extraction twice. The protein extract was a good source of essential amino acids. The lowest protein solubility in distilled water solution was found between pH 4 and 5, and increased with either increasing or decreasing pH. Lower solubility was observed in 0.5 M NaCl solution compared with distilled water. The rheological tests indicated that temperature, sample concentration, addition of salt and enzyme, incubation time and pH alterations influenced the elastic modulus of yellow mealworm protein extract (YMPE). These results demonstrate that the functional properties of YMPE can be modified for different food applications. PMID:26840533

  13. Functionally specified protein signatures distinctive for each of the different blue copper proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anishetty Sharmila

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins having similar functions from different sources can be identified by the occurrence in their sequences, a conserved cluster of amino acids referred to as pattern, motif, signature or fingerprint. The wide usage of protein sequence analysis in par with the growth of databases signifies the importance of using patterns or signatures to retrieve out related sequences. Blue copper proteins are found in the electron transport chain of prokaryotes and eukaryotes. The signatures already existing in the databases like the type 1 copper blue, multiple copper oxidase, cyt b/b6, photosystem 1 psaA&B, psaG&K, and reiske iron sulphur protein are not specified signatures for blue copper proteins as the name itself suggests. Most profile and motif databases strive to classify protein sequences into a broad spectrum of protein families. This work describes the signatures designed based on the copper metal binding motifs in blue copper proteins. The common feature in all blue copper proteins is a trigonal planar arrangement of two nitrogen ligands [each from histidine] and one sulphur containing thiolate ligand [from cysteine], with strong interactions between the copper center and these ligands. Results Sequences that share such conserved motifs are crucial to the structure or function of the protein and this could provide a signature of family membership. The blue copper proteins chosen for the study were plantacyanin, plastocyanin, cucumber basic protein, stellacyanin, dicyanin, umecyanin, uclacyanin, cusacyanin, rusticyanin, sulfocyanin, halocyanin, azurin, pseudoazurin, amicyanin and nitrite reductase which were identified in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. ClustalW analysis of the protein sequences of each of the blue copper proteins was the basis for designing protein signatures or peptides. The protein signatures and peptides identified in this study were designed involving the active site region involving the amino acids

  14. Hydration water dynamics around a protein surface: a first passage time approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shivangi; Biswas, Parbati

    2018-01-01

    A stochastic noise-driven dynamic model is proposed to study the diffusion of water molecules around a protein surface, under the effect of thermal fluctuations that arise due to the collision of water molecules with the surrounding environment. The underlying dynamics of such a system may be described in the framework of the generalized Langevin equation, where the thermal fluctuations are assumed to be algebraically correlated in time, which governs the non-Markovian behavior of the system. Results of the calculations of mean-square displacement and the velocity autocorrelation function reveal that the hydration water around the protein surface follows subdiffusive dynamics at long times. Analytical expressions for the first passage time distribution, survival probability, mean residence time and mean first passage time of water molecules are derived for different boundary conditions, to analyze hydration water dynamics under the effect of thermally correlated noise. The results depict a unimodal distribution of the first passage time unlike Brownian motion. The survival probability of hydration water follows a stretched exponential decay for both boundary conditions. The mean residence time of the hydration water molecule for different initial positions increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the surrounding environment for both boundary conditions. The mean first passage time of the water molecule to reach the absorbing/reflecting boundary follows an asymptotic power law with respect to the thickness of the hydration layer, and increases with increase in the complexity/heterogeneity of the environment.

  15. Neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation: a conjugate approach to investigate the dynamics of electron transfer proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bizzarri, Anna Rita

    2004-01-01

    The neutron scattering technique is a relevant tool for studying the dynamical properties of electron transfer proteins. Macromolecular motions ranging in wide temporal and spatial windows can be investigated by separately analysing elastic, inelastic and quasielastic incoherent neutron scattering. The dynamical behaviour of the solvent surrounding a macromolecule can also be analysed. Neutron scattering is particularly rewarding when used in combination with molecular dynamics simulations. From the simulated atomic trajectories, physical quantities directly related to the neutron scattering technique can be calculated and compared with the corresponding experimental data. This article briefly introduces both the neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation methods applied to proteins, and reviews the biophysical studies of some electron transfer proteins. Both experimental and molecular dynamics results for these proteins and the surrounding solvent are also discussed in connection with their electron transfer properties. Possible developments are briefly outlined. (topical review)

  16. Screening of mutations affecting protein stability and dynamics of FGFR1—A simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. George Priya Doss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Single amino acid substitutions in Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 1 (FGFR1 destabilize protein and have been implicated in several genetic disorders like various forms of cancer, Kallamann syndrome, Pfeiffer syndrome, Jackson Weiss syndrome, etc. In order to gain functional insight into mutation caused by amino acid substitution to protein function and expression, special emphasis was laid on molecular dynamics simulation techniques in combination with in silico tools such as SIFT, PolyPhen 2.0, I-Mutant 3.0 and SNAP. It has been estimated that 68% nsSNPs were predicted to be deleterious by I-Mutant, slightly higher than SIFT (37%, PolyPhen 2.0 (61% and SNAP (58%. From the observed results, P722S mutation was found to be most deleterious by comparing results of all in silico tools. By molecular dynamics approach, we have shown that P722S mutation leads to increase in flexibility, and deviated more from the native structure which was supported by the decrease in the number of hydrogen bonds. In addition, biophysical analysis revealed a clear insight of stability loss due to P722S mutation in FGFR1 protein. Majority of mutations predicted by these in silico tools were in good concordance with the experimental results.

  17. Functional Characteristics of Milk Protein Concentrates and Their Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uluko, Hankie; Liu, Lu; Lv, Jia-Ping; Zhang, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    A major deterrent to the usage of milk protein concentrate (MPC), a high-protein milk product with increasing demand as a food and sports drink ingredient, has been its poor functional characteristics when compared with other milk protein products such as whey protein concentrate and sodium caseinates. This review discusses the recent research on functional properties of MPC, focusing on factors that may contribute to the poor functional characteristics before, during, and after production. Current research, methods employed, and new understanding on the causes of poor solubility of MPC at mild temperatures (about 20°C) has been presented, including loss of solubility during storage as these areas have received unprecedented attention over the past decade, and also affects other useful functional properties of MPC, such as emulsifying properties, gelation, and foaming. Processing methods, which include heat treatment, high-pressure application, microwave heating, ultrasound application, and enzyme and salts modification, have been used or have potential to modify or improve the functional properties of MPCs. Future research on the effects of these processing methods on the functional properties, including effects of enzyme hydrolysis on bitterness and bioactivity, has also been discussed.

  18. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin☆

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to mani...

  19. Optimization of functionalization conditions for protein analysis by AFM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arroyo-Hernández, María, E-mail: maria.arroyo@ctb.upm.es [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, Rafael; Pérez-Rigueiro, Jose; Elices, Manuel; Nieto-Márquez, Jorge; Guinea, Gustavo V. [Centro de Tecnología Biomédica, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28223 Pozuelo de Alarcón, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales, ETSI Caminos, Canales y Puertos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-10-30

    Highlights: • Highest fluorescence is obtained for central conditions. • Largest primary amine contribution is obtained for central conditions. • RMS roughness is smaller than 1 nm for all functional films. • Selected deposition conditions lead to proper RMS and functionality values. • LDH proteins adsorbed on AVS-films were observed by AFM. - Abstract: Activated vapor silanization (AVS) is used to functionalize silicon surfaces through deposition of amine-containing thin films. AVS combines vapor silanization and chemical vapor deposition techniques and allows the properties of the functionalized layers (thickness, amine concentration and topography) to be controlled by tuning the deposition conditions. An accurate characterization is performed to correlate the deposition conditions and functional-film properties. In particular, it is shown that smooth surfaces with a sufficient surface density of amine groups may be obtained with this technique. These surfaces are suitable for the study of proteins with atomic force microscopy.

  20. Dynamic Pattern of HOXB9 Protein Localization during Oocyte Maturation and Early Embryonic Development in Mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sauvegarde

    Full Text Available We previously showed that the homeodomain transcription factor HOXB9 is expressed in mammalian oocytes and early embryos. However, a systematic and exhaustive study of the localization of the HOXB9 protein, and HOX proteins in general, during mammalian early embryonic development has so far never been performed.The distribution of HOXB9 proteins in oocytes and the early embryo was characterized by immunofluorescence from the immature oocyte stage to the peri-gastrulation period in both the mouse and the bovine. HOXB9 was detected at all studied stages with a dynamic expression pattern. Its distribution was well conserved between the two species until the blastocyst stage and was mainly nuclear. From that stage on, trophoblastic cells always showed a strong nuclear staining, while the inner cell mass and the derived cell lines showed important dynamic variations both in staining intensity and in intra-cellular localization. Indeed, HOXB9 appeared to be progressively downregulated in epiblast cells and only reappeared after gastrulation had well progressed. The protein was also detected in the primitive endoderm and its derivatives with a distinctive presence in apical vacuoles of mouse visceral endoderm cells.Together, these results could suggest the existence of unsuspected functions for HOXB9 during early embryonic development in mammals.

  1. Multienzyme Modification of Hemp Protein for Functional Peptides Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjana Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional foods and nutraceuticals are of special importance, particularly for their impact on human health and prevention of certain chronic diseases. Consequently, the production and properties of bioactive peptides have received an increasing scientific interest over past few years. Present work intends to compare the competence of metalloendopeptidases (“Protease N” and “Protease A” with papain for getting functional peptides from hemp seed meal, which is an obligatory waste of hemp fiber production industry. As a measure of the functional potential hemp protein hydrolysates were analyzed for their antiradical properties in DPPH system. “Protease N” modified protein hydrolysate exhibited comparatively superior radical scavenging activity in DPPH system. Overall findings represent the importance of “Protease N,” as endopeptidase in getting peptides of good antiradical properties from various protein sources.

  2. Diversity and functions of protein glycosylation in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walski, Tomasz; De Schutter, Kristof; Van Damme, Els J M; Smagghe, Guy

    2017-04-01

    The majority of proteins is modified with carbohydrate structures. This modification, called glycosylation, was shown to be crucial for protein folding, stability and subcellular location, as well as protein-protein interactions, recognition and signaling. Protein glycosylation is involved in multiple physiological processes, including embryonic development, growth, circadian rhythms, cell attachment as well as maintenance of organ structure, immunity and fertility. Although the general principles of glycosylation are similar among eukaryotic organisms, insects synthesize a distinct repertoire of glycan structures compared to plants and vertebrates. Consequently, a number of unique insect glycans mediate functions specific to this class of invertebrates. For instance, the core α1,3-fucosylation of N-glycans is absent in vertebrates, while in insects this modification is crucial for the development of wings and the nervous system. At present, most of the data on insect glycobiology comes from research in Drosophila. Yet, progressively more information on the glycan structures and the importance of glycosylation in other insects like beetles, caterpillars, aphids and bees is becoming available. This review gives a summary of the current knowledge and recent progress related to glycan diversity and function(s) of protein glycosylation in insects. We focus on N- and O-glycosylation, their synthesis, physiological role(s), as well as the molecular and biochemical basis of these processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional conservation study of polarity protein Crumbs intracellular domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qi-ping; Cao, Hao-wei; Xu, Rui; Zhang, Dan-dan; Huang, Juan

    2017-01-20

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) plays key roles in the establishing and maintaining cell apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells by determining the apical plasma membrane identity. Although its intracellular domain contains only 37 amino acids, it is absolutely essential for its function. In Drosophila, mutations in this intracellular domain result in severe defects in epithelial polarity and abnormal embryonic development. The intracellular domain of Crb shows high homology across species from Drosophila to Mus musculus and Homo sapiens. However, the intracellular domains of the two Crb proteins in C. elegans are rather divergent from those of Drosophila and mammals, raising the question on whether the function of the intracellular domain of the Crb protein is conserved in C. elegans. Using genomic engineering approach, we replaced the intracellular domain of the Drosophila Crb with that of C. elegans Crb2 (CeCrb2), which has extremely low homology with those from the Crb proteins of Drosophila and mammals. Surprisingly, substituting the intracellular domain of Drosophila Crb with that of CeCrb2 did not cause any abnormalities in development of the Drosophila embryo, in terms of expression and localization of Crb and other polarity proteins and apical-basal polarity in embryonic epithelial cells. Our results support the notion that despite their extensive sequence variations, all functionally critical amino acid residues and motifs of the intercellular domain of Crb proteins are fully conserved between Drosophila and C. elegans.

  4. RACK1, A Multifaceted Scaffolding Protein: Structure and Function

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adams, David R

    2011-10-06

    Abstract The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a member of the tryptophan-aspartate repeat (WD-repeat) family of proteins and shares significant homology to the β subunit of G-proteins (Gβ). RACK1 adopts a seven-bladed β-propeller structure which facilitates protein binding. RACK1 has a significant role to play in shuttling proteins around the cell, anchoring proteins at particular locations and in stabilising protein activity. It interacts with the ribosomal machinery, with several cell surface receptors and with proteins in the nucleus. As a result, RACK1 is a key mediator of various pathways and contributes to numerous aspects of cellular function. Here, we discuss RACK1 gene and structure and its role in specific signaling pathways, and address how posttranslational modifications facilitate subcellular location and translocation of RACK1. This review condenses several recent studies suggesting a role for RACK1 in physiological processes such as development, cell migration, central nervous system (CN) function and circadian rhythm as well as reviewing the role of RACK1 in disease.

  5. Mung bean proteins and peptides: nutritional, functional and bioactive properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Yi-Shen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To date, no extensive literature review exists regarding potential uses of mung bean proteins and peptides. As mung bean has long been widely used as a food source, early studies evaluated mung bean nutritional value against the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO/the World Health Organization (WHO amino acids dietary recommendations. The comparison demonstrated mung bean to be a good protein source, except for deficiencies in sulphur-containing amino acids, methionine and cysteine. Methionine and cysteine residues have been introduced into the 8S globulin through protein engineering technology. Subsequently, purified mung bean proteins and peptides have facilitated the study of their structural and functional properties. Two main types of extraction methods have been reported for isolation of proteins and peptides from mung bean flours, permitting sequencing of major proteins present in mung bean, including albumins and globulins (notably 8S globulin. However, the sequence for albumin deposited in the UniProt database differs from other sequences reported in the literature. Meanwhile, a limited number of reports have revealed other useful bioactivities for proteins and hydrolysed peptides, including angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity, anti-fungal activity and trypsin inhibitory activity. Consequently, several mung bean hydrolysed peptides have served as effective food additives to prevent proteolysis during storage. Ultimately, further research will reveal other nutritional, functional and bioactive properties of mung bean for uses in diverse applications.

  6. Quantum fluid dynamics within a relativistic density-functional framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.K.; Deb, B.M.; Indian Inst. of Tech., Bombay. Group of Theoretical Studies)

    1984-01-01

    The authors explore certain interconnections between density-functional theory and quantum fluid dynamics of many-electron systems, in the relativistic domain, following the hydrodynamical approach for the one-particle Dirac equation. The spinor formulation is transformed into a tensor formulation, by defining a number of density functions. These lead to six 'classical' fluid dynamical equations, for a complete specification of the system. The various density functions and the hydrodynamical equations are physically interpreted. The relativistic hydrodynamics discussed, correspond to a 'spinning' fluid. The net many-electron fluid consists of components each of which is characterised by fluid dynamical quantities corresponding to each spinor. The net hydrodynamical quantities are obtained by summing over the occupied spinors. Thus, the earlier non-relativistic 'classical' picture of the many-electron fluid as a collection of individual fluid components is also valid in the relativistic domain. (author)

  7. Dynamic intracellular localization of Dazl protein during Xenopus germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Haru; Orii, Hidefumi

    2015-08-01

    Xenopus dazl encoding an RNA-binding protein has been identified as a component of the germ plasm and is involved in the migration and differentiation of the primordial germ cells (PGCs). Here, we investigated the intracellular localization of Dazl in germline cells throughout the lifetime of Xenopus. In early embryogenesis, Dazl was detected initially in the germ plasm and then translocated to a perinuclear region. Then, it was detected within the nucleus in PGCs. Dazl was observed only in the cytoplasm in PGCs when sex differentiation began in the gonads. Dazl was distributed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of the primary oogonium and spermatogonium, but only in the cytoplasm of the secondary oogonium and spermatogonium. In spermatocytes, Dazl was distributed throughout cytoplasm and localized at the spindles and cytoplasm during meiosis. Then, it was detected as speckles in the nucleus in the round spermatid. The dynamic intracellular localization suggests that Dazl is a multifunctional protein regulating RNA metabolism required for Xenopus germline development.

  8. Dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins in Holozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheel, Bettina M; Hausdorf, Bernhard

    2014-07-01

    We studied the highly dynamic evolution of mitochondrial ribosomal proteins (MRPs) in Holozoa. Most major clades within Holozoa are characterized by gains and/or losses of MRPs. The usefulness of gains of MRPs as rare genomic changes in phylogenetics is undermined by the high frequency of secondary losses. However, phylogenetic analyses of the MRP sequences provide evidence for the Acrosomata hypothesis, a sister group relationship between Ctenophora and Bilateria. An extensive restructuring of the mitochondrial genome and, as a consequence, of the mitochondrial ribosomes occurred in the ancestor of metazoans. The last MRP genes encoded in the mitochondrial genome were either moved to the nuclear genome or were lost. The strong decrease in size of the mitochondrial genome was probably caused by selection for rapid replication of mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis in the metazoan ancestor. A phylogenetic analysis of MRPL56 sequences provided evidence for a horizontal gene transfer of the corresponding MRP gene between metazoans and Dictyostelidae (Amoebozoa). The hypothesis that the requisition of additional MRPs compensated for a loss of rRNA segments in the mitochondrial ribosomes is corroborated by a significant negative correlation between the number of MRPs and length of the rRNA. Newly acquired MRPs evolved faster than bacterial MRPs and positions in eukaryote-specific MRPs were more strongly affected by coevolution than positions in prokaryotic MRPs in accordance with the necessity to fit these proteins into the pre-existing structure of the mitoribosome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. SM30 protein function during sea urchin larval spicule formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilt, Fred; Killian, Christopher E; Croker, Lindsay; Hamilton, Patricia

    2013-08-01

    A central issue in better understanding the process of biomineralization is to elucidate the function of occluded matrix proteins present in mineralized tissues. A potent approach to addressing this issue utilizes specific inhibitors of expression of known genes. Application of antisense oligonucleotides that specifically suppress translation of a given mRNA are capable of causing aberrant biomineralization, thereby revealing, at least in part, a likely function of the protein and gene under investigation. We have applied this approach to study the possible function(s) of the SM30 family of proteins, which are found in spicules, teeth, spines, and tests of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as well as other euechinoid sea urchins. It is possible using the anti-SM30 morpholino-oligonucleotides (MO's) to reduce the level of these proteins to very low levels, yet the development of skeletal spicules in the embryo shows little or no aberration. This surprising result requires re-thinking about the role of these, and possibly other occluded matrix proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Functionality of alternative protein in gluten-free product development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deora, Navneet Singh; Deswal, Aastha; Mishra, Hari Niwas

    2015-07-01

    Celiac disease is an immune-mediated disease triggered in genetically susceptible individuals by ingested gluten from wheat, rye, barley, and other closely related cereal grains. The current treatment for celiac disease is life-long adherence to a strict gluten-exclusion diet. The replacement of gluten presents a significant technological challenge, as it is an essential structure-building protein, which is necessary for formulating high-quality baked goods. A major limitation in the production of gluten-free products is the lack of protein functionality in non-wheat cereals. Additionally, commercial gluten-free mixes usually contain only carbohydrates, which may significantly limit the amount of protein in the diet. In the recent past, various approaches are attempted to incorporate protein-based ingredients and to modify the functional properties for gluten-free product development. This review aims to the highlight functionality of the alternative protein-based ingredients, which can be utilized for gluten-free product development both functionally as well as nutritionally. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. An information theory framework for dynamic functional domain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergara, Victor M; Miller, Robyn; Calhoun, Vince

    2017-06-01

    Dynamic functional network connectivity (dFNC) analyzes time evolution of coherent activity in the brain. In this technique dynamic changes are considered for the whole brain. This paper proposes an information theory framework to measure information flowing among subsets of functional networks call functional domains. Our method aims at estimating bits of information contained and shared among domains. The succession of dynamic functional states is estimated at the domain level. Information quantity is based on the probabilities of observing each dynamic state. Mutual information measurement is then obtained from probabilities across domains. Thus, we named this value the cross domain mutual information (CDMI). Strong CDMIs were observed in relation to the subcortical domain. Domains related to sensorial input, motor control and cerebellum form another CDMI cluster. Information flow among other domains was seldom found. Other methods of dynamic connectivity focus on whole brain dFNC matrices. In the current framework, information theory is applied to states estimated from pairs of multi-network functional domains. In this context, we apply information theory to measure information flow across functional domains. Identified CDMI clusters point to known information pathways in the basal ganglia and also among areas of sensorial input, patterns found in static functional connectivity. In contrast, CDMI across brain areas of higher level cognitive processing follow a different pattern that indicates scarce information sharing. These findings show that employing information theory to formally measured information flow through brain domains reveals additional features of functional connectivity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dissociation of activated protein C functions by elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harmon, Shona

    2008-11-07

    Activated protein C (APC) plays a critical anticoagulant role in vivo by inactivating procoagulant factor Va and factor VIIIa and thus down-regulating thrombin generation. In addition, APC bound to the endothelial cell protein C receptor can initiate protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1)-mediated cytoprotective signaling. Protein S constitutes a critical cofactor for the anticoagulant function of APC but is not known to be involved in regulating APC-mediated protective PAR-1 signaling. In this study we utilized a site-directed mutagenesis strategy to characterize a putative protein S binding region within the APC Gla domain. Three single amino acid substitutions within the APC Gla domain (D35T, D36A, and A39V) were found to mildly impair protein S-dependent anticoagulant activity (<2-fold) but retained entirely normal cytoprotective activity. However, a single amino acid substitution (L38D) ablated the ability of protein S to function as a cofactor for this APC variant. Consequently, in assays of protein S-dependent factor Va proteolysis using purified proteins or in the plasma milieu, APC-L38D variant exhibited minimal residual anticoagulant activity compared with wild type APC. Despite the location of Leu-38 in the Gla domain, APC-L38D interacted normally with endothelial cell protein C receptor and retained its ability to trigger PAR-1 mediated cytoprotective signaling in a manner indistinguishable from that of wild type APC. Consequently, elimination of protein S cofactor enhancement of APC anticoagulant function represents a novel and effective strategy by which to separate the anticoagulant and cytoprotective functions of APC for potential therapeutic gain.

  13. Inferring the Functions of Proteins from the Interrelationships between Functional Categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2018-01-01

    This study proposes a new method to determine the functions of an unannotated protein. The proteins and amino acid residues mentioned in biomedical texts associated with an unannotated protein can be considered as characteristics terms for , which are highly predictive of the potential functions of . Similarly, proteins and amino acid residues mentioned in biomedical texts associated with proteins annotated with a functional category can be considered as characteristics terms of . We introduce in this paper an information extraction system called IFP_IFC that predicts the functions of an unannotated protein by representing and each functional category by a vector of weights. Each weight reflects the degree of association between a characteristic term and (or a characteristic term and ). First, IFP_IFC constructs a network, whose nodes represent the different functional categories, and its edges the interrelationships between the nodes. Then, it determines the functions of by employing random walks with restarts on the mentioned network. The walker is the vector of . Finally, is assigned to the functional categories of the nodes in the network that are visited most by the walker. We evaluated the quality of IFP_IFC by comparing it experimentally with two other systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  14. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of a Powder Model of the Intrinsically Disordered Protein Tau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichou, Yann; Heyden, Matthias; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Weik, Martin; Tobias, Douglas J

    2015-10-01

    The tau protein, whose aggregates are involved in Alzheimer's disease, is an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP) that regulates microtubule activity in neurons. An IDP lacks a single, well-defined structure and, rather, constantly exchanges among multiple conformations. In order to study IDP dynamics, the combination of experimental techniques, such as neutron scattering, and computational techniques, such as molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, is a powerful approach. Amorphous hydrated powder samples have been very useful for studying protein internal dynamics experimentally, e.g., using neutron scattering. Thus, there is demand for realistic in silico models of hydrated protein powders. Here we present an MD simulation analysis of a powder hydrated at 0.4 g water/g protein of the IDP tau in the temperature range 20-300 K. By comparing with neutron scattering data, we identify the protein-water interface as the predominant feature determining IDP dynamics. The so-called protein dynamical transition is shown to be attenuated, but not suppressed, in the parts of the protein that are not exposed to the solvent. In addition, we find similarities in the mean-squared displacements of the core of a globular protein and "dry" clusters formed by the IDP in hydrated powders. Thus, the ps to ns dynamics of proteins in hydrated powders originate mainly from those residues in contact with solvent. We propose that by measuring the dynamics of protein assemblies, such as aggregates, one might assess qualitatively their state of hydration.

  15. Folding dynamics of a family of beta-sheet proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denis

    2008-03-01

    Fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) consist of ten anti-parallel beta strands and two small alpha helices. The beta strands are arranged into two nearly orthogonal five-strand beta sheets that surround the interior cavity, which binds unsaturated long-chain fatty acids. In the brain isoform (BFABP), these are very important for the development of the central nervous system and neuron differentiation. Furthermore, BFABP is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases including cancer and neuronal degenerative disorders. In this work, site-directed spin labeling combined with EPR techniques have been used to study the folding mechanism of BFABP. In the first series of studies, we labeled the two Cys residues at position 5 and 80 in the wild type protein with an EPR spin marker; in addition, two singly labeled mutants at positions 5 and 80 in the C80A and C5A mutants, respectively, were also produced and used as controls. The changes in the distances between the two residues were examined by a pulsed EPR method, DEER (Double Electron Electron Resonance), as a function of guanidinium hydrochloride concentration. The results were compared with those from CW EPR, circular dichroism and fluorescence measurements, which provide the information regarding sidechain mobility, secondary structure and tertiary structure, respectively. The results will be discussed in the context of the folding mechanism of the family of fatty acid binding proteins.

  16. Arabidopsis thaliana mTERF proteins: evolution and functional classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana eKleine

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Organellar gene expression (OGE is crucial for plant development, photosynthesis and respiration, but our understanding of the mechanisms that control it is still relatively poor. Thus, OGE requires various nucleus-encoded proteins that promote transcription, splicing, trimming and editing of organellar RNAs, and regulate translation. In metazoans, proteins of the mitochondrial Transcription tERmination Factor (mTERF family interact with the mitochondrial chromosome and regulate transcriptional initiation and termination. Sequencing of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome led to the identification of a diversified MTERF gene family but, in contrast to mammalian mTERFs, knowledge about the function of these proteins in photosynthetic organisms is scarce. In this hypothesis article, I show that tandem duplications and one block duplication contributed to the large number of MTERF genes in A. thaliana, and propose that the expansion of the family is related to the evolution of land plants. The MTERF genes - especially the duplicated genes - display a number of distinct mRNA accumulation patterns, suggesting functional diversification of mTERF proteins to increase adaptability to environmental changes. Indeed, hypothetical functions for the different mTERF proteins can be predicted using co-expression analysis and gene ontology annotations. On this basis, mTERF proteins can be sorted into five groups. Members of the chloroplast and chloroplast-associated clusters are principally involved in chloroplast gene expression, embryogenesis and protein catabolism, while representatives of the mitochondrial cluster seem to participate in DNA and RNA metabolism in that organelle. Moreover, members of the mitochondrion-associated cluster and the low expression group may act in the nucleus and/or the cytosol. As proteins involved in OGE and presumably nuclear gene expression, mTERFs are ideal candidates for the coordination of the expression of organelle and nuclear

  17. SitesIdentify: a protein functional site prediction tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doig Andrew J

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of protein structures being deposited in the Protein Data Bank surpasses the capacity to experimentally characterise them and therefore computational methods to analyse these structures have become increasingly important. Identifying the region of the protein most likely to be involved in function is useful in order to gain information about its potential role. There are many available approaches to predict functional site, but many are not made available via a publicly-accessible application. Results Here we present a functional site prediction tool (SitesIdentify, based on combining sequence conservation information with geometry-based cleft identification, that is freely available via a web-server. We have shown that SitesIdentify compares favourably to other functional site prediction tools in a comparison of seven methods on a non-redundant set of 237 enzymes with annotated active sites. Conclusion SitesIdentify is able to produce comparable accuracy in predicting functional sites to its closest available counterpart, but in addition achieves improved accuracy for proteins with few characterised homologues. SitesIdentify is available via a webserver at http://www.manchester.ac.uk/bioinformatics/sitesidentify/

  18. Structure and Dynamics of the P7 Protein from the Bacteriophage 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eryilmaz, E.; Benach, J; Su, M; Seetharaman, J; Dutta, K; Wei, H; Gottlieb, p; Hung, J; Ghose, R

    2008-01-01

    Cystoviruses are a class of enveloped double-stranded RNA viruses that use a multiprotein polymerase complex (PX) to replicate and transcribe the viral genome. Although the structures of the polymerase and ATPase components of the cystoviral PX are known and their functional behavior is understood to a large extent, no atomic-resolution structural information is available for the major capsid protein P1 that defines the overall structure and symmetry of the viral capsid and the essential protein P7. Toward obtaining a complete structural and functional understanding of the cystoviral PX, we have obtained the structure of P7 from the cystovirus phi12 at a resolution of 1.8 A. The N-terminal core region (1-129) of P7 forms a novel homodimeric ?/?-fold having structural similarities with BRCT domains implicated in multiple protein-protein interactions in DNA repair proteins. Our results, combined with the known role of P7 in stabilizing the nucleation complex during capsid assembly, hint toward its participation in key protein-protein interactions within the cystoviral PX. Additionally, we have found through solution NMR studies that the C-terminal tail of P7 (130-169) that is essential for virus viability, although highly disordered, contains a nascent helix. We demonstrate for the first time, through NMR titrations, that P7 is capable of interacting with RNA. We find that both the N-terminal core and the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7 play a role in RNA recognition. This interaction leads to a significant reduction of the degree of disorder in the C-terminal tail. Given the requirement of P7 in maintaining genome packaging efficiency and transcriptional fidelity, our data suggest a central biological role for P7-RNA interactions.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of the P7 Protein from the Bacteriophage ϕ12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eryilmaz,E.

    2008-01-01

    Cystoviruses are a class of enveloped double-stranded RNA viruses that use a multiprotein polymerase complex (PX) to replicate and transcribe the viral genome. Although the structures of the polymerase and ATPase components of the cystoviral PX are known and their functional behavior is understood to a large extent, no atomic-resolution structural information is available for the major capsid protein P1 that defines the overall structure and symmetry of the viral capsid and the essential protein P7. Toward obtaining a complete structural and functional understanding of the cystoviral PX, we have obtained the structure of P7 from the cystovirus phi12 at a resolution of 1.8 Angstroms. The N-terminal core region (1-129) of P7 forms a novel homodimeric {alpha}/{beta}-fold having structural similarities with BRCT domains implicated in multiple protein-protein interactions in DNA repair proteins. Our results, combined with the known role of P7 in stabilizing the nucleation complex during capsid assembly, hint toward its participation in key protein-protein interactions within the cystoviral PX. Additionally, we have found through solution NMR studies that the C-terminal tail of P7 (130-169) that is essential for virus viability, although highly disordered, contains a nascent helix. We demonstrate for the first time, through NMR titrations, that P7 is capable of interacting with RNA. We find that both the N-terminal core and the dynamic C-terminal tail of P7 play a role in RNA recognition. This interaction leads to a significant reduction of the degree of disorder in the C-terminal tail. Given the requirement of P7 in maintaining genome packaging efficiency and transcriptional fidelity, our data suggest a central biological role for P7-RNA interactions.

  20. Intracellular Localization, Interactions and Functions of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widana Gamage, Shirani M K; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2017-01-01

    Tospoviruses are among the most devastating viruses of horticultural and field crops. Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) has emerged as an important pathogen of capsicum and tomato in Australia and South-east Asia. Present knowledge about CaCV protein functions in host cells is lacking. We determined intracellular localization and interactions of CaCV proteins by live plant cell imaging to gain insight into the associations of viral proteins during infection. Proteins were transiently expressed as fusions to autofluorescent proteins in leaf epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana and capsicum. All viral proteins localized at least partially in the cell periphery suggestive of cytoplasmic replication and assembly of CaCV. Nucleocapsid (N) and non-structural movement (NSm) proteins localized exclusively in the cell periphery, while non-structural suppressor of silencing (NSs) protein and Gc and Gn glycoproteins accumulated in both the cell periphery and the nucleus. Nuclear localization of CaCV Gn and NSs is unique among tospoviruses. We validated nuclear localization of NSs by immunofluorescence in protoplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation showed self-interactions of CaCV N, NSs and NSm, and heterotypic interactions of N with NSs and Gn. All interactions occurred in the cytoplasm, except NSs self-interaction was exclusively nuclear. Interactions of a tospoviral NSs protein with itself and with N had not been reported previously. Functionally, CaCV NSs showed strong local and systemic RNA silencing suppressor activity and appears to delay short-distance spread of silencing signal. Cell-to-cell movement activity of NSm was demonstrated by trans -complementation of a movement-defective tobamovirus replicon. CaCV NSm localized at plasmodesmata and its transient expression led to the formation of tubular structures that protruded from protoplasts. The D 155 residue in the 30K-like movement protein-specific LxD/N 50-70 G motif of NSm was critical for

  1. Helix unfolding/refolding characterizes the functional dynamics of Staphylococcus aureus Clp protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Hongchuan; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; Zhang, Ruihan; Kong, Xiangqian; Li, Lianchun; Lu, Junyan; Zhang, Xinlei; Li, Donghai; Jiang, Hualiang; Yang, Cai-Guang; Luo, Cheng

    2013-06-14

    The ATP-dependent Clp protease (ClpP) plays an essential role not only in the control of protein quality but also in the regulation of bacterial pathogen virulence, making it an attractive target for antibacterial treatment. We have previously determined the crystal structures of Staphylococcus aureus ClpP (SaClpP) in two different states, extended and compressed. To investigate the dynamic switching of ClpP between these states, we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations. During the structural transition, the long and straight helix E in the extended SaClpP monomer underwent an unfolding/refolding process, resulting in a kinked helix very similar to that in the compressed monomer. As a stable intermediate in the molecular dynamics simulation, the compact state was suggested and subsequently identified in x-ray crystallographic experiment. Our combined studies also determined that Ala(140) acted as a "hinge" during the transition between the extended and compressed states, and Glu(137) was essential for stabilizing the compressed state. Overall, this study provides molecular insights into the dynamics and mechanism of the functional conformation changes of SaClpP. Given the highly conserved sequences of ClpP proteins among different species, these findings potentially reflect a switching mechanism for the dynamic process shared in the whole ClpP family in general and thus aid in better understand the principles of Clp protease assembly and function.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling.Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density.The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005.Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  3. On-the-fly analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories of proteins using the Bayesian inference method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Naoyuki; Yonezawa, Yasushige

    2017-09-01

    Robust and reliable analyses of long trajectories from molecular dynamics simulations are important for investigations of functions and mechanisms of proteins. Structural fitting is necessary for various analyses of protein dynamics, thus removing time-dependent translational and rotational movements. However, the fitting is often difficult for highly flexible molecules. Thus, to address the issues, we proposed a fitting algorithm that uses the Bayesian inference method in combination with rotational fitting-weight improvements, and the well-studied globular protein systems trpcage and lysozyme were used for investigations. The present method clearly identified rigid core regions that fluctuate less than other regions and also separated core regions from highly fluctuating regions with greater accuracy than conventional methods. Our method also provided simultaneous variance-covariance matrix elements composed of atomic coordinates, allowing us to perform principle component analysis and prepare domain cross-correlation map during molecular dynamics simulations in an on-the-fly manner.

  4. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  5. Coupling functions: Universal insights into dynamical interaction mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovski, Tomislav; Pereira, Tiago; McClintock, Peter V. E.; Stefanovska, Aneta

    2017-10-01

    The dynamical systems found in nature are rarely isolated. Instead they interact and influence each other. The coupling functions that connect them contain detailed information about the functional mechanisms underlying the interactions and prescribe the physical rule specifying how an interaction occurs. A coherent and comprehensive review is presented encompassing the rapid progress made recently in the analysis, understanding, and applications of coupling functions. The basic concepts and characteristics of coupling functions are presented through demonstrative examples of different domains, revealing the mechanisms and emphasizing their multivariate nature. The theory of coupling functions is discussed through gradually increasing complexity from strong and weak interactions to globally coupled systems and networks. A variety of methods that have been developed for the detection and reconstruction of coupling functions from measured data is described. These methods are based on different statistical techniques for dynamical inference. Stemming from physics, such methods are being applied in diverse areas of science and technology, including chemistry, biology, physiology, neuroscience, social sciences, mechanics, and secure communications. This breadth of application illustrates the universality of coupling functions for studying the interaction mechanisms of coupled dynamical systems.

  6. Regulation of thrombosis and vascular function by protein methionine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Sean X.; Stevens, Jeff W.

    2015-01-01

    Redox biology is fundamental to both normal cellular homeostasis and pathological states associated with excessive oxidative stress. Reactive oxygen species function not only as signaling molecules but also as redox regulators of protein function. In the vascular system, redox reactions help regulate key physiologic responses such as cell adhesion, vasoconstriction, platelet aggregation, angiogenesis, inflammatory gene expression, and apoptosis. During pathologic states, altered redox balance can cause vascular cell dysfunction and affect the equilibrium between procoagulant and anticoagulant systems, contributing to thrombotic vascular disease. This review focuses on the emerging role of a specific reversible redox reaction, protein methionine oxidation, in vascular disease and thrombosis. A growing number of cardiovascular and hemostatic proteins are recognized to undergo reversible methionine oxidation, in which methionine residues are posttranslationally oxidized to methionine sulfoxide. Protein methionine oxidation can be reversed by the action of stereospecific enzymes known as methionine sulfoxide reductases. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is a prototypical methionine redox sensor that responds to changes in the intracellular redox state via reversible oxidation of tandem methionine residues in its regulatory domain. Several other proteins with oxidation-sensitive methionine residues, including apolipoprotein A-I, thrombomodulin, and von Willebrand factor, may contribute to vascular disease and thrombosis. PMID:25900980

  7. From Protein Structure to Function via Single Crystal Optical Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eRonda

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The more than 100.000 protein structures determined by X-ray crystallography provide a wealth of information for the characterization of biological processes at the molecular level. However, several crystallographic artifacts, including conformational selection, crystallization conditions and radiation damages, may affect the quality and the interpretation of the electron density map, thus limiting the relevance of structure determinations. Moreover, for most of these structures no functional data have been obtained in the crystalline state, thus posing serious questions on their validity in the inference for protein mechanisms. In order to solve these issues, spectroscopic methods have been applied for the determination of equilibrium and kinetic properties of proteins in the crystalline state. These methods are UV-vis spectrophotometry, spectrofluorimetry, IR, EPR, Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy. Some of these approaches have been implemented with on-line instruments at X-ray synchrotron beamlines. Here, we provide an overview of investigations predominantly carried out in our laboratory by single crystal polarized absorption UV-vis microspectrophotometry, the most applied technique for the functional characterization of proteins in the crystalline state. Studies on hemoglobins, pyridoxal 5’-phosphate dependent enzymes and green fluorescent protein in the crystalline state have addressed key biological issues, leading to either straightforward structure-function correlations or limitations to structure-based mechanisms.

  8. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION AND FUNCTIONAL PROPERTIES OF RICE PROTEIN CONCENTRATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Kolpakova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally rice and products of its processing are used to cook porridge, pilaf, lettuce, confectionery, fish, dairy and meat products. At the same time new ways of its processing with releasing of protein products for more effective using, including the use of a glutenfree diet, are developing. The task of this study was a comparative research of nutrition and biological value and functional properties of protein and protein-calcium concentrates produced from rice flour milled from white and brown rice. The traditional and special methods were used. Concentrates were isolated with enzyme preparations of xylanase and amylolytic activity with the next dissolution of protein in diluted hydrochloric acid. Concentrates differed in the content of mineral substances (calcium, zinc, iron and other elements, amino acids and functional properties. The values of the functional properties and indicators of the nutritional value of concentrates from white rice show the advisability of their using in food products, including gluten-free products prepared on the basis of the emulsion and foam systems, and concentrates from brown rice in food products prepared on the basis of using of the emulsion systems. Protein concentrates of brown rice have a low foaming capacity and there is no foam stability at all.

  9. Structuring detergents for extracting and stabilizing functional membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Matar-Merheb

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Membrane proteins are privileged pharmaceutical targets for which the development of structure-based drug design is challenging. One underlying reason is the fact that detergents do not stabilize membrane domains as efficiently as natural lipids in membranes, often leading to a partial to complete loss of activity/stability during protein extraction and purification and preventing crystallization in an active conformation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Anionic calix[4]arene based detergents (C4Cn, n=1-12 were designed to structure the membrane domains through hydrophobic interactions and a network of salt bridges with the basic residues found at the cytosol-membrane interface of membrane proteins. These compounds behave as surfactants, forming micelles of 5-24 nm, with the critical micellar concentration (CMC being as expected sensitive to pH ranging from 0.05 to 1.5 mM. Both by 1H NMR titration and Surface Tension titration experiments, the interaction of these molecules with the basic amino acids was confirmed. They extract membrane proteins from different origins behaving as mild detergents, leading to partial extraction in some cases. They also retain protein functionality, as shown for BmrA (Bacillus multidrug resistance ATP protein, a membrane multidrug-transporting ATPase, which is particularly sensitive to detergent extraction. These new detergents allow BmrA to bind daunorubicin with a Kd of 12 µM, a value similar to that observed after purification using dodecyl maltoside (DDM. They preserve the ATPase activity of BmrA (which resets the protein to its initial state after drug efflux much more efficiently than SDS (sodium dodecyl sulphate, FC12 (Foscholine 12 or DDM. They also maintain in a functional state the C4Cn-extracted protein upon detergent exchange with FC12. Finally, they promote 3D-crystallization of the membrane protein. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These compounds seem promising to extract in a functional state

  10. Proton structure functions in the dipole picture of BFKL dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navelet, H.; Peschanski, R.; Wallon, S.; Royon, Ch.

    1996-06-01

    The proton structure functions are derived in the QCD dipole picture. Assuming k T and renormalization-group factorization, deep-inelastic proton scattering is related to deep-inelastic onium scattering. A three parameter fit of the 1994 H1 data in the low-x, moderate Q 2 range has been obtained. The dipole picture of BFKL dynamics is shown to provide a relevant model for quantitatively describing the proton structure functions at HERA. (author)

  11. Protein networks as logic functions in development and cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Dutkowski

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Many biological and clinical outcomes are based not on single proteins, but on modules of proteins embedded in protein networks. A fundamental question is how the proteins within each module contribute to the overall module activity. Here, we study the modules underlying three representative biological programs related to tissue development, breast cancer metastasis, or progression of brain cancer, respectively. For each case we apply a new method, called Network-Guided Forests, to identify predictive modules together with logic functions which tie the activity of each module to the activity of its component genes. The resulting modules implement a diverse repertoire of decision logic which cannot be captured using the simple approximations suggested in previous work such as gene summation or subtraction. We show that in cancer, certain combinations of oncogenes and tumor suppressors exert competing forces on the system, suggesting that medical genetics should move beyond cataloguing individual cancer genes to cataloguing their combinatorial logic.

  12. A Bioinformatic Approach to Inter Functional Interactions within Protein Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-23

    cell division genes in Eubacteria, and ribosomal genes in Eubacteria and Eukaryotic organelles. Genetica 2000, 108(1):1-7. 9. Altschul SF, Gish W...functional domains of serpin proteins. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 2005. 22: 1627-1634. 3. Codoner, F.M. & M.A. Fares, Why should we care about

  13. Vaccinia virus Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mysteries of the smallpox vaccine. 141. Viral mimicry. Viral mimicry of the complement system. 249. Viral molecules. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional pro- tein and a potential wonder drug. 265. Viral pneumonia. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new ...

  14. New factors influencing G protein coupled receptors' system functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New factors such as the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) surrounding's chemical environment, cell membrane constituents, the existent gap junction, endogenous receptor affinity status and animal species have been shown to influence the GPCR physiology and variations of those factors can modify the functions of the ...

  15. Sampling Protein Form and Function with the Atomic Force Microscope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baclayon, Marian; Roos, Wouter H.; Wuite, Gijs J. L.

    To study the structure, function, and interactions of proteins, a plethora of techniques is available. Many techniques sample such parameters in non-physiological environments (e. g. in air, ice, or vacuum). Atomic force microscopy (AFM), however, is a powerful biophysical technique that can probe

  16. Functional protein networks unifying limb girdle muscular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrée, Antoine de

    2011-01-01

    Limb Girdle Muscular Dystrophy (LGMD) is a rare progressive heterogeneous disorder that can be caused by mutations in at least 21 different genes. These genes are often widely expressed and encode proteins with highly differing functions. And yet mutations in all of them give rise to a similar

  17. From protein interactions to functional annotation: graph alignment in Herpes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolář, Michal; Lassig, M.; Berg, J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 90 (2008), e-e ISSN 1752-0509 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : graph alignment * functional annotation * protein orthology Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.706, year: 2008

  18. Glucoamylase: structure/function relationships, and protein engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, J; Sigurskjold, B W; Christensen, U

    2000-01-01

    fundamental structure/function relationships in the binding and catalytic mechanisms. In parallel, issues of relevance for application have been pursued using protein engineering to improve the industrial properties. The present review focuses on recent findings on the catalytic site, mechanism of action......, substrate recognition, the linker region, the multidomain architecture, the engineering of specificity and stability, and roles of individual substrate binding subsites....

  19. The structure and function of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup; Kobilka, Brian K

    2009-01-01

    -protein structure and biology. Great progress has been made over the past three decades in understanding diverse GPCRs, from pharmacology to functional characterization in vivo. Recent high-resolution structural studies have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms of GPCR activation and constitutive...

  20. Structure function relations in PDZ-domain-containing proteins ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G P Manjunath

    2017-12-30

    Dec 30, 2017 ... cost to the organism by the appearance of functionally redundant ... fashion, making them both robust as well as highly responsive to the ...... Trends Cell Biol. 10. 32–38. Basdevant N, Weinstein H and Ceruso M 2006 Thermodynamic basis for promiscuity and selectivity in protein–protein interac- tions: PDZ ...

  1. Dynamics Model Abstraction Scheme Using Radial Basis Functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Tolu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a control model for object manipulation. Properties of objects and environmental conditions influence the motor control and learning. System dynamics depend on an unobserved external context, for example, work load of a robot manipulator. The dynamics of a robot arm change as it manipulates objects with different physical properties, for example, the mass, shape, or mass distribution. We address active sensing strategies to acquire object dynamical models with a radial basis function neural network (RBF. Experiments are done using a real robot’s arm, and trajectory data are gathered during various trials manipulating different objects. Biped robots do not have high force joint servos and the control system hardly compensates all the inertia variation of the adjacent joints and disturbance torque on dynamic gait control. In order to achieve smoother control and lead to more reliable sensorimotor complexes, we evaluate and compare a sparse velocity-driven versus a dense position-driven control scheme.

  2. A surprising role for conformational entropy in protein function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wand, A. Joshua; Moorman, Veronica R.; Harpole, Kyle W.

    2014-01-01

    Formation of high-affinity complexes is critical for the majority of enzymatic reactions involving proteins. The creation of the family of Michaelis and other intermediate complexes during catalysis clearly involves a complicated manifold of interactions that are diverse and complex. Indeed, computing the energetics of interactions between proteins and small molecule ligands using molecular structure alone remains a grand challenge. One of the most difficult contributions to the free energy of protein-ligand complexes to experimentally access is that due to changes in protein conformational entropy. Fortunately, recent advances in solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation methods have enabled the use of measures-of-motion between conformational states of a protein as a proxy for conformational entropy. This review briefly summarizes the experimental approaches currently employed to characterize fast internal motion in proteins, how this information is used to gain insight into conformational entropy, what has been learned and what the future may hold for this emerging view of protein function. PMID:23478875

  3. Modeling dynamic functional connectivity using a wishart mixture model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard

    2017-01-01

    Dynamic functional connectivity (dFC) has recently become a popular way of tracking the temporal evolution of the brains functional integration. However, there does not seem to be a consensus on how to choose the complexity, i.e. number of brain states, and the time-scale of the dynamics, i.......e. the window length. In this work we use the Wishart Mixture Model (WMM) as a probabilistic model for dFC based on variational inference. The framework admits arbitrary window lengths and number of dynamic components and includes the static one-component model as a special case. We exploit that the WMM...... framework provides model selection by quantifying models generalization to new data. We use this to quantify the number of states within a prespecified window length. We further propose a heuristic procedure for choosing the window length based on contrasting for each window length the predictive...

  4. Structure Function Studies of Vaccinia Virus Host Range Protein K1 Reveal a Novel Functional Surface for Ankyrin Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yongchao; Meng, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Yan; Deng, Junpeng (Texas-HSC); (OKLU)

    2010-06-15

    Poxvirus host tropism at the cellular level is regulated by virus-encoded host range proteins acting downstream of virus entry. The functioning mechanisms of most host range proteins are unclear, but many contain multiple ankyrin (ANK) repeats, a motif that is known for ligand interaction through a concave surface. We report here the crystal structure of one of the ANK repeat-containing host range proteins, the vaccinia virus K1 protein. The structure, at a resolution of 2.3 {angstrom}, showed that K1 consists entirely of ANK repeats, including seven complete ones and two incomplete ones, one each at the N and C terminus. Interestingly, Phe82 and Ser83, which were previously shown to be critical for K1's function, are solvent exposed and located on a convex surface, opposite the consensus ANK interaction surface. The importance of this convex surface was further supported by our additional mutagenesis studies. We found that K1's host range function was negatively affected by substitution of either Asn51 or Cys47 and completely abolished by substitution of both residues. Cys47 and Asn51 are also exposed on the convex surface, spatially adjacent to Phe82 and Ser83. Altogether, our data showed that K1 residues on a continuous convex ANK repeat surface are critical for the host range function, suggesting that K1 functions through ligand interaction and does so with a novel ANK interaction surface.

  5. Origin of diverse time scales in the protein hydration layer solvation dynamics: A simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayantan; Mukherjee, Saumyak; Bagchi, Biman

    2017-10-01

    In order to inquire the microscopic origin of observed multiple time scales in solvation dynamics, we carry out several computer experiments. We perform atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on three protein-water systems, namely, lysozyme, myoglobin, and sweet protein monellin. In these experiments, we mutate the charges of the neighbouring amino acid side chains of certain natural probes (tryptophan) and also freeze the side chain motions. In order to distinguish between different contributions, we decompose the total solvation energy response in terms of various components present in the system. This allows us to capture the interplay among different self- and cross-energy correlation terms. Freezing the protein motions removes the slowest component that results from side chain fluctuations, but a part of slowness remains. This leads to the conclusion that the slow component approximately in the 20-80 ps range arises from slow water molecules present in the hydration layer. While the more than 100 ps component has multiple origins, namely, adjacent charges in amino acid side chains, hydrogen bonded water molecules and a dynamically coupled motion between side chain and water. In addition, the charges enforce a structural ordering of nearby water molecules and helps to form a local long-lived hydrogen bonded network. Further separation of the spatial and temporal responses in solvation dynamics reveals different roles of hydration and bulk water. We find that the hydration layer water molecules are largely responsible for the slow component, whereas the initial ultrafast decay arises predominantly (approximately 80%) due to the bulk. This agrees with earlier theoretical observations. We also attempt to rationalise our results with the help of a molecular hydrodynamic theory that was developed using classical time dependent density functional theory in a semi-quantitative manner.

  6. Dynamics of environmental gradients on plant functional groups ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    Dec 19, 2011 ... the northern slope of the Fu-Niu Mountain Nature Reserve. Using community ecology techniques, these researchers examined the influences of elevation on plant functional group (PFG) dynamics and population interactions at elevations between 855 and 1920 m on the northern slope of the Fu-Niu.

  7. Dynamic response of fly ash reinforced functionally graded rubber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dynamic analysis of jute-epoxy sandwiches with fly ash reinforced functionally gradient (FG) flexible, compliant rubber core is presented. FG samples are prepared using conventional casting technique. Presence of gradation is quantified by weight method. An attempt is made to study the influence of fly ash weight ...

  8. From dynamics to structure and function of model biomolecular systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fontaine-Vive-Curtaz, F.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to extend recent works on structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded crystals to model biomolecular systems and biological processes. The tools that we have used are neutron scattering (NS) and density functional theory (DFT) and force field (FF) based simulation

  9. Automated Quantitative Assessment of Proteins' Biological Function in Protein Knowledge Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Mayr

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary protein sequence data are archived in databases together with information regarding corresponding biological functions. In this respect, UniProt/Swiss-Prot is currently the most comprehensive collection and it is routinely cross-examined when trying to unravel the biological role of hypothetical proteins. Bioscientists frequently extract single entries and further evaluate those on a subjective basis. In lieu of a standardized procedure for scoring the existing knowledge regarding individual proteins, we here report about a computer-assisted method, which we applied to score the present knowledge about any given Swiss-Prot entry. Applying this quantitative score allows the comparison of proteins with respect to their sequence yet highlights the comprehension of functional data. pfs analysis may be also applied for quality control of individual entries or for database management in order to rank entry listings.

  10. Automated quantitative assessment of proteins' biological function in protein knowledge bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Gabriele; Lepperdinger, Günter; Lackner, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Primary protein sequence data are archived in databases together with information regarding corresponding biological functions. In this respect, UniProt/Swiss-Prot is currently the most comprehensive collection and it is routinely cross-examined when trying to unravel the biological role of hypothetical proteins. Bioscientists frequently extract single entries and further evaluate those on a subjective basis. In lieu of a standardized procedure for scoring the existing knowledge regarding individual proteins, we here report about a computer-assisted method, which we applied to score the present knowledge about any given Swiss-Prot entry. Applying this quantitative score allows the comparison of proteins with respect to their sequence yet highlights the comprehension of functional data. pfs analysis may be also applied for quality control of individual entries or for database management in order to rank entry listings.

  11. Towards the identification of protein complexes and functional modules by integrating PPI network and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein complexes and functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI networks is crucial to understanding the principles of cellular organization and predicting protein functions. In the past few years, many computational methods have been proposed. However, most of them considered the PPI networks as static graphs and overlooked the dynamics inherent within these networks. Moreover, few of them can distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules. Results In this paper, a new framework is proposed to distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules by integrating gene expression data into protein-protein interaction (PPI data. A series of time-sequenced subnetworks (TSNs is constructed according to the time that the interactions were activated. The algorithm TSN-PCD was then developed to identify protein complexes from these TSNs. As protein complexes are significantly related to functional modules, a new algorithm DFM-CIN is proposed to discover functional modules based on the identified complexes. The experimental results show that the combination of temporal gene expression data with PPI data contributes to identifying protein complexes more precisely. A quantitative comparison based on f-measure reveals that our algorithm TSN-PCD outperforms the other previous protein complex discovery algorithms. Furthermore, we evaluate the identified functional modules by using “Biological Process” annotated in GO (Gene Ontology. The validation shows that the identified functional modules are statistically significant in terms of “Biological Process”. More importantly, the relationship between protein complexes and functional modules are studied. Conclusions The proposed framework based on the integration of PPI data and gene expression data makes it possible to identify protein complexes and functional modules more effectively. Moveover, the proposed new framework and

  12. Improved protein model quality assessments by changing the target function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uziela, Karolis; Menéndez Hurtado, David; Shu, Nanjiang; Wallner, Björn; Elofsson, Arne

    2018-03-09

    Protein modeling quality is an important part of protein structure prediction. We have for more than a decade developed a set of methods for this problem. We have used various types of description of the protein and different machine learning methodologies. However, common to all these methods has been the target function used for training. The target function in ProQ describes the local quality of a residue in a protein model. In all versions of ProQ the target function has been the S-score. However, other quality estimation functions also exist, which can be divided into superposition- and contact-based methods. The superposition-based methods, such as S-score, are based on a rigid body superposition of a protein model and the native structure, while the contact-based methods compare the local environment of each residue. Here, we examine the effects of retraining our latest predictor, ProQ3D, using identical inputs but different target functions. We find that the contact-based methods are easier to predict and that predictors trained on these measures provide some advantages when it comes to identifying the best model. One possible reason for this is that contact based methods are better at estimating the quality of multi-domain targets. However, training on the S-score gives the best correlation with the GDT_TS score, which is commonly used in CASP to score the global model quality. To take the advantage of both of these features we provide an updated version of ProQ3D that predicts local and global model quality estimates based on different quality estimates. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Probing how initial retinal configuration controls photochemical dynamics in retinal proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheves M.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the initial retinal configuration and the active isomerization coordinate on the photochemistry of retinal proteins (RPs are assessed by comparing photochemical dynamics of two stable retinal ground state configurations (all-trans,15-anti vs. 13-cis,15-syn, within two RPs: Bacteriorhodopsin (BR and Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin (ASR. Hyperspectral pump-probe spectroscopy shows that photochemistry starting from 13-cis retinal in both proteins is 3-10 times faster than when started in the all-trans state, suggesting that the hastening is ubiquitous to microbial RPs, regardless of their different biological functions and origin. This may also relate to the known disparity of photochemical rates between microbial RPs and visual pigments. Importance and possible underlying mechanisms are discussed as well.

  14. Photo-initiated dynamics and spectroscopy of the deprotonated Green Fluorescent Protein chromophore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bochenkova, Anastasia; Andersen, Lars Henrik

    2013-01-01

    . Knowledge of intrinsic properties of the GFP photoabsorbing molecular unit is a prerequisite in understanding the atomic-scale interactions that play a key role for the diverse functioning of these proteins. Here, we show how recent developments in action and photoelectron spectroscopy combined with state-of-the......This chapter combines recent advances in understanding the photophysics of the chromophore anion of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) from the jellyfish Aequorea Victoria. GFP and its homologues are widely used for in vivo labeling in biology through their remarkable fluorescent properties...... dynamics, where non-radiative decay occurs on a (sub)picosecond timescale. Deactivation includes resonant electron emission and fast internal conversion followed by slow statistical decay in the vibrationally hot ground state. Remarkably, both electronic and nuclear excited-state decay channels may here...

  15. The E4 protein; structure, function and patterns of expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doorbar, John, E-mail: jdoorba@nimr.mrc.ac.uk

    2013-10-15

    The papillomavirus E4 open reading frame (ORF) is contained within the E2 ORF, with the primary E4 gene-product (E1{sup ∧}E4) being translated from a spliced mRNA that includes the E1 initiation codon and adjacent sequences. E4 is located centrally within the E2 gene, in a region that encodes the E2 protein′s flexible hinge domain. Although a number of minor E4 transcripts have been reported, it is the product of the abundant E1{sup ∧}E4 mRNA that has been most extensively analysed. During the papillomavirus life cycle, the E1{sup ∧}E4 gene products generally become detectable at the onset of vegetative viral genome amplification as the late stages of infection begin. E4 contributes to genome amplification success and virus synthesis, with its high level of expression suggesting additional roles in virus release and/or transmission. In general, E4 is easily visualised in biopsy material by immunostaining, and can be detected in lesions caused by diverse papillomavirus types, including those of dogs, rabbits and cattle as well as humans. The E4 protein can serve as a biomarker of active virus infection, and in the case of high-risk human types also disease severity. In some cutaneous lesions, E4 can be expressed at higher levels than the virion coat proteins, and can account for as much as 30% of total lesional protein content. The E4 proteins of the Beta, Gamma and Mu HPV types assemble into distinctive cytoplasmic, and sometimes nuclear, inclusion granules. In general, the E4 proteins are expressed before L2 and L1, with their structure and function being modified, first by kinases as the infected cell progresses through the S and G2 cell cycle phases, but also by proteases as the cell exits the cell cycle and undergoes true terminal differentiation. The kinases that regulate E4 also affect other viral proteins simultaneously, and include protein kinase A, Cyclin-dependent kinase, members of the MAP Kinase family and protein kinase C. For HPV16 E1{sup

  16. Automatically extracting functionally equivalent proteins from SwissProt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Andrew CR

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a frequent need to obtain sets of functionally equivalent homologous proteins (FEPs from different species. While it is usually the case that orthology implies functional equivalence, this is not always true; therefore datasets of orthologous proteins are not appropriate. The information relevant to extracting FEPs is contained in databanks such as UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot and a manual analysis of these data allow FEPs to be extracted on a one-off basis. However there has been no resource allowing the easy, automatic extraction of groups of FEPs – for example, all instances of protein C. We have developed FOSTA, an automatically generated database of FEPs annotated as having the same function in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot which can be used for large-scale analysis. The method builds a candidate list of homologues and filters out functionally diverged proteins on the basis of functional annotations using a simple text mining approach. Results Large scale evaluation of our FEP extraction method is difficult as there is no gold-standard dataset against which the method can be benchmarked. However, a manual analysis of five protein families confirmed a high level of performance. A more extensive comparison with two manually verified functional equivalence datasets also demonstrated very good performance. Conclusion In summary, FOSTA provides an automated analysis of annotations in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot to enable groups of proteins already annotated as functionally equivalent, to be extracted. Our results demonstrate that the vast majority of UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot functional annotations are of high quality, and that FOSTA can interpret annotations successfully. Where FOSTA is not successful, we are able to highlight inconsistencies in UniProtKB/Swiss-Prot annotation. Most of these would have presented equal difficulties for manual interpretation of annotations. We discuss limitations and possible future extensions to FOSTA, and

  17. Properties and Functions of the Dengue Virus Capsid Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Laura A; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-09-29

    Dengue virus affects hundreds of millions of people each year around the world, causing a tremendous social and economic impact on affected countries. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the functions, structure, and interactions of the viral capsid protein. The primary role of capsid is to package the viral genome. There are two processes linked to this function: the recruitment of the viral RNA during assembly and the release of the genome during infection. Although particle assembly takes place on endoplasmic reticulum membranes, capsid localizes in nucleoli and lipid droplets. Why capsid accumulates in these locations during infection remains unknown. In this review, we describe available data and discuss new ideas on dengue virus capsid functions and interactions. We believe that a deeper understanding of how the capsid protein works during infection will create opportunities for novel antiviral strategies, which are urgently needed to control dengue virus infections.

  18. Multifarious Functions of the Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jenna K; Broadie, Kendal

    2017-10-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS), a heritable intellectual and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), results from the loss of Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). This neurodevelopmental disease state exhibits neural circuit hyperconnectivity and hyperexcitability. Canonically, FMRP functions as an mRNA-binding translation suppressor, but recent findings have enormously expanded its proposed roles. Although connections between burgeoning FMRP functions remain unknown, recent advances have extended understanding of its involvement in RNA, channel, and protein binding that modulate calcium signaling, activity-dependent critical period development, and the excitation-inhibition (E/I) neural circuitry balance. In this review, we contextualize 3 years of FXS model research. Future directions extrapolated from recent advances focus on discovering links between FMRP roles to determine whether FMRP has a multitude of unrelated functions or whether combinatorial mechanisms can explain its multifaceted existence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein dynamics as seen by (quasi) elastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magazù, S; Mezei, F; Falus, P; Farago, B; Mamontov, E; Russina, M; Migliardo, F

    2017-01-01

    Elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering studies proved to be efficient probes of the atomic mean square displacement (MSD), a fundamental parameter for the characterization of the motion of individual atoms in proteins and its evolution with temperature and compositional environment. We present a technical overview of the different types of experimental situations and the information quasi-elastic neutron scattering approaches can make available. In particular, MSD can crucially depend on the time scale over which the averaging (building of the "mean") takes place, being defined by the instrumental resolution. Due to their high neutron scattering cross section, hydrogen atoms can be particularly sensitively observed with little interference by the other atoms in the sample. A few examples, including new data, are presented for illustration. The incoherent character of neutron scattering on hydrogen atoms restricts the information obtained to the self-correlations in the motion of individual atoms, simplifying at the same time the data analysis. On the other hand, the (often overlooked) exploration of the averaging time dependent character of MSD is crucial for unambiguous interpretation and can provide a wealth of information on micro- and nanoscale atomic motion in proteins. By properly exploiting the broad range capabilities of (quasi)elastic neutron scattering techniques to deliver time dependent characterization of atomic displacements, they offer a sensitive, direct and simple to interpret approach to exploration of the functional activity of hydrogen atoms in proteins. Partial deuteration can add most valuable selectivity by groups of hydrogen atoms. "This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Science for Life" Guest Editor: Dr. Austen Angell, Dr. Salvatore Magazù and Dr. Federica Migliardo". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Microsecond molecular dynamics simulation shows effect of slow loop dynamics on backbone amide order parameters of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maragakis, Paul; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Eastwood, Michael P

    2008-01-01

    . Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation provides a complementary approach to the study of protein dynamics on similar time scales. Comparisons between NMR spectroscopy and MD simulations can be used to interpret experimental results and to improve the quality of simulation-related force fields and integration...

  1. Computational design of receptor and sensor proteins with novel functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looger, Loren L.; Dwyer, Mary A.; Smith, James J.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2003-05-01

    The formation of complexes between proteins and ligands is fundamental to biological processes at the molecular level. Manipulation of molecular recognition between ligands and proteins is therefore important for basic biological studies and has many biotechnological applications, including the construction of enzymes, biosensors, genetic circuits, signal transduction pathways and chiral separations. The systematic manipulation of binding sites remains a major challenge. Computational design offers enormous generality for engineering protein structure and function. Here we present a structure-based computational method that can drastically redesign protein ligand-binding specificities. This method was used to construct soluble receptors that bind trinitrotoluene, L-lactate or serotonin with high selectivity and affinity. These engineered receptors can function as biosensors for their new ligands; we also incorporated them into synthetic bacterial signal transduction pathways, regulating gene expression in response to extracellular trinitrotoluene or L-lactate. The use of various ligands and proteins shows that a high degree of control over biomolecular recognition has been established computationally. The biological and biosensing activities of the designed receptors illustrate potential applications of computational design.

  2. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël M. Miedema

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell’s cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models, like the paradigmatic, totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP, have been used to predict these crowding effects based on simple exclusion interactions, but verifying them in experiments remains challenging. Here, we introduce a correlation imaging technique to precisely measure the motor density, velocity, and run length along filaments under crowding conditions, enabling us to elucidate the physical nature of crowding and test TASEP model predictions. Using the kinesin motor proteins kinesin-1 and OSM-3, we identify crowding effects in qualitative agreement with TASEP predictions, and we achieve excellent quantitative agreement by extending the model with motor-specific interaction ranges and crowding-dependent detachment probabilities. These results confirm the applicability of basic nonequilibrium models to the intracellular transport and highlight motor-specific strategies to deal with crowding.

  3. Correlation Imaging Reveals Specific Crowding Dynamics of Kinesin Motor Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miedema, Daniël M.; Kushwaha, Vandana S.; Denisov, Dmitry V.; Acar, Seyda; Nienhuis, Bernard; Peterman, Erwin J. G.; Schall, Peter

    2017-10-01

    Molecular motor proteins fulfill the critical function of transporting organelles and other building blocks along the biopolymer network of the cell's cytoskeleton, but crowding effects are believed to crucially affect this motor-driven transport due to motor interactions. Physical transport models, like the paradigmatic, totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), have been used to predict these crowding effects based on simple exclusion interactions, but verifying them in experiments remains challenging. Here, we introduce a correlation imaging technique to precisely measure the motor density, velocity, and run length along filaments under crowding conditions, enabling us to elucidate the physical nature of crowding and test TASEP model predictions. Using the kinesin motor proteins kinesin-1 and OSM-3, we identify crowding effects in qualitative agreement with TASEP predictions, and we achieve excellent quantitative agreement by extending the model with motor-specific interaction ranges and crowding-dependent detachment probabilities. These results confirm the applicability of basic nonequilibrium models to the intracellular transport and highlight motor-specific strategies to deal with crowding.

  4. Analysis of Amyloid Precursor Protein function in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Kretzschmar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid precursor protein (APP has mainly been investigated in connection with its role in Alzheimer’s disease due to its cleavage resulting in the production of the Aβ peptides that accumulate in the plaques characteristic for this disease. However, APP is an evolutionary conserved protein that is not only found in humans but also in many other species, including Drosophila, suggesting an important physiological function. Besides Aβ, several other fragments are produced by the cleavage of APP; large secreted fragments derived from the N-terminus and a small intracellular C-terminal fragment. Although these fragments have received much less attention than Aβ, a picture about their function is finally emerging. In contrast to mammals, which express three APP family members, Drosophila expresses only one APP protein called Amyloid Precursor Protein-like or APPL. Therefore APPL functions can be studied in flies without the complication that other APP family members may have redundant functions. Flies lacking APPL are viable but show defects in neuronal outgrowth in the central and peripheral nervous system in addition to synaptic changes. Furthermore, APPL has been connected with axonal transport functions. In the adult nervous system, APPL, and more specifically its secreted fragments, can protect neurons from degeneration. APPL cleavage also prevents glial death. Lastly, APPL was found to be involved in behavioural deficits and in regulating sleep/activity patterns. This review, will describe the role of APPL in neuronal development and maintenance and briefly touch on its emerging function in circadian rhythms while an accompanying review will focus on its role in learning and memory formation.

  5. Aging synaptic mitochondria exhibit dynamic proteomic changes while maintaining bioenergetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-04-01

    Aging correlates with a progressive impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis and is an influential factor for several forms of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related alterations in synaptosomal mitochondria, a neuronal mitochondria population highly susceptible to insults and critical for brain function, remain incompletely understood. Therefore this study investigates the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic and bioenergetic alterations that occur with age. The utilization of a state of the art quantitative proteomics approach allowed for the comparison of protein expression levels in synaptic mitochondria isolated from 5 (mature), 12 (old), and 24 (aged) month old mice. During the process of aging we find that dynamic proteomic alterations occur in synaptic mitochondria. Despite direct (mitochondrial DNA deletions) and indirect (increased antioxidant protein levels) signs of mitochondrial damage in the aged mice, there was an overall maintenance of mitochondrial function. Therefore the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic changes that occur with aging correlate with preservation of synaptic mitochondrial function.

  6. Functional clustering in hippocampal cultures: relating network structure and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldt, S; Dzakpasu, R; Olariu, E; Żochowski, M; Wang, J X; Shtrahman, E

    2010-01-01

    In this work we investigate the relationship between gross anatomic structural network properties, neuronal dynamics and the resultant functional structure in dissociated rat hippocampal cultures. Specifically, we studied cultures as they developed under two conditions: the first supporting glial cell growth (high glial group), and the second one inhibiting it (low glial group). We then compared structural network properties and the spatio-temporal activity patterns of the neurons. Differences in dynamics between the two groups could be linked to the impact of the glial network on the neuronal network as the cultures developed. We also implemented a recently developed algorithm called the functional clustering algorithm (FCA) to obtain the resulting functional network structure. We show that this new algorithm is useful for capturing changes in functional network structure as the networks evolve over time. The FCA detects changes in functional structure that are consistent with expected dynamical differences due to the impact of the glial network. Cultures in the high glial group show an increase in global synchronization as the cultures age, while those in the low glial group remain locally synchronized. We additionally use the FCA to quantify the amount of synchronization present in the cultures and show that the total level of synchronization in the high glial group is stronger than in the low glial group. These results indicate an interdependence between the glial and neuronal networks present in dissociated cultures

  7. Predictive assessment of models for dynamic functional connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Søren Føns Vind; Schmidt, Mikkel Nørgaard; Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard

    2018-01-01

    In neuroimaging, it has become evident that models of dynamic functional connectivity (dFC), which characterize how intrinsic brain organization changes over time, can provide a more detailed representation of brain function than traditional static analyses. Many dFC models in the literature...... represent functional brain networks as a meta-stable process with a discrete number of states; however, there is a lack of consensus on how to perform model selection and learn the number of states, as well as a lack of understanding of how different modeling assumptions influence the estimated state...

  8. DEFINE: A Service-Oriented Dynamically Enabling Function Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Wei-Yi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce an innovative Dynamically Enable Function In Network Equipment (DEFINE to allow tenant get the network service quickly. First, DEFINE decouples an application into different functional components, and connects these function components in a reconfigurable method. Second, DEFINE provides a programmable interface to the third party, who can develop their own processing modules according to their own needs. To verify the effectiveness of this model, we set up an evaluating network with a FPGA-based OpenFlow switch prototype, and deployed several applications on it. Our results show that DEFINE has excellent flexibility and performance.

  9. Binary codes with impulse autocorrelation functions for dynamic experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corran, E.R.; Cummins, J.D.

    1962-09-01

    A series of binary codes exist which have autocorrelation functions approximating to an impulse function. Signals whose behaviour in time can be expressed by such codes have spectra which are 'whiter' over a limited bandwidth and for a finite time than signals from a white noise generator. These codes are used to determine system dynamic responses using the correlation technique. Programmes have been written to compute codes of arbitrary length and to compute 'cyclic' autocorrelation and cross-correlation functions. Complete listings of these programmes are given, and a code of 1019 bits is presented. (author)

  10. Comparison Criteria for Nonlinear Functional Dynamic Equations of Higher Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher S. Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We will consider the higher order functional dynamic equations with mixed nonlinearities of the form xnt+∑j=0Npjtϕγjxφjt=0, on an above-unbounded time scale T, where n≥2, xi(t≔ri(tϕαixi-1Δ(t,  i=1,…,n-1,   with  x0=x,  ϕβ(u≔uβsgn⁡u, and α[i,j]≔αi⋯αj. The function φi:T→T is a rd-continuous function such that limt→∞φi(t=∞ for j=0,1,…,N. The results extend and improve some known results in the literature on higher order nonlinear dynamic equations.

  11. Improved Functional Characteristics of Whey Protein Hydrolysates in Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeewanthi, Renda Kankanamge Chaturika; Lee, Na-Kyoung; Paik, Hyun-Dong

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on the enhanced functional characteristics of enzymatic hydrolysates of whey proteins (WPHs) in food applications compared to intact whey proteins (WPs). WPs are applied in foods as whey protein concentrates (WPCs), whey protein isolates (WPIs), and WPHs. WPs are byproducts of cheese production, used in a wide range of food applications due to their nutritional validity, functional activities, and cost effectiveness. Enzymatic hydrolysis yields improved functional and nutritional benefits in contrast to heat denaturation or native applications. WPHs improve solubility over a wide range of pH, create viscosity through water binding, and promote cohesion, adhesion, and elasticity. WPHs form stronger but more flexible edible films than WPC or WPI. WPHs enhance emulsification, bind fat, and facilitate whipping, compared to intact WPs. Extensive hydrolyzed WPHs with proper heat applications are the best emulsifiers and addition of polysaccharides improves the emulsification ability of WPHs. Also, WPHs improve the sensorial properties like color, flavor, and texture but impart a bitter taste in case where extensive hydrolysis (degree of hydrolysis greater than 8%). It is important to consider the type of enzyme, hydrolysis conditions, and WPHs production method based on the nature of food application. PMID:26761849

  12. Uncovering genes with divergent mRNA-protein dynamics in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik P Jayapal

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes are intrinsically dynamic, incurring profound changes at both molecular and physiological levels. Systems analyses of such processes incorporating large-scale transcriptome or proteome profiling can be quite revealing. Although consistency between mRNA and proteins is often implicitly assumed in many studies, examples of divergent trends are frequently observed. Here, we present a comparative transcriptome and proteome analysis of growth and stationary phase adaptation in Streptomyces coelicolor, taking the time-dynamics of process into consideration. These processes are of immense interest in microbiology as they pertain to the physiological transformations eliciting biosynthesis of many naturally occurring therapeutic agents. A shotgun proteomics approach based on mass spectrometric analysis of isobaric stable isotope labeled peptides (iTRAQ enabled identification and rapid quantification of approximately 14% of the theoretical proteome of S. coelicolor. Independent principal component analyses of this and DNA microarray-derived transcriptome data revealed that the prominent patterns in both protein and mRNA domains are surprisingly well correlated. Despite this overall correlation, by employing a systematic concordance analysis, we estimated that over 30% of the analyzed genes likely exhibited significantly divergent patterns, of which nearly one-third displayed even opposing trends. Integrating this data with biological information, we discovered that certain groups of functionally related genes exhibit mRNA-protein discordance in a similar fashion. Our observations suggest that differences between mRNA and protein synthesis/degradation mechanisms are prominent in microbes while reaffirming the plausibility of such mechanisms acting in a concerted fashion at a protein complex or sub-pathway level.

  13. Reverse micelles as a tool for probing solvent modulation of protein dynamics: Reverse micelle encapsulated hemoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Camille J.; Dantsker, David; Heller, Elizabeth R.; Sabat, Joseph E.; Friedman, Joel M.

    2013-08-01

    Hydration waters impact protein dynamics. Dissecting the interplay between hydration waters and dynamics requires a protein that manifests a broad range of dynamics. Proteins in reverse micelles (RMs) have promise as tools to achieve this objective because the water content can be manipulated. Hemoglobin is an appropriate tool with which to probe hydration effects. We describe both a protocol for hemoglobin encapsulation in reverse micelles and a facile method using PEG and cosolvents to manipulate water content. Hydration properties are probed using the water-sensitive fluorescence from Hb bound pyranine and covalently attached Badan. Protein dynamics are probed through ligand recombination traces derived from photodissociated carbonmonoxy hemoglobin on a log scale that exposes the potential role of both α and β solvent fluctuations in modulating protein dynamics. The results open the possibility of probing hydration level phenomena in this system using a combination of NMR and optical probes.

  14. IMPACT OF DYNAMICAL HYDRATION SHELL AROUND HA PROTEIN ON NONLINEAR CONCENTRATION DEPENDENT T-RAYS ABSORPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIWEN SUN

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available T-rays is sensitive to covalently cross-linked proteins and can be used to probe unique dynamic properties of water surrounding a protein. In this paper, we demonstrate the unique absorption properties of the dynamic hydration shells determined by hemagglutinin (HA protein in terahertz frequency. We study the changes arising from different concentrations in detail and show that nonlinear absorption coefficient is induced by the dynamic hydration water. The binary and ternary component model were used to interpret the nonlinearity absorption behaviors and predict the thickness of the hydration shells around the HA protein in aqueous phase.

  15. Comparative Investigation of Normal Modes and Molecular Dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asafi, M. S.; Yildirim, A.; Tekpinar, M.

    2016-04-01

    Understanding dynamics of proteins has many practical implications in terms of finding a cure for many protein related diseases. Normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics methods are widely used physics-based computational methods for investigating dynamics of proteins. In this work, we studied dynamics of Hepatitis C NS5B protein with molecular dynamics and normal mode analysis. Principal components obtained from a 100 nanoseconds molecular dynamics simulation show good overlaps with normal modes calculated with a coarse-grained elastic network model. Coarse-grained normal mode analysis takes at least an order of magnitude shorter time. Encouraged by this good overlaps and short computation times, we analyzed further low frequency normal modes of Hepatitis C NS5B. Motion directions and average spatial fluctuations have been analyzed in detail. Finally, biological implications of these motions in drug design efforts against Hepatitis C infections have been elaborated.

  16. Clustering of protein domains for functional and evolutionary studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Paul F

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of protein family members defined by DNA sequencing is usually much larger than those characterised experimentally. This paper describes a method to divide protein families into subtypes purely on sequence criteria. Comparison with experimental data allows an independent test of the quality of the clustering. Results An evolutionary split statistic is calculated for each column in a protein multiple sequence alignment; the statistic has a larger value when a column is better described by an evolutionary model that assumes clustering around two or more amino acids rather than a single amino acid. The user selects columns (typically the top ranked columns to construct a motif. The motif is used to divide the family into subtypes using a stochastic optimization procedure related to the deterministic annealing EM algorithm (DAEM, which yields a specificity score showing how well each family member is assigned to a subtype. The clustering obtained is not strongly dependent on the number of amino acids chosen for the motif. The robustness of this method was demonstrated using six well characterized protein families: nucleotidyl cyclase, protein kinase, dehydrogenase, two polyketide synthase domains and small heat shock proteins. Phylogenetic trees did not allow accurate clustering for three of the six families. Conclusion The method clustered the families into functional subtypes with an accuracy of 90 to 100%. False assignments usually had a low specificity score.

  17. Preparation, characterization and functional properties of flax seed protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Pratibha; Dowling, Kim; McKnight, Stafford; Barrow, Colin J; Wang, Bo; Adhikari, Benu

    2016-04-15

    Flaxseed protein isolate (FPI) was extracted from flaxseeds, and its amino acid composition and functional properties (solubility, thermal stability, emulsifying properties and electrostatic charge density, water holding and fat absorption capacities) were determined. The highest purity of FPI (90.6%) was achieved by extraction at 60°C. FPI had a low lysine to arginine ratio of 0.25, which is desired in heart-healthy foods and infant formulas. The denaturation temperature of FPI was 105°C. FPI had the highest emulsion activity index (375.51 m(2)/g), highest emulsion stability index (179.5 h) and zeta potential (-67.4 mV) when compared to those of other commonly used proteins, such as sodium caseinate (SC), whey protein isolate (WPI), gelatin (Gel) and soy protein isolate (SPI). The average emulsion droplet size of emulsions stabilized by these proteins was in the order SCproteins. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Functional genomic analysis of cassava proteins with TIR domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roman Reyna, Veronica; Lopez, Camilo

    2012-01-01

    Proteins containing a TIR domain (toll interleukin receptor) are involved in plant and animal immunity. The aim of this work was to carry out an overall genomic analysis of cassava proteins with a TIR domain and discern their possible role in resistance to cassava bacterial blight. In total 46 proteins with a TIR domain were identified in the cassava proteome and were classed in four categories according the presence or absence of other domains: TIR (T), TIR -NB (TN), TIR - lRR (TL) and TIR - NB - lRR (TNL). 56.6 % of these 46 proteins have TIR, NB and lRR domains. Using multiple alignments it was possible to demonstrate that not all cassava TIR domains contain the AE region, involved in dimerization and activation of immune responses. Three of the four proteins categories (T, TNL and TN) presented a higher number of synonymous substitutions suggesting that they are not involved in recognition process. two TIR domains not presenting the ae region were analyzed by yeast two hybrid assays and by agro-infiltration, finding that both are able to form homo and heterodimers, but they do not trigger defense responses. With this study it was possible to conclude that TIR domains can function as adaptors in the signal transduction with other resistance proteins. In addition, it became clear that not always the AE region is important for TIR dimerization but it seems necessary to activate defense responses signals.

  19. Predictive assessment of models for dynamic functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Søren F V; Schmidt, Mikkel N; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Mørup, Morten

    2018-05-01

    In neuroimaging, it has become evident that models of dynamic functional connectivity (dFC), which characterize how intrinsic brain organization changes over time, can provide a more detailed representation of brain function than traditional static analyses. Many dFC models in the literature represent functional brain networks as a meta-stable process with a discrete number of states; however, there is a lack of consensus on how to perform model selection and learn the number of states, as well as a lack of understanding of how different modeling assumptions influence the estimated state dynamics. To address these issues, we consider a predictive likelihood approach to model assessment, where models are evaluated based on their predictive performance on held-out test data. Examining several prominent models of dFC (in their probabilistic formulations) we demonstrate our framework on synthetic data, and apply it on two real-world examples: a face recognition EEG experiment and resting-state fMRI. Our results evidence that both EEG and fMRI are better characterized using dynamic modeling approaches than by their static counterparts, but we also demonstrate that one must be cautious when interpreting dFC because parameter settings and modeling assumptions, such as window lengths and emission models, can have a large impact on the estimated states and consequently on the interpretation of the brain dynamics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A dynamic model for functional mapping of biological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Guifang; Luo, Jiangtao; Berg, Arthur; Wang, Zhong; Li, Jiahan; Das, Kiranmoy; Li, Runze; Wu, Rongling

    2011-01-01

    Functional mapping is a statistical method for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that regulate the dynamic pattern of a biological trait. This method integrates mathematical aspects of biological complexity into a mixture model for genetic mapping and tests the genetic effects of QTLs by comparing genotype-specific curve parameters. As a way of quantitatively specifying the dynamic behavior of a system, differential equations have proven to be powerful for modeling and unraveling the biochemical, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of a biological process, such as biological rhythms. The equipment of functional mapping with biologically meaningful differential equations provides new insights into the genetic control of any dynamic processes. We formulate a new functional mapping framework for a dynamic biological rhythm by incorporating a group of ordinary differential equations (ODE). The Runge-Kutta fourth order algorithm was implemented to estimate the parameters that define the system of ODE. The new model will find its implications for understanding the interplay between gene interactions and developmental pathways in complex biological rhythms.

  1. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins: roles in protein folding, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Everett Clinton; Smith, Stacy E; Carter, James R; Webb, Stacy R; Gibson, Kathleen M; Hellman, Lance M; Fried, Michael G; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2013-12-13

    Paramyxovirus fusion (F) proteins promote membrane fusion between the viral envelope and host cell membranes, a critical early step in viral infection. Although mutational analyses have indicated that transmembrane (TM) domain residues can affect folding or function of viral fusion proteins, direct analysis of TM-TM interactions has proved challenging. To directly assess TM interactions, the oligomeric state of purified chimeric proteins containing the Staphylococcal nuclease (SN) protein linked to the TM segments from three paramyxovirus F proteins was analyzed by sedimentation equilibrium analysis in detergent and buffer conditions that allowed density matching. A monomer-trimer equilibrium best fit was found for all three SN-TM constructs tested, and similar fits were obtained with peptides corresponding to just the TM region of two different paramyxovirus F proteins. These findings demonstrate for the first time that class I viral fusion protein TM domains can self-associate as trimeric complexes in the absence of the rest of the protein. Glycine residues have been implicated in TM helix interactions, so the effect of mutations at Hendra F Gly-508 was assessed in the context of the whole F protein. Mutations G508I or G508L resulted in decreased cell surface expression of the fusogenic form, consistent with decreased stability of the prefusion form of the protein. Sedimentation equilibrium analysis of TM domains containing these mutations gave higher relative association constants, suggesting altered TM-TM interactions. Overall, these results suggest that trimeric TM interactions are important driving forces for protein folding, stability and membrane fusion promotion.

  2. General framework for fluctuating dynamic density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Olivencia, Miguel A.; Yatsyshin, Peter; Goddard, Benjamin D.; Kalliadasis, Serafim

    2017-12-01

    We introduce a versatile bottom-up derivation of a formal theoretical framework to describe (passive) soft-matter systems out of equilibrium subject to fluctuations. We provide a unique connection between the constituent-particle dynamics of real systems and the time evolution equation of their measurable (coarse-grained) quantities, such as local density and velocity. The starting point is the full Hamiltonian description of a system of colloidal particles immersed in a fluid of identical bath particles. Then, we average out the bath via Zwanzig’s projection-operator techniques and obtain the stochastic Langevin equations governing the colloidal-particle dynamics. Introducing the appropriate definition of the local number and momentum density fields yields a generalisation of the Dean-Kawasaki (DK) model, which resembles the stochastic Navier-Stokes description of a fluid. Nevertheless, the DK equation still contains all the microscopic information and, for that reason, does not represent the dynamical law of observable quantities. We address this controversial feature of the DK description by carrying out a nonequilibrium ensemble average. Adopting a natural decomposition into local-equilibrium and nonequilibrium contribution, where the former is related to a generalised version of the canonical distribution, we finally obtain the fluctuating-hydrodynamic equation governing the time-evolution of the mesoscopic density and momentum fields. Along the way, we outline the connection between the ad hoc energy functional introduced in previous DK derivations and the free-energy functional from classical density-functional theory. The resultant equation has the structure of a dynamical density-functional theory (DDFT) with an additional fluctuating force coming from the random interactions with the bath. We show that our fluctuating DDFT formalism corresponds to a particular version of the fluctuating Navier-Stokes equations, originally derived by Landau and Lifshitz

  3. Intermolecular detergent-membrane protein noes for the characterization of the dynamics of membrane protein-detergent complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichmann, Cédric; Orts, Julien; Tzitzilonis, Christos; Vögeli, Beat; Smrt, Sean; Lorieau, Justin; Riek, Roland

    2014-12-11

    The interaction between membrane proteins and lipids or lipid mimetics such as detergents is key for the three-dimensional structure and dynamics of membrane proteins. In NMR-based structural studies of membrane proteins, qualitative analysis of intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancements (NOEs) or paramagnetic resonance enhancement are used in general to identify the transmembrane segments of a membrane protein. Here, we employed a quantitative characterization of intermolecular NOEs between (1)H of the detergent and (1)H(N) of (2)H-perdeuterated, (15)N-labeled α-helical membrane protein-detergent complexes following the exact NOE (eNOE) approach. Structural considerations suggest that these intermolecular NOEs should show a helical-wheel-type behavior along a transmembrane helix or a membrane-attached helix within a membrane protein as experimentally demonstrated for the complete influenza hemagglutinin fusion domain HAfp23. The partial absence of such a NOE pattern along the amino acid sequence as shown for a truncated variant of HAfp23 and for the Escherichia coli inner membrane protein YidH indicates the presence of large tertiary structure fluctuations such as an opening between helices or the presence of large rotational dynamics of the helices. Detergent-protein NOEs thus appear to be a straightforward probe for a qualitative characterization of structural and dynamical properties of membrane proteins embedded in detergent micelles.

  4. Metals on the move: zinc ions in cellular regulation and in the coordination dynamics of zinc proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maret, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    Homeostatic control maintains essential transition metal ions at characteristic cellular concentrations to support their physiological functions and to avoid adverse effects. Zinc is especially widely used as a catalytic or structural cofactor in about 3000 human zinc proteins. In addition, the homeostatic control of zinc in eukaryotic cells permits functions of zinc(II) ions in regulation and in paracrine and intracrine signaling. Zinc ions are released from proteins through ligand-centered reactions in zinc/thiolate coordination environments, and from stores in cellular organelles, where zinc transporters participate in zinc loading and release. Muffling reactions allow zinc ions to serve as signaling ions (second messengers) in the cytosol that is buffered to picomolar zinc ion concentrations at steady-state. Muffling includes zinc ion binding to metallothioneins, cellular translocations of metallothioneins, delivery of zinc ions to transporter proteins, and zinc ion fluxes through cellular membranes with the result of removing the additional zinc ions from the cytosol and restoring the steady-state. Targets of regulatory zinc ions are proteins with sites for transient zinc binding, such as membrane receptors, enzymes, protein-protein interactions, and sensor proteins that control gene expression. The generation, transmission, targets, and termination of zinc ion signals involve proteins that use coordination dynamics in the inner and outer ligand spheres to control metal ion association and dissociation. These new findings establish critically important functions of zinc ions and zinc metalloproteins in cellular control.

  5. Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) for measuring fast protein dynamics and concentrations with a commercial laser scanning confocal microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C M; Dalal, R B; Hebert, B; Digman, M A; Horwitz, A R; Gratton, E

    2008-01-01

    Raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) is a new and novel technique for measuring molecular dynamics and concentrations from fluorescence confocal images. The RICS technique extracts information about molecular dynamics and concentrations from images of living cells taken on commercial confocal systems. Here we develop guidelines for performing the RICS analysis on an analogue commercial laser scanning confocal microscope. Guidelines for typical instrument settings, image acquisition settings and analogue detector characterization are presented. Using appropriate instrument/acquisition parameters, diffusion coefficients and concentrations can be determined, even for highly dynamic dye molecules in solution. Standard curves presented herein demonstrate the ability to detect protein concentrations as low as approximately 2 nM. Additionally, cellular measurements give accurate values for the diffusion of paxillin-enhanced-green fluorescent protein (EGFP), an adhesion adaptor molecule, in the cytosol of the cell and also show slower paxillin dynamics near adhesions where paxillin interacts with immobile adhesion components. Methods are presented to account for bright immobile structures within the cell that dominate spatial correlation functions; allowing the extraction of fast protein dynamics within and near these structures. A running average algorithm is also presented to address slow cellular movement or movement of cellular features such as adhesions. Finally, methods to determine protein concentration in the presence of immobile structures within the cell are presented. A table is presented giving guidelines for instrument and imaging setting when performing RICS on the Olympus FV300 confocal and these guidelines are a starting point for performing the analysis on other commercial confocal systems.

  6. Topological and functional properties of the small GTPases protein interaction network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Delprato

    Full Text Available Small GTP binding proteins of the Ras superfamily (Ras, Rho, Rab, Arf, and Ran regulate key cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell proliferation, cell motility, and vesicle transport. A great deal of experimental evidence supports the existence of signaling cascades and feedback loops within and among the small GTPase subfamilies suggesting that these proteins function in a coordinated and cooperative manner. The interplay occurs largely through association with bi-partite regulatory and effector proteins but can also occur through the active form of the small GTPases themselves. In order to understand the connectivity of the small GTPases signaling routes, a systems-level approach that analyzes data describing direct and indirect interactions was used to construct the small GTPases protein interaction network. The data were curated from the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes (STRING database and include only experimentally validated interactions. The network method enables the conceptualization of the overall structure as well as the underlying organization of the protein-protein interactions. The interaction network described here is comprised of 778 nodes and 1943 edges and has a scale-free topology. Rac1, Cdc42, RhoA, and HRas are identified as the hubs. Ten sub-network motifs are also identified in this study with themes in apoptosis, cell growth/proliferation, vesicle traffic, cell adhesion/junction dynamics, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH oxidase response, transcription regulation, receptor-mediated endocytosis, gene silencing, and growth factor signaling. Bottleneck proteins that bridge signaling paths and proteins that overlap in multiple small GTPase networks are described along with the functional annotation of all proteins in the network.

  7. Prebiotic Alternatives to Proteins: Structure and Function of Hyperbranched Polyesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamajanov, Irena; Callahan, Michael P.; Dworkin, Jason P.; Cody, George D.

    2015-06-01

    Proteins are responsible multiple biological functions, such as ligand binding, catalysis, and ion channeling. This functionality is enabled by proteins' three-dimensional structures that require long polypeptides. Since plausibly prebiotic synthesis of functional polypeptides has proven challenging in the laboratory, we propose that these functions may have been initially performed by alternative macromolecular constructs, namely hyperbranched polymers (HBPs), during early stages of chemical evolution. HBPs can be straightforwardly synthesized in one-pot processes, possess globular structures determined by their architecture as opposed to folding in proteins, and have documented ligand binding and catalytic properties. Our initial study focuses on glycerol-citric acid HBPs synthesized via moderate heating in the dry state. The polymerization products consisted of a mixture of isomeric structures of varying molar mass as evidenced by NMR, mass spectrometry and size-exclusion chromatography. Addition of divalent cations during polymerization resulted in increased incorporation of citric acid into the HBPs and the possible formation of cation-oligomer complexes. The chelating properties of citric acid govern the makeup of the resulting polymer, turning the polymerization system into a rudimentary smart material.

  8. The formation, function and fate of protein storage compartments in seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibl, Verena; Stoger, Eva

    2012-04-01

    Seed storage proteins (SSPs) have been studied for more than 250 years because of their nutritional value and their impact on the use of grain in food processing. More recently, the use of seeds for the production of recombinant proteins has rekindled interest in the behavior of SSPs and the question how they are able to accumulate as stable storage reserves. Seed cells produce vast amounts of SSPs with different subcellular destinations creating an enormous logistic challenge for the endomembrane system. Seed cells contain several different storage organelles including the complex and dynamic protein storage vacuoles (PSVs) and other protein bodies (PBs) derived from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Storage proteins destined for the PSV may pass through or bypass the Golgi, using different vesicles that follow different routes through the cell. In addition, trafficking may depend on the plant species, tissue and developmental stage, showing that the endomembrane system is capable of massive reorganization. Some SSPs contain sorting signals or interact with membranes or with other proteins en route in order to reach their destination. The ability of SSPs to form aggregates is particularly important in the formation or ER-derived PBs, a mechanism that occurs naturally in response to overloading with proteins that cannot be transported and that can be used to induce artificial storage bodies in vegetative tissues. In this review, we summarize recent findings that provide insight into the formation, function, and fate of storage organelles and describe tools that can be used to study them.

  9. Hubs with network motifs organize modularity dynamically in the protein-protein interaction network of yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Guangxu; Zhang, Shihua; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Chen, Luonan

    2007-11-21

    It has been recognized that modular organization pervades biological complexity. Based on network analysis, 'party hubs' and 'date hubs' were proposed to understand the basic principle of module organization of biomolecular networks. However, recent study on hubs has suggested that there is no clear evidence for coexistence of 'party hubs' and 'date hubs'. Thus, an open question has been raised as to whether or not 'party hubs' and 'date hubs' truly exist in yeast interactome. In contrast to previous studies focusing on the partners of a hub or the individual proteins around the hub, our work aims to study the network motifs of a hub or interactions among individual proteins including the hub and its neighbors. Depending on the relationship between a hub's network motifs and protein complexes, we define two new types of hubs, 'motif party hubs' and 'motif date hubs', which have the same characteristics as the original 'party hubs' and 'date hubs' respectively. The network motifs of these two types of hubs display significantly different features in spatial distribution (or cellular localizations), co-expression in microarray data, controlling topological structure of network, and organizing modularity. By virtue of network motifs, we basically solved the open question about 'party hubs' and 'date hubs' which was raised by previous studies. Specifically, at the level of network motifs instead of individual proteins, we found two types of hubs, motif party hubs (mPHs) and motif date hubs (mDHs), whose network motifs display distinct characteristics on biological functions. In addition, in this paper we studied network motifs from a different viewpoint. That is, we show that a network motif should not be merely considered as an interaction pattern but be considered as an essential function unit in organizing modules of networks.

  10. An efficient multi-scale Green's function reaction dynamics scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbailò, Luigi; Noé, Frank

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics-Green's Function Reaction Dynamics (MD-GFRD) is a multiscale simulation method for particle dynamics or particle-based reaction-diffusion dynamics that is suited for systems involving low particle densities. Particles in a low-density region are just diffusing and not interacting. In this case, one can avoid the costly integration of microscopic equations of motion, such as molecular dynamics (MD), and instead turn to an event-based scheme in which the times to the next particle interaction and the new particle positions at that time can be sampled. At high (local) concentrations, however, e.g., when particles are interacting in a nontrivial way, particle positions must still be updated with small time steps of the microscopic dynamical equations. The efficiency of a multi-scale simulation that uses these two schemes largely depends on the coupling between them and the decisions when to switch between the two scales. Here we present an efficient scheme for multi-scale MD-GFRD simulations. It has been shown that MD-GFRD schemes are more efficient than brute-force molecular dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 102 μM. In this paper, we show that the choice of the propagation domains has a relevant impact on the computational performance. Domains are constructed using a local optimization of their sizes and a minimal domain size is proposed. The algorithm is shown to be more efficient than brute-force Brownian dynamics simulations up to a molar concentration of 103 μM and is up to an order of magnitude more efficient compared with previous MD-GFRD schemes.

  11. Prediction of functional sites in proteins using conserved functional group analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innis, C Axel; Anand, A Prem; Sowdhamini, R

    2004-04-02

    A detailed knowledge of a protein's functional site is an absolute prerequisite for understanding its mode of action at the molecular level. However, the rapid pace at which sequence and structural information is being accumulated for proteins greatly exceeds our ability to determine their biochemical roles experimentally. As a result, computational methods are required which allow for the efficient processing of the evolutionary information contained in this wealth of data, in particular that related to the nature and location of functionally important sites and residues. The method presented here, referred to as conserved functional group (CFG) analysis, relies on a simplified representation of the chemical groups found in amino acid side-chains to identify functional sites from a single protein structure and a number of its sequence homologues. We show that CFG analysis can fully or partially predict the location of functional sites in approximately 96% of the 470 cases tested and that, unlike other methods available, it is able to tolerate wide variations in sequence identity. In addition, we discuss its potential in a structural genomics context, where automation, scalability and efficiency are critical, and an increasing number of protein structures are determined with no prior knowledge of function. This is exemplified by our analysis of the hypothetical protein Ydde_Ecoli, whose structure was recently solved by members of the North East Structural Genomics consortium. Although the proposed active site for this protein needs to be validated experimentally, this example illustrates the scope of CFG analysis as a general tool for the identification of residues likely to play an important role in a protein's biochemical function. Thus, our method offers a convenient solution to rapidly and automatically process the vast amounts of data that are beginning to emerge from structural genomics projects.

  12. Effect of drying methods on the structure, thermo and functional properties of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum graecum) protein isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyzi, Samira; Varidi, Mehdi; Zare, Fatemeh; Varidi, Mohammad Javad

    2018-03-01

    Different drying methods due to protein denaturation could alter the functional properties of proteins, as well as their structure. So, this study focused on the effect of different drying methods on amino acid content, thermo and functional properties, and protein structure of fenugreek protein isolate. Freeze and spray drying methods resulted in comparable protein solubility, dynamic surface and interfacial tensions, foaming and emulsifying properties except for emulsion stability. Vacuum oven drying promoted emulsion stability, surface hydrophobicity and viscosity of fenugreek protein isolate at the expanse of its protein solubility. Vacuum oven process caused a higher level of Maillard reaction followed by the spray drying process, which was confirmed by the lower amount of lysine content and less lightness, also more browning intensity. ΔH of fenugreek protein isolates was higher than soy protein isolate, which confirmed the presence of more ordered structures. Also, the bands which are attributed to the α-helix structures in the FTIR spectrum were in the shorter wave number region for freeze and spray dried fenugreek protein isolates that show more possibility of such structures. This research suggests that any drying method must be conducted in its gentle state in order to sustain native structure of proteins and promote their functionalities. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Structure-based inference of molecular functions of proteins of unknown function from Berkeley Structural Genomics Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong Hae; Hou, Jingtong; Chandonia, John-Marc; Das, Debanu; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2007-09-02

    Advances in sequence genomics have resulted in an accumulation of a huge number of protein sequences derived from genome sequences. However, the functions of a large portion of them cannot be inferred based on the current methods of sequence homology detection to proteins of known functions. Three-dimensional structure can have an important impact in providing inference of molecular function (physical and chemical function) of a protein of unknown function. Structural genomics centers worldwide have been determining many 3-D structures of the proteins of unknown functions, and possible molecular functions of them have been inferred based on their structures. Combined with bioinformatics and enzymatic assay tools, the successful acceleration of the process of protein structure determination through high throughput pipelines enables the rapid functional annotation of a large fraction of hypothetical proteins. We present a brief summary of the process we used at the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center to infer molecular functions of proteins of unknown function.

  14. Exploring the molecular origins of protein dynamics in the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; Bandaria, Jigar N; Fox, Michelle; Vanderah, Elizabeth; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M

    2009-08-20

    We present three-pulse vibrational echo measurements of azide ion bound to the active site Zn of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) and of two separate active-site mutants Thr199 --> Ala (T199A) and Leu198 --> Phe (L198F). Because structural motions of the protein active site influence the frequency of bound ligands, the differences in the time scales of the frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs) obtained from global fits to each set of data allow us to make inferences about the time scales of the active site dynamics of HCA II. Surprisingly, the deletion of a potential electrostatic interaction in results in very little change in the FFCF, but the insertion of the bulky phenylalanine ring in causes much faster dynamics. We conclude that the fast, sub-picosecond time scale in the correlation function is attributable to hydrogen bond dynamics, and the slow, apparently static contribution is due to the conformational flexibility of Zn-bound azide in the active site.

  15. Two-step relaxation mode analysis with multiple evolution times applied to all-atom molecular dynamics protein simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, N.; Mitsutake, A.; Takano, H.

    2017-12-01

    Proteins implement their functionalities when folded into specific three-dimensional structures, and their functions are related to the protein structures and dynamics. Previously, we applied a relaxation mode analysis (RMA) method to protein systems; this method approximately estimates the slow relaxation modes and times via simulation and enables investigation of the dynamic properties underlying the protein structural fluctuations. Recently, two-step RMA with multiple evolution times has been proposed and applied to a slightly complex homopolymer system, i.e., a single [n ] polycatenane. This method can be applied to more complex heteropolymer systems, i.e., protein systems, to estimate the relaxation modes and times more accurately. In two-step RMA, we first perform RMA and obtain rough estimates of the relaxation modes and times. Then, we apply RMA with multiple evolution times to a small number of the slowest relaxation modes obtained in the previous calculation. Herein, we apply this method to the results of principal component analysis (PCA). First, PCA is applied to a 2-μ s molecular dynamics simulation of hen egg-white lysozyme in aqueous solution. Then, the two-step RMA method with multiple evolution times is applied to the obtained principal components. The slow relaxation modes and corresponding relaxation times for the principal components are much improved by the second RMA.

  16. Crossing the entropy barrier of dynamical zeta functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurich, R.; Bolte, J.; Matthies, C.; Sieber, M.; Steiner, F. (Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik)

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical zeta functions are an important tool to quantize chaotic dynamical systems. The basic quantization rules require the computation of the zeta functions on the real energy axis, where the Euler product representations running over the classical periodic orbits usually do not converge due to the existence of the so-called entropy barrier determined by the topological entropy of the classical system. We shown that the convergence properties of the dynamical zeta functions rewritten as Dirichlet series are governed not only by the well-known topological and metric entropy, but depend crucially on subtle statistical properties of the Maslow indices and of the multiplicities of the periodic orbits that are measured by a new parameter for which we introduce the notion of a third entropy. If and only if the third entropy is nonvanishing, one can cross the entropy barrier; if it exceeds a certain value, one can even compute the zeta function in the physical region by means of a convergent Dirichlet series. A simple statistical model is presented which allows to compute the third entropy. Four examples of chaotic systems are studied in detail to test the model numerically. (orig.).

  17. Crossing the entropy barrier of dynamical zeta functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aurich, R.; Bolte, J.; Matthies, C.; Sieber, M.; Steiner, F.

    1992-01-01

    Dynamical zeta functions are an important tool to quantize chaotic dynamical systems. The basic quantization rules require the computation of the zeta functions on the real energy axis, where the Euler product representations running over the classical periodic orbits usually do not converge due to the existence of the so-called entropy barrier determined by the topological entropy of the classical system. We shown that the convergence properties of the dynamical zeta functions rewritten as Dirichlet series are governed not only by the well-known topological and metric entropy, but depend crucially on subtle statistical properties of the Maslow indices and of the multiplicities of the periodic orbits that are measured by a new parameter for which we introduce the notion of a third entropy. If and only if the third entropy is nonvanishing, one can cross the entropy barrier; if it exceeds a certain value, one can even compute the zeta function in the physical region by means of a convergent Dirichlet series. A simple statistical model is presented which allows to compute the third entropy. Four examples of chaotic systems are studied in detail to test the model numerically. (orig.)

  18. Functional and technological properties of camel milk proteins: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hailu, Yonas; Hansen, Egon Bech; Seifu, Eyassu

    2016-01-01

    This review summarises current knowledge on camel milk proteins, with focus on significant peculiarities in protein composition and molecular properties. Camel milk is traditionally consumed as a fresh or naturally fermented product. Within the last couple of years, an increasing quantity is being...... in relation to dairy processing. In addition to the technological properties, there are also implications for human nutrition and camel milk proteins are of interest for applications in infant foods, for food preservation and in functional foods. Proposed health benefits include inhibition of the angiotensin...... converting enzyme, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties as well as an antidiabetogenic effect. Detailed investigations on foaming, gelation and solubility as well as technological consequences of processing should be investigated further for the improvement of camel milk utilisation in the near future....

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response: Dynamics and Metabolic Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Roberto; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Wang, Zhao V.; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A.; Jaimovich, Enrique; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic intracellular organelle with multiple functions essential for cellular homeostasis, development, and stress responsiveness. In response to cellular stress, a well-established signaling cascade, the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated. This intricate mechanism is an important means of reestablishing cellular homeostasis and alleviating the inciting stress. Now, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the UPR influences cellular metabolism through diverse mechanisms, including calcium and lipid transfer, raising the prospect of involvement of these processes in the pathogenesis of disease, including neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the distinct functions of the ER and UPR from a metabolic point of view, highlighting their association with prevalent pathologies. PMID:23317820

  20. Trends in genome dynamics among major orders of insects revealed through variations in protein families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappoport, Nadav; Linial, Michal

    2015-08-07

    Insects belong to a class that accounts for the majority of animals on earth. With over one million identified species, insects display a huge diversity and occupy extreme environments. At present, there are dozens of fully sequenced insect genomes that cover a range of habitats, social behavior and morphologies. In view of such diverse collection of genomes, revealing evolutionary trends and charting functional relationships of proteins remain challenging. We analyzed the relatedness of 17 complete proteomes representative of proteomes from insects including louse, bee, beetle, ants, flies and mosquitoes, as well as an out-group from the crustaceans. The analyzed proteomes mostly represented the orders of Hymenoptera and Diptera. The 287,405 protein sequences from the 18 proteomes were automatically clustered into 20,933 families, including 799 singletons. A comprehensive analysis based on statistical considerations identified the families that were significantly expanded or reduced in any of the studied organisms. Among all the tested species, ants are characterized by an exceptionally high rate of family gain and loss. By assigning annotations to hundreds of species-specific families, the functional diversity among species and between the major clades (Diptera and Hymenoptera) is revealed. We found that many species-specific families are associated with receptor signaling, stress-related functions and proteases. The highest variability among insects associates with the function of transposition and nucleic acids processes (collectively coined TNAP). Specifically, the wasp and ants have an order of magnitude more TNAP families and proteins relative to species that belong to Diptera (mosquitoes and flies). An unsupervised clustering methodology combined with a comparative functional analysis unveiled proteomic signatures in the major clades of winged insects. We propose that the expansion of TNAP families in Hymenoptera potentially contributes to the accelerated

  1. Dynamic density functional theory of solid tumor growth: Preliminary models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Chauviere

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a disease that can be seen as a complex system whose dynamics and growth result from nonlinear processes coupled across wide ranges of spatio-temporal scales. The current mathematical modeling literature addresses issues at various scales but the development of theoretical methodologies capable of bridging gaps across scales needs further study. We present a new theoretical framework based on Dynamic Density Functional Theory (DDFT extended, for the first time, to the dynamics of living tissues by accounting for cell density correlations, different cell types, phenotypes and cell birth/death processes, in order to provide a biophysically consistent description of processes across the scales. We present an application of this approach to tumor growth.

  2. Production of Lupinus angustifolius protein hydrolysates with improved functional properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Millán, Francisco

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Protein hydrolysates wer e obtained from lupin flour and from the purified globulin α -conglutin, and their functional properties were studied. Hydrolysis with alcalase for 60 minutes yielded degrees of hydrolysis ranging from 4 % to 11 % for lupin flour, and from 4 % to 13% for α -conglutin. Protein solubility, oil absorption, foam capacity and stability, emulsifying activity, and emulsion stability of hydrolysates with 6% degree of hydrolysis were determined and compared with the properties of the original flour. The protein hydrolysates showed better functional properties than the original proteins. Most importantly, the solubility of the α -conglutin and L. angustifolius flour hydrolysates was increased by 43 % and 52 %, respectively. Thus, lupin seed protein hydrolysates have improved functional properties and could be used in the elaboration of a variety of products such as breads, cakes, and salad dressings.Se obtuvieron hidrolizados proteicos de la harina del altramuz y de la globulina α - conglutina purificada y se estudiaron sus propiedades funcionales. La hidrólisis con alcalasa durante 60 minutos produjo hidrolizados con grados de hidrólisis entre el 4 % y el 11 % para la harina y entre el 4 % y el 13 % para la α - conglutina. Se estudió en un hidrolizado con un 6 % de grado de hidrólisis la solubilidad proteica, absorción de aceite, capacidad y estabilidad espumante y actividad y estabilidad emulsificante. Los hidrolizados proteicos mostraron mejores propiedades funcionales que las proteínas originales. Más aún, la solubilidad de los hidrolizados de α - conglutina y la harina se incrementó en un 43 % y 52 % respectivamente. Así pues, hidrolizados de proteínas de semilla de lupino presentan mejores propiedades funcionales y podrían usarse en la elaboración de productos como pan, dulces, salsas o cremas.

  3. Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Protein dynamics revealed by 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cushman Mark

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Riboflavin synthase catalyzes the transformation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine into riboflavin in the last step of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway. Gram-negative bacteria and certain yeasts are unable to incorporate riboflavin from the environment and are therefore absolutely dependent on endogenous synthesis of the vitamin. Riboflavin synthase is therefore a potential target for the development of antiinfective drugs. Results A cDNA sequence from Schizosaccharomyces pombe comprising a hypothetical open reading frame with similarity to riboflavin synthase of Escherichia coli was expressed in a recombinant E. coli strain. The recombinant protein is a homotrimer of 23 kDa subunits as shown by sedimentation equilibrium centrifugation. The protein sediments at an apparent velocity of 4.1 S at 20°C. The amino acid sequence is characterized by internal sequence similarity indicating two similar folding domains per subunit. The enzyme catalyzes the formation of riboflavin from 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine at a rate of 158 nmol mg-1 min-1 with an apparent KM of 5.7 microM. 19F NMR protein perturbation experiments using fluorine-substituted intermediate analogs show multiple signals indicating that a given ligand can be bound in at least 4 different states. 19F NMR signals of enzyme-bound intermediate analogs were assigned to ligands bound by the N-terminal respectively C-terminal folding domain on basis of NMR studies with mutant proteins. Conclusion Riboflavin synthase of Schizosaccharomyces pombe is a trimer of identical 23-kDa subunits. The primary structure is characterized by considerable similarity of the C-terminal and N-terminal parts. Riboflavin synthase catalyzes a mechanistically complex dismutation of 6,7-dimethyl-8-ribityllumazine affording riboflavin and 5-amino-6-ribitylamino-2,4(1H,3H-pyrimidinedione. The 19F NMR data suggest large scale dynamic mobility in the trimeric protein which may play an important

  4. Copper and the Prion Protein: Methods, Structures, Function, and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millhauser, Glenn L.

    2007-05-01

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) arise from conversion of the membrane-bound prion protein from PrPC to PrPSc. Examples of the TSEs include mad cow disease, chronic wasting disease in deer and elk, scrapie in goats and sheep, and kuru and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Although the precise function of PrPC in healthy tissues is not known, recent research demonstrates that it binds Cu(II) in an unusual and highly conserved region of the protein termed the octarepeat domain. This review describes recent connections between copper and PrPC, with an emphasis on the electron paramagnetic resonance elucidation of the specific copper-binding sites, insights into PrPC function, and emerging connections between copper and prion disease.

  5. Production of functional proteins: balance of shear stress and gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas John (Inventor); Hammond, Timothy Grant (Inventor); Kaysen, James Howard (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method for the production of functional proteins including hormones by renal cells in a three dimensional culturing process responsive to shear stress uses a rotating wall vessel. Natural mixture of renal cells expresses the enzyme 1-.alpha.-hydroxylase which can be used to generate the active form of vitamin D: 1,25-diOH vitamin D.sub.3. The fibroblast cultures and co-culture of renal cortical cells express the gene for erythropoietin and secrete erythropoietin into the culture supernatant. Other shear stress response genes are also modulated by shear stress, such as toxin receptors megalin and cubulin (gp280). Also provided is a method of treating an in-need individual with the functional proteins produced in a three dimensional co-culture process responsive to shear stress using a rotating wall vessel.

  6. Intracellular transport proteins: classification, structure and function of kinesins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Chudy

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Correct cell functioning, division and morphogenesis rely on efficient intracellular transport. Apart from dyneins and myosins, kinesins are the main proteins responsible for intracellular movement. Kinesins are a large, diverse group of motor proteins, which based on phylogenetic similarity were classified into fourteen families. Among these families, due to the location of their motor domains, three groups have been characterized: N-, C- and M-kinesin. As molecular motors, kinesins transport various molecules and vesicles mainly towards the microtubule plus end (from the cell body participating in anterograde transport, although there are also kinesins involved in retrograde transport (C-kinesins. Kinesins are also involved in spindle formation, chromosome segregation, and spermatogenesis. Because of their great importance for the correct functioning of cells, mutations in kinesin coding genes may lead to such neurodegenerative diseases as dominant hereditary spastic paraplegia or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease.

  7. Functional and technological properties of camel milk proteins: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hailu, Yonas; Hansen, Egon Bech; Seifu, Eyassu; Eshetu, Mitiku; Ipsen, Richard; Kappeler, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    This review summarises current knowledge on camel milk proteins, with focus on significant peculiarities in protein composition and molecular properties. Camel milk is traditionally consumed as a fresh or naturally fermented product. Within the last couple of years, an increasing quantity is being processed in dairy plants, and a number of consumer products have been marketed. A better understanding of the technological and functional properties, as required for product improvement, has been gained in the past years. Absence of the whey protein β-LG and a low proportion of к-casein cause differences in relation to dairy processing. In addition to the technological properties, there are also implications for human nutrition and camel milk proteins are of interest for applications in infant foods, for food preservation and in functional foods. Proposed health benefits include inhibition of the angiotensin converting enzyme, antimicrobial and antioxidant properties as well as an antidiabetogenic effect. Detailed investigations on foaming, gelation and solubility as well as technological consequences of processing should be investigated further for the improvement of camel milk utilisation in the near future.

  8. High protein adsorptive capacity of amino acid-functionalized hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wing-Hin; Loo, Ching-Yee; Zavgorodniy, Alexander V; Rohanizadeh, Ramin

    2013-03-01

    Charged functional groups present on the surface of biomaterials play an important role to regulate the affinity and attachment of macromolecules, including proteins, on the surface of biomaterials. In this study, the protein adsorptive capacity of hydroxyapatite (HA) was regulated by introducing different amino acids during the precipitation of HA. After incubation of HA samples in 5000 μg/mL lysozyme solution at pH 7.4 for 24 h, unmodified HA adsorbed 0.886 mg/m(2) of lysozyme while amino acid-functionalized HA (AA-HA) particles demonstrated higher adsorption capacity ranging from 1.090 to 1.680 mg/m(2). Incorporation of amino acids with longer side chain lengths decreased the crystallinity and increased the negative value of the surface charge of HA particles. The specific surface areas were significantly increased in the presence of amino acids. Protein loading capacity onto AA-HA was further enhanced by regulating the pH of working solution whereby the protein adsorption rate increased with decreasing the pH, while reverse trend obtained in unmodified HA. The study demonstrated that the amount of adsorbed lysozyme onto AA-HA particles was correlated with the particles' surface charges. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Functional properties of tropical banded cricket (Gryllodes sigillatus) protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Felicia G; Jones, Owen G; O'Haire, Marguerite E; Liceaga, Andrea M

    2017-06-01

    Recently, the benefits of entomophagy have been widely discussed. Due to western cultures' reluctance, entomophagy practices are leaning more towards incorporating insects into food products. In this study, whole crickets (Gryllodes sigillatus) were hydrolyzed with alcalase at 0.5, 1.5, and 3.0% (w/w) for 30, 60, and 90min. Degree of hydrolysis (DH), amino acid composition, solubility, emulsion and foaming properties were evaluated. Hydrolysis produced peptides with 26-52% DH compared to the control containing no enzyme (5% DH). Protein solubility of hydrolysates improved (p30% soluble protein at pH 3 and 7 and 50-90% at alkaline pH, compared with the control. Emulsion activity index ranged from 7 to 32m 2 /g, while foamability ranged from 100 to 155% for all hydrolysates. These improved functional properties demonstrate the potential to develop cricket protein hydrolysates as a source of functional alternative protein in food ingredient formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Network approaches to the functional analysis of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallinan, J S; James, K; Wipat, A

    2011-01-01

    Large amounts of detailed biological data have been generated over the past few decades. Much of these data is freely available in over 1000 online databases; an enticing, but frustrating resource for microbiologists interested in a systems-level view of the structure and function of microbial cells. The frustration engendered by the need to trawl manually through hundreds of databases in order to accumulate information about a gene, protein, pathway, or organism of interest can be alleviated by the use of computational data integration to generated network views of the system of interest. Biological networks can be constructed from a single type of data, such as protein-protein binding information, or from data generated by multiple experimental approaches. In an integrated network, nodes usually represent genes or gene products, while edges represent some form of interaction between the nodes. Edges between nodes may be weighted to represent the probability that the edge exists in vivo. Networks may also be enriched with ontological annotations, facilitating both visual browsing and computational analysis via web service interfaces. In this review, we describe the construction, analysis of both single-data source and integrated networks, and their application to the inference of protein function in microbes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics in environmental samples for microbially mediated biogeochemical processes: Targeted quantification of functional enzyme dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Minjing [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Qian, Wei-Jun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Shi, Liang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Yuanyuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nelson, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Resch, Charles T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Thompson, Christopher [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Yan, Sen [School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074 People' s Republic of China; Fredrickson, James K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Zachara, John M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; Liu, Chongxuan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Southern University of Science and Technology, Shenzhen 518055 People' s Republic of China

    2017-07-13

    Microbially mediated biogeochemical processes are catalyzed by enzymes that control the transformation of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements in environment. The dynamic linkage between enzymes and biogeochemical species transformation has, however, rarely been investigated because of the lack of analytical approaches to efficiently and reliably quantify enzymes and their dynamics in soils and sediments. Herein, we developed a signature peptide-based technique for sensitively quantifying dissimilatory and assimilatory enzymes using nitrate-reducing enzymes in a hyporheic zone sediment as an example. Moreover, the measured changes in enzyme concentration were found to correlate with the nitrate reduction rate in a way different from that inferred from biogeochemical models based on biomass or functional genes as surrogates for functional enzymes. This phenomenon has important implications for understanding and modeling the dynamics of microbial community functions and biogeochemical processes in environments. Our results also demonstrate the importance of enzyme quantification for the identification and interrogation of those biogeochemical processes with low metabolite concentrations as a result of faster enzyme-catalyzed consumption of metabolites than their production. The dynamic enzyme behaviors provide a basis for the development of enzyme-based models to describe the relationship between the microbial community and biogeochemical processes.

  12. The functional significance of the autolysis loop in protein C and activated protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Likui; Manithody, Chandrashekhara; Rezaie, Alireza R

    2005-07-01

    The autolysis loop of activated protein C (APC) is five residues longer than the autolysis loop of other vitamin K-dependent coagulation proteases. To investigate the role of this loop in the zymogenic and anticoagulant properties of the molecule, a protein C mutant was constructed in which the autolysis loop of the protein was replaced with the corresponding loop of factor X. The protein C mutant was activated by thrombin with approximately 5-fold higher rate in the presence of Ca2+. Both kinetics and direct binding studies revealed that the Ca2+ affinity of the mutant has been impaired approximately 3-fold. The result of a factor Va degradation assay revealed that the anticoagulant function of the mutant has been improved 4-5-fold in the absence but not in the presence of protein S. The improvement was due to a better recognition of both the P1-Arg506 and P1-Arg306 cleavage sites by the mutant protease. However, the plasma half-life of the mutant was markedly shortened due to faster inactivation by plasma serpins. These results suggest that the autolysis loop of protein C is critical for the Ca(2+)-dependence of activation by thrombin. Moreover, a longer autolysis loop in APC is not optimal for interaction with factor Va in the absence of protein S, but it contributes to the lack of serpin reactivity and longer half-life of the protease in plasma.

  13. Functional Modification of Thioether Groups in Peptides, Polypeptides, and Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deming, Timothy J

    2017-03-15

    Recent developments in the modification of methionine and other thioether-containing residues in peptides, polypeptides, and proteins are reviewed. Properties and potential applications of the resulting functionalized products are also discussed. While much of this work is focused on natural Met residues, modifications at other side-chain residues have also emerged as new thioether-containing amino acids have been incorporated into peptidic materials. Functional modification of thioether-containing amino acids has many advantages and is a complementary methodology to the widely utilized methods for modification at cysteine residues.

  14. Methods of reconstitution to investigate membrane protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypek, Ruth; Iqbal, Shagufta; Callaghan, Richard

    2018-02-16

    Membrane proteins are notoriously difficult to investigate in isolation. The focus of this chapter is the key step following extraction and purification of membrane proteins; namely reconstitution. The process of reconstitution re-inserts proteins into a lipid bilayer that partly resembles their native environment. This native environment is vital to the stability of membrane proteins, ensuring that they undergo vital conformational transitions and maintain optimal interaction with their substrates. Reconstitution may take many forms and these have been classified into two broad categories. Symmetric systems enable unfettered access to both sides of a bilayer. Compartment containing systems contain a lumen and are ideally suited to measurement of transport processes. The investigator is encouraged to ascertain what aspects of protein function will be undertaken and to apply the most advantageous reconstitution system or systems. It is important to note that the process of reconstitution is not subject to defined protocols and requires empirical optimisation to specific targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Organizers and activators: Cytosolic Nox proteins impacting on vascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Katrin; Weissmann, Norbert; Brandes, Ralf P

    2017-08-01

    NADPH oxidases of the Nox family are important enzymatic sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cardiovascular system. Of the 7 members of the Nox family, at least three depend for their activation on specific cytosolic proteins. These are p47phox and its homologue NoxO1 and p67phox and its homologue NoxA1. Also the Rho-GTPase Rac is important but as this protein has many additional functions, it will not be covered here. The Nox1 enzyme is preferentially activated by the combination of NoxO1 with NoxA1, whereas Nox2 gains highest activity with p47phox together with p67phox. As p47phox, different to NoxO1 contains an auto inhibitory region it has to be phosphorylated prior to complex formation. In the cardio-vascular system, all cytosolic Nox proteins are expressed but the evidence for their contribution to ROS production is not well established. Most data have been collected for p47phox, whereas NoxA1 has basically not yet been studied. In this article the specific aspects of cytosolic Nox proteins in the cardiovascular system with respect to Nox activation, their expression and their importance will be reviewed. Finally, it will be discussed whether cytosolic Nox proteins are suitable pharmacological targets to tamper with vascular ROS production. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Methanococcus maripaludis: an archaeon with multiple functional MCM proteins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Alison D; Chong, James P J

    2009-02-01

    There are a large number of proteins involved in the control of eukaryotic DNA replication, which act together to ensure DNA is replicated only once every cell cycle. Key proteins involved in the initiation and elongation phases of DNA replication include the MCM (minchromosome maintenance) proteins, MCM2-MCM7, a family of six related proteins believed to act as the replicative helicase. Genome sequencing has revealed that the archaea possess a simplified set of eukaryotic replication homologues. The complexity of the DNA replication machinery in eukaryotes has led to a number of archaeal species being adapted as model organisms for the study of the DNA replication process. Most archaea sequenced to date possess a single MCM homologue that forms a hexameric complex. Recombinant MCMs from several archaea have been used in the biochemical characterization of the protein, revealing that the MCM complex has ATPase, DNA-binding and -unwinding activities. Unusually, the genome of the methanogenic archaeon Methanococcus maripaludis contains four MCM homologues, all of which contain the conserved motifs required for function. The availability of a wide range of genetic tools for the manipulation of M. maripaludis and the relative ease of growth of this organism in the laboratory makes it a good potential model for studying the role of multiple MCMs in DNA replication.

  17. Minor snake venom proteins: Structure, function and potential applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldrini-França, Johara; Cologna, Camila Takeno; Pucca, Manuela Berto; Bordon, Karla de Castro Figueiredo; Amorim, Fernanda Gobbi; Anjolette, Fernando Antonio Pino; Cordeiro, Francielle Almeida; Wiezel, Gisele Adriano; Cerni, Felipe Augusto; Pinheiro-Junior, Ernesto Lopes; Shibao, Priscila Yumi Tanaka; Ferreira, Isabela Gobbo; de Oliveira, Isadora Sousa; Cardoso, Iara Aimê; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2017-04-01

    Snake venoms present a great diversity of pharmacologically active compounds that may be applied as research and biotechnological tools, as well as in drug development and diagnostic tests for certain diseases. The most abundant toxins have been extensively studied in the last decades and some of them have already been used for different purposes. Nevertheless, most of the minor snake venom protein classes remain poorly explored, even presenting potential application in diverse areas. The main difficulty in studying these proteins lies on the impossibility of obtaining sufficient amounts of them for a comprehensive investigation. The advent of more sensitive techniques in the last few years allowed the discovery of new venom components and the in-depth study of some already known minor proteins. This review summarizes information regarding some structural and functional aspects of low abundant snake venom proteins classes, such as growth factors, hyaluronidases, cysteine-rich secretory proteins, nucleases and nucleotidases, cobra venom factors, vespryns, protease inhibitors, antimicrobial peptides, among others. Some potential applications of these molecules are discussed herein in order to encourage researchers to explore the full venom repertoire and to discover new molecules or applications for the already known venom components. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Simultaneous characterization of protein-material and cell-protein interactions using dynamic QCM-D analysis on SAM surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushiro, Keiichiro; Lee, Chih-Hao; Takai, Madoka

    2016-05-24

    Understanding the interactions among materials, proteins and cells is critical for the development of novel biomaterials, and establishing a highly sensitive and quantitative method to standardize these interactions is desired. In this study, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) combined with microscopy was utilized to quantitatively monitor the entirety of the cell adhesion processes, starting from the protein adsorption, on various self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surfaces. Although the resulting cell adhesion morphologies were similar on most of the surfaces, the dynamic QCM-D signal patterns were unique on each surface, suggesting different forms of material-protein-cell interactions. The viscoelasticity and the density of the surface-adsorbed fibronectin (FN), as well as the relative exposure of the cell adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motifs, were correlated to the different cell adhesion dynamics and mechanics. Some surfaces exhibited complicated behaviors alluding to the detachment/rearrangement of surface proteins or highly sparse but bioactive proteins that promote a slow adhesion process. This study underscores the potential use of the QCM-D signal pattern as a rule of thumb for delineating different protein-material and cell-protein interactions, and offers a rapid in vitro platform for the dynamic evaluation of protein and cell behaviors on novel biomaterials.

  19. Developmentally distinct MYB genes encode functionally equivalent proteins in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M M; Schiefelbein, J

    2001-05-01

    The duplication and divergence of developmental control genes is thought to have driven morphological diversification during the evolution of multicellular organisms. To examine the molecular basis of this process, we analyzed the functional relationship between two paralogous MYB transcription factor genes, WEREWOLF (WER) and GLABROUS1 (GL1), in Arabidopsis. The WER and GL1 genes specify distinct cell types and exhibit non-overlapping expression patterns during Arabidopsis development. Nevertheless, reciprocal complementation experiments with a series of gene fusions showed that WER and GL1 encode functionally equivalent proteins, and their unique roles in plant development are entirely due to differences in their cis-regulatory sequences. Similar experiments with a distantly related MYB gene (MYB2) showed that its product cannot functionally substitute for WER or GL1. Furthermore, an analysis of the WER and GL1 proteins shows that conserved sequences correspond to specific functional domains. These results provide new insights into the evolution of the MYB gene family in Arabidopsis, and, more generally, they demonstrate that novel developmental gene function may arise solely by the modification of cis-regulatory sequences.

  20. Generation of a Functionally Distinct Rhizopus oryzae Lipase through Protein Folding Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Atsushi; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) has a propeptide at its N-terminus that functions as an intramolecular chaperone and facilitates the folding of mature ROL (mROL). In this study, we successfully generated a functionally distinct imprinted mROL (mROLimp) through protein folding memory using a mutated propeptide. The mutated propeptide left its structural memory on mROL and produced mROLimp that exhibited different substrate specificities compared with mROLWT (prepared from the wild type propeptide), although the amino acid sequences of both mROLs were the same. mROLimp showed a preference for substrates with medium chain-length acyl groups and, noticeably, recognized a peptidase-specific substrate. In addition, ROLimp was more stable than mROLWT. These results strongly suggest that proteins with identical amino acid sequences can fold into different conformations and that mutations in intramolecular chaperones can dynamically induce changes in enzymatic activity. PMID:25970342

  1. Reduced Abundance and Subverted Functions of Proteins in Prion-Like Diseases: Gained Functions Fascinate but Lost Functions Affect Aetiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen-Phuoc, Kim; Leighton, Patricia L. A.

    2017-01-01

    Prions have served as pathfinders that reveal many aspects of proteostasis in neurons. The recent realization that several prominent neurodegenerative diseases spread via a prion-like mechanism illuminates new possibilities for diagnostics and therapeutics. Thus, key proteins in Alzheimer Disease and Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including amyloid-β precursor protein, Tau and superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), spread to adjacent cells in their misfolded aggregated forms and exhibit template-directed misfolding to induce further misfolding, disruptions to proteostasis and toxicity. Here we invert this comparison to ask what these prion-like diseases can teach us about the broad prion disease class, especially regarding the loss of these key proteins’ function(s) as they misfold and aggregate. We also consider whether functional amyloids might reveal a role for subverted protein function in neurodegenerative disease. Our synthesis identifies SOD1 as an exemplar of protein functions being lost during prion-like protein misfolding, because SOD1 is inherently unstable and loses function in its misfolded disease-associated form. This has under-appreciated parallels amongst the canonical prion diseases, wherein the normally folded prion protein, PrPC, is reduced in abundance in fatal familial insomnia patients and during the preclinical phase in animal models, apparently via proteostatic mechanisms. Thus while template-directed misfolding and infectious properties represent gain-of-function that fascinates proteostasis researchers and defines (is required for) the prion(-like) diseases, loss and subversion of the functions attributed to hallmark proteins in neurodegenerative disease needs to be integrated into design towards effective therapeutics. We propose experiments to uniquely test these ideas. PMID:29064456

  2. Cross-talk between lipid and protein carbonylation in a dynamic cardiomyocyte model of mild nitroxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Griesser

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS play an important role in the regulation of cardiac function. Increase in ROS/RNS concentration results in lipid and protein oxidation and is often associated with onset and/or progression of many cardiovascular disorders. However, interplay between lipid and protein modifications has not been simultaneously studied in detail so far. Biomolecule carbonylation is one of the most common biomarkers of oxidative stress. Using a dynamic model of nitroxidative stress we demonstrated rapid changes in biomolecule carbonylation in rat cardiomyocytes. Levels of carbonylated species increased as early as 15 min upon treatment with the peroxynitrite donor, 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1, and decreased to values close to control after 16 h. Total (lipids+proteins vs. protein-specific carbonylation showed different dynamics, with a significant increase in protein-bound carbonyls at later time points. Treatment with SIN-1 in combination with inhibitors of proteasomal and autophagy/lysosomal degradation pathways allowed confirmation of a significant role of the proteasome in the degradation of carbonylated proteins, whereas lipid carbonylation increased in the presence of autophagy/lysosomal inhibitors. Electrophilic aldehydes and ketones formed by lipid peroxidation were identified and relatively quantified using LC-MS/MS. Molecular identity of reactive species was used for data-driven analysis of their protein targets. Combination of different enrichment strategies with LC-MS/MS analysis allowed identification of more than 167 unique proteins with 332 sites mod