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Sample records for functional mri studies

  1. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  2. To see bruxism: a functional MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Since the pathophysiology of bruxism is not clearly understood, there exists no possible treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate the cerebral activation differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism on behalf of possible aetiological factors. Methods: 12 healthy subjects and 12 patients with bruxism, a total of 24 right-handed female subjects (aged 20–27 years) were examined using functional MRI during tooth-clenching and resting tasks. Imaging was performed with 3.0-T MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil. Differences in regional brain activity between patients with bruxism and healthy subjects (control group) were observed with BrainVoyager QX 2.8 (Brain Innovation, Maastricht, Netherlands) statistical data analysis program. Activation maps were created using the general linear model: single study and multistudy multisubject for statistical group analysis. This protocol was approved by the ethics committee of medical faculty of Kirikkale University, Turkey (02/04), based on the guidelines set forth in the Declaration of Helsinki. Results: The group analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of three clusters in the control group (p < 0.005), which may indicate brain regions related with somatognosis, repetitive passive motion, proprioception and tactile perception. These areas coincide with Brodmann areas 7, 31, 39 and 40. It is conceivable that there are differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that there was a decrease of cortical activation pattern in patients with bruxism in clenching tasks. This indicates decreased blood flow and activation in regional neuronal activity. Bruxism, as an oral motor disorder concerns dentistry, neurology and psychiatry. These results might improve the understanding and physiological handling of sleep bruxism. PMID:25806864

  3. Neural Basis of Tics: A Functional MRI Study

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    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Event-related functional MRI (fMRI was used to study the neural basis of spontaneous motor and vocal tics in 10 patients with Tourette syndrome, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD.

  4. Language networks in children: Evidence from functional MRI studies

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We review functional MRI and other neuroimaging studies of language skills in children from infancy to adulthood. These studies show developmental changes in the networks of brain regions supporting language, which can be affected by brain injuries or neurological disorders. Particular aspects of language rely on networks that lateralize to the dominant hemisphere; others rely on bilateral or non-dominant mechanisms. Multiple fMRI tasks for pediatric patients characterize functional brain reo...

  5. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

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    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  6. Functional MRI studies in disruptive behaviour disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, M; Garzitto, M; Brambilla, P

    2012-03-01

    Aggressive or antisocial behaviours with violations of social rules are the main features of disruptive behaviour disorders (DBDs), which are developmental diseases and include conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder. In the last decade, several efforts have been made to shed light on the biological underpinnings of DBDs. In this context, the main findings of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in DBD are reported here. There are indications of neural dysfunctions in response to affective stimuli, especially regarding medial and orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex and connected subcortical structures.

  7. When Learning and Remembering Compete: A Functional MRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, W.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Cabeza, R.; Daselaar, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging evidence suggests a bottleneck between learning new information and remembering old information. In two behavioral experiments and one functional MRI (fMRI) experiment, we tested the hypothesis that learning and remembering compete when both processes happen within a b

  8. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: case study and cautionary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: case study and cautionary notes. ... Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging ... Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been ...

  9. Cortical language activation in aphasia:a functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓俊; 张敏鸣; 商德胜; 汪启东; 罗本燕; 翁旭初

    2004-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging has been used in neurolinguistic research on normal subjects and on patients with brain damage. This study was designed to investigate the differences of the neural basis underlying language processing between normal subjects and aphasics.Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to map the language network in 6 normal subjects and 3 patients with aphasia who were in the stage of recovery from acute stroke. The participants performed a word generation task during multi-slice functional scanning for the measurement of signal change associated with regional neural activity induced by the task. Results In normal subjects, a distributed language network was activated. Activations were present in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions. In the patient group, however, no activation was detected in the left inferior frontal gyrus whether the patient had a lesion in the left frontal lobe or not. Two patients showed activations in some right hemisphere regions where no activation appeared in normal subjects. Conclusions fMRI with word generation task is feasible for evaluating language function in aphasic patients. Remote effect of focal lesion and functional redistribution or reorganisation can be found in aphasic patients.

  10. Considerations for Resting State Functional MRI and Functional Connectivity Studies in Rodents

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    Wen-Ju ePan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI and functional connectivity mapping have become widely used tools in the human neuroimaging community and their use is rapidly spreading into the realm of rodent research as well. One of the many attractive features of rs-fMRI is that it is readily translatable from humans to animals and back again. Changes in functional connectivity observed in human studies can be followed by more invasive animal experiments to determine the neurophysiological basis for the alterations, while exploratory work in animal models can identify possible biomarkers for further investigation in human studies. These types of interwoven human and animal experiments have a potentially large impact on neuroscience and clinical practice. However, impediments exist to the optimal application of rs-fMRI in small animals, some similar to those encountered in humans and some quite different. In this review we identify the most prominent of these barriers, discuss differences between rs-fMRI in rodents and in humans, highlight best practices for animal studies, and review selected applications of rs-fMRI in rodents. Our goal is to facilitate the integration of human and animal work to the benefit of both fields.

  11. The Neural Basis of Typewriting: A Functional MRI Study.

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    Yuichi Higashiyama

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrate of typewriting Japanese words and to detect the difference between the neural substrate of typewriting and handwriting, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study in 16 healthy volunteers. All subjects were skillful touch typists and performed five tasks: a typing task, a writing task, a reading task, and two control tasks. Three brain regions were activated during both the typing and the writing tasks: the left superior parietal lobule, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the left premotor cortex close to Exner's area. Although typing and writing involved common brain regions, direct comparison between the typing and the writing task revealed greater left posteromedial intraparietal cortex activation in the typing task. In addition, activity in the left premotor cortex was more rostral in the typing task than in the writing task. These findings suggest that, although the brain circuits involved in Japanese typewriting are almost the same as those involved in handwriting, there are brain regions that are specific for typewriting.

  12. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

  13. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

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    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  14. Mentalizing in schizophrenia: A multivariate functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew K; Dzafic, Ilvana; Robinson, Gail A; Reutens, David; Mowry, Bryan

    2016-12-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with mentalizing deficits that impact on social functioning and quality of life. Recently, schizophrenia has been conceptualized as a disorder of neural dysconnectivity and network level analyses offers a means of understanding the underlying deficits leading to mentalizing difficulty. Using an established mentalizing task (The Triangles Task), functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were acquired from 19 patients with schizophrenia and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs). Participants were required to watch short animations of two triangles interacting with each other with the interactions either random (no interaction), physical (patterned movement), or mental (intentional movement). Task-based Partial Least Squares (PLS) was used to analyze activation differences and commonalities between the three conditions and the two groups. Seed-based PLS was used to assess functional connectivity with peaks identified in the task-based PLS. Behavioural PLS was then performed using the accuracy from the mental conditions. Patients with schizophrenia performed worse on the mentalizing condition compared to HCs. Task-based PLS revealed one significant latent variable (LV) that explained 42.9% of the variance in the task, with theLV separating the mental condition from the physical and random conditions in patients with schizophrenia, but only the mental from physical in healthy controls. The mental animations were associated with increased modulation of the inferior frontal gyri bilaterally, left superior temporal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and left caudate nucleus. The physical/random animations were associated with increased modulation of the right medial frontal gyrus and left superior frontal gyrus. Seed-based PLS identified increased functional connectivity with the left inferior frontal gyrus (liFG) and caudate nucleus in patients with schizophrenia, during the mental and physical interactions, with functional connectivity

  15. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

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    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  16. EEG-fMRI integration for the study of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2014-11-15

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have proved to be extremely valuable tools for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Moreover, due to a notable degree of complementarity between the two modalities, the combination of EEG and fMRI data has been actively sought in the last two decades. Although initially focused on epilepsy, EEG-fMRI applications were rapidly extended to the study of healthy brain function, yielding new insights into its underlying mechanisms and pathways. Nevertheless, EEG and fMRI have markedly different spatial and temporal resolutions, and probe neuronal activity through distinct biophysical processes, many aspects of which are still poorly understood. The remarkable conceptual and methodological challenges associated with EEG-fMRI integration have motivated the development of a wide range of analysis approaches over the years, each relying on more or less restrictive assumptions, and aiming to shed further light on the mechanisms of brain function along with those of the EEG-fMRI coupling itself. Here, we present a review of the most relevant EEG-fMRI integration approaches yet proposed for the study of brain function, supported by a general overview of our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms coupling the signals obtained from the two modalities.

  17. Structural MRI studies of language function in the undamaged brain.

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    Richardson, Fiona M; Price, Cathy J

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, the demonstration that structural changes can occur in the human brain beyond those associated with development, ageing and neuropathology has revealed a new approach to studying the neural basis of behaviour. In this review paper, we focus on structural imaging studies of language that have utilised behavioural measures in order to investigate the neural correlates of language skills in the undamaged brain. We report studies that have used two different techniques: voxel-based morphometry of whole brain grey or white matter images and diffusion tensor imaging. At present, there are relatively few structural imaging studies of language. We group them into those that investigated (1) the perception of novel speech sounds, (2) the links between speech sounds and their meaning, (3) speech production, and (4) reading. We highlight the validity of the findings by comparing the results to those from functional imaging studies. Finally, we conclude by summarising the novel contribution of these studies to date and potential directions for future research.

  18. Functional MRI study of mild Alzheimer's disease using amplitude of low frequency fluctuation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Qian; ZHAO Xiao-hu; WANG Pei-jun; GUO Qi-hao; YAN Chao-gan; HE Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the functional brain activity in the resting state is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.However,most studies focused on the relationship between different brain areas,rather than the amplitude or strength of the regional brain activity.The purpose of this study was to explore the functional brain changes in AD patients by measuring the amplitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signals.Methods Twenty mild AD patients and twenty healthy elderly subjects participated in the fMRI scan.The amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was calculated using REST software.Results Compared with the healthy elderly subjects,the mild AD patients showed decreased ALFF in the right posterior cingulate cortex,right ventral medial prefrontal cortex,and in the bilateral dorsal medial prefrontal cortex.No brain region with increased ALFF was found in the AD group compared with the control group.Conclusions The reduced activity in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex observed in the present study suggest that the functional abnormalities of those areas are at an early stage of AD.The ALFF analysis may provide a useful tool in fMRI study of AD.

  19. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

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    Mara Fabri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and motor tasks. We reviewed our published and unpublished fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging data on the cortical representation of tactile, gustatory, auditory, and visual sensitivity and of motor activation, obtained in 36 normal volunteers and in 6 patients with partial callosotomy. Activation foci were consistently detected in discrete CC regions: anterior (taste stimuli, central (motor tasks, central and posterior (tactile stimuli, and splenium (auditory and visual stimuli. Reconstruction of callosal fibers connecting activated primary gustatory, motor, somatosensory, auditory, and visual cortices by diffusion tensor tracking showed bundles crossing, respectively, through the genu, anterior and posterior body, and splenium, at sites harboring fMRI foci. These data confirm that the CC commissure has a topographical organization and demonstrate that its functional topography can be explored with fMRI.

  20. Functional MRI studies in human Ecstasy and cannabis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G.

    2006-01-01

    Cannabis and ecstasy are among the most widely used illicit drugs in the world. However, there are substantial concerns about their neurotoxic potential for brain and brain function. Despite previous research, some crucial questions regarding the causality, course and clinical relevance have remaine

  1. Motor function deficits in schizophrenia: an fMRI and VBM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Namita; Khushu, Subash [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Center, Delhi (India); Goyal, Satnam; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N. [RML Hospital, PGIMER, New Delhi (India)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate whether the motor functional alterations in schizophrenia (SZ) are also associated with structural changes in the related brain areas using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 right-handed SZ patients and 14 right-handed healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during right index finger-tapping task in the same session. fMRI results showed reduced functional activation in the motor areas (contralateral precentral and postcentral gyrus) and ipsilateral cerebellum in SZ subjects as compared to healthy controls (n = 14). VBM analysis also revealed reduced grey matter in motor areas and white matter reduction in cerebellum of SZ subjects as compared to controls. The present study provides an evidence for a possible association between structural alterations in the motor cortex and disturbed functional activation in the motor areas in persons affected with SZ during a simple finger-tapping task. (orig.)

  2. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  3. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: Case study and cautionary notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Spottiswoode

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has greatly advanced our knowledge of human brain function. Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been encouraging advances for its use in pre-operative functional cortical mapping to identify potentially eloquent areas prior to neurosurgery. Objectives. We explore the potential use of this emerging technique by presenting a neurosurgical case study, as performed at the Cape Universities Brain Imaging Centre (CUBIC, Tygerberg, Cape Town. We conclude with a brief summary of the potential pitfalls of this technique, as well as cautionary guidelines based on our experience. Methods and results. A 22-year-old male patient from Tygerberg Hospital underwent the successful resection of an anaplastic astrocytoma after fMRI presurgical planning at our facility. The subject was able to leave the ward unassisted. Conclusion. If consideration is given to the many limitations of this emerging technique, fMRI can be useful in aiding the neurosurgeon in pre-operative planning of his surgical approach.

  4. Functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: A multicenter fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Hulst, Hanneke E; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled; Enzinger, Christian; Gallo, Antonio; Pareto, Debora; Riccitelli, Gianna; Muhlert, Nils; Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Fazekas, Franz; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Arévalo, Maria J; Filippi, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    In this multicenter study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define the functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). fMRI scans during the performance of the N-back task were acquired from 42 right-handed relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients and 52 sex-matched right-handed healthy controls, studied at six European sites using 3.0 Tesla scanners. Patients with at least two abnormal (<2 standard deviations from the normative values) neuropsychological tests at a standardized evaluation were considered cognitively impaired (CI). FMRI data were analyzed using the SPM8 software, modeling regions showing load-dependent activations/deactivations with increasing task difficulty. Twenty (47%) MS patients were CI. During the N-back load condition, compared to controls and CI patients, cognitively preserved (CP) patients had increased recruitment of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. As a function of increasing task difficulty, CI MS patients had reduced activations of several areas located in the fronto-parieto-temporal lobes as well as reduced deactivations of regions which are part of the default mode network compared to the other two groups. Significant correlations were found between abnormal fMRI patterns of activations and deactivations and behavioral measures, cognitive performance, and brain T2 and T1 lesion volumes. This multicenter study supports the theory that a preserved fMRI activity of the frontal lobe is associated with a better cognitive profile in MS patients. It also indicates the feasibility of fMRI to monitor disease evolution and treatment effects in future studies.

  5. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study

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    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Qiu, Mingguo [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Hongliang; Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yang, Jun; Wang, Jian [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia. (orig.)

  6. A functional MRI study of language disturbances in subjects with migraine headache during treatment with topiramate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Muti, Marco; Piccolini, Carlo; Principi, Massimo; Di Renzo, Antonio; De Ciantis, Rita; Frondizi, Domenico; Iannone, Gregorio; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Piccirilli, Massimo

    2008-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a new antiepileptic drug approved for the prevention of migraine headache. However its use is limited by treatment-emergent adverse events; in particular, therapy can exert profound impact on language function. In this investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the anatomofunctional correlates of language disturbances in TPM patients experiencing subjective cognitive impairment. Ten right-handed individuals receiving therapy (five with and five without language disfluency) and five matched healthy control subjects took part in this study. During fMRI subjects alternately rested and performed a word-generating task. The task comprised the silent generation of words beginning with a different input letter visually presented. The activation paradigm consisted of six activation blocks alternating with six baseline rest blocks. The main fMRI measure was the pattern activation of the prefrontal regions (Brodmann's areas 44, 45, and 46) in both left and right hemispheres. Patients receiving TPM (50-100 mg/day) significantly reduced mean monthly migraine frequency. However several differences in fMRI activation were evident in the subject group comparison. Notably, changes in brain activity were observed during the phonemic task in patients with language disturbances. It is likely that TPM therapy is associated with a "remapping" of the language cerebral network.

  7. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-10-25

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46.

  8. Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Ischemic Stroke after Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Lu, Jie; Meng, Chun-Ling; Fang, Hong-Ying; Xue, Rong; Fan, Yong; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to figure out brain functional reorganization evidence after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Twelve patients with unilateral subcortex lesion in the middle cerebral artery territory were recruited. Seven of them received a 10-day rTMS treatment beginning at about 5 days after stroke onset. The remaining five received sham treatment. RsfMRI and motor functional scores were obtained before and after rTMS or sham rTMS. The rTMS group showed motor recovery according to the behavioral testing scores, while there was no significant difference of motor functional scores in the sham group before and after the sham rTMS. It proved that rTMS facilitates motor recovery of early ischemic stroke patients. Compared with the sham, the rTMS treatment group achieved increased functional connectivity (FC) between ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1, supplementary motor area, bilateral thalamus, and contralesional postcentral gyrus. And decreased FC was found between ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional M1, postcentral gyrus and inferior and middle frontal gyrus. Increased or decreased FC detected by rsfMRI is an important finding to understand the mechanism of brain functional reorganization. The rTMS treatment is a promising therapeutic approach to facilitate motor rehabilitation for early stroke patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Functional Imaging of Broca’s Area in Native Persian Speakers: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahdavi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The problem of localization of speech associated cortices using noninvasive methods has been of utmost importance in many neuroimaging studies, but the results are difficult to resolve for specific neurosurgical applications. In this study, we used fMRI to delineate language-related brain activation patterns with emphasis on the Broca's area during the execution of two Persian language tasks."nPatients and Methods: The subjects comprised of nine healthy right-handed men who participated voluntarily in this study. They performed two consequent fMRI paradigms namely; "Word Production" and "Reverse Word Reading". The fMRI data were collected and analyzed. Then, functional images were registered to anatomical images using FSL software. The laterality indices were also calculated in regions of interest with different threshold levels."nResults: The results indicate that Broca's area, as the classical language-production center, was robustly activated while performing these two tasks. In eight out of nine subjects, the left hemisphere dominancy and Broca's area activation were observed and in one case activation was prominent in the homologous area in the right hemisphere."nConclusion: Similar pattern of cortical activation during Persian word production and Anglophone languages such as English was revealed. fMRI is a valuable means for brain mapping in language studies.

  10. A central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture for migraine An ongoing functional MRI study**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Lan; Yujie Gao; Fang Zeng; Wei Qin; Mingkai Dong; Mailan Liu; Taipin Guo; Fanrong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Shaoyang acupoints are the most frequently used in migraine treatment. However, the central anal-gesic mechanism remains poorly understood. Studies have demonstrated that single stimulus of the verum acupuncture in healthy subjects can induce significant connectivity or activity changes in pain-related central networks compared with sham acupuncture. However, these findings are not indicative of the central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints. Thus, we recruited 100 migraine sufferers and randomly assigned them into five groups: Shaoyang uncommon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, non-acupoint control, and blank control groups. Subjects were subjected to evaluation of curative effects and functional MRI prior to and after 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. Al subjects were diagnosed by physicians and enrol ed fol owing clinical physical examination. Subjects were observed during 1-4 weeks after inclusion. At the fifth week, the first clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI were conducted. The Shaoyang uncom-mon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, and non-acupoint control grousp then were treated with acupuncture, five times per week, 20 times in total over 4 weeks. The second and third clinical evaluations and resting functional MRI screenings were conducted fol owing 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. The blank control group was observed during the 5 to 8 week pe-riod, fol owed by clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI. The aim of this study was to examine changes in brain functional activity and central networks in subjects with migraine undergoing acu-puncture at Shaoyang uncommon acupoints. This study provides a further explanation of the central analgesic mechanism by which acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints treats migraine.

  11. Cerebral lateralization of language in normal left-handed people studied by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, J; Deus, J; Losilla, J M; Capdevila, A

    1999-03-23

    To use functional MRI (fMRI) to further define the occurrence of left-hemisphere, bilateral, and right-hemisphere language in a normal left-handed population. A total of 100 healthy volunteers, consisting of 50 left-handed subjects and a reference group of 50 right-handed subjects, were studied by fMRI of the frontal cortex during silent word generation. Ninety-six percent of right-handed subjects showed fMRI changes lateralized to the left hemisphere, whereas 4% showed a bilateral activation pattern. In contrast, left-hemisphere lateralization occurred in 76% of left-handers, bilateral activation in 14%, and right-hemisphere lateralization in the remaining 10%. The predominance of right-hemisphere activation, however, was weak in these cases; only a single left-handed subject (2%) showed complete right-hemisphere lateralization. Silent word generation lateralizes to the left cerebral hemisphere in both handedness groups, but right-hemisphere participation is frequent in normal left-handed subjects. Exclusive right-hemisphere activation rarely occurred in the frontal lobe region studied.

  12. Cerebral basis of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: structural and functional MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa; Junque, Carme; Marti, Maria J; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-11-15

    The presence of visual hallucinations (VH) is a significant predictor of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is associated with a more rapid cognitive decline. Non-demented PD patients with VH present greater neuropsychological impairment than those without VH in domains such as verbal and visual memory, language comprehension, and visuospatial and visuoperceptive functions. Frontal dysfunction has also been described in PD with VH, including deficits in verbal fluency, sustained attention, and inhibition. In PD with VH, structural and functional abnormalities within the primary visual system and visual association areas, including ventral and dorsal pathways, have been reported. Structural MRI studies have shown that non-demented PD patients with VH present grey matter reduction in parieto-occipital areas and the hippocampal head. A follow-up study performed at a mean of 30 months revealed that unlike PD patients without VH, PD patients with VH frequently develop dementia associated with progressive atrophy in limbic, paralimbic and neocortical areas. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have revealed altered activation in occipito-temporal and frontal areas in response to simple and complex visual stimuli in PD patients with VH, suggesting a marked impairment in bottom-up visual processing, as well as an attentional deficit in the pathophysiology of VH in PD.

  13. Learn the effective connectivity pattern of attention networks: a resting functional MRI and Bayesian network study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Li, Rui; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia

    2011-03-01

    Task-based neuroimaging studies revealed that different attention operations were carried out by the functional interaction and cooperation between two attention systems: the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the ventral attention network (VAN), which were respectively involved in the "top-down" endogenous attention orienting and the "bottomup" exogenous attention reorienting process. Recent focused resting functional MRI (fMRI) studies found the two attention systems were inherently organized in the human brain regardless of whether or not the attention process were required, but how the two attention systems interact with each other in the absence of task is yet to be investigated. In this study, we first separated the DAN and VAN by applying the group independent component analysis (ICA) to the resting fMRI data acquired from 12 healthy young subjects, then used Gaussian Bayesian network (BN) learning approach to explore the plausible effective connectivity pattern of the two attention systems. It was found regions from the same attention network were strongly intra-dependent, and all the connections were located in the information flow from VAN to DAN, which suggested that an orderly functional interactions and information exchanges between the two attention networks existed in the intrinsic spontaneous brain activity, and the inherent connections might benefit the efficient cognitive process between DAN and VAN, such as the "top-down" and "bottom-up" reciprocal interaction when attention-related tasks were involved.

  14. Functional Study of the Heart using MRI and Multi-slice CT (MSCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Sh. Akhlaghpour

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: By using newer imaging techniques (MRI and MSCT, it is possible to perform functional studies of the heart including, wall mo-tion, chamber volume evaluation, and myocardial mass and wall thickness. While MRI had recently been introduced as the gold standard method for the morphological and functional studies of the heart, recent advances in the number of detectors, rotation time, and reconstruction protocols made Multislice CT (MSCT another new application for functional studies of the heart too. Ordinary raw data for coro-nary CT angiography is sufficient for these functional studies. Apart from the point that which technique is to be used to get a standard and reproducible meas-urement, a proper imaging strategy is necessary. To use MSCT, various softwares are available for these studies. By the use of these two modalities, valvular evaluations are also possible as addressed in many recent publications. In this article the strategy for functional study of the heart is presented and some case studies are also discussed.

  15. Dynamic Causal Modelling and physiological confounds: a functional MRI study of vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Sébastien; Picq, Chloé; Sinniger, Valérie; Clarençon, Didier; Bonaz, Bruno; David, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) has been proposed to estimate neuronal connectivity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a biophysical model that links synaptic activity to hemodynamic processes. However, it is well known that fMRI is sensitive not only to neuronal activity, but also to many other psychophysiological responses which may be task-related, such as changes in cardio-respiratory activity. They are not explicitly taken into account in the generative models of DCM and their effects on estimated neuronal connectivity are not known. The main goal of this study was to report the face validity of DCM in the presence of strong physiological confounds that presumably cannot be corrected for, using an fMRI experiment of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) performed in rats. First, a simple simulation was used to evaluate the principled ability of DCM to recover directed connectivity in the presence of a confounding factor. Second, we tested the experimental validity using measures of the BOLD correlates of left 5Hz VNS. Because VNS mostly activates the central autonomic regulation system, fMRI signals were likely to represent both direct and indirect vascular responses to such activation. In addition to the inference of standard statistical parametric maps, DCM was thus used to estimate directed neural connectivity in a small brain network including the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) known to receive vagal afferents. Though blood pressure changes may constitute a major physiological confound in this dataset, model comparison of DCMs still allowed the identification of the NTS as the input station of the VNS pathway to the brain. Our study indicates that current developments of DCM are robust to psychophysiological responses to some extent, but does not exclude the need to develop specific models of brain - body interactions within the DCM framework to better estimate neuronal connectivity from fMRI time series. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. The Use of Functional MRI to Study Appetite Control in the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akila De Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has provided the opportunity to safely investigate the workings of the human brain. This paper focuses on its use in the field of human appetitive behaviour and its impact in obesity research. In the present absence of any safe or effective centrally acting appetite suppressants, a better understanding of how appetite is controlled is vital for the development of new antiobesity pharmacotherapies. Early functional imaging techniques revealed an attenuation of brain reward area activity in response to visual food stimuli when humans are fed—in other words, the physiological state of hunger somehow increases the appeal value of food. Later studies have investigated the action of appetite modulating hormones on the fMRI signal, showing how the attenuation of brain reward region activity that follows feeding can be recreated in the fasted state by the administration of anorectic gut hormones. Furthermore, differences in brain activity between obese and lean individuals have provided clues about the possible aetiology of overeating. The hypothalamus acts as a central gateway modulating homeostatic and nonhomeostatic drives to eat. As fMRI techniques constantly improve, functional data regarding the role of this small but hugely important structure in appetite control is emerging.

  17. Motor association cortex activity in Parkinson`s disease. A functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Yukiko [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation of motor association cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Parkinson`s disease (PD) and control subjects during performed hand movements. There were 26 patients with PD (12 patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II, 14 patients with stage III) and 8 control subjects. Functional imaging was performed using a 1.5 tesla MRI system equipped with a single-shot, echo-planar pulse sequence. The significant signal changes were observed within the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area (SMA), and the parietal association area in both PD and control subjects. In PD subjects, the SMA was less activated than in control subjects; there were significant differences in the number of pixels activated in SMA between control and Yahr III group (p<0.01), and between Yahr I-II and Yahr III group (p<0.01). Our results demonstrated that movement related cerebral activity in the SMA is reduced in PD subjects, consistent with previously published data using other methods. It is well known from anatomical studies that one of the major cortical outputs of the basal ganglia is the SMA. This may explain the hypoactivation of the SMA in PD. Studies using fMRI provide a promising method not only for localizing cortical activation related to voluntary movements but also for investigating pathophysiology of movement disorders. (author)

  18. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state A functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Huang; Tongjun Zeng; Guifeng Zhang; Ganlong Li; Na Lu; Xinsheng Lai; Yangjia Lu; Jiarong Chen

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state,as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture.Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint.Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling,true needling activated Brodmann areas 3,6,8,9,10,11,13,20,21,37,39,40,43,and 47,the head of the caudate nucleus,the parahippocampal gyrus,thalamus and red nucleus.True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10,18,24,31,40 and 46.

  19. Memory Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Selective Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C. Lahti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex chronic mental illness that is characterized by positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Cognitive deficits are most predictive of long-term outcomes, with abnormalities in memory being the most robust finding. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has allowed exploring neural correlates of memory deficits in vivo. In this article, we will give a selective review of fMRI studies probing brain regions and functional networks that are thought to be related to abnormal memory performance in two memory systems prominently affected in schizophrenia; working memory and episodic memory. We revisit the classic “hypofrontality” hypothesis of working memory deficits and explore evidence for frontotemporal dysconnectivity underlying episodic memory abnormalities. We conclude that fMRI studies of memory deficits in schizophrenia are far from universal. However, the current literature does suggest that alterations are not isolated to a few brain regions, but are characterized by abnormalities within large-scale brain networks.

  20. Masking level differences--a diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Wack

    Full Text Available In our previous study we investigated Masking Level Differences (MLD using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, but were unable to confirm neural correlations for the MLD within the auditory cortex and inferior colliculus. Here we have duplicated conditions from our previous study, but have included more participants and changed the study site to a new location with a newer scanner and presentation system. Additionally, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI is included to allow investigation of fiber tracts that may be involved with MLDs. Twenty participants were included and underwent audiometric testing and MRI scanning. The current study revealed regions of increased and decreased activity within the auditory cortex when comparing the combined noise and signal of the dichotic MLD stimuli (N0Sπ and NπS0 with N0S0. Furthermore, we found evidence of inferior colliculus involvement. Our DTI findings show strong correlations between DTI measures within the brainstem and signal detection threshold levels. Patterns of correlation when the signal was presented only to the right ear showed an extensive network in the left hemisphere; however, the opposite was not true for the signal presented only to the left ear. Our current study was able to confirm what we had previously hypothesized using fMRI, while extending our investigation of MLDs to include the characteristics of connecting neural pathways.

  1. The Brain Functional State of Music Creation: an fMRI Study of Composers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jing; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Xingxing; He, Hui; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-07-23

    In this study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore the functional networks in professional composers during the creation of music. We compared the composing state and resting state imagery of 17 composers and found that the functional connectivity of primary networks in the bilateral occipital lobe and bilateral postcentral cortex decreased during the composing period. However, significantly stronger functional connectivity appeared between the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), the right angular gyrus and the bilateral superior frontal gyrus during composition. These findings indicate that a specific brain state of musical creation is formed when professional composers are composing, in which the integration of the primary visual and motor areas is not necessary. Instead, the neurons of these areas are recruited to enhance the functional connectivity between the ACC and the default mode network (DMN) to plan the integration of musical notes with emotion.

  2. Diagnostic precision of PET imaging and functional MRI in disorders of consciousness: a clinical validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stender, Johan; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie; Charland-Verville, Vanessa; Vanhaudenhuyse, Audrey; Demertzi, Athena; Chatelle, Camille; Thonnard, Marie; Thibaut, Aurore; Heine, Lizette; Soddu, Andrea; Boly, Mélanie; Schnakers, Caroline; Gjedde, Albert; Laureys, Steven

    2014-08-09

    Bedside clinical examinations can have high rates of misdiagnosis of unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (vegetative state) or minimally conscious state. The diagnostic and prognostic usefulness of neuroimaging-based approaches has not been established in a clinical setting. We did a validation study of two neuroimaging-based diagnostic methods: PET imaging and functional MRI (fMRI). For this clinical validation study, we included patients referred to the University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between January, 2008, and June, 2012, who were diagnosed by our unit with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, locked-in syndrome, or minimally conscious state with traumatic or non-traumatic causes. We did repeated standardised clinical assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R), cerebral (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and fMRI during mental activation tasks. We calculated the diagnostic accuracy of both imaging methods with CRS-R diagnosis as reference. We assessed outcome after 12 months with the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. We included 41 patients with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, four with locked-in syndrome, and 81 in a minimally conscious state (48=traumatic, 78=non-traumatic; 110=chronic, 16=subacute). (18)F-FDG PET had high sensitivity for identification of patients in a minimally conscious state (93%, 95% CI 85-98) and high congruence (85%, 77-90) with behavioural CRS-R scores. The active fMRI method was less sensitive at diagnosis of a minimally conscious state (45%, 30-61) and had lower overall congruence with behavioural scores (63%, 51-73) than PET imaging. (18)F-FDG PET correctly predicted outcome in 75 of 102 patients (74%, 64-81), and fMRI in 36 of 65 patients (56%, 43-67). 13 of 41 (32%) of the behaviourally unresponsive patients (ie, diagnosed as unresponsive with CRS-R) showed brain activity compatible with (minimal) consciousness (ie, activity associated with consciousness, but diminished compared with fully conscious individuals

  3. Quantitative NumART2* mapping in functional MRI studies at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Patria, Fabiana; Indovina, Iole

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of the effective transverse relaxation time, T2* and proton density was performed in a motor activation functional MRI (fMRI) study using multi-echo, echo planar imaging (EPI) and NumART2* (Numerical Algorithm for Real time T2*). Comparisons between NumART2* and conventional single echo EPI with an echo time of 64 ms were performed for five healthy participants examined twice. Simulations were also performed to address specific issues associated with the two techniques, such as echo time-dependent signal variation. While the single echo contrast varied with the baseline T2* value, relative changes in T2* remained unaffected. Statistical analysis of the T2* maps yielded fMRI activation patterns with an improved statistical detection relative to conventional EPI but with less activated voxels, suggesting that NumART2* has superior spatial specificity. Two effects, inflow and dephasing, that may explain this finding were investigated. Particularly, a statistically significant increase in proton density was found in a brain area that was detected as activated by conventional EPI but not by NumART2* while no such changes were observed in brain areas that showed stimulus correlated signal changes on T2* maps.

  4. Effect of bread gluten content on gastrointestinal function: a crossover MRI study on healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, Marina; Gates, Fred K; Marciani, Luca; Shiwani, Henna; Major, Giles; Hoad, Caroline L; Chaddock, Gemma; Gowland, Penny A; Spiller, Robin C

    2016-01-14

    Gluten is a crucial functional component of bread, but the effect of increasing gluten content on gastrointestinal (GI) function remains uncertain. Our aim was to investigate the effect of increasing gluten content on GI function and symptoms in healthy participants using the unique capabilities of MRI. A total of twelve healthy participants completed this randomised, mechanistic, open-label, three-way crossover study. On days 1 and 2 they consumed either gluten-free bread (GFB), or normal gluten content bread (NGCB) or added gluten content bread (AGCB). The same bread was consumed on day 3, and MRI scans were performed every 60 min from fasting baseline up to 360 min after eating. The appearance of the gastric chime in the images was assessed using a visual heterogeneity score. Gastric volumes, the small bowel water content (SBWC), colonic volumes and colonic gas content and GI symptoms were measured. Fasting transverse colonic volume after the 2-d preload was significantly higher after GFB compared with NGCB and AGCB with a dose-dependent response (289 (SEM 96) v. 212 (SEM 74) v. 179 (SEM 87) ml, respectively; P=0·02). The intragastric chyme heterogeneity score was higher for the bread with increased gluten (AGCB 6 (interquartile range (IQR) 0·5) compared with GFB 3 (IQR 0·5); P=0·003). However, gastric half-emptying time was not different between breads nor were study day GI symptoms, postprandial SBWC, colonic volume and gas content. This MRI study showed novel mechanistic insights in the GI responses to different breads, which are poorly understood notwithstanding the importance of this staple food.

  5. Neural Changes following Behavioral Activation for a Depressed Breast Cancer Patient: A Functional MRI Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gawrysiak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging is an innovative but at this stage underutilized method to assess the efficacy of psychotherapy for depression. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used in this case study to examine changes in brain activity in a depressed breast cancer patient receiving an 8-session Behavioral Activation Treatment for Depression (BATD, based on the work of Hopko and Lejuez (2007. A music listening paradigm was used during fMRI brain scans to assess reward responsiveness at pre- and posttreatment. Following treatment, the patient exhibited attenuated depression and changes in blood oxygenation level dependence (BOLD response in regions of the prefrontal cortex and the subgenual cingulate cortex. These preliminary findings outline a novel means to assess psychotherapy efficacy and suggest that BATD elicits functional brain changes in areas implicated in the pathophysiology of depression. Further research is necessary to explore neurobiological mechanisms of change in BATD, particularly the potential mediating effects of reward responsiveness and associated brain functioning.

  6. Cerebral reorganization as a function of linguistic recovery in children: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkana, Odelia; Frost, Ram; Kramer, Uri; Ben-Bashat, Dafna; Hendler, Talma; Schmidt, David; Schweiger, Avraham

    2011-02-01

    Characterizing and mapping the relationship between neuronal reorganization and functional recovery are essential to the understanding of cerebral plasticity and the dynamic processes which occur following brain damage. The neuronal mechanisms underlying linguistic recovery following left hemisphere (LH) lesions are still unknown. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we investigated whether the extent of brain lateralization of linguistic functioning in specific regions of interest (ROIs) is correlated with the level of linguistic performance following recovery from acquired childhood aphasia. The study focused on a rare group of children in whom lesions occurred after normal language acquisition, but prior to complete maturation of the brain. During fMRI scanning, rhyming, comprehension and verb generation activation tasks were monitored. The imaging data were evaluated with reference to linguistic performance measured behaviorally during imaging, as well as outside the scanner. Compared with normal controls, we found greater right hemisphere (RH) lateralization in patients. However, correlations with linguistic performance showed that increased proficiency in linguistic tasks was associated with greater lateralization to the LH. These results were replicated in a longitudinal case study of a patient scanned twice, 3 years apart. Additional improvement in linguistic performance of the patient was accompanied by increasing lateralization to the LH in the anterior language region. This, however, was the result of a decreased involvement of the RH. These findings suggest that recovery is a dynamic, ongoing process, which may last for years after onset. The role of each hemisphere in the recovery process may continuously change within the chronic stage.

  7. Creating probabilistic maps of the face network in the adolescent brain: a multicentre functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Amir M; Artiges, Eric; Banaschewski, Tobias; Barker, Gareth J; Bruehl, Ruediger; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia J; Flor, Herta; Garavan, Hugh; Gallinat, Jürgen; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Loth, Eva; Mareckova, Klara; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rietschel, Marcella; Smolka, Michael N; Ströhle, Andreas; Schumann, Gunter; Paus, Tomáš

    2012-04-01

    Large-scale magnetic resonance (MR) studies of the human brain offer unique opportunities for identifying genetic and environmental factors shaping the human brain. Here, we describe a dataset collected in the context of a multi-centre study of the adolescent brain, namely the IMAGEN Study. We focus on one of the functional paradigms included in the project to probe the brain network underlying processing of ambiguous and angry faces. Using functional MR (fMRI) data collected in 1,110 adolescents, we constructed probabilistic maps of the neural network engaged consistently while viewing the ambiguous or angry faces; 21 brain regions responding to faces with high probability were identified. We were also able to address several methodological issues, including the minimal sample size yielding a stable location of a test region, namely the fusiform face area (FFA), as well as the effect of acquisition site (eight sites) and scanner (four manufacturers) on the location and magnitude of the fMRI response to faces in the FFA. Finally, we provided a comparison between male and female adolescents in terms of the effect sizes of sex differences in brain response to the ambiguous and angry faces in the 21 regions of interest. Overall, we found a stronger neural response to the ambiguous faces in several cortical regions, including the fusiform face area, in female (vs. male) adolescents, and a slightly stronger response to the angry faces in the amygdala of male (vs. female) adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. An fMRI Study of Intra-Individual Functional Topography in the Human Cerebellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine J. Stoodley

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies report cerebellar activation during both motor and non-motor paradigms, and suggest a functional topography within the cerebellum. Sensorimotor tasks activate the anterior lobe, parts of lobule VI, and lobule VIII, whereas higher-level tasks activate lobules VI and VII in the posterior lobe. To determine whether these activation patterns are evident at a single-subject level, we conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during five tasks investigating sensorimotor (finger tapping, language (verb generation, spatial (mental rotation, working memory (N-back, and emotional processing (viewing images from the International Affective Picture System. Finger tapping activated the ipsilateral anterior lobe (lobules IV-V as well as lobules VI and VIII. Activation during verb generation was found in right lobules VII and VIIIA. Mental rotation activated left-lateralized clusters in lobules VII-VIIIA, VI-Crus I, and midline VIIAt. The N-back task showed bilateral activation in right lobules VI-Crus I and left lobules VIIB-VIIIA. Cerebellar activation was evident bilaterally in lobule VI while viewing arousing vs. neutral images. This fMRI study provides the first proof of principle demonstration that there is topographic organization of motor execution vs. cognitive/emotional domains within the cerebellum of a single individual, likely reflecting the anatomical specificity of cerebro-cerebellar circuits underlying different task domains. Inter-subject variability of motor and non-motor topography remains to be determined.

  9. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors A critical review of functional MRI studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xiao; Dongfeng Huang; Bryan O'Young

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients' lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients' brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects.

  10. Neural plasticity in functional and anatomical MRI studies of children with Tourette syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eichele, Heike; Plessen, Kerstin J

    2012-01-01

    callosum and the limbic system. Discussion: Factors that potentially influence the development of adaptive changes in the brain of children with TS are age, comorbidity with other developmental disorders, medication use, IQ along with study-design or MRI techniques for acquisition, and analysis of data...... resulted in 13 original studies, which were reviewed with a focus on findings suggesting adaptive processes (using fMRI) and plasticity (using anatomical MRI). Differences in brain activation compared to healthy controls during tasks that require overriding of prepotent responses help to understand...

  11. Vicarious function within the human primary motor cortex? A longitudinal fMRI stroke study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaillard, Assia; Martin, Chantal Delon; Garambois, Katia; Lebas, Jean François; Hommel, Marc

    2005-01-01

    .... We examined four patients with one ischaemic stroke limited to M1, and four sex- and age-matched healthy controls in a temporally balanced prospective longitudinal fMRI study over three sessions...

  12. Tracking Adult Literacy Acquisition with Functional MRI: A Single-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Lucia W.; Amemiya, Eduardo; Tauil, Alexandre; Suguieda, Denis; Lacerda, Carolina; Klein, Elise; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated neuro-functional changes associated with late acquisition of reading in an illiterate adult who underwent 20 longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans during 2 years, while the participant progressed from complete illiteracy to a modest level of alphabetical decoding. Initially, the participant did not activate…

  13. CHANGES IN REGIONAL BRAIN ACTIVATION RELATED TO DEPRESSIVE STATE: A 2-YEAR LONGITUDINAL FUNCTIONAL MRI STUDY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opmeer, Esther M; Kortekaas, Rudie; van Tol, Marie-José; Renken, Remco J; Demenescu, Liliana R; Woudstra, Saskia; Ter Horst, Gert J; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Wee, Nic J A; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal brain activations during processing of emotional facial expressions in depressed patients have been demonstrated. We investigated the natural course of brain activation in response to emotional faces in depression, indexed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans preceding and following change in depressive state. We hypothesized a decrease in activation in the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and insula with a decrease in depressive pathology. A 2-year longitudinal fMRI study was conducted as part of the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety. We included 32 healthy controls and 49 depressed patients. During the second scan, 27 patients were in remission (remitters), the other 22 were not (nonremitters). All participants viewed faces with emotional expressions during scanning. Rostral ACC activation during processing of happy faces was predictive of a decrease in depressive state (PFWE = .003). In addition, remitters showed decreased activation of the insula over time (PFWE = .016), specifically during happy faces. Nonremitters displayed increased abnormalities in emotion recognition circuitry during the second scan compared to the first. No effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor use was observed. Our results demonstrate that rostral ACC activation may predict changes in depressive state even at 2-year outcome. The association between change in depressed state and change in insula activation provides further evidence for the role of the insula in a network maintaining emotional and motivational states. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Association of Coffee Consumption with MRI Markers and Cognitive Function: A Population-Based Study

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, Larissa Fortunato; Mirza, Saira; Bos, Daniel; Niessen, Wiro; Barreto, Sandhi Maria; Van der Lugt, Aad; Vernooij, Meike; Hofman, Albert; Tiemeier, Henning; Ikram, Arfan,; Polidori, M. C.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide and has been of considerable interest in research on cognition and dementia. Objective: To investigate the effect of coffee on preclinical brain MRI markers of dementia and cognitive performance. Methods: In 2,914 participants from the population-based Rotterdam Study (mean age: 59.3±7.2 years, 55 females), we assessed coffee consumption, performed brain MRI, and assessed cognition at baseline. To study cogn...

  15. Impaired neural networks for approximate calculation in dyscalculic children: a functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dosch Mengia

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Developmental dyscalculia (DD is a specific learning disability affecting the acquisition of mathematical skills in children with otherwise normal general intelligence. The goal of the present study was to examine cerebral mechanisms underlying DD. Methods Eighteen children with DD aged 11.2 ± 1.3 years and twenty age-matched typically achieving schoolchildren were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during trials testing approximate and exact mathematical calculation, as well as magnitude comparison. Results Children with DD showed greater inter-individual variability and had weaker activation in almost the entire neuronal network for approximate calculation including the intraparietal sulcus, and the middle and inferior frontal gyrus of both hemispheres. In particular, the left intraparietal sulcus, the left inferior frontal gyrus and the right middle frontal gyrus seem to play crucial roles in correct approximate calculation, since brain activation correlated with accuracy rate in these regions. In contrast, no differences between groups could be found for exact calculation and magnitude comparison. In general, fMRI revealed similar parietal and prefrontal activation patterns in DD children compared to controls for all conditions. Conclusion In conclusion, there is evidence for a deficient recruitment of neural resources in children with DD when processing analog magnitudes of numbers.

  16. A functional MRI study of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu Aihong, E-mail: yuaihong163@tom.com [Department of Radiology, the 4th Medical College of Peking University, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing 100035 (China); Wang Xiaoyi; Xu Guoqing [Beijing Normal University, State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning, Beijing 100875 (China); Li Yongjie [Beijing Institute of Functional Neurosurgery, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100053 (China); Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng [Department of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China); Wang, Yuping [Department of Neurology, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital University of Medical Sciences (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate the abnormality of language networks in left medial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) using fMRI. Materials and methods: Eight patients with left MTLE and 15 healthy subjects were evaluated. An auditory semantic judgment (AJ) paradigm was used. The fMRI data were collected on a 3T MR system and analyzed by AFNI (analysis of functional neuroimages) to generate the activation map. Results: Behavioral data showed that the reaction time of the left MTLE patients was significantly longer than that of controls on the AJ task (t = -3.396, P < 0.05). The left MTLE patients also exhibited diffusively decreased activation in the AJ task. Right hemisphere dominance of Broca's and Wernicke's areas was demonstrated in left MTLE patients. Conclusions: Long-term activation of spikes in left MTLE patients results in language impairment, which is associated with an abnormality of the brain neural network.

  17. Subdivision of the occipital lobes: an anatomical and functional MRI connectivity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiebaut de Schotten, Michel; Urbanski, Marika; Valabregue, Romain; Bayle, Dimitri J; Volle, Emmanuelle

    2014-07-01

    Exploring brain connectivity is fundamental to understanding the functional architecture of the cortex. In our study we employed tractography-based parcellation, combined with the principal component analysis statistical framework, to divide the occipital lobes into seven areas in a group of eighteen healthy participants. Tractography-based parcellation is a method based on diffusion imaging tractography, which segregates the living human brain into distinctive areas showing sharp differences in their anatomical connectivity. The results were compared to covarying functional networks involving distinct areas within the occipital lobes, that we obtained using resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), as well as to other existing subdivisions of the occipital lobes. Our results showed similarities with functional imaging data in healthy controls and cognitive profiles in brain-damaged patients, although several differences with cytoarchitectonic, myelogenetic, myeloarchitectonic and functional maps were reported. While the similarities are encouraging, the potential validity and limitations of the differences observed are discussed. Taken together these results suggest that tractography-based parcellation may provide a new promising anatomical subdivision of the living human brain based on its anatomical connectivity, which may benefit the understanding of clinical-neuroanatomical dissociations and functional neuroimaging results.

  18. Utility of functional MRI in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Emily R; Gaillard, William D

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI), a tool increasingly used to study cognitive function, is also an important tool for understanding not only normal development in healthy children, but also abnormal development, as seen in children with epilepsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism. Since its inception almost 15 years ago, fMRI has seen an explosion in its use and applications in the adult literature. However, only recently has it found a home in pediatric neurology. New adaptations in study design and technologic advances, especially the study of resting state functional connectivity as well as the use of passive task design in sedated children, have increased the utility of functional imaging in pediatrics to help us gain understanding into the developing brain at work. This article reviews the background of fMRI in pediatrics and highlights the most recent literature and clinical applications.

  19. Clinical functional MRI. Presurgical functional neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, C. (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2007-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) permits noninvasive imaging of the ''human brain at work'' under physiological conditions. This is the first textbook on clinical fMRI. It is devoted to preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies, which are the most well-established clinical applications. By localizing and lateralizing specific brain functions, as well as epileptogenic zones, fMRI facilitates the selection of a safe treatment and the planning and performance of function-preserving neurosurgery. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of the physiological and methodological background, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, diagnostic possibilities and limitations, and other related techniques. All chapters are written by recognized experts in their fields, and the book is designed to be of value to beginners, trained clinicians and experts alike. (orig.)

  20. Does simile comprehension differ from metaphor comprehension? A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Midori; Toyomura, Akira; Motoyama, Hiroki; Itoh, Hiroaki; Kawabata, Yasuhiro; Abe, Jun-Ichi

    2012-06-01

    Since Aristotle, people have believed that metaphors and similes express the same type of figurative meaning, despite the fact that they are expressed with different sentence patterns. In contrast, recent psycholinguistic models have suggested that metaphors and similes may promote different comprehension processes. In this study, we investigated the neural substrates involved in the comprehension of metaphor and simile using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to evaluate whether simile comprehension differs from metaphor comprehension or not. In the metaphor and simile sentence conditions, higher activation was seen in the left inferior frontal gyrus. This result suggests that the activation in both metaphor and simile conditions indicates similar patterns in the left frontal region. The results also suggest that similes elicit higher levels of activation in the medial frontal region which might be related to inference processes, whereas metaphors elicit more right-sided prefrontal activation which might be related to figurative language comprehension.

  1. Application of functional MRI in epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; LI Kun-cheng; PIAO Chang-fu; LI Hong-li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review the recent development of functional MRI application in epilepsy. Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were researched using MEDLINE/ CD ROM (1996-2005) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Disk (1996-2005). Study selection Published articles about functional MRI application and epilepsy were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 38 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results fMRI can be used to localize seizure foci through detecting these cerebral hemodynamic changes produced by epileptiform discharges. EEG-triggered fMRI, which has higher spatial and temporal resolution, helps to detect the spatiotemporal pattern of spike origin and propagation, and define localization of the epileptogenic focus. fMRI is also useful in language and memory cognitive function assessment and presurgical assessment of refractory epilepsy. Atypically distributed cognitive function areas can be detected by fMRI, because of cortical language and memory areas reorganization during long-term epileptic activity in patients with epilepsy. Conclusions fMRI technique plays a very important role in cognitive function and presurgical assessment of patients with epilepsy. It is meaningful for understanding pathogenesis of epilepsy.

  2. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  3. Correlation of CT-based regional cardiac function (SQUEEZ) with myocardial strain calculated from tagged MRI: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Chen, Marcus Y; van der Pals, Jesper; Arai, Andrew E; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between local myocardial function estimates from CT and myocardial strain from tagged MRI in the same heart. Accurate detection of regional myocardial dysfunction can be an important finding in the diagnosis of functionally significant coronary artery disease. Tagged MRI is currently a reference standard for noninvasive regional myocardial function analysis; however, it has practical drawbacks. We have developed a CT imaging protocol and automated image analysis algorithm for estimating regional cardiac function from a few heartbeats. This method tracks the motion of the left ventricular (LV) endocardial surface to produce local function maps: we call the method Stretch Quantification of Endocardial Engraved Zones (SQUEEZ). Myocardial infarction was created by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 2 h followed by reperfusion in canine models. Tagged and cine MRI scans were performed during the reperfusion phase and first-pass contrast enhanced CT scans were acquired. The average delay between the CT and MRI scans was myocardial strain (Ecc) was calculated from the tagged MRI data. The agreement between peak systolic Ecc and SQUEEZ was investigated in 162 segments in the 9 hearts. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the correlation between the two metrics of local LV function. The results show good agreement between SQUEEZ and Ecc: (r = 0.71, slope = 0.78, p function. The good agreement between the estimates of local myocardial function obtained from CT SQUEEZ and tagged MRI provides encouragement to investigate the use of SQUEEZ for measuring regional cardiac function at a low clinical dose in humans.

  4. The Integration of Prosodic Speech in High Functioning Autism: A Preliminary fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesling, Isabelle; Dilharreguy, Bixente; Peppé, Sue; Amirault, Marion; Bouvard, Manuel; Allard, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    Background Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a specific triad of symptoms such as abnormalities in social interaction, abnormalities in communication and restricted activities and interests. While verbal autistic subjects may present a correct mastery of the formal aspects of speech, they have difficulties in prosody (music of speech), leading to communication disorders. Few behavioural studies have revealed a prosodic impairment in children with autism, and among the few fMRI studies aiming at assessing the neural network involved in language, none has specifically studied prosodic speech. The aim of the present study was to characterize specific prosodic components such as linguistic prosody (intonation, rhythm and emphasis) and emotional prosody and to correlate them with the neural network underlying them. Methodology/Principal Findings We used a behavioural test (Profiling Elements of the Prosodic System, PEPS) and fMRI to characterize prosodic deficits and investigate the neural network underlying prosodic processing. Results revealed the existence of a link between perceptive and productive prosodic deficits for some prosodic components (rhythm, emphasis and affect) in HFA and also revealed that the neural network involved in prosodic speech perception exhibits abnormal activation in the left SMG as compared to controls (activation positively correlated with intonation and emphasis) and an absence of deactivation patterns in regions involved in the default mode. Conclusions/Significance These prosodic impairments could not only result from activation patterns abnormalities but also from an inability to adequately use the strategy of the default network inhibition, both mechanisms that have to be considered for decreasing task performance in High Functioning Autism. PMID:20644633

  5. Decreased connectivity of the default mode network in pathological gambling: a resting state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Myung Hun; Kim, Jae-Hun; Shin, Young-Chul; Jung, Wi Hoon; Jang, Joon Hwan; Choi, Jung-Seok; Kang, Do-Hyung; Yi, Jung-Seo; Choi, Chi-Hoon; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2014-11-01

    The default mode network (DMN) represents neuronal activity that is intrinsically generated during a resting state. The present study used resting-state fMRI to investigate whether functional connectivity is altered in pathological gambling (PG). Fifteen drug-naive male patients with PG and 15 age-matched male control subjects participated in the present study. The pathological gambling modification of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (PG-YBOCS), the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Beck Anxiety Inventory were used to determine symptom severity in all participants. Participants were instructed to keep their eyes closed and not to focus on any particular thoughts during the 4.68-min resting-state functional scan. The patients with PG displayed decreased default mode connectivity in the left superior frontal gyrus, right middle temporal gyrus, and precuneus compared with healthy controls. The severity of PG symptoms in patients with PG was negatively associated with connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex seed region and the precuneus (r=-0.599, p=0.018). Decreased functional connectivity within DMN suggests that PG may share similar neurobiological abnormalities with other addictive disorders. Moreover, the severity of PG symptoms was correlated with decreased connectivity in the precuneus, which may be important in the response to treatment in patients with PG.

  6. Functional connectomics from resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.M.; Vidaurre, D.; Beckmann, C.F.; Jenkinson, M.; Nichols, T.E.; Robinson, E.C.; Woolrich, M.W.; Barch, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in activity in different parts of the brain can be used to study functional brain networks. We review the use of resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI) for the purpose of mapping the macroscopic functional connectome. After describing MRI acquisition and image-processing metho

  7. Complexity of motor sequences and cortical reorganization in Parkinson's disease: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Caproni

    Full Text Available Motor impairment is the most relevant clinical feature in Parkinson's disease (PD. Functional imaging studies on motor impairment in PD have revealed changes in the cortical motor circuits, with particular involvement of the fronto-striatal network. The aim of this study was to assess brain activations during the performance of three different motor exercises, characterized by progressive complexity, using a functional fMRI multiple block paradigm, in PD patients and matched control subjects. Unlike from single-task comparisons, multi-task comparisons between similar exercises allowed to analyse brain areas involved in motor complexity planning and execution. Our results showed that in the single-task comparisons the involvement of primary and secondary motor areas was observed, consistent with previous findings based on similar paradigms. Most notably, in the multi-task comparisons a greater activation of supplementary motor area and posterior parietal cortex in PD patients, compared with controls, was observed. Furthermore, PD patients, compared with controls, had a lower activation of the basal ganglia and limbic structures, presumably leading to the impairment in the higher levels of motor control, including complexity planning and execution. The findings suggest that in PD patients occur both compensatory mechanisms and loss of efficiency and provide further insight into the pathophysiological role of distinct cortical and subcortical areas in motor dysfunction.

  8. Complexity of motor sequences and cortical reorganization in Parkinson's disease: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caproni, Stefano; Muti, Marco; Principi, Massimo; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Frondizi, Domenico; Capocchi, Giuseppe; Floridi, Piero; Rossi, Aroldo; Calabresi, Paolo; Tambasco, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Motor impairment is the most relevant clinical feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). Functional imaging studies on motor impairment in PD have revealed changes in the cortical motor circuits, with particular involvement of the fronto-striatal network. The aim of this study was to assess brain activations during the performance of three different motor exercises, characterized by progressive complexity, using a functional fMRI multiple block paradigm, in PD patients and matched control subjects. Unlike from single-task comparisons, multi-task comparisons between similar exercises allowed to analyse brain areas involved in motor complexity planning and execution. Our results showed that in the single-task comparisons the involvement of primary and secondary motor areas was observed, consistent with previous findings based on similar paradigms. Most notably, in the multi-task comparisons a greater activation of supplementary motor area and posterior parietal cortex in PD patients, compared with controls, was observed. Furthermore, PD patients, compared with controls, had a lower activation of the basal ganglia and limbic structures, presumably leading to the impairment in the higher levels of motor control, including complexity planning and execution. The findings suggest that in PD patients occur both compensatory mechanisms and loss of efficiency and provide further insight into the pathophysiological role of distinct cortical and subcortical areas in motor dysfunction.

  9. Connectivity of the amygdala, piriform, and orbitofrontal cortex during olfactory stimulation: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Anna; Ferraro, Stefania; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Critchley, Hugo D; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Minati, Ludovico

    2013-03-06

    The majority of existing functional MRI studies on olfactory perception have addressed the relationship between stimulus features and the intensity of activity in separate regions considered in isolation. However, anatomical studies as well as neurophysiological recordings in rats and insects suggest that odor features may also be represented in a sparse manner through the simultaneous activity of multiple cortical areas interacting as a network. Here, we aimed to map the interdependence of neural activity among regions of the human brain, representing functional connectivity, during passive smelling. Seventeen healthy participants were scanned while performing a blocked-design task alternating exposure to two unpleasant odorants and breathing fresh air. High efferent connectivity was detected for the piriform cortex and the amygdala bilaterally. By contrast, the medial orbitofrontal cortex was characterized by high afferent connectivity, notably in the absence of an overall change in the intensity of hemodynamic activity during olfactory stimulation. Our results suggest that, even in the context of an elementary task, information on olfactory stimuli is scattered by the amygdala and piriform cortex onto an anatomically sparse representation and then gathered and integrated in the medial orbitofrontal cortex.

  10. Recent applications of UHF-MRI in the study of human brain function and structure : a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zwaag, W.; Schäfer, Andreas; Marques, José P; Turner, R.; Trampel, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The increased availability of ultra-high-field (UHF) MRI has led to its application in a wide range of neuroimaging studies, which are showing promise in transforming fundamental approaches to human neuroscience. This review presents recent work on structural and functional brain imaging, at 7 T and

  11. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  12. A method for using blocked and event-related fMRI data to study "resting state" functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Damien A; Schlaggar, Bradley L; Cohen, Alexander L; Miezin, Francis M; Dosenbach, Nico U F; Wenger, Kristin K; Fox, Michael D; Snyder, Abraham Z; Raichle, Marcus E; Petersen, Steven E

    2007-03-01

    Resting state functional connectivity MRI (fcMRI) has become a particularly useful tool for studying regional relationships in typical and atypical populations. Because many investigators have already obtained large data sets of task-related fMRI, the ability to use this existing task data for resting state fcMRI is of considerable interest. Two classes of data sets could potentially be modified to emulate resting state data. These data sets include: (1) "interleaved" resting blocks from blocked or mixed blocked/event-related sets, and (2) residual timecourses from event-related sets that lack rest blocks. Using correlation analysis, we compared the functional connectivity of resting epochs taken from a mixed blocked/event-related design fMRI data set and the residuals derived from event-related data with standard continuous resting state data to determine which class of data can best emulate resting state data. We show that, despite some differences, the functional connectivity for the interleaved resting periods taken from blocked designs is both qualitatively and quantitatively very similar to that of "continuous" resting state data. In contrast, despite being qualitatively similar to "continuous" resting state data, residuals derived from event-related design data had several distinct quantitative differences. These results suggest that the interleaved resting state data such as those taken from blocked or mixed blocked/event-related fMRI designs are well-suited for resting state functional connectivity analyses. Although using event-related data residuals for resting state functional connectivity may still be useful, results should be interpreted with care.

  13. Human medullary responses to cooling and rewarming the skin: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAllen, Robin M; Farrell, Michael; Johnson, John M; Trevaks, David; Cole, Leonie; McKinley, Michael J; Jackson, Graeme; Denton, Derek A; Egan, Gary F

    2006-01-17

    A fall in skin temperature precipitates a repertoire of thermoregulatory responses that reduce the likelihood of a decrease in core temperature. Studies in animals suggest that medullary raphé neurons are essential for cold-defense, mediating both the cutaneous vasoconstrictor and thermogenic responses to ambient cooling; however, the involvement of raphé neurons in human thermoregulation has not been investigated. This study used functional MRI with an anatomically guided region of interest (ROI) approach to characterize changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signal within the human medulla of nine normal subjects during non-noxious cooling and rewarming of the skin by a water-perfused body suit. An ROI covering 4.9 +/- 0.3 mm(2) in the ventral midline of the medulla immediately caudal to the pons (the rostral medullary raphé) showed an increase in BOLD signal of 3.9% (P medullary cross section at the same level (area, 126 +/- 15 mm(2)) showed no significant change in mean BOLD signal with cooling (+0.2%, P > 0.05). These findings demonstrate that human rostral medullary raphé neurons are selectively activated in response to a thermoregulatory challenge and point to the location of thermoregulatory neurons homologous to those of the raphé pallidus nucleus in rodents.

  14. Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP and its sham point (SHAM. Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (P<0.05, corrected by false discovery rate approach effects of only acupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM. Using an uncorrected P<0.05, point-related effects were also observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal and occipital regions while stimulation-related effects in various brain regions of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex regions. In addition, we found that several limbic and subcortical brain regions exhibited point- and stimulation-related alterations in their regional homogeneity (P<0.05, uncorrected. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional

  15. Mirror neuron activation in children with developmental coordination disorder: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Jess E; Licari, Melissa K; Billington, Jac; Chen, Yihui; Aziz-Zadeh, Lisa; Werner, Julie; Winsor, Anne M; Bynevelt, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal cortical areas that may contribute to the movement difficulties seen in children with Developmental Coordination Disorder (DCD). Specifically, we hypothesized that there may be a deficit in the mirror neuron system (MNS), a neural system that responds to both performed and observed actions. Using functional MRI, 14 boys with DCD (x=10.08 years ± 1.31, range=7.83-11.58 years) and 12 typically developing controls (x=10.10 years ± 1.15, range=8.33-12.00 years) were scanned observing, executing and imitating a finger sequencing task using their right hand. Cortical activations of mirror neuron regions, including posterior inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), ventral premotor cortex, anterior inferior parietal lobule and superior temporal sulcus were examined. Children with DCD had decreased cortical activation mirror neuron related regions, including the precentral gyrus and IFG, as well as in the posterior cingulate and precuneus complex when observing the sequencing task. Region of interest analysis revealed lower activation in the pars opercularis, a primary MNS region, during imitation in the DCD group compared to controls. These findings provide some preliminary evidence to support a possible MNS dysfunction in children with DCD.

  16. Impairments in Brain Perfusion, Metabolites, Functional Connectivity, and Cognition in Severe Asymptomatic Carotid Stenosis Patients: An Integrated MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid artery stenosis without transient ischemic attack (TIA or stroke is considered as “asymptomatic.” However, recent studies have demonstrated that these asymptomatic carotid artery stenosis (aCAS patients had cognitive impairment in tests of executive function, psychomotor speed, and memory, indicating that “asymptomatic” carotid stenosis may not be truly asymptomatic. In this study, when 19 aCAS patients compared with 24 healthy controls, aCAS patients showed significantly poorer performance on global cognition, memory, and executive function. By utilizing an integrated MRI including pulsed arterial spin labeling (pASL MRI, Proton MR Spectroscopy (MRS, and resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI, we also found that aCAS patients suffered decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF mainly in the Left Frontal Gyrus and had decreased NAA/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus and decreased connectivity to the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC in the anterior part of default mode network (DMN.

  17. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Goyal, Satnam; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Namita; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N; Khushu, Subash

    2015-06-01

    Empathy deficit is a core feature of schizophrenia which may lead to social dysfunction. The present study was carried out to investigate functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and education were examined with structural highresolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during empathy task in the same session. The analysis was carried out using SPM8 software. On behavioural assessment, schizophrenic patients (83.00+-29.04) showed less scores for sadness compared to healthy controls (128.70+-22.26) (p less than 0.001). fMRI results also showed reduced clusters of activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left middle and inferior occipital gyrus in schizophrenic subjects as compared to controls during empathy task. In the same brain areas, VBM results also showed reduced grey and white matter volumes. The present study provides an evidence for an association between structural alterations and disturbed functional brain activation during empathy task in persons affected with schizophrenia. These findings suggest a biological basis for social cognition deficits in schizophrenics.

  18. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sadhana Singh; Shilpi Modi; Satnam Goyal; Prabhjot Kaur; Namita Singh; Triptish Bhatia; Smita N Deshpande; Subash Khushu

    2015-06-01

    Empathy deficit is a core feature of schizophrenia which may lead to social dysfunction. The present study was carried out to investigate functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during empathy task in the same session. The analysis was carried out using SPM8 software. On behavioural assessment, schizophrenic patients (83.00±29.04) showed less scores for sadness compared to healthy controls (128.70±22.26) ( < 0.001). fMRI results also showed reduced clusters of activation in the bilateral fusiform gyrus, left lingual gyrus, left middle and inferior occipital gyrus in schizophrenic subjects as compared to controls during empathy task. In the same brain areas, VBM results also showed reduced grey and white matter volumes. The present study provides an evidence for an association between structural alterations and disturbed functional brain activation during empathy task in persons affected with schizophrenia. These findings suggest a biological basis for social cognition deficits in schizophrenics.

  19. Cerebral Responses to Vocal Attractiveness and Auditory Hallucinations in Schizophrenia: A Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiko eKoeda

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Impaired self-monitoring and abnormalities of cognitive bias have been implicated as cognitive mechanisms of hallucination; regions fundamental to these processes including inferior frontal gyrus (IFG and superior temporal gyrus (STG are abnormally activated in individuals that hallucinate. A recent study showed activation in IFG-STG to be modulated by auditory attractiveness, but no study has investigated whether these IFG-STG activations are impaired in schizophrenia. We aimed to clarify the cerebral function underlying the perception of auditory attractiveness in schizophrenia patients. Cerebral activation was examined in 18 schizophrenia patients and 18 controls when performing Favourability Judgment Task (FJT and Gender Differentiation Task (GDT for pairs of greetings using event-related functional MRI. A full-factorial analysis revealed that the main effect of task was associated with activation of left IFG and STG. The main effect of Group revealed less activation of left STG in schizophrenia compared with controls, whereas significantly greater activation in schizophrenia than in controls was revealed at the left middle frontal gyrus (MFG, right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ, right occipital lobe, and right amygdala (p<0.05, FDR-corrected. A significant positive correlation was observed at the right TPJ and right MFG between cerebral activation under FJT minus GDT contrast and the score of hallucinatory behaviour on the Positive and Negative Symptom Scale. Findings of hypo-activation in the left STG could designate brain dysfunction in accessing vocal attractiveness in schizophrenia, whereas hyper-activation in the right TPJ and MFG may reflect the process of mentalizing other person’s behaviour by auditory hallucination by abnormality of cognitive bias.

  20. Functional correlates of the speech-in-noise perception impairment in dyslexia: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dole, Marjorie; Meunier, Fanny; Hoen, Michel

    2014-07-01

    Dyslexia is a language-based neurodevelopmental disorder. It is characterized as a persistent deficit in reading and spelling. These difficulties have been shown to result from an underlying impairment of the phonological component of language, possibly also affecting speech perception. Although there is little evidence for such a deficit under optimal, quiet listening conditions, speech perception difficulties in adults with dyslexia are often reported under more challenging conditions, such as when speech is masked by noise. Previous studies have shown that these difficulties are more pronounced when the background noise is speech and when little spatial information is available to facilitate differentiation between target and background sound sources. In this study, we investigated the neuroimaging correlates of speech-in-speech perception in typical readers and participants with dyslexia, focusing on the effects of different listening configurations. Fourteen adults with dyslexia and 14 matched typical readers performed a subjective intelligibility rating test with single words presented against concurrent speech during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning. Target words were always presented with a four-talker background in one of three listening configurations: Dichotic, Binaural or Monaural. The results showed that in the Monaural configuration, in which no spatial information was available and energetic masking was maximal, intelligibility was severely decreased in all participants, and this effect was particularly strong in participants with dyslexia. Functional imaging revealed that in this configuration, participants partially compensate for their poorer listening abilities by recruiting several areas in the cerebral networks engaged in speech perception. In the Binaural configuration, participants with dyslexia achieved the same performance level as typical readers, suggesting that they were able to use spatial information when available

  1. Functional MRI study of diencephalic amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulo, M; Van Hecke, J; Toma, L; Ferretti, A; Tartaro, A; Colosimo, C; Romani, G L; Uncini, A

    2005-07-01

    Anterograde amnesia in Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with diencephalic lesions, mainly in the anterior thalamic nuclei. Whether diencephalic and temporal lobe amnesias are distinct entities is still not clear. We investigated episodic memory for faces using functional MRI (fMRI) in eight controls and in a 34-year-old man with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome and diencephalic lesions but without medial temporal lobe (MTL) involvement at MRI. fMRI was performed with a 1.5 tesla unit. Three dual-choice tasks were employed: (i) face encoding (18 faces were randomly presented three times and subjects were asked to memorize the faces); (ii) face perception (subjects indicated which of two faces matched a third face); and (iii) face recognition (subjects indicated which of two faces belonged to the group they had been asked to memorize during encoding). All activation was greater in the right hemisphere. In controls both the encoding and recognition tasks activated two hippocampal regions (anterior and posterior). The anterior hippocampal region was more activated during recognition. Activation in the prefrontal cortex was greater during recognition. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, fMRI did not show hippocampal activation during either encoding or recognition. During recognition, although behavioural data showed defective retrieval, the prefrontal regions were activated as in controls, except for the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex. fMRI activation of the visual cortices and the behavioural score on the perception task indicated that the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome perceived the faces, paid attention to the task and demonstrated accurate judgement. In the subject with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, although the anatomical damage does not involve the MTL, the hippocampal memory encoding has been lost, possibly as a consequence of the hippocampal-anterior thalamic axis involvement. Anterograde amnesia could therefore be the expression of

  2. Neural Activations of Guided Imagery and Music in Negative Emotional Processing: A Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2016-01-01

    The Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music uses music and imagery to access and explore personal emotions associated with episodic memories. Understanding the neural mechanism of guided imagery and music (GIM) as combined stimuli for emotional processing informs clinical application. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate neural mechanisms of GIM for negative emotional processing when personal episodic memory is recalled and re-experienced through GIM processes. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in the study, which used classical music and verbal instruction stimuli to evoke negative emotions. To analyze the neural mechanism, activated regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing were extracted by conducting volume analyses for the contrast between GIM and guided imagery (GI) or music (M). The GIM stimuli showed increased activation over the M-only stimuli in five neural regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing, including the left amygdala, left anterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, bilateral culmen, and left angular gyrus (AG). Compared with GI alone, GIM showed increased activation in three regions associated with episodic memory processing in the emotional context, including the right posterior cingulate gyrus, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and AG. No neural regions related to negative emotional and episodic memory processing showed more activation for M and GI than for GIM. As a combined multimodal stimulus, GIM may increase neural activations related to negative emotions and episodic memory processing. Findings suggest a neural basis for GIM with personal episodic memories affecting cortical and subcortical structures and functions. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology: a combined structural and functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opmeer, Esther M; van Tol, Marie-José; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J A; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A; Penninx, Brenda W; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISC1 differentially modulates brain function during executive and memory processing, and morphology in regions relevant for depression and anxiety disorders (affective disorders). 128 participants, with (n = 103) and without (controls; n = 25) affective disorders underwent genotyping for Ser704Cys (with Cys-allele considered as risk-allele) and structural and functional (f) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) during visuospatial planning and emotional episodic memory tasks. For both voxel-based morphometry and fMRI analyses, we investigated the effect of genotype in controls and explored genotypeXdiagnosis interactions. Results are reported at p < 0.05 FWE small volume corrected. In controls, Cys-carriers showed smaller bilateral (para)hippocampal volumes compared with Ser-homozygotes, and lower activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral PFC during visuospatial planning. In anxiety patients, Cys-carriers showed larger (para)hippocampal volumes and more ACC activation during visuospatial planning. In depressive patients, no effect of genotype was observed and overall, no effect of genotype on episodic memory processing was detected. We demonstrated that Ser704Cys-genotype influences (para)hippocampal structure and functioning the dorsal PFC during executive planning, most prominently in unaffected controls. Results suggest that presence of psychopathology moderates Ser704Cys effects.

  4. Neural Correlates of Associative Memory in the Elderly: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Weicong; Li, Rui; Zheng, Zhiwei; Li, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The neural correlates of associative memory in healthy older adults were investigated by examining the correlation of associative memory performance with spontaneous brain oscillations. Eighty healthy older adults underwent a resting-state functional MRI and took a paired-associative learning test (PALT). Correlations between the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) as well as fractional ALFF (fALFF) in the whole brain and PALT scores were calculated. We found that spontaneous activity as indexed by both ALFF and fALFF in the parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) was significantly positively correlated with associative memory performance, suggesting that the PHG plays a critical role in associative memory in older people.

  5. Altered cortical activation during action observation in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a parametric functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haiqing; Li, Yuxin; Yin, Bo; Tang, Weijun; Yu, Xiangrong; Geng, Daoying [Huashan Hospital, Department of Radiology, Fudan University, Shanghai (China); Chen, Yan [Fudan University, Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Huang, Weiyuan [People' s Hospital of Hainan Province, Department of Radiology, Haikou, Hainan Province (China); Zhang, Biyun [Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Department of radiotherapy, Affiliated Jiangsu Province Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanjing (China)

    2015-09-15

    To investigate functional cerebral abnormalities in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during action observation. Thirty patients with ALS and 30 matched healthy controls underwent fMRI with an experimental paradigm while observing a video of repetitive flexion-extension of the fingers at three frequency levels or three complexity levels, alternated with periods of a static hand. A parametric analysis was applied to determine the effects of each of the two factors. Action observation activated similar neural networks as the research on execution of action in the ALS patients and healthy subjects in several brain regions related to the mirror-neuron system (MNS). In the ALS patients, in particular, the dorsal lateral premotor cortex (dPMC), inferior parietal gyrus (IPG), and SMA, were more activated compared with the activation in the controls. Increased activation within the primary motor cortex (M1), dPMC, inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), and superior parietal gyrus (SPG) mainly correlated with hand movement frequency/complexity in the videos in the patients compared with controls. The findings indicated an ongoing compensatory process occurring within the higher order motor-processing system of ALS patients, likely to overcome the loss of function. (orig.)

  6. Hemisphere- and gender-related differences in small-world brain networks: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lixia; Wang, Jinhui; Yan, Chaogan; He, Yong

    2011-01-01

    We employed resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) to investigate hemisphere- and gender-related differences in the topological organization of human brain functional networks. Brain networks were first constructed by measuring inter-regional temporal correlations of R-fMRI data within each hemisphere in 86 young, healthy, right-handed adults (38 males and 48 females) followed by a graph-theory analysis. The hemispheric networks exhibit small-world attributes (high clustering and short paths) that are compatible with previous results in the whole-brain functional networks. Furthermore, we found that compared with females, males have a higher normalized clustering coefficient in the right hemispheric network but a lower clustering coefficient in the left hemispheric network, suggesting a gender-hemisphere interaction. Moreover, we observed significant hemisphere-related differences in the regional nodal characteristics in various brain regions, such as the frontal and occipital regions (leftward asymmetry) and the temporal regions (rightward asymmetry), findings that are consistent with previous studies of brain structural and functional asymmetries. Together, our results suggest that the topological organization of human brain functional networks is associated with gender and hemispheres, and they provide insights into the understanding of functional substrates underlying individual differences in behaviors and cognition.

  7. A functional MRI study of happy and sad emotions in music with and without lyrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira eBrattico

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Musical emotions, such as happiness and sadness, have been investigated using instrumental music devoid of linguistic content. However, pop and rock, the most common musical genres, utilize lyrics for conveying emotions. Using participants’ self-selected musical excerpts, we studied their behavior and brain responses to elucidate how lyrics interact with musical emotion processing, as reflected by emotion recognition and activation of limbic areas involved in affective experience. We extracted samples from subjects’ selections of sad and happy pieces and sorted them according to the presence of lyrics. Acoustic feature analysis showed that music with lyrics differed from music without lyrics in spectral centroid, a feature related to perceptual brightness, whereas sad music with lyrics did not diverge from happy music without lyrics, indicating the role of other factors in emotion classification. Behavioral ratings revealed that happy music without lyrics induced stronger positive emotions than happy music with lyrics. We also acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data while subjects performed affective tasks regarding the music. First, using ecological and acoustically variable stimuli, we broadened previous findings about the brain processing of musical emotions and of songs versus instrumental music. Additionally, contrasts between sad music with versus without lyrics recruited the parahippocampal gyrus, the amygdala, the claustrum, the putamen, the precentral gyrus, the medial and inferior frontal gyri (including Broca’s area, and the auditory cortex, while the reverse contrast produced no activations. Happy music without lyrics activated structures of the limbic system and the right pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, whereas auditory regions alone responded to happy music with lyrics. These findings point to the role of acoustic cues for the experience of happiness in music and to the importance of lyrics

  8. Developing a comprehensive presurgical functional MRI protocol for patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deblaere, K.; Vandemaele, P.; Achten, E. [MRI Department -1 K12, Department of Radiology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Backes, W.H.; Hofman, P.; Wilmink, J. [Department of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Maastricht, Postbus 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht (Netherlands); Boon, P.A.; Vonck, K. [Department of Neurology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Boon, P. [Department of Medical Psychology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Troost, J. [Department of Neurology, University Hospital Maastricht (Netherlands); Vermeulen, J. [S.E.I.N Heemstede, Psychological Laboratory, Achterweg 5, 2103 SW Heemstede (Netherlands); Aldenkamp, A. [Epilepsy Center ' Kempenhaeghe' , Postbus 61, 5900 AB Heeze (Netherlands)

    2002-08-01

    Our aim was to put together and test a comprehensive functional MRI (fMRI) protocol which could compete with the intracarotid amytal (IAT) or Wada test for the localisation of language and memory function in patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy. The protocol was designed to be performed in under 1 h on a standard 1.5 tesla imager. We used five paradigms to test nine healthy right-handed subjects: complex scene-encoding, picture-naming, reading, word-generation and semantic-decision tasks. The combination of these tasks generated two activation maps related to memory in the mesial temporal lobes, and three language-related maps of activation in a major part of the known language network. The functional maps from the encoding and naming tasks showed typical and symmetrical posterior mesial temporal lobe activation related to memory in all subjects. Only four of nine subjects also showed symmetrical anterior hippocampal activation. Language lateralisation was best with the word generation and reading paradigms and proved possible in all subjects. The reading paradigm enables localisation of language function in the left anterior temporal pole and middle temporal gyrus, areas typically resected during epilepsy surgery. The combined results of this comprehensive f MRI protocol are adequate for a comparative study with the IAT in patients with epilepsy being assessed for surgery. (orig.)

  9. Altered Functional Connectivity in Essential Tremor: A Resting-State fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Romero, Juan Pablo; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Manzanedo, Eva; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Posada, Ignacio; Rocon, Eduardo

    2015-12-01

    Essential tremor (ET) has been associated with a spectrum of clinical features, with both motor and nonmotor elements, including cognitive deficits. We employed resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess whether brain networks that might be involved in the pathogenesis of nonmotor manifestations associated with ET are altered, and the relationship between abnormal connectivity and ET severity and neuropsychological function.Resting-state fMRI data in 23 ET patients (12 women and 11 men) and 22 healthy controls (HC) (12 women and 10 men) were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify the group differences of resting-state networks (RSNs) (default mode network [DMN] and executive, frontoparietal, sensorimotor, cerebellar, auditory/language, and visual networks). All participants underwent a neuropsychological and neuroimaging session, where resting-state data were collected.Relative to HC, ET patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (DMN and frontoparietal networks) and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and visual networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with ET severity (DMN) and ET duration (DMN and left frontoparietal network), but also with cognitive ability. Moreover, in at least 3 networks (DMN and frontoparietal networks), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, verbal memory, visual memory, and language) and depressive symptoms. Further, in the visual network, decreased connectivity was associated with worse performance on visuospatial ability.ET was associated with abnormal brain connectivity in major RSNs that might be involved in both motor and nonmotor symptoms. Our findings underscore the importance of examining RSNs in this population as a biomarker of disease.

  10. Thoughts turned into high-level commands: Proof-of-concept study of a vision-guided robot arm driven by functional MRI (fMRI) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Nigri, Anna; Rosazza, Cristina; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the possibility of using functional MRI to control a robot arm through a brain-machine interface by directly coupling haemodynamic activity in the sensory-motor cortex to the position of two axes. Here, we extend this work by implementing interaction at a more abstract level, whereby imagined actions deliver structured commands to a robot arm guided by a machine vision system. Rather than extracting signals from a small number of pre-selected regions, the proposed system adaptively determines at individual level how to map representative brain areas to the input nodes of a classifier network. In this initial study, a median action recognition accuracy of 90% was attained on five volunteers performing a game consisting of collecting randomly positioned coloured pawns and placing them into cups. The "pawn" and "cup" instructions were imparted through four mental imaginery tasks, linked to robot arm actions by a state machine. With the current implementation in MatLab language the median action recognition time was 24.3s and the robot execution time was 17.7s. We demonstrate the notion of combining haemodynamic brain-machine interfacing with computer vision to implement interaction at the level of high-level commands rather than individual movements, which may find application in future fMRI approaches relevant to brain-lesioned patients, and provide source code supporting further work on larger command sets and real-time processing.

  11. Correspondence between altered functional and structural connectivity in the contralesional sensorimotor cortex after unilateral stroke in rats: a combined resting-state functional MRI and manganese-enhanced MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meer, Maurits PA; van der Marel, Kajo; Otte, Willem M; Berkelbach van der Sprenkel, Jan Willem; Dijkhuizen, Rick M

    2010-01-01

    This study shows a significant correlation between functional connectivity, as measured with resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and neuroanatomical connectivity, as measured with manganese-enhanced MRI, in rats at 10 weeks after unilateral stroke and in age-matched controls. Reduced interhemispheric functional connectivity between the contralesional primary motor cortex (M1) and ipsilesional sensorimotor cortical regions was accompanied by a decrease in transcallosal manganese transfer from contralesional M1 to the ipsilesional sensorimotor cortex after a large unilateral stroke. Increased intrahemispheric functional connectivity in the contralesional sensorimotor cortex was associated with locally enhanced neuroanatomical tracer uptake, which underlines the strong link between functional and structural reorganization of neuronal networks after stroke. PMID:20664609

  12. fMRI Study Revealing Neural Mechanisms of the Functions of SOA in Spatial Orienting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Tian; Qian Zhang; De-Zhong Yao

    2009-01-01

    It is well documented that orienting attention plays an important role in visual search. However, it remains unclear how the executive brain regions will act when two different stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) are used in visual search. In this work, event-related fMRI was used to investigate neural mechanisms on the functions of SOA in endogenous and exogenous orienting. The results showed that in the endogenous orienting, long SOA versus short SOA resulted in widespread cortical activation mainly including right medial frontal gyrus and bilateral middle frontal gyri. Conversely, in exogenous orienting, long SOA compared to short SOA resulted in only activations in bilateral middle frontal gyri. These findings indicated that these two spatial orienting involved different brain areas and neural mechanisms.

  13. Functional MRI/event-related potential study of sensory consonance and dissonance in musicians and nonmusicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Rosazza, Cristina; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Pietrocini, Emanuela; Valentini, Laura; Scaioli, Vidmer; Loveday, Catherine; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia

    2009-01-07

    Pleasurability of individual chords, known as sensory consonance, is widely regarded as physiologically determined and has been shown to be associated with differential activity in the auditory cortex and in several other regions. Here, we present results obtained contrasting isolated four-note chords classified as consonant or dissonant in tonal music. Using event-related functional MRI, consonant chords were found to elicit a larger haemodynamic response in the inferior and middle frontal gyri, premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule. The effect was right lateralized for nonmusicians and less asymmetric for musicians. Using event-related potentials, the degree of sensory consonance was found to modulate the amplitude of the P1 in both groups and of the N2 in musicians only.

  14. Corticospinal Tract Compression by Hematoma in a Patient with Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Diffusion Tensor Tractography and Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung-Ho; Lee, Mi Young; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, Joong Hwi; Jeong, Dong-Hoon; Choi, Byung Yeun; Lee, Dong Gyu

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to demonstrate corticospinal tract compression that was due to a hematoma by using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) and functional MRI (fMRI) in a patient with an intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). A 23-year-old right-handed woman presented with severe paralysis of her right extremities at the onset of a spontaneous ICH. Over the first three days from onset, the motor function of the affected upper and lower extremities rapidly recovered to the extent that she was able to overcome applied resistance to the affected limbs, and her limbs regained normal function 3 weeks after onset. The tract of the right hemisphere originated from the primary sensori-motor cortex (SM1) and it passed through the known corticospinal tract pathway. However, the tract of the left hemisphere was similar to that of the right hemisphere except that it was displaced to the antero-medial side by the hematoma at the cerebral peduncle. Only the contralateral SM1 area centered on the precentral knob was activated during affected (right) or unaffected (left) hand movements, respectively. In conclusion, fMRI and DTT demonstrated a corticospinal tract compression due to hematoma in this patient. We conclude that the combined use of these two modalities appears to improve the accuracy of investigating the state of the corticospinal tract. PMID:16502496

  15. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  16. Mild cognitive impairment and fMRI studies of brain functional connectivity: the state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farràs-Permanyer, Laia; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    In the last 15 years, many articles have studied brain connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment patients with fMRI techniques, seemingly using different connectivity statistical models in each investigation to identify complex connectivity structures so as to recognize typical behavior in this type of patient. This diversity in statistical approaches may cause problems in results comparison. This paper seeks to describe how researchers approached the study of brain connectivity in MCI patients using fMRI techniques from 2002 to 2014. The focus is on the statistical analysis proposed by each research group in reference to the limitations and possibilities of those techniques to identify some recommendations to improve the study of functional connectivity. The included articles came from a search of Web of Science and PsycINFO using the following keywords: f MRI, MCI, and functional connectivity. Eighty-one papers were found, but two of them were discarded because of the lack of statistical analysis. Accordingly, 79 articles were included in this review. We summarized some parts of the articles, including the goal of every investigation, the cognitive paradigm and methods used, brain regions involved, use of ROI analysis and statistical analysis, emphasizing on the connectivity estimation model used in each investigation. The present analysis allowed us to confirm the remarkable variability of the statistical analysis methods found. Additionally, the study of brain connectivity in this type of population is not providing, at the moment, any significant information or results related to clinical aspects relevant for prediction and treatment. We propose to follow guidelines for publishing fMRI data that would be a good solution to the problem of study replication. The latter aspect could be important for future publications because a higher homogeneity would benefit the comparison between publications and the generalization of results. PMID:26300802

  17. Mild cognitive impairment and fMRI studies of brain functional connectivity: the state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia eFarràs-Permanyer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last fifteen years, many articles have studied brain connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment patients with fMRI techniques, seemingly using different connectivity statistical models in each investigation to identify complex connectivity structures so as to recognize typical behavior in this type of patient. This diversity in statistical approaches may cause problems in results comparison. This paper seeks to describe how researchers approached the study of brain connectivity in MCI patients using fMRI techniques from 2002 to 2014.The focus is on the statistical analysis proposed by each research group in reference to the limitations and possibilities of those techniques to identify some recommendations to improve the study of functional connectivity. The included articles came from a search of Web of Science and PsycINFO using the following keywords: fMRI, MCI and functional connectivity. Eighty-one papers were found, but 2 of them were discarded because of the lack of statistical analysis. Accordingly, 79 articles were included in this review. We summarized some parts of the articles, including the goal of every investigation, the cognitive paradigm and methods used, brain regions involved, use of ROI analysis and statistical analysis, emphasizing on the connectivity estimation model used in each investigation. The present analysis allowed us to confirm the remarkable variability of the statistical analysis methods found. Additionally, the study of brain connectivity in this type of population is not providing, at the moment, any significant information or results related to clinical aspects relevant for prediction and treatment. We propose to follow guidelines for publishing fMRI data that would be a good solution to the problem of study replication. The latter aspect could be important for future publications because a higher homogeneity would benefit the comparison between publications and the generalization of results.

  18. Mild cognitive impairment and fMRI studies of brain functional connectivity: the state of the art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farràs-Permanyer, Laia; Guàrdia-Olmos, Joan; Peró-Cebollero, Maribel

    2015-01-01

    In the last 15 years, many articles have studied brain connectivity in Mild Cognitive Impairment patients with fMRI techniques, seemingly using different connectivity statistical models in each investigation to identify complex connectivity structures so as to recognize typical behavior in this type of patient. This diversity in statistical approaches may cause problems in results comparison. This paper seeks to describe how researchers approached the study of brain connectivity in MCI patients using fMRI techniques from 2002 to 2014. The focus is on the statistical analysis proposed by each research group in reference to the limitations and possibilities of those techniques to identify some recommendations to improve the study of functional connectivity. The included articles came from a search of Web of Science and PsycINFO using the following keywords: f MRI, MCI, and functional connectivity. Eighty-one papers were found, but two of them were discarded because of the lack of statistical analysis. Accordingly, 79 articles were included in this review. We summarized some parts of the articles, including the goal of every investigation, the cognitive paradigm and methods used, brain regions involved, use of ROI analysis and statistical analysis, emphasizing on the connectivity estimation model used in each investigation. The present analysis allowed us to confirm the remarkable variability of the statistical analysis methods found. Additionally, the study of brain connectivity in this type of population is not providing, at the moment, any significant information or results related to clinical aspects relevant for prediction and treatment. We propose to follow guidelines for publishing fMRI data that would be a good solution to the problem of study replication. The latter aspect could be important for future publications because a higher homogeneity would benefit the comparison between publications and the generalization of results.

  19. A study of the brain functional network of Deqi via acupuncturing stimulation at BL40 by rs-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu; Zhang, Shanshan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Ziping; Guo, Shigui; Yang, Jiangming; Wu, Wen

    2016-04-01

    Acupuncture is a therapeutic treatment defined as the insertion of needles into the body at specific points (i.e., acupoints). The acupuncture sensation of Deqi is an important component of acupuncture, but the functional brain responses of Deqi have not been entirely supported by the results of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. The aims of this study were to test the conditions that would generate a Deqi sensation and to investigate the effect of Deqi and the response of acupuncture at different depths and intensities on brain fMRI blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals. Healthy subjects (n=16) completed two resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI) scans, once during shallow needling (2 mm) and once during deep needling (10-20 mm) pseudorandomly, at the acupoint BL40. When undergoing shallow needling, 16 subjects had a mild stabbing pain sensation, and no one had a composite Deqi sensation; when undergoing deep needling, 14 subjects had a composite Deqi sensation, and only 2 subjects had a sharp pain feeling. Composite deep needling of Deqi sensation modulated neural activity at multiple levels of the brain and cerebellum, decreased functional connectivity in the default mode networks (DMN) and the pain matrix networks, and increased connectivity in the right posterior cerebellar lobe, left parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus, and supplementary motor area (PDeqi sensation hypothesis whereby deep needing could affect a variety of deep tissues and never fibers was supported as acupuncture modulates the limbic-paralimbic-neocortical network to produce its Deqi effects. The similarity of LPNN and DMN suggests that deep needing may mobilize an important intrinsic brain network for its multiple modulation effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...... have been described. Still, to take full advantage of simultaneously recorded VEP-fMRI one would ideally want to track single-trial changes in the VEP and use this information in the fMRI analysis. In order to do this we examined 10 healthy volunteers with simultaneous VEP-fMRI. Different measures...

  1. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Sophia; Keeser, Daniel; Samson, Andrea C; Kirsch, Valerie; Blautzik, Janusch; Grothe, Michel; Erat, Okan; Hegenloh, Michael; Coates, Ute; Reiser, Maximilian F; Hennig-Fast, Kristina; Meindl, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA). We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI) to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male) and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male). Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA) values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  2. Convergent Findings of Altered Functional and Structural Brain Connectivity in Individuals with High Functioning Autism: A Multimodal MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Mueller

    Full Text Available Brain tissue changes in autism spectrum disorders seem to be rather subtle and widespread than anatomically distinct. Therefore a multimodal, whole brain imaging technique appears to be an appropriate approach to investigate whether alterations in white and gray matter integrity relate to consistent changes in functional resting state connectivity in individuals with high functioning autism (HFA. We applied diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, voxel-based morphometry (VBM and resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (fcMRI to assess differences in brain structure and function between 12 individuals with HFA (mean age 35.5, SD 11.4, 9 male and 12 healthy controls (mean age 33.3, SD 9.0, 8 male. Psychological measures of empathy and emotionality were obtained and correlated with the most significant DTI, VBM and fcMRI findings. We found three regions of convergent structural and functional differences between HFA participants and controls. The right temporo-parietal junction area and the left frontal lobe showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA values along with decreased functional connectivity and a trend towards decreased gray matter volume. The bilateral superior temporal gyrus displayed significantly decreased functional connectivity that was accompanied by the strongest trend of gray matter volume decrease in the temporal lobe of HFA individuals. FA decrease in the right temporo-parietal region was correlated with psychological measurements of decreased emotionality. In conclusion, our results indicate common sites of structural and functional alterations in higher order association cortex areas and may therefore provide multimodal imaging support to the long-standing hypothesis of autism as a disorder of impaired higher-order multisensory integration.

  3. Surface-Based fMRI-Driven Diffusion Tractography in the Presence of Significant Brain Pathology: A Study Linking Structure and Function in Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnington, Ross; Boyd, Roslyn N.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion MRI (dMRI) tractography analyses are difficult to perform in the presence of brain pathology. Automated methods that rely on cortical parcellation for structural connectivity studies often fail, while manually defining regions is extremely time consuming and can introduce human error. Both methods also make assumptions about structure-function relationships that may not hold after cortical reorganisation. Seeding tractography with functional-MRI (fMRI) activation is an emerging method that reduces these confounds, but inherent smoothing of fMRI signal may result in the inclusion of irrelevant pathways. This paper describes a novel fMRI-seeded dMRI-analysis pipeline based on surface-meshes that reduces these issues and utilises machine-learning to generate task specific white matter pathways, minimising the requirement for manually-drawn ROIs. We directly compared this new strategy to a standard voxelwise fMRI-dMRI approach, by investigating correlations between clinical scores and dMRI metrics of thalamocortical and corticomotor tracts in 31 children with unilateral cerebral palsy. The surface-based approach successfully processed more participants (87%) than the voxel-based approach (65%), and provided significantly more-coherent tractography. Significant correlations between dMRI metrics and five clinical scores of function were found for the more superior regions of these tracts. These significant correlations were stronger and more frequently found with the surface-based method (15/20 investigated were significant; R2 = 0.43–0.73) than the voxelwise analysis (2 sig. correlations; 0.38 & 0.49). More restricted fMRI signal, better-constrained tractography, and the novel track-classification method all appeared to contribute toward these differences. PMID:27487011

  4. Unique functional abnormalities in youth with combined marijuana use and depression: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A Ford

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Prior research has shown a relationship between early onset marijuana (MJ use and depression, however this relationship is complex and poorly understood. Here, we utilized passive music listening and fMRI to examine functional brain activation to a rewarding stimulus in 75 participants (healthy controls (HC, patients with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD, frequent MJ users (MJ, and the combination of MDD and MJ (MDD+MJ. For each participant a preferred and neutral piece of instrumental music was determined (utilizing ratings on a standardized scale, and each completed two 6-minute fMRI scans of a passive music listening task. Data underwent preprocessing and 61 participants were carried forward for analysis (17 HC, 15 MDD, 15 MJ, 14 MDD+MJ. Two statistical analyses were performed using SPM8, an ANCOVA with two factors (group x music-type and a whole brain, multiple regression analysis incorporating two predictors of interest (MJ use in past 28 days; and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI score. We identified a significant group x music-type interaction. Post hoc comparisons showed the preferred music had significantly greater activation in the MDD+MJ group in areas including the right middle and inferior frontal gyri extending into the claustrum and putamen and the anterior cingulate. No significant differences were identified in MDD, MJ or HC groups. Multiple regression analysis showed that activation in medial frontal cortex was positively correlated with amount of MJ use, and activation in areas including the insula was negatively correlated with BDI score. Results showed modulation in brain activation during passive music listening specific to MDD, frequent MJ users. This supports the suggestion that frequent MJ use, when combined with MDD, is associated with changes in neurocircuitry involved in reward-processing in ways that are absent with either frequent marijuana use or MDD alone. This could help inform clinical recommendations for youth with

  5. Brain Function and Upper Limb Outcome in Stroke: A Cross-Sectional fMRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floor E Buma

    Full Text Available The nature of changes in brain activation related to good recovery of arm function after stroke is still unclear. While the notion that this is a reflection of neuronal plasticity has gained much support, confounding by compensatory strategies cannot be ruled out. We address this issue by comparing brain activity in recovered patients 6 months after stroke with healthy controls.We included 20 patients with upper limb paresis due to ischemic stroke and 15 controls. We measured brain activation during a finger flexion-extension task with functional MRI, and the relationship between brain activation and hand function. Patients exhibited various levels of recovery, but all were able to perform the task.Comparison between patients and controls with voxel-wise whole-brain analysis failed to reveal significant differences in brain activation. Equally, a region of interest analysis constrained to the motor network to optimize statistical power, failed to yield any differences. Finally, no significant relationship between brain activation and hand function was found in patients. Patients and controls performed scanner task equally well.Brain activation and behavioral performance during finger flexion-extensions in (moderately well recovered patients seems normal. The absence of significant differences in brain activity even in patients with a residual impairment may suggest that infarcts do not necessarily induce reorganization of motor function. While brain activity could be abnormal with higher task demands, this may also introduce performance confounds. It is thus still uncertain to what extent capacity for true neuronal repair after stroke exists.

  6. Functional connectivity associated with social networks in older adults: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillemer, Sarah; Holtzer, Roee; Blumen, Helena M

    2017-06-01

    Poor social networks and decreased levels of social support are associated with worse mood, health, and cognition in younger and older adults. Yet, we know very little about the brain substrates associated with social networks and social support, particularly in older adults. This study examined functional brain substrates associated with social networks using the Social Network Index (SNI) and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Resting-state fMRI data from 28 non-demented older adults were analyzed with independent components analyses. As expected, four established resting-state networks-previously linked to motor, vision, speech, and other language functions-correlated with the quality (SNI-1: total number of high-contact roles of a respondent) and quantity (SNI-2: total number of individuals in a respondent's social network) of social networks: a sensorimotor, a visual, a vestibular/insular, and a left frontoparietal network. Moreover, SNI-1 was associated with greater functional connectivity in the lateral prefrontal regions of the left frontoparietal network, while SNI-2 was associated with greater functional connectivity in the medial prefrontal regions of this network. Thus, lateral prefrontal regions may be particularly linked to the quality of social networks while medial prefrontal regions may be particularly linked to the quantity of social networks.

  7. Language dominance in neurologically normal and epilepsy subjects: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springer, J A; Binder, J R; Hammeke, T A; Swanson, S J; Frost, J A; Bellgowan, P S; Brewer, C C; Perry, H M; Morris, G L; Mueller, W M

    1999-11-01

    Language dominance and factors that influence language lateralization were investigated in right-handed, neurologically normal subjects (n = 100) and right-handed epilepsy patients (n = 50) using functional MRI. Increases in blood oxygenation-dependent signal during a semantic language activation task relative to a non-linguistic, auditory discrimination task provided an index of language system lateralization. As expected, the majority of both groups showed left hemisphere dominance, although a continuum of activation asymmetry was evident, with nearly all subjects showing some degree of right hemisphere activation. Using a categorical dominance classification, 94% of the normal subjects were considered left hemisphere dominant and 6% had bilateral, roughly symmetric language representation. None of the normal subjects had rightward dominance. There was greater variability of language dominance in the epilepsy group, with 78% showing left hemisphere dominance, 16% showing a symmetric pattern and 6% showing right hemisphere dominance. Atypical language dominance in the epilepsy group was associated with an earlier age of brain injury and with weaker right hand dominance. Language lateralization in the normal group was weakly related to age, but was not significantly related to sex, education, task performance or familial left-handedness.

  8. Neuro-pharmacological functional MRI of epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiriyama, Hideki; Makabe, Tetsuo; Tomita, Susumu; Omoto, Takashi; Asari, Shoji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Aihara, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Ito, Takahiko

    2000-03-01

    We studied patients with epilepsy by neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam. Five normal volunteers and 7 patients with epilepsy were investigated. MRI was performed by a 1.5 T unit (SIGNA Horizon, GE) using the following parameters: TR/TE 5000 msec/80 msec, FA 90 deg, FOV 200 mm, matrix 128 x 128, slice thickness 7 mm. We performed MRI scanning over 5 minutes (2 minutes before and 3 minutes after injection of diazepam) for each 1 session; we scanned 3 sessions for each patient at intervals of 5 minutes. The diazepam was injected rapidly from the antecubital vein. The dose of diazepam was 0.05 mg/kg/injection (total dose was 0.15 mg/kg). The data were analyzed statistically using t-test. Signal change after administration of diazepam was less than 1 to 2% in healthy volunteers. By contrast, in patient with epilepsy, the signal change was almost 3%, which was significantly greater than that of the normal area (p=0.01). The neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam might be a useful method to identify epileptic foci. (author)

  9. Accessibility of spoken, written, and sign language in Landau-Kleffner syndrome: a linguistic and functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieratzki, J S; Calvert, G A; Brammer, M; David, A; Woll, B

    2001-06-01

    Landau-Kleffner syndrome (LKS) is an acquired aphasia which begins in childhood and is thought to arise from an epileptic disorder within the auditory speech cortex. Although the epilepsy usually subsides at puberty, a severe communication impairment often persists. Here we report on a detailed study of a 26-year old, left-handed male, with onset of LKS at age 5 years, who is aphasic for English but who learned British Sign Language (BSL) at age 13. We have investigated his skills in different language modalities, recorded EEGs during wakefulness, sleep, and under conditions of auditory stimulation, measured brain stem auditory-evoked potentials (BAEP), and performed functional MRI (fMRI) during a range of linguistic tasks. Our investigation demonstrated severe restrictions in comprehension and production of spoken English as well as lip-reading, while reading was comparatively less impaired. BSL was by far the most efficient mode of communication. All EEG recordings were normal, while BAEP showed minor abnormalities. fMRI revealed: 1) powerful and extensive bilateral (R > L) activation of auditory cortices in response to heard speech, much stronger than when listening to music; 2) very little response to silent lip-reading; 3) strong activation in the temporo-parieto-occipital association cortex, exclusively in the right hemisphere (RH), when viewing BSL signs. Analysis of these findings provides novel insights into the disturbance of the auditory speech cortex which underlies LKS and its diagnostic evaluation by fMRI, and underpins a strategy of restoring communication abilities in LKS through a natural sign language of the deaf (with Video)

  10. Brain's reward circuits mediate itch relief. a functional MRI study of active scratching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru D P Papoiu

    Full Text Available Previous brain imaging studies investigating the brain processing of scratching used an exogenous intervention mimicking scratching, performed not by the subjects themselves, but delivered by an investigator. In real life, scratching is a conscious, voluntary, controlled motor response to itching, which is directed to the perceived site of distress. In this study we aimed to visualize in real-time by brain imaging the core mechanisms of the itch-scratch cycle when scratching was performed by subjects themselves. Secondly, we aimed to assess the correlations between brain patterns of activation and psychophysical ratings of itch relief or pleasurability of scratching. We also compared the patterns of brain activity evoked by self-scratching vs. passive scratching. We used a robust tridimensional Arterial Spin Labeling fMRI technique that is less sensitive to motion artifacts: 3D gradient echo and spin echo (GRASE--Propeller. Active scratching was accompanied by a higher pleasurability and induced a more pronounced deactivation of the anterior cingulate cortex and insula, in comparison with passive scratching. A significant involvement of the reward system including the ventral tegmentum of the midbrain, coupled with a mechanism deactivating the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG, suggests that itch modulation operates in reverse to the mechanism known to suppress pain. Our findings not only confirm a role for the central networks processing reward in the pleasurable aspects of scratching, but also suggest they play a role in mediating itch relief.

  11. Age-related reorganization of functional networks for successful conflict resolution: a combined functional and structural MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Tilman; Müller-Oehring, Eva M; Chanraud, Sandra; Rosenbloom, Margaret J; Pfefferbaum, Adolf; Sullivan, Edith V

    2011-11-01

    Aging has readily observable effects on the ability to resolve conflict between competing stimulus attributes that are likely related to selective structural and functional brain changes. To identify age-related differences in neural circuits subserving conflict processing, we combined structural and functional MRI and a Stroop Match-to-Sample task involving perceptual cueing and repetition to modulate resources in healthy young and older adults. In our Stroop Match-to-Sample task, older adults handled conflict by activating a frontoparietal attention system more than young adults and engaged a visuomotor network more than young adults when processing repetitive conflict and when processing conflict following valid perceptual cueing. By contrast, young adults activated frontal regions more than older adults when processing conflict with perceptual cueing. These differential activation patterns were not correlated with regional gray matter volume despite smaller volumes in older than young adults. Given comparable performance in speed and accuracy of responding between both groups, these data suggest that successful aging is associated with functional reorganization of neural systems to accommodate functionally increasing task demands on perceptual and attentional operations.

  12. Perspective-taking as part of narrative comprehension: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mano, Yoko; Harada, Tokiko; Sugiura, Motoaki; Saito, Daisuke N; Sadato, Norihiro

    2009-02-01

    During narrative comprehension, readers understand the emotions of the protagonist by taking the perspective of the character, which is an essential component of empathy. Spatial perspective-taking is crucial to understanding the standpoints and perceptions of others, and gives clues as to what the protagonist knows. As a default, a "here and now" point-of-view is adopted to make sense of the narrative. If the protagonist is in a different location while an event takes place ("there and now"), in order to comprehend the narrative the reader must take an allocentric perspective, which places greater demands on spatial perspective-taking. Utilizing this phenomenon, we evaluated the neural substrates of perspective-taking in emotional narrative comprehension using functional MRI in 18 normal adults. The subjects read short stories followed by a target sentence, which described an event that might evoke an emotional response in the protagonist if the character were present. The stories involved a scenario in which the character was either present at the same location ("here and now") or at a distant location ("there and now") during the event. The "there and now" scenario activated the posterior cingulate cortex and the right temporo-parietal junction more prominently than the "here and now" condition. In contrast to the control tasks, both scenarios activated the well-known mentalizing network including the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, temporal pole, posterior cingulate cortex and temporo-parietal junction. Along with the mentalizing network, the posterior cingulate cortex and the right temporo-parietal junction are involved in spatial perspective-taking during emotional narrative comprehension.

  13. Preliminary pilot fMRI study of neuropostural optimization with a noninvasive asymmetric radioelectric brain stimulation protocol in functional dysmetria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mura M

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marco Mura1, Alessandro Castagna2, Vania Fontani2, Salvatore Rinaldi21Institute of Radiology, University of Cagliari, 2Rinaldi Fontani Institute – Department of Neuro Psycho Physical Optimization, Florence, ItalyPurpose: This study assessed changes in functional dysmetria (FD and in brain activation observable by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a leg flexion-extension motor task following brain stimulation with a single radioelectric asymmetric conveyer (REAC pulse, according to the precisely defined neuropostural optimization (NPO protocol.Population and methods: Ten healthy volunteers were assessed using fMRI conducted during a simple motor task before and immediately after delivery of a single REAC-NPO pulse. The motor task consisted of a flexion-extension movement of the legs with the knees bent. FD signs and brain activation patterns were compared before and after REAC-NPO.Results: A single 250-millisecond REAC-NPO treatment alleviated FD, as evidenced by patellar asymmetry during a sit-up motion, and modulated activity patterns in the brain, particularly in the cerebellum, during the performance of the motor task.Conclusion: Activity in brain areas involved in motor control and coordination, including the cerebellum, is altered by administration of a REAC-NPO treatment and this effect is accompanied by an alleviation of FD.Keywords: motor behavior, motor control, cerebellum, dysmetria, functional dysmetria, fluctuating asymmetry

  14. Pulmonary functional MRI:an animal model study of oxygen-enhanced ventilation combined with Gd-DTPA-enhanced perfusion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨健; 万明习; 郭佑民

    2004-01-01

    Background The assessment of regional pulmonary ventilation and perfusion is essential for the evaluation of a variety of lung disorders. Pulmonary ventilation MRI using inhaled oxygen as a contrast medium can be obtained with a clinical MR scanner, without additional equipment, and has been demonstrated to be a feasible means of assessing ventilation in animal models and some clinical patients. However, few studies have reported on MR ventilation-perfusion imaging. In this study, we evaluated the usefulness of oxygen-enhanced ventilation in combination with first-pass Gd-DTPA-enhanced perfusion MRI in a canine model of pulmonary embolism and airway obstruction.Methods Peripheral pulmonary embolisms were produced in eight dogs by intravenous injection of gelfoam strips at the pulmonary segmental arterial level, and airway obstructions were created in five of the dogs by inserting a self-designed balloon catheter into a secondary bronchus. Oxygen-enhanced MR ventilation images were produced by subtracting images from before and after inhalation of pure oxygen. Pulmonary perfusion MR images were acquired with a dynamic three-dimensional fast gradient-echo sequence. MR ventilation and perfusion images were read and contrasted with results from general examinations of pathological anatomy, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, and pulmonary angiography. Results Regions identified as having airway obstructions matched using both MR ventilation and perfusion imaging, but regions of pulmonary embolisms were mismatched. The area of airway obstruction defects was smaller using MR ventilation imagery than that using ventilation scintigraphy. Abnormal perfusion regions due to pulmonary embolisms were divided into defective regions and reduced regions based on the time course of signal intensity changes. In the diagnosis of pulmonary embolisms with the technique of ventilation and perfusion MRI, sensitivity and specificity were 75.0% and 98.1%, respectively, and the diagnostic

  15. Association of Coffee Consumption with MRI Markers and Cognitive Function: A Population-Based Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.F. Araújo (Larissa Fortunato); S.S. Mirza (Saira); D. Bos (Daniel); W.J. Niessen (Wiro); S.M. Barreto (Sandhi Maria); A. van der Lugt (Aad); M.W. Vernooij (Meike); A. Hofman (Albert); H.W. Tiemeier (Henning); M.A. Ikram (Arfan); Polidori, M.C. (M. Cristina)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Coffee is one of the most widely consumed beverages worldwide and has been of considerable interest in research on cognition and dementia. Objective: To investigate the effect of coffee on preclinical brain MRI markers of dementia and cognitive performance. Methods: In 2,914

  16. Structural and functional MRI study of the brain, cognition and mood in long-term adequately treated Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinque, Eva M; Karger, Stefan; Arélin, Katrin; Schroeter, Matthias L; Kratzsch, Jürgen; Villringer, Arno

    2014-04-01

    The current study investigated neuropsychological and underlying structural and functional brain alterations in long-term adequately treated patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis in order to examine much discussed residual complaints in patients in relation to possible long-term neural alterations with a specific interest in the underlying autoimmune process. Eighteen patients with treated hypothyroidism due to Hashimoto's thyroiditis (mean age 32, range 18-54 years; two males; mean treatment duration 4.4 years) and 18 healthy matched control subjects underwent 3-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate grey matter density, resting-state functional MRI to analyse the brain connectivity of areas known to be altered in hypothyroidism and event-related functional MRI to examine brain activity during associative memory encoding. Neuropsychological assessment included memory, working memory, psychomotor speed and attention. We previously reported subclinically reduced mood in this study population and investigated its neural correlates here. Thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodthyronine, free thyroxine and thyroid peroxidase antibodies were measured in serum. We did not find cognitive deficits or alterations in grey matter density, functional connectivity or associative memory-related brain activity in comparison to the control group and cognition was unrelated to thyroid serum measures in the patient group. Thyroid peroxidase antibodies in the patient group correlated with increased grey matter density in right amygdala and enhanced connectivity between subcallosal and parahippocampal areas. Treatment duration was associated with brain structure in frontal and occipital cortex and connectivity between left amygdala and frontal cortex. Mood correlated with brain areas associated with distinct functional networks, but not with those most prominently affected in depression. In conclusion, no cognitive or neural

  17. Modafinil alters intrinsic functional connectivity of the right posterior insula: a pharmacological resting state fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Cera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Modafinil is employed for the treatment of narcolepsy and has also been, off-label, used to treat cognitive dysfunction in neuropsychiatric disorders. In a previous study, we have reported that single dose administration of modafinil in healthy young subjects enhances fluid reasoning and affects resting state activity in the Fronto Parietal Control (FPC and Dorsal Attention (DAN networks. No changes were found in the Salience Network (SN, a surprising result as the network is involved in the modulation of emotional and fluid reasoning. The insula is crucial hub of the SN and functionally divided in anterior and posterior subregions. METHODOLOGY: Using a seed-based approach, we have now analyzed effects of modafinil on the functional connectivity (FC of insular subregions. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Analysis of FC with resting state fMRI (rs-FMRI revealed increased FC between the right posterior insula and the putamen, the superior frontal gyrus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the modafinil-treated group. CONCLUSIONS: Modafinil is considered a putative cognitive enhancer. The rs-fMRI modifications that we have found are consistent with the drug cognitive enhancing properties and indicate subregional targets of action. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306.

  18. Alternations of functional connectivity in amblyopia patients: a resting-state fMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jieqiong; Hu, Ling; Li, Wenjing; Xian, Junfang; Ai, Likun; He, Huiguang

    2014-03-01

    Amblyopia is a common yet hard-to-cure disease in children and results in poor or blurred vision. Some efforts such as voxel-based analysis, cortical thickness analysis have been tried to reveal the pathogenesis of amblyopia. However, few studies focused on alterations of the functional connectivity (FC) in amblyopia. In this study, we analyzed the abnormalities of amblyopia patients by both the seed-based FC with the left/right primary visual cortex and the network constructed throughout the whole brain. Experiments showed the following results: (1)As for the seed-based FC analysis, FC between superior occipital gyrus and the primary visual cortex was found to significantly decrease in both sides. The abnormalities were also found in lingual gyrus. The results may reflect functional deficits both in dorsal stream and ventral stream. (2)Two increased functional connectivities and 64 decreased functional connectivities were found in the whole brain network analysis. The decreased functional connectivities most concentrate in the temporal cortex. The results suggest that amblyopia may be caused by the deficits in the visual information transmission.

  19. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) procedure as experienced by healthy participants and stroke patients--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szameitat, André J; Shen, Shan; Sterr, Annette

    2009-07-31

    An important aspect in functional imaging research employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is how participants perceive the MRI scanning itself. For instance, the knowledge of how (un)comfortable MRI scanning is perceived may help institutional review boards (IRBs) or ethics committees to decide on the approval of a study, or researchers to design their experiments. We provide empirical data from our lab gained from 70 neurologically healthy mainly student subjects and from 22 mainly elderly patients suffering from motor deficits after brain damage. All participants took part in various basic research fMRI studies using a 3T MRI scanner. Directly after the scanning, all participants completed a questionnaire assessing their experience with the fMRI procedure. 87.2% of the healthy subjects and 77.3% of the patients rated the MRI procedure as acceptable to comfortable. In healthy subjects, males found the procedure more comfortable, while the opposite was true for patients. 12.1% of healthy subjects considered scanning durations between 30 and 60 min as too long, while no patient considered their 30 min scanning interval as too long. 93.4% of the healthy subjects would like to participate in an fMRI study again, with a significantly lower rate for the subjects who considered the scanning as too long. Further factors, such as inclusion of a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scan, age, and study duration had no effect on the questionnaire responses. Of the few negative comments, the main issues were noise, the restriction to keep still for the whole time, and occasional feelings of dizziness. MRI scanning in the basic research setting is an acceptable procedure for elderly and patient participants as well as young healthy subjects.

  20. The functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI procedure as experienced by healthy participants and stroke patients – A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Shan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An important aspect in functional imaging research employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is how participants perceive the MRI scanning itself. For instance, the knowledge of how (uncomfortable MRI scanning is perceived may help institutional review boards (IRBs or ethics committees to decide on the approval of a study, or researchers to design their experiments. Methods We provide empirical data from our lab gained from 70 neurologically healthy mainly student subjects and from 22 mainly elderly patients suffering from motor deficits after brain damage. All participants took part in various basic research fMRI studies using a 3T MRI scanner. Directly after the scanning, all participants completed a questionnaire assessing their experience with the fMRI procedure. Results 87.2% of the healthy subjects and 77.3% of the patients rated the MRI procedure as acceptable to comfortable. In healthy subjects, males found the procedure more comfortable, while the opposite was true for patients. 12.1% of healthy subjects considered scanning durations between 30 and 60 min as too long, while no patient considered their 30 min scanning interval as too long. 93.4% of the healthy subjects would like to participate in an fMRI study again, with a significantly lower rate for the subjects who considered the scanning as too long. Further factors, such as inclusion of a diffusion tensor imaging (DTI scan, age, and study duration had no effect on the questionnaire responses. Of the few negative comments, the main issues were noise, the restriction to keep still for the whole time, and occasional feelings of dizziness. Conclusion MRI scanning in the basic research setting is an acceptable procedure for elderly and patient participants as well as young healthy subjects.

  1. Superior digit memory of abacus experts: an event-related functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Michimata, Chikashi; Kaminaga, Tatsuro; Honda, Manabu; Sadato, Norihiro

    2002-12-01

    Abacus experts exhibit superior short-term memory for digits, but the underlying neurophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using event-related fMRI, we examined the brain activity of abacus experts and non-experts during the memory retention period of a delayed match-to-sample task using digits as stimuli. In controls, activity was greater in cortical areas related to verbal working memory, including Broca's area. In contrast, in experts, activity was greater in cortical areas related to visuo-spatial working memory, including the bilateral superior frontal sulcus and superior parietal lobule. This provides neurophysiological evidence that abacus experts utilize a visuo-spatial representation for digit memory.

  2. A 3 T event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study of primary and secondary gustatory cortex localization using natural tastants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smits, Marion [Erasmus MC, University Medical Center Rotterdam, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 2040, CA Rotterdam (Netherlands); K.U.Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Peeters, Ronald R.; Hecke, Paul van; Sunaert, Stefan [K.U.Leuven, Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    2007-01-15

    It is known that taste is centrally represented in the insula, frontal and parietal operculum, as well as in the orbitofrontal cortex (secondary gustatory cortex). In functional MRI (fMRI) experiments activation in the insula has been confirmed, but activation in the orbitofrontal cortex is only infrequently found, especially at higher field strengths (3 T). Due to large susceptibility artefacts, the orbitofrontal cortex is a difficult region to examine with fMRI. Our aim was to localize taste in the human cortex at 3 T, specifically in the orbitofrontal cortex as well as in the primary gustatory cortex. Event-related fMRI was performed at 3 T in seven healthy volunteers. Taste stimuli consisted of lemon juice and chocolate. To visualize activation in the orbitofrontal cortex a dedicated 3D SENSE EPI fMRI sequence was used, in addition to a 2D SENSE EPI fMRI sequence for imaging the entire brain. Data were analyzed using a perception-based model. The dedicated 3D SENSE EPI sequence successfully reduced susceptibility artefacts in the orbitofrontal area. Significant taste-related activation was found in the orbitofrontal and insular cortices. fMRI of the orbitofrontal cortex is feasible at 3 T, using a dedicated sequence. Our results corroborate findings from previous studies. (orig.)

  3. Two types of exercise-induced neuroplasticity in congenital hemiparesis: a transcranial magnetic stimulation, functional MRI, and magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juenger, Hendrik; Kuhnke, Nicola; Braun, Christoph; Ummenhofer, Frank; Wilke, Marko; Walther, Michael; Koerte, Inga; Delvendahl, Igor; Jung, Nikolai H; Berweck, Steffen; Staudt, Martin; Mall, Volker

    2013-10-01

    Early unilateral brain lesions can lead to a persistence of ipsilateral corticospinal projections from the contralesional hemisphere, which can enable the contralesional hemisphere to exert motor control over the paretic hand. In contrast to the primary motor representation (M1), the primary somatosensory representation (S1) of the paretic hand always remains in the lesioned hemisphere. Here, we report on differences in exercise-induced neuroplasticity between individuals with such ipsilateral motor projections (ipsi) and individuals with early unilateral lesions but 'healthy' contralateral motor projections (contra). Sixteen children and young adults with congenital hemiparesis participated in the study (contralateral [Contra] group: n=7, four females, three males; age range 10-30y, median age 16y; ipsilateral [Ipsi] group: n=9, four females, five males; age range 11-31y, median age 12y; Manual Ability Classification System levels I to II in all individuals in both groups). The participants underwent a 12-day intervention of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT), consisting of individual training (2h/d) and group training (8h/d). Before and after CIMT, hand function was tested using the Wolf Motor Function Test (WMFT) and diverging neuroplastic effects were observed by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and magnetoencephalography (MEG). Statistical analysis of TMS data was performed using the non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test for pair-wise comparison; for fMRI standard statistical parametric and non-parametric mapping (SPM5, SnPM3) procedures (first level/second level) were carried out. Statistical analyses of MEG data involved analyses of variance (ANOVA) and t-tests. While MEG demonstrated a significant increase in S1 activation in both groups (p=0.012), TMS showed a decrease in M1 excitability in the Ipsi group (p=0.036), but an increase in M1 excitability in the Contra group (p=0.043). Similarly

  4. Changes in brain activation in stroke patients after mental practice and physical exercise:a functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Liu; Luping Song; Tong Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Mental practice is a new rehabilitation method that refers to the mental rehearsal of motor imagery content with the goal of improving motor performance. However, the relationship between activated regions and motor recovery after mental practice training is not well understood. In this study, 15 patients who suffered a first-ever subcortical stroke with neurological deficits affecting the right hand, but no significant cognitive impairment were recruited. 10 patients underwent mental practice combined with physical practice training, and 5 patients only underwent physical practice training. We observed brain activation regions after 4 weeks of training, and explored the correlation of activation changes with functional recovery of the affected hands. The results showed that, after 4 weeks of mental practice combined with physical training, the Fugl-Meyer assessment score for the affected right hand was significantly increased than that after 4 weeks of practice training alone. Functional MRI showed enhanced activation in the left primary somatosensory cortex, attenuated activation intensity in the right primary motor cortex, and enhanced right cerebellar activation observed during the motor imagery task using the affected right hand after mental practice training. The changes in brain cortical activity were related to functional recovery of the hand. Experimental findings indicate that cortical and cerebellar functional reorganization following mental practice contributed to the improvement of hand function.

  5. Motor matters: tackling heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease in functional MRI studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štefan Holiga

    Full Text Available To tackle the heterogeneity of Parkinson's disease symptoms, most functional imaging studies tend to select a uniform group of subjects. We hypothesize that more profound considerations are needed to account for intra/inter-subject clinical variability and possibly for differing pathophysiological processes. Twelve patients were investigated using functional magnetic resonance imaging during visually-guided finger tapping. To account for disease heterogeneity, the motor score and individual symptom scores from the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS-III were utilized in the group-level model using two approaches either as the explanatory variable or as the effect of interest. Employment of the UPDRS-III score and symptom scores was systematically tested on the resulting group response to the levodopa challenge, which further accentuated the diversity of the diseased state of participants. Statistics revealed a bilateral group response to levodopa in the basal ganglia. Interestingly, systematic incorporation of individual motor aspects of the disease in the modelling amended the resulting activity patterns conspicuously, evidencing a manifold amount of explained variability by the particular score. In conclusion, the severity of clinical symptoms expressed in the UPDRS-III scores should be considered in the analysis to attain unbiased statistics, draw reliable conclusions and allow for comparisons between research groups studying Parkinson's disease using functional magnetic resonance imaging.

  6. Brain-Gut Axis Modulation of Acupuncture in Functional Dyspepsia: A Preliminary Resting-State fcMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiliang Fang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore acupuncture effects on brain functional connectivity in patients with functional dyspepsia (FD. Methods. Eight patients in an acupuncture treatment group and ten healthy adults in the control group participated in the study. Acupuncture effectiveness was evaluated based on changes of the gastrointestinal symptoms, gastric motility measurements, and gastrin levels and comparisons with the control group when appropriate. To investigate functional connectivity changes related to FD and potential modulation after acupuncture, a set of regions of interest (ROIs were selected according to previous fMRI reports of acupuncture. Results. Patients showed significant improvements of FD signs and symptoms after acupuncture treatments. For all of the ROIs, we identified subportions of the networks showing reduced connectivity in patients with FD. Connectivity between the ROIs and corresponding disease targets showed significant improvement after acupuncture treatment (P<0.05 in all ROIs except for right medial temporal lobe-hippocampus and right inferior parietal lobule. Conclusion. Functional connectivity of the brain is changed in patients with FD but approximates that in healthy control after acupuncture treatment. The relief of gastrointestinal signs and symptoms by acupuncture is likely due to the normalization of brain-gut axis associated with FD.

  7. The glycemic response to fibre rich foods and their relationship with gastric emptying and motor functions: an MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopirajah, R; Raichurkar, Keshav Prakash; Wadhwa, Rajkumar; Anandharamakrishnan, C

    2016-09-14

    The chief motor functions of human stomach, namely receiving, storing, mixing and emptying, influence the absorption of ingested food and hence determine the glycemic response to the meal. However, among these functions, the gastric emptying pattern of the stomach is essentially regulated by the meal characteristics such as particle size, volume, nutrient composition and viscosity. Understanding the complex relationship between the stomach motor functions and the physicochemical characteristics of meal on glycemic control needs more attention in the formulation of functional foods. Hence, the objective of this study is to employ the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique in ten healthy human volunteers to elucidate the relationship between the motor functions of the stomach and the glycemic response to fibre rich foods. For this, wheat and oat based breakfast meals were selected as fibre rich foods with low (0.042 Pa s) and high (0.266 Pa s) viscosity, respectively. Although wheat meal had a lower viscosity compared to oatmeal, the gastric emptying was found to be delayed for the former due to its high caloric density. This was reflected in the glycemic response as well, with wheat meal having a lower area under the curve (AUC) value than oatmeal. The antral contraction frequency is significantly reduced (P < 0.05) with delayed gastric emptying in the case of high nutrient wheat meal. Overall, the study demonstrated the synergistic effect of gastric emptying, stomach motor functions and physicochemical characteristics of food on the glycemic response to a meal. This information will aid in the development of functional foods with specific end applications.

  8. Altered interhemispheric functional connectivity in patients with anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia: a resting-state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Minglong; Xie, Bing; Yin, Xuntao; Wang, Jian [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); Yang, Hong; Wang, Hao [Third Military Medical University, Ophthalmology Research Center, Southwest Eye Hospital/Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yu, Longhua [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing (China); 401st Hospital of PLA, Department of Radiology, Qingdao (China); He, Sheng [University of Minnesota Twin Cities, Department of Psychology, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    Altered brain functional connectivity has been reported in patients with amblyopia by recent neuroimaging studies. However, relatively little is known about the alterations in interhemispheric functional connectivity in amblyopia. The present study aimed to investigate the functional connectivity patterns between homotopic regions across hemispheres in patients with anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia under resting state. Nineteen monocular anisometropic amblyopia (AA), 18 strabismic amblyopia (SA), and 20 normal-sight controls (NC) were enrolled in this study. After a comprehensive ophthalmologic examination, resting-state fMRI scanning was performed in all participants. The pattern of the interhemispheric functional connectivity was measured with the voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC) approach. VMHC values differences within and between three groups were compared, and correlations between VMHC values and each the clinical variable were also analyzed. Altered VMHC was observed in AA and SA patients in lingual gyrus and fusiform gyrus compared with NC subjects. The altered VMHC of lingual gyrus showed a pattern of AA > SA > NC, while the altered VMHC of fusiform gyrus showed a pattern of AA > NC > SA. Moreover, the VMHC values of lingual gyrus were positively correlated with the stereoacuity both in AA and SA patients, and the VMHC values of fusiform gyrus were positively correlated with the amount of anisometropia just in AA patients. These findings suggest that interhemispheric functional coordination between several homotopic visual-related brain regions is impaired both in AA and SA patients under resting state and revealed the similarities and differences in interhemispheric functional connectivity between the anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia. (orig.)

  9. Altered Long- and Short-Range Functional Connectivity in Patients with Betel Quid Dependence: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Addiction is a chronic relapsing brain disease. Brain structural abnormalities may constitute an abnormal neural network that underlies the risk of drug dependence. We hypothesized that individuals with Betel Quid Dependence (BQD have functional connectivity alterations that can be described by long- and short-range functional connectivity density(FCD maps. Methods: We tested this hypothesis using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data from subjects of the Han ethnic group in Hainan, China. Here, we examined BQD individuals (n = 33 and age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls (HCs (n = 32 in a rs-fMRI study to observe FCD alterations associated with the severity of BQD. Results: Compared with HCs, long-range FCD was decreased in the right anterior cingulate cortex (ACC and increased in the left cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL and bilateral inferior parietal lobule (IPL in the BQD group. Short-range FCD was reduced in the right ACC and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC, and increased in the left CPL. The short-range FCD alteration in the right ACC displayed a negative correlation with the Betel Quid Dependence Scale (BQDS (r=-0.432, P=0.012, and the long-range FCD alteration of left IPL showed a positive correlation with the duration of BQD(r=0.519, P=0.002 in BQD individuals. Conclusions: fMRI revealed differences in long- and short- range FCD in BQD individuals, and these alterations might be due to BQ chewing, BQ dependency, or risk factors for developing BQD.

  10. Spinal cord stimulation modulates cerebral function: an fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moens, M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurosurgery and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Sunaert, S.; Peeters, R. [UZ Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven (Belgium); Marien, P. [ZNA Middelheim General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Antwerp (Belgium); Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Department of Clinical and Experimental Neurolinguistics, Brussels (Belgium); Brouns, R.; Smedt, A. de [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Neurology and Center for Neuroscience, Brussels (Belgium); Droogmans, S. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Cardiology, Brussels (Belgium); Schuerbeek, P. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Radiology, Brussels (Belgium); Poelaert, J. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Department of Anesthesiology, Brussels (Belgium); Nuttin, B. [UZ Leuven, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Neurosurgery, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-12-15

    Although spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is widely used for chronic neuropathic pain after failed spinal surgery, little is known about the underlying physiological mechanisms. This study aims to investigate the neural substrate underlying short-term (30 s) SCS by means of functional magnetic resonance imaging in 20 patients with failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). Twenty patients with FBSS, treated with externalized SCS, participated in a blocked functional magnetic resonance imaging design with stimulation and rest phases of 30 s each, repeated eight times in a row. During scanning, patients rated pain intensity over time using an 11-point numerical rating scale with verbal anchors (0 = no pain at all to 10 = worst pain imaginable) by pushing buttons (left hand, lesser pain; right hand, more pain). This scale was back projected to the patients on a flat screen allowing them to manually direct the pain indicator. To increase the signal-to-noise ratio, the 8-min block measurements were repeated three times. Marked deactivation of the bilateral medial thalamus and its connections to the rostral and caudal cingulate cortex and the insula was found; the study also showed immediate pain relief obtained by short-term SCS correlated negatively with activity in the inferior olivary nucleus, the cerebellum, and the rostral anterior cingulate cortex. Results indicate the key role of the medial thalamus as a mediator and the involvement of a corticocerebellar network implicating the modulation and regulation of averse and negative affect related to pain. The observation of a deactivation of the ipsilateral antero-medial thalamus might be used as a region of interest for further response SCS studies. (orig.)

  11. Degrading traumatic memories with eye movements: a pilot functional MRI study in PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaes, Kathleen; Engelhard, Iris M.; Sijbrandij, Marit; Cath, Danielle C.; Van den Heuvel, Odile A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). During EMDR, the patient recalls traumatic memories while making eye movements (EMs). Making EMs during recall is associated with decreased vividness and emotionality of traumatic memories, but the underlying mechanism has been unclear. Recent studies support a “working-memory” (WM) theory, which states that the two tasks (recall and EMs) compete for limited capacity of WM resources. However, prior research has mainly relied on self-report measures. Methods Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we tested whether “recall with EMs,” relative to a “recall-only” control condition, was associated with reduced activity of primary visual and emotional processing brain regions, associated with vividness and emotionality respectively, and increased activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), associated with working memory. We used a randomized, controlled, crossover experimental design in eight adult patients with a primary diagnosis of PTSD. A script-driven imagery (SDI) procedure was used to measure responsiveness to an audio-script depicting the participant's traumatic memory before and after conditions. Results SDI activated mainly emotional processing-related brain regions (anterior insula, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex), WM-related (DLPFC), and visual (association) brain regions before both conditions. Although predicted pre- to post-test decrease in amygdala activation after “recall with EMs” was not significant, SDI activated less right amygdala and rostral ACC activity after “recall with EMs” compared to post-“recall-only.” Furthermore, functional connectivity from the right amygdala to the rostral ACC was decreased after “recall with EMs” compared with after “recall-only.” Conclusions These preliminary results in a small sample suggest that

  12. Why cold water delays the onset of vestibular vertigo-An functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhi [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: zhiwang76@gmail.com; Chen Min [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Gong Xia; Huang Weining [Department of E.N.T., Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Xu Liang [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China); Zhou Cheng [Department of Radiology, Beijing Hospital, No. 1 Dahua Road Dongdan, Beijing 100730 (China)], E-mail: chengzhou2000@yahoo.com

    2008-09-15

    The mechanism of vertigo is unclear. Generally, the peak time or the latency of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect is about 6 s. However, clinically, the latency of vertigo or nystagmus induced by caloric stimulations is much longer than 6 s, commonly about 30 s induced by water of 30 deg. C or 44 deg. C. We hypothesize that there is an inhibitive power or mechanism for the occurrence of vestibular vertigo, since it is an unpleasant feeling. The caloric test was performed in healthy volunteers during the BOLD fMRI scanning. The overlaid results of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) showed that three brain regions showed neural activation during vestibular dizziness while deactivation occurred in response to cold water simulation: (1) supplementary motor area (SMA); (2) middle temporal area/medial superior temporal area (MT/MST); (3) visual association area (BA19). The time course of the regions further demonstrated that the signal decreased during the cold-water stimulation and increased during the period of vertigo. We therefore further hypothesize that there may be two forces for the production of vertigo: inhibitory power (IP) and promotive power (PP). The delayed onset of vertigo was the result of the interaction between IP and PP. All of our findings, for the first time, suggested such an original mechanism of vertigo.

  13. The neural basis of mark making: a functional MRI study of drawing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Yuan

    Full Text Available Compared to most other forms of visually-guided motor activity, drawing is unique in that it "leaves a trail behind" in the form of the emanating image. We took advantage of an MRI-compatible drawing tablet in order to examine both the motor production and perceptual emanation of images. Subjects participated in a series of mark making tasks in which they were cued to draw geometric patterns on the tablet's surface. The critical comparison was between when visual feedback was displayed (image generation versus when it was not (no image generation. This contrast revealed an occipito-parietal stream involved in motion-based perception of the emerging image, including areas V5/MT+, LO, V3A, and the posterior part of the intraparietal sulcus. Interestingly, when subjects passively viewed animations of visual patterns emerging on the projected surface, all of the sensorimotor network involved in drawing was strongly activated, with the exception of the primary motor cortex. These results argue that the origin of the human capacity to draw and write involves not only motor skills for tool use but also motor-sensory links between drawing movements and the visual images that emanate from them in real time.

  14. Neural correlates of serial abacus mental calculation in children: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Feiyan; Hu, Zhenghui; Zhao, Xiaohu; Wang, Rui; Yang, Zhenyan; Wang, Xiaolu; Tang, Xiaowei

    2006-07-31

    Abacus experts have demonstrated extraordinary potential of mental calculation by using an imaginary abacus. But the neural correlates of abacus mental calculation and the imaginary abacus still remain unclear. Here, we report, respectively, the analysis of fMRI images of abacus experts and non-experts in response to the performance of simple and complex serial calculation by visual stimuli as well as the images of the abacus experts with performance of the same tasks by auditory stimuli. We found that activated areas were quite different between two groups. In experts, enhanced activations were mainly observed in fronto-temporal circuit (lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) and posterior temporal areas) in simple addition, but in fronto-parietal circuit (lateral premotor cortex (LPMC) and posterior superior parietal lobe (PSPL)) in complex one. By contrast, in controls, the activated areas were almost similar in both simple and complex tasks, including bilateral inferior parietal lobule, prefrontal and premotor cortices. Furthermore, visual and auditory stimuli generated almost similar activations in experts. These observations reveal that (1) abacus mental calculation induces special patterns of brain response, and simple and complex tasks are sustained by dissociated brain circuits between the temporal and parietal cortices, respectively; (2) the abacus mental calculation may rely on neural resources of visuospatial representations with a super-modal form of abacus beads; (3) the posterior temporal areas and PSPL may be recruited for imaginary abacus.

  15. Degrading traumatic memories with eye movements: a pilot functional MRI study in PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Thomaes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. During EMDR, the patient recalls traumatic memories while making eye movements (EMs. Making EMs during recall is associated with decreased vividness and emotionality of traumatic memories, but the underlying mechanism has been unclear. Recent studies support a “working-memory” (WM theory, which states that the two tasks (recall and EMs compete for limited capacity of WM resources. However, prior research has mainly relied on self-report measures. Methods: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we tested whether “recall with EMs,” relative to a “recall-only” control condition, was associated with reduced activity of primary visual and emotional processing brain regions, associated with vividness and emotionality respectively, and increased activity of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC, associated with working memory. We used a randomized, controlled, crossover experimental design in eight adult patients with a primary diagnosis of PTSD. A script-driven imagery (SDI procedure was used to measure responsiveness to an audio-script depicting the participant's traumatic memory before and after conditions. Results: SDI activated mainly emotional processing-related brain regions (anterior insula, rostral anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, WM-related (DLPFC, and visual (association brain regions before both conditions. Although predicted pre- to post-test decrease in amygdala activation after “recall with EMs” was not significant, SDI activated less right amygdala and rostral ACC activity after “recall with EMs” compared to post-“recall-only.” Furthermore, functional connectivity from the right amygdala to the rostral ACC was decreased after “recall with EMs” compared with after “recall-only.” Conclusions: These preliminary results in a small sample

  16. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, J.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Payne, G.S.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T{sub 1} relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. (orig.)

  17. Neurophysiology of motor function following cannabis discontinuation in chronic cannabis smokers: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillay, Srinivasan S; Rogowska, Jadwiga; Kanayama, Gen; Jon, Duk-In; Gruber, Staci; Simpson, Norah; Cherayil, Monisha; Pope, Harrison G; Yurgelun-Todd, Deborah A

    2004-12-07

    The objective of this study was to identify the differences in cerebral activation between chronic cannabis smokers and controls in response to finger sequencing. We hypothesized that attentional areas related to motor function as well as primary and supplementary motor cortices would show diminished activation in chronic cannabis smokers. Nine cannabis smokers and 16 controls were included in these analyses. Scanning was performed on a GE 1.5T scanner. Echo planar images and high-resolution MR images were acquired. The challenge paradigm included left and right finger sequencing. Group differences in cerebral activation were examined for Brodmann areas (BA) 4, 6, 24, and 32 using ROI analyses in SPM. Cannabis users, tested within 4-36 h of discontinuation, exhibited significantly less activation than controls in BA 24 and 32 bilaterally during right- and left-sided sequencing and for BA 6 in all tasks except for left-sided sequencing in the left hemisphere. There were no statistically significant differences for BA 4. None of these regional activations correlated with urinary cannabis concentration and verbal IQ for smokers. These results suggest that recently abstinent chronic cannabis smokers produce reduced activation in motor cortical areas in response to finger sequencing compared to controls.

  18. ORIGINAL ARTICLE CASE REPORT Functional MRI in pre-surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an MRI technique ... most promising direct clinical application is in pre-surgical planning, where fMRI is ... robust and established, although it is interesting to note that recent.

  19. A blood pool contrast aided T1 functional MRI in patients with brain tumors - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majos, Agata; Sapieha, Michal; Stefanczyk, Ludomir [Medical University of Lodz, Radiology Department, Lodz (Poland); Wolak, Tomasz [Institute of Physiology and Pathology of Hearing, Warsaw (Poland); Bogorodzki, Piotr [Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics, Warsaw (Poland); Tybor, Krzysztof [Medical University of Lodz, Neurosurgery Department, Lodz (Poland)

    2011-07-15

    The aim of our study was to determine the possibility of using a new functional technique: a T1-dependent sequence with administration of blood pool contrast agent (BPCA), in patients with brain tumors before and after surgical treatment. We also aimed to compare our results with those obtained using the fMRI technique, based on Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD) contrast. For each of our 14 oncologic patients (four before and ten after neurosurgical intervention), we obtained: a T1-3D GRE sequence (TR = 2.6 ms/TE = 1.1 ms/FA = 10 ) after intravenous administration of BPCA (0.03 mmol/kg), as well as a T2*EPI sequence (TR = 3 s/TE = 50 ms/FA = 90 ). Movement and/or tactile block type paradigms were carried out during both functional runs. SPM5 software was used for analysis. For both functional techniques, maximum activations were localized in the same areas. There were no significant differences observed in the t values calculated for activations located in the primary motor cortex between groups of pre- and post-intervention patients (in the same functional technique). The mean values for T2* EPI examinations were 10.84 and 9.36, respectively. The mean t values for the T1 technique were lower, especially for the post-intervention patients (5.83 and 3.9, respectively). The T1 technique can be used to detect functional areas in patients with brain tumors, pre-, and post-surgical intervention. This technique enables the evaluation of cortical centers that suffer from susceptibility artifacts when using the T2* BOLD technique. Activations found using both techniques have the same localization, with lower values for the T1 technique. (orig.)

  20. A Functional MRI Study of Happy and Sad Emotions in Music with and without Lyrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattico, Elvira; Alluri, Vinoo; Bogert, Brigitte; Jacobsen, Thomas; Vartiainen, Nuutti; Nieminen, Sirke; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2011-01-01

    Musical emotions, such as happiness and sadness, have been investigated using instrumental music devoid of linguistic content. However, pop and rock, the most common musical genres, utilize lyrics for conveying emotions. Using participants' self-selected musical excerpts, we studied their behavior and brain responses to elucidate how lyrics interact with musical emotion processing, as reflected by emotion recognition and activation of limbic areas involved in affective experience. We extracted samples from subjects' selections of sad and happy pieces and sorted them according to the presence of lyrics. Acoustic feature analysis showed that music with lyrics differed from music without lyrics in spectral centroid, a feature related to perceptual brightness, whereas sad music with lyrics did not diverge from happy music without lyrics, indicating the role of other factors in emotion classification. Behavioral ratings revealed that happy music without lyrics induced stronger positive emotions than happy music with lyrics. We also acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging data while subjects performed affective tasks regarding the music. First, using ecological and acoustically variable stimuli, we broadened previous findings about the brain processing of musical emotions and of songs versus instrumental music. Additionally, contrasts between sad music with versus without lyrics recruited the parahippocampal gyrus, the amygdala, the claustrum, the putamen, the precentral gyrus, the medial and inferior frontal gyri (including Broca's area), and the auditory cortex, while the reverse contrast produced no activations. Happy music without lyrics activated structures of the limbic system and the right pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, whereas auditory regions alone responded to happy music with lyrics. These findings point to the role of acoustic cues for the experience of happiness in music and to the importance of lyrics for sad musical emotions.

  1. A Functional MRI Study of Happy and Sad Emotions in Music with and without Lyrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brattico, Elvira; Alluri, Vinoo; Bogert, Brigitte; Jacobsen, Thomas; Vartiainen, Nuutti; Nieminen, Sirke; Tervaniemi, Mari

    2011-01-01

    Musical emotions, such as happiness and sadness, have been investigated using instrumental music devoid of linguistic content. However, pop and rock, the most common musical genres, utilize lyrics for conveying emotions. Using participants’ self-selected musical excerpts, we studied their behavior and brain responses to elucidate how lyrics interact with musical emotion processing, as reflected by emotion recognition and activation of limbic areas involved in affective experience. We extracted samples from subjects’ selections of sad and happy pieces and sorted them according to the presence of lyrics. Acoustic feature analysis showed that music with lyrics differed from music without lyrics in spectral centroid, a feature related to perceptual brightness, whereas sad music with lyrics did not diverge from happy music without lyrics, indicating the role of other factors in emotion classification. Behavioral ratings revealed that happy music without lyrics induced stronger positive emotions than happy music with lyrics. We also acquired functional magnetic resonance imaging data while subjects performed affective tasks regarding the music. First, using ecological and acoustically variable stimuli, we broadened previous findings about the brain processing of musical emotions and of songs versus instrumental music. Additionally, contrasts between sad music with versus without lyrics recruited the parahippocampal gyrus, the amygdala, the claustrum, the putamen, the precentral gyrus, the medial and inferior frontal gyri (including Broca’s area), and the auditory cortex, while the reverse contrast produced no activations. Happy music without lyrics activated structures of the limbic system and the right pars opercularis of the inferior frontal gyrus, whereas auditory regions alone responded to happy music with lyrics. These findings point to the role of acoustic cues for the experience of happiness in music and to the importance of lyrics for sad musical emotions

  2. Decreased Functional Connectivity of Homotopic Brain Regions in Chronic Stroke Patients: A Resting State fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuang; Zheng, Xiaohui; Sun, Fenfen; Zhang, Xiaoli; Tian, Jing; Fan, Mingxia; Wu, Yi; Jia, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The recovery of motor functions is accompanied by brain reorganization, and identifying the inter-hemispheric interaction post stroke will conduce to more targeted treatments. However, the alterations of bi-hemispheric coordination pattern between homologous areas in the whole brain for chronic stroke patients were still unclear. The present study focuses on the functional connectivity (FC) of mirror regions of the whole brain to investigate the inter-hemispheric interaction using a new fMRI method named voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC). Thirty left subcortical chronic stroke patients with pure motor deficits and 37 well-matched healthy controls (HCs) underwent resting-state fMRI scans. We employed a VMHC analysis to determine the brain areas showed significant differences between groups in FC between homologous regions, and we explored the relationships between the mean VMHC of each survived area and clinical tests within patient group using Pearson correlation. In addition, the brain areas showed significant correlations between the mean VMHC and clinical tests were defined as the seed regions for whole brain FC analysis. Relative to HCs, patients group displayed lower VMHC in the precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, middle temporal gyrus, calcarine gyrus, thalamus, cerebellum anterior lobe, and cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL). Moreover, the VMHC of CPL was positively correlated with the Fugl–Meyer Score of hand (FMA-H), while a negative correlation between illness duration and the VMHC of this region was also detected. Furthermore, we found that when compared with HCs, the right CPL exhibited reduced FC with the left precentral gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, middle temporal gyrus, thalamus and hippocampus. Our results suggest that the functional coordination across hemispheres is impaired in chronic stroke patients, and increased VMHC of the CPL is significantly associated with higher FMA-H scores

  3. Onsite-effects of dual-hemisphere versus conventional single-hemisphere transcranial direct current stimulation: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yong Hyun; Jang, Sung Ho

    2012-08-25

    We performed functional MRI examinations in six right-handed healthy subjects. During functional MRI scanning, transcranial direct current stimulation was delivered with the anode over the right primary sensorimotor cortex and the cathode over the left primary sensorimotor cortex using dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. This was compared to a cathode over the left supraorbital area using conventional single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. Voxel counts and blood oxygenation level-dependent signal intensities in the right primary sensorimotor cortex regions were estimated and compared between the two transcranial direct current stimulation conditions. Our results showed that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation induced greater cortical activities than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation. These findings suggest that dual-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation may provide more effective cortical stimulation than single-hemispheric transcranial direct current stimulation.

  4. Multimodal functional neuroimaging: integrating functional MRI and EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging.

  5. Functional MRI of swallowing: from neurophysiology to neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Johnson, Sterling; Robbins, Joanne

    2011-10-01

    Swallowing is a complex neurogenic sensorimotor process involving all levels of the neuraxis and a vast number of muscles and anatomic structures. Disruption of any of these anatomic or functional components can lead to swallowing disorders (also known as dysphagia). Understanding the neural pathways that govern swallowing is necessary in diagnosing and treating patients with dysphagia. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a prevalent and effective neuroimaging method that has been used to study the complex neurophysiologic control of swallowing in vivo. This article presents a summary of the research studies that have used fMRI to study the neural control of swallowing in normal subjects and dysphagic patients, and to investigate the effects of swallowing treatments on neuroplasticity. Methodologic challenges and caveats are discussed, and a case study of a pre-posttreatment paradigm is presented to highlight potential future directions of fMRI applications in swallowing research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Brain Function and Upper Limb Outcome in Stroke : A Cross-Sectional fMRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buma, Floor E; Raemaekers, Mathijs; Kwakkel, Gert; Ramsey, Nick F

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The nature of changes in brain activation related to good recovery of arm function after stroke is still unclear. While the notion that this is a reflection of neuronal plasticity has gained much support, confounding by compensatory strategies cannot be ruled out. We address this issue by

  7. Neurophysiological correlates of increased verbal working memory in high-dissociative participants: a functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, D.J.; de Ruiter, M.B.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Lazeron, R.H.C.; Barkhof, F.; van Dyck, R.; Dolan, R.J.; Phaf, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Background Dissociation, defined as a disruption in usually integrated mental functions, is found not only in DSM-IV dissociative disorders, but also in post-traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders. Dissociative phenomena are also common in the general population, and may reflect a

  8. Neurophysiological correlates of increased verbal working memory in high-dissociative participants: A functional MRI study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, D.J.; de Ruiter, M.B.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Lazeron, R.H.C.; Barkhof, F.; van Dyck, R.; Dolan, R.J.; Phaf, R.H.

    2005-01-01

    Background. Dissociation, defined as a disruption in usually integrated mental functions, is found not only in DSM-IV dissociative disorders, but also in post-traumatic stress disorder and eating disorders. Dissociative phenomena are also common in the general population, and may reflect a

  9. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology : A combined structural and functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opmeer, Esther M.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Veltman, Dick J.; Aleman, Andre

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISCI) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISCI

  10. Functional Asymmetries Revealed in Visually Guided Saccades: An fMRI Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, L.; Zago, L.; Vigneau, M.; Crivello, F.; Mazoyer, B.; Mellet, E.; Tzourio-Mazoyer, N. [Centre for Imaging, Neurosciences and Applications to Pathologies, UMR6232 CNRS CEA (France); Mazoyer, B. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, Caen (France); Andersson, F. [Institut Federatif de Recherche 135, Imagerie fonctionnelle, Tours (France); Mazoyer, B. [Institut Universitaire de France, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Because eye movements are a fundamental tool for spatial exploration, we hypothesized that the neural bases of these movements in humans should be under right cerebral dominance, as already described for spatial attention. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging in 27 right-handed participants who alternated central fixation with either large or small visually guided saccades (VGS), equally performed in both directions. Hemispheric functional asymmetry was analyzed to identify whether brain regions showing VGS activation elicited hemispheric asymmetries. Hemispheric anatomical asymmetry was also estimated to assess its influence on the VGS functional lateralization. Right asymmetrical activations of a saccadic/attentional system were observed in the lateral frontal eye fields (FEF), the anterior part of the intra-parietal sulcus (aIPS), the posterior third of the superior temporal sulcus (STS), the occipito-temporal junction (MT/V5 area), the middle occipital gyrus, and medially along the calcarine fissure (V1). The present rightward functional asymmetries were not related to differences in gray matter (GM) density/sulci positions between right and left hemispheres in the pre-central, intra-parietal, superior temporal, and extrastriate regions. Only V1 asymmetries were explained for almost 20% of the variance by a difference in the position of the right and left calcarine fissures. Left asymmetrical activations of a saccadic motor system were observed in the medial FEF and in the motor strip eye field along the Rolando sulcus. They were not explained by GM asymmetries. We suggest that the leftward saccadic motor asymmetry is part of a general dominance of the left motor cortex in right-handers, which must include an effect of sighting dominance. Our results demonstrate that, although bilateral by nature, the brain network involved in the execution of VGSs, irrespective of their direction, presented specific right and left asymmetries that were not related to

  11. Functional connectivity of motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury after contralateral cervical nerve transfer: a resting-state fMRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Aihong; Cheng, Xiaoguang; Liang, Wei; Bai, Rongjie [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Radiology, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Xicheng Qu, Beijing (China); Wang, Shufeng; Xue, Yunhao; Li, Wenjun [The 4th Medical College of Peking University, Department of Hand Surgery, Beijing Jishuitan Hospital, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to assess the functional connectivity of the motor cortical network in patients with brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI). Twelve patients with total brachial plexus root avulsion underwent RS-fMRI after contralateral C7 nerve transfer. Seventeen healthy volunteers were also included in this fMRI study as controls. The hand motor seed regions were defined as region of interests in the bilateral hemispheres. The seed-based functional connectivity was calculated in all the subjects. Differences in functional connectivity of the motor cortical network between patients and healthy controls were compared. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the M1 areas was increased in patients with BPAI compared with the controls. The inter-hemispheric functional connectivity between the supplementary motor areas was reduced bilaterally. The resting-state inter-hemispheric functional connectivity of the bilateral M1 areas is altered in patients after contralateral C7 nerve transfer, suggesting a functional reorganization of cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  12. 'Timed up and go' and brain atrophy: a preliminary MRI study to assess functional mobility performance in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorefice, Lorena; Coghe, G; Fenu, G; Porta, M; Pilloni, G; Frau, J; Corona, F; Sechi, V; Barracciu, M A; Marrosu, M G; Pau, M; Cocco, E

    2017-09-11

    Motor and cognitive disabilities are related to brain atrophy in multiple sclerosis (MS). 'Timed up and go' (TUG) has been recently tested in MS as functional mobility test, as it is able to evaluate ambulation/coordination-related tasks, as well as cognitive function related to mobility. The objective of this study is to evaluate the relationship between brain volumes and TUG performances. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of MS and the ability to walk at least 20 m. TUG was performed using a wearable inertial sensor. Times and velocities of TUG sub-phases were calculated by processing trunk acceleration data. Patients underwent to a brain MRI, and volumes of whole brain, white matter (WM), grey matter (GM), and cortical GM (C) were estimated with SIENAX. Sixty patients were enrolled. Mean age was 41.5 ± 11.6 years and mean EDSS 2.3 ± 1.2. Total TUG duration was correlated to lower WM (ρ = 0.358, p = 0.005) and GM (ρ = 0.309, p = 0.017) volumes. A stronger association with lower GM volume was observed for intermediate (ρ = 0.427, p = 0.001) and final turning (ρ = 0.390, p = 0.002). TUG is a useful tool in a clinical setting as it can not only evaluate patients' disability in terms of impaired functional mobility, but also estimate pathological features, such as grey atrophy.

  13. Functionally integrated neural processing of linguistic and talker information: An event-related fMRI and ERP study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caicai; Pugh, Kenneth R; Mencl, W Einar; Molfese, Peter J; Frost, Stephen J; Magnuson, James S; Peng, Gang; Wang, William S-Y

    2016-01-01

    Speech signals contain information of both linguistic content and a talker's voice. Conventionally, linguistic and talker processing are thought to be mediated by distinct neural systems in the left and right hemispheres respectively, but there is growing evidence that linguistic and talker processing interact in many ways. Previous studies suggest that talker-related vocal tract changes are processed integrally with phonetic changes in the bilateral posterior superior temporal gyrus/superior temporal sulcus (STG/STS), because the vocal tract parameter influences the perception of phonetic information. It is yet unclear whether the bilateral STG is also activated by the integral processing of another parameter - pitch, which influences the perception of lexical tone information and is related to talker differences in tone languages. In this study, we conducted separate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and event-related potential (ERP) experiments to examine the spatial and temporal loci of interactions of lexical tone and talker-related pitch processing in Cantonese. We found that the STG was activated bilaterally during the processing of talker changes when listeners attended to lexical tone changes in the stimuli and during the processing of lexical tone changes when listeners attended to talker changes, suggesting that lexical tone and talker processing are functionally integrated in the bilateral STG. It extends the previous study, providing evidence for a general neural mechanism of integral phonetic and talker processing in the bilateral STG. The ERP results show interactions of lexical tone and talker processing 500-800ms after auditory word onset (a simultaneous posterior P3b and a frontal negativity). Moreover, there is some asymmetry in the interaction, such that unattended talker changes affect linguistic processing more than vice versa, which may be related to the ambiguity that talker changes cause in speech perception and/or attention bias

  14. Food and drug cues activate similar brain regions: a meta-analysis of functional MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, D W; Fellows, L K; Small, D M; Dagher, A

    2012-06-06

    In healthy individuals, food cues can trigger hunger and feeding behavior. Likewise, smoking cues can trigger craving and relapse in smokers. Brain imaging studies report that structures involved in appetitive behaviors and reward, notably the insula, striatum, amygdala and orbital frontal cortex, tend to be activated by both visual food and smoking cues. Here, by carrying out a meta-analysis of human neuro-imaging studies, we investigate the neural network activated by: 1) food versus neutral cues (14 studies, 142 foci) 2) smoking versus neutral cues (15 studies, 176 foci) 3) smoking versus neutral cues when correlated with craving scores (7 studies, 108 foci). PubMed was used to identify cue-reactivity imaging studies that compared brain response to visual food or smoking cues to neutral cues. Fourteen articles were identified for the food meta-analysis and fifteen articles were identified for the smoking meta-analysis. Six articles were identified for the smoking cue correlated with craving analysis. Meta-analyses were carried out using activation likelihood estimation. Food cues were associated with increased blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) response in the left amygdala, bilateral insula, bilateral orbital frontal cortex, and striatum. Smoking cues were associated with increased BOLD signal in the same areas, with the exception of the insula. However, the smoking meta-analysis of brain maps correlating cue-reactivity with subjective craving did identify the insula, suggesting that insula activation is only found when craving levels are high. The brain areas identified here are involved in learning, memory and motivation, and their cue-induced activity is an index of the incentive salience of the cues. Using meta-analytic techniques to combine a series of studies, we found that food and smoking cues activate comparable brain networks. There is significant overlap in brain regions responding to conditioned cues associated with natural and drug rewards.

  15. Action processing and mirror neuron function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Jelsone-Swain

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a highly debilitating and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease. It has been suggested that social cognition may be affected, such as impairment in theory of mind (ToM ability. Despite these findings, research in this area is scarce and the investigation of neural mechanisms behind such impairment is absent. Nineteen patients with ALS and eighteen healthy controls participated in this study. Because the mirror neuron system (MNS is thought to be involved in theory of mind, we first implemented a straightforward action-execution and observation task to assess basic MNS function. Second, we examined the social-cognitive ability to understand actions of others, which is a component of ToM. We used fMRI to assess BOLD activity differences between groups during both experiments. Theory of mind was also measured behaviorally using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RME. ALS patients displayed greater BOLD activity during the action-execution and observation task, especially throughout right anterior cortical regions. These areas included the right inferior operculum, premotor and primary motor regions, and left inferior parietal lobe. A conjunction analysis showed significantly more co-activated voxels during both the observation and action-execution conditions in the patient group throughout MNS regions. These results support a compensatory response in the MNS during action processing. In the action understanding experiment, healthy controls performed better behaviorally and subsequently recruited greater regions of activity throughout the prefrontal cortex and middle temporal gyrus. Lastly, action understanding performance was able to cluster patients with ALS into high and lower performing groups, which then differentiated RME performance. Collectively, these data suggest that social cognition, particularly theory of mind, may be affected in a subset of patients with ALS. This impairment may be related to

  16. Action processing and mirror neuron function in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelsone-Swain, Laura; Persad, Carol; Burkard, David; Welsh, Robert C

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a highly debilitating and rapidly fatal neurodegenerative disease. It has been suggested that social cognition may be affected, such as impairment in theory of mind (ToM) ability. Despite these findings, research in this area is scarce and the investigation of neural mechanisms behind such impairment is absent. Nineteen patients with ALS and eighteen healthy controls participated in this study. Because the mirror neuron system (MNS) is thought to be involved in theory of mind, we first implemented a straightforward action-execution and observation task to assess basic MNS function. Second, we examined the social-cognitive ability to understand actions of others, which is a component of ToM. We used fMRI to assess BOLD activity differences between groups during both experiments. Theory of mind was also measured behaviorally using the Reading the Mind in the Eyes test (RME). ALS patients displayed greater BOLD activity during the action-execution and observation task, especially throughout right anterior cortical regions. These areas included the right inferior operculum, premotor and primary motor regions, and left inferior parietal lobe. A conjunction analysis showed significantly more co-activated voxels during both the observation and action-execution conditions in the patient group throughout MNS regions. These results support a compensatory response in the MNS during action processing. In the action understanding experiment, healthy controls performed better behaviorally and subsequently recruited greater regions of activity throughout the prefrontal cortex and middle temporal gyrus. Lastly, action understanding performance was able to cluster patients with ALS into high and lower performing groups, which then differentiated RME performance. Collectively, these data suggest that social cognition, particularly theory of mind, may be affected in a subset of patients with ALS. This impairment may be related to functioning of

  17. [Standartization of MRI studies in multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryukhov, V V; Krotenkova, I A; Morozova, S N; Krotenkova, M V

    2016-01-01

    The use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with multiple sclerosis has markedly increased in recent years. The main task of the MRI studies after the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is to assess the dynamics of MRI for determining disease progression and monitoring the efficacy of therapy. In this regard, it is very important to obtain the most identical baseline and follow-up MRI that is possible when a single standard protocol is used. This article presents the protocol of brain MRI and spinal cord MRI and interpretation of MRI studies in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  18. 'What is it?' A functional MRI and SPECT study of ictal speech in a second language

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, V.; Chauvire, V.; Baulac, M.; Cohen, L. [Department of Neurology, AP-HP, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, IFR 70, Paris (France); Delmaire, Ch.; Lehericy, St. [Department of Neuroradiology, AP-HP, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, IFR 70, Paris (France); Habert, M.O. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, AP-HP, Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, IFR 70, Paris (France); Footnick, R.; Pallier, Ch. [INSERM, U562, CEA/DSV, IFR 49, Orsay (France); Baulac, M.; Cohen, L. [Universite Paris VI, Faculte Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    Neuronal networks involved in second language (L2) processing vary between normal subjects. Patients with epilepsy may have ictal speech automatisms in their second language. To delineate the brain systems involved in L2 ictal speech, we combined functional MRI during bilingual tasks and ictal - inter-ictal single-photon emission computed tomography in a patient who presented L2 ictal speech productions. These analyses showed that the networks activated by the seizure and those activated by L2 processing intersected in the right hippocampus. These results may provide some insights both into the pathophysiology of ictal speech and into the brain organization for L2. (authors)

  19. Effect of Integrated Cognitive Therapy on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity Patterns in Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    OpenAIRE

    Shanli Yang; Cai Jiang; Haicheng Ye; Jing Tao; Jia Huang; Yanling Gao; Zhicheng Lin; Lidian Chen

    2014-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to identify abnormal hippocampal functional connectivity (FC) following ischemic stroke using resting-state fMRI. We also explored whether abnormal hippocampal FC could be modulated by integrated cognitive therapy and tested whether these alterations were associated with cognitive performance. Methods. 18 right-handed cognitively impaired ischemic stroke patients and 18 healty control (HC) subjects were included in this study. Stroke subjects were scanned at baseli...

  20. Real-time neurofeedback using functional MRI could improve down-regulation of amygdala activity during emotional stimulation: a proof-of-concept study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brühl, Annette Beatrix; Scherpiet, Sigrid; Sulzer, James; Stämpfli, Philipp; Seifritz, Erich; Herwig, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    The amygdala is a central target of emotion regulation. It is overactive and dysregulated in affective and anxiety disorders and amygdala activity normalizes with successful therapy of the symptoms. However, a considerable percentage of patients do not reach remission within acceptable duration of treatment. The amygdala could therefore represent a promising target for real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) neurofeedback. rtfMRI neurofeedback directly improves the voluntary regulation of localized brain activity. At present, most rtfMRI neurofeedback studies have trained participants to increase activity of a target, i.e. up-regulation. However, in the case of the amygdala, down-regulation is supposedly more clinically relevant. Therefore, we developed a task that trained participants to down-regulate activity of the right amygdala while being confronted with amygdala stimulation, i.e. negative emotional faces. The activity in the functionally-defined region was used as online visual feedback in six healthy subjects instructed to minimize this signal using reality checking as emotion regulation strategy. Over a period of four training sessions, participants significantly increased down-regulation of the right amygdala compared to a passive viewing condition to control for habilitation effects. This result supports the concept of using rtfMRI neurofeedback training to control brain activity during relevant stimulation, specifically in the case of emotion, and has implications towards clinical treatment of emotional disorders.

  1. Acupuncture at Waiguan (TE5) influences activation/deactivation of functional brain areas in ischemic stroke patients and healthy people A functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Junqi Chen; Yong Huang; Xinsheng Lai; Chunzhi Tang; Junjun Yang; Hua Chen; Tongjun Zeng; Junxian Wu; Shanshan Qu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, 10 patients with ischemic stroke in the left hemisphere and six healthy controls were subjected to acupuncture at right Waiguan (TE5). In ischemic stroke subjects, functional MRI showed enhanced activation in Broadmann areas 5, 6, 7, 18, 19, 24, 32, the hypothalamic inferior lobe, the mamillary body, and the ventral posterolateral nucleus of the left hemisphere, and Broadmann areas 4, 6, 7, 18, 19 and 32 of the right hemisphere, but attenuated activation of Broadmann area 13, the hypothalamic inferior lobe, the posterior lobe of the tonsil of cerebellum, and the culmen of the anterior lobe of hypophysis, in the left hemisphere and Broadmann area 13 in the right hemisphere. In ischemic stroke subjects, a number of deactivated brain areas were enhanced, including Broadmann areas 6, 11, 20, 22, 37, and 47, the culmen of the anterior lobe of hypophysis, alae lingulae cerebella, and the posterior lobe of the tonsil of cerebellum of the left hemisphere, and Broadmann areas 8, 37, 45 and 47, the culmen of the anterior lobe of hypophysis, pars tuberalis adenohypophyseos, inferior border of lentiform nucleus, lateral globus pallidus, inferior temporal gyrus, and the parahippocampal gyrus of the right hemisphere. These subjects also exhibited attenuation of a number of deactivated brain areas, including Broadmann area 7. These data suggest that acupuncture at Waiguan specifically alters brain function in regions associated with sensation, vision, and motion in ischemic stroke patients. By contrast, in normal individuals, acupuncture at Waiguan generally activates brain areas associated with insomnia and other functions.

  2. Cardiac structure and function during ageing in energetically compromised Guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT-knockout mice – a one year longitudinal MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Kieran

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI is well suited for determining global cardiac function longitudinally in genetically or surgically manipulated mice, but in practice it is seldom used to its full potential. In this study, male and female guanidinoacetate N-methyltransferase (GAMT knockout, and wild type littermate mice were subjected to a longitudinal cine-MRI study at four time points over the course of one year. GAMT is an essential enzyme in creatine biosynthesis, such that GAMT deficient mice are entirely creatine-free. Since creatine plays an important role in the buffering and transfer of high-energy phosphate bonds in the heart, it was hypothesized that lack of creatine would be detrimental for resting cardiac performance during ageing. Methods Measurements of cardiac structure (left ventricular mass and volumes and function (ejection fraction, stroke volume, cardiac output were obtained using high-resolution cine-MRI at 9.4 T under isoflurane anaesthesia. Results There were no physiologically significant differences in cardiac function between wild type and GAMT knockout mice at any time point for male or female groups, or for both combined (for example ejection fraction: 6 weeks (KO vs. WT: 70 ± 6% vs. 65 ± 7%; 4 months: 70 ± 6% vs. 62 ± 8%; 8 months: 62 ± 11% vs. 62 ± 6%; 12 months: 61 ± 7% vs. 59 ± 11%, respectively. Conclusion These findings suggest the presence of comprehensive adaptations in the knockout mice that can compensate for a lack of creatine. Furthermore, this study clearly demonstrates the power of cine-MRI for accurate non-invasive, serial cardiac measurements. Cardiac growth curves could easily be defined for each group, in the same set of animals for all time points, providing improved statistical power, and substantially reducing the number of mice required to conduct such a study. This technique should be eminently useful for following changes of cardiac structure and

  3. Clinical functional MRI. Persurgical functional neuroimaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, Christoph (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Division of Diagnostic and Inventional Neuroradiology

    2015-06-01

    The second, revised edition of this successful textbook provides an up-to-date description of the use of preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of practical aspects, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, and diagnostic possibilities and limitations. Relevant information on brain physiology, functional neuroanatomy, imaging technique, and methodology is provided by recognized experts in these fields. Compared with the first edition, chapters have been updated to reflect the latest developments and in particular the current use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Entirely new chapters are included on resting-state presurgical fMRI and the role of DTI and tractography in brain tumor surgery. Further chapters address multimodality functional neuroimaging, brain plasticity, and pitfalls, tips, and tricks.

  4. Effects of different correlation metrics and preprocessing factors on small-world brain functional networks: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Liang

    Full Text Available Graph theoretical analysis of brain networks based on resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI has attracted a great deal of attention in recent years. These analyses often involve the selection of correlation metrics and specific preprocessing steps. However, the influence of these factors on the topological properties of functional brain networks has not been systematically examined. Here, we investigated the influences of correlation metric choice (Pearson's correlation versus partial correlation, global signal presence (regressed or not and frequency band selection [slow-5 (0.01-0.027 Hz versus slow-4 (0.027-0.073 Hz] on the topological properties of both binary and weighted brain networks derived from them, and we employed test-retest (TRT analyses for further guidance on how to choose the "best" network modeling strategy from the reliability perspective. Our results show significant differences in global network metrics associated with both correlation metrics and global signals. Analysis of nodal degree revealed differing hub distributions for brain networks derived from Pearson's correlation versus partial correlation. TRT analysis revealed that the reliability of both global and local topological properties are modulated by correlation metrics and the global signal, with the highest reliability observed for Pearson's-correlation-based brain networks without global signal removal (WOGR-PEAR. The nodal reliability exhibited a spatially heterogeneous distribution wherein regions in association and limbic/paralimbic cortices showed moderate TRT reliability in Pearson's-correlation-based brain networks. Moreover, we found that there were significant frequency-related differences in topological properties of WOGR-PEAR networks, and brain networks derived in the 0.027-0.073 Hz band exhibited greater reliability than those in the 0.01-0.027 Hz band. Taken together, our results provide direct evidence regarding the influences of correlation metrics

  5. Structural and functional correlates of visual field asymmetry in the human brain by diffusion kurtosis MRI and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Caitlin; Ho, Leon C; Murphy, Matthew C; Conner, Ian P; Wollstein, Gadi; Cham, Rakie; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-11-09

    Human visual performance has been observed to show superiority in localized regions of the visual field across many classes of stimuli. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to determine whether the visual information processing in the human brain is dependent on the location of stimuli in the visual field and the corresponding neuroarchitecture using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI, respectively, in 15 healthy individuals at 3 T. In fMRI, visual stimulation to the lower hemifield showed stronger brain responses and larger brain activation volumes than the upper hemifield, indicative of the differential sensitivity of the human brain across the visual field. In diffusion kurtosis MRI, the brain regions mapping to the lower visual field showed higher mean kurtosis, but not fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity compared with the upper visual field. These results suggested the different distributions of microstructural organization across visual field brain representations. There was also a strong positive relationship between diffusion kurtosis and fMRI responses in the lower field brain representations. In summary, this study suggested the structural and functional brain involvements in the asymmetry of visual field responses in humans, and is important to the neurophysiological and psychological understanding of human visual information processing.

  6. The Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation for Brain Activation and Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy: Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Ha Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We attempted to investigate whether acupuncture stimulation at HT7 can have an effect on brain activation patterns and alcohol abstinence self-efficacy. Thirty-four right-handed healthy subjects were recruited for this study. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the HT7 (Shenmen group and the LI5 (Yangxi group. Acupuncture stimulation was performed using a block paradigm during fMRI scanning. Additionally, the Korean version of Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale (AASES was used to determine the effect of acupuncture stimulation on self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use. According to the result of fMRI group analysis, the activation induced by HT7 stimulation was found on the bilateral postcentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, claustrum, insula, and anterior lobe of the cerebellum, as well as on the left posterior lobe of the cerebellum (p<0.001, uncorrected. According to the AASES analysis, the interaction effect for gender and treatment was marginally significant (F(1,30=4.152, p=0.050. For female group, the simple main effect of treatment was significant (F(1,11=8.040, p=0.016, indicating that the mean change score was higher in the HT7 stimulation than in the LI5 stimulation. Therefore, our study has provided evidence to support that HT7 stimulation has a positive therapeutic effect on the alcohol-related diseases.

  7. The Effects of Acupuncture Stimulation for Brain Activation and Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy: Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Hun; Kim, Ju Sang; Ryu, Yeon Hee; Lim, Young Jin; Kim, Moon Seup; Sohn, Jeong woo; Oh, Sung Suk

    2017-01-01

    We attempted to investigate whether acupuncture stimulation at HT7 can have an effect on brain activation patterns and alcohol abstinence self-efficacy. Thirty-four right-handed healthy subjects were recruited for this study. They were randomly assigned into two groups: the HT7 (Shenmen) group and the LI5 (Yangxi) group. Acupuncture stimulation was performed using a block paradigm during fMRI scanning. Additionally, the Korean version of Alcohol Abstinence Self-Efficacy Scale (AASES) was used to determine the effect of acupuncture stimulation on self-efficacy to abstain from alcohol use. According to the result of fMRI group analysis, the activation induced by HT7 stimulation was found on the bilateral postcentral gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, claustrum, insula, and anterior lobe of the cerebellum, as well as on the left posterior lobe of the cerebellum (p < 0.001, uncorrected). According to the AASES analysis, the interaction effect for gender and treatment was marginally significant (F(1, 30) = 4.152, p = 0.050). For female group, the simple main effect of treatment was significant (F(1, 11) = 8.040, p = 0.016), indicating that the mean change score was higher in the HT7 stimulation than in the LI5 stimulation. Therefore, our study has provided evidence to support that HT7 stimulation has a positive therapeutic effect on the alcohol-related diseases. PMID:28280514

  8. TTC post-processing is beneficial for functional MRI at low magnetic field: a comparative study at 1 T and 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Attila; Auer, Tibor; Janszky, Jozsef; Doczi, Tamas; Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Frahm, Jens

    2008-11-01

    This study aimed to broaden the diagnostic possibilities of low-field MRI systems (i) by examining the feasibility of functional MRI of human brain activation at 1 T, and (ii) by assessing its reliability in comparison with acquisitions at 3 T. Eight subjects were studied at 1 T and 3T using standard echo-planar-imaging sequences at 3-mm isotropic spatial resolution. Paradigms included silent word generation, sequential finger-to-thumb opposition, and passive finger movements. Image post-processing was carried out either with statistical parametric mapping (SPM5, single-subject and group analysis) or with a two-threshold correlation (TTC, single-subject analysis only) analysis. Single-subject analysis with SPM5 resulted in 3-5 times more activated pixels at 3 T than at 1 T in the examined Broca and sensorimotor regions. By comparison, the TTC single-subject analysis yielded the same amount of activated pixels at 3 T and 1 T. Moreover, this number was identical to that obtained with SPM at 3 T. The group analysis with SPM5 resulted in very similar numbers of activated pixels at both field strengths. The present findings suggest that a field strength of 1 T combined with adequate post-processing allows for reliable functional MRI studies of human brain activation. High-field advantages are therefore best invested in higher spatial resolution.

  9. TTC post-processing is beneficial for functional MRI at low magnetic field: a comparative study at 1 T and 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarcz, Attila [University of Pecs, Department of Neurosurgery, Pecs (Hungary); University of Pecs, Pecs Diagnostic Institute, Pecs (Hungary); Auer, Tibor; Doczi, Tamas [University of Pecs, Department of Neurosurgery, Pecs (Hungary); Janszky, Jozsef [University of Pecs, Department of Neurology, Pecs (Hungary); Merboldt, Klaus-Dietmar; Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2008-11-15

    This study aimed to broaden the diagnostic possibilities of low-field MRI systems (i) by examining the feasibility of functional MRI of human brain activation at 1 T, and (ii) by assessing its reliability in comparison with acquisitions at 3 T. Eight subjects were studied at 1 T and 3T using standard echo-planar-imaging sequences at 3-mm isotropic spatial resolution. Paradigms included silent word generation, sequential finger-to-thumb opposition, and passive finger movements. Image post-processing was carried out either with statistical parametric mapping (SPM5, single-subject and group analysis) or with a two-threshold correlation (TTC, single-subject analysis only) analysis. Single-subject analysis with SPM5 resulted in 3-5 times more activated pixels at 3 T than at 1 T in the examined Broca and sensorimotor regions. By comparison, the TTC single-subject analysis yielded the same amount of activated pixels at 3 T and 1 T. Moreover, this number was identical to that obtained with SPM at 3 T. The group analysis with SPM5 resulted in very similar numbers of activated pixels at both field strengths. The present findings suggest that a field strength of 1 T combined with adequate post-processing allows for reliable functional MRI studies of human brain activation. High-field advantages are therefore best invested in higher spatial resolution. (orig.)

  10. Does Chronic Tinnitus Alter the Emotional Response Function of the Amygdala?: A Sound-Evoked fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jeff E.; Gander, Phillip E.; Hall, Deborah A.

    2017-01-01

    Tinnitus is often associated with strong negative thoughts and emotions which can contribute to a distressing and chronic long-term condition. The amygdala, the “feeling and reacting” part of the brain, may play a key role in this process. Although implicated in several theoretical models of tinnitus, quantification of activity in the human amygdala has only been made possible more recently through neuroimaging methods such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) but benefits from modified scanning parameters using a double-echo acquisition for improved BOLD sensitivity. This study thus examined the role of the amygdala in emotional sound processing in people with tinnitus using a novel double-echo imaging sequence for optimal detectability of subcortical activity. Our hypotheses were: (1) emotionally evocative sound clips rated as pleasant or unpleasant would elicit stronger amygdalar activation than sound clips rated as neutral, (2) people with tinnitus have greater amygdalar activation in response to emotionally evocative sounds (relative to neutral sounds) compared to controls. Methods: Twelve participants all with chronic, constant tinnitus took part. We also recruited 11 age and hearing-matched controls. Participants listened to a range of emotionally evocative sound clips; rated as pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. A region-of-interest analysis was chosen to test our a priori hypotheses. Results: Both groups displayed a robust and similar overall response to sounds vs. silence in the following ascending auditory pathways; inferior colliculus, medial geniculate body and the primary auditory cortex. In support of our first hypothesis, the amygdala's response to pleasant and unpleasant sound clips was significantly greater than neutral sounds. Opposing our second hypothesis, we found that the amygdala's overall response to pleasant and unpleasant sounds (compared to neutral sounds) was actually lower in the tinnitus group as compared to the controls

  11. Regional homogeneity changes in hemodialysis patients with end stage renal disease: in vivo resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Li

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To prospectively investigate and detect early cerebral regional homogeneity (ReHo changes in neurologically asymptomatic patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD using in vivo resting-state functional MR imaging (Rs-fMRI. METHODS: We enrolled 20 patients (15 men, 5 women; meanage, 37.1 years; range, 19-49 years with ESRD and 20 healthy controls (15 men, 5 women; mean age, 38.3 years; range, 28-49 years. The mean duration of hemodialysis for the patient group was 10.7±6.4 monthes. There was no significant sex or age difference between the ESRD and control groups. Rs-fMRI was performed using a gradient-echo echo-planar imaging sequence. ReHo was calculated using software (DPARSF. Voxel-based analysis of the ReHo maps between ESRD and control groups was performed with a two-samples t test. Statistical maps were set at P value less than 0.05 and were corrected for multiple comparisons. The Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE was administered to all participants at imaging. RESULTS: ReHo values were increased in the bilateral superior temporal gyrus and left medial frontal gyrus in the ERSD group compared with controls, but a significantly decreased ReHo value was found in the right middle temporal gyrus. There was no significant correlation between ReHo values and the duration of hemodialysis in the ESRD group. Both the patients and control subjects had normal MMSE scores (≥28. CONCLUSIONS: Our finding revealed that abnormal brain activity was distributed mainly in the memory and cognition related cotices in patients with ESRD. The abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in those areas provide information on the neural mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment in patients with ESRD, and demonstrate that Rs-fMRI with ReHo analysis is a useful non-invasive imaging tool for the detection of early cerebral ReHo changes in hemodialysis patients with ESRD.

  12. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses.

  13. Contribution of the left and right inferior frontal gyrus in recovery from aphasia: a functional MRI study in stroke patients with preserved hemodynamic responsiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oers, C.A.M.M.; Vink, M.; van Zandvoort, M.J.E.; van der Worp, H.B.; de Haan, E.H.F.; Kappelle, L.J.; Ramsey, N.F.; Dijkhuizen, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of dominant and non-dominant language networks to recovery from aphasia is a matter of debate. We assessed with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to what extent the left and right hemispheres are associated with recovery from aphasia after stroke. fMRI with three

  14. HIV Infection Is Associated with Impaired Striatal Function during Inhibition with Normal Cortical Functioning on Functional MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Plessis, Stéfan; Vink, Matthijs; Joska, John A; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Bagadia, Asif; Stein, Dan J; Emsley, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HIV infection on cortical and subcortical regions of the frontal-striatal system involved in the inhibition of voluntary movement. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with

  15. Altered Brain Functional Connectivity in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients after Chemotherapy Treatment: A Resting-State fMRI Study

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    Konstantinos Bromis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in small-cell lung cancer (SCLC patients have mainly focused on exploring neurocognitive deficits associated with prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI. Little is known about functional brain alterations that might occur due to chemotherapy treatment in this population before PCI is administered. For this reason, we used resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI to examine potential functional connectivity disruptions in brain networks, including the Default Mode Network (DMN, the Sensorimotor Network, and the Task-Positive Network (TPN. Nineteen SCLC patients after platinum-based chemotherapy treatment and thirteen controls were recruited in the current study. ROI-to-ROI and Seed-to-Voxel analyses were carried out and revealed functional connectivity deficits in patients within all the networks investigated demonstrating the possible negative effect of chemotherapy in cognitive functions in SCLC populations.

  16. Changes in brain activation patterns according to cross-training effect in serial reaction time task An functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Hyun Kwon; Jung Won Kwon; Ji Won Park

    2013-01-01

    Cross-training is a phenomenon related to motor learning, where motor performance of the untrained limb shows improvement in strength and skill execution following unilateral training of the homologous contralateral limb. We used functional MRI to investigate whether motor performance of the untrained limb could be improved using a serial reaction time task according to motor sequential learning of the trained limb, and whether these skill acquisitions led to changes in brain activation patterns. We recruited 20 right-handed healthy subjects, who were randomly allocated into training and control groups. The training group was trained in performance of a serial reaction time task using their non-dominant left hand, 40 minutes per day, for 10 days, over a period of 2 weeks. The control group did not receive training. Measurements of response time and percentile of response accuracy were performed twice during pre- and post-training, while brain functional MRI was scanned during performance of the serial reaction time task using the untrained right hand. In the training group, prominent changes in response time and percentile of response accuracy were observed in both the untrained right hand and the trained left hand between pre- and post-training. The control group showed no significant changes in the untrained hand between pre- and post-training. In the training group, the activated volume of the cortical areas related to motor function (i.e., primary motor cortex, premotor area, posterior parietal cortex) showed a gradual decrease, and enhanced cerebellar activation of the vermis and the newly activated ipsilateral dentate nucleus were observed during performance of the serial reaction time task using the untrained right hand, accompanied by the cross-motor learning effect. However, no significant changes were observed in the control group. Our findings indicate that motor skills learned over the 2-week training using the trained limb were transferred to the

  17. Interhemispheric functional connectivity and its relationships with clinical characteristics in major depressive disorder: a resting state fMRI study.

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    Li Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abnormalities in large-scale, structural and functional brain connectivity have been increasingly reported in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD. However, MDD-related alterations in functional interaction between the cerebral hemispheres are still not well understood. Resting state fMRI, which reveals spontaneous neural fluctuations in blood oxygen level dependent signals, provides a means to detect interhemispheric functional coherence. We examined the resting state functional connectivity (RSFC between the two hemispheres and its relationships with clinical characteristics in MDD patients using a recently proposed measurement named "voxel-mirrored homotopic connectivity (VMHC". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We compared the interhemispheric RSFC, computed using the VMHC approach, of seventeen first-episode drug-naive patients with MDD and seventeen healthy controls. Compared to the controls, MDD patients showed significant VMHC decreases in the medial orbitofrontal gyrus, parahippocampal gyrus, fusiform gyrus, and occipital regions including the middle occipital gyrus and cuneus. In MDD patients, a negative correlation was found between VMHC of the fusiform gyrus and illness duration. Moreover, there were several regions whose VMHC showed significant negative correlations with the severity of cognitive disturbance, including the prefrontal regions, such as middle and inferior frontal gyri, and two regions in the cereballar crus. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that the functional coordination between homotopic brain regions is impaired in MDD patients, thereby providing new evidence supporting the interhemispheric connectivity deficits of MDD. The significant correlations between the VMHC and clinical characteristics in MDD patients suggest potential clinical implication of VMHC measures for MDD. Interhemispheric RSFC may serve as a useful screening method for evaluating MDD where neural connectivity is

  18. Imaging brain neuronal activity using functionalized magnetonanoparticles and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Massoud; Bragin, Anatol; Moats, Rex; Frew, Andrew; Mandelkern, Mark

    2012-10-01

    This study explored the use of non-radioactive 2-deoxy glucose (2DG)-labeled magnetonanoparticles (MNP) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect functional activity during rest, peripheral stimulation, and epileptic seizures, in animal models. Non-radioactive 2DG was covalently attached to magnetonanoparticles composed of iron oxide and dextran and intravenous (tail) injections were performed. 2DG-MNP was injected in resting and stimulated naïve rodents and the subsequent MRI was compared to published (14)C-2DG autoradiography data. Reproducibility and statistical significance was established in one studied model. Negative contrast enhancement (NCE) in acute seizures and chronic models of epilepsy were investigated. MRI NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles was compared to that of plain (unconjugated) MNP in one animal. NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles at 3 T, which is approved for human use, was also investigated. Histology showed presence of MNP (following intravenous injection) in the brain tissues of resting naïve animal. 2DG-MNP intraparenchymal uptake was visible on MRI and histology. The locations of NCE agreed with published results of 2DG autoradiography in resting and stimulated animals and epileptic rats. Localization of epileptogenicity was confirmed by subsequent depth-electrode EEG (iEEG). Non-radioactive 2DG-MNP can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may accurately localize areas of increased activity. Although, this proof-of-principle study involves only a limited number of animals, and much more research and quantification are necessary to demonstrate that 2DG-MNP, or MNPs conjugated with other ligands, could eventually be used to image localized cerebral function with MRI in humans, this MNP-MRI approach is potentially applicable to the use of many bioactive molecules as ligands for imaging normal and abnormal localized cerebral functions.

  19. Functional Laterality of Task-Evoked Activation in Sensorimotor Cortex of Preterm Infants: An Optimized 3 T fMRI Study Employing a Customized Neonatal Head Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Collins, Adam PR; Müller, Nicole; Stegmann-Woessner, Gaby; Jankowski, Jacob; Gieseke, Jürgen; Born, Mark; Seitz, Hermann; Bartmann, Peter; Schild, Hans H.; Pruessmann, Klaas P.; Boecker, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Background Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in neonates has been introduced as a non-invasive method for studying sensorimotor processing in the developing brain. However, previous neonatal studies have delivered conflicting results regarding localization, lateralization, and directionality of blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) responses in sensorimotor cortex (SMC). Amongst the confounding factors in interpreting neonatal fMRI studies include the use of standard adult MR-coils providing insufficient signal to noise, and liberal statistical thresholds, compromising clinical interpretation at the single subject level. Patients / methods Here, we employed a custom-designed neonatal MR-coil adapted and optimized to the head size of a newborn in order to improve robustness, reliability and validity of neonatal sensorimotor fMRI. Thirteen preterm infants with a median gestational age of 26 weeks were scanned at term-corrected age using a prototype 8-channel neonatal head coil at 3T (Achieva, Philips, Best, NL). Sensorimotor stimulation was elicited by passive extension/flexion of the elbow at 1 Hz in a block design. Analysis of temporal signal to noise ratio (tSNR) was performed on the whole brain and the SMC, and was compared to data acquired with an ‘adult’ 8 channel head coil published previously. Task-evoked activation was determined by single-subject SPM8 analyses, thresholded at p lateralization of SMC activation, as found in children and adults, is already present in the newborn period. PMID:28076368

  20. Functional MRI experiments : acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, NF; Hoogduin, H; Jansma, JM

    2002-01-01

    Functional MRI is widely used to address basic and clinical neuroscience questions. In the key domains of fMRI experiments, i.e. acquisition, processing and analysis, and interpretation of data, developments are ongoing. The main issues are sensitivity for changes in fMRI signal that are associated

  1. Cardiosphere-derived cells improve function in the infarcted rat heart for at least 16 weeks--an MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A Carr

    Full Text Available AIMS: Endogenous cardiac progenitor cells, expanded from explants via cardiosphere formation, present a promising cell source to prevent heart failure following myocardial infarction. Here we used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to track administered cardiosphere-derived cells (CDCs and to measure changes in cardiac function over four months in the infarcted rat heart. METHODS AND RESULTS: CDCs, cultured from neonatal rat heart, comprised a heterogeneous population including cells expressing the mesenchymal markers CD90 and CD105, the stem cell marker c-kit and the pluripotency markers Sox2, Oct3/4 and Klf-4. CDCs (2 × 10(6 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP+ were labelled with fluorescent micron-sized particles of iron oxide (MPIO. Labelled cells were administered to the infarcted rat hearts (n = 7 by intramyocardial injection immediately following reperfusion, then by systemic infusion (4 × 10(6 2 days later. A control group (n = 7 was administered cell medium. MR hypointensities caused by the MPIOs were detected at all times and GFP+ cells containing MPIO particles were identified in tissue slices at 16 weeks. At two days after infarction, cardiac function was similar between groups. By 6 weeks, ejection fractions in control hearts had significantly decreased (47 ± 2%, but this was not evident in CDC-treated hearts (56 ± 3%. The significantly higher ejection fractions in the CDC-treated group were maintained for a further 10 weeks. In addition, CDC-treated rat hearts had significantly increased capillary density in the peri-infarct region and lower infarct sizes. MPIO-labelled cells also expressed cardiac troponin I, von Willebrand factor and smooth muscle actin, suggesting their differentiation along the cardiomyocyte lineage and the formation of new blood vessels. CONCLUSIONS: CDCs were retained in the infarcted rat heart for 16 weeks and improved cardiac function.

  2. Lying about Facial Recognition: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, S.; Mbwana, J.; Adeyemo, A.; Sawyer, A.; Hailu, A.; VanMeter, J.

    2009-01-01

    Novel deception detection techniques have been in creation for centuries. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a neuroscience technology that non-invasively measures brain activity associated with behavior and cognition. A number of investigators have explored the utilization and efficiency of fMRI in deception detection. In this study,…

  3. Lying about Facial Recognition: An fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, S.; Mbwana, J.; Adeyemo, A.; Sawyer, A.; Hailu, A.; VanMeter, J.

    2009-01-01

    Novel deception detection techniques have been in creation for centuries. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a neuroscience technology that non-invasively measures brain activity associated with behavior and cognition. A number of investigators have explored the utilization and efficiency of fMRI in deception detection. In this study,…

  4. Mapping brain morphological and functional conversion patterns in amnestic MCI: a voxel-based MRI and FDG-PET study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morbelli, Silvia [University of Genoa, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Internal Medicine, Genoa (Italy); Piccardo, Arnoldo; Villavecchia, Giampiero [Galliera Hospital, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy); Dessi, Barbara; Brugnolo, Andrea; Rodriguez, Guido; Nobili, Flavio [University of Genoa, Clinical Neurophysiology Unit, Department of Neurosciences, Ophthalmology and Genetics, Genoa (Italy); Piccini, Alessandra [Cell Biology Unit, National Cancer Research Institute, Genoa (Italy); Caroli, Anna [LENITEM - Laboratory of Epidemiology Neuroimaging and Telemedicine, Brescia (Italy); Mario Negri Institute, Medical Imaging Unit, Biomedical Engineering Department, Bergamo (Italy); Frisoni, Giovanni [LENITEM - Laboratory of Epidemiology Neuroimaging and Telemedicine, Brescia (Italy)

    2010-01-15

    To reveal the morphological and functional substrates of memory impairment and conversion to Alzheimer disease (AD) from the stage of amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI). Brain MRI and FDG-PET were performed in 20 patients with aMCI and 12 controls at baseline. During a mean follow-up of about 2 years, 9 patients developed AD (converters), and 11 did not (nonconverters). All images were processed with SPM2. FDG-PET and segmented grey matter (GM) images were compared in: (1) converters versus controls, (2) nonconverters versus controls, and (3) converters versus nonconverters. As compared to controls, converters showed lower GM density in the left parahippocampal gyrus and both thalami, and hypometabolism in the precuneus, posterior cingulate and superior parietal lobule in the left hemisphere. Hypometabolism was found in nonconverters as compared to controls in the left precuneus and posterior cingulated gyrus. As compared to nonconverters, converters showed significant hypometabolism in the left middle and superior temporal gyri. The discordant topography between atrophy and hypometabolism reported in AD is already present at the aMCI stage. Posterior cingulate-precuneus hypometabolism seemed to be an early sign of memory deficit, whereas hypometabolism in the left temporal cortex marked the conversion to AD. (orig.)

  5. Adult age differences in the functional neuroanatomy of visual attention: A combined fMRI and DTI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, David J.; Spaniol, Julia; Whiting, Wythe L.; Bucur, Barbara; Provenzale, James M.; Cabeza, Roberto; White, Leonard E.; Huettel, Scott A.

    2007-01-01

    We combined measures from event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and cognitive performance (visual search response time) to test the hypotheses that differences between younger and older adults in top-down (goal-directed) attention would be related to cortical activation, and that white matter integrity as measured by DTI (fractional anisotropy, FA) would be a mediator of this age-related effect. Activation in frontal and parietal cortical regions was overall greater for older adults than for younger adults. The relation between activation and search performance supported the hypothesis of age differences in top-down attention. When the task involved top-down control (increased target predictability), performance was associated with frontoparietal activation for older adults, but with occipital (fusiform) activation for younger adults. White matter integrity (FA) exhibited an age-related decline that was more pronounced for anterior brain regions than for posterior regions, but white matter integrity did not specifically mediate the age-related increase in activation of the frontoparietal attentional network. PMID:16500004

  6. Modulation of the visual word retrieval system in writing: a functional MRI study on the Japanese orthographies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kimihiro; Honda, Manabu; Hirano, Shigeru; Oga, Tatsuhide; Sawamoto, Nobukatsu; Hanakawa, Takashi; Inoue, Hiroshi; Ito, Jin; Matsuda, Tetsu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Shibasaki, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to examine whether the act of writing involves different neuropsychological mechanisms between the two script systems of the Japanese language: kanji (ideogram) and kana (phonogram). The main experiments employed a 2 x 2 factorial design that comprised writing-to-dictation and visual mental recall for kanji and kana. For both scripts, the actual writing produced a widespread fronto-parietal activation in the left hemisphere. Especially, writing of kanji activated the left posteroinferior temporal cortex (lPITC), whereas that of kana also yielded a trend of activation in the same area. Mental recall for both scripts activated similarly the left parietotemporal regions including the lPITC. The writing versus mental recall comparison revealed greater activations in the left sensorimotor areas and right cerebellum. The kanji versus kana comparison showed increased responses in the left prefrontal and anterior cingulate areas. Especially, the lPITC showed a significant task-by-script interaction. Two additional control tasks, repetition (REP) and semantic judgment (SJ), activated the bilateral perisylvian areas, but enhanced the lPITC response only weakly. These results suggest that writing of the ideographic and phonographic scripts, although using the largely same cortical regions, each modulates the visual word-retrieval system according to their graphic features. Furthermore, comparisons with two additional tasks indicate that the activity of the lPITC increases especially in expressive language operations regardless of sensory modalities of the input stimulus.

  7. The future of functional MRI in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, Ed

    2012-08-15

    In the last 20 years or so, functional MRI has matured very rapidly from being an experimental imaging method in the hands of a few labs to being a very widely available and widely used workhorse of cognitive neuroscience and clinical neuroscience research internationally. FMRI studies have had a considerable impact on our understanding of brain system phenotypes of neurological and psychiatric disorders; and some impact already on development of new therapeutics. However, the direct benefit of fMRI to individual patients with brain disorders has so far been minimal. Here I provide a personal perspective on what has already been achieved, and imagine how the further development of fMRI over the medium term might lead to even greater engagement with clinical medicine.

  8. Structural and functional changes in subcortical vascular mild cognitive impairment: a combined voxel-based morphometry and resting-state fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liye Yi

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate changes in structural gray matter (GM volume and functional amplitude of spontaneous low-frequency oscillations (LFO and functional connectivity density in patients with subcortical vascular mild cognitive impairment (svMCI. Structural MRI and resting-sate functional MRI data were collected from 26 svMCI patients and 28 age- and gender-matched healthy controls. Structurally, widespread GM atrophy was found in the svMCI patients that resided primarily in frontal (e.g., the superior and middle frontal gyri and medial prefrontal cortex and temporal (the superior and inferior temporal gyri brain regions as well as several subcortical brain sites (e.g., the thalamus and the caudate. Functionally, svMCI-related changes were predominantly found in the default mode network (DMN. Compared with the healthy controls, the svMCI patients exhibited decreased LFO amplitudes in the anterior part of the DMN (e.g., the medial prefrontal cortex, whereas increased LFO amplitudes in the posterior part of the DMN (e.g., the posterior cingulate/precuneus. As for functional connectivity density, the DMN regions (e.g., the posterior cingulate/precuneus, the medial prefrontal cortex and the middle temporal gyrus consistently exhibited decreased functional connectivity. Finally, the overall patterns of functional alterations in LFO amplitudes and functional connectivity density remained little changed after controlling for structural GM volume losses, which suggests that functional abnormalities can be only partly explained by morphological GM volume changes. Together, our results indicate that svMCI patients exhibit widespread abnormalities in both structural GM volume and functional intrinsic brain activity, which have important implications in understanding the pathophysiological mechanism of svMCI.

  9. Bayesian estimation of the hemodynamic response function in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelec, G.; Benali, H.; Ciuciu, P.; Poline, J.-B.

    2002-05-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a recent, non-invasive technique allowing for the evolution of brain processes to be dynamically followed in various cognitive or behavioral tasks. In BOLD fMRI, what is actually measured is only indirectly related to neuronal activity through a process that is still under investigation. A convenient way to analyze BOLD fMRI data consists of considering the whole brain as a system characterized by a transfer response function, called the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). Precise and robust estimation of the HRF has not been achieved yet: parametric methods tend to be robust but require too strong constraints on the shape of the HRF, whereas non-parametric models are not reliable since the problem is badly conditioned. We therefore propose a full Bayesian, non-parametric method that makes use of basic but relevant a priori knowledge about the underlying physiological process to make robust inference about the HRF. We show that this model is very robust to decreasing signal-to-noise ratio and to the actual noise sampling distribution. We finally apply the method to real data, revealing a wide variety of HRF shapes.

  10. Aberrant Brain Regional Homogeneity and Functional Connectivity in Middle-Aged T2DM Patients: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Daihong; Duan, Shanshan; Zhang, Jiuquan; Zhou, Chaoyang; Liang, Minglong; Yin, Xuntao; Wei, Ping; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been associated with cognitive impairment. However, its neurological mechanism remains elusive. Combining regional homogeneity (ReHo) and functional connectivity (FC) analyses, the present study aimed to investigate brain functional alterations in middle-aged T2DM patients, which could provide complementary information for the neural substrates underlying T2DM-associated brain dysfunction. Twenty-five T2DM patients and 25 healthy controls were involved in neuropsychological testing and structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data acquisition. ReHo analysis was conducted to determine the peak coordinates of brain regions with abnormal local brain activity synchronization. Then, the identified brain regions were considered as seeds, and FC between these brain regions and global voxels was computed. Finally, the potential correlations between the imaging indices and neuropsychological data were also explored. Compared with healthy controls, T2DM patients exhibited higher ReHo values in the anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) and lower ReHo in the right fusiform gyrus (FFG), right precentral gyrus (PreCG) and right medial orbit of the superior frontal gyrus (SFG). Considering these areas as seed regions, T2DM patients displayed aberrant FC, mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes. The pattern of FC alterations in T2DM patients was characterized by decreased connectivity and positive to negative or negative to positive converted connectivity. Digital Span Test (DST) forward scores revealed significant correlations with the ReHo values of the right PreCG (ρ = 0.527, p = 0.014) and FC between the right FFG and middle temporal gyrus (MTG; ρ = −0.437, p = 0.048). Our findings suggest that T2DM patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction related to spatially local and remote brain activity synchronization impairment. The patterns of ReHo and FC alterations shed light on the mechanisms underlying T2DM

  11. Effects of ¿9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossong, M.G.; Jager, G.; Hell, van H.H.; Zuurman, L.; Jansma, J.M.; Mehta, M.A.; Gerven, van J.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing

  12. Effects of ¿9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossong, M.G.; Jager, G.; Hell, van H.H.; Zuurman, L.; Jansma, J.M.; Mehta, M.A.; Gerven, van J.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing ev

  13. Effects of ¿9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration on human encoding and recall memory function: a pharmacological fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bossong, M.G.; Jager, G.; Hell, van H.H.; Zuurman, L.; Jansma, J.M.; Mehta, M.A.; Gerven, van J.; Kahn, R.S.; Ramsey, N.F.

    2012-01-01

    Deficits in memory function are an incapacitating aspect of various psychiatric and neurological disorders. Animal studies have recently provided strong evidence for involvement of the endocannabinoid (eCB) system in memory function. Neuropsychological studies in humans have shown less convincing ev

  14. Effect of Integrated Cognitive Therapy on Hippocampal Functional Connectivity Patterns in Stroke Patients with Cognitive Dysfunction: A Resting-State fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanli Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study aimed to identify abnormal hippocampal functional connectivity (FC following ischemic stroke using resting-state fMRI. We also explored whether abnormal hippocampal FC could be modulated by integrated cognitive therapy and tested whether these alterations were associated with cognitive performance. Methods. 18 right-handed cognitively impaired ischemic stroke patients and 18 healty control (HC subjects were included in this study. Stroke subjects were scanned at baseline and after integrated cognitive therapy, while HCs were only scanned at baseline, to identify regions that show significant correlations with the seed region. Behavioral and cognitive assessments were obtained before each scan. Results. During the resting state, we found abnormal hippocampal FC associated with temporal regions, insular cortex, cerebellum, and prefrontal cortex in stroke patients compared to HCs. After integrated cognitive therapy, however, the stroke group showed increased hippocampal FC mainly located in the prefrontal gyrus and the default mode network (DMN. Altered hippocampal FC was associated with cognitive improvement. Conclusion. Resting-state fMRI may provide novel insight into the study of functional networks in the brain after stroke. Furthermore, altered hippocampal FC may be a compensatory mechanism for cognitive recovery after ischemic stroke.

  15. Connectivity pattern differences bilaterally in the cerebellum posterior lobe in healthy subjects after normal sleep and sleep deprivation: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu XM

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Xuming Liu,1 Zhihan Yan,2 Tingyu Wang,1 Xiaokai Yang,1 Feng Feng,3 Luping Fan,1 Jian Jiang4 1Department of Radiology, The Third Clinical Institute Affiliated to Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 2Department of Radiology, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, 3Peking Union Hospital, Peking Union Medical College, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing, 4Department of Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, People’s Republic of China Objective: The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI technique to explore the resting-state functional connectivity (rsFC differences of the bilaterial cerebellum posterior lobe (CPL after normal sleep (NS and after sleep deprivation (SD. Methods: A total of 16 healthy subjects (eight males, eight females underwent an fMRI scan twice at random: once following NS and the other following 24 hours’ SD, with an interval of 1 month between the two scans. The fMRI scanning included resting state and acupuncture stimulation. The special activated regions located during the acupuncture stimulation were selected as regions of interest for rsFC analysis. Results: Bilateral CPLs were positively activated by acupuncture stimulation. In the NS group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral CPL, bilateral frontal lobe (BFL, left precuneus and right inferior parietal lobule, while the right CPL showed rsFC with the bilateral temporal lobe, right cerebellum anterior lobe, right CPL, left frontal lobe, left anterior cingulate, right posterior cingulate, and bilateral inferior parietal lobule. In the SD group, the left CPL showed rsFC with the left posterior cingulate gyrus bilateral CPL, left precuneus, left precentral gyrus, BFL, and the left parietal lobe, while the right CPL showed rsFC with bilateral cerebellum anterior lobe, bilateral CPL, left frontal lobe and left temporal lobe. Compared with the NS group, the

  16. 3T MRI investigation of cardiac left ventricular structure and function in a UK population : he Tayside screening for the prevention of cardiac events (TASCFORCE) study

    OpenAIRE

    Gandy, Stephen J.; Lambert, Matthew; Belch, Jill; Cavin, Ian; Crowe, Elena; Littleford, Roberta; Macfarlane, Jennifer A.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Nicholas, R. Stephen; Struthers, Allan; Sullivan, Frank; Waugh, Shelley A.; White, Richard D.; Weir-McCall, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    Contract grant sponsor: Souter Charitable Trust, and Chest, Heart and Stroke Scotland; Contract grant sponsor: Wellcome Trust; contract grant number: WT 085664 (Clinical Research Fellowship to J.W-McC.) Purpose : To scan a volunteer population using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI of the left ventricular (LV) structure and function in healthy volunteers has been reported extensively at 1.5T. Materials and Methods : A population of 1528 volunteers was scanned. A standardized appr...

  17. Clustered functional MRI of overt speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörös, Peter; Sokoloff, Lisa Guttman; Bose, Arpita; McIntosh, Anthony R; Graham, Simon J; Stuss, Donald T

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the neural network of overt speech production, event-related fMRI was performed in 9 young healthy adult volunteers. A clustered image acquisition technique was chosen to minimize speech-related movement artifacts. Functional images were acquired during the production of oral movements and of speech of increasing complexity (isolated vowel as well as monosyllabic and trisyllabic utterances). This imaging technique and behavioral task enabled depiction of the articulo-phonologic network of speech production from the supplementary motor area at the cranial end to the red nucleus at the caudal end. Speaking a single vowel and performing simple oral movements involved very similar activation of the cortical and subcortical motor systems. More complex, polysyllabic utterances were associated with additional activation in the bilateral cerebellum, reflecting increased demand on speech motor control, and additional activation in the bilateral temporal cortex, reflecting the stronger involvement of phonologic processing.

  18. Probing the neural correlates of associative memory formation : a parametrically analyzed event-related functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tendolkar, I.; Arnold, J.F.; Petersson, K.M.; Weis, S.; Eijndhoven, P. van; Buitelaar, J.K.; Fernandez, G.

    2007-01-01

    The medial temporal lobe (MTL) is crucial for declarative memory formation, but the function of its subcomponents in associative memory formation remains controversial. Most functional imaging studies on this topic are based on a stepwise approach comparing a condition with and one without

  19. Combination of functional MRI with SAS and MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Takeshita, Shinichirou; Kutsuna, Munenori; Akimitsu, Tomohide; Arita, Kazunori; Kurisu, Kaoru [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    For presurgical diagnosis of brain surface, combination of functional MRI (fMRI) with the MR angiography was examined. This method could visualize brain bay, convolution and vein as index of surface. Five normal adults (male, mean age: 28-year-old) and 7 patients with brain tumor on the main locus to surface (male: 4, female: 3, mean age: 52.3-year-old) were studied. fMRI was performed by SPGR method (TR 70, TE 40, flip angle 60, one slice, thickness 10 mm, FOV 20 cm, matrix 128 x 128). The brain surface was visualized by SAS (surface anatomy scanning). SAS was performed by FSE method (TR 6000, TE 200, echo train 16, thickness 20 mm, slice 3, NEX 2). Cortical veins near superior sagittal sinus were visualized by MRA with 2D-TOF method (TR 50, TE 20, flip angle 60, thickness 2 mm, slice 28, NEX 1). These images were superimposed and functional image of peripheral sensorimotor region was evaluated anatomically. In normal adults, high signal was visualized at another side of near sensorimotor region at 8 of 10 sides. All high signal area of fMRI agreed with cortical vein near sensorimotor region that was visualized by MRA. In patients with brain tumor, signal was visualized at another side of sensorimotor region of tumor without 2 cases with palsy. In another side of tumor, signal of fMRI was visualized in 5 of 7 cases. The tumor was visualized as opposite low signal field in SAS. Locational relation between tumor and brain surface and brain function was visualized distinctly by combination of MRA, SAS and MRA. This method could become useful for presurgical diagnosis. (K.H.)

  20. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoetker, Andreas M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazaheri, Yousef [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, Leonard B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K{sup trans} on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  1. Accumulation of MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease is associated with decreased cognitive function. A study in first-ever lacunar stroke and hypertensive patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjolein eHuijts

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background – White matter lesions (WMLs, asymptomatic lacunar infarcts, brain microbleeds (BMBs and enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS have been identified as silent lesions due to cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD. All these markers have been individually linked to cognitive functioning, but are also strongly correlated with each other. The combined effect of these markers on cognitive function has never been studied and would possibly provide more useful information on the effect on cognitive function. Methods – Brain MRI and extensive neuropsychological assessment were performed in 189 patients at risk for cSVD (112 hypertensive patients and 77 first-ever lacunar stroke patients. We rated the presence of any asymptomatic lacunar infarct, extensive WMLs, any deep BMB, and moderate to extensive EPVS in the basal ganglia. The presence of each marker was summed to an ordinal score between 0 and 4. Associations with domains of cognitive function (memory, executive function, information processing speed and overall cognition were analyzed with correlation analyses. Results – Correlation analyses revealed significant associations between accumulating cSVD burden and decreased performance on all cognitive domains (all p≤.001. Results remained significant for information processing speed (r=-.181, p=.013 and overall cognition (r=-.178, p=.017, after correction for age and sex. Testing of trend using linear regression analyses revealed the same results. Discussion – We tested a new approach to capture total brain damage resulting from cSVD and found that accumulation of MRI burden of cSVD is associated with decreased performance on tests of information processing speed and overall cognition, implying that accumulating brain damage is accompanied by worse cognitive functioning.

  2. Neuronal correlates of ADHD in adults with evidence for compensation strategies – a functional MRI study with a Go/No-Go paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohlmeier, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Response inhibition impairment is one of the most characteristic symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Thus functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI during a Go/No-Go task seems to be an ideal tool for examining neuronal correlates of inhibitory control deficits in ADHD. Prior studies have shown frontostriatal abnormalities in children and adolescents. The aim of our study was to investigate whether adults with ADHD would still show abnormal brain activation in prefrontal brain regions during motor response inhibition tasks. Methods: fMRI was used to compare brain activation in 15 untreated adult patients with ADHD and 15 healthy reference volunteers during performance of a Go/No-Go task. Results: In contrast to various other studies with children and adolescents with ADHD, we found no significant difference in the activity of anterior cingulate cortex (ACC or other frontostriatal structures between ADHD and healthy adults. Significantly enhanced activity was found in the parietal cortex, which is known to play an important role in building up attention. Conclusion: We hypothesize that the enhanced activity is due to the ability of adult ADHD patients to compensate their deficits for a short time, which is demonstrated in our study by equal task performance in both groups.

  3. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell W Chan

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline and seventeen days after mating (G17. G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  4. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Russell W; Ho, Leon C; Zhou, Iris Y; Gao, Patrick P; Chan, Kevin C; Wu, Ed X

    2015-01-01

    Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline) and seventeen days after mating (G17). G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  5. Evaluation of various somatosensory stimulations for functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Kazushi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Mizoi, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimizu, Hiroaki

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to test detectability of activated area using various somatosensory stimulations. The following stimulations were performed in normal volunteers: regular or irregular electrical median nerve stimulation (n=5, each), tactile stimulation to the palm and fingers (n=8), pain stimulation to the index finger (n=5) or to the palm and fingers (n=5). fMRI was acquired with a spoiled gradient echo sequence at 1.5 T. Detectability of activated area was the highest when the pain stimulation was applied to the palm and fingers (80%). A successful rate for the tactile stimulation was 25%, and the other stimulations failed to demonstrate any activation. When successful, the highest signal activation on fMRI was seen on a sulcus, which presumably arose from a vein. The sulcus was defined as the central sulcus by somatosensory evoked field using a median nerve stimulation. Our study indicates that the pain stimulation to the palm and fingers may be a choice for the sensory fMRI. (author)

  6. Mapping Human Brain Function with MRI at 7 Tesla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In the past decade, the most significant development in MRI is the introduction of fMRI, which permits the mapping of human brain function with exquisite details noninvasively. Functional mapping can be achieved by measuring changes in the blood oxygenation level (I.e. The BOLD contrast) or cerebral blood flow.

  7. Pathological changes of the chemosensory function in multiple sclerosis. An MRI study; Pathologische Veraenderungen der Chemosensorik mittels Kernspintomografie bei Multipler Sklerose. Eine MRT-Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, F.A.; Harms, L. [Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Neurology - Consultation Service for Multiple Sclerosis; Fleiner, F.; Dahlslett, B.; Goektas, Oe. [Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery; Bohner, G.; Erb, K.; Luedemann, L. [Charite Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Dept. of Radiology

    2011-06-15

    Purpose: To examine possible causes for olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in MS patients in a prospective study with MRI. Materials and Methods: 30 MS patients (21 women, 11 men, 22 - 65 years, diameter 42 years) were examined by MRI. The olfactory bulb (OB) and olfactory brain volume was correlated with the number and volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain and the non-olfactory brain. Olfactory testing was performed using the Threshold-Discrimination-Identification Test (TDI), and gustatory function was tested using the Taste-Strips-Test (TST). Results: 33 % of the MS patients displayed olfactory dysfunction (8 % of the control group), and 17 % displayed gustatory dysfunction (5 % of the control group). There was a correlation between the olfactory brain volume and the number (r = -0.38, p < 0.05) and volume (r = -0.38, p < 0.05) of MS lesions in the olfactory brain. The olfactory brain volume correlated with the number of MS lesions in the non-olfactory brain (r = -0.48, p < 0.05). The volume of the left OB correlated with the volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain (r = -0.42, p < 0.05), the number (r = 0.37, p < 0.05) and volume (r = 0.4, p < 0.05) of lesions in the left part of the olfactory brain and with the TST score (r = -0.45, p < 0.05). The TST score correlated with the volume of lesions in the left (r = -0.45, p < 0.05) and right part (r = -0.53, p < 0.05) of the olfactory brain. The TST score correlated with the number of lesions in the non-olfactory brain (r = -0.48, p < 0.05). Conclusion: The correlation between a higher number and volume of MS lesions in the olfactory brain with a decreased OB and olfactory brain volume could help to explain olfactory and gustatory dysfunction in MS patients. Just the left OB correlated with the number and volume of lesions in the olfactory brain. Manual segmentation was a suitable method for measuring OB and olfactory brain volume. (orig.)

  8. Aortic Function's Adaptation in Response to Exercise-Induced Stress Assessing by 1.5T MRI: A Pilot Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Bal-Theoleyre

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the aortic "elastic reserve" might be a relevant marker to assess the risk of aortic event. Our aim was to compare regional aortic elasticity at rest and during supine bicycle exercise at 1.5 T MRI in healthy individuals.Fifteen volunteers (8 men, with a mean age of 29 (23-41 years, completed the entire protocol. Images were acquired immediately following maximal exercise. Retrospective cine sequences were acquired to assess compliance, distensibility, maximum rates of systolic distension and diastolic recoil at four different locations: ascending aorta, proximal descending aorta, distal descending aorta and aorta above the coeliac trunk level. Segmental aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV was assessed by through plane velocity-encoded MRI.Exercise induced a significant decrease of aortic compliance and distensibility, and a significant increase of the absolute values of maximum rates of systolic distension and diastolic recoil at all sites (p<10-3. At rest and during stress, ascending aortic compliance was statistically higher compared to the whole descending aorta (p≤0.0007. We found a strong correlation between the rate pressure product and aortic distensibility at all sites (r = - 0.6 to -0.75 according to the site, p<10-4. PWV measured at the proximal and distal descending aorta increased significantly during stress (p = 0.02 and p = 0.008, respectively.Assessment of regional aortic function during exercise is feasible using MRI. During stress, aortic elasticity decreases significantly in correlation with an increase of the PWV. Further studies are required to create thresholds for ascending aorta dysfunction among patients with aneurysms, and to monitor the impact of medication on aortic remodeling.

  9. Mapping Numerical Processing, Reading, and Executive Functions in the Developing Brain: An fMRI Meta-Analysis of 52 Studies Including 842 Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houde, Olivier; Rossi, Sandrine; Lubin, Amelie; Joliot, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Tracing the connections from brain functions to children's cognitive development and education is a major goal of modern neuroscience. We performed the first meta-analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data obtained over the past decade (1999-2008) on more than 800 children and adolescents in three core systems of cognitive…

  10. Depletion of brain functional connectivity enhancement leads to disability progression in multiple sclerosis: A longitudinal resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faivre, Anthony; Robinet, Emmanuelle; Guye, Maxime; Rousseau, Celia; Maarouf, Adil; Le Troter, Arnaud; Zaaraoui, Wafaa; Rico, Audrey; Crespy, Lydie; Soulier, Elisabeth; Confort-Gouny, Sylviane; Pelletier, Jean; Achard, Sophie; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe; Audoin, Bertrand

    2016-11-01

    The compensatory effect of brain functional connectivity enhancement in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) remains controversial. To characterize the relationships between brain functional connectivity changes and disability progression in RRMS. Long-range connectivity, short-range connectivity, and density of connections were assessed using graph theoretical analysis of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired in 38 RRMS patients (disease duration: 120 ± 32 months) and 24 controls. All subjects were explored at baseline and all patients and six controls 2 years later. At baseline, levels of long-range and short-range brain functional connectivity were higher in patients compared to controls. During the follow-up, decrease in connections' density was inversely correlated with disability progression. Post-hoc analysis evidenced differential evolution of brain functional connectivity metrics in patients according to their level of disability at baseline: while patients with lowest disability at baseline experienced an increase in all connectivity metrics during the follow-up, patients with higher disability at baseline showed a decrease in the connectivity metrics. In these patients, decrease in the connectivity metrics was associated with disability progression. The study provides two main findings: (1) brain functional connectivity enhancement decreases during the disease course after reaching a maximal level, and (2) decrease in brain functional connectivity enhancement participates in disability progression. © The Author(s), 2016.

  11. Functional MRI in Patients with Intracranial Lesions near Language Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakyemez, B; Erdogan, C; Yildirim, N; Bora, I; Bekar, A; Parlak, M

    2006-06-30

    We aimed to depict Broca's area and Wernicke's area by word generation and sentence formation paradigms in patients with various intracranial lesions adjacent to language areas using functional MRI technique and to evaluate the ability of functional MRI to lateralize the hemispheric dominance for language. Twenty-three right-handed patients were included in this study. Lesions were classified as low-grade glioma (n=8), high-grade glioma (n=9), metastasis (n=1), meningioma (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=2) and mesial temporal sclerosis (n=2). We performed blood-oxygenated-level-dependant functional MRI using a 1.5-T unit. Word generation and sentence formation tasks were used to activate language areas. Language areas were defined as Brodmann 44, 45 (Broca's area) and Brodmann 22 area (Wernicke's area). Laterality index was used to show the dominant hemisphere. Two poorly cooperative patients showed no activation and were excluded from the study. Broca's area was localized in 21 patients (100 %). Wernicke's area, on the other hand, could only be localized in eight of the 21 patients (38 %).The left hemisphere was dominant in 86% of patients while atypical language lateralization (right or bilateral) was demonstrated in 14% of the patients. Bilateral activation areas were shown in 10% of those patients while right cerebral hemisphere was dominant in 4% of the patients. Word generation and sentence formation tasks are especially helpful in localizing Broca's area. Wernicke's area could also be demonstrated in some of the cases. Functional MRI can be used as an important and useful means of demonstrating language areas in patients with lesions adjacent to those areas and depicting the hemispheric dominance.

  12. Functional MRI of Language Processing and Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ My thesis describe the utility of implementing fMRI to investigate how the language system is reorganized in brain damaged patients. Specifically for aphasia research fMRI allows to show how specific language treatment methods have the potential to enhance language

  13. Educational attainment, MRI changes, and cognitive function in older postmenopausal women from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Stephen R; Espeland, Mark A; Manson, Joann E; Resnick, Susan M; Bryan, Nick R; Smoller, Sylvia; Coker, Laura H; Phillips, Lawrence S; Stefanick, Marcia L; Sarto, Gloria E

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between neuropathology and clinically manifested functional and cognitive deficits is complex. Clinical observations of individuals with greater neuropathology who function better than some individuals with less neuropathology are common and puzzling. Educational attainment, a proxy for "cognitive reserve," may help to explain this apparent contradiction. The objective of this study is to determine if educational attainment is correlated with cognitive decline, brain lesion volume, and total brain atrophy. One thousand three hundred ninety of the 7,479 community-dwelling women 65 years of age and older enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study, two parallel randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials comparing unopposed and opposed postmenopausal hormone therapy with placebo, were studied. Study participants received annual assessments of global cognitive function with the Modified Mini Mental State exam. One thousand sixty-three participants also received supplemental neurocognitive battery and neuroimaging studies. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to calculate total ischemic lesion and brain volumes. Incident cases of probable dementia and mild cognitive impairment were centrally adjudicated. After adjustment for total lesion and total brain volumes (atrophy), higher educational attainment predicted better cognitive performance (p cognitive function (p < 0.001). Thus, higher educational attainment was associated with a delay in diagnosis of dementia/MCI in the face of a growing neuropathological load.

  14. Acute caffeine administration impact on working memory-related brain activation and functional connectivity in the elderly: a BOLD and perfusion MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, S; Rodriguez, C; Moser, D; Toma, S; Hofmeister, J; Sinanaj, I; Van De Ville, D; Giannakopoulos, P; Lovblad, K-O

    2013-10-10

    In young individuals, caffeine-mediated blockade of adenosine receptors and vasoconstriction has direct repercussions on task-related activations, changes in functional connectivity, as well as global vascular effects. To date, no study has explored the effect of caffeine on brain activation patterns during highly demanding cognitive tasks in the elderly. This prospective, placebo-controlled crossover design comprises 24 healthy elderly individuals (mean age 68.8 ± 4.0 years, 17 females) performing a 2-back working memory (WM) task in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Analyses include complimentary assessment of task-related activations (general linear model, GLM), functional connectivity (tensorial independent component analysis, TICA), and baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling). Despite a reduction in whole-brain global perfusion (-22.7%), caffeine-enhanced task-related GLM activation in a local and distributed network is most pronounced in the bilateral striatum and to a lesser degree in the right middle and inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral insula, left superior and inferior parietal lobule as well as in the cerebellum bilaterally. TICA was significantly enhanced (+8.2%) in caffeine versus placebo in a distributed and task-relevant network including the pre-frontal cortex, the supplementary motor area, the ventral premotor cortex and the parietal cortex as well as the occipital cortex (visual stimuli) and basal ganglia. The inverse comparison of placebo versus caffeine had no significant difference. Activation strength of the task-relevant-network component correlated with response accuracy for caffeine yet not for placebo, indicating a selective cognitive effect of caffeine. The present findings suggest that acute caffeine intake enhances WM-related brain activation as well as functional connectivity of blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI in elderly individuals.

  15. The functional organization of the left STS: a large scale meta-analysis of PET and fMRI studies of healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat eLiebenthal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The superior temporal sulcus (STS in the left hemisphere is functionally diverse, with sub-areas implicated in both linguistic and non-linguistic functions. However, the number and boundaries of distinct functional regions remain to be determined. Here, we present new evidence, from meta-analysis of a large number of positron emission tomography (PET and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies, of different functional specificity in the left STS supporting a division of its middle to terminal extent into at least three functional areas. The middle portion of the left STS stem (fmSTS is highly specialized for speech perception and the processing of language material. The posterior portion of the left STS stem (fpSTS is highly versatile and involved in multiple functions supporting semantic memory and associative thinking. The fpSTS responds to both language and non-language stimuli but the sensitivity to non-language material is greater. The horizontal portion of the left STS stem and terminal ascending branches (ftSTS display intermediate functional specificity, with the anterior ascending branch adjoining the supramarginal gyrus (fatSTS supporting executive functions and motor planning and showing greater sensitivity to language material, and the horizontal stem and posterior ascending branch adjoining the angular gyrus (fptSTS supporting primarily semantic processing and displaying greater sensitivity to non-language material. We suggest that the high functional specificity of the left fmSTS for speech is an important means by which the human brain achieves exquisite affinity and efficiency for native speech perception. In contrast, the extreme multi-functionality of the left fpSTS reflects the role of this area as a cortical hub for semantic processing and the extraction of meaning from multiple sources of information. Finally, in the left ftSTS, further functional differentiation between the dorsal and ventral aspect is warranted.

  16. Oxytocin and vasopressin modulation of the neural correlates of motivation and emotion: results from functional MRI studies in awake rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febo, Marcelo; Ferris, Craig F

    2014-09-11

    Oxytocin and vasopressin modulate a range of species typical behavioral functions that include social recognition, maternal-infant attachment, and modulation of memory, offensive aggression, defensive fear reactions, and reward seeking. We have employed novel functional magnetic resonance mapping techniques in awake rats to explore the roles of these neuropeptides in the maternal and non-maternal brain. Results from the functional neuroimaging studies that are summarized here have directly and indirectly confirmed and supported previous findings. Oxytocin is released within the lactating rat brain during suckling stimulation and activates specific subcortical networks in the maternal brain. Both vasopressin and oxytocin modulate brain regions involved unconditioned fear, processing of social stimuli and the expression of agonistic behaviors. Across studies there are relatively consistent brain networks associated with internal motivational drives and emotional states that are modulated by oxytocin and vasopressin. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav.

  17. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease: first experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bettina; Karstoft, Kristian; Jørgensen, Troels Munch;

    2010-01-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides....

  18. Congenital heart disease. Evaluation of anatomy and function by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebergen, S.A.; Roos, A. de [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2000-06-01

    With the increasing number of patients surviving after therapeutic intervention for congenital heart disease (CHD), accurate and frequent follow-up of their morphologic and functional cardiovascular status is required, preferably with a noninvasive imaging technique. Echocardiography, either transthoracic or transesophageal, has been the first choice for this purpose, and will probably keep that status, at least in a large segment of the CHD spectrum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established method for high-resolution visualization of cardiovascular morphology. In the past decade, newer MRI techniques have been developed that allow functional evaluation of CHD patients. Particularly the introduction of breath-hold imaging, contrast-enhanced MRA and user-friendly computer software for image analysis may move functional MRI of CHD from the science laboratory to clinical use. It is already evident that MRI is superior to echocardiography in certain areas of limited echocardiographic acces, such as the pulmonary artery branches and the aortic arch in adult patients. But MRI has also a unique potential for accurate volumetric analysis of ventricular function and cardiovascular blood flow, without any geometric assumptions. If supported by increased cooperation between cardiologists and radiologists, MRI will grow into a useful noninvasive imaging tool that, together with echocardiography, will obviate the need for invasive catheter studies for diagnostic purposes. (orig.) [German] Weltweit werden jaehrlich etwa 1,5 Millionen Kinder mit kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen (CHD, congenital heart disease) geboren. Durch Verbesserung der verschiedenen chirurgischen und interventionellen Techniken ist die Ueberlebensrate von CHD-Patienten drastisch gestiegen. Immer mehr Patienten mit postoperativen Residuen, Folgezustaenden und Komplikationen benoetigen eine umfassende Nachsorge. Die Darstellung und Quantifizierung morphologischer und funktioneller kardiovaskulaerer

  19. A Cross-Sectional and Follow-Up Functional MRI Study with a Working Memory Task in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Caldu, Xavier; Andres-Perpina, Susana; Lazaro, Luisa; Bargallo, Nuria; Falcon, Carles; Plana, Maria Teresa; Junque, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Structural and functional brain abnormalities have been described in anorexia nervosa (AN). The objective of this study was to examine whether there is abnormal regional brain activation during a working memory task not associated with any emotional stimuli in adolescent patients with anorexia and to detect possible changes after weight recovery.…

  20. A Cross-Sectional and Follow-Up Functional MRI Study with a Working Memory Task in Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Caldu, Xavier; Andres-Perpina, Susana; Lazaro, Luisa; Bargallo, Nuria; Falcon, Carles; Plana, Maria Teresa; Junque, Carme

    2010-01-01

    Structural and functional brain abnormalities have been described in anorexia nervosa (AN). The objective of this study was to examine whether there is abnormal regional brain activation during a working memory task not associated with any emotional stimuli in adolescent patients with anorexia and to detect possible changes after weight recovery.…

  1. Executive attention control and emotional responding in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder — A functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soonjo Hwang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The current study demonstrated disrupted recruitment of regions implicated in executive function and impaired connectivity within those regions in children/adolescents with ADHD. There were also indications of heightened representation of emotional stimuli in patients with ADHD. However, as the findings were specific for positive stimuli, the suggestion of a general failure in emotion regulation in ADHD was not supported.

  2. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Le Roux, P. [GEHC, Buc (France); Dehaine-Lambertz, G. [Unite INSERM 562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  3. An fMRI study of visual attention and sensorimotor function before and after antipsychotic treatment in first-episode schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keedy, Sarah K; Rosen, Cherise; Khine, Tin; Rajarethinam, Rajaprabhakaran; Janicak, Philip G; Sweeney, John A

    2009-04-30

    While much is known about receptor affinity profiles of antipsychotic medications, less is known about their impact on functional brain systems in patients with schizophrenia. We conducted functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies with first-episode schizophrenia patients as they made saccades to unpredictable visual targets before and after 4-6 weeks of antipsychotic treatment. Matched healthy individuals were scanned at similar time intervals. Pretreatment, patients had less activation in frontal and parietal eye fields and cerebellum. After treatment these disturbances were not present, suggesting improved function in attentional and sensorimotor systems. Other pretreatment abnormalities were noted in sensory and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, but after treatment these abnormalities were absent or less prominent, in line with improved function in attentional systems. In addition, although not abnormal at baseline, there was reduced activity after treatment in dorsal prefrontal cortex, dorsal striatum, and dorsomedial thalamus, suggesting a potential adverse effect of treatment on frontostriatal systems, perhaps related to dopamine blockade in the caudate. These findings provide evidence for a complex impact of antipsychotic medication on functional brain systems in schizophrenia and illustrate the potential of neuroimaging biomarkers for both adverse and beneficial drug effects on functional brain systems.

  4. MB-SWIFT functional MRI during deep brain stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Lauri J; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Zhang, Jinjin; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-08-07

    Recently introduced 3D radial MRI pulse sequence entitled Multi-Band SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (MB-SWIFT) having virtually zero acquisition delay was used to obtain functional MRI (fMRI) contrast in rat's brain at 9.4 T during deep brain stimulation (DBS). The results demonstrate that MB-SWIFT allows functional images free of susceptibility artifacts, and provides an excellent fMRI activation contrast in the brain. Flip angle dependence of the MB-SWIFT fMRI signal and elimination of the fMRI contrast while using saturation bands, indicate a blood flow origin of the observed fMRI contrast. MB-SWIFT fMRI modality permits activation studies in the close proximity to an implanted lead, which is not possible to achieve with conventionally used gradient echo and spin echo - echo planar imaging fMRI techniques. We conclude that MB-SWIFT fMRI is a powerful imaging modality for investigations of functional responses during DBS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Simultaneous resting-state functional MRI and electroencephalography recordings of functional connectivity in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoji; Fukuta, Mayuko; Inami, Rie; Arai, Heii; Inoue, Reiichi; Aoki, Shigeki

    2017-04-01

    It remains unclear how functional connectivity (FC) may be related to specific cognitive domains in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we used simultaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recording in patients with schizophrenia, to evaluate FC within and outside the default mode network (DMN). Our study population included 14 patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy control participants. From all participants, we acquired rsfMRI data, and simultaneously recorded EEG data using an MR-compatible amplifier. We analyzed the rsfMRI-EEG data, and used the CONN toolbox to calculate the FC between regions of interest. We also performed between-group comparisons of standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography-based intracortical lagged coherence for each EEG frequency band. FC within the DMN, as measured by rsfMRI and EEG, did not significantly differ between groups. Analysis of rsfMRI data showed that FC between the right posterior inferior temporal gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex was stronger among patients with schizophrenia compared to control participants. Analysis of FC within the DMN using rsfMRI and EEG data revealed no significant differences between patients with schizophrenia and control participants. However, rsfMRI data revealed over-modulated FC between the medial prefrontal cortex and right posterior inferior temporal gyrus in patients with schizophrenia compared to control participants, suggesting that the patients had altered FC, with higher correlations across nodes within and outside of the DMN. Further studies using simultaneous rsfMRI and EEG are required to determine whether altered FC within the DMN is associated with schizophrenia. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  6. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  7. Improved Neural Processing Efficiency in a Chronic Aphasia Patient following Melodic Intonation Therapy: A Neuropsychological and Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken-Ichi Tabei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Melodic intonation therapy (MIT is a treatment program for the rehabilitation of aphasic patients with speech production disorders. We report a case of severe chronic non-fluent aphasia unresponsive to several years of conventional therapy that showed a marked improvement following intensive nine-day training on the Japanese version of MIT (MIT-J. The purposes of this study were to verify the efficacy of MIT-J by functional assessment and examine associated changes in neural processing by functional magnetic resonance imaging. MIT improved language output and auditory comprehension, and decreased the response time for picture naming. Following MIT-J, an area of the right hemisphere was less activated on correct naming trials than compared to before training but similarly activated on incorrect trials. These results suggest that the aphasic symptoms of our patient were improved by increased neural processing efficiency and a concomitant decrease in cognitive load.

  8. Resting-state fMRI studies in epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wurina; Yu-Feng Zang; Shi-Gang Zhao

    2012-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease characterized by abnormal spontaneous activity in the brain.Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (RS-fMRI) is a powerful technique for exploring this activity.With good spatial and temporal resolution,RS-fMRI is a promising approach for accurate localization of the focus of seizure activity.Although simultaneous electroencephalogram-fMR1 has been performed with patients in the resting state,most studies focused on activation.This mini-review focuses on RS-fMRI alone,including its computational methods and its application to epilepsy.

  9. A study-specific fMRI normalization approach that operates directly on high resolution functional EPI data at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabner, G.; Poser, B.; Fujimoto, K.; Polimeni, J.R.; Wald, L.L.; Trattnig, S.; Toni, I.; Barth, M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the availability of ultra-high field scanners and novel imaging methods, high resolution, whole brain functional MR imaging (fMRI) has become increasingly feasible. However, it is common to use extensive spatial smoothing to account for inter-subject anatomical variation when pooling over

  10. A study-specific fMRI normalization approach that operates directly on high resolution functional EPI data at 7 Tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grabner, G.; Poser, B.; Fujimoto, K.; Polimeni, J.R.; Wald, L.L.; Trattnig, S.; Toni, I.; Barth, M.

    2014-01-01

    Due to the availability of ultra-high field scanners and novel imaging methods, high resolution, whole brain functional MR imaging (fMRI) has become increasingly feasible. However, it is common to use extensive spatial smoothing to account for inter-subject anatomical variation when pooling over sub

  11. A study-specific fMRI normalization approach that operates directly on high resolution functional EPI data at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabner, Günther; Poser, Benedikt A; Fujimoto, Kyoko; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Wald, Lawrence L; Trattnig, Siegfried; Toni, Ivan; Barth, Markus

    2014-10-15

    Due to the availability of ultra-high field scanners and novel imaging methods, high resolution, whole brain functional MR imaging (fMRI) has become increasingly feasible. However, it is common to use extensive spatial smoothing to account for inter-subject anatomical variation when pooling over subjects. This reduces the spatial details of group level functional activation considerably, even when the original data was acquired with high resolution. In our study we used an accelerated 3D EPI sequence at 7 Tesla to acquire whole brain fMRI data with an isotropic spatial resolution of 1.1mm which shows clear gray/white matter contrast due to the stronger T1 weighting of 3D EPI. To benefit from the high spatial resolution on the group level, we develop a study specific, high resolution anatomical template which is facilitated by the good anatomical contrast that is present in the average functional EPI images. Different template generations with increasing accuracy were created by using a hierarchical linear and stepwise non-linear registration approach. As the template is based on the functional data themselves no additional co-registration step with the usual T1-weighted anatomical data is necessary which eliminates a potential source of misalignment. To test the improvement of functional localization and spatial details we performed a group level analysis of a finger tapping experiment in eight subjects. The most accurate template shows better spatial localization--such as a separation of somatosensory and motor areas and of single digit activation--compared to the simple linear registration. The number of activated voxels is increased by a factor of 1.2, 2.5, and 3.1 for somatosensory, supplementary motor area, and dentate nucleus, respectively, for the functional contrast between left versus right hand. Similarly, the number of activated voxels is increased 1.4- and 2.4-fold for right little versus right index finger and left little versus left index finger

  12. How skill expertise shapes the brain functional architecture: an fMRI study of visuo-spatial and motor processing in professional racing-car and naive drivers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Bernardi

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the brain functional architecture that subserves visuo-spatial and motor processing in highly skilled individuals. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, we measured brain activity while eleven Formula racing-car drivers and eleven 'naïve' volunteers performed a motor reaction and a visuo-spatial task. Tasks were set at a relatively low level of difficulty such to ensure a similar performance in the two groups and thus avoid any potential confounding effects on brain activity due to discrepancies in task execution. The brain functional organization was analyzed in terms of regional brain response, inter-regional interactions and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD signal variability. While performance levels were equal in the two groups, as compared to naïve drivers, professional drivers showed a smaller volume recruitment of task-related regions, stronger connections among task-related areas, and an increased information integration as reflected by a higher signal temporal variability. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that, as compared to naïve subjects, the brain functional architecture sustaining visuo-motor processing in professional racing-car drivers, trained to perform at the highest levels under extremely demanding conditions, undergoes both 'quantitative' and 'qualitative' modifications that are evident even when the brain is engaged in relatively simple, non-demanding tasks. These results provide novel evidence in favor of an increased 'neural efficiency' in the brain of highly skilled individuals.

  13. Altered brain function in new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhanqi; Zou, Dongfang; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yue; Liao, Jianxiang; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guosheng; Zeng, Hongwu; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive impairments had been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, what caused the impairments needed to be demonstrated, chemotherapy-related or the disease itself. The primary aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if there were changes in brain function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy. In this study, we advanced a measure named regional homogeneity to evaluate the resting-state brain activities, intelligence quotient test was performed at same time. Using regional homogeneity, we first investigated the resting state brain function in patients with new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy, healthy children as control. The decreased ReHo values were mainly founded in the default mode network and left frontal lobe, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, precentral gyrus, bilateral cerebellum in the newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients compared with the healthy control. While in contrast, increased ReHo values were mainly shown in the right frontal lobe (language area), superior frontal gyrus-R, middle frontal gyrus-R and inferior parietal lobule-R for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients group. There were no significant differences for intelligence quotient measurements between the acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient group and the healthy control in performance intelligence quotient, verbal intelligence quotient, total intelligence quotient. The altered brain functions are associated with cognitive change and language, it is suggested that there may be cognition impairment before the chemotherapy. Regional homogeneity by functional magnetic resonance image is a sensitive way for early detection on brain damage in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment between echocardiography and MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddhe, Sujatha; Lewin, Mark; Olson, Aaron; Soriano, Brian D. [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Ferguson, Mark [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with death in approximately 40% of patients. Echocardiography is routinely used to assess left ventricular (LV) function; however, it has limitations in these patients. We compared echocardiographic measures of cardiac function assessment to cardiac MRI. We included children and young adults with DMD who had MRI performed between January 2010 and July 2015. We measured echocardiographic and MRI parameters of function assessment, including strain. Presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by MRI. Subjects were divided into two groups based on MRI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): group I, LVEF ≥55% and group II, LVEF <55%. We included 41 studies in 33 subjects, with 25 in group I and 16 in group II. Mean age of subjects was 13.6 ± 2.8 years and mean duration between echocardiogram and MRI was 7.6 ± 4.1 months. Only 8 of 16 (50%) patients in group II had diminished function on echocardiogram. Echocardiographic images were suboptimal in 16 subjects (39%). Overall, echocardiographic parameters had weak correlation with MRI-derived ejection fraction percentage. MRI-derived myocardial strain assessment has better correlation with MRI ejection fraction as compared to echocardiography-derived strain parameters. Echocardiography-based ventricular functional assessment has weak correlation with MRI parameters in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. While this correlation improves in the subset of subjects with adequate echocardiographic image quality, it remains modest and potentially suboptimal for clinical management. Accordingly, we conclude that MRI should be performed routinely and early in children with DMD, not only for LGE imaging but also for functional assessment. (orig.)

  15. The Right Supramarginal Gyrus Is Important for Proprioception in Healthy and Stroke-Affected Participants: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Shabat, Ettie; Matyas, Thomas A.; Pell, Gaby S.; Brodtmann, Amy; Carey, Leeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Human proprioception is essential for motor control, yet its central processing is still debated. Previous studies of passive movements and illusory vibration have reported inconsistent activation patterns related to proprioception, particularly in high-order sensorimotor cortices. We investigated brain activation specific to proprioception, its laterality, and changes following stroke. Twelve healthy and three stroke-affected individuals with proprioceptive deficits participated. Proprioception was assessed clinically with the Wrist Position Sense Test, and participants underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. An event-related study design was used, where each proprioceptive stimulus of passive wrist movement was followed by a motor response of mirror ­copying with the other wrist. Left (LWP) and right (RWP) wrist proprioception were tested separately. Laterality indices (LIs) were calculated for the main cortical regions activated during proprioception. We found proprioception-related brain activation in high-order sensorimotor cortices in healthy participants especially in the supramarginal gyrus (SMG LWP z = 4.51, RWP z = 4.24) and the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd LWP z = 4.10, RWP z = 3.93). Right hemispheric dominance was observed in the SMG (LI LWP mean 0.41, SD 0.22; RWP 0.29, SD 0.20), and to a lesser degree in the PMd (LI LWP 0.34, SD 0.17; RWP 0.13, SD 0.25). In stroke-affected participants, the main difference in proprioception-related brain activation was reduced laterality in the right SMG. Our findings indicate that the SMG and PMd play a key role in proprioception probably due to their role in spatial processing and motor control, respectively. The findings from stroke-­affected individuals suggest that decreased right SMG function may be associated with decreased proprioception. We recommend that clinicians pay particular attention to the assessment and rehabilitation of proprioception following right hemispheric

  16. Quantitative evaluation of statistical inference in resting state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Kang, Hakmook; Newton, Allen; Landman, Bennett A

    2012-01-01

    Modern statistical inference techniques may be able to improve the sensitivity and specificity of resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) connectivity analysis through more realistic characterization of distributional assumptions. In simulation, the advantages of such modern methods are readily demonstrable. However quantitative empirical validation remains elusive in vivo as the true connectivity patterns are unknown and noise/artifact distributions are challenging to characterize with high fidelity. Recent innovations in capturing finite sample behavior of asymptotically consistent estimators (i.e., SIMulation and EXtrapolation - SIMEX) have enabled direct estimation of bias given single datasets. Herein, we leverage the theoretical core of SIMEX to study the properties of inference methods in the face of diminishing data (in contrast to increasing noise). The stability of inference methods with respect to synthetic loss of empirical data (defined as resilience) is used to quantify the empirical performance of one inference method relative to another. We illustrate this new approach in a comparison of ordinary and robust inference methods with rs-fMRI.

  17. Blood Flow and Brain Function: Investigations of neurovascular coupling using BOLD fMRI at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, J.C.W.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultra high field (7 tesla) MRI systems has opened the possibility to probe biological processes of the human body in great detail. Especially for studying brain function using BOLD fMRI there is a large benefit from the increased magnetic field strength. BOLD fMRI is the working horse

  18. Acute aerobic exercise increases cortical activity during working memory: a functional MRI study in female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Men, Wei-Wei; Chang, Yu-Kai; Fan, Ming-Xia; Ji, Liu; Wei, Gao-Xia

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that acute aerobic exercise is associated with improved cognitive function. However, neural correlates of its cognitive plasticity remain largely unknown. The present study examined the effect of a session of acute aerobic exercise on working memory task-evoked brain activity as well as task performance. A within-subjects design with a counterbalanced order was employed. Fifteen young female participants (M = 19.56, SD = 0.81) were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a working memory task, the N-back task, both following an acute exercise session with 20 minutes of moderate intensity and a control rest session. Although an acute session of exercise did not improve behavioral performance, we observed that it had a significant impact on brain activity during the 2-back condition of the N-back task. Specifically, acute exercise induced increased brain activation in the right middle prefrontal gyrus, the right lingual gyrus, and the left fusiform gyrus as well as deactivations in the anterior cingulate cortexes, the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right paracentral lobule. Despite the lack of an effect on behavioral measures, significant changes after acute exercise with activation of the prefrontal and occipital cortexes and deactivation of the anterior cingulate cortexes and left frontal hemisphere reflect the improvement of executive control processes, indicating that acute exercise could benefit working memory at a macro-neural level. In addition to its effects on reversing recent obesity and disease trends, our results provide substantial evidence highlighting the importance of promoting physical activity across the lifespan to prevent or reverse cognitive and neural decline.

  19. Functional connectivity in tactile object discrimination: a principal component analysis of an event related fMRI-Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Hartmann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tactile object discrimination is an essential human skill that relies on functional connectivity between the neural substrates of motor, somatosensory and supramodal areas. From a theoretical point of view, such distributed networks elude categorical analysis because subtraction methods are univariate. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the neural networks involved in somatosensory object discrimination using a voxel-based principal component analysis (PCA of event-related functional magnetic resonance images. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Seven healthy, right-handed subjects aged between 22 and 44 years were required to discriminate with their dominant hand the length differences between otherwise identical parallelepipeds in a two-alternative forced-choice paradigm. Of the 34 principal components retained for analysis according to the 'bootstrapped' Kaiser-Guttman criterion, t-tests applied to the subject-condition expression coefficients showed significant mean differences between the object presentation and inter-stimulus phases in PC 1, 3, 26 and 32. Specifically, PC 1 reflected object exploration or manipulation, PC 3 somatosensory and short-term memory processes. PC 26 evinced the perception that certain parallelepipeds could not be distinguished, while PC 32 emerged in those choices when they could be. Among the cerebral regions evident in the PCs are the left posterior parietal lobe and premotor cortex in PC 1, the left superior parietal lobule (SPL and the right cuneus in PC 3, the medial frontal and orbitofrontal cortex bilaterally in PC 26, and the right intraparietal sulcus, anterior SPL and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in PC 32. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The analysis provides evidence for the concerted action of large-scale cortico-subcortical networks mediating tactile object discrimination. Parallel to activity in nodes processing object-related impulses we found activity in key cerebral regions

  20. Acute aerobic exercise increases cortical activity during working memory: a functional MRI study in female college students.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Li

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that acute aerobic exercise is associated with improved cognitive function. However, neural correlates of its cognitive plasticity remain largely unknown. The present study examined the effect of a session of acute aerobic exercise on working memory task-evoked brain activity as well as task performance. A within-subjects design with a counterbalanced order was employed. Fifteen young female participants (M = 19.56, SD = 0.81 were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging while performing a working memory task, the N-back task, both following an acute exercise session with 20 minutes of moderate intensity and a control rest session. Although an acute session of exercise did not improve behavioral performance, we observed that it had a significant impact on brain activity during the 2-back condition of the N-back task. Specifically, acute exercise induced increased brain activation in the right middle prefrontal gyrus, the right lingual gyrus, and the left fusiform gyrus as well as deactivations in the anterior cingulate cortexes, the left inferior frontal gyrus, and the right paracentral lobule. Despite the lack of an effect on behavioral measures, significant changes after acute exercise with activation of the prefrontal and occipital cortexes and deactivation of the anterior cingulate cortexes and left frontal hemisphere reflect the improvement of executive control processes, indicating that acute exercise could benefit working memory at a macro-neural level. In addition to its effects on reversing recent obesity and disease trends, our results provide substantial evidence highlighting the importance of promoting physical activity across the lifespan to prevent or reverse cognitive and neural decline.

  1. Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa B Klaassen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioural performance including: 1 greater activation in middle-aged versus young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC areas; and 2 differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.

  2. Young and Middle-Aged Schoolteachers Differ in the Neural Correlates of Memory Encoding and Cognitive Fatigue: A Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaassen, Elissa B; Plukaard, Sarah; Evers, Elisabeth A T; de Groot, Renate H M; Backes, Walter H; Veltman, Dick J; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding tasks and to a control condition. Results showed age-related brain activation differences underlying behavioral performance including: (1) greater activation in middle-aged vs. young teachers in bilateral prefrontal cortex (PFC) areas; and (2) differential fatigue effects in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) depending on age group. Middle-aged schoolteachers showed decreased ACC activation in the fatigue compared to the control condition, whereas no change in activation was found in young teachers. Findings demonstrate age effects in these middle-aged subjects that are typically found in older adults, specifically in PFC over-activation. Findings also indicate that already in middle age cognitive aging may be associated with greater resource depletion following sustained task performance. The findings underscore the notion that persons in a cognitively demanding profession can experience subtle age effects, which are evident on fMRI and which impact daily functioning. Possible practical implications for middle-aged schoolteachers are discussed.

  3. Brain regional homogeneity changes following transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt in cirrhotic patients support cerebral adaptability theory—A resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Ling; Qi, Rongfeng [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhang, Long Jiang, E-mail: kevinzhlj@163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Zhong, Jianhui [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310027 (China); Zheng, Gang [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Wu, Xingjiang; Fan, Xinxin [Department of General Surgery, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China); Lu, Guang Ming, E-mail: cjr.luguangming@vip.163.com [Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Medical School of Nanjing University, Nanjing 210002 (China)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The exact neuro-pathophysiological effect of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) on brain function remains unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the longitudinal brain activity changes in cirrhotic patients with TIPS insertion using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with regional homogeneity (ReHo) method. Methods: Fifteen cirrhotic patients without overt hepatic encephalopathy (OHE) planned for TIPS procedure and 15 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Eleven of the 15 patients underwent repeated fMRI examinations at median 7-day following TIPS, 8 patients in median 3-month, and 7 patients in median 1-year follow-up duration, respectively. Regional homogeneity was calculated by the Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC) and compared between patients before TIPS and healthy controls with two-sample t test as well as pre-and post-TIPS patients with paired t test. Correlations between the pre- and post-TIPS changes of ReHo and the changes of venous blood ammonia level and number connection test type A (NCT-A)/digit symbol test (DST) scores were calculated by crossing subjects. Results: Compared with healthy controls, 15 cirrhotic patients before TIPS procedure showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes and increased ReHo in the bilateral caudate. Compared with the pre-TIPS patients, 11 post-TIPS patients in the median 7-day follow-up examinations demonstrated decreased ReHo in the medial frontal gyrus (MFG), superior parietal gyrus (SPG), middle/superior temporal gyrus (M/STG), anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula. Eight post-TIPS patients in the median 3-month follow-up examinations showed widespread decreased ReHo in the bilateral frontal and parietal lobes, ACC, caudate, and increased ReHo in the insula and precuneus/cuneus. In the median 1-year follow-up studies, seven post-TIPS patients displayed

  4. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  5. Measuring hepatic functional reserve using low temporal resolution Gd-EOB-DTPA dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI: a preliminary study comparing galactosyl human serum albumin scintigraphy with indocyanine green retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Tsuyoshi; Araki, Yoichi; Akata, Soichi; Tokuuye, Koichi [Tokyo Medical University, Department of Radiology, Tokyo (Japan); Ledsam, Joseph; Sourbron, Steven [University of Leeds, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    To investigate if tracer kinetic modelling of low temporal resolution dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with Gd-EOB-DTPA could replace technetium-99 m galactosyl human serum albumin (GSA) single positron emission computed tomography (SPECT) and indocyanine green (ICG) retention for the measurement of liver functional reserve. Twenty eight patients awaiting liver resection for various cancers were included in this retrospective study that was approved by the institutional review board. The Gd-EOB-DTPA MRI sequence acquired five images: unenhanced, double arterial phase, portal phase, and 4 min after injection. Intracellular contrast uptake rate (UR) and extracellular volume (Ve) were calculated from DCE-MRI, along with the ratio of GSA radioactivity of liver to heart-plus-liver and per cent of cumulative uptake from 15-16 min (LHL15 and LU15, respectively) from GSA-scintigraphy. ICG retention at 15 min, Child-Pugh cirrhosis score (CPS) and postoperative Inuyama fibrosis criteria were also recorded. Statistical analysis was with Spearman rank correlation analysis. Comparing MRI parameters with the reference methods, significant correlations were obtained for UR and LHL15, LU15, ICG15 (all 0.4-0.6, P < 0.05); UR and CPS (-0.64, P < 0.001); Ve and Inuyama (0.44, P < 0.05). Measures of liver function obtained by routine Gd-EOB-DTPA DCE-MRI with tracer kinetic modelling may provide a suitable method for the evaluation of liver functional reserve. (orig.)

  6. Evolution and current challenges in the teaching of functional MRI and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, Robert L

    2012-08-15

    The report of any new and successful method for studying the world triggers the need to train people in the use of that method. In the case of functional magnetic resonance imaging and its use for examining human brain function in vivo, expertise is required in a greater collection of domains than usual. Development of fMRI training programs started shortly after the announcement of BOLD-based fMRI in humans. These programs had a variety of durations and primary content areas. All programs had to deal with the challenge of bringing interested researchers from a wide variety of areas-many of whom had little or no understanding of MR physics, and/or experimental psychology, and/or the nuances of data analysis and modeling-to a sufficiently detailed level of knowledge that both the funding agencies, and the existing proprietors of the technology (often radiologists or MR physicists at hospitals) would take the research proposals of new investigators seriously. Now that fMRI-based research is well established, there are new educational challenges. Some have to do with the growing list of technologies used to study human brain function in vivo. But perhaps more daunting is the challenge of training consumers of the reports and claims based on fMRI and other brain imaging modalities. As fMRI becomes influential in contexts beyond the research environment-from the clinic to the courtroom to the legislature-training consumers of fMRI-based claims will take on increasing importance, and represents its own unique challenges for education.

  7. Abacus in the brain: a longitudinal functional MRI study of a skilled abacus user with the right hemispheric lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi eTanaka

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The abacus, a traditional physical calculation device, is still widely used in Asian countries. Previous behavioral work has shown that skilled abacus users perform rapid and precise mental arithmetic by manipulating a mental representation of an abacus, which is based on visual imagery. However, its neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Here, we report the case of a patient who was a good abacus user, but transiently lost her mental abacus and superior arithmetic performance after a stroke owing to a right hemispheric lesion including the dorsal premotor cortex and inferior parietal lobule.Functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were conducted 6 and 13 months after her stroke. In the mental calculation task, her brain activity was shifted from the language-related areas, including Broca’s area and the left dorsolateral prefrontal and inferior parietal lobules, to the visuospatial-related brain areas including the left superior parietal lobule, according to the recovery of her arithmetic abilities. In the digit memory task, activities in the bilateral superior parietal lobule and right visual association cortex were also observed after recovery. The shift of brain activities was consistent with her subjective report that she was able to shift the calculation strategy from linguistic to visuospatial as her mental abacus became stable again. In a behavioral experiment using an interference paradigm, a visual presentation of an abacus picture, but not a human face picture, interfered with the performance of her digit memory, confirming her use of the mental abacus after recovery.This is the first case report on the impairment of the mental abacus by a brain lesion and on recovery-related brain activity. We named this rare case abacus-based acalculia. Together with previous neuroimaging studies, the present result suggests an important role for the dorsal premotor cortex and parietal cortex in the superior arithmetic ability of

  8. Abacus in the brain: a longitudinal functional MRI study of a skilled abacus user with a right hemispheric lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Seki, Keiko; Hanakawa, Takashi; Harada, Madoka; Sugawara, Sho K; Sadato, Norihiro; Watanabe, Katsumi; Honda, Manabu

    2012-01-01

    The abacus, a traditional physical calculation device, is still widely used in Asian countries. Previous behavioral work has shown that skilled abacus users perform rapid and precise mental arithmetic by manipulating a mental representation of an abacus, which is based on visual imagery. However, its neurophysiological basis remains unclear. Here, we report the case of a patient who was a good abacus user, but transiently lost her "mental abacus" and superior arithmetic performance after a stroke owing to a right hemispheric lesion including the dorsal premotor cortex (PMd) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL). Functional magnetic resonance imaging experiments were conducted 6 and 13 months after her stroke. In the mental calculation task, her brain activity was shifted from the language-related areas, including Broca's area and the left dorsolateral prefrontal and IPLs, to the visuospatial-related brain areas including the left superior parietal lobule (SPL), according to the recovery of her arithmetic abilities. In the digit memory task, activities in the bilateral SPL, and right visual association cortex were also observed after recovery. The shift of brain activities was consistent with her subjective report that she was able to shift the calculation strategy from linguistic to visuospatial as her mental abacus became stable again. In a behavioral experiment using an interference paradigm, a visual presentation of an abacus picture, but not a human face picture, interfered with the performance of her digit memory, confirming her use of the mental abacus after recovery. This is the first case report on the impairment of the mental abacus by a brain lesion and on recovery-related brain activity. We named this rare case "abacus-based acalculia." Together with previous neuroimaging studies, the present result suggests an important role for the PMd and parietal cortex in the superior arithmetic ability of abacus users.

  9. Study of MRI in Stratified Viscous Plasma Configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Carlevaro, Nakia; Renzi, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the morphology of the Magneto-rotational Instability (MRI) for a stratified viscous plasma disk configuration in differential rotation, taking into account the so-called corotation theorem for the background profile. In order to select the intrinsic Alfv\\'enic nature of MRI, we deal with an incompressible plasma and we adopt a formulation of the perturbation analysis based on the use of the magnetic flux function as a dynamical variable. Our study outlines, as consequence of the corotation condition, a marked asymmetry of the MRI with respect to the equatorial plane, particularly evident in a complete damping of the instability over a positive critical height on the equatorial plane. We also emphasize how such a feature is already present (although less pronounced) even in the ideal case, restoring a dependence of the MRI on the stratified morphology of the gravitational field.

  10. Distinct functional properties of the vertical and horizontal saccadic network in Health and Parkinson's disease: An eye-tracking and fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, J; Pereira, D; Almendra, L; Rebelo, D; Patrício, M; Castelhano, J; Cunha, G; Januário, C; Cunha, L; Freire, A; Castelo-Branco, M

    2016-10-01

    Saccadic behaviour ranges from reflexive (e.g., prosaccade) to goal oriented voluntary movements (e.g., antisaccade). Behavioural asymmetries between vertical and horizontal saccades have been described both in normal individuals (greater delay of vertical prosaccades) and in disease states such as Parkinson's disease (PD) (prosaccades are short and antisaccades are delayed, especially in the vertical plane, possibly due to a frontostriatal deficit). Importantly, the cortical mechanisms for the generation of vertical saccades are largely unknown, both in health and disease, when compared with their horizontal counterpart. Moreover, studies exploring saccadic neural correlates and putative compensatory mechanisms at a functional level in PD are scarce. We investigated horizontal and vertical prosaccades and antisaccades in an eye tracking paradigm in 19 PD patients off medication and 22 healthy controls, followed by a block-design functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) study, consisting of two runs (prosaccade, antisaccade) of 6 blocks each (3 vertical, 3 horizontal). While saccade metrics were not significantly different between groups, PD showed left frontal underactivation during horizontal prosaccades and right parietal overactivation during horizontal and vertical prosaccades and horizontal antisaccades. Moreover, controls showed greater deactivation of the default-mode network (DMN) during antisaccades. Vertical prosaccades were associated with greater right frontal and cerebellar activity in controls, and cuneus hypoactivity in PD. Vertical antisaccades were associated with greater DMN deactivation in both groups and left frontal hypoactivity in PD. Putative functional compensatory changes in the right parietal cortex in PD patients may help to keep saccadic behaviour at the same level as the healthy controls. We provide first time evidence showing that functional cortical asymmetries between vertical and horizontal saccades occur distinctively in PD

  11. Functional cortical changes in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis at amplitude configuration: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu H

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Heng Liu,1,* Hua Chen,1,* Bo Wu,1 Tijiang Zhang,1 Jinhui Wang,2,3 Kexin Huang,1 Ganjun Song,1 Jian Zhan4 1Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Medical Imaging Center of Guizhou Province, Zunyi, Guizhou, 2Department of Psychology, Hangzhou Normal University, 3Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou, 4Department of Neurology, Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The aim of this study was to explore the amplitude of spontaneous brain activity fluctuations in patients with relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method. Methods: ALFF and SPM8 were utilized to assess alterations in regional spontaneous brain activities in patients with RRMS in comparison with healthy controls (HCs. The beta values of altered brain regions between patients with RRMS and HCs were extracted, and a receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve was generated to calculate the sensitivities and specificities of these different brain areas for distinguishing patients with RRMS from HCs. Pearson correlation analyses were applied to assess the relationships between the beta values of altered brain regions and disease duration and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS score. Patients and participants: A total of 18 patients with RRMS (13 females; five males and 18 sex-, age-, and education-matched HCs (14 females; four males were recruited for this study. Measurements and results: Compared with HCs, patients with RRMS showed higher ALFF responses in the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann area [BA] 37 and lower ALFF responses in the bilateral anterior cingulate cortices (BA 24 and 32, bilateral heads of the caudate nuclei, and bilateral brainstem. The ROC analysis revealed that the beta values of these abnormal brain areas

  12. Functional MRI of language lateralization during development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott K; Vannest, Jennifer; Mecoli, Marc; Jacola, Lisa M; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Karunanayaka, Prasanna R; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Yuan, Weihong; Plante, Elena; Byars, Anna W

    2007-09-01

    Changes in the distribution of language function in the brain have been documented from infancy through adulthood. Even macroscopic measures of language lateralization reflect a dynamic process of language development. In this review, we summarize a series of functional MRI studies of language skills in children ages of five to 18 years, both typically-developing children and children with brain injuries or neurological disorders that occur at different developmental stages with different degrees of severity. These studies used a battery of fMRI-compatible language tasks designed to tap sentential and lexical language skills that develop early and later in childhood. In typically-developing children, lateralization changes with age are associated with language skills that have a protracted period of development, reflecting the developmental process of skill acquisition rather than general maturation of the brain. Normative data, across the developmental period, acts as a reference for disentangling developmental patterns in brain activation from changes due to developmental or acquired abnormalities. This review emphasizes the importance of considering age and child development in neuroimaging studies of language.

  13. Functional specialization and convergence in the occipito-temporal cortex supporting haptic and visual identification of human faces and body parts: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Ryo; Johnsrude, Ingrid S; Kochiyama, Takanori; Lederman, Susan J

    2009-10-01

    Humans can recognize common objects by touch extremely well whenever vision is unavailable. Despite its importance to a thorough understanding of human object recognition, the neuroscientific study of this topic has been relatively neglected. To date, the few published studies have addressed the haptic recognition of nonbiological objects. We now focus on haptic recognition of the human body, a particularly salient object category for touch. Neuroimaging studies demonstrate that regions of the occipito-temporal cortex are specialized for visual perception of faces (fusiform face area, FFA) and other body parts (extrastriate body area, EBA). Are the same category-sensitive regions activated when these components of the body are recognized haptically? Here, we use fMRI to compare brain organization for haptic and visual recognition of human body parts. Sixteen subjects identified exemplars of faces, hands, feet, and nonbiological control objects using vision and haptics separately. We identified two discrete regions within the fusiform gyrus (FFA and the haptic face region) that were each sensitive to both haptically and visually presented faces; however, these two regions differed significantly in their response patterns. Similarly, two regions within the lateral occipito-temporal area (EBA and the haptic body region) were each sensitive to body parts in both modalities, although the response patterns differed. Thus, although the fusiform gyrus and the lateral occipito-temporal cortex appear to exhibit modality-independent, category-sensitive activity, our results also indicate a degree of functional specialization related to sensory modality within these structures.

  14. Lateralisation of cerebral response to active acupuncture in patients with unilateral ischaemic stroke: an fMRI study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Huang, Yong; Chen, Jun-Qi; Lai, Xin-Sheng; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Yang, Jun-Jun; Chen, Hua; Wu, Jun-Xian; Xiao, Hui-Ling; Qu, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Yi-Dan; Zhang, Zhang-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture is beneficial in treating stroke neuropsychiatric symptoms. The present study aimed to identify functional brain response to active acupuncture in patients with unilateral ischaemic stroke using functional MRI (fMRI...

  15. Incidental use of ecstasy: no evidence for harmful effects on cognitive brain function in a prospective fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G.; Win, M.M. de; Vervaeke, H.K.; Schilt, T.; Kahn, R.S.; Brink, W. van den; Ree, J.M. van; Ramsey, M.F.

    2007-01-01

    Rationale Heavy ecstasy use in humans has been associated with cognitive impairments and changes in cognitive brain function supposedly due to damage to the serotonin system. There is concern that even a single dose of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine may be neurotoxic, but very little is known ab

  16. Variable Selection for Functional Logistic Regression in fMRI Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedret BILLOR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was motivated by classification problem in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, a noninvasive imaging technique which allows an experimenter to take images of a subject's brain over time. As fMRI studies usually have a small number of subjects and we assume that there is a smooth, underlying curve describing the observations in fMRI data, this results in incredibly high-dimensional datasets that are functional in nature. High dimensionality is one of the biggest problems in statistical analysis of fMRI data. There is also a need for the development of better classification methods. One of the best things about fMRI technique is its noninvasiveness. If statistical classification methods are improved, it could aid the advancement of noninvasive diagnostic techniques for mental illness or even degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. In this paper, we develop a variable selection technique, which tackles high dimensionality and correlation problems in fMRI data, based on L1 regularization-group lasso for the functional logistic regression model where the response is binary and represent two separate classes; the predictors are functional. We assess our method with a simulation study and an application to a real fMRI dataset.

  17. Enhancement of Odor-Induced Activity in the Canine Brain by Zinc Nanoparticles: A Functional MRI Study in Fully Unrestrained Conscious Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hao; Pustovyy, Oleg M; Wang, Yun; Waggoner, Paul; Beyers, Ronald J; Schumacher, John; Wildey, Chester; Morrison, Edward; Salibi, Nouha; Denney, Thomas S; Vodyanoy, Vitaly J; Deshpande, Gopikrishna

    2016-01-01

    Using noninvasive in vivo functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we demonstrate that the enhancement of odorant response of olfactory receptor neurons by zinc nanoparticles leads to increase in activity in olfaction-related and higher order areas of the dog brain. To study conscious dogs, we employed behavioral training and optical motion tracking for reducing head motion artifacts. We obtained brain activation maps from dogs in both anesthetized state and fully conscious and unrestrained state. The enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles was higher in conscious dogs with more activation in higher order areas as compared with anesthetized dogs. In conscious dogs, voxels in the olfactory bulb and hippocampus showed higher activity to odorants mixed with zinc nanoparticles as compared with pure odorants, odorants mixed with gold nanoparticles as well as zinc nanoparticles alone. These regions have been implicated in odor intensity processing in other species including humans. If the enhancement effect of zinc nanoparticles observed in vivo are confirmed by future behavioral studies, zinc nanoparticles may provide a way for enhancing the olfactory sensitivity of canines for detection of target substances such as explosives and contraband substances at very low concentrations, which would otherwise go undetected.

  18. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the "glymphatic system" of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain.

  19. Comprehensive presurgical functional MRI language evaluation in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Holland, Scott K; Jacola, Lisa M; Lindsell, Christopher; Privitera, Michael D; Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to replace the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) in presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy. In this study, we compared fMRI verb generation (VG) and semantic decision/tone decision (SDTD) tasks and the IAP in their ability to localize language functions in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation. We enrolled 50 healthy controls to establish normal language activation patterns for VG and SDTD tasks at 3 or 4 T, and to design language regions of interest (ROIs) that were later applied to 38 patients with epilepsy (28 of 38 also underwent the IAP). We calculated laterality indices (LIs) for each task for each subject based on the ROIs, and we used general linear modeling to analyze the fMRI data. All healthy and epileptic subjects activated language areas with both fMRI tasks. We found significant correlations in language lateralization between the fMRI tasks (r=0.495, Planguage. In the general linear modeling, only the SDTD task significantly contributed to the determination of language lateralization in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation. Results indicate a moderate convergent validity between both fMRI language tasks and between IAP and fMRI tasks. The results of this study indicate that either of these fMRI tasks can be used for language lateralization in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation, but that the SDTD task is likely to provide more information regarding language lateralization than the VG task.

  20. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease. First experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Bettina; Froekiaer, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Michael [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). MR Research Centre; Joergensen, Troels Munch [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Urology; Rittig, Soeren [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Paediatrics

    2010-07-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides. We included renal impaired children who were recruited for clinical radioisotopic GFR measurements (n=8). MRI was performed 2 hours after Cr-EDTA measurements and was conducted using a protocol involving both anatomical/structural sequences and a dynamic contrast-enhanced sequence. Data obtained with the dynamic MRI sequence were processed using the graphical Patlak approach to obtain estimates of GFR. We were able to characterize the intrarenal configuration (cortex, medulla, pelvicalyceal arrangement) in all cases. Functional analyses of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealed an overall underestimation of GFR measured by MRI compared to Cr-EDTPA measures (range: -2% to -43%). We advocate the use of MRI as a single-modality approach in the structural and functional evaluation of impaired kidneys in children, and concurrently, we presented a clinically available strategy for estimations of renal cortical volume and single kidney function. However, the use of MRI contrast agents have recently become controversial in renal patients due to the risk of NSF. (orig.)

  1. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Ryan V.; Nair, Veena A.; Sattin, Justin A.; Vivek Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a br...

  2. Functional and structural MRI biomarkers to detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Wolf, Robert Christian; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Saft, Carsten; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The availability of an accurate genetic test to identify Huntington's Disease (HD) in the pre-symptomatic stage makes HD an important model to develop biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases, such as pre-clinical Alzheimer's Disease. We reasoned that functional changes, measured by functional MRI (fMRI), would precede gray matter changes and that performing a task specifically affected by the disease would carry the clearest signature. Separate cohorts of HD gene mutations carriers and controls performed four different fMRI tasks, probing functions either primarly affected by the disease (i.e. motor control), higher cognitive functions (i.e. working memory and irritability), or basic sensory functions (i.e. auditory system). With the aim to compare fMRI and structural MRI biomarkers, all subjects underwent an additional high-resolution T1-weighted MRI. Best classification performance was achived from fMRI-based activations with motor sequence tapping and task-induced irritation. Classification performance based on gray matter probability maps was also significantly above chance and similar to that of fMRI. Both were sufficiently informative to separate gene mutation carriers that were on average 17 years before predicted disease onset from controls with up to 80% accuracy. Further analyses showed that classification accuracy was best in regions of interest with low within-group heterogeneity in relation to disease specific changes. Our study indicates that structural and some functional markers can accurately detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration. However, the lower variability and easier processing of the strucutral MRI data make latter the more useful tool for disease detection in a clinical setting.

  3. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  4. Language Laterality in Autism Spectrum Disorder and Typical Controls: A Functional, Volumetric, and Diffusion Tensor MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, Tracey A.; Silver, Andrew M.; Kennedy, Meaghan; Lindgren, Kristen A.; Dominick, Kelli C.; Siegel, Jeremy; Tager-Flusberg, Helen

    2010-01-01

    Language and communication deficits are among the core features of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Reduced or reversed asymmetry of language has been found in a number of disorders, including ASD. Studies of healthy adults have found an association between language laterality and anatomical measures but this has not been systematically…

  5. A prosocial online game for social cognition training in adolescents with high-functioning autism: an fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung US

    2016-03-01

    helped participants more accurately consider associated environments in response to facial emotional stimulation. However, the online CBT was less effective than the offline-CBT at evoking emotions in response to emotional words. Keywords: autism, online games, sociality, cognitive behavior therapy, functional magnetic resonance image

  6. Functional and morphological findings in early and advanced stages of HIV infection: A comparison of sup 99m Tc-HMPAO SPECT with CT and MRI studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsch, K.; Bauer, W.M.; Markl, A.; Kirsch, C.M. (Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Radiologische Klinik und Poliklinik); Schielke, E.; Einhaeupl, K.M. (Klinikum Grosshadern, Muenchen (Germany, F.R.). Neurologische Klinik)

    1990-12-01

    In fourty patients at early and advanced stages of HIV infection (Water-Reed stages I-VI) regional cerebral blood flow was determined by {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO SPECT, comparing the results with CT and MRI findings. All patients with HIV encephalopathy (AIDS dementia complex) had pathologic SPECT results (multilocular, patchy uptake defects), but also in earlier and even earliest stages of HIV infection positive SPECT findings were observed. Compared to functional SPECT imaging, morphologically orientated method (CT, MRI) were insensitive in detecting HIV-induced foci: More than 50% of the patients with pathologic SPECT findings had negative CT or MRI scans. Most patients in advanced Walter Reed stages had neurological abnormalities accompanied by positive SPECT. Subtle alterations of HMPAO uptake were observed even in a few cases of early HIV infection without neurological CNS symptoms. The data presented suggest that HMPAO SPECT is highly sensitive in the detection of altered brain perfusion not only in advanced but also early stages of HIV infection. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow are presented before noticeable structural defects may be observed. (orig./MG).

  7. Dynamic MRI study for breast tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seki, Tsuneaki (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1990-10-01

    Application of MRI for diagnosis of breast tumors was retrospectively examined in 103 consecutive cases. Contrast enhancement, mostly by dynamic study, was performed in 83 cases using Gd-DTPA and 0.5 T superconductive apparatus. Results were compared to those of mammography and sonography. On dynamic study, carcinoma showed abrupt rise of signal intensity with clear-cut peak formation in early phase, while benign fibroadenoma showed slow rise of signal intensity and prolonged enhancement without peak formation. In 12 of 33 carcinomas (33%), peripheral ring enhancement was noted reflecting vascular stroma of histologic sections. All fibroadenomas showed homogenous enhancement without peripheral ring. In MRI, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were 86%, 96%, 91%. In mammography 82%, 95%, 87% and in ultrasonography 91%, 95%, 93%. Although MRI should not be regarded as routine diagnostic procedure because of expense and limited availability, it may afford useful additional information when standard mammographic findings are not conclusive. (author).

  8. Fairness decisions in response to emotions: a functional MRI study among criminal justice-involved boys with conduct disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapwijk, Eduard T; Lelieveld, Gert-Jan; Aghajani, Moji; Boon, Albert E; van der Wee, Nic J A; Popma, Arne; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Colins, Olivier F

    2016-04-01

    Research suggests that individuals with conduct disorder (CD) are marked by social impairments, such as difficulties in processing the affective reactions of others. Little is known, though, about how they make decisions during social interactions in response to emotional expressions of others. In this study, we therefore investigated the neural mechanisms underlying fairness decisions in response to communicated emotions of others in aggressive, criminal justice-involved boys with CD (N = 32) compared with typically developing (TD) boys (N = 33), aged 15-19 years. Participants received written emotional responses (angry, disappointed or happy) from peers in response to a previous offer and then had to make fairness decisions in a version of the Dictator Game. Behavioral results showed that CD boys did not make differential fairness decisions in response to the emotions, whereas the TD boys did show a differentiation and also responded more unfair to happy reactions than the CD boys. Neuroimaging results revealed that when receiving happy vs disappointed and angry reactions, the CD boys showed less activation than the TD boys in the temporoparietal junction and supramarginal gyrus, regions involved in perspective taking and attention. These results suggest that boys with CD have difficulties with processing explicit emotional cues from others on behavioral and neural levels. © The Author (2016). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Functional MRI in awake unrestrained dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Berns

    Full Text Available Because of dogs' prolonged evolution with humans, many of the canine cognitive skills are thought to represent a selection of traits that make dogs particularly sensitive to human cues. But how does the dog mind actually work? To develop a methodology to answer this question, we trained two dogs to remain motionless for the duration required to collect quality fMRI images by using positive reinforcement without sedation or physical restraints. The task was designed to determine which brain circuits differentially respond to human hand signals denoting the presence or absence of a food reward. Head motion within trials was less than 1 mm. Consistent with prior reinforcement learning literature, we observed caudate activation in both dogs in response to the hand signal denoting reward versus no-reward.

  10. MRI quantification of pancreas motion as a function of patient setup for particle therapy -a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Giulia; Riboldi, Marco; Gianoli, Chiara; Chirvase, Cezarina I; Villa, Gaetano; Paganelli, Chiara; Summers, Paul E; Tagaste, Barbara; Pella, Andrea; Fossati, Piero; Ciocca, Mario; Baroni, Guido; Valvo, Francesca; Orecchia, Roberto

    2016-09-08

    Particle therapy (PT) has shown positive therapeutic results in local control of locally advanced pancreatic lesions. PT effectiveness is highly influenced by target localization accuracy both in space, since the pancreas is located in proximity to radiosensitive vital organs, and in time as it is subject to substantial breathing-related motion. The purpose of this preliminary study was to quantify pancreas range of motion under typical PT treatment conditions. Three common immobilization devices (vacuum cushion, thermoplastic mask, and compressor belt) were evaluated on five male patients in prone and supine positions. Retrospective four-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging data were reconstructed for each condition and the pancreas was manually segmented on each of six breathing phases. A k-means algorithm was then applied on the manually segmented map in order to obtain clusters representative of the three pancreas segments: head, body, and tail. Centers of mass (COM) for the pancreas and its segments were computed, as well as their displacements with respect to a reference breathing phase (beginning exhalation). The median three-dimensional COM displacements were in the range of 3 mm. Latero-lateral and superior-inferior directions had a higher range of motion than the anterior-posterior direction. Motion analysis of the pancreas segments showed slightly lower COM displacements for the head cluster compared to the tail cluster, especially in prone position. Statistically significant differences were found within patients among the investigated setups. Hence a patient-specific approach, rather than a general strategy, is suggested to define the optimal treatment setup in the frame of a millimeter positioning accuracy.

  11. Infimal convolution of total generalized variation functionals for dynamic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegl, Matthias; Holler, Martin; Schwarzl, Andreas; Bredies, Kristian; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2017-07-01

    To accelerate dynamic MR applications using infimal convolution of total generalized variation functionals (ICTGV) as spatio-temporal regularization for image reconstruction. ICTGV comprises a new image prior tailored to dynamic data that achieves regularization via optimal local balancing between spatial and temporal regularity. Here it is applied for the first time to the reconstruction of dynamic MRI data. CINE and perfusion scans were investigated to study the influence of time dependent morphology and temporal contrast changes. ICTGV regularized reconstruction from subsampled MR data is formulated as a convex optimization problem. Global solutions are obtained by employing a duality based non-smooth optimization algorithm. The reconstruction error remains on a low level with acceleration factors up to 16 for both CINE and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data. The GPU implementation of the algorithm suites clinical demands by reducing reconstruction times of one dataset to less than 4 min. ICTGV based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction allows for vast undersampling and therefore enables for very high spatial and temporal resolutions, spatial coverage and reduced scan time. With the proposed distinction of model and regularization parameters it offers a new and robust method of flexible decomposition into components with different degrees of temporal regularity. Magn Reson Med 78:142-155, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Application of MRI and biomedical engineering in speech production study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, S R; Freitas, D R; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2009-12-01

    Speech production has always been a subject of interest both at the morphological and acoustic levels. This knowledge is useful for a better understanding of all the involved mechanisms and for the construction of articulatory models. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique that allows the study of the whole vocal tract, with good soft tissue contrast and resolution, and permits the calculation of area functions towards a better understanding of this mechanism. Thus, our aim is to demonstrate the value and application of MRI in speech production study and its relationship with engineering, namely with biomedical engineering. After vocal tract contours extraction, data were processed for 3D reconstruction culminating in model construction of some of the sounds of European Portuguese. MRI provides useful morphological data about the position and shape of the different speech articulators, and the biomedical engineering computational tools for its analysis.

  13. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Søren; Poulsen, Jákup M;

    2016-01-01

    -FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in (18)F-FDG uptake and MRI T......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T 2 changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. METHODS: Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 - 28 years) were injected with (18)F...... 2 values. RESULTS: A significant linear correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T 2 (R (2) = 0.71) was found. for both small and large muscles and in voxel to voxel comparisons. Despite large intersubject differences in muscle recruitment, the linear correlation between (18)F...

  14. Mixed-effects and fMRI studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friston, K.J; Stephan, K.E; Ellegaard Lund, Torben

    2005-01-01

    This note concerns mixed-effect (MFX) analyses in multisession functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. It clarifies the relationship between mixed-effect analyses and the two-stage 'summary statistics' procedure (Holmes, A.P., Friston, K.J., 1998. Generalisability, random effects...... and population inference. NeuroImage 7, S754) that has been adopted widely for analyses of fMRI data at the group level. We describe a simple procedure, based on restricted maximum likelihood (ReML) estimates of covariance components, that enables full mixed-effects analyses in the context of statistical...

  15. Sexually dimorphic functional connectivity in response to high vs. low energy-dense food cues in obese humans: an fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalayer, Deniz; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Gibson, Charlisa D; McOuatt, Haley; Puma, Lauren; Astbury, Nerys M; Geliebter, Allan

    2014-10-15

    Sexually-dimorphic behavioral and biological aspects of human eating have been described. Using psychophysiological interaction (PPI) analysis, we investigated sex-based differences in functional connectivity with a key emotion-processing region (amygdala, AMG) and a key reward-processing area (ventral striatum, VS) in response to high vs. low energy-dense (ED) food images using blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in obese persons in fasted and fed states. When fed, in response to high vs. low-ED food cues, obese men (vs. women) had greater functional connectivity with AMG in right subgenual anterior cingulate, whereas obese women had greater functional connectivity with AMG in left angular gyrus and right primary motor areas. In addition, when fed, AMG functional connectivity with pre/post-central gyrus was more associated with BMI in women (vs. men). When fasted, obese men (vs. women) had greater functional connectivity with AMG in bilateral supplementary frontal and primary motor areas, left precuneus, and right cuneus, whereas obese women had greater functional connectivity with AMG in left inferior frontal gyrus, right thalamus, and dorsomedial prefrontal cortex. When fed, greater functional connectivity with VS was observed in men in bilateral supplementary and primary motor areas, left postcentral gyrus, and left precuneus. These sex-based differences in functional connectivity in response to visual food cues may help partly explain differential eating behavior, pathology prevalence, and outcomes in men and women.

  16. Aberrant brain regional homogeneity and functional connectivity in middle-aged T2DM patients: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daihong Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM has been associated with cognitive impairment. However, its neurological mechanism remains elusive. Combining regional homogeneity (ReHo and functional connectivity (FC analyses, the present study aimed to investigate brain functional alterations in middle-aged T2DM patients, which could provide complementary information for the neural substrates underlying T2DM-associated brain dysfunction. Twenty-five T2DM patients and 25 healthy controls were involved in neuropsychological testing and structural and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data acquisition. ReHo analysis was conducted to determine the peak coordinates of brain regions with abnormal local brain activity synchronization. Then, the identified brain regions were considered as seeds, and FC between these brain regions and global voxels was computed. Finally, the potential correlations between the imaging indices and neuropsychological data were also explored. Compared with healthy controls, T2DM patients exhibited higher ReHo values in the anterior cingulate gyrus and lower ReHo in right fusiform gyrus, right precentral gyrus and right medial orbit of the superior frontal gyrus. Considering these areas as seed regions, T2DM patients displayed aberrant FC, mainly in the frontal and parietal lobes. The pattern of FC alterations in T2DM patients was characterized by decreased connectivity and positive to negative or negative to positive converted connectivity. Digital Span Test forward scores revealed significant correlations with the ReHo values of the right precentral gyrus (ρ = 0.527, p = 0.014 and FC between the right fusiform gyrus and middle temporal gyrus (ρ = -0.437, p = 0.048. Our findings suggest that T2DM patients suffer from cognitive dysfunction related to spatially local and remote brain activity synchronization impairment. The patterns of ReHo and FC alterations shed light on the mechanisms underlying T2DM-associated brain

  17. Functional topography of the corpus callosum investigated by DTI and f MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara; Fabri; Chiara; Pierpaoli; Paolo; Barbaresi; Gabriele; Polonara

    2014-01-01

    This short review examines the most recent functional studies of the topographic organization of the human corpus callosum, the main interhemispheric commissure. After a brief description of its anatomy, development, microstructure, and function, it examines and discusses the latest findings obtained using diffusion tensor imaging(DTI) and tractography(DTT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging(f MRI), three recently developed imaging techniques that have significantly expanded and refined our knowledge of the commissure. While DTI and DTT have been providing insights into its microstructure, integrity and level of myelination, f MRI has been the key technique in documenting the activation of white matter fibers, particularly in the corpus callosum. By combining DTT and f MRI it has been possible to describe the trajectory of the callosal fibers interconnecting the primary olfactory, gustatory, motor, somatic sensory, auditory and visual cortices at sites where the activation elicited by peripheral stimulation was detected by fMRI. These studies have demonstrated the presence of callosal fiber tracts that cross the commissure at the level of the genu, body, and splenium, at sites showing f MRI activation. Altogether such findings lend further support to the notion that the corpus callosum displays a functional topographic organization that can be explored with f MRI.

  18. Functional MRI of the brain: localisation of eloquent cortex in focal brain lesion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dymarkowski, S.; Sunaert, S.; Oostende, S. van; Hecke, P. van; Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Nuttin, B.; Plets, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of functional MRI (fMRI) in a clinical environment on a large patient group, and to evaluate the pretherapeutic value of localisation of eloquent cortex. Forty patients with focal brain lesions of different origin were studied using fMRI. Functional information was obtained using motor, somatosensory, auditory and phonological stimuli depending on the localisation of the lesions. To obtain information about the spatial accuracy of fMRI, the results were compared with postoperative electrocortical stimulation. Two patients with secondary trigeminal neuralgia were scanned using a motor protocol and were implanted with an extradural plate electrode. Imaging was successful in 40 of 42 patients (including the 2 with trigeminal neuralgia). These patients were analysed for strength of activation, the relation of the lesion to activation sites and the presence of mass effect. The correlation between these data and surgical findings provided significant additional clinical information. Functional MRI can be accurately performed in patients with focal brain lesions using a dedicated approach. Functional MRI offers important clinical information as a contribution to a decrease in posttherapeutic morbidity. The accuracy of the technique can be confirmed by other modalities, including invasive cortical electrostimulation. (orig.) With 7 figs., 2 tabs., 25 refs.

  19. In vivo visuotopic brain mapping with manganese-enhanced MRI and resting-state functional connectivity MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin C; Fan, Shu-Juan; Chan, Russell W; Cheng, Joe S; Zhou, Iris Y; Wu, Ed X

    2014-04-15

    The rodents are an increasingly important model for understanding the mechanisms of development, plasticity, functional specialization and disease in the visual system. However, limited tools have been available for assessing the structural and functional connectivity of the visual brain network globally, in vivo and longitudinally. There are also ongoing debates on whether functional brain connectivity directly reflects structural brain connectivity. In this study, we explored the feasibility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) via 3 different routes of Mn(2+) administration for visuotopic brain mapping and understanding of physiological transport in normal and visually deprived adult rats. In addition, resting-state functional connectivity MRI (RSfcMRI) was performed to evaluate the intrinsic functional network and structural-functional relationships in the corresponding anatomical visual brain connections traced by MEMRI. Upon intravitreal, subcortical, and intracortical Mn(2+) injection, different topographic and layer-specific Mn enhancement patterns could be revealed in the visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei along retinal, callosal, cortico-subcortical, transsynaptic and intracortical horizontal connections. Loss of visual input upon monocular enucleation to adult rats appeared to reduce interhemispheric polysynaptic Mn(2+) transfer but not intra- or inter-hemispheric monosynaptic Mn(2+) transport after Mn(2+) injection into visual cortex. In normal adults, both structural and functional connectivity by MEMRI and RSfcMRI was stronger interhemispherically between bilateral primary/secondary visual cortex (V1/V2) transition zones (TZ) than between V1/V2 TZ and other cortical nuclei. Intrahemispherically, structural and functional connectivity was stronger between visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei than between visual cortex and other subcortical nuclei. The current results demonstrated the sensitivity of MEMRI and RSfcMRI for assessing the

  20. Would the field of cognitive neuroscience be advanced by sharing functional MRI data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissman Daniel H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past two decades, the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has fundamentally changed our understanding of brain-behavior relationships. However, the data from any one study add only incrementally to the big picture. This fact raises important questions about the dominant practice of performing studies in isolation. To what extent are the findings from any single study reproducible? Are researchers who lack the resources to conduct a fMRI study being needlessly excluded? Is pre-existing fMRI data being used effectively to train new students in the field? Here, we will argue that greater sharing and synthesis of raw fMRI data among researchers would make the answers to all of these questions more favorable to scientific discovery than they are today and that such sharing is an important next step for advancing the field of cognitive neuroscience.

  1. Adaptive cyclic physiologic noise modeling and correction in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Erik B

    2010-03-30

    Physiologic noise in BOLD-weighted MRI data is known to be a significant source of the variance, reducing the statistical power and specificity in fMRI and functional connectivity analyses. We show a dramatic improvement on current noise correction methods in both fMRI and fcMRI data that avoids overfitting. The traditional noise model is a Fourier series expansion superimposed on the periodicity of parallel measured breathing and cardiac cycles. Correction using this model results in removal of variance matching the periodicity of the physiologic cycles. Using this framework allows easy modeling of noise. However, using a large number of regressors comes at the cost of removing variance unrelated to physiologic noise, such as variance due to the signal of functional interest (overfitting the data). It is our hypothesis that there are a small variety of fits that describe all of the significantly coupled physiologic noise. If this is true, we can replace a large number of regressors used in the model with a smaller number of the fitted regressors and thereby account for the noise sources with a smaller reduction in variance of interest. We describe these extensions and demonstrate that we can preserve variance in the data unrelated to physiologic noise while removing physiologic noise equivalently, resulting in data with a higher effective SNR than with current corrections techniques. Our results demonstrate a significant improvement in the sensitivity of fMRI (up to a 17% increase in activation volume for fMRI compared with higher order traditional noise correction) and functional connectivity analyses.

  2. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  3. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  4. Visualization of the eloquent motor system by integration of MEG, functional, and anisotropic diffusion-weighted MRI in functional neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kyousuke; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Takeuchi, Fumiya; Ishii, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Jun; Sawamura, Yutaka; Kuriki, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we visualized the eloquent motor system including the somatosensory-motor cortex and corticospinal tract on a neuronavigation system, integrating magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and anisotropic diffusion-weighted MRI (ADWI). Four patients with brain lesions adjacent to the eloquent motor system were studied. Motor-evoked responses (MER) by finger-tapping paradigm were acquired with a 1.5-Tesla MR scanner, and somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEF) by median nerve stimulation were measured with a 204-channel MEG system. In the same fMRI examination, ADWI and anatomic three-dimensional T1-weighted imaging (3-D MRI) were obtained. Activated areas of MER, estimated SEF dipoles, and the corticospinal tract on ADWI were coregistered to 3-D MRI, and the combined MR data were transferred to a neuronavigation system (functional neuronavigation). Intraoperative recording of cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials was performed for confirmation of the central sulcus. Combination of fMRI and MEG enabled firm identification of the central sulcus. Functional neuronavigation facilitated extensive tumor resection, having the advantage of sparing the motor cortex and corticospinal tract in all cases. The proposed functional neuronavigation allows neurosurgeons to perform effective and maximal resection of brain lesions, identifying and sparing eloquent cortical components and their subcortical connections. Potential clinical application of this technique is discussed.

  5. Recent developments in multivariate pattern analysis for functional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yang; Fang Fang; Xuchu Weng

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) is a recently-developed approach for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analyses.Compared with the traditional univariate methods,MVPA is more sensitive to subtle changes in multivariate patterns in fMRI data.In this review,we introduce several significant advances in MVPA applications and summarize various combinations of algorithms and parameters in different problem settings.The limitations of MVPA and some critical questions that need to be addressed in future research are also discussed.

  6. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  7. Joint Compression-Segmentation of functional MRI Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, N.; Wu, Mo; Forchhammer, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data sets are four dimensional (4D) and very large in size. Compression can enhance system performance in terms of storage and transmission capacities. Two approaches are investigated: adaptive DPCM and integer wavelets. In the DPCM approach, each voxel...... information. Each voxel time sequence is DPCM coded using a quantized autoregressive model. The prediction residuals are coded by simple Rice coding for high decoder throughput. In the wavelet approach, the 4D fMRI data set is mapped to a 3D data set, with the 3D volume at each time instance being laid out...... into a 2D plane as a slice mosaic. 3D integer wavelet packets are used for lossless compression of fMRI data. The wavelet coefficients are compressed by 3D context-based adaptive arithmetic coding. An object-oriented compression mode is also introduced in the wavelet codec. An elliptic mask combined...

  8. Passive ventricular mechanics modelling using MRI of structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, V Y; Lam, H I; Ennis, D B; Young, A A; Nash, M P

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy or myocardial infarction can develop left ventricular (LV) diastolic impairment. The LV remodels its structure and function to adapt to pathophysiological changes in geometry and loading conditions and this remodeling process can alter the passive ventricular mechanics. In order to better understand passive ventricular mechanics, a LV finite element model was developed to incorporate physiological and mechanical information derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue tagging, in vivo LV cavity pressure recording and ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) of a canine heart. MRI tissue tagging enables quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanical function with high spatial and temporal resolution, whilst the direction of maximum water diffusion (the primary eigenvector) in each voxel of a DTMRI directly correlates with the myocardial fibre orientation. This model was customized to the geometry of the canine LV during diastasis by fitting the segmented epicardial and endocardial surface data from tagged MRI using nonlinear finite element fitting techniques. Myofibre orientations, extracted from DTMRI of the same heart, were incorporated into this geometric model using a free form deformation methodology. Pressure recordings, temporally synchronized to the tissue tagging MRI data, were used to simulate the LV deformation during diastole. Simulation of the diastolic LV mechanics allowed us to estimate the stiffness of the passive LV myocardium based on kinematic data obtained from tagged MRI. This integrated physiological model will allow more insight into the regional passive diastolic mechanics of the LV on an individualized basis, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying structural basis of mechanical dysfunction in pathological conditions.

  9. 3T MRI investigation of cardiac left ventricular structure and function in a UK population: The tayside screening for the prevention of cardiac events (TASCFORCE) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandy, Stephen J.; Lambert, Matthew; Belch, Jill; Cavin, Ian; Crowe, Elena; Littleford, Roberta; MacFarlane, Jennifer A.; Matthew, Shona Z.; Martin, Patricia; Nicholas, R. Stephen; Struthers, Allan; Sullivan, Frank; Waugh, Shelley A.; White, Richard D.; Weir‐McCall, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To scan a volunteer population using 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). MRI of the left ventricular (LV) structure and function in healthy volunteers has been reported extensively at 1.5T. Materials and Methods A population of 1528 volunteers was scanned. A standardized approach was taken to acquire steady‐state free precession (SSFP) LV data in the short‐axis plane, and images were quantified using commercial software. Six observers undertook the segmentation analysis. Results Mean values (±standard deviation, SD) were: ejection fraction (EF) = 69 ± 6%, end diastolic volume index (EDVI) = 71 ± 13 ml/m2, end systolic volume index (ESVI) = 22 ± 7 ml/m2, stroke volume index (SVI) = 49 ± 8 ml/m2, and LV mass index (LVMI) = 55 ± 12 g/m2. The mean EF was slightly larger for females (69%) than for males (68%), but all other variables were smaller for females (EDVI 68v77 ml/m2, ESVI 21v25 ml/m2, SVI 46v52 ml/m2, LVMI 49v64 g/m2, all P J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;44:1186–1196. PMID:27143317

  10. Sparse representation of whole-brain fMRI signals for identification of functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Shu; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Huang, Heng; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2015-02-01

    There have been several recent studies that used sparse representation for fMRI signal analysis and activation detection based on the assumption that each voxel's fMRI signal is linearly composed of sparse components. Previous studies have employed sparse coding to model functional networks in various modalities and scales. These prior contributions inspired the exploration of whether/how sparse representation can be used to identify functional networks in a voxel-wise way and on the whole brain scale. This paper presents a novel, alternative methodology of identifying multiple functional networks via sparse representation of whole-brain task-based fMRI signals. Our basic idea is that all fMRI signals within the whole brain of one subject are aggregated into a big data matrix, which is then factorized into an over-complete dictionary basis matrix and a reference weight matrix via an effective online dictionary learning algorithm. Our extensive experimental results have shown that this novel methodology can uncover multiple functional networks that can be well characterized and interpreted in spatial, temporal and frequency domains based on current brain science knowledge. Importantly, these well-characterized functional network components are quite reproducible in different brains. In general, our methods offer a novel, effective and unified solution to multiple fMRI data analysis tasks including activation detection, de-activation detection, and functional network identification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional MRI using robotic MRI compatible devices for monitoring rehabilitation from chronic stroke in the molecular medicine era (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS G.; NAQVI, SYED HASSAN ABBAS; KATEB, BABAK; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2012-01-01

    The number of individuals suffering from stroke is increasing daily, and its consequences are a major contributor to invalidity in today’s society. Stroke rehabilitation is relatively new, having been hampered from the longstanding view that lost functions were not recoverable. Nowadays, robotic devices, which aid by stimulating brain plasticity, can assist in restoring movement compromised by stroke-induced pathological changes in the brain which can be monitored by MRI. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of stroke patients participating in a training program with a novel Magnetic Resonance Compatible Hand-Induced Robotic Device (MR_CHIROD) could yield a promising biomarker that, ultimately, will enhance our ability to advance hand motor recovery following chronic stroke. Using state-of-the art MRI in conjunction with MR_CHIROD-assisted therapy can provide novel biomarkers for stroke patient rehabilitation extracted by a meta-analysis of data. Successful completion of such studies may provide a ground breaking method for the future evaluation of stroke rehabilitation therapies. Their results will attest to the effectiveness of using MR-compatible hand devices with MRI to provide accurate monitoring during rehabilitative therapy. Furthermore, such results may identify biomarkers of brain plasticity that can be monitored during stroke patient rehabilitation. The potential benefit for chronic stroke patients is that rehabilitation may become possible for a longer period of time after stroke than previously thought, unveiling motor skill improvements possible even after six months due to retained brain plasticity. PMID:22426741

  12. Enhanced Thalamic Functional Connectivity with No fMRI Responses to Affected Forelimb Stimulation in Stroke-Recovered Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Woo H.; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jeong K.; Jeong, Jaeseung; Kim, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological recovery after stroke has been extensively investigated to provide better understanding of neurobiological mechanism, therapy, and patient management. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly functional MRI (fMRI), have widely contributed to unravel the relationship between the altered neural function and stroke-affected brain areas. As results of previous investigations, the plastic reorganization and/or gradual restoration of the hemodynamic fMRI responses to neural stimuli have been suggested as relevant mechanisms underlying the stroke recovery process. However, divergent study results and modality-dependent outcomes have clouded the proper interpretation of variable fMRI signals. Here, we performed both evoked and resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) to clarify the link between the fMRI phenotypes and post-stroke functional recovery. The experiments were designed to examine the altered neural activity within the contra-lesional hemisphere and other undamaged brain regions using rat models with large unilateral stroke, which despite the severe injury, exhibited nearly full recovery at ∼6 months after stroke. Surprisingly, both blood oxygenation level-dependent and blood volume-weighted (CBVw) fMRI activities elicited by electrical stimulation of the stroke-affected forelimb were completely absent, failing to reveal the neural origin of the behavioral recovery. In contrast, the functional connectivity maps showed highly robust rs-fMRI activity concentrated in the contra-lesional ventromedial nucleus of thalamus (VM). The negative finding in the stimuli-induced fMRI study using the popular rat middle cerebral artery model denotes weak association between the fMRI hemodynamic responses and neurological improvement. The results strongly caution the indiscreet interpretation of stroke-affected fMRI signals and demonstrate rs-fMRI as a complementary tool for efficiently characterizing stroke recovery. PMID:28119575

  13. In vivo MRI biocompatibility evaluation of functionalized carbon fibers in reaction with soft tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić B.B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern medicine implants are very important and so is their design and choice of materials. Almost equally important is the choice of imaging technique used to in vivo monitor their fate and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in monitoring the biocompatibility of two newly designed carbon fibers. We have analyzed the interaction of surface functionalized carbon fibers (basic and acidic with muscle and subcutaneous tissues of rabbits. MRI techniques showed to be useful in longitudinal monitoring of the surrounding tissues, assessment of biocompatibility of new implants, and in the distinction of in vivo surgical edema from inflammation. Histopathology confirmed MRI results, thus showing that MRI has a great potential for in vivo studies of such materials. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45006 and III 41005

  14. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan V. Raut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR, which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a breath-hold fMRI task to evaluate CVR across gray matter in a group of acute stroke patients (<10 days from stroke; N = 22 to address this question. These estimates were compared with those from both age-matched (N = 22 and younger (N = 22 healthy controls. As expected, young controls had the greatest mean CVR, as indicated by magnitude and extent of fMRI activation; however, stroke patients did not differ from age-matched controls. Moreover, the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres of stroke patients did not differ with respect to any of these measures. These findings suggest that fMRI remains a valid tool within the first few days of a stroke, particularly for group fMRI studies in which findings are compared with healthy subjects of similar age. However, given the relatively high variability in CVR observed in our stroke sample, caution is warranted when interpreting fMRI data from individual patients or a small cohort. We conclude that a breath-hold task can be a useful addition to functional imaging protocols for stroke patients.

  15. Altered Brain Functional Activity in Infants with Congenital Bilateral Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study under Sedation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Jing; Li, Qiang; Chai, Chao; Zheng, Meizhu; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Early hearing deprivation could affect the development of auditory, language, and vision ability. Insufficient or no stimulation of the auditory cortex during the sensitive periods of plasticity could affect the function of hearing, language, and vision development. Twenty-three infants with congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss (CSSHL) and 17 age and sex matched normal hearing subjects were recruited. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) of the auditory, language, and vision related brain areas were compared between deaf infants and normal subjects. Compared with normal hearing subjects, decreased ALFF and ReHo were observed in auditory and language-related cortex. Increased ALFF and ReHo were observed in vision related cortex, which suggest that hearing and language function were impaired and vision function was enhanced due to the loss of hearing. ALFF of left Brodmann area 45 (BA45) was negatively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. ALFF of right BA39 was positively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. In conclusion, ALFF and ReHo can reflect the abnormal brain function in language, auditory, and visual information processing in infants with CSSHL. This demonstrates that the development of auditory, language, and vision processing function has been affected by congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss before 4 years of age.

  16. Altered Brain Functional Activity in Infants with Congenital Bilateral Severe Sensorineural Hearing Loss: A Resting-State Functional MRI Study under Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Xia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Early hearing deprivation could affect the development of auditory, language, and vision ability. Insufficient or no stimulation of the auditory cortex during the sensitive periods of plasticity could affect the function of hearing, language, and vision development. Twenty-three infants with congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss (CSSHL and 17 age and sex matched normal hearing subjects were recruited. The amplitude of low frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo of the auditory, language, and vision related brain areas were compared between deaf infants and normal subjects. Compared with normal hearing subjects, decreased ALFF and ReHo were observed in auditory and language-related cortex. Increased ALFF and ReHo were observed in vision related cortex, which suggest that hearing and language function were impaired and vision function was enhanced due to the loss of hearing. ALFF of left Brodmann area 45 (BA45 was negatively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. ALFF of right BA39 was positively correlated with deaf duration in infants with CSSHL. In conclusion, ALFF and ReHo can reflect the abnormal brain function in language, auditory, and visual information processing in infants with CSSHL. This demonstrates that the development of auditory, language, and vision processing function has been affected by congenital severe sensorineural hearing loss before 4 years of age.

  17. On the averaging of cardiac diffusion tensor MRI data: the effect of distance function selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) metrics were judged by quantitative—rather than qualitative—criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the ‘swelling effect’ occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration.

  18. A SVM-based quantitative fMRI method for resting-state functional network detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-09-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to measure baseline neuronal connectivity independent of specific functional tasks and to capture changes in the connectivity due to neurological diseases. Most existing network detection methods rely on a fixed threshold to identify functionally connected voxels under the resting state. Due to fMRI non-stationarity, the threshold cannot adapt to variation of data characteristics across sessions and subjects, and generates unreliable mapping results. In this study, a new method is presented for resting-state fMRI data analysis. Specifically, the resting-state network mapping is formulated as an outlier detection process that is implemented using one-class support vector machine (SVM). The results are refined by using a spatial-feature domain prototype selection method and two-class SVM reclassification. The final decision on each voxel is made by comparing its probabilities of functionally connected and unconnected instead of a threshold. Multiple features for resting-state analysis were extracted and examined using an SVM-based feature selection method, and the most representative features were identified. The proposed method was evaluated using synthetic and experimental fMRI data. A comparison study was also performed with independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation analysis. The experimental results show that the proposed method can provide comparable or better network detection performance than ICA and correlation analysis. The method is potentially applicable to various resting-state quantitative fMRI studies.

  19. Comparison of post-surgical MRI presentation of the pituitary gland and its hormonal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladowska, Joanna; Sokolska, Violetta; Sozański, Tomasz; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change of anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of a tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of filling material used and time of its resorption.The aim of the study was to compare MR image of the pituitary gland after surgery with clinical findings and to establish a correlation between MRI presentation of spared pituitary and its hormonal function. Material/Methods: 124 patients after resection of pituitary adenomas – 409 MRI results in total – were studied. With a 1.5-T unit, T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images were obtained. Results: The pituitary gland seemed to be normal in MRI in 11 patients, 8 of them had completely regular pituitary function but in 3 of them we noticed a partial hypopituitarism. In 99 patients only a part of the pituitary gland was recognised, 53 of them had hypopituitarism but 46 of them were endocrinologically healthy. 14 patients seemed to have no persistent pituitary gland in MRI, in comparison to hormonal studies: there was panhypopituitarism in 6 and hypopituitarism in 8 cases. Conclusions: MRI presentation of post – surgical pituitary gland doesn’t necessarily correlate with its hormonal function – there was a significant statistical difference. Some patients with partial pituitary seems normal hormonal function. In some cases the pituitary seem normal in MRI but these patients have hormonal disorders and need substitution therapy. PMID:22802758

  20. Assignment Confidence in Localization of the Hand Motor Cortex: Comparison of Structural Imaging With Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Mohan, Suyash; Maralani, Pejman J; Duddukuri, Srikalyan; O'Rourke, Donald M; Melhem, Elias R; Wolf, Ronald L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assign confidence levels to structural MRI and functional MRI (fMRI) for localization of the primary motor cortex. Ninety-one fMRI studies with at least one motor task (178 hemispheres) were identified. Three anatomic assessments were used to localize the primary motor cortex: relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus; cortical thickness; and configuration of the precentral knob. In 105 hemispheres, interreader agreement was assessed for two investigators with different experience levels. Confidence ratings from 0 to 5 (0, no confidence; 5, 100% confidence) were assigned for fMRI and each anatomic localization method. Cortical thickness had the highest confidence rating (mean, 4.90 ± 0.47 [SD]) with only one failure. The relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus had the lowest confidence rating (4.33 ± 0.91) with three failures. The greatest statistical significance was observed for the cortical thickness and superior frontal sulcus-precentral sulcus methods (post hoc Bonferroni test, p Confidence rating scores were significantly higher for the cortical thickness sign than for fMRI results (4.72 ± 0.54) for a single motor task (post hoc Bonferroni test, p = 0.006); however, the mean confidence rating for fMRI improved to 4.87 ± 0.36 when additional motor tasks were performed. Interreader differences were least for the cortical thickness sign (paired t test, t = 4.25, p confidence regarding localization of the primary motor cortex; however, localization of motor function is more specific when combined with fMRI findings. Multiple techniques can be used to increase confidence in identifying the hand motor cortex.

  1. Peripheral inflammation related to lower fMRI activation during a working memory task and resting functional connectivity among older adults: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Sheena I; Moore, Raeanne C; Soontornniyomkij, Benchawanna; Achim, Cristian L; Jeste, Dilip V; Eyler, Lisa T

    2017-03-01

    Peripheral inflammation has been associated with adverse effects on cognition and brain structure in late life, a process called 'inflammaging.' Identifying biomarkers of preclinical cognitive decline is critical in the development of preventative therapies, and peripheral inflammation may be able to serve as an indicator of cognitive decline. However, little is known regarding the relationship between peripheral inflammation and brain structure and function among older adults. Twenty-four older adults (mean age = 78) underwent a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state functional connectivity scan, and a subset (n = 14) completed the n-Back working memory task in the scanner. All participants completed a blood draw, and inflammation was measured with interleukin 6 (IL-6) and C-Reactive Protein (CRP). Surprisingly, age was unrelated to measures of inflammation (IL-6, CRP) or brain function (default mode network (DMN) connectivity; working memory performance; blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation with higher working memory load). However, lower functional connectivity between the left parietal seed and all other DMN regions was associated with higher levels of IL-6 and CRP. Additionally, greater plasma concentration of IL-6 was associated with lower BOLD activation in the left middle frontal gyrus in response to increased working memory load. These preliminary findings support the importance of IL-6 and CRP in brain function among older adults. Frontal and parietal regions may be particularly sensitive to the effects of inflammation. Additionally, these findings provide preliminary evidence of inflammatory contributions to level of neural activity, even after accounting for vascular risk factors. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcar, V.L. [University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Treichlerstrasse 10, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Girard, F. [GE Medical Systems SA, 283, rue de la Miniere B.P. 34, 78533 Buc Cedex (France); Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E. [University Children' s Hospital, Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-11-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  3. Pharmaco fMRI: Determining the functional anatomy of the effects of medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Wandschneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI studies have helped to elucidate underlying mechanisms in complex neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Disease processes often involve complex large-scale network interactions, extending beyond the presumed main disease focus. Given both the complexity of the clinical phenotype and the underlying dysfunctional brain circuits, so called pharmaco-fMRI (ph-MRI studies probe pharmacological effects on functional neuro-anatomy, and can help to determine early treatment response, mechanisms of drug efficacy and side effects, and potentially advance CNS drug development. In this review, we discuss recent ph-MRI research in three major neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders and associated network alterations, namely selective serotonin and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors in affective disorders and emotional processing circuits; antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy and cognitive networks; and stimulants in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and networks of attention control. We conclude that ph-MRI studies show consistent and reproducible changes on disease relevant networks, and prove sensitive to early pharmacological effects on functional anatomy associated with disease. Further CNS drug research and development would benefit greatly from improved disease phenotyping, or biomarkers, using advanced imaging techniques.

  4. Cognitive function and MRI findings in very low birth weight infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Atsuko; Takagishi, Yuka; Takada, Satoru; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Toru; Nakamura, Hajime [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Inagaki, Yuko

    1996-07-01

    Twenty-two very low birth weight infants at preschool ages of 5-6 years were studied to clarify the correlation between cognitive function and MRI findings. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Frostig developmental test of visual perception. Ventricular enlargement, assessed by the bioccipital index (B.I.) measured on MRI, was correlated to cognitive disorders. Children with periventricular high intensity areas (T{sub 2}-weighted images) extending from the posterior periventricular region to the parietal lobe tend to highly suffer from cerebral palsy and visuoperceptual impairment. These results indicate that the disorders of cognitive function in very low birth weight infants were caused by a damage of association fibers in periventricular areas which was detectable by MRI. (author)

  5. Decoding lifespan changes of the human brain using resting-state functional connectivity MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubin Wang

    Full Text Available The development of large-scale functional brain networks is a complex, lifelong process that can be investigated using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI. In this study, we aimed to decode the developmental dynamics of the whole-brain functional network in seven decades (8-79 years of the human lifespan. We first used parametric curve fitting to examine linear and nonlinear age effect on the resting human brain, and then combined manifold learning and support vector machine methods to predict individuals' "brain ages" from rs-fcMRI data. We found that age-related changes in interregional functional connectivity exhibited spatially and temporally specific patterns. During brain development from childhood to senescence, functional connections tended to linearly increase in the emotion system and decrease in the sensorimotor system; while quadratic trajectories were observed in functional connections related to higher-order cognitive functions. The complex patterns of age effect on the whole-brain functional network could be effectively represented by a low-dimensional, nonlinear manifold embedded in the functional connectivity space, which uncovered the inherent structure of brain maturation and aging. Regression of manifold coordinates with age further showed that the manifold representation extracted sufficient information from rs-fcMRI data to make prediction about individual brains' functional development levels. Our study not only gives insights into the neural substrates that underlie behavioral and cognitive changes over age, but also provides a possible way to quantitatively describe the typical and atypical developmental progression of human brain function using rs-fcMRI.

  6. Connectivity in Autism: A review of MRI connectivity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rane, Pallavi; Cochran, David; Hodge, Steven M.; Haselgrove, Christian; Kennedy, David; Frazier, Jean A.

    2016-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) affects 1 in 50 children between the ages of 6–17 years as per a 2012 CDC survey of parents. The etiology of ASD is not precisely known. ASD is an umbrella term, which includes low (IQ70) individuals. A better understanding of the disorder, and how it manifests in an individual subject can lead to more effective intervention plans to fulfill the individual’s treatment needs. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a non-invasive investigational tool that can help study the ways in which the brain develops and/or deviates from the typical developmental trajectory. MRI offers insights into the structure, function, and metabolism of the brain. In this article, we review published studies on brain connectivity changes in ASD using either resting state functional MRI or diffusion tensor imaging. The general findings of decreases in white matter integrity and long-range neural coherence are prevalent in ASD literature. However, there is somewhat less of a consensus in the detailed localization of these findings. There are even fewer studies linking these connectivity alterations with the behavioral phenotype of the disorder. Nevertheless, with the help of data sharing and large-scale analytic efforts, the field is advancing towards several convergent themes. These include reduced functional coherence of long-range intra-hemispheric cortico-cortical default mode circuitry, impaired inter-hemispheric regulation, and an associated, perhaps compensatory, increase in local and short-range cortico-subcortical coherence. PMID:26146755

  7. 帕金森病患者静息态功能磁共振的研究%Resting-state functional MRI studies in patients with Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    康德智; 王芳玉; 陈富勇; 刘颖; 吴刚; 曹代荣; 余良宏; 林元相; 林章雅

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the changes of rest-state functional MRI (fMRI) features in patients with Parkinson's disease.Methods Twelve patients with Parkinson's disease,collected in our hospital from September 2013 to March 2014,and 12 volunteers (controls) were recruited.The fMRI based on blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) was performed at resting state; the differences of amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) and regional homogeneity (ReHo) were statistically analyzed; and the correlations of values of ALFF and ReHo with uniformed Parkinsonism rating scale (UPDRS) scores and Hoehn-Yahr (H-Y) grading were analyzed.Results PD patients exhibited increased ALFF values in the limbic lobe,the right parahippocampal gyrus and the right middle temporal pole,and reduced ALFF values in the left thalamus as compared with the controls.PD patients exhibited increased ReHo values in the superior medial frontal gyrus,the left middle frontal gyrus,brodmann area (BA) 9 and medial frontal gyrus,and reduced ReHo values in the left rolandic,the left superior temporal gyrus and insula lobe as compared with the controls.ALFF values were positively correlated with the UPDRS Ⅲ scores in the right posterior cerebellum lobe and cerebellar tonsil.ALFF values and H-Y grading were negatively correlated on the left superior frontal gyrus.Negative correlation was noted between the ReHo values and UPDRS Ⅲ scores in the right superior temporal gyrus and insular lobe.Positive correlation was noted between the ReHo values and H-Y grading in medial frontal gyrus,limbic lobe,anterior cingulate,medial orbitofrontal area,middle superior frontal gyrus,BA32,left superior frontal gyrus and BA10.Conclusion By resting-state fMRI,abnormal brain function in Parkinson's disease was noted; ReHo and ALFF showed abnormal changes in the connection of neuronal networks,and the compensatory response may lead to the increased brain function.%目的 探讨帕金森病(PD)患者静息态功能性磁共振成像(fMRI

  8. Chronotype Modulates Language Processing-Related Cerebral Activity during Functional MRI (fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rosenberg

    Full Text Available Based on individual daily physiological cycles, humans can be classified as early (EC, late (LC and intermediate (IC chronotypes. Recent studies have verified that chronotype-specificity relates to performance on cognitive tasks: participants perform more efficiently when tested in the chronotype-specific optimal time of day than when tested in their non-optimal time. Surprisingly, imaging studies focussing on the underlying neural mechanisms of potential chronotype-specificities are sparse. Moreover, chronotype-specific alterations of language-related semantic processing have been neglected so far.16 male, healthy ECs, 16 ICs and 16 LCs participated in a fast event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI paradigm probing semantic priming. Subjects read two subsequently presented words (prime, target and were requested to determine whether the target word was an existing word or a non-word. Subjects were tested during their individual evening hours when homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian alertness levels are high to ensure equal entrainment.Chronotype-specificity is associated with task-performance and brain activation. First, ECs exhibited slower reaction times than LCs. Second, ECs showed attenuated BOLD responses in several language-related brain areas, e.g. in the left postcentral gyrus, left and right precentral gyrus and in the right superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, increased BOLD responses were revealed for LCs as compared to ICs in task-related areas, e.g. in the right inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral gyrus.These findings reveal that even basic language processes are associated with chronotype-specific neuronal mechanisms. Consequently, results might change the way we schedule patient evaluations and/or healthy subjects in e.g. experimental research and adding "chronotype" as a statistical covariate.

  9. 精神分裂症患者基底节功能连接的静息态 fMRI 研究%Resting - state functional magnetic resonance imaging study of functional connectivity of basal ganglia in schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋宇超; 陈琳; 段明君; 陈曦; 杨宓; 邓佳燕; 赖永秀; 尧德中; 罗程

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore the difference of functional connectivity of basal ganglia in schizophrenia during a resting state by functional magnetic resoncance imaging(fMRI). Methods 3. 0T fMRI was used to assess the whole brain activity of 15 schizophrenia patients and 12 health controls. Functional connectivity analysis based on basal ganglia was performed to obtain the significant differ-ence between two groups. Results Compared with the health controls,the patients showed significantly increased functional connectiv-ity between media superior frontal gyrus,posterior cingulate and caudate;increased functional connectivity between left superior frontal gyrus,right anterior cingulate and left pallidum;increased functional connectivity between left medial frontal gyrus and right pallidum;increased functional connectivity between left superior frontal gyrus and left putamen. Conclusion This study discovers increased func-tional connectivity between basal ganglia and crucial regions of Default Model Network(DMN). The results imply that basal ganglia -DMN loop altered aberrantly,which might be associated with the pathological mechanisms of schizophrenia.%目的:通过功能磁共振(fMRI)技术,探讨精神分裂症患者静息状态下与基底节异常连接的脑区。方法采用3.0T 功能磁共振成像技术检测15例精神分裂症患者与12例正常对照组在静息状态下的全脑功能活动。采用功能连接分析对比两组被试的基底节(双侧尾状核、壳核和苍白球共6个区域)与全脑功能连接的差异。结果与对照组相比,精神分裂症患者的内侧额上回、后扣带与尾状核的功能连接上升;左侧额上回、右侧前扣带与左侧苍白球功能连接上升;左内侧额上回与右侧苍白球功能连接上升;左侧额上回与左侧壳核功能连接上升。差异均有统计学意义。结论精神分裂症患者的基底节区域与默认网络的重要节点功能连接上升,提

  10. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter?A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Reanna Gawryluk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: 1 the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and 2 fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter. Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI.

  11. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  12. Altered pattern of spontaneous brain activity in the patients with end-stage renal disease: a resting-state functional MRI study with regional homogeneity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Liang

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the pattern of spontaneous neural activity in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD with and without neurocognitive dysfunction using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI with a regional homogeneity (ReHo algorithm. MATERIALS AND METHODS: rs-fMRI data were acquired in 36 ESRD patients (minimal nephro-encephalopathy [MNE], n = 19, 13 male, 37±12.07 years; non-nephro-encephalopathy [non-NE], n = 17, 11 male, 38±12.13 years and 20 healthy controls (13 male, 7 female, 36±10.27 years. Neuropsychological (number connection test type A [NCT-A], digit symbol test [DST] and laboratory tests were performed in all patients. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance (KCC was used to measure the regional homogeneity for each subject. The regional homogeneity maps were compared using ANOVA tests among MNE, non-NE, and healthy control groups and post hoc t -tests between each pair in a voxel-wise way. A multiple regression analysis was performed to evaluate the relationships between ReHo index and NCT-A, DST scores, serum creatinine and urea levels, disease and dialysis duration. RESULTS: Compared with healthy controls, both MNE and non-NE patients showed decreased ReHo in the multiple areas of bilateral frontal, parietal and temporal lobes. Compared with the non-NE, MNE patients showed decreased ReHo in the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL, medial frontal cortex (MFC and left precuneus (PCu. The NCT-A scores and serum urea levels of ESRD patients negatively correlated with ReHo values in the frontal and parietal lobes, while DST scores positively correlated with ReHo values in the bilateral PCC/precuneus, MFC and inferior parietal lobe (IPL (all P0.05, AlphaSim corrected. CONCLUSION: Diffused decreased ReHo values were found in both MNE and non-NE patients. The progressively decreased ReHo in the default mode network (DMN, frontal and parietal lobes might be trait-related in MNE. The Re

  13. Absent activation in medial prefrontal cortex and temporoparietal junction but not superior temporal sulcus during the perception of biological motion in schizophrenia: a functional MRI study

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    Hashimoto N

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Naoki Hashimoto,1,2 Atsuhito Toyomaki,1 Masahiro Hirai,3 Tamaki Miyamoto,1 Hisashi Narita,1 Ryo Okubo,1 Ichiro Kusumi1 1Department of Psychiatry, Graduate School of Medicine, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan; 2Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA; 3Center for Development of Advanced Medical Technology, Jichi Medical University, Yakushiji, Shimotsuke, Tochigi, Japan Background: Patients with schizophrenia show disturbances in both visual perception and social cognition. Perception of biological motion (BM is a higher-level visual process, and is known to be associated with social cognition. BM induces activation in the “social brain network”, including the superior temporal sulcus (STS. Although deficits in the detection of BM and atypical activation in the STS have been reported in patients with schizophrenia, it remains unclear whether other nodes of the “social brain network” are also atypical in patients with schizophrenia.Purpose: We aimed to explore whether brain regions other than STS were involved during BM perception in patients with schizophrenia, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI.Methods and patients: Seventeen patients with schizophrenia, and 17 age- and sex- matched healthy controls, underwent fMRI scanning during a one-back visual task, containing three experimental conditions: (1 BM, (2 scrambled motion (SM, and (3 static condition. We used one-sample t-tests to examine neural responses selective to BM versus SM within each group, and two-sample t-tests to directly compare neural patterns to BM versus SM in schizophrenics versus controls.Results: We found significant activation in the STS region when BM was contrasted with SM in both groups, with no significant difference between groups. On the contrary, significant activation in the medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC and bilateral temporoparietal junction (TPJ was found only in the

  14. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p central sensitisation. People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

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    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density. RESULTS: The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005. CONCLUSION: Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  16. The effect of experimental low back pain on lumbar muscle activity in people with a history of clinical low back pain: a muscle functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneels, Lieven; Cagnie, Barbara; D'hooge, Roseline; De Deene, Yves; Crombez, Geert; Vanderstraeten, Guy; Parlevliet, Thierry; Van Oosterwijck, Jessica

    2016-02-01

    In people with a history of low back pain (LBP), structural and functional alterations have been observed at several peripheral and central levels of the sensorimotor pathway. These existing alterations might interact with the way the sensorimotor system responds to pain. We examined this assumption by evaluating the lumbar motor responses to experimental nociceptive input of 15 participants during remission of unilateral recurrent LBP. Quantitative T2 images (muscle functional MRI) were taken bilaterally of multifidus, erector spinae, and psoas at several segmental levels (L3 upper and L4 upper and lower endplate) and during several conditions: 1) at rest, 2) upon trunk-extension exercise without pain, and 3) upon trunk-extension exercise with experimental induced pain at the clinical pain-side (1.5-ml intramuscular hypertonic saline injections in erector spinae). Following experimental pain induction, muscle activity levels similarly reduced for all three muscles, on both painful and nonpainful sides, and at multiple segmental levels (P = 0.038). Pain intensity and localization from experimental LBP were similar as during recalled clinical LBP episodes. In conclusion, unilateral and unisegmental experimental LBP exerts a generalized and widespread decrease in lumbar muscle activity during remission of recurrent LBP. This muscle response is consistent with previous observed patterns in healthy people subjected to the same experimental pain paradigm. It is striking that similar inhibitory patterns in response to pain could be observed, despite the presence of preexisting alterations in the lumbar musculature during remission of recurrent LBP. These results suggest that motor output can modify along the course of recurrent LBP.

  17. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    to both the results of the contrast sensitivity test and to the Snellen visual acuity. Our results indicate that fMRI is a useful method for the study of ON, even in cases where the visual acuity is severely impaired. The reduction in activated volume could be explained as a reduced neuronal input......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...... of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...

  18. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  19. The Association of MRI Findings and Neuropsychological Functioning after the First Recognized Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Anna W.; deGrauw, Ton J.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Fastenau, Philip S.; Perkins, Susan M.; Egelhoff, John C.; Kalnin, Andrew; Dunn, David W.; Austin, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Purpose To explore relationships between MRI abnormalities of the brain and neuropsychological functioning in children who were evaluated following their first recognized seizure. Methods Subjects were children aged 6 to 14 years with a first recognized seizure within the past 3 months who participated in a larger prospective study of child adaptation. The 249 children with neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging were studied. Children underwent neuropsychological examination an average of 2.8 months and MRI examination an average of 1.3 months after the first recognized seizure. On factor analysis four factors were found for neuropsychological function: LANG = Language, PS = Processing Speed, EC = Executive/Construction, VMEM = Verbal Memory and Learning. For analysis, structural abnormalities found on MRI were classified as significant (yes/no) based on whether they were presumed to be related to the seizure condition. Results On MRI, 34 (14%) had structural abnormalities that were judged to be significant in that they were possibly related to their seizures. Children with significant abnormalities had significantly lower estimated IQ scores and significantly lower language, processing speed, executive/constructional ability, and verbal memory and learning factor scores than did children without significant abnormalities. Conclusions Children who have structural brain abnormalities at onset have slightly lower cognitive functioning overall, and all neuropsychological domains seemed to be affected relatively equally. This pattern was apparent even when we restricted the analysis to children with intellectual functioning in the broadly normal range. PMID:17442004

  20. Neural correlate of vernier acuity tasks assessed by functional MRI (FMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N; Walker, B Michael; Modestino, Edward J; Miki, Atsushi; Terhune, Kyla P; Francis, Ellie L; Haselgrove, John C; Liu, Grant T

    2007-01-01

    Vernier acuity refers to the ability to discern a small offset within a line. However, while Vernier acuity has been extensively studied psychophysically, its neural correlates are uncertain. Based upon previous psychophysical and electrophysiologic data, we hypothesized that extrastriate areas of the brain would be involved in Vernier acuity tasks, so we designed event-related functional MRI (fMRI) paradigms to identify cortical regions of the brain involved in this behavior. Normal subjects identified suprathreshold and subthreshold Vernier offsets. The results suggest a cortical network including frontal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellar regions subserves the observation, processing, interpretation, and acknowledgment of briefly presented Vernier offsets.

  1. Visualization and analysis of functional cardiac MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Elliot R.; Guttman, Michael A.; Poon, Eric; Pisupati, Chandrasekhar; Moore, Christopher C.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Heng, PhengAnn

    1994-05-01

    Rapid analysis of large multi-dimensional data sets is critical for the successful implementation of a comprehensive MR cardiac exam. We have developed a software package for the analysis and visualization of cardiac MR data. The program allows interactive visualization of time and space stacks of MRI data, automatic segmentation of myocardial borders and myocardial tagging patterns, and visualization of functional parameters such a motion, strain, and blood flow, mapped as colors in an interactive dynamic 3D volume rendering of the beating heart.

  2. A functional MRI study on how oxytocin affects decision making in social dilemmas: Cooperate as long as it pays off, aggress only when you think you can win.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Bruno; Declerck, Carolyn H; Boone, Christophe; Parizel, Paul M

    2017-08-01

    We investigate if the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT), known to moderate social behaviour, influences strategic decision making in social dilemmas by facilitating the integration of incentives and social cues. Participants (N=29) played two economic games with different incentive structures in the fMRI scanner after receiving OT or placebo (following a double blind, within-subject design). Pictures of angry or neutral faces (the social cues) were displayed alongside the game matrices. Consistent with a priori hypotheses based on the modulatory role of OT in mesolimbic dopaminergic brain regions, the results indicate that, compared to placebo, OT significantly increases the activation of the nucleus accumbens during an assurance (coordination) game that rewards mutual cooperation. This increases appetitive motivation so that cooperative behaviour is facilitated for risk averse individuals. OT also significantly attenuates the amygdala, thereby reducing the orienting response to social cues. The corresponding change in behaviour is only apparent in the chicken (or anti-coordination) game, where aggression is incentivized but fatal if the partner also aggresses. Because of this ambiguity, decision making can be improved by additional information, and OT steers decisions in the chicken game in accordance with the valence of the facial cue: aggress when face is neutral; retreat when it is angry. Through its combined influence on amygdala and nucleus accumbens, OT improves the selection of a cooperative or aggressive strategy in function of the best match between the incentives of the game and the social cues present in the decision environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Arcuate fasciculus laterality by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with language laterality by functional MRI in preadolescent children

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    Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu [Government Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Menon, Amitha C.; Thomas, Sanjeev V. [Sree Chitra, Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); James, Jija S.; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [SCTIMST, Department of Imaging Science and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2015-03-01

    Language lateralization is unique to humans. Functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable the study of language areas and white matter fibers involved in language, respectively. The objective of this study was to correlate arcuate fasciculus (AF) laterality by diffusion tensor imaging with that by fMRI in preadolescent children which has not yet been reported. Ten children between 8 and 12 years were subjected to fMRI and DTI imaging using Siemens 1.5 T MRI. Two language fMRI paradigms - visual verb generation and word pair task - were used. Analysis was done using SPM8 software. In DTI, the fiber volume of the arcuate fasciculus (AFV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured. The fMRI Laterality Index (fMRI-LI) and DTI Laterality Index (DTI-LI) were calculated and their correlation assessed using the Pearson Correlation Index. Of ten children, mean age 10.6 years, eight showed left lateralization while bilateral language lateralization was seen in two. AFV by DTI was more on the left side in seven of the eight children who had left lateralization by fMRI. DTI could not trace the AF in one child. Of the two with bilateral language lateralization on fMRI, one showed larger AFV on the right side while the other did not show any asymmetry. There was a significant correlation (p < 0.02) between fMRI-LI and DTI-LI. Group mean of AFV by DTI was higher on the left side (2659.89 ± 654.75 mm{sup 3}) as compared to the right (1824.11 ± 582.81 mm{sup 3}) (p < 0.01). Like fMRI, DTI also reveals language laterality in children with a high degree of correlation between the two imaging modalities. (orig.)

  4. Improved detection of event-related functional MRI signals using probability functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, G E; Zito, G; Patria, F; Sanes, J N

    2001-11-01

    Selecting an optimal event distribution for experimental use in event-related fMRI studies can require the generation of large numbers of event sequences with characteristics hard to control. The use of known probability distributions offers the possibility to control event timing and constrain the search space for finding optimal event sequences. We investigated different probability distributions in terms of response estimation (estimation efficiency), detectability (detection power, parameter estimation efficiency, sensitivity to true positives), and false-positive activation. Numerous simulated event sequences were generated selecting interevent intervals (IEI) from the uniform, uniform permuted, Latin square, exponential, binomial, Poisson, chi(2), geometric, and bimodal probability distributions and fixed IEI. Event sequences from the bimodal distribution, like block designs, had the best performance for detection and the poorest for estimation, while high estimation and detectability occurred for the long-decay exponential distribution. The uniform distribution also yielded high estimation efficiency, but probability functions with a long tail toward higher IEI, such as the geometric and the chi(2) distributions, had superior detectability. The distributions with the best detection performance also had a relatively high incidence of false positives, in contrast to the ordered distributions (Latin square and uniform permuted). The predictions of improved sensitivities for distributions with long tails were confirmed with empirical data. Moreover, the Latin square design yielded detection of activated voxels similar to the chi(2) distribution. These results indicate that high detection and suitable behavioral designs have compatibility for application of functional MRI methods to experiments requiring complex designs.

  5. Functional asymmetry and effective connectivity of the auditory system during speech perception is modulated by the place of articulation of the consonant- A 7T fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eSpecht

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To differentiate between stop-consonants, the auditory system has to detect subtle place of articulation (PoA and voice onset time (VOT differences between stop-consonants. How this differential processing is represented on the cortical level remains unclear. The present functional magnetic resonance (fMRI study takes advantage of the superior spatial resolution and high sensitivity of ultra high field 7T MRI. Subjects were attentively listening to consonant-vowel syllables with an alveolar or bilabial stop-consonant and either a short or long voice-onset time. The results showed an overall bilateral activation pattern in the posterior temporal lobe during the processing of the consonant-vowel syllables. This was however modulated strongest by place of articulation such that syllables with an alveolar stop-consonant showed stronger left lateralized activation. In addition, analysis of underlying functional and effective connectivity revealed an inhibitory effect of the left planum temporale onto the right auditory cortex during the processing of alveolar consonant-vowel syllables. Further, the connectivity result indicated also a directed information flow from the right to the left auditory cortex, and further to the left planum temporale for all syllables. These results indicate that auditory speech perception relies on an interplay between the left and right auditory cortex, with the left planum temporale as modulator. Furthermore, the degree of functional asymmetry is determined by the acoustic properties of the consonant-vowel syllables.

  6. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. Purpose: fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. Materials and Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery. Results: In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, middle frontal gyrus (MFG, and superior temporal gyrus (STG, during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Conclusion: Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease.

  7. Cortical reorganization in children with connatal spastic hemiparesis - a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study; Kortikale Reorganisation bei Kindern mit konnataler spastischer Hemiparese - eine funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie-(fMRT-)Studie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Sektion fuer Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Neuropaediatrie; Ulmer, S. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Sektion fuer Neuroradiologie; Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Neurochirurgie; Wolff, S.; Jansen, O. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Sektion fuer Neuroradiologie; Stephani, U. [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Campus Kiel (Germany). Klinik fuer Neuropaediatrie

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: We applied fMRI to investigate atypical cortical activation in patients with connatal spastic hemiparesis using voluntary movements of the hand, foot, and tongue. The relation between the findings from fMRI and the motor dysfunction was examined. Materials and Methods: 11 patients with connatal spastic hemiparesis were studied. Eight of these patients had periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), and three patients had cortical-subcortical lesions. To evaluate the severity of motor impairment tests for the upper and lower limb were performed. fMRI data were obtained in a block design using hand, foot, and tongue movements. As a control group, 14 healthy volunteers were examined with the fMRI protocol. Results: A laterally cortical representation of the paretic foot was found in three patients with PVL. In patients with cortical-subcortical lesions, tongue movements were associated with cortical activation restricted to the unaffected hemisphere. Movements of the paretic limb showed more ipsilateral activation in patients with PVL than in patients with cortical-subcortical lesions. Conclusion: Different types of structural damage such as PVL and cortical-subcortical lesions show differences in fMRI examination. (orig.)

  8. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland); Luetschg, Juerg [University Children' s Hospital (UKBB), Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  9. Resting-state functional MRI in an intraoperative MRI setting: proof of feasibility and correlation to clinical outcome of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Constantin; Charyasz-Leks, Edyta; Breitkopf, Martin; Decker, Karlheinz; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively. METHODS Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)-fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed. RESULTS iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge. CONCLUSIONS The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes.

  10. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    motor as well as higher cognitive functions (i.e. language). Pre-operative fMRI can be used to identify the brain regions that are activated during specific sensorimotor or language tasks. TMS is able to disrupt neuronal processing in the targeted brain area which in turn may affect task performance......Neurosurgical resection of brain lesions aims to maximize excision while minimizing the risk of permanent injury to the surrounding intact brain tissue and resulting neurological deficits. While direct electrical cortical stimulation at the time of surgery allows the precise identification......MRI is well established although the number of studies on presurgical language fMRI is still limited. In contrast, the reliability and accuracy of preoperative TMS remains to be determined....

  11. Functional MRI and Response Inhibition in Children Exposed to Cocaine in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Lester, Barry M.; Sanes, Jerome N.; Eliassen, James C.; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Seifer, Ronald; LaGasse, Linda L.; Durston, Sarah; Casey, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the potential long-term effects of cocaine exposure on brain functioning using fMRI in school-aged children. The sample included 12 children with prenatal cocaine exposure and 12 non-exposed children (8–9 years old). Groups did not differ on IQ, socioeconomic status, or perinatal risk factors. A response inhibition task was administered during an fMRI scan using a 1.5-T MRI system. Task performance did not differentiate groups, but groups were differentiated by patterns of task-related brain activity. Cocaine-exposed children showed greater activation in the right inferior frontal cortex and caudate during response inhibition, whereas non-exposed children showed greater activations in temporal and occipital regions. These preliminary findings suggest that prenatal cocaine may affect the development of brain systems involved in the regulation of attention and response inhibition. PMID:19372696

  12. Comparison of functional MRI image realignment tools using a computer-generated phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Hartmann, S L; Price, R R

    2001-09-01

    This study discusses the development of a computer-generated phantom to compare the effects of image realignment programs on functional MRI (fMRI) pixel activation. The phantom is a whole-head MRI volume with added random noise, activation, and motion. It allows simulation of realistic head motions with controlled areas of activation. Without motion, the phantom shows the effects of realignment on motion-free data sets. Prior to realignment, the phantom illustrates some activation corruption due to motion. Finally, three widely used realignment packages are examined. The results showed that the most accurate algorithms are able to increase specificity through accurate realignment while maintaining sensitivity through effective resampling techniques. In fact, accurate realignment alone is not a powerful indicator of the most effective algorithm in terms of true activation.

  13. MRI study of lumbosacral lipoma in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taviere, V.; Brunelle, F.; Baraton, J.; Teman, M.; Pierre-Kahn, A.; Lallemand, D.

    1989-06-01

    We report our experience with 16 cases of lumbosacral lipoma and MRI in children. From these observations, MRI appears to be a suitable examination. The exact situation of the cord and the lipoma is clearly seen. Associated anomalies such as syringomyelia is also clearly demonstrated.

  14. Evaluation of right ventricular volume and function by 2D and 3D echocardiography compared to MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergaard, Jesper; Petersen, Claus Leth; Kjaer, Andreas;

    2005-01-01

    AIMS: Radionuclide techniques, and recently MRI, have been used for clinical evaluation of right ventricular (RV) volumes function (RVEF) and volumes; but with the introduction of 3D echocardiography, new echocardiographic possibilities for RV evaluation independent of geometrical assumptions have...... emerged. This study compared classic and new echocardiographic and radionuclide estimates, including gated blood pool single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of RV size and function to RV volumes, and ejection fraction (RVEF) measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS AND RESULTS...

  15. Multisite functional connectivity MRI classification of autism: ABIDE results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A Nielsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systematic differences in functional connectivity MRI metrics have been consistently observed in autism, with predominantly decreased cortico-cortical connectivity. Previous attempts at single subject classification in high-functioning autism using whole brain point-to-point functional connectivity have yielded about 80% accurate classification of autism vs. control subjects across a wide age range. We attempted to replicate the method and results using the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange including resting state fMRI data obtained from 964 subjects and 16 separate international sites.Methods: For each of 964 subjects, we obtained pairwise functional connectivity measurements from a lattice of 7266 regions of interest covering the gray matter (26.4 million "connections" after preprocessing that included motion and slice timing correction, coregistration to an anatomic image, normalization to standard space, and voxelwise removal by regression of motion parameters, soft tissue, CSF, and white matter signals. Connections were grouped into multiple bins, and a leave-one-out classifier was evaluated on connections comprising each set of bins. Age, age-squared, gender, handedness, and site were included as covariates for the classifier.Results: Classification accuracy significantly outperformed chance but was much lower for multisite prediction than for previous single site results. As high as 60% accuracy was obtained for whole brain classification, with the best accuracy from connections involving regions of the default mode network, parahippocampal and fusiform gyri, insula, Wernicke Area, and intraparietal sulcus. The classifier score was related to symptom severity, social function, daily living skills, and verbal IQ. Classification accuracy was significantly higher for sites with longer BOLD imaging times.Conclusions: Multisite functional connectivity classification of autism outperformed chance using a simple leave

  16. Investigating repetition and change in musical rhythm by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, A; Otnæss, M K; Jensen, J; Williams, S C R; Ostberg, B C

    2014-09-05

    Groove-based rhythm is a basic and much appreciated feature of Western popular music. It is commonly associated with dance, movement and pleasure and is characterized by the repetition of a basic rhythmic pattern. At various points in the musical course, drum breaks occur, representing a change compared to the repeated pattern of the groove. In the present experiment, we investigated the brain response to such drum breaks in a repetitive groove. Participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a previously unheard naturalistic groove with drum breaks at uneven intervals. The rhythmic pattern and the timing of its different parts as performed were the only aspects that changed from the repetitive sections to the breaks. Differences in blood oxygen level-dependent activation were analyzed. In contrast to the repetitive parts, the drum breaks activated the left cerebellum, the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and the superior temporal gyri (STG) bilaterally. A tapping test using the same stimulus showed an increase in the standard deviation of inter-tap-intervals in the breaks versus the repetitive parts, indicating extra challenges for auditory-motor integration in the drum breaks. Both the RIFG and STG have been associated with structural irregularity and increase in musical-syntactical complexity in several earlier studies, whereas the left cerebellum is known to play a part in timing. Together these areas may be recruited in the breaks due to a prediction error process whereby the internal model is being updated. This concurs with previous research suggesting a network for predictive feed-forward control that comprises the cerebellum and the cortical areas that were activated in the breaks.

  17. BOLDSync: a MATLAB-based toolbox for synchronized stimulus presentation in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jitesh; Saharan, Sumiti; Mandal, Pravat K

    2014-02-15

    Precise and synchronized presentation of paradigm stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is central to obtaining accurate information about brain regions involved in a specific task. In this manuscript, we present a new MATLAB-based toolbox, BOLDSync, for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI. BOLDSync provides a user friendly platform for design and presentation of visual, audio, as well as multimodal audio-visual (AV) stimuli in functional imaging experiments. We present simulation experiments that demonstrate the millisecond synchronization accuracy of BOLDSync, and also illustrate the functionalities of BOLDSync through application to an AV fMRI study. BOLDSync gains an advantage over other available proprietary and open-source toolboxes by offering a user friendly and accessible interface that affords both precision in stimulus presentation and versatility across various types of stimulus designs and system setups. BOLDSync is a reliable, efficient, and versatile solution for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. TWave: high-order analysis of functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnathan, Michael; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Faloutsos, Christos; Faro, Scott; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2011-09-15

    The traditional approach to functional image analysis models images as matrices of raw voxel intensity values. Although such a representation is widely utilized and heavily entrenched both within neuroimaging and in the wider data mining community, the strong interactions among space, time, and categorical modes such as subject and experimental task inherent in functional imaging yield a dataset with "high-order" structure, which matrix models are incapable of exploiting. Reasoning across all of these modes of data concurrently requires a high-order model capable of representing relationships between all modes of the data in tandem. We thus propose to model functional MRI data using tensors, which are high-order generalizations of matrices equivalent to multidimensional arrays or data cubes. However, several unique challenges exist in the high-order analysis of functional medical data: naïve tensor models are incapable of exploiting spatiotemporal locality patterns, standard tensor analysis techniques exhibit poor efficiency, and mixtures of numeric and categorical modes of data are very often present in neuroimaging experiments. Formulating the problem of image clustering as a form of Latent Semantic Analysis and using the WaveCluster algorithm as a baseline, we propose a comprehensive hybrid tensor and wavelet framework for clustering, concept discovery, and compression of functional medical images which successfully addresses these challenges. Our approach reduced runtime and dataset size on a 9.3GB finger opposition motor task fMRI dataset by up to 98% while exhibiting improved spatiotemporal coherence relative to standard tensor, wavelet, and voxel-based approaches. Our clustering technique was capable of automatically differentiating between the frontal areas of the brain responsible for task-related habituation and the motor regions responsible for executing the motor task, in contrast to a widely used fMRI analysis program, SPM, which only detected the

  19. Functional brain activation differences in stuttering identified with a rapid fMRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech motor and auditory brain activity in children who stutter closer to the age at which recovery from stuttering is documented. Rapid sequences may be preferred for individuals or populations who do not tolerate long scanning sessions. In this report, we document the application of a picture naming and phoneme monitoring task in three minute fMRI sequences with adults who stutter (AWS). If relevant brain differences are found in AWS with these approaches that conform to previous reports, then these approaches can be extended to younger populations. Pairwise contrasts of brain BOLD activity between AWS and normally fluent adults indicated the AWS showed higher BOLD activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right temporal lobe and sensorimotor cortices during picture naming and and higher activity in the right IFG during phoneme monitoring. The right lateralized pattern of BOLD activity together with higher activity in sensorimotor cortices is consistent with previous reports, which indicates rapid fMRI sequences can be considered for investigating stuttering in younger participants. PMID:22133409

  20. Mapping the mouse brain with rs-fMRI: An optimized pipeline for functional network identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbi, Valerio; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The use of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) in translational research is a powerful tool to assess brain connectivity and investigate neuropathology in mouse models. However, despite encouraging initial results, the characterization of consistent and robust resting state networks in mice remains a methodological challenge. One key reason is that the quality of the measured MR signal is degraded by the presence of structural noise from non-neural sources. Notably, in the current pipeline of the Human Connectome Project, a novel approach has been introduced to clean rs-fMRI data, which involves automatic artifact component classification and data cleaning (FIX). FIX does not require any external recordings of physiology or the segmentation of CSF and white matter. In this study, we evaluated the performance of FIX for analyzing mouse rs-fMRI data. Our results showed that FIX can be easily applied to mouse datasets and detects true signals with 100% accuracy and true noise components with very high accuracy (>98%), thus reducing both within- and between-subject variability of rs-fMRI connectivity measurements. Using this improved pre-processing pipeline, maps of 23 resting state circuits in mice were identified including two networks that displayed default mode network-like topography. Hierarchical clustering grouped these neural networks into meaningful larger functional circuits. These mouse resting state networks, which are publicly available, might serve as a reference for future work using mouse models of neurological disorders.

  1. Functional connectivity of prefrontal cortex in chronic heroin addicts:a resting-state functional MRI study%长期海洛因成瘾者前额叶功能连接的静息态fMRI研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐印宝; 傅先明; 钱若兵; 魏祥品; 牛朝诗; 王昌新; 曾飞雁; 汪业汉

    2011-01-01

    目的 利用静息态fMRI探讨长期海洛因成瘾者前额叶功能连接的变化情况.方法 13例长期海洛因成瘾者和14例正常者接受静息态fMRI检查,对数据进行相关的预处理后,以前额叶为种子点与全脑每个体素进行相关分析,比较海洛因成瘾组与正常对照组前额叶功能连接的变化情况.结果 以左侧前额叶为种子点进行功能连接分析,海洛因成瘾组左侧前额叶与左侧海马、右侧前扣带回、左侧额中回、右侧额中回、右侧楔前叶功能连接明显低于正常对照组:以右侧前额叶为种子点进行功能连接分析,海洛因成瘾组右侧前额叶与左侧眶额叶、左侧额中回功能连接明显低于正常对照组.结论 长期海洛因成瘾者前额叶与相关脑区的功能连接减弱,前额叶可能参与了海洛因成瘾的维持与戒断后复吸.%Objective To explore the changes of functional connectivity of the prefrontal cortex in chronic heroin addicts under resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). Methods Resting fMRI examination was performed on 13 chronic heroin addicts and 14 healthy volunteers. After pre-processing the resting-state fMRI data, the prefrontal cortex was selected as the seed region, with which a whole-brain voxel temporal correlation in Iow frequency fMRI fluctuations was analyzed and the changes of functional connectivity of the prefrontal lobe in both chronic heroin addicts and healthy volunteers were calculated with SPM5 software. Results Compared with that in the control group, the functional connectivity between the left prefrontal cortex and the left hippocampus, right anterior cingulate, left middle frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, right precuneus in the heroin addiction group was significantly decreased. The functional connectivity between the right prefrontal cortex and the left orbital frontal cortex, left middle frontal gyrus in thc heroin addiction group was also significantly decreased as compared

  2. Assessment of apical periodontitis by MRI. A feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geibel, M.A. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery; Schreiber, E.S.; Bracher, A.K.; Rasche, V. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Internal Medicine II; Hell, E.; Ulrici, J. [Sirona Dental Systems GmbH, Bensheim (Germany). Dental Imaging; Sailer, L.K. [DOC Praxisklinik im Wiley, Neu-Ulm (Germany). MKG; Ozpeynirci, Y. [Ulm Univ. (Germany). Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2015-04-15

    The purpose of this clinical feasibility study was to evaluate the applicability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of apical periodontitis in direct comparison with cone beam CT (CBCT). 19 consecutive patients (average age 43 ± 13 years) with 34 lesions in total (13 molars, 14 premolars and 7 front teeth) were enrolled in this feasibility study. Periapical lesions were defined as periapical radiolucencies (CBCT) or structural changes in the spongy bone signal (MRI), which were connected with the apical part of a root and with at least twice the width of the periodontal ligament space. The location and dimension of the lesions were compared between MRI and CBCT. While mainly mineralized tissue components such as teeth and bone were visible with CBCT, complimentary information of the soft tissue components was assessable with MRI. The MRI images provided sufficient diagnostic detail for the assessment of the main structures of interest. Heterogeneous contrast was observed within the lesion, with often a clear enhancement close to the apical foramen and the periodontal gap. No difference for lesion visibility was observed between MRI and CBCT. The lesion dimensions corresponded well, but were slightly but significantly overestimated with MRI. A heterogeneous lesion appearance was observed in several patients. Four patients presented with a well circumscribed hyperintense signal in the vicinity of the apical foramen. The MRI capability of soft tissue characterization may facilitate detailed analysis of periapical lesions. This clinical study confirms the applicability of multi-contrast MRI for the identification of periapical lesions.

  3. Epileptic networks studied with EEG-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotman, Jean

    2008-01-01

    It is not easy to determine the location of the cerebral generators and the other brain regions that may be involved at the time of an epileptic spike seen in the scalp EEG. The possibility to combine EEG recording with functional MRI scanning (fMRI) opens the opportunity to uncover the regions of the brain showing changes in metabolism and blood flow in response to epileptic spikes seen in the EEG. These regions are presumably involved in the abnormal neuronal activity at the origin of epileptic discharges. This paper reviews the methodology involved in performing such studies, including the special techniques required for recording the EEG inside the scanner and the statistical issues in analyzing the fMRI signal. We then discuss the results obtained in patients with different types of focal epileptic disorders and in patients with primary generalized epilepsy. The results in general indicate that interictal epileptic discharges may affect brain areas well beyond the presumed region in which they are generated. The noninvasive nature of this method opens new horizons in the investigation of brain regions involved and affected by epileptic discharges.

  4. Large-scale Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the information flow between each pair of time series in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human brain and subsequently recover its underlying network structure. By integrating dimensionality reduction into predictive time series modeling, large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) analysis method can reveal directed information flow suggestive of causal influence at an individual voxel level, unlike other multivariate approaches. This method quantifies the influence each voxel time series has on every other voxel time series in a multivariate sense and hence contains information about the underlying dynamics of the whole system, which can be used to reveal functionally connected networks within the brain. To identify such networks, we perform non-metric network clustering, such as accomplished by the Louvain method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to recover the motor and visual cortex from resting state human brain fMRI data and compare it with the network recovered from a visuomotor stimulation experiment, where the similarity is measured by the Dice Coefficient (DC). The best DC obtained was 0.59 implying a strong agreement between the two networks. In addition, we thoroughly study the effect of dimensionality reduction in lsGC analysis on network recovery. We conclude that our approach is capable of detecting causal influence between time series in a multivariate sense, which can be used to segment functionally connected networks in the resting-state fMRI.

  5. Acquisition and analysis strategies in functional MRI at high fields

    CERN Document Server

    Windischberger, C

    2001-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging represents a non-invasive technique to examine neuronal activity in the brain. It applies radio waves to excite nuclear spins, using the emitted signal during relaxation for image generation. Signal modulations from local blood flow and oxygenation level changes caused by neuronal activity are the basis for calculating functional brain maps with high spatial resolution. The present work discusses concepts for improving the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as sophisticated analysis approaches. Besides an exhaustive description of image reconstruction algorithms, computational simulations on echo-shifting in echo-planar imaging are presented and effects on spatial resolution are quantified. The results demonstrate that echo-shifting causes only minimal resolution losses for high signal-to-noise data, but leads to severe resolution degradation (up to 30 %) in images with low signal-to-noise ratios. After an overview of the mechanisms that cause fMRI signal changes su...

  6. Usefulness of MRI and SPECT studies in evaluating the lesion of aphasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Haruo; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Arai, Hisayuki; Hatano, Nobuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Katsuhiko; Katsunuma, Hideyo (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1990-06-01

    Since the introduction of CT scanning, correlations between neuropsychological findings and anatomical lesions have been studied. Anatomical studies by CT scans may, however, be misleading in delineating the extent of lesions in aphasia. We have carried out MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) and SPECT (single photon emission CT) examinations in 15 aphasic patients with cerebrovascular disease and discussed the usefulness of these studies. Compared to CT scan, MRI or SPECT studies were considered to be very useful in 8 of 15 patients. The useful points of these studies were: (1) easy detection of lesions with undetectable damages on CT, (2) demonstration of functional abnormalities in areas adjacent or distant from cerebrovascular lesions, and (3) precise definition of topographical abnormalities because of the three-dimensional imaging capability of MRI. As MRI or SPECT may define the actual extent of lesions and show areas of functional abnormality, these studies are useful and necessary in the assessment of lesions causing aphasia. (author).

  7. Impaired sensory processing measured by functional MRI in Bipolar disorder manic and depressed mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joseph J; Johnson, Casey P; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Christensen, Gary E; Wemmie, John A; Magnotta, Vincent A

    2017-07-03

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by recurring episodes of depression and mania. Defining differences in brain function during these states is an important goal of bipolar disorder research. However, few imaging studies have directly compared brain activity between bipolar mood states. Herein, we compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses during a flashing checkerboard stimulus between bipolar participants across mood states (euthymia, depression, and mania) in order to identify functional differences between these states. 40 participants with bipolar I disorder and 33 healthy controls underwent fMRI during the presentation of the stimulus. A total of 23 euthymic-state, 16 manic-state, 15 depressed-state, and 32 healthy control imaging sessions were analyzed in order to compare functional activation during the stimulus between mood states and with healthy controls. A reduced response was identified in the visual cortex in both the depressed and manic groups compared to euthymic and healthy participants. Functional differences between bipolar mood states were also observed in the cerebellum, thalamus, striatum, and hippocampus. Functional differences between mood states occurred in several brain regions involved in visual and other sensory processing. These differences suggest that altered visual processing may be a feature of mood states in bipolar disorder. The key limitations of this study are modest mood-state group size and the limited temporal resolution of fMRI which prevents the segregation of primary visual activity from regulatory feedback mechanisms.

  8. Visual grading of 2D and 3D functional MRI compared with image-based descriptive measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragnehed, Mattias [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences/Radiology, Faculty of Health Sciences, Linkoeping (Sweden); Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Pihlsgaard, Johan; Lundberg, Peter [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiation Physics, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Wirell, Staffan [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Soekjer, Hannibal; Faegerstam, Patrik [Linkoeping University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Linkoeping (Sweden); Jiang, Bo [Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden); Smedby, Oerjan; Engstroem, Maria [Linkoeping University, Division of Radiological Sciences, Radiology, IMH, Linkoeping (Sweden); Linkoeping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization, CMIV, Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2010-03-15

    A prerequisite for successful clinical use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the selection of an appropriate imaging sequence. The aim of this study was to compare 2D and 3D fMRI sequences using different image quality assessment methods. Descriptive image measures, such as activation volume and temporal signal-to-noise ratio (TSNR), were compared with results from visual grading characteristics (VGC) analysis of the fMRI results. Significant differences in activation volume and TSNR were not directly reflected by differences in VGC scores. The results suggest that better performance on descriptive image measures is not always an indicator of improved diagnostic quality of the fMRI results. In addition to descriptive image measures, it is important to include measures of diagnostic quality when comparing different fMRI data acquisition methods. (orig.)

  9. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Mera Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets.

  10. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Aramburu Núñez, David; del Olmo Claudio, José Luis; Salvador Gómez, Francisco; Driscoll, Brandon; Coolens, Catherine; Alba Castro, José L.; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets. PMID:25788972

  11. Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Elissa; Plukaard, Sarah; Evers, Elisabeth; De Groot, Renate; Backes, Walter; Veltman, Dick; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to eva

  12. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  13. Interpreting the effects of altered brain anatomical connectivity on fMRI functional connectivity: a role for computational neural modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Barry; Hwang, Chuhern; Alstott, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there have been a large number of studies using resting state fMRI to characterize abnormal brain connectivity in patients with a variety of neurological, psychiatric, and developmental disorders. However, interpreting what the differences in resting state fMRI functional connectivity (rsfMRI-FC) actually reflect in terms of the underlying neural pathology has proved to be elusive because of the complexity of brain anatomical connectivity. The same is the case for task-based fMRI studies. In the last few years, several groups have used large-scale neural modeling to help provide some insight into the relationship between brain anatomical connectivity and the corresponding patterns of fMRI-FC. In this paper we review several efforts at using large-scale neural modeling to investigate the relationship between structural connectivity and functional/effective connectivity to determine how alterations in structural connectivity are manifested in altered patterns of functional/effective connectivity. Because the alterations made in the anatomical connectivity between specific brain regions in the model are known in detail, one can use the results of these simulations to determine the corresponding alterations in rsfMRI-FC. Many of these simulation studies found that structural connectivity changes do not necessarily result in matching changes in functional/effective connectivity in the areas of structural modification. Often, it was observed that increases in functional/effective connectivity in the altered brain did not necessarily correspond to increases in the strength of the anatomical connection weights. Note that increases in rsfMRI-FC in patients have been interpreted in some cases as resulting from neural plasticity. These results suggest that this interpretation can be mistaken. The relevance of these simulation findings to the use of functional/effective fMRI connectivity as biomarkers for brain disorders is also discussed.

  14. Reviews of functional MRI: the ethical dimensions of methodological critique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Anderson

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies involving human subjects raise a range of ethics issues. Many of these issues are heightened in the context of neuroimaging research involving persons with mental health disorders. There has been growing interest in these issues among legal scholars, philosophers, social scientists, and as well as neuroimagers over the last decade. Less clear, however, is the extent to which members of the neuroimaging community are engaged with these issues when they undertake their research and report results. In this study, we analyze the peer-reviewed review literature involving fMRI as applied to the study of mental health disorders. Our hypothesis is that, due to the critical orientation of reviews, and the vulnerability of mental health population, the penetrance of neuroethics will be higher in the review literature in this area than it is in the primary fMRI research literature more generally. We find that while authors of reviews do focus a great deal of attention on the methodological limitations of the studies they discussed, contrary to our hypothesis, they do not frame concerns in ethical terms despite their ethical significance. We argue that an ethics lens on such discussion would increase the knowledge-value of this scholarly work.

  15. Establishing motion control in children with autism and intellectual disability: Applications for anatomical and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Alison D; Virues-Ortega, Javier; Julio, Flavia; Martin, Toby L

    2017-01-01

    Excessive motion makes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) extremely challenging among children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The medical risks of sedation establish the need for behavioral interventions to promote motion control among children with ASD undergoing MRI scans. We present a series of experiments aimed at establishing both tolerance of the MRI environment and a level of motion control that would be compatible with a successful MRI. During Study 1, we evaluated the effects of prompting and contingent reinforcement on compliance with a sequence of successive approximations to an MRI using a mock MRI. During Study 2, we used prompting and progressive differential reinforcement of other behaviors (DRO) to promote motion control in a mock MRI for increasing periods of time. Finally, during Study 3, some of the participants underwent a real MRI scan while a detailed in-session motion analysis informed the quality of the images captured. © 2016 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  16. Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use : a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, Janna; Vingerhoets, Wilhelmina A M; Koenders, Laura; de Haan, Lieuwe; van den Brink, Wim; Wiers, Reinout W; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-01-01

    Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate t

  17. Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, J.; Vingerhoets, W.A.M.; Koenders, L.; de Haan, L.; van den Brink, W.; Wiers, R.W.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate t

  18. Relationship between working-memory network function and substance use: a 3-year longitudinal fMRI study in heavy cannabis users and controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Cousijn; W.A.M. Vingerhoets; L. Koenders; L. de Haan; W. van den Brink; R.W. Wiers; A.E. Goudriaan

    2013-01-01

    Deficient executive functions play an important role in the development of addiction. Working-memory may therefore be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use, but chronic substance use may also impair working-memory. The aim of this 3-year longitudinal neuro-imaging study was to investigate t

  19. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeneke, Susan; Pedroni, Andreas F; Dieckmann, Anja; Bosch, Volker; Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations. PMID:19032746

  20. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Volker

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value. Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations.

  1. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain’s spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain’s intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  2. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhui; Zuo, Xinian; He, Yong

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain's spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free) activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain's intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging, and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  3. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    surgical site. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Functional brain mapping using fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS...Fluency, for verbal fluency; DKEFS Trails, for visual motor-sequencing; and a Grooved Pegboard task to assess manipulation dexterity. Results for...epilepsy patients at our institution. We have explored fMRI for improving epilepsy surgical planning in pediatric patients. To that end we acquired

  4. Young and middle-aged schoolteachers differ in the neural correlates of memory encoding and cognitive fatigue: a functional MRI study

    OpenAIRE

    Klaassen, Elissa B.; Plukaard, Sarah; Evers, Elisabeth A. T.; de Groot, Renate H. M.; Walter H. Backes; Veltman, Dick J.; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This investigation was inspired by growing evidence that middle-aged persons in a cognitively demanding profession might be characterized by subtle cognitive fatigue. We studied young and middle-aged male schoolteachers. They were compared in a study with functional magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate differences during successful memory encoding. The schoolteachers were additionally subjected to an induced fatigue condition involving the sustained performance of cognitively demanding task...

  5. An MRI study on the relations between muscle atrophy, shoulder function and glenohumeral deformity in shoulders of children with obstetric brachial plexus injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Doorn-Loogman Mirjam H

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A substantial number of children with an obstetric brachial plexus lesion (OBPL will develop internal rotation adduction contractures of the shoulder, posterior humeral head subluxations and glenohumeral deformities. Their active shoulder function is generally limited and a recent study showed that their shoulder muscles were atrophic. This study focuses on the role of shoulder muscles in glenohumeral deformation and function. Methods This is a prospective study on 24 children with unilateral OBPL, who had internal rotation contractures of the shoulder (mean age 3.3 years, range 14.7 months to 7.3 years. Using MR imaging from both shoulders the following parameters were assessed: glenoid form, glenoscapular angle, subluxation of the humeral head, thickness and segmental volume of the subscapularis, infraspinatus and deltoid muscles. Shoulder function was assessed measuring passive external rotation of the shoulder and using the Mallet score for active function. Statistical tests used are t-tests, Spearman's rho, Pearsons r and logistic regression. Results The affected shoulders showed significantly reduced muscle sizes, increased glenoid retroversion and posterior subluxation. Mean muscle size compared to the normal side was: subscapularis 51%, infraspinatus 61% and deltoid 76%. Glenoid form was related to infraspinatus muscle atrophy. Subluxation was related to both infraspinatus and subscapularis atrophy. There was no relation between atrophy of muscles and passive external rotation. Muscle atrophy was not related to the Mallet score or its dimensions. Conclusion Muscle atrophy was more severe in the subscapularis muscle than in infraspinatus and deltoid. As the muscle ratios are not related to passive external rotation nor to active function of the shoulder, there must be other muscle properties influencing shoulder function.

  6. Alterations in renal morphology and function after ESWL therapy: evaluation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestin, G.P. [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Fischbach, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Vorreuther, R. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Schulthess, G.K. von [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    1993-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced gradient-echo MRI was used to evaluate morphological and functional alterations in the kidneys after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Dynamic MRI with a temporal resolution of 10 s per image was performed by repeated imaging in the coronal plane after administration of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) before and after ESWL for renal calculi in 25 patients. Before ESWL 22 patients had normally functioning kidneys, characterised by a marked decrease in signal intensity in the renal medulla 30-40 s after the onset of cortical perfusion. After ESWL 8 patients had functional abnormalities: in 2 cases the medullary signal decrease was disturbed throughout the whole organ, while 6 kidneys demonstrated regional loss of concentrating ability in the medulla. Morphological alterations (oedema with blurred contours and loss of corticomedullary differentiation; parenchymal haemorrhage and haemorrhage in a cortical cyst; subcapsular, perirenal and pararenal haematoma) were detected in 9 cases. Haemorrhage was encountered more often after administration of more than 2500 shock waves; however, no such correlation was seen in the kidneys with functional disturbances following ESWL therapy. MRI proved to be a sensitive method for the assessment of morphological and functional alterations after ESWL, but longer follow-up studies are required to identify the clinical impact of these early changes. (orig.)

  7. Using model-based functional MRI to locate working memory updates and declarative memory retrievals in the fronto-parietal network

    OpenAIRE

    Borst, Jelmer P.; Anderson, John R.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we used model-based functional MRI (fMRI) to locate two functions of the fronto-parietal network: declarative memory retrievals and updating of working memory. Because regions in the fronto-parietal network are by definition coherently active, locating functions within this network is difficult. To overcome this problem, we applied model-based fMRI, an analysis method that uses predictions of a computational model to inform the analysis. We applied model-based fMRI to five prev...

  8. [Functional MRI at 1 Tesla. Basic paradigms and clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Attila; Auer, Tibor; Komoly, Sámuel; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József

    2007-07-30

    To perform functional MRI experiments at low magnetic field, and to set up routine protocol to help the planning of neurosurgical operations and the examination of epilepsy patients. An optimized 2D EPI sequence was applied to yield functional MR images in basic paradigms such as finger tapping and internal word generation. Further, activation was induced also by a task involving mental navigation based on the retrieval of individually familiar visuo-spatial knowledge. Low resolution (matrix of 64x64) functional MR images satisfactorily visualized moto-sensor strip and speech centers. In the mental navigation task bilateral activation of the hippocampal formation was observed. Determination of motor area was also performed in an epilepsy patient whose seizure focus had been found in the area of pre- and post-central gyrus. The dislocation of the motor cortex was demonstrated. Functional MR images with fine quality can be obtained in basic paradigms even at low magnetic field if MR imaging parameters and paradigms are optimized.

  9. Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Allan

    Full Text Available Functional brain signals are frequently decomposed into a relatively small set of large scale, distributed cortical networks that are associated with different cognitive functions. It is generally assumed that the connectivity of these networks is static in time and constant over the whole network, although there is increasing evidence that this view is too simplistic. This work proposes novel techniques to investigate the contribution of spontaneous BOLD events to the temporal dynamics of functional connectivity as assessed by ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The results show that: 1 spontaneous events in recognised brain networks contribute significantly to network connectivity estimates; 2 these spontaneous events do not necessarily involve whole networks or nodes, but clusters of voxels which act in concert, forming transiently synchronising sub-networks and 3 a task can significantly alter the number of localised spontaneous events that are detected within a single network. These findings support the notion that spontaneous events are the main driver of the large scale networks that are commonly detected by seed-based correlation and ICA. Furthermore, we found that large scale networks are manifestations of smaller, transiently synchronising sub-networks acting dynamically in concert, corresponding to spontaneous events, and which do not necessarily involve all voxels within the network nodes oscillating in unison.

  10. MRI-guided percutaneous nephrostomy: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariniemi, Juho; Sequeiros, Roberto Blanco; Ojala, Risto; Tervonen, Osmo [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology, P.O. Box 50, Oulu (Finland)

    2009-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided PCN in an open-configuration low-field MRI system. Eight patients were prospectively enrolled in the study. The degree of the dilatation of the renal collecting system varied from minimal to severe. All procedures were performed solely under MRI guidance with a 0.23-T open configuration C-arm-shaped MRI system with interventional optical tracking. In each case, PCN was performed with a MRI-compatible drainage kit using the Seldinger technique. Seven out of eight nephrostomies were successfully performed under MRI guidance. All PCN procedures in dilated renal collection systems were successful; however, nephrostomy catheter could not be placed in a nondilated system. The mean time needed for the MRI-guided PCN was 26 min. No major complications occurred during the procedure or follow-up. MRI-guided PCN in dilated renal collection system is feasible and safe. The presented technique has limitations that necessitate further technical developments before the procedure can be applied to nondilated kidneys and recommended for routine clinical use. (orig.)

  11. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in orthostatic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Manzanedo, Eva; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Molina-Arjona, José Antonio; Matarazzo, Michele; Romero, Juan Pablo; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    Very little is known about the pathogenesis of orthostatic tremor (OT). We have observed that OT patients might have deficits in specific aspects of neuropsychological function, particularly those thought to rely on the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, which suggests a possible involvement of frontocerebellar circuits. We examined whether resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might provide further insights into the pathogenesis on OT. Resting-state fMRI data in 13 OT patients (11 women and 2 men) and 13 matched healthy controls were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify group differences in several resting-state networks (RSNs). All participants also underwent neuropsychological testing during the same session. Relative to healthy controls, OT patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (default mode network [DMN] and frontoparietal networks), and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and sensorimotor networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with duration (DMN and medial visual network), but also with cognitive function. Moreover, in at least 2 networks (DMN and medial visual network), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, visual memory, and language). In this exploratory study, we observed selective impairments of RSNs in OT patients. This and other future resting-state fMRI studies might provide a novel method to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of motor and nonmotor features of OT.

  12. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  13. Insights into the mechanisms of absence seizure generation provided by EEG with Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick William Carney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Absence seizures are brief epileptic events characterized by loss of awareness with subtle motor features. They may be very frequent, and impact on attention, learning and memory. A number of pathophysiological models have been developed to explain the mechanism of absence seizure generation which rely heavily on observations from animal studies. Studying the structural and functional relationships between large-scale brain networks in humans is only practical with non-invasive whole brain techniques. EEG with functional MRI (EEG-fMRI is one such technique that provides an opportunity to explore the interactions between brain structures involved in AS generation. A number of fMRI techniques including event-related analysis, time course analysis and functional connectivity have identified a common network of structures involved in AS seizures. This network comprises the thalamus, midline and lateral parietal cortex (the default mode network [DMN], caudate nuclei and the reticular structures of the pons. The main component displaying an increase in BOLD signal relative to the resting state, in group studies, is the thalamus while the most consistent cortical change is reduced BOLD signal in the DMN. Time course analysis shows that, rather than some structures being activated or inactivated during AS, there appears to be increase in activity across components of the network preceding or following the electro-clinical onset of the seizure. The earliest change in BOLD signal occurs in the DMN, prior to the onset of epileptiform events. This region also shows altered functional connectivity in patients with absence seizures. Hence it appears that engagement of this network is central to absence seizures. In this review we will explore the insights EEG-fMRI studies into the mechanisms of AS and considers how the DMN is likely to be the major large scale brain network central to both seizure generation and the seizure manifestations.

  14. Cellular therapy of tumor angiogenesis : morphological and functional imaging using MRI and videomicroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Faye, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction : Tumor angiogenesis leads to the development of new vessels enabling the growth of the tumor. Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormalities including mural cells (perivascular muscular cells) responsible for abnormal vessel function and maturation. In this thesis, we studied cellular therapy in a tumor model by injection of mural cells using MRI and fluorescence videomicroscopy. Materiels and methods: Nude mice were injected with squamous cell TC1 tumors and animals were divi...

  15. Identification by functional MRI of human cerebral region activated by taste stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Naoya [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was the examination of possible imaging of the primary taste region of human cerebral cortex by functional MRI (fMRI). Subjects were 19-36 years old, healthy adult male and female volunteers given information concerning the purpose, significance and method of the study. MRI equipment was 1.5 T Signa Horizon (GE) with Head Coil. Images were processed by the software FuncTool on the Advantage Windows Workstation (GE). Taste stimulation was done by swab bearing the solution of 4% quinine hydrochloride, 20% sodium chloride or distilled water (control) or by dripping from the syringe of the solutions, 8% tartaric acid or 80% sugar. Preliminary examinations with the swab suggested the possibility of the identification. Further, with use of dripping apparatus, the taste active region was shown to be identified by fMRI and of which area tended to be larger in male than in female: a significant difference was seen for the quinine hydrochloride. As above, the method was suggested to be a diagnostic mean for the taste perception. (K.H.)

  16. Human memory retention and recall processes. A review of EEG and fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Hafeezullah; Malik, Aamir S

    2013-10-01

    Human memory is an important concept in cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Our brain is actively engaged in functions of learning and memorization. Generally, human memory has been classified into 2 groups: short-term/working memory, and long-term memory. Using different memory paradigms and brain mapping techniques, psychologists and neuroscientists have identified 3 memory processes: encoding, retention, and recall. These processes have been studied using EEG and functional MRI (fMRI) in cognitive and neuroscience research. This study reviews previous research reported for human memory processes, particularly brain behavior in memory retention and recall processes with the use of EEG and fMRI. We discuss issues and challenges related to memory research with EEG and fMRI techniques.

  17. Altered functional connectivity in posttraumatic stress disorder with versus without comorbid major depressive disorder: a resting state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennis, Mitzy; Rademaker, Arthur R; van Rooij, Sanne J H; Kahn, René S; Geuze, Elbert

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that is often diagnosed with comorbid depressive disorder. Therefore, neuroimaging studies investigating PTSD typically include both patients with and without comorbid depression. Differences in activity of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insula have been shown to differentiate PTSD patients with and without major depressive disorder (MDD). Whether or not comorbid MDD affects resting state functional connectivity of PTSD patients has not been investigated to our knowledge. Here, resting state functional connectivity of PTSD patients with (PTSD+MDD; n=27) and without (PTSD-MDD; n=23) comorbid MDD was investigated. The subgenual ACC and insula were investigated as seed regions. Connectivity between the subgenual ACC and perigenual parts of the ACC was increased in PTSD+MDD versus PTSD-MDD, which may reflect the presence of depressive specific symptoms such as rumination. Functional connectivity of the subgenual ACC with the thalamus was reduced, potentially related to more severe deficits in executive functioning in the PTSD+MDD group versus the PTSD-MDD group. In addition, the PTSD+MDD group showed reduced functional connectivity of the insula with the hippocampus compared to the PTSD-MDD group. However, this cluster was no longer significantly different when PTSD patients that were using medication were excluded from analyses. Thus, resting state functional connectivity of the subgenual ACC can distinguish PTSD+MDD from PTSD-MDD, and this may therefore be used as a neurobiological marker for comorbid MDD in the presence of PTSD. As PTSD+MDD are more treatment resistant, these findings can also guide treatment development, for example by targeting the subgenual ACC network with treatment.

  18. Functional MRI of sustained attention in bipolar mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D E; Eliassen, J C; Durling, M; Lamy, M; Adler, C M; DelBello, M P; Shear, P K; Cerullo, M A; Lee, J-H; Strakowski, S M

    2012-03-01

    We examined sustained attention deficits in bipolar disorder and associated changes in brain activation assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We hypothesized that relative to healthy participants, those with mania or mixed mania would (1) exhibit incremental decrements in sustained attention over time, (2) overactivate brain regions required for emotional processing and (3) progressively underactivate attentional regions of prefrontal cortex. Fifty participants with manic/mixed bipolar disorder (BP group) and 34 healthy comparison subjects (HC group) received an fMRI scan while performing a 15-min continuous performance task (CPT). The data were divided into three consecutive 5-min vigilance periods to analyze sustained attention. Composite brain activation maps indicated that both groups activated dorsal and ventral regions of an anterior-limbic network, but the BP group exhibited less activation over time relative to baseline. Consistent with hypotheses 1 and 2, the BP group showed a marginally greater behavioral CPT sustained attention decrement and more bilateral amygdala activation than the HC group, respectively. Instead of differential activation in prefrontal cortex over time, as predicted in hypothesis 3, the BP group progressively decreased activation in subcortical regions of striatum and thalamus relative to the HC group. These results suggest that regional activation decrements in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex accompany sustained attention decrements in both bipolar and healthy individuals. Stable amygdala overactivation across prolonged vigils may interfere with sustained attention and exacerbate attentional deficits in bipolar disorder. Differential striatal and thalamic deactivation in bipolar disorder is interpreted as a loss of amygdala (emotional brain) modulation by the ventrolateral prefrontal-subcortical circuit, which interferes with attentional maintenance.

  19. Collective Correlations of Brodmann Areas fMRI Study with RMT-Denoising

    OpenAIRE

    Burda, Zdzislaw; Kornelsen, Jennifer; Nowak, Maciej A.; Porebski, Bartosz; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Tomanek, Boguslaw; Tyburczyk, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We study collective behavior of Brodmann regions of human cerebral cortex using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Random Matrix Theory (RMT). The raw fMRI data is mapped onto the cortex regions corresponding to the Brodmann areas with the aid of the Talairach coordinates. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the Pearson correlation matrix for 41 different Brodmann regions is carried out to determine their collective activity in the idle state and in the active state stimulated...

  20. An iterative two-threshold analysis for single-subject functional MRI of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Tibor; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Current thresholding strategies for the analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) datasets may suffer from specific limitations (e.g. with respect to the required smoothness) or lead to reduced performance for a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Although a previously proposed two-threshold (TT) method offers a promising solution to these problems, the use of preset settings limits its performance. This work presents an optimised TT approach that estimates the required parameters in an iterative manner. The iterative TT (iTT) method is compared with the original TT method, as well as other established voxel-based and cluster-based thresholding approaches and spatial mixture modelling (SMM) for both simulated data and fMRI of a hometown walking task at different experimental settings (spatial resolution, filtering and SNR). In general, the iTT method presents with remarkable sensitivity and good specificity that outperforms all conventional approaches tested except for SMM in a few cases. This also holds true for challenging conditions such as high spatial resolution, the absence of filtering, high noise level, or a low number of task repetitions. Thus, iTT emerges as a good candidate for both scientific fMRI studies at high spatial resolution and more routine applications for clinical purposes. (orig.)

  1. Accurate alignment of functional EPI data to anatomical MRI using a physics-based distortion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, C; Constable, R T; Duncan, J S

    2000-11-01

    Mapping of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to conventional anatomical MRI is a valuable step in the interpretation of fMRI activations. One of the main limits on the accuracy of this alignment arises from differences in the geometric distortion induced by magnetic field inhomogeneity. This paper describes an approach to the registration of echo planar image (EPI) data to conventional anatomical images which takes into account this difference in geometric distortion. We make use of an additional spin echo EPI image and use the known signal conservation in spin echo distortion to derive a specialized multimodality nonrigid registration algorithm. We also examine a plausible modification using log-intensity evaluation of the criterion to provide increased sensitivity in areas of low EPI signal. A phantom-based imaging experiment is used to evaluate the behavior of the different criteria, comparing nonrigid displacement estimates to those provided by a imagnetic field mapping acquisition. The algorithm is then applied to a range of nine brain imaging studies illustrating global and local improvement in the anatomical alignment and localization of fMRI activations.

  2. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N Boubela

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to true neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.. From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  3. A primary fMRI study of the chinese language function:a free fluency paradigm%汉语言自由联想功能磁共振的初步研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鹏; 于红梅; 杜飞舟; 顾明; 汪洋; 何次

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To design a stimulus task for Chinese free fluency, and explore the brains language function areas in Chinese people. Materials and Methods:Nineteen healthy Chinese volunteers underwent a BOLD-fMRI scan with a free fluency stimulus task, that was block design. All images were collected and processed by SPM 8, followed by a First-and Second-level analysis. The distribution, sizes(number of voxels), and peak intensity of activations were shown by Xjview. Results: All participants completed the language task in connection with chinese language functional areas located primarily in the right superior temporal gyrus. In this study, the left fusiform gyrus and left parahippocampal gyrus were not activated, and bilateral hippocampus with low-grade activations. Conclusion:This stimulus task effectively activated brain language areas relating to chinese free fluency. BOLD-fMRI located activated areas accurately, and quantified the size and peak intensity of activations. It was stable and reliable with good compliance from patients. This study shows that chinese free fluency.%目的:设计一种适合汉语言自由联想的脑功能磁共振刺激任务,探索汉语言自由联想脑功能区表现。材料与方法对19名健康汉语志愿者进行任务态自由联想语言功能刺激,同时采集功能性磁共振成像(functional magnetic resonance imaging, fMRI)数据,通过SPM8软件分析获取自由联想任务相关主要脑功能区位置,激活大小及最大激活强度。结果汉语自由联想主效应区位于右颞上回(BA21);左颞枕内侧回、左海马旁回在联想任务中没有激活信号,双侧海马的激活程度较低。结论利用该语言任务能激活正常人自由联想语言功能区;同时血氧水平依赖性功能磁共振成像(blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging, BOLD-fMRI)可以准确定位激活区,量化激活区大小及最大激活强度,技术稳定可靠,适

  4. Differential responses to acute administration of a new 5-HT7-R agonist as a function of adolescent pre-treatment: phMRI and immuno-histochemical study

    OpenAIRE

    Altabella, Luisa; Sbriccoli, Marco; Zoratto, Francesca; Poleggi, Anna; Vinci, Ramona; Lacivita, Enza; Leopoldo, Marcello; Laviola, Giovanni; Cardone, Franco; Canese, Rossella; Adriani, Walter

    2014-01-01

    LP-211 is a new, selective agonist of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) receptor 7 (5-HT7-R), which is part of a neuro-transmission system with a proposed role in neural plasticity and in mood, cognitive and sleep regulation. Adolescent subchronic LP-211 treatment produces some persisting changes in rats' forebrain structural and functional parameters. Here, using pharmacological MRI (phMRI), we investigated the effect of acute administration with LP-211 (10 mg/kg i.p.), or vehicle, to ad...

  5. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies.

  6. How skill expertise shapes the brain functional architecture: an fMRI study of visuo-spatial and motor processing in professional racing-car and naïve drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Giulio; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Sani, Lorenzo; Gaglianese, Anna; Papasogli, Alessandra; Ceccarelli, Riccardo; Franzoni, Ferdinando; Galetta, Fabio; Santoro, Gino; Goebel, Rainer; Pietrini, Pietro

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the brain functional architecture that subserves visuo-spatial and motor processing in highly skilled individuals. By using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we measured brain activity while eleven Formula racing-car drivers and eleven 'naïve' volunteers performed a motor reaction and a visuo-spatial task. Tasks were set at a relatively low level of difficulty such to ensure a similar performance in the two groups and thus avoid any potential confounding effects on brain activity due to discrepancies in task execution. The brain functional organization was analyzed in terms of regional brain response, inter-regional interactions and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal variability. While performance levels were equal in the two groups, as compared to naïve drivers, professional drivers showed a smaller volume recruitment of task-related regions, stronger connections among task-related areas, and an increased information integration as reflected by a higher signal temporal variability. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that, as compared to naïve subjects, the brain functional architecture sustaining visuo-motor processing in professional racing-car drivers, trained to perform at the highest levels under extremely demanding conditions, undergoes both 'quantitative' and 'qualitative' modifications that are evident even when the brain is engaged in relatively simple, non-demanding tasks. These results provide novel evidence in favor of an increased 'neural efficiency' in the brain of highly skilled individuals.

  7. Interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in intrinsic fMRI networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuciu, Philippe; Abry, Patrice; He, Biyu J

    2014-07-15

    Studies employing functional connectivity-type analyses have established that spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals are organized within large-scale brain networks. Meanwhile, fMRI signals have been shown to exhibit 1/f-type power spectra - a hallmark of scale-free dynamics. We studied the interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in fMRI signals, utilizing the fractal connectivity framework - a multivariate extension of the univariate fractional Gaussian noise model, which relies on a wavelet formulation for robust parameter estimation. We applied this framework to fMRI data acquired from healthy young adults at rest and while performing a visual detection task. First, we found that scale-invariance existed beyond univariate dynamics, being present also in bivariate cross-temporal dynamics. Second, we observed that frequencies within the scale-free range do not contribute evenly to inter-regional connectivity, with a systematically stronger contribution of the lowest frequencies, both at rest and during task. Third, in addition to a decrease of the Hurst exponent and inter-regional correlations, task performance modified cross-temporal dynamics, inducing a larger contribution of the highest frequencies within the scale-free range to global correlation. Lastly, we found that across individuals, a weaker task modulation of the frequency contribution to inter-regional connectivity was associated with better task performance manifesting as shorter and less variable reaction times. These findings bring together two related fields that have hitherto been studied separately - resting-state networks and scale-free dynamics, and show that scale-free dynamics of human brain activity manifest in cross-regional interactions as well.

  8. Studies on the reliability of high-field intra-operative MRI in brain glioma resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-jun SONG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the reliability of high-field intra-operative magnetic resonance imaging(iMRI in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.Method One hundred and thirty-one cases of brain glioma(69 males and 62 females,aged from 7 to 79 years with mean of 39.6 years hospitalized from Nov.2009 to Aug.2010 were involved in present study.All the patients were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging(MRI before the operation.The tumors were resected under conventional navigation microscope,and the high-field iMRI was used for all the patients when the operators considered the tumor was satisfactorily resected,while the residual tumor was difficult to detect under the microscope,but resected after being revealed by high-field iMRI.Histopathological examination was performed.The patients without residual tumors recieved high-field MRI scan at day 4 or 5 after operation to evaluate the accuracy of high-field iMRI during operation.Results High quality intra-operative images were obtained by using high-field iMRI.Twenty-eight cases were excluded because their residual tumors were not resected due to their location too close to functional area.Combined with the results of intra-operative histopathological examination and post-operative MRI at the early recovery stage,the sensitivity of high-field iMRI in residual tumor diagnosis was 98.0%(49/50,the specificity was 94.3%(50/53,and the accuracy was 96.1%(99/103.Conclusion High-quality intra-operative imaging could be acquired by high-field iMRI,which maybe used as a safe and reliable method in detecting the residual tumors during glioma resection.

  9. Functional MRI in medulloblastoma survivors supports prophylactic reading intervention during tumor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Conklin, Heather M; Scoggins, Matthew A; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Jones, Melissa M; Palmer, Shawna L; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Development of reading skills is vulnerable to disruption in children treated for brain tumors. Interventions, remedial and prophylactic, are needed to mitigate reading and other learning difficulties faced by survivors. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted to investigate long-term effects of a prophylactic reading intervention administered during radiation therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma. The fMRI study included 19 reading-intervention (age 11.7 ± 0.6 years) and 21 standard-of-care (age 12.1 ± 0.6 years) medulloblastoma survivors, and 21 typically developing children (age 12.3 ± 0.6 years). The survivors were 2.5 [1.2, 5.4] years after completion of tumor therapies and reading-intervention survivors were 2.9 [1.6, 5.9] years after intervention. Five fMRI tasks (Rapid Automatized Naming, Continuous Performance Test using faces and letters, orthographic and phonological processing of letter pairs, implicit word reading, and story reading) were used to probe reading-related neural activation. Woodcock-Johnson Reading Fluency, Word Attack, and Sound Awareness subtests were used to evaluate reading abilities. At the time of fMRI, Sound Awareness scores were significantly higher in the reading-intervention group than in the standard-of-care group (p = 0.046). Brain activation during the fMRI tasks was detected in left inferior frontal, temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and subcortical regions, and differed among the groups (p reading-intervention group. Standardized reading scores and patterns of brain activation provide evidence of long-term effects of prophylactic reading intervention in children treated for medulloblastoma.

  10. Advances in longitudinal studies of amnestic mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease based on multi-modal MRI techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongjie; Wu, Liyong; Jia, Jianping; Han, Ying

    2014-04-01

    Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI) is a prodromal stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 75%-80% of aMCI patients finally develop AD. So, early identification of patients with aMCI or AD is of great significance for prevention and intervention. According to cross-sectional studies, it is known that the hippocampus, posterior cingulate cortex, and corpus callosum are key areas in studies based on structural MRI (sMRI), functional MRI (fMRI), and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) respectively. Recently, longitudinal studies using each MRI modality have demonstrated that the neuroimaging abnormalities generally involve the posterior brain regions at the very beginning and then gradually affect the anterior areas during the progression of aMCI to AD. However, it is not known whether follow-up studies based on multi-modal neuroimaging techniques (e.g., sMRI, fMRI, and DTI) can help build effective MRI models that can be directly applied to the screening and diagnosis of aMCI and AD. Thus, in the future, large-scale multi-center follow-up studies are urgently needed, not only to build an MRI diagnostic model that can be used on a single person, but also to evaluate the variability and stability of the model in the general population. In this review, we present longitudinal studies using each MRI modality separately, and then discuss the future directions in this field.

  11. Impact of thoracic surgery on cardiac morphology and function in small animal models of heart disease: a cardiac MRI study in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nordbeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surgical procedures in small animal models of heart disease might evoke alterations in cardiac morphology and function. The aim of this study was to reveal and quantify such potential artificial early or long term effects in vivo, which might account for a significant bias in basic cardiovascular research, and, therefore, could potentially question the meaning of respective studies. METHODS: Female Wistar rats (n = 6 per group were matched for weight and assorted for sham left coronary artery ligation or control. Cardiac morphology and function was then investigated in vivo by cine magnetic resonance imaging at 7 Tesla 1 and 8 weeks after the surgical procedure. The time course of metabolic and inflammatory blood parameters was determined in addition. RESULTS: Compared to healthy controls, rats after sham surgery showed a lower body weight both 1 week (267.5±10.6 vs. 317.0±11.3 g, n<0.05 and 8 weeks (317.0±21.1 vs. 358.7±22.4 g, n<0.05 after the intervention. Left and right ventricular morphology and function were not different in absolute measures in both groups 1 week after surgery. However, there was a confined difference in several cardiac parameters normalized to the body weight (bw, such as myocardial mass (2.19±0.30/0.83±0.13 vs. 1.85±0.22/0.70±0.07 mg left/right per g bw, p<0.05, or enddiastolic ventricular volume (1.31±0.36/1.21±0.31 vs. 1.14±0.20/1.07±0.17 µl left/right per g bw, p<0.05. Vice versa, after 8 weeks, cardiac masses, volumes, and output showed a trend for lower values in sham operated rats compared to controls in absolute measures (782.2±57.2/260.2±33.2 vs. 805.9±84.8/310.4±48.5 mg, p<0.05 for left/right ventricular mass, but not normalized to body weight. Matching these findings, blood testing revealed only minor inflammatory but prolonged metabolic changes after surgery not related to cardiac disease. CONCLUSION: Cardio-thoracic surgical procedures in experimental myocardial infarction

  12. Assessment of biofeedback rehabilitation in post-stroke patients combining fMRI and gait analysis: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Del Din, Silvia; Bertoldo, Alessandra; Sawacha, Zimi; Jonsdottir, Johanna; Rabuffetti, Marco; Cobelli, Claudio; Ferrarin, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability to walk independently is a primary goal for rehabilitation after stroke. Gait analysis provides a great amount of valuable information, while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) offers a powerful approach to define networks involved in motor control. The present study reports a new methodology based on both fMRI and gait analysis outcomes in order to investigate the ability of fMRI to reflect the phases of motor learning before/after electromyographic biofeedba...

  13. Juxtafacet cysts of the lumbar spine: a positional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, Pascal [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Kuchta, Johannes [Interdisziplinaeres Wirbelsaeulenzentrum, Bonn (Germany); Hoeffer, Janine; Beyer, Hans-Konrad [Upright MRT, Cologne (Germany); Grosskurth, Dieter; Delank, Karl-Stefan [Upright MRT, Cologne (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Orthopaedic and Trauma Surgery, Cologne (Germany)

    2012-03-15

    Juxtafacet cysts (JFC) are related to facet joint degeneration. Supine MRI is routinely used to evaluate JFC. However, some JFC are missed and found only intraoperatively. The present study addresses positional MRI features and factors leading to variation in the size of JFC. Fifty patients in whom positional MRI had been performed were investigated retrospectively and 67 distinct intraspinal or intraneuroforaminal were JFC found. Signal intensity, size of the JFC, the presence and variance of a vertebral slip and the angular movement of affected segments were assessed in supine, neutral sitting, flexion (sitting) and extension (standing). The overall movement of the spine and the lordosis angle in different positions were measured. JFC varied in size in segments with unstable slip and increased angular movement (variation of the angle in the affected segment in function: 13.3 degrees compared to 8.7 degrees). JFC with bright signals tended to vary in size compared to JFC with intermediate or low signal intensity (all: p < 0.001). Joint effusion and displacement of effusion lead to formation and variations in the size of JFC. JFC were most prominent in extension: 6.7 mm, less prominent in supine: 5.5 mm and in neutral sitting position: 4.6 mm (all p < 0.05). The detection rate for JFC was 97% for extension, 89% for supine and 78% for neutral sitting. The detection rate of JFC improves with increasing lordosis of the spine and under weight-bearing conditions, particularly when standing. Unstable slipping or increased angular movement affects the size of JFC. (orig.)

  14. Blood oxygen-level dependent functional assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity: Feasibility for intraoperative 3 Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; van Niftrik, Christiaan Hendrik Bas; Piccirelli, Marco; Pangalu, Athina; Kocian, Roman; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Valavanis, Antonios; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of functional blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) MRI to evaluate intraoperative cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at 3 Tesla field strength. Ten consecutive neurosurgical subjects scheduled for a clinical intraoperative MRI examination were enrolled in this study. In addition to the clinical protocol a BOLD sequence was implemented with three cycles of 44 s apnea to calculate CVR values on a voxel-by-voxel basis throughout the brain. The CVR range was then color-coded and superimposed on an anatomical volume to create high spatial resolution CVR maps. Ten subjects (mean age 34.8 ± 13.4; 2 females) uneventfully underwent the intraoperative BOLD protocol, with no complications occurring. Whole-brain CVR for all subjects was (mean ± SD) 0.69 ± 0.42, whereas CVR was markedly higher for tumor subjects as compared to vascular subjects, 0.81 ± 0.44 versus 0.33 ± 0.10, respectively. Furthermore, color-coded functional maps could be robustly interpreted for a whole-brain assessment of CVR. We demonstrate that intraoperative BOLD MRI is feasible in creating functional maps to assess cerebrovascular reactivity throughout the brain in subjects undergoing a neurosurgical procedure. Magn Reson Med 77:806-813, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  15. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niskanen, Eini [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kaelviaeinen, Reetta [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  16. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...... a reduced blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increase and a greater asymmetry in the visual cortex, compared with controls. The volume of visual cortical activation was significantly correlated to the result of the contrast sensitivity test. The BOLD signal increase correlated significantly...... of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...

  17. Infinite Relational Modeling of Functional Connectivity in Resting State fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Dogonowski, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    of resting state as functional coherent groups we search for functional units of the brain that communicate with other parts of the brain in a coherent manner as measured by mutual information. We use the infinite relational model (IRM) to quantify functional coherent groups of resting state networks......Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be applied to study the functional connectivity of the neural elements which form complex network at a whole brain level. Most analyses of functional resting state networks (RSN) have been based on the analysis of correlation between the temporal...... dynamics of various regions of the brain. While these models can identify coherently behaving groups in terms of correlation they give little insight into how these groups interact. In this paper we take a different view on the analysis of functional resting state networks. Starting from the definition...

  18. Negative childhood experiences alter a prefrontal-insular-motor cortical network in healthy adults: A preliminary multimodal rsfMRI-fMRI-MRS-dMRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Niall W.; Hayes, Dave J.; Wiebking, Christine; Tiret, Brice; Pietruska, Karin; Chen, David Q.; Rainville, Pierre; Marjańska, Malgorzata; Mohammid, Omar; Doyon, Julien; Hodaie, Mojgan; Northoff, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Research in humans and animals has shown that negative childhood experiences (NCE) can have long-term effects on the structure and function of the brain. Alterations have been noted in grey and white matter, in the brain’s resting state, on the glutamatergic system, and on neural and behavioural responses to aversive stimuli. These effects can be linked to psychiatric disorder such as depression and anxiety disorders that are influenced by excessive exposure to early life stressors. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of NCEs on these systems. Resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI), aversion task fMRI, glutamate magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) were combined with the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) in healthy subjects to examine the impact of NCEs on the brain. Low CTQ scores, a measure of NCEs, were related to higher resting state glutamate levels and higher resting state entropy in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). CTQ scores, mPFC glutamate and entropy, correlated with neural BOLD responses to the anticipation of aversive stimuli in regions throughout the aversion-related network, with strong correlations between all measures in the motor cortex and left insula. Structural connectivity strength, measured using mean fractional anisotropy, between the mPFC and left insula correlated to aversion-related signal changes in the motor cortex. These findings highlight the impact of NCEs on multiple inter-related brain systems. In particular, they highlight the role of a prefrontal-insular-motor cortical network in the processing and responsivity to aversive stimuli and its potential adaptability by NCEs. PMID:26287448

  19. Neural correlates of the popular music phenomenon: evidence from functional MRI and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Ying; Hou, Haifeng; Du, Fenglei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Lin; Shen, Yehua; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei [Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Chung, June-key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Music can induce different emotions. However, its neural mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission tomography (PET) imaging for mapping of neural changes under the most popular music in healthy volunteers. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and monoamine receptor PET imaging with {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) were conducted under the popular music Gangnam Style and light music A Comme Amour in healthy subjects. PET and fMRI images were analyzed by using the Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM). Significantly increased fMRI BOLD signals were found in the bilateral superior temporal cortices, left cerebellum, left putamen and right thalamus cortex. Monoamine receptor availability was increased significantly in the left superior temporal gyrus and left putamen, but decreased in the bilateral superior occipital cortices under the Gangnam Style compared with the light music condition. Significant positive correlation was found between {sup 11}C-NMSP binding and fMRI BOLD signals in the left temporal cortex. Furthermore, increased {sup 11}C-NMSP binding in the left putamen was positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Popular music Gangnam Style can arouse pleasure experience and strong emotional response. The left putamen is positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Our results revealed characteristic patterns of brain activity associated with Gangnam Style, and may also provide more general insights into the music-induced emotional processing. (orig.)

  20. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation.

  1. A multifunctional method (ERP and fMRI of analysis on facial expression. Three pilot studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Yovel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available As social primates, one of the most important cognitive tasks we conduct, dozens of times a day, is to look at a face and extract the person's identity. During the last decade, the neural basis of face processing has been extensively investigated in humans with event-related potential (ERP and functional MRI (fMRI. These two methods provide complementary information about the temporal and spatial aspects of the neural response, with ERPs allowing high temporal resolution of milliseconds but low spatial resolution of the neural generator and fMRI displaying a slow hemodynamic response but better spatial localization of the activated regions. Despite the extensive fMRI and ERP research of faces, only a few studies have assessed the relationship between the two methods and no study to date have collected simultaneous ERP and fMRI responses to face stimuli. In the current paper we will try to assess the spatial and temporal aspects of the neural response to faces by simultaneously collecting functional MRI and event-related potentials (ERP to face stimuli. Our goals are twofold: 1 ERP and fMRI show a robust selective response to faces. In particular, two well-established face-specific phenomena, the RH superiority and the inversion effect are robustly found with both ERP and fMRI. Despite the extensive research of these effects with ERP and fMRI, it is still unknown to what extent their spatial (fMRI and temporal (ERP aspects are associated. In Study 1 we will employ an individual differences approach, to assess the relationship between these ERP and fMRI face-specific responses. 2 Face processing involves several stages starting from structural encoding of the face image through identity processing to storage for later retrieval. This representation undergoes several manipulations that take place at different time points and in different brain regions before the final percept is generated. By simultaneously recording ERP and fMRI we hope to gain a

  2. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy; Klinischer Einsatz der funktionellen MRT bei chronischer Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K. [Krankenhaus Mara, Epilepsiezentrum Bethel, Abteilung fuer Magentresonanztomographie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) wird im Rahmen der Epilepsiediagnostik vor epilepsiechirurgischen Eingriffen insbesondere zur Lateralisation von Sprache und Gedaechtnis und zur Lokalisation der Zentralregion eingesetzt, um den eloquenten Kortex von der epilepsieverursachenden, chirurgisch zugaenglichen Laesion abzugrenzen. Dabei ist die fMRT Teil einer Sequenz nichtinvasiver klinischer Tests (Anamnese, Anfall-Semiologie, neurologischer Status, interiktales und iktales EEG, strukturelles MRT, Video-EEG-Monitoring, Neuropsychologie). Das Ergebnis dieser Sequenz ist die Entscheidung fuer oder gegen einen

  3. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  4. Corticobasal degeneration: structural and functional MRI and single-photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukmar, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste (Italy); Moretti, R.; Bava, A. [Department of Physiology and Pathology, University of Trieste (Italy); Torre, P.; Antonello, R.M. [Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Neurology, University of Trieste (Italy); Longo, R. [Department of Physics, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2003-10-01

    We studied seven patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) from a clinical and imaging perspective. We describe the main morphological features of CBD and, using functional MRI, try to define the possible role of the parietal lobe in simple and complex learned motor sequences. We showed decreased activation of the parietal lobe contralateral to the more affected arm, when movements, simple or complex, are performed with that hand. Moreover we found that functional imaging can demonstrate parietal and motor cortex dysfunction before structural, and even single-photon emission computed tomography changes become evident. (orig.)

  5. Treatment planning with functional MRI; Strahlentherapieplanung mit der funktionellen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, P. [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Andrzejewski, P.; Georg, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer medizinische Strahlenphysik, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wien (Austria); Pinker, K. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer molekulare Bildgebung, Univ. Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy is high precision in treatment delivery. With new developments it is possible to focus the high dose irradiation on the tumor while sparing the surrounding tissue. The achievements in precision of the treatment planning and delivery warrant equally precise tumor definition. In conventional radiation therapy it is necessary to carry out a planning computed tomography (CT). For many tumors there is also need for an additional morphological MRI because of more accurate tumor definition. In standard radiotherapy the tumor volume is irradiated with a homogeneous dose. The aim of functional multiparametric MRI is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at the cellular and molecular levels. Based on this information it is possible to elucidate tumor biology and identify subvolumes of more aggressive behavior. They are often radiotherapy-resistant, leading to tumor recurrence thus requiring further dose escalation. The concept of inhomogeneous tumor irradiation according to its biological behavior is called dose painting. Dose painting is technically feasible. The expected clinical benefit is motivated by selective treatment adaptations based on biological tumor characteristics. Tumors show variable response to therapy underlining the need for individual treatment plans. This approach may lead not only to higher local control but also to better sparing of normal surrounding tissue. With the clinical implementation of dose painting, improvements in the therapeutic outcome can be expected. Due to the existing technical challenges, extensive collaboration between radiation oncologists, radiologists, medical physicists and radiation biologists is needed. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlentherapieplanung mit der funktionellen Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) zielt auf eine Hochpraezisionsradiotherapie ab. Mit den modernen Technologien ist es moeglich, die Strahlentherapie nahezu

  6. Exploring the brain network: a review on resting-state fMRI functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2010-08-01

    Our brain is a network. It consists of spatially distributed, but functionally linked regions that continuously share information with each other. Interestingly, recent advances in the acquisition and analysis of functional neuroimaging data have catalyzed the exploration of functional connectivity in the human brain. Functional connectivity is defined as the temporal dependency of neuronal activation patterns of anatomically separated brain regions and in the past years an increasing body of neuroimaging studies has started to explore functional connectivity by measuring the level of co-activation of resting-state fMRI time-series between brain regions. These studies have revealed interesting new findings about the functional connections of specific brain regions and local networks, as well as important new insights in the overall organization of functional communication in the brain network. Here we present an overview of these new methods and discuss how they have led to new insights in core aspects of the human brain, providing an overview of these novel imaging techniques and their implication to neuroscience. We discuss the use of spontaneous resting-state fMRI in determining functional connectivity, discuss suggested origins of these signals, how functional connections tend to be related to structural connections in the brain network and how functional brain communication may form a key role in cognitive performance. Furthermore, we will discuss the upcoming field of examining functional connectivity patterns using graph theory, focusing on the overall organization of the functional brain network. Specifically, we will discuss the value of these new functional connectivity tools in examining believed connectivity diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, dementia, schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advances in the study of brain structure and function of migraine with MRI%偏头痛脑结构和功能的MRI研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    兰慧; 李康; 吕发金

    2016-01-01

    作为一原发性头痛,偏头痛表现出特征性的单侧、中、重度搏动性头痛,并且随着日常活动的增加而加剧,也常伴随恶心呕吐、畏光畏声等神经、胃肠、自主神经症状。偏头痛给患者和社会带来负担,例如增加患者的环境敏感性、造成残疾甚至丧失社会生产的能力。近年的神经影像学发现频繁的头痛发作引起了脑结构与功能的改变。该文将从MRI所显示的偏头痛脑结构与功能异常作一次回顾性分析研究。%AbstractAs an primary headache disorder, migraine is characteri zed by moderate to severe pain, which consists of unilateral and pulsating headache attacks that are typically aggravated by physical activity ,and accompanied by nausea and vomiting, photophobia, pho nophobia and other neurological, gastrointestinal, autonomic sympto-ms. Causes significant individual and societal burdens as a result of pain, such as environmental sensitivity, disability and even lost prod uctivity. Recently, advanced neuroimaging has led to an evolution in our perception of migraine pathophysiology. Numerous neuroima ging studies have detected alterations in brain structureand function in patients with migraine.In this article, we will make a retrospec tive analysis of the brain structure and function of migraine, which is shown by magnetic resonance imaging.

  8. Correcting partial volume artifacts of the arterial input function in quantitative cerebral perfusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, MJP; Vonken, EJPA; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2001-01-01

    To quantify cerebral perfusion with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI), one needs to measure the arterial input function (AIF). Conventionally, one derives the contrast concentration from the DSC sequence by monitoring changes in either the amplitude or the phase signal on the assumption

  9. Morpho-Functional 1H-MRI of the Lung in COPD: Short-Term Test-Retest Reliability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertram J Jobst

    Full Text Available Non-invasive end-points for interventional trials and tailored treatment regimes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD for monitoring regionally different manifestations of lung disease instead of global assessment of lung function with spirometry would be valuable. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance imaging (1H-MRI allows for a radiation-free assessment of regional structure and function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term reproducibility of a comprehensive morpho-functional lung MRI protocol in COPD.20 prospectively enrolled COPD patients (GOLD I-IV underwent 1H-MRI of the lung at 1.5T on two consecutive days, including sequences for morphology, 4D contrast-enhanced perfusion, and respiratory mechanics. Image quality and COPD-related morphological and functional changes were evaluated in consensus by three chest radiologists using a dedicated MRI-based visual scoring system. Test-retest reliability was calculated per each individual lung lobe for the extent of large airway (bronchiectasis, wall thickening, mucus plugging and small airway abnormalities (tree in bud, peripheral bronchiectasis, mucus plugging, consolidations, nodules, parenchymal defects and perfusion defects. The presence of tracheal narrowing, dystelectasis, pleural effusion, pulmonary trunk ectasia, right ventricular enlargement and, finally, motion patterns of diaphragma and chest wall were addressed.Median global scores [10(Q1:8.00;Q3:16.00 vs.11(Q1:6.00;Q3:15.00] as well as category subscores were similar between both timepoints, and kappa statistics indicated "almost perfect" global agreement (ĸ = 0.86, 95%CI = 0.81-0.91. Most subscores showed at least "substantial" agreement of MRI1 and MRI2 (ĸ = 0.64-1.00, whereas the agreement for the diagnosis of dystelectasis/effusion (ĸ = 0.42, 95%CI = 0.00-0.93 was "moderate" and of tracheal abnormalities (ĸ = 0.21, 95%CI = 0.00-0.75 "fair". Most MRI acquisitions showed at least diagnostic quality at

  10. Assessing cue-induced brain response as a function of abstinence duration in heroin-dependent individuals: an event-related fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    Full Text Available The brain activity induced by heroin-related cues may play a role in the maintenance of heroin dependence. Whether the reinforcement or processing biases construct an everlasting feature of heroin addiction remains to be resolved. We used an event-related fMRI paradigm to measure brain activation in response to heroin cue-related pictures versus neutral pictures as the control condition in heroin-dependent patients undergoing short-term and long-term abstinence. The self-reported craving scores were significantly increased after cue exposure in the short-term abstinent patients (t = 3.000, P = 0.008, but no increase was found in the long-term abstinent patients (t = 1.510, P = 0.149. However, no significant differences in cue-induced craving changes were found between the two groups (t = 1.193, P = 0.850. Comparing between the long-term abstinence and short-term abstinence groups, significant decreases in brain activation were detected in the bilateral anterior cingulated cortex, left medial prefrontal cortex, caudate, middle occipital gyrus, inferior parietal lobule and right precuneus. Among all of the heroin dependent patients, the abstinence duration was negatively correlated with brain activation in the left medial prefrontal cortex and left inferior parietal lobule. These findings suggest that long-term abstinence may be useful for heroin-dependent patients to diminish their saliency value of heroin-related cues and possibly lower the relapse vulnerability to some extent.

  11. Investigation of acupoint specificity by multivariate granger causality analysis from functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Bai, Lijun; Zhang, Wensheng; Xue, Ting; Ren, Yanshuang; Zhong, Chongguang; Wang, Hu; You, Youbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Dai, Jianping; Liu, Yijun; Tian, Jie

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the acupoint specificity by exploring the effective connectivity patterns of the poststimulus resting brain networks modulated by acupuncture at the PC6, with the same meridian acupoint PC7 and different meridian acupoint GB37. The functional MRI (fMRI) study was performed in 36 healthy right-handed subjects receiving acupuncture at three acupoints, respectively. Due to the sustained effects of acupuncture, a novel experimental paradigm using the nonrepeated event-related (NRER) design was adopted. Psychophysical responses (deqi sensations) were also assessed. Finally, a newly multivariate Granger causality analysis (mGCA) was used to analyze effective connectivity patterns of the resting fMRI data taken following acupuncture at three acupoints. Following acupuncture at PC6, the red nucleus and substantia nigra emerged as central hubs, in comparison with the fusiform gyrus following acupuncture at GB37. Red nucleus was also a target following acupuncture at PC7, but with fewer inputs than those of PC6. In addition, the most important target following acupuncture at PC7 was located at the parahippocampus. Our findings demonstrated that acupuncture at different acupoints may exert heterogeneous modulatory effects on the causal interactions of brain areas during the poststimulus resting state. These preliminary findings provided a clue to elucidate the relatively function-oriented specificity of acupuncture effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Effect of baseline cannabis use and working-memory network function on changes in cannabis use in heavy cannabis users : a prospective fMRI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cousijn, Janna; Wiers, Reinout W; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models of addiction suggest that a substance use disorder represents an imbalance between hypersensitive motivational processes and deficient regulatory executive functions. Working-memory (a central executive function) may be a powerful predictor of the course of drug use and drug-relat

  13. Implementation of time-efficient adaptive sampling function design for improved undersampled MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinhyeok; Kim, Hyeonjin

    2016-12-01

    To improve the efficacy of undersampled MRI, a method of designing adaptive sampling functions is proposed that is simple to implement on an MR scanner and yet effectively improves the performance of the sampling functions. An approximation of the energy distribution of an image (E-map) is estimated from highly undersampled k-space data acquired in a prescan and efficiently recycled in the main scan. An adaptive probability density function (PDF) is generated by combining the E-map with a modeled PDF. A set of candidate sampling functions are then prepared from the adaptive PDF, among which the one with maximum energy is selected as the final sampling function. To validate its computational efficiency, the proposed method was implemented on an MR scanner, and its robust performance in Fourier-transform (FT) MRI and compressed sensing (CS) MRI was tested by simulations and in a cherry tomato. The proposed method consistently outperforms the conventional modeled PDF approach for undersampling ratios of 0.2 or higher in both FT-MRI and CS-MRI. To fully benefit from undersampled MRI, it is preferable that the design of adaptive sampling functions be performed online immediately before the main scan. In this way, the proposed method may further improve the efficacy of the undersampled MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Resting-state fMRI study of patients with fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isanova, E.; Petrovskiy, E.; Savelov, A.; Yudkin, D.; Tulupov, A.

    2017-08-01

    The study aimed to assess the neural activity of different brain regions in patients with fragile X syndrome (FXS) and the healthy volunteers by resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on a 1.5 T MRI Achieva scanner (Philips). Results: The fMRI study showed a DMN of brain function in patients with FXS, as well as in the healthy volunteers. Furthermore, it was found that a default mode network of the brain in patients with FXS and healthy volunteers does not have statistically significant differences (p>0.05), which may indicate that the basal activity of neurons in patients with FXS is not reduced. In addition, we have found a significant (pfunctional status of the brain in patients with FXS were received. The significant increase in the resting state functional connectivity within the right inferior parietal and right angular gyrus (p<0.001) in patients with FXS was found.

  15. 创伤后应激障碍的记忆损害与脑结构MRI特点探讨%Study on memory function impairment and structural MRI in posttraumatic stress disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张若成; 李春艳; 杨兵; 张树暾

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Study on memory function impairment and structural MRI in posttraumatic stress disorder. To provide a reliable basis for clinical improvement in patients with clinical diagnosis and treatment of such. Materials and Methods:Selected for the study group and the control group 16 cases each, memory function evaluation, and give the magnetic resonance imaging examination, assessment results, two groups were recorded in memory function magnetic resonance examination results, give statistical analysis, draw the conclusion. Results:The understanding of memory, understanding, memory, visual reproduction delay delay visual reproduction scores were signiifcantly lower than that of the control group of healthy people, and P<0.05 in patients with stress disorder after trauma research group, two groups of patients the results with statistical signiifcance, the study group patients by MRI examination shows, the brain frontal and temporal lobe brain gray matter volume was signiifcantly smaller than that of the control group healthy people. Conclusions: Clinicians according to post-traumatic stress disorder symptom is memory impairment in patients with frontal lobe of the brain gray matter volume and temporal lobe brain regions were signiifcantly lower than healthy people this trait, to severe posttraumatic stress disorder in patients with brain MRI examination, to determine whether memory impairment, and judge the clinical treatment effect.%目的:探讨创伤后应激障碍的记忆损害与脑结构MRI特点,为提高此类患者临床诊断与治疗效果提供可靠依据。材料与方法选取研究组(患者)和对照组(健康志愿者)各16例,进行记忆功能评估,所有受检者均行MRI检查,记录两组的记忆功能评估结果、MRI检查结果,进行统计学分析。结果研究组创伤后应激障碍患者理解记忆、延迟理解记忆、视觉再生、延迟视觉再生评分均显著低于对照组(P<0.05),两组对比结果

  16. Renal and perirenal space involvement in acute pancreatitis: An MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xing Hui, E-mail: lixinghui1005@126.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhang, Xiao Ming, E-mail: cjr.zhxm@vip.163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Ji, Yi Fan, E-mail: 526504036@qq.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Jing, Zong Lin, E-mail: jzl325@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Huang, Xiao Hua, E-mail: nc_hxh1966@yahoo.com.cn [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Yang, Lin, E-mail: linyangmd@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China); Zhai, Zhao Hua, E-mail: zhaizhaohuada@163.com [Sichuan Key Laboratory of Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Affiliated Hospital of North Sichuan Medical College, Nanchong 637000 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Objectives: To study the prevalence and characteristics of renal and perirenal space involvement and its relation to the severity of acute pancreatitis (AP) using MRI. Methods: 115 patients with AP who underwent MRI with the clinical kidney function test were retrospectively analyzed in this study. MRI sequences included conventional and diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) sequences. The renal and perirenal space involvement in AP was noted on MRI. The renal apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) on DWI was measured for each kidney. The severity of AP on MRI was graded using MR severity index (MRSI). The relationships among the renal and perirenal space involvement on MRI, the renal ADC, MRSI and the results of the kidney function test were analyzed. Results: In the 115 patients with AP, the renal and perirenal space abnormalities detected included renal parenchymal abnormalities (0.8%), abnormalities of the renal collecting system (2.6%), renal vascular abnormalities (1.7%), thickened renal fascia (99%), perirenal stranding (62%) and perirenal fluid collection (40%). The prevalence of perirenal space abnormalities was correlated with the severity of AP based on MRSI (P < 0.05). The renal ADC values were lower in patients with abnormal kidney function than in those without kidney injury (P < 0.05). The prevalence of kidney function abnormalities was 9.4%, 32% and 100% in mild, moderate, and severe AP cases, respectively (P = 0.00). Conclusion: Perirenal space involvement is much more than renal parenchymal involvement in AP. The prevalence of perirenal space involvement in AP on MRI has a positive correlation with the severity of AP according to MRSI.

  17. Unified structural equation modeling approach for the analysis of multisubject, multivariate functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jieun; Zhu, Wei; Chang, Linda; Bentler, Peter M; Ernst, Thomas

    2007-02-01

    The ultimate goal of brain connectivity studies is to propose, test, modify, and compare certain directional brain pathways. Path analysis or structural equation modeling (SEM) is an ideal statistical method for such studies. In this work, we propose a two-stage unified SEM plus GLM (General Linear Model) approach for the analysis of multisubject, multivariate functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) time series data with subject-level covariates. In Stage 1, we analyze the fMRI multivariate time series for each subject individually via a unified SEM model by combining longitudinal pathways represented by a multivariate autoregressive (MAR) model, and contemporaneous pathways represented by a conventional SEM. In Stage 2, the resulting subject-level path coefficients are merged with subject-level covariates such as gender, age, IQ, etc., to examine the impact of these covariates on effective connectivity via a GLM. Our approach is exemplified via the analysis of an fMRI visual attention experiment. Furthermore, the significant path network from the unified SEM analysis is compared to that from a conventional SEM analysis without incorporating the longitudinal information as well as that from a Dynamic Causal Modeling (DCM) approach.

  18. 轻微肝性脑病全脑功能连接的静息态功能MRI研究%Altered whole brain functional connectivity in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戚荣丰; 张龙江; 许强; 梁雪; 罗松; 张志强; 卢光明

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the alteration of the whole brain functional connectivity in patients with minimal hepatic encephalopathy(MHE) by using resting-state functional MRI,and to explore its role in distinguishing the MHE from cirrhotic patients without MHE by using the receiver operator characteristic(ROC) curve.Methods Thirty cirrhotic patients with MHE,32 cirrhotic patients without MHE (non-MHE),and 49 healthy controls underwent standard resting-state functional MRI scan.Whole brain functional connectivities were compared with analysis of variance test to observe the difference among three groups,and then compared with Post-hoc test to investigate the changes between MHE and non-MHE groups.Results There were widespreadly different functional connectivities among three groups.All 115 functional conenctivities showed significant difference among three groups(all P<0.05).Compared with non-MHE patients,MHE patients showed 6 decreased functional connectivity in the following brain regions (P<0.05):between left supper temporal gyrus-right orbitofrontal cortex,left Heschl's gyrus-left Rolandic operculum,left Heschl's gyrus-right olfactory cortex,left hippocampus-right amygdala,left putamen-right putamen,and left temporal pole of supper temporal gyrus-right temporal pole of middle temporal gyrus (t=-4.41-3.82,P<0.01).ROC analysis demonstrated that the left hippocampus-right amygdala had the highest value for differentiating MHE from non-MHE group(AUC=0.78,95%CI 0.66-0.90) with a cutoff value=0.56,sensitivity=73% and specificity=81%).Conclusion Functional connectivity analysis can be used to observe the functional changes in MHE patient,and has a potential for the early diagnosis of MHE.%目的 利用静息态fMRI观察轻微肝性脑病(MHE)患者全脑功能连接的改变,并通过ROC曲线分析差异脑区连接在鉴别MHE和无MHE的肝硬化患者中的价值.方法 收集30例MHE患者(MHE组)、32例无MHE的肝硬化患者(无MHE组)和49名健

  19. State-space model with deep learning for functional dynamics estimation in resting-state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Heung-Il; Wee, Chong-Yaw; Lee, Seong-Whan; Shen, Dinggang

    2016-04-01

    Studies on resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rs-fMRI) have shown that different brain regions still actively interact with each other while a subject is at rest, and such functional interaction is not stationary but changes over time. In terms of a large-scale brain network, in this paper, we focus on time-varying patterns of functional networks, i.e., functional dynamics, inherent in rs-fMRI, which is one of the emerging issues along with the network modelling. Specifically, we propose a novel methodological architecture that combines deep learning and state-space modelling, and apply it to rs-fMRI based Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) diagnosis. We first devise a Deep Auto-Encoder (DAE) to discover hierarchical non-linear functional relations among regions, by which we transform the regional features into an embedding space, whose bases are complex functional networks. Given the embedded functional features, we then use a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) to estimate dynamic characteristics of functional networks inherent in rs-fMRI via internal states, which are unobservable but can be inferred from observations statistically. By building a generative model with an HMM, we estimate the likelihood of the input features of rs-fMRI as belonging to the corresponding status, i.e., MCI or normal healthy control, based on which we identify the clinical label of a testing subject. In order to validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we performed experiments on two different datasets and compared with state-of-the-art methods in the literature. We also analyzed the functional networks learned by DAE, estimated the functional connectivities by decoding hidden states in HMM, and investigated the estimated functional connectivities by means of a graph-theoretic approach. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Functional Organization of Trial-Related Activity in Lexical Processing after Early Left Hemispheric Brain Lesions: An Event-Related fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Damien A.; Choi, Alexander H.; Dosenbach, Yannic B. L.; Coalson, Rebecca S.; Miezin, Francis M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2010-01-01

    Children with congenital left hemisphere damage due to perinatal stroke are capable of acquiring relatively normal language functions despite experiencing a cortical insult that in adults often leads to devastating lifetime disabilities. Although this observed phenomenon is accepted, its neurobiological mechanisms are not well characterized. In…

  1. The Functional Organization of Trial-Related Activity in Lexical Processing after Early Left Hemispheric Brain Lesions: An Event-Related fMRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Damien A.; Choi, Alexander H.; Dosenbach, Yannic B. L.; Coalson, Rebecca S.; Miezin, Francis M.; Petersen, Steven E.; Schlaggar, Bradley L.

    2010-01-01

    Children with congenital left hemisphere damage due to perinatal stroke are capable of acquiring relatively normal language functions despite experiencing a cortical insult that in adults often leads to devastating lifetime disabilities. Although this observed phenomenon is accepted, its neurobiological mechanisms are not well characterized. In…

  2. Simultaneous functional imaging using fPET and fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villien, Marjorie [CERMEP (France)

    2015-05-18

    Brain mapping of task-associated changes in metabolism with PET has been accomplished by subtracting scans acquired during two distinct static states. We have demonstrated that PET can provide truly dynamic information on cerebral energy metabolism using constant infusion of FDG and multiple stimuli in a single experiment. We demonstrate here that the functional PET (fPET-FDG) method accomplished simultaneously with fMRI, can enable the first direct comparisons in time, space and magnitude of hemodynamics and oxygen and glucose consumption. The imaging studies were performed on a 3T Tim-Trio MR scanner modified to support an MR-compatible BrainPET insert. Ten healthy subjects were included. The total PET acquisition and infusion time was 90 minutes. We did 3 blocks of right hand fingers tapping for 10 minutes at 30, 50 and 70 minutes after the beginning of the PET acquisition. ASL and BOLD imaging were acquired simultaneously during the motor paradigm. Changes in glucose utilization are easily observed as changes in the TAC slope of the PET data (FDG utilization rate) and in the derivative signal during motor stimuli in the activated voxels. PET and MRI (ASL, and BOLD) activations are largely colocalized but with very different statistical significance and temporal dynamic, especially in the ipsilateral side of the stimuli. This study demonstrated that motor activation can be measured dynamically during a single FDG PET scan. The complementary nature of fPET-FDG to fMRI capitalizes on the emerging technology of hybrid MR-PET scanners. fPET-FDG, combined with quantitative fMRI methods, allow us to simultaneously measure dynamic changes in glucose utilization and hemodynamic, addressing vital questions about neurovascular coupling.

  3. Autism spectrum disorder, functional MRI and MR spectroscopy: possibilities and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Hugdahl

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this article we provide an overview of the use of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and MR spectroscopy (MRS in studies of autism spectrum disorders (ASD. We moreover provide preliminary data using these measures in cases of children with ASD and healthy controls. A hypothesis was that ASD children would show aberrant brain activation in the prefrontal and parietal cortex in an oddball stimulus situation, with predictable and unpredictable deviant tone stimuli, as an index of resistance to change in the ASD children. We also hypothesized that glutamate and GABA metabolite levels would differ between the two groups. Methods: fMRI images were acquired from a GE Signa HDx 3T MR scanner, as were the MRS data. Behavioral data were acquired as response accuracy to the deviant tone stimulus. The tone stimuli were presented in a standard fMRI ON-OFF box-car paradigim. Results: The fMRI results showed reduced brain activation in the ASD cases compared to the controls, preferably in the inferior and superior frontal gyrus, posterior temporal lobe, and superior and inferior parietal lobule. These areas make up an effort mode network (EMN, being activated in response to cognitive effort. The MRS results also showed differences between the groups. Discussion: The results are discussed in a theoretical framework of resistance to unexpected changes in the environment in ASD children, and how this could have a neurobiological underpinning. The results are also discussed in relation to the brain-gut link, and the possibility that ASD may have a microbial link. A limitation with the study is the few cases reported and the preliminary quality of the results.

  4. [Progress of clinical application of functional MRI in the localization of brain language area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong

    2016-02-01

    For surgical operation in the functional area in the brain, it's commonly demanded to resect the lesion to the maximal extent on the basis of preserve the normal neural function, thus the precise localization of functional area is extremely important. As for the advantages of being widely available, easy to grasp and non-invasive, the functional MRI (fMRI) has come into wide use, while the application of language fMRI is still in the initial stage. It's important to choose appropriate fMRI task according to the individual condition of the subject, the commonly-adopted tasks include verb generation, picture naming, word recognition, word generation, etc. However, the effectiveness of using fMRI to localize language area is not totally satisfactory, adopting multiple task is an effective approach to improve the sensitivity of this technique. The application of resting state fMRI in the localization of language area and the further research of the role of fMRI in localizing the Chinese language area are the important future directions.

  5. Value of functional MRI in evaluation of patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed Mostafa Elian

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Functional MRI provided a highly sensitive method in diagnosing and localizing prostate cancer. Being noninvasive, highly sensitive with wider spectrum in nearby pelvic organs assessment in one imaging session, it may totally replace TRUS-guided biopsy.

  6. Carbamazepine reduces memory induced activation of mesial temporal lobe structures: a pharmacological fMRI-study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okujava Michael

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Purpose It is not known whether carbamazepine (CBZ; a drug widely used in neurology and psychiatry influences the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD contrast changes induced by neuronal activation and measured by functional MRI (fMRI. We aimed to investigate the influence of CBZ on memory induced activation of the mesial temporal lobes in patients with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. Material and Methods Twenty-one individual patients with refractory symptomatic TLE with different CBZ serum levels and 20 healthy controls were studied using BOLD fMRI. Mesial temporal lobe (MTL activation was induced by a task that is based on the retrieval of individually familiar visuo-spatial knowledge. The extent of significant MTL fMRI activation was measured and correlated with the CBZ serum level. Results In TLE patients, the extent of significant fMRI activation over both MTL was negatively correlated to the CBZ serum level (Spearman r = -0.654, P Conclusions In TLE patients, carbamazepine reduces the fMRI-detectable changes within the mesial temporal lobes as induced by effortful memory retrieval. FMRI appears to be suitable to study the effects of chronic drug treatment in patients with epilepsy.

  7. N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis mediates loss of intrinsic activity measured by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brier, Matthew R; Day, Gregory S; Snyder, Abraham Z; Tanenbaum, Aaron B; Ances, Beau M

    2016-06-01

    Spontaneous brain activity is required for the development and maintenance of normal brain function. Many disease processes disrupt the organization of intrinsic brain activity, but few pervasively reduce the amplitude of resting state blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI fluctuations. We report the case of a female with anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis, longitudinally studied during the course of her illness to determine the contribution of NMDAR signaling to spontaneous brain activity. Resting state BOLD fMRI was measured at the height of her illness and 18 weeks following discharge from hospital. Conventional resting state networks were defined using established methods. Correlation and covariance matrices were calculated by extracting the BOLD time series from regions of interest and calculating either the correlation or covariance quantity. The intrinsic activity was compared between visits, and to expected activity from 45 similarly aged healthy individuals. Near the height of the illness, the patient exhibited profound loss of consciousness, high-amplitude slowing of the electroencephalogram, and a severe reduction in the amplitude of spontaneous BOLD fMRI fluctuations. The patient's neurological status and measures of intrinsic activity improved following treatment. We conclude that NMDAR-mediated signaling plays a critical role in the mechanisms that give rise to organized spontaneous brain activity. Loss of intrinsic activity is associated with profound disruptions of consciousness and cognition.

  8. Ensuring safety and functionality of electroglottography measurements during dynamic pulmonary MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özen, Ali Caglar; Traser, Louisa; Echternach, Matthias; Dadakova, Tetiana; Burdumy, Michael; Richter, Bernhard; Bock, Michael

    2016-11-01

    To combine vocal tract measurements with dynamic MRI of the lungs to provide fundamental insights into the lung physiology during singing. To analyze vocal fold oscillatory patterns during dynamic lung MRI, an electroglottography (EGG) system was modified to allow for simultaneous EGG measurements during MR image acquisitions. A low-pass filter was introduced to suppress residual radiofrequency (RF) coupling into the EGG signal. RF heating was tested in a gel phantom to ensure MR safety, and functionality of the EGG device was assessed in a volunteer experiment at singing frequencies from A5 to A3. In the recorded EGG signals, remaining RF interferences were removed by independent component analysis post processing, and standard EGG parameters such as fundamental frequency, contact quotient and jitter were calculated. In a second volunteer experiment, EGG recordings were compared with lung diameter measurements from 2D time-resolved trueFISP acquisitions. RF heating measurements resulted in less than 1.2°C temperature increase in the gel phantom. EGG parameters measured during MR imaging are within the range of ideal values. In the lung measurement, both the lung diameter and the EGG recordings could be successfully performed with only minimal interference. EGG recording is pos sible during dynamic lung MRI, and glottal activity can be studied safely at 1.5T. Magn Reson Med 76:1629-1635, 2016. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2015 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Maturation of language networks in children: A systematic review of 22years of functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss-Croft, Louise J; Baldeweg, Torsten

    2015-12-01

    Understanding how language networks change during childhood is important for theories of cognitive development and for identifying the neural causes of language impairment. Despite this, there is currently little systematic evidence regarding the typical developmental trajectory for language from the field of neuroimaging. We reviewed functional MRI (fMRI) studies published between 1992 and 2014, and quantified the evidence for age-related changes in localisation and lateralisation of fMRI activation in the language network (excluding the cerebellum and subcortical regions). Although age-related changes differed according to task type and input modality, we identified four consistent findings concerning the typical maturation of the language system. First, activation in core semantic processing regions increases with age. Second, activation in lower-level sensory and motor regions increases with age as activation in higher-level control regions reduces. We suggest that this reflects increased automaticity of language processing as children become more proficient. Third, the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus (regions associated with the default mode network) show increasing attenuation across childhood and adolescence. Finally, language lateralisation is established by approximately 5years of age. Small increases in leftward lateralisation are observed in frontal regions, but these are tightly linked to performance.

  10. Robust preprocessing for stimulus-based functional MRI of the moving fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wonsang; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Zun, Zungho; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Fetal motion manifests as signal degradation and image artifact in the acquired time series of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. We present a robust preprocessing pipeline to specifically address fetal and placental motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI with slowly cycled block design in the living fetus. In the proposed pipeline, motion correction is optimized to the experimental paradigm, and it is performed separately in each phase as well as in each region of interest (ROI), recognizing that each phase and organ experiences different types of motion. To obtain the averaged BOLD signals for each ROI, both misaligned volumes and noisy voxels are automatically detected and excluded, and the missing data are then imputed by statistical estimation based on local polynomial smoothing. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline was effective in mitigating the motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI data of the fetal brain and placenta.

  11. Puzzlingly High Correlations in fMRI Studies of Emotion, Personality, and Social Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vul, Edward; Harris, Christine; Winkielman, Piotr; Pashler, Harold

    2009-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) studies of emotion, personality, and social cognition have drawn much attention in recent years, with high-profile studies frequently reporting extremely high (e.g., > 8) correlations between behavioral and self-report measures of personality or emotion and measures of brain activation. We show that…