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Sample records for functional mri detection

  1. Improved detection of event-related functional MRI signals using probability functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, G E; Zito, G; Patria, F; Sanes, J N

    2001-11-01

    Selecting an optimal event distribution for experimental use in event-related fMRI studies can require the generation of large numbers of event sequences with characteristics hard to control. The use of known probability distributions offers the possibility to control event timing and constrain the search space for finding optimal event sequences. We investigated different probability distributions in terms of response estimation (estimation efficiency), detectability (detection power, parameter estimation efficiency, sensitivity to true positives), and false-positive activation. Numerous simulated event sequences were generated selecting interevent intervals (IEI) from the uniform, uniform permuted, Latin square, exponential, binomial, Poisson, chi(2), geometric, and bimodal probability distributions and fixed IEI. Event sequences from the bimodal distribution, like block designs, had the best performance for detection and the poorest for estimation, while high estimation and detectability occurred for the long-decay exponential distribution. The uniform distribution also yielded high estimation efficiency, but probability functions with a long tail toward higher IEI, such as the geometric and the chi(2) distributions, had superior detectability. The distributions with the best detection performance also had a relatively high incidence of false positives, in contrast to the ordered distributions (Latin square and uniform permuted). The predictions of improved sensitivities for distributions with long tails were confirmed with empirical data. Moreover, the Latin square design yielded detection of activated voxels similar to the chi(2) distribution. These results indicate that high detection and suitable behavioral designs have compatibility for application of functional MRI methods to experiments requiring complex designs.

  2. Functional and structural MRI biomarkers to detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Ronneberger, Olaf; Wolf, Robert Christian; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Saft, Carsten; Klöppel, Stefan

    2013-02-01

    The availability of an accurate genetic test to identify Huntington's Disease (HD) in the pre-symptomatic stage makes HD an important model to develop biomarkers for other neurodegenerative diseases, such as pre-clinical Alzheimer's Disease. We reasoned that functional changes, measured by functional MRI (fMRI), would precede gray matter changes and that performing a task specifically affected by the disease would carry the clearest signature. Separate cohorts of HD gene mutations carriers and controls performed four different fMRI tasks, probing functions either primarly affected by the disease (i.e. motor control), higher cognitive functions (i.e. working memory and irritability), or basic sensory functions (i.e. auditory system). With the aim to compare fMRI and structural MRI biomarkers, all subjects underwent an additional high-resolution T1-weighted MRI. Best classification performance was achived from fMRI-based activations with motor sequence tapping and task-induced irritation. Classification performance based on gray matter probability maps was also significantly above chance and similar to that of fMRI. Both were sufficiently informative to separate gene mutation carriers that were on average 17 years before predicted disease onset from controls with up to 80% accuracy. Further analyses showed that classification accuracy was best in regions of interest with low within-group heterogeneity in relation to disease specific changes. Our study indicates that structural and some functional markers can accurately detect pre-clinical neurodegeneration. However, the lower variability and easier processing of the strucutral MRI data make latter the more useful tool for disease detection in a clinical setting.

  3. A SVM-based quantitative fMRI method for resting-state functional network detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-09-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to measure baseline neuronal connectivity independent of specific functional tasks and to capture changes in the connectivity due to neurological diseases. Most existing network detection methods rely on a fixed threshold to identify functionally connected voxels under the resting state. Due to fMRI non-stationarity, the threshold cannot adapt to variation of data characteristics across sessions and subjects, and generates unreliable mapping results. In this study, a new method is presented for resting-state fMRI data analysis. Specifically, the resting-state network mapping is formulated as an outlier detection process that is implemented using one-class support vector machine (SVM). The results are refined by using a spatial-feature domain prototype selection method and two-class SVM reclassification. The final decision on each voxel is made by comparing its probabilities of functionally connected and unconnected instead of a threshold. Multiple features for resting-state analysis were extracted and examined using an SVM-based feature selection method, and the most representative features were identified. The proposed method was evaluated using synthetic and experimental fMRI data. A comparison study was also performed with independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation analysis. The experimental results show that the proposed method can provide comparable or better network detection performance than ICA and correlation analysis. The method is potentially applicable to various resting-state quantitative fMRI studies.

  4. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    epilepsy patients as well as tumor and intravenous malformation patients who were placed under consideration to undergo pediatric brain surgery at...dissemination activities— journal articles, abstracts, and presentations—have friends or family who suffer from pediatric brain disorders; these...Page | 2 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0464 TITLE: Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

  5. Model-free functional MRI analysis for detecting low-frequency functional connectivity in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wismueller, Axel; Lange, Oliver; Auer, Dorothee; Leinsinger, Gerda

    2010-03-01

    Slowly varying temporally correlated activity fluctuations between functionally related brain areas have been identified by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) research in recent years. These low-frequency oscillations of less than 0.08 Hz appear to play a major role in various dynamic functional brain networks, such as the so-called 'default mode' network. They also have been observed as a property of symmetric cortices, and they are known to be present in the motor cortex among others. These low-frequency data are difficult to detect and quantify in fMRI. Traditionally, user-based regions of interests (ROI) or 'seed clusters' have been the primary analysis method. In this paper, we propose unsupervised clustering algorithms based on various distance measures to detect functional connectivity in resting state fMRI. The achieved results are evaluated quantitatively for different distance measures. The Euclidian metric implemented by standard unsupervised clustering approaches is compared with a non-metric topographic mapping of proximities based on the the mutual prediction error between pixel-specific signal dynamics time-series. It is shown that functional connectivity in the motor cortex of the human brain can be detected based on such model-free analysis methods for resting state fMRI.

  6. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    surgical site. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Functional brain mapping using fMRI, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS...Fluency, for verbal fluency; DKEFS Trails, for visual motor-sequencing; and a Grooved Pegboard task to assess manipulation dexterity. Results for...epilepsy patients at our institution. We have explored fMRI for improving epilepsy surgical planning in pediatric patients. To that end we acquired

  7. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cribben, Ivor; Wager, Tor D; Lindquist, Martin A

    2013-01-01

    Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR) is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within) subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR) data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n = 23) of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  8. Detection versus location judgments in a hidden pattern task: functional MRI and behavioral correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolster, R Bruce; D'Arcy, Ryan C N; Song, Xiaowei; Runke, Dwayne S; Ryner, Lawrence

    2011-08-01

    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to assess cortical involvement in a hidden pattern task. The experimental and control conditions involved judgment of the presence/absence versus the position of a complex pattern. Activation specific to hidden pattern identification was concentrated on frontal, dorsal parietal, and mesolimbic cortex. This was consistent not only across individual subjects, but with hidden figures tasks used in previous fMRI investigations. Results suggest that pattern identification relies on a relatively stable neural network controlling selective attention. In combination with fMRI, hidden pattern tasks may be useful in neuropsychological assessment of visual search and object identification.

  9. Detecting functional connectivity change points for single-subject fMRI data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivor eCribben

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies there has been an increased interest in understanding the dynamic manner in which brain regions communicate with one another, as subjects perform a set of experimental tasks or as their psychological state changes. Dynamic Connectivity Regression (DCR is a data-driven technique used for detecting temporal change points in functional connectivity between brain regions where the number and location of the change points are unknown a priori. After finding the change points, DCR estimates a graph or set of relationships between the brain regions for data that falls between pairs of change points. In previous work, the method was predominantly validated using multi-subject data. In this paper, we concentrate on single-subject data and introduce a new DCR algorithm. The new algorithm increases accuracy for individual subject data with a small number of observations and reduces the number of false positives in the estimated undirected graphs. We also introduce a new Likelihood Ratio test for comparing sparse graphs across (or within subjects; thus allowing us to determine whether data should be combined across subjects. We perform an extensive simulation analysis on vector autoregression (VAR data as well as to an fMRI data set from a study (n=23 of a state anxiety induction using a socially evaluative threat challenge. The focus on single-subject data allows us to study the variation between individuals and may provide us with a deeper knowledge of the workings of the brain.

  10. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andronache, Adrian; Rosazza, Cristina; Sattin, Davide; Leonardi, Matilde; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Minati, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC), where integrity of default-mode network (DMN) activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the rs-fMRI signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering (BPF), removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA) and seed-based analysis (SBA) were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  11. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter?A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Reanna Gawryluk

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: 1 the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and 2 fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter. Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI.

  12. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems....... Minimizing image noise and maximizing system stability is critical in fMRI because the blood oxygenation level- dependent (BOLD) signal changes that are used for most fMRI studies represent only a small fraction of the total MR signal. In addition, multiple imaging volumes must be acquired over time to track...... cognitive processes. As a result, MRI scanners must have excellent time-series stability to accurately measure BOLD signal changes over the course of a long time series (typically on the order of 10 min per scan). fMRI studies are particularly demanding on the scanner hardware because they utilize fast...

  13. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eAndronache

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC, where integrity of default-mode network (DMN activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering, removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA and seed-based analysis (SBA were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  14. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    determination of language dominance in screening for epilepsy surgery: the Wada test and newer noninvasive alternatives. Epilepsia . 2007 Mar;48(3...Hammeke TA, Sabsevitz DS. A comparison of five fMRI protocols for mapping speech comprehension systems. Epilepsia . 2008 Dec;49(12):1980-97. doi: 10.1111

  15. Application of functional MRI in epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ai-hong; LI Kun-cheng; PIAO Chang-fu; LI Hong-li

    2005-01-01

    Objective To review the recent development of functional MRI application in epilepsy. Data sources Both Chinese and English language literatures were researched using MEDLINE/ CD ROM (1996-2005) and the Chinese Biomedical Literature Disk (1996-2005). Study selection Published articles about functional MRI application and epilepsy were selected.Data extraction Data were mainly extracted from 38 articles which are listed in the reference section of this review.Results fMRI can be used to localize seizure foci through detecting these cerebral hemodynamic changes produced by epileptiform discharges. EEG-triggered fMRI, which has higher spatial and temporal resolution, helps to detect the spatiotemporal pattern of spike origin and propagation, and define localization of the epileptogenic focus. fMRI is also useful in language and memory cognitive function assessment and presurgical assessment of refractory epilepsy. Atypically distributed cognitive function areas can be detected by fMRI, because of cortical language and memory areas reorganization during long-term epileptic activity in patients with epilepsy. Conclusions fMRI technique plays a very important role in cognitive function and presurgical assessment of patients with epilepsy. It is meaningful for understanding pathogenesis of epilepsy.

  16. Automated detection of arterial input function in DSC perfusion MRI in a stroke rat model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, M.-Y.; Lee, T.-H.; Yang, S.-T.; Kuo, H.-H.; Chyi, T.-K.; Liu, H.-L.

    2009-05-01

    Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimation requires deconvolution of the tissue concentration time curves with an arterial input function (AIF). However, image-based determination of AIF in rodent is challenged due to limited spatial resolution. We evaluated the feasibility of quantitative analysis using automated AIF detection and compared the results with commonly applied semi-quantitative analysis. Permanent occlusion of bilateral or unilateral common carotid artery was used to induce cerebral ischemia in rats. The image using dynamic susceptibility contrast method was performed on a 3-T magnetic resonance scanner with a spin-echo echo-planar-image sequence (TR/TE = 700/80 ms, FOV = 41 mm, matrix = 64, 3 slices, SW = 2 mm), starting from 7 s prior to contrast injection (1.2 ml/kg) at four different time points. For quantitative analysis, CBF was calculated by the AIF which was obtained from 10 voxels with greatest contrast enhancement after deconvolution. For semi-quantitative analysis, relative CBF was estimated by the integral divided by the first moment of the relaxivity time curves. We observed if the AIFs obtained in the three different ROIs (whole brain, hemisphere without lesion and hemisphere with lesion) were similar, the CBF ratios (lesion/normal) between quantitative and semi-quantitative analyses might have a similar trend at different operative time points. If the AIFs were different, the CBF ratios might be different. We concluded that using local maximum one can define proper AIF without knowing the anatomical location of arteries in a stroke rat model.

  17. Long-term functional outcome after stroke: the impact of MRI-detected lesion characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiemanck, S.K.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to gain a better understanding of the relationship between ischemic lesion characteristics and long-term functional outcome of stroke survivors. The relationship between volume and localization of the ischemic cerebral lesion and the long-term functional outcome of

  18. Clinical functional MRI. Presurgical functional neuroimaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, C. (ed.) [Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Div. of Neuroradiology

    2007-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) permits noninvasive imaging of the ''human brain at work'' under physiological conditions. This is the first textbook on clinical fMRI. It is devoted to preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies, which are the most well-established clinical applications. By localizing and lateralizing specific brain functions, as well as epileptogenic zones, fMRI facilitates the selection of a safe treatment and the planning and performance of function-preserving neurosurgery. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of the physiological and methodological background, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, diagnostic possibilities and limitations, and other related techniques. All chapters are written by recognized experts in their fields, and the book is designed to be of value to beginners, trained clinicians and experts alike. (orig.)

  19. Distinct Neural Signatures Detected for ADHD Subtypes After Controlling for Micro-Movements in Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eFair

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been growing enthusiasm that functional MRI could achieve clinical utility for a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, several barriers remain. For example, the acquisition of large-scale datasets capable of clarifying the marked heterogeneity that exists in psychiatric illnesses will need to be realized. In addition, there continues to be a need for the development of image processing and analysis methods capable of separating signal from artifact. As a prototypical hyperkinetic disorder, and movement related artifact being a significant confound in functional imaging studies, ADHD offers a unique challenge. As part of the ADHD-200 Global Competition and this special edition of Frontiers, the ADHD-200 Consortium demonstrates the utility of an aggregate dataset pooled across five institutions in addressing these challenges. The work aimed to A examine the impact of emerging techniques for controlling for micro-movements, and B provide novel insights into the neural correlates of ADHD subtypes. Using SVM based MVPA we show that functional connectivity patterns in individuals are capable of differentiating the two most prominent ADHD subtypes. The application of graph-theory revealed that the Combined (ADHD-C and Inattentive (ADHD-I subtypes demonstrated some overlapping (particularly sensorimotor systems, but unique patterns of atypical connectivity. For ADHD-C, atypical connectivity was prominent in midline default network components, as well as insular cortex; in contrast, the ADHD-I group exhibited atypical patterns within the dlPFC regions and cerebellum. Systematic motion-related artifact was noted, and highlighted the need for stringent motion correction. Findings reported were robust to the specific motion correction strategy employed. These data suggest that rs-fcMRI data can be used to characterize individual patients with ADHD and to identify neural distinctions underlying the clinical

  20. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...... have been described. Still, to take full advantage of simultaneously recorded VEP-fMRI one would ideally want to track single-trial changes in the VEP and use this information in the fMRI analysis. In order to do this we examined 10 healthy volunteers with simultaneous VEP-fMRI. Different measures...

  1. Impaired target detection in schizophrenia and the ventral attentional network: Findings from a joint event-related potential-functional MRI analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jonathan K; Jimenez, Amy M; Roach, Brian J; Korb, Alexander; Lee, Junghee; Horan, William P; Ford, Judith M; Green, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have abnormal neural responses to salient, infrequent events. We integrated event-related potentials (ERP) and fMRI to examine the contributions of the ventral (salience) and dorsal (sustained) attention networks to this dysfunctional neural activation. Twenty-one schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls were assessed in separate sessions with ERP and fMRI during a visual oddball task. Visual P100, N100, and P300 ERP waveforms and fMRI activation were assessed. A joint independent components analysis (jICA) on the ERP and fMRI data were conducted. Patients exhibited reduced P300, but not P100 or N100, amplitudes to targets and reduced fMRI neural activation in both dorsal and ventral attentional networks compared with controls. However, the jICA revealed that the P300 was linked specifically to activation in the ventral (salience) network, including anterior cingulate, anterior insula, and temporal parietal junction, with patients exhibiting significantly lower activation. The P100 and N100 were linked to activation in the dorsal (sustained) network, with no group differences in level of activation. This joint analysis approach revealed the nature of target detection deficits that were not discernable by either imaging methodology alone, highlighting the utility of a multimodal fMRI and ERP approach to understand attentional network deficits in schizophrenia.

  2. Impaired target detection in schizophrenia and the ventral attentional network: Findings from a joint event-related potential–functional MRI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Jonathan K.; Jimenez, Amy M.; Roach, Brian J.; Korb, Alexander; Lee, Junghee; Horan, William P.; Ford, Judith M.; Green, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia patients have abnormal neural responses to salient, infrequent events. We integrated event-related potentials (ERP) and fMRI to examine the contributions of the ventral (salience) and dorsal (sustained) attention networks to this dysfunctional neural activation. Twenty-one schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls were assessed in separate sessions with ERP and fMRI during a visual oddball task. Visual P100, N100, and P300 ERP waveforms and fMRI activation were assessed. A joint independent components analysis (jICA) on the ERP and fMRI data were conducted. Patients exhibited reduced P300, but not P100 or N100, amplitudes to targets and reduced fMRI neural activation in both dorsal and ventral attentional networks compared with controls. However, the jICA revealed that the P300 was linked specifically to activation in the ventral (salience) network, including anterior cingulate, anterior insula, and temporal parietal junction, with patients exhibiting significantly lower activation. The P100 and N100 were linked to activation in the dorsal (sustained) network, with no group differences in level of activation. This joint analysis approach revealed the nature of target detection deficits that were not discernable by either imaging methodology alone, highlighting the utility of a multimodal fMRI and ERP approach to understand attentional network deficits in schizophrenia. PMID:26448909

  3. Impaired target detection in schizophrenia and the ventral attentional network: Findings from a joint event-related potential–functional MRI analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan K. Wynn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia patients have abnormal neural responses to salient, infrequent events. We integrated event-related potentials (ERP and fMRI to examine the contributions of the ventral (salience and dorsal (sustained attention networks to this dysfunctional neural activation. Twenty-one schizophrenia patients and 22 healthy controls were assessed in separate sessions with ERP and fMRI during a visual oddball task. Visual P100, N100, and P300 ERP waveforms and fMRI activation were assessed. A joint independent components analysis (jICA on the ERP and fMRI data were conducted. Patients exhibited reduced P300, but not P100 or N100, amplitudes to targets and reduced fMRI neural activation in both dorsal and ventral attentional networks compared with controls. However, the jICA revealed that the P300 was linked specifically to activation in the ventral (salience network, including anterior cingulate, anterior insula, and temporal parietal junction, with patients exhibiting significantly lower activation. The P100 and N100 were linked to activation in the dorsal (sustained network, with no group differences in level of activation. This joint analysis approach revealed the nature of target detection deficits that were not discernable by either imaging methodology alone, highlighting the utility of a multimodal fMRI and ERP approach to understand attentional network deficits in schizophrenia.

  4. Utility of functional MRI in pediatric neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilich, Emily R; Gaillard, William D

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI), a tool increasingly used to study cognitive function, is also an important tool for understanding not only normal development in healthy children, but also abnormal development, as seen in children with epilepsy, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism. Since its inception almost 15 years ago, fMRI has seen an explosion in its use and applications in the adult literature. However, only recently has it found a home in pediatric neurology. New adaptations in study design and technologic advances, especially the study of resting state functional connectivity as well as the use of passive task design in sedated children, have increased the utility of functional imaging in pediatrics to help us gain understanding into the developing brain at work. This article reviews the background of fMRI in pediatrics and highlights the most recent literature and clinical applications.

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE CASE REPORT Functional MRI in pre-surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CASE REPORT. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an MRI technique ... most promising direct clinical application is in pre-surgical planning, where fMRI is ... robust and established, although it is interesting to note that recent.

  6. Neuro-pharmacological functional MRI of epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiriyama, Hideki; Makabe, Tetsuo; Tomita, Susumu; Omoto, Takashi; Asari, Shoji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Aihara, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Ito, Takahiko

    2000-03-01

    We studied patients with epilepsy by neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam. Five normal volunteers and 7 patients with epilepsy were investigated. MRI was performed by a 1.5 T unit (SIGNA Horizon, GE) using the following parameters: TR/TE 5000 msec/80 msec, FA 90 deg, FOV 200 mm, matrix 128 x 128, slice thickness 7 mm. We performed MRI scanning over 5 minutes (2 minutes before and 3 minutes after injection of diazepam) for each 1 session; we scanned 3 sessions for each patient at intervals of 5 minutes. The diazepam was injected rapidly from the antecubital vein. The dose of diazepam was 0.05 mg/kg/injection (total dose was 0.15 mg/kg). The data were analyzed statistically using t-test. Signal change after administration of diazepam was less than 1 to 2% in healthy volunteers. By contrast, in patient with epilepsy, the signal change was almost 3%, which was significantly greater than that of the normal area (p=0.01). The neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam might be a useful method to identify epileptic foci. (author)

  7. Clinical functional MRI. Persurgical functional neuroimaging. 2. ed.

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    Stippich, Christoph (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Division of Diagnostic and Inventional Neuroradiology

    2015-06-01

    The second, revised edition of this successful textbook provides an up-to-date description of the use of preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of practical aspects, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, and diagnostic possibilities and limitations. Relevant information on brain physiology, functional neuroanatomy, imaging technique, and methodology is provided by recognized experts in these fields. Compared with the first edition, chapters have been updated to reflect the latest developments and in particular the current use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Entirely new chapters are included on resting-state presurgical fMRI and the role of DTI and tractography in brain tumor surgery. Further chapters address multimodality functional neuroimaging, brain plasticity, and pitfalls, tips, and tricks.

  8. Functional connectomics from resting-state fMRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.M.; Vidaurre, D.; Beckmann, C.F.; Jenkinson, M.; Nichols, T.E.; Robinson, E.C.; Woolrich, M.W.; Barch, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in activity in different parts of the brain can be used to study functional brain networks. We review the use of resting-state functional MRI (rfMRI) for the purpose of mapping the macroscopic functional connectome. After describing MRI acquisition and image-processing metho

  9. Imaging brain neuronal activity using functionalized magnetonanoparticles and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtari, Massoud; Bragin, Anatol; Moats, Rex; Frew, Andrew; Mandelkern, Mark

    2012-10-01

    This study explored the use of non-radioactive 2-deoxy glucose (2DG)-labeled magnetonanoparticles (MNP) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect functional activity during rest, peripheral stimulation, and epileptic seizures, in animal models. Non-radioactive 2DG was covalently attached to magnetonanoparticles composed of iron oxide and dextran and intravenous (tail) injections were performed. 2DG-MNP was injected in resting and stimulated naïve rodents and the subsequent MRI was compared to published (14)C-2DG autoradiography data. Reproducibility and statistical significance was established in one studied model. Negative contrast enhancement (NCE) in acute seizures and chronic models of epilepsy were investigated. MRI NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles was compared to that of plain (unconjugated) MNP in one animal. NCE due to 2DG-MNP particles at 3 T, which is approved for human use, was also investigated. Histology showed presence of MNP (following intravenous injection) in the brain tissues of resting naïve animal. 2DG-MNP intraparenchymal uptake was visible on MRI and histology. The locations of NCE agreed with published results of 2DG autoradiography in resting and stimulated animals and epileptic rats. Localization of epileptogenicity was confirmed by subsequent depth-electrode EEG (iEEG). Non-radioactive 2DG-MNP can cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and may accurately localize areas of increased activity. Although, this proof-of-principle study involves only a limited number of animals, and much more research and quantification are necessary to demonstrate that 2DG-MNP, or MNPs conjugated with other ligands, could eventually be used to image localized cerebral function with MRI in humans, this MNP-MRI approach is potentially applicable to the use of many bioactive molecules as ligands for imaging normal and abnormal localized cerebral functions.

  10. Evaluation of various somatosensory stimulations for functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Kazushi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Mizoi, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Takashi [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). School of Medicine; Shimizu, Hiroaki

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to test detectability of activated area using various somatosensory stimulations. The following stimulations were performed in normal volunteers: regular or irregular electrical median nerve stimulation (n=5, each), tactile stimulation to the palm and fingers (n=8), pain stimulation to the index finger (n=5) or to the palm and fingers (n=5). fMRI was acquired with a spoiled gradient echo sequence at 1.5 T. Detectability of activated area was the highest when the pain stimulation was applied to the palm and fingers (80%). A successful rate for the tactile stimulation was 25%, and the other stimulations failed to demonstrate any activation. When successful, the highest signal activation on fMRI was seen on a sulcus, which presumably arose from a vein. The sulcus was defined as the central sulcus by somatosensory evoked field using a median nerve stimulation. Our study indicates that the pain stimulation to the palm and fingers may be a choice for the sensory fMRI. (author)

  11. Multiparametric MRI in detection and staging of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    the aggressiveness and stage of the cancer. Scientific work supports the rapidly growing use of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI) as the most sensitive and specific imaging tool for detection, lesion characterisation and staging of PCa. However, the experience with mp-MRI in PCa management...... in Denmark has been very limited. Therefore, we carried out this PhD project based on three original studies to evaluate the use of mp-MRI in detection, assessment of biological aggression and staging of PCa in a Danish setup with limited experience in mp-MRI prostate diagnostics. The aim was to assess...... whether mp-MRI could 1) improve the overall detection rate of clinically significant PCa previously missed by TRUS-bx, 2) identify patients with extracapsular tumour extension and 3) categorize the histopathological aggressiveness based on diffusion-weighted imaging. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Study I included...

  12. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  13. Restriction spectrum imaging improves MRI-based prostate cancer detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammack, Kevin C.; Schenker-Ahmed, Natalie M.; White, Nathan S.; Best, Shaun R.; Marks, Robert M.; Heimbigner, Jared; Kane, Christopher J.; Parsons, J. Kellogg; Kuperman, Joshua M.; Bartsch, Hauke; Desikan, Rahul S.; Rakow-Penner, Rebecca A.; Liss, Michael A.; Margolis, Daniel J. A.; Raman, Steven S.; Shabaik, Ahmed; Dale, Anders M.; Karow, David S.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To compare the diagnostic performance of restriction spectrum imaging (RSI), with that of conventional multi-parametric (MP) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for prostate cancer (PCa) detection in a blinded reader-based format. Methods Three readers independently evaluated 100 patients (67 with proven PCa) who underwent MP-MRI and RSI within 6 months of systematic biopsy (N = 67; 23 with targeting performed) or prostatectomy (N = 33). Imaging was performed at 3 Tesla using a phased-array coil. Readers used a five-point scale estimating the likelihood of PCa present in each prostate sextant. Evaluation was performed in two separate sessions, first using conventional MP-MRI alone then immediately with MP-MRI and RSI in the same session. Four weeks later, another scoring session used RSI and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) without conventional diffusion-weighted or dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. Reader interpretations were then compared to prostatectomy data or biopsy results. Receiver operating characteristic curves were performed, with area under the curve (AUC) used to compare across groups. Results MP-MRI with RSI achieved higher AUCs compared to MP-MRI alone for identifying high-grade (Gleason score greater than or equal to 4 + 3=7) PCa (0.78 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level; P MRI for high-grade PCa (0.71 vs. 0.70 at the sextant level). With hemigland analysis, high-grade disease results were similar when comparing RSI + T2WI with MP-MRI, although with greater AUCs compared to the sextant analysis (0.80 vs. 0.79). Conclusion Including RSI with MP-MRI improves PCa detection compared to MP-MRI alone, and RSI with T2WI achieves similar PCa detection as MP-MRI. PMID:26910114

  14. Functional MRI experiments : acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, NF; Hoogduin, H; Jansma, JM

    2002-01-01

    Functional MRI is widely used to address basic and clinical neuroscience questions. In the key domains of fMRI experiments, i.e. acquisition, processing and analysis, and interpretation of data, developments are ongoing. The main issues are sensitivity for changes in fMRI signal that are associated

  15. In situ targeted MRI detection of Helicobacter pylori with stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunjie; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Ding, Ding; Zou, Yuxiu; Xu, Yiting; Wang, Xuewei; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in the aetiology of many diseases. Despite numerous studies, a painless, fast and direct method for the in situ detection of H. pylori remains a challenge, mainly due to the strong acidic/enzymatic environment of the gastric mucosa. Herein, we report the use of stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules (MGNs), for in situ targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of H. pylori. Several layers of graphene as the shell effectively protect the magnetic core from corrosion while retaining the superior contrast effect for MRI in the gastric environment. Boronic-polyethylene glycol molecules were synthesized and modified on the MGN surface for targeted MRI detection. In a mouse model of H. pylori-induced infection, H. pylori was specifically detected through both T2-weighted MR imaging and Raman gastric mucosa imaging using functionalized MGNs. These results indicated that enhancement of MRI using MGNs may be a promising diagnostic and bioimaging platform for very harsh conditions.

  16. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, J.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Payne, G.S.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T{sub 1} relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. (orig.)

  17. Bayesian estimation of the hemodynamic response function in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrelec, G.; Benali, H.; Ciuciu, P.; Poline, J.-B.

    2002-05-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is a recent, non-invasive technique allowing for the evolution of brain processes to be dynamically followed in various cognitive or behavioral tasks. In BOLD fMRI, what is actually measured is only indirectly related to neuronal activity through a process that is still under investigation. A convenient way to analyze BOLD fMRI data consists of considering the whole brain as a system characterized by a transfer response function, called the Hemodynamic Response Function (HRF). Precise and robust estimation of the HRF has not been achieved yet: parametric methods tend to be robust but require too strong constraints on the shape of the HRF, whereas non-parametric models are not reliable since the problem is badly conditioned. We therefore propose a full Bayesian, non-parametric method that makes use of basic but relevant a priori knowledge about the underlying physiological process to make robust inference about the HRF. We show that this model is very robust to decreasing signal-to-noise ratio and to the actual noise sampling distribution. We finally apply the method to real data, revealing a wide variety of HRF shapes.

  18. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F. [CEA Saclay, DSV, I2BM, Neurospin, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Le Roux, P. [GEHC, Buc (France); Dehaine-Lambertz, G. [Unite INSERM 562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  19. Clustered functional MRI of overt speech production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sörös, Peter; Sokoloff, Lisa Guttman; Bose, Arpita; McIntosh, Anthony R; Graham, Simon J; Stuss, Donald T

    2006-08-01

    To investigate the neural network of overt speech production, event-related fMRI was performed in 9 young healthy adult volunteers. A clustered image acquisition technique was chosen to minimize speech-related movement artifacts. Functional images were acquired during the production of oral movements and of speech of increasing complexity (isolated vowel as well as monosyllabic and trisyllabic utterances). This imaging technique and behavioral task enabled depiction of the articulo-phonologic network of speech production from the supplementary motor area at the cranial end to the red nucleus at the caudal end. Speaking a single vowel and performing simple oral movements involved very similar activation of the cortical and subcortical motor systems. More complex, polysyllabic utterances were associated with additional activation in the bilateral cerebellum, reflecting increased demand on speech motor control, and additional activation in the bilateral temporal cortex, reflecting the stronger involvement of phonologic processing.

  20. Multimodal functional neuroimaging: integrating functional MRI and EEG/MEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Liu, Zhongming

    2008-01-01

    Noninvasive functional neuroimaging, as an important tool for basic neuroscience research and clinical diagnosis, continues to face the need of improving the spatial and temporal resolution. While existing neuroimaging modalities might approach their limits in imaging capability mostly due to fundamental as well as technical reasons, it becomes increasingly attractive to integrate multiple complementary modalities in an attempt to significantly enhance the spatiotemporal resolution that cannot be achieved by any modality individually. Electrophysiological and hemodynamic/metabolic signals reflect distinct but closely coupled aspects of the underlying neural activity. Combining fMRI and EEG/MEG data allows us to study brain function from different perspectives. In this review, we start with an overview of the physiological origins of EEG/MEG and fMRI, as well as their fundamental biophysics and imaging principles, we proceed with a review of the major advances in the understanding and modeling of neurovascular coupling and in the methodologies for the fMRI-EEG/MEG simultaneous recording. Finally, we summarize important remaining issues and perspectives concerning multimodal functional neuroimaging, including brain connectivity imaging.

  1. To see bruxism: a functional MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Since the pathophysiology of bruxism is not clearly understood, there exists no possible treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate the cerebral activation differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism on behalf of possible aetiological factors. Methods: 12 healthy subjects and 12 patients with bruxism, a total of 24 right-handed female subjects (aged 20–27 years) were examined using functional MRI during tooth-clenching and resting tasks. Imaging was performed with 3.0-T MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil. Differences in regional brain activity between patients with bruxism and healthy subjects (control group) were observed with BrainVoyager QX 2.8 (Brain Innovation, Maastricht, Netherlands) statistical data analysis program. Activation maps were created using the general linear model: single study and multistudy multisubject for statistical group analysis. This protocol was approved by the ethics committee of medical faculty of Kirikkale University, Turkey (02/04), based on the guidelines set forth in the Declaration of Helsinki. Results: The group analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of three clusters in the control group (p < 0.005), which may indicate brain regions related with somatognosis, repetitive passive motion, proprioception and tactile perception. These areas coincide with Brodmann areas 7, 31, 39 and 40. It is conceivable that there are differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism. Conclusions: Our findings indicate that there was a decrease of cortical activation pattern in patients with bruxism in clenching tasks. This indicates decreased blood flow and activation in regional neuronal activity. Bruxism, as an oral motor disorder concerns dentistry, neurology and psychiatry. These results might improve the understanding and physiological handling of sleep bruxism. PMID:25806864

  2. Cortical language activation in aphasia:a functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐晓俊; 张敏鸣; 商德胜; 汪启东; 罗本燕; 翁旭初

    2004-01-01

    Background Functional neuroimaging has been used in neurolinguistic research on normal subjects and on patients with brain damage. This study was designed to investigate the differences of the neural basis underlying language processing between normal subjects and aphasics.Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to map the language network in 6 normal subjects and 3 patients with aphasia who were in the stage of recovery from acute stroke. The participants performed a word generation task during multi-slice functional scanning for the measurement of signal change associated with regional neural activity induced by the task. Results In normal subjects, a distributed language network was activated. Activations were present in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions. In the patient group, however, no activation was detected in the left inferior frontal gyrus whether the patient had a lesion in the left frontal lobe or not. Two patients showed activations in some right hemisphere regions where no activation appeared in normal subjects. Conclusions fMRI with word generation task is feasible for evaluating language function in aphasic patients. Remote effect of focal lesion and functional redistribution or reorganisation can be found in aphasic patients.

  3. Mapping Human Brain Function with MRI at 7 Tesla

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    @@ In the past decade, the most significant development in MRI is the introduction of fMRI, which permits the mapping of human brain function with exquisite details noninvasively. Functional mapping can be achieved by measuring changes in the blood oxygenation level (I.e. The BOLD contrast) or cerebral blood flow.

  4. When Learning and Remembering Compete: A Functional MRI Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huijbers, W.; Pennartz, C.M.A.; Cabeza, R.; Daselaar, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging evidence suggests a bottleneck between learning new information and remembering old information. In two behavioral experiments and one functional MRI (fMRI) experiment, we tested the hypothesis that learning and remembering compete when both processes happen within a b

  5. Brown adipose tissue in humans: detection and functional analysis using PET (positron emission tomography), MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), and DECT (dual energy computed tomography).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borga, Magnus; Virtanen, Kirsi A; Romu, Thobias; Leinhard, Olof Dahlqvist; Persson, Anders; Nuutila, Pirjo; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    If the beneficial effects of brown adipose tissue (BAT) on whole body metabolism, as observed in nonhuman experimental models, are to be translated to humans, tools that accurately measure how BAT influences human metabolism will be required. This chapter discusses such techniques, how they can be used, what they can measure and also some of their limitations. The focus is on detection and functional analysis of human BAT and how this can be facilitated by applying advanced imaging technology such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and dual energy computed tomography. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional MRI of Language Processing and Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ My thesis describe the utility of implementing fMRI to investigate how the language system is reorganized in brain damaged patients. Specifically for aphasia research fMRI allows to show how specific language treatment methods have the potential to enhance language

  7. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  8. Detection of scale-freeness in brain connectivity by functional MRI: signal processing aspects and implementation of an open hardware co-processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Ludovico; Nigri, Anna; Cercignani, Mara; Chan, Dennis

    2013-10-01

    An outstanding issue in graph-theoretical studies of brain functional connectivity is the lack of formal criteria for choosing parcellation granularity and correlation threshold. Here, we propose detectability of scale-freeness as a benchmark to evaluate time-series extraction settings. Scale-freeness, i.e., power-law distribution of node connections, is a fundamental topological property that is highly conserved across biological networks, and as such needs to be manifest within plausible reconstructions of brain connectivity. We demonstrate that scale-free network topology only emerges when adequately fine cortical parcellations are adopted alongside an appropriate correlation threshold, and provide the full design of the first open-source hardware platform to accelerate the calculation of large linear regression arrays.

  9. Magnetic Resonance, Functional (fMRI) -- Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... their nature and the strength of the MRI magnet. Many implanted devices will have a pamphlet explaining ... large cylinder-shaped tube surrounded by a circular magnet. You will lie on a moveable examination table ...

  10. Neural Basis of Tics: A Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Event-related functional MRI (fMRI was used to study the neural basis of spontaneous motor and vocal tics in 10 patients with Tourette syndrome, at the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Bethesda, MD.

  11. Directly detected (55)Mn MRI: application to phantoms for human hyperpolarized (13)C MRI development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Morze, Cornelius; Carvajal, Lucas; Reed, Galen D; Swisher, Christine Leon; Tropp, James; Vigneron, Daniel B

    2014-12-01

    In this work we demonstrate for the first time directly detected manganese-55 ((55)Mn) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a clinical 3T MRI scanner designed for human hyperpolarized (13)C clinical studies with no additional hardware modifications. Due to the similar frequency of the (55)Mn and (13)C resonances, the use of aqueous permanganate for large, signal-dense, and cost-effective "(13)C" MRI phantoms was investigated, addressing the clear need for new phantoms for these studies. Due to 100% natural abundance, higher intrinsic sensitivity, and favorable relaxation properties, (55)Mn MRI of aqueous permanganate demonstrates dramatically increased sensitivity over typical (13)C phantom MRI, at greatly reduced cost as compared with large (13)C-enriched phantoms. A large sensitivity advantage (22-fold) was demonstrated. A cylindrical phantom (d=8 cm) containing concentrated aqueous sodium permanganate (2.7 M) was scanned rapidly by (55)Mn MRI in a human head coil tuned for (13)C, using a balanced steady state free precession acquisition. The requisite penetration of radiofrequency magnetic fields into concentrated permanganate was investigated by experiments and high frequency electromagnetic simulations, and found to be sufficient for (55)Mn MRI with reasonably sized phantoms. A sub-second slice-selective acquisition yielded mean image signal-to-noise ratio of ~60 at 0.5 cm(3) spatial resolution, distributed with minimum central signal ~40% of the maximum edge signal. We anticipate that permanganate phantoms will be very useful for testing HP (13)C coils and methods designed for human studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. White matter injury detection in neonatal MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Irene; Hajari, Nasim; Firouzmanesh, Amirhossein; Shen, Rui; Miller, Steven; Poskitt, Ken; Basu, Anup

    2013-02-01

    Early detection of white matter injury in premature newborns can facilitate timely clinical treatments reducing the potential risk of later developmental deficits. It was reported that there were more than 5% premature newborns in British Columbia, Canada, among which 5-10% exhibited major motor deficits and 25-50% exhibited significant developmental and visual deficits. With the advancement of computer assisted detection systems, it is possible to automatically identify white matter injuries, which are found inside the grey matter region of the brain. Atlas registration has been suggested in the literature to distinguish grey matter from the soft tissues inside the skull. However, our subjects are premature newborns delivered at 24 to 32 weeks of gestation. During this period, the grey matter undergoes rapid changes and differs significantly from one to another. Besides, not all detected white spots represent injuries. Additional neighborhood information and expert input are required for verification. In this paper, we propose a white matter feature identification system for premature newborns, which is composed of several steps: (1) Candidate white matter segmentation; (2) Feature extraction from candidates; (3) Validation with data obtained at a later stage on the children; and (4) Feature confirmation for automated detection. The main challenge of this work lies in segmenting white matter injuries from noisy and low resolution data. Our approach integrates image fusion and contrast enhancement together with a fuzzy segmentation technique to achieve promising results. Other applications, such as brain tumor and intra-ventricular haemorrhage detection can also benefit from our approach.

  13. Computer-aided Detection of Prostate Cancer with MRI: Technology and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lizhi; Tian, Zhiqiang; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Fei, Baowei

    2016-08-01

    One in six men will develop prostate cancer in his lifetime. Early detection and accurate diagnosis of the disease can improve cancer survival and reduce treatment costs. Recently, imaging of prostate cancer has greatly advanced since the introduction of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mp-MRI). Mp-MRI consists of T2-weighted sequences combined with functional sequences including dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging. Because of the big data and variations in imaging sequences, detection can be affected by multiple factors such as observer variability and visibility and complexity of the lesions. To improve quantitative assessment of the disease, various computer-aided detection systems have been designed to help radiologists in their clinical practice. This review paper presents an overview of literatures on computer-aided detection of prostate cancer with mp-MRI, which include the technology and its applications. The aim of the survey is threefold: an introduction for those new to the field, an overview for those working in the field, and a reference for those searching for literature on a specific application.

  14. Sparse representation of whole-brain fMRI signals for identification of functional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jinglei; Jiang, Xi; Li, Xiang; Zhu, Dajiang; Chen, Hanbo; Zhang, Tuo; Zhang, Shu; Hu, Xintao; Han, Junwei; Huang, Heng; Zhang, Jing; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2015-02-01

    There have been several recent studies that used sparse representation for fMRI signal analysis and activation detection based on the assumption that each voxel's fMRI signal is linearly composed of sparse components. Previous studies have employed sparse coding to model functional networks in various modalities and scales. These prior contributions inspired the exploration of whether/how sparse representation can be used to identify functional networks in a voxel-wise way and on the whole brain scale. This paper presents a novel, alternative methodology of identifying multiple functional networks via sparse representation of whole-brain task-based fMRI signals. Our basic idea is that all fMRI signals within the whole brain of one subject are aggregated into a big data matrix, which is then factorized into an over-complete dictionary basis matrix and a reference weight matrix via an effective online dictionary learning algorithm. Our extensive experimental results have shown that this novel methodology can uncover multiple functional networks that can be well characterized and interpreted in spatial, temporal and frequency domains based on current brain science knowledge. Importantly, these well-characterized functional network components are quite reproducible in different brains. In general, our methods offer a novel, effective and unified solution to multiple fMRI data analysis tasks including activation detection, de-activation detection, and functional network identification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of brain metastases from lung cancer by CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tetsu; Ohno, Yoshiharu [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Endo, Masahiro [and others

    1996-08-01

    To compare the detectability of brain metastases from lung cancer, both CT and MRI were performed on all patients. Thirty-two lung cancer patients with brain metastases admitted from December 1990 to June 1994 were examined by CT and MRI using contrast enhancement. Six radiologists individually evaluated CT and MRI films for brain metastases. In 3 of 32 cases, multiple small metastatic lesions which could not be detected on CT were detected on MRI. In 29 of the 32 cases, 56 metastatic lesions were detected on CT, whereas 103 lesions were detected on MRI. There were no lesions that were detected only by CT and were not detected by MRI. MRI was superior to CT for determining small lesions less than 9 mm and inferior tentorial lesions. As a result, we consider that CT is not sufficiently effective for detecting brain metastases of lung cancer, and that MRI is now indispensable. (author)

  17. Language networks in children: Evidence from functional MRI studies

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We review functional MRI and other neuroimaging studies of language skills in children from infancy to adulthood. These studies show developmental changes in the networks of brain regions supporting language, which can be affected by brain injuries or neurological disorders. Particular aspects of language rely on networks that lateralize to the dominant hemisphere; others rely on bilateral or non-dominant mechanisms. Multiple fMRI tasks for pediatric patients characterize functional brain reo...

  18. TWave: high-order analysis of functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnathan, Michael; Megalooikonomou, Vasileios; Faloutsos, Christos; Faro, Scott; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2011-09-15

    The traditional approach to functional image analysis models images as matrices of raw voxel intensity values. Although such a representation is widely utilized and heavily entrenched both within neuroimaging and in the wider data mining community, the strong interactions among space, time, and categorical modes such as subject and experimental task inherent in functional imaging yield a dataset with "high-order" structure, which matrix models are incapable of exploiting. Reasoning across all of these modes of data concurrently requires a high-order model capable of representing relationships between all modes of the data in tandem. We thus propose to model functional MRI data using tensors, which are high-order generalizations of matrices equivalent to multidimensional arrays or data cubes. However, several unique challenges exist in the high-order analysis of functional medical data: naïve tensor models are incapable of exploiting spatiotemporal locality patterns, standard tensor analysis techniques exhibit poor efficiency, and mixtures of numeric and categorical modes of data are very often present in neuroimaging experiments. Formulating the problem of image clustering as a form of Latent Semantic Analysis and using the WaveCluster algorithm as a baseline, we propose a comprehensive hybrid tensor and wavelet framework for clustering, concept discovery, and compression of functional medical images which successfully addresses these challenges. Our approach reduced runtime and dataset size on a 9.3GB finger opposition motor task fMRI dataset by up to 98% while exhibiting improved spatiotemporal coherence relative to standard tensor, wavelet, and voxel-based approaches. Our clustering technique was capable of automatically differentiating between the frontal areas of the brain responsible for task-related habituation and the motor regions responsible for executing the motor task, in contrast to a widely used fMRI analysis program, SPM, which only detected the

  19. Functional Connectivity in MRI Is Driven by Spontaneous BOLD Events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W Allan

    Full Text Available Functional brain signals are frequently decomposed into a relatively small set of large scale, distributed cortical networks that are associated with different cognitive functions. It is generally assumed that the connectivity of these networks is static in time and constant over the whole network, although there is increasing evidence that this view is too simplistic. This work proposes novel techniques to investigate the contribution of spontaneous BOLD events to the temporal dynamics of functional connectivity as assessed by ultra-high field functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. The results show that: 1 spontaneous events in recognised brain networks contribute significantly to network connectivity estimates; 2 these spontaneous events do not necessarily involve whole networks or nodes, but clusters of voxels which act in concert, forming transiently synchronising sub-networks and 3 a task can significantly alter the number of localised spontaneous events that are detected within a single network. These findings support the notion that spontaneous events are the main driver of the large scale networks that are commonly detected by seed-based correlation and ICA. Furthermore, we found that large scale networks are manifestations of smaller, transiently synchronising sub-networks acting dynamically in concert, corresponding to spontaneous events, and which do not necessarily involve all voxels within the network nodes oscillating in unison.

  20. GPU accelerated dynamic functional connectivity analysis for functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Devrim; Sakoğlu, Ünal; Esquivel, Johnny; Adinoff, Bryon; Mete, Mutlu

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in multi-core processors and graphics card based computational technologies have paved the way for an improved and dynamic utilization of parallel computing techniques. Numerous applications have been implemented for the acceleration of computationally-intensive problems in various computational science fields including bioinformatics, in which big data problems are prevalent. In neuroimaging, dynamic functional connectivity (DFC) analysis is a computationally demanding method used to investigate dynamic functional interactions among different brain regions or networks identified with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. In this study, we implemented and analyzed a parallel DFC algorithm based on thread-based and block-based approaches. The thread-based approach was designed to parallelize DFC computations and was implemented in both Open Multi-Processing (OpenMP) and Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) programming platforms. Another approach developed in this study to better utilize CUDA architecture is the block-based approach, where parallelization involves smaller parts of fMRI time-courses obtained by sliding-windows. Experimental results showed that the proposed parallel design solutions enabled by the GPUs significantly reduce the computation time for DFC analysis. Multicore implementation using OpenMP on 8-core processor provides up to 7.7× speed-up. GPU implementation using CUDA yielded substantial accelerations ranging from 18.5× to 157× speed-up once thread-based and block-based approaches were combined in the analysis. Proposed parallel programming solutions showed that multi-core processor and CUDA-supported GPU implementations accelerated the DFC analyses significantly. Developed algorithms make the DFC analyses more practical for multi-subject studies with more dynamic analyses.

  1. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  2. Detection of early subclinical lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis by lung ventilation imaging with hyperpolarised gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Horsley, Alex; Taylor, Chris J; Smith, Laurie; Hughes, David; Horn, Felix C; Swift, Andrew J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Hughes, Paul J; Norquay, Graham; Stewart, Neil J; Collier, Guilhem J; Teare, Dawn; Cunningham, Steve; Aldag, Ina; Wild, Jim M

    2017-08-01

    Hyperpolarised (3)He ventilation-MRI, anatomical lung MRI, lung clearance index (LCI), low-dose CT and spirometry were performed on 19 children (6-16 years) with clinically stable mild cystic fibrosis (CF) (FEV1>-1.96), and 10 controls. All controls had normal spirometry, MRI and LCI. Ventilation-MRI was the most sensitive method of detecting abnormalities, present in 89% of patients with CF, compared with CT abnormalities in 68%, LCI 47% and conventional MRI 22%. Ventilation defects were present in the absence of CT abnormalities and in patients with normal physiology, including LCI. Ventilation-MRI is thus feasible in young children, highly sensitive and provides additional information about lung structure-function relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Functional MRI of swallowing: from neurophysiology to neuroplasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malandraki, Georgia A; Johnson, Sterling; Robbins, Joanne

    2011-10-01

    Swallowing is a complex neurogenic sensorimotor process involving all levels of the neuraxis and a vast number of muscles and anatomic structures. Disruption of any of these anatomic or functional components can lead to swallowing disorders (also known as dysphagia). Understanding the neural pathways that govern swallowing is necessary in diagnosing and treating patients with dysphagia. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a prevalent and effective neuroimaging method that has been used to study the complex neurophysiologic control of swallowing in vivo. This article presents a summary of the research studies that have used fMRI to study the neural control of swallowing in normal subjects and dysphagic patients, and to investigate the effects of swallowing treatments on neuroplasticity. Methodologic challenges and caveats are discussed, and a case study of a pre-posttreatment paradigm is presented to highlight potential future directions of fMRI applications in swallowing research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Detection of colorectal liver metastases: a prospective multicenter trial comparing unenhanced MRI, MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, and spiral CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolozzi, Carlo; Donati, Francescamaria; Cioni, Dania; Lencioni, Riccardo [Department of Radiology, University of Pisa, Via Roma 67, 56100, Pisa (Italy); Procacci, Carlo; Morana, Giovanni [Department of Radiology, University of Verona, Piazzale L.A. Scuro 1, 37134, Verona (Italy); Chiesa, Antonio; Grazioli, Luigi [Department of Radiology, University of Brescia, Piazzale Spedali Civili 1, 25023, Brescia (Italy); Cittadini, Giorgio; Cittadini, Giuseppe [Department of Radiology, University of Genova, Largo R. Benzi 10, 16132, Genova (Italy); Giovagnoni, Andrea [Department of Radiology, University of Ancona, Concam, Torrette, 60020, Ancona (Italy); Gandini, Giovanni; Maass, Jochen [Department of Radiology, University of Torino, Genova 3, 10110, Torino (Italy)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare unenhanced MRI, MnDPDP-enhanced MRI, and spiral CT in the detection of hepatic colorectal metastases. Forty-four patients with hepatic colorectal metastases were examined with unenhanced and MnDPDP-enhanced MRI and with unenhanced and contrast-enhanced spiral CT. The MR examination protocol included baseline T1-weighted spin-echo (SE), T1-weighted gradient-recalled-echo (GRE), and T2-weighted fast-SE sequences; and T1-weighted SE and T1-weighted GRE sequences obtained 30-60 min after administration of 0.5 {mu}mol/kg (0.5 ml/kg) mangafodipir trisodium (MnDPDP). Images were interpreted by three blinded readers. Findings at CT and MRI were compared with those at intraoperative US, which were used as term of reference. Intraoperative US detected 128 metastases. In a lesion-by-lesion analysis, the overall detection rate was 71% (91 of 128) for spiral CT, 72% (92 of 128) for unenhanced MRI, and 90% (115 of 128) for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI. MnDPDP-enhanced MRI was more sensitive than either unenhanced MRI (p<0.0001) or spiral CT (p=0.0007). In a patient-by-patient analysis, agreement with gold standard was higher for MnDPDP-enhanced MRI (33 of 44 cases) than for spiral CT (22 of 44 cases, p=0.0023) and unenhanced MRI (21 of 44 cases, p=0.0013). MnDPDP-enhanced MRI is superior to unenhanced MRI and spiral CT in the detection of hepatic colorectal metastases. (orig.)

  5. Functional topography of the corpus callosum investigated by DTI and f MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mara; Fabri; Chiara; Pierpaoli; Paolo; Barbaresi; Gabriele; Polonara

    2014-01-01

    This short review examines the most recent functional studies of the topographic organization of the human corpus callosum, the main interhemispheric commissure. After a brief description of its anatomy, development, microstructure, and function, it examines and discusses the latest findings obtained using diffusion tensor imaging(DTI) and tractography(DTT) and functional magnetic resonance imaging(f MRI), three recently developed imaging techniques that have significantly expanded and refined our knowledge of the commissure. While DTI and DTT have been providing insights into its microstructure, integrity and level of myelination, f MRI has been the key technique in documenting the activation of white matter fibers, particularly in the corpus callosum. By combining DTT and f MRI it has been possible to describe the trajectory of the callosal fibers interconnecting the primary olfactory, gustatory, motor, somatic sensory, auditory and visual cortices at sites where the activation elicited by peripheral stimulation was detected by fMRI. These studies have demonstrated the presence of callosal fiber tracts that cross the commissure at the level of the genu, body, and splenium, at sites showing f MRI activation. Altogether such findings lend further support to the notion that the corpus callosum displays a functional topographic organization that can be explored with f MRI.

  6. Automatic probe artifact detection in MRI-guided cryoablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2013-03-01

    Probe or needle artifact detection in 3D scans gives an approximate location for the tools inserted, and is thus crucial in assisting many image-guided procedures. Conventional needle localization algorithms often start with cropped images, where unwanted parts of raw scans are cropped either manually or by applying pre-defined masks. In cryoablation, however, the number of probes used, the placement and direction of probe insertion, and the portions of abdomen scanned differs significantly from case to case, and probes are often constantly being adjusted during the Probe Placement Phase. These features greatly reduce the practicality of approaches based on image cropping. In this work, we present a fully Automatic Probe Artifact Detection method, APAD, that works directly on uncropped raw MRI images, taken during the Probe Placement Phase in 3Tesla MRI-guided cryoablation. The key idea of our method is to first locate an initial 2D line strip within a slice of the MR image which approximates the position and direction of the 3D probes bundle, noting that cryoprobes or biopsy needles create a signal void (black) artifact in MRI with a bright cylindrical border. With the initial 2D line, standard approaches to detect line structures such as the 3D Hough Transform can be applied to quickly detect each probe's axis. By comparing with manually labeled probes, the analysis of 5 patient treatment cases of kidney cryoablation with varying probe placements demonstrates that our algorithm combined with standard 3D line detection is an accurate and robust method to detect probe artifacts.

  7. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  8. Visual field changes as an early indicator of glioblastoma multiforme progression: two cases of functional vision changes before MRI detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie K

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Kate Xie,1,* Catherine Y Liu,1,* Anton N Hasso,2 Robert Wade Crow1 1Department of Ophthalmology, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, USA, 2Department of Radiological Sciences, University of California Irvine Medical Center, Orange, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme is an aggressive tumor associated with a high rate of recurrence even after maximal therapy. In a disease with poor prognosis and rapid deterioration, early detection of tumor progression is necessary to make timely treatment decisions or to initiate end of life care. We identify two cases where Humphrey visual field testing predated magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission tomography findings of tumor progression by months in glioblastoma multiforme. New or worsening visual field defects may indicate signs of tumor progression in glioblastoma multiforme and should prompt further investigation. Keywords: glioblastoma multiforme, optic pathway, visual field defects

  9. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  10. Automated detection of periventricular veins on 7 T brain MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijf, Hugo J.; Bouvy, Willem H.; Zwanenburg, Jaco J. M.; Viergever, Max A.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Vincken, Koen L.

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease is common in elderly persons and a leading cause of cognitive decline, dementia, and acute stroke. With the introduction of ultra-high field strength 7.0T MRI, it is possible to visualize small vessels in the brain. In this work, a proof-of-principle study is conducted to assess the feasibility of automatically detecting periventricular veins. Periventricular veins are organized in a fan-pattern and drain venous blood from the brain towards the caudate vein of Schlesinger, which is situated along the lateral ventricles. Just outside this vein, a region-of- interest (ROI) through which all periventricular veins must cross is defined. Within this ROI, a combination of the vesselness filter, tubular tracking, and hysteresis thresholding is applied to locate periventricular veins. All detected locations were evaluated by an expert human observer. The results showed a positive predictive value of 88% and a sensitivity of 95% for detecting periventricular veins. The proposed method shows good results in detecting periventricular veins in the brain on 7.0T MR images. Compared to previous works, that only use a 1D or 2D ROI and limited image processing, our work presents a more comprehensive definition of the ROI, advanced image processing techniques to detect periventricular veins, and a quantitative analysis of the performance. The results of this proof-of-principle study are promising and will be used to assess periventricular veins on 7.0T brain MRI.

  11. Local vascular CO2 reactivity in the infant brain assessed by functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P.B.; Leth, H; Lou, H.C.

    1995-01-01

    hyperventilated voluntarily, the vascular reactivity was homogeneously distributed predominantly over the grey matter. The experiments demonstrate that local impairment of vascular CO2 reactivity in the distressed infant brain can be detected by T2 sensitive gradient-echo MRI, which is also known as functional...

  12. Functional MRI in awake unrestrained dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Berns

    Full Text Available Because of dogs' prolonged evolution with humans, many of the canine cognitive skills are thought to represent a selection of traits that make dogs particularly sensitive to human cues. But how does the dog mind actually work? To develop a methodology to answer this question, we trained two dogs to remain motionless for the duration required to collect quality fMRI images by using positive reinforcement without sedation or physical restraints. The task was designed to determine which brain circuits differentially respond to human hand signals denoting the presence or absence of a food reward. Head motion within trials was less than 1 mm. Consistent with prior reinforcement learning literature, we observed caudate activation in both dogs in response to the hand signal denoting reward versus no-reward.

  13. Structural and functional correlates of visual field asymmetry in the human brain by diffusion kurtosis MRI and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Caitlin; Ho, Leon C; Murphy, Matthew C; Conner, Ian P; Wollstein, Gadi; Cham, Rakie; Chan, Kevin C

    2016-11-09

    Human visual performance has been observed to show superiority in localized regions of the visual field across many classes of stimuli. However, the underlying neural mechanisms remain unclear. This study aims to determine whether the visual information processing in the human brain is dependent on the location of stimuli in the visual field and the corresponding neuroarchitecture using blood-oxygenation-level-dependent functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion kurtosis MRI, respectively, in 15 healthy individuals at 3 T. In fMRI, visual stimulation to the lower hemifield showed stronger brain responses and larger brain activation volumes than the upper hemifield, indicative of the differential sensitivity of the human brain across the visual field. In diffusion kurtosis MRI, the brain regions mapping to the lower visual field showed higher mean kurtosis, but not fractional anisotropy or mean diffusivity compared with the upper visual field. These results suggested the different distributions of microstructural organization across visual field brain representations. There was also a strong positive relationship between diffusion kurtosis and fMRI responses in the lower field brain representations. In summary, this study suggested the structural and functional brain involvements in the asymmetry of visual field responses in humans, and is important to the neurophysiological and psychological understanding of human visual information processing.

  14. Cognitive function and MRI findings in very low birth weight infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Atsuko; Takagishi, Yuka; Takada, Satoru; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Toru; Nakamura, Hajime [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Inagaki, Yuko

    1996-07-01

    Twenty-two very low birth weight infants at preschool ages of 5-6 years were studied to clarify the correlation between cognitive function and MRI findings. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Frostig developmental test of visual perception. Ventricular enlargement, assessed by the bioccipital index (B.I.) measured on MRI, was correlated to cognitive disorders. Children with periventricular high intensity areas (T{sub 2}-weighted images) extending from the posterior periventricular region to the parietal lobe tend to highly suffer from cerebral palsy and visuoperceptual impairment. These results indicate that the disorders of cognitive function in very low birth weight infants were caused by a damage of association fibers in periventricular areas which was detectable by MRI. (author)

  15. [Early Detection of Manganese Intoxication Based on Occupational History and T1-weighted MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Toshio; Yano, Hajime; Kushida, Ryutaro; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2016-02-01

    Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal cell function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course terminating to atypical parkinsonism with little therapeutic efficacy. For subjects with chronic manganese exposure such as welders, manganese intoxication can be detected early based on the presence of hyperintensity in the globus pallidus on T(1)-weighted MRI and abnormally high urinary excretion of manganese with a chelating agent even in cases of normal serum/urine level of manganese.

  16. Adaptive cyclic physiologic noise modeling and correction in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Erik B

    2010-03-30

    Physiologic noise in BOLD-weighted MRI data is known to be a significant source of the variance, reducing the statistical power and specificity in fMRI and functional connectivity analyses. We show a dramatic improvement on current noise correction methods in both fMRI and fcMRI data that avoids overfitting. The traditional noise model is a Fourier series expansion superimposed on the periodicity of parallel measured breathing and cardiac cycles. Correction using this model results in removal of variance matching the periodicity of the physiologic cycles. Using this framework allows easy modeling of noise. However, using a large number of regressors comes at the cost of removing variance unrelated to physiologic noise, such as variance due to the signal of functional interest (overfitting the data). It is our hypothesis that there are a small variety of fits that describe all of the significantly coupled physiologic noise. If this is true, we can replace a large number of regressors used in the model with a smaller number of the fitted regressors and thereby account for the noise sources with a smaller reduction in variance of interest. We describe these extensions and demonstrate that we can preserve variance in the data unrelated to physiologic noise while removing physiologic noise equivalently, resulting in data with a higher effective SNR than with current corrections techniques. Our results demonstrate a significant improvement in the sensitivity of fMRI (up to a 17% increase in activation volume for fMRI compared with higher order traditional noise correction) and functional connectivity analyses.

  17. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  18. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) stud

  19. Recent developments in multivariate pattern analysis for functional MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Yang; Fang Fang; Xuchu Weng

    2012-01-01

    Multivariate pattern analysis (MVPA) is a recently-developed approach for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data analyses.Compared with the traditional univariate methods,MVPA is more sensitive to subtle changes in multivariate patterns in fMRI data.In this review,we introduce several significant advances in MVPA applications and summarize various combinations of algorithms and parameters in different problem settings.The limitations of MVPA and some critical questions that need to be addressed in future research are also discussed.

  20. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  1. Joint Compression-Segmentation of functional MRI Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, N.; Wu, Mo; Forchhammer, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data sets are four dimensional (4D) and very large in size. Compression can enhance system performance in terms of storage and transmission capacities. Two approaches are investigated: adaptive DPCM and integer wavelets. In the DPCM approach, each voxel...... information. Each voxel time sequence is DPCM coded using a quantized autoregressive model. The prediction residuals are coded by simple Rice coding for high decoder throughput. In the wavelet approach, the 4D fMRI data set is mapped to a 3D data set, with the 3D volume at each time instance being laid out...... into a 2D plane as a slice mosaic. 3D integer wavelet packets are used for lossless compression of fMRI data. The wavelet coefficients are compressed by 3D context-based adaptive arithmetic coding. An object-oriented compression mode is also introduced in the wavelet codec. An elliptic mask combined...

  2. The future of functional MRI in clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullmore, Ed

    2012-08-15

    In the last 20 years or so, functional MRI has matured very rapidly from being an experimental imaging method in the hands of a few labs to being a very widely available and widely used workhorse of cognitive neuroscience and clinical neuroscience research internationally. FMRI studies have had a considerable impact on our understanding of brain system phenotypes of neurological and psychiatric disorders; and some impact already on development of new therapeutics. However, the direct benefit of fMRI to individual patients with brain disorders has so far been minimal. Here I provide a personal perspective on what has already been achieved, and imagine how the further development of fMRI over the medium term might lead to even greater engagement with clinical medicine.

  3. Likelihood-Based Hypothesis Tests for Brain Activation Detection From MRI Data Disturbed by Colored Noise: A Simulation Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Den Dekker, A.J.; Poot, D.H.J.; Bos, R.; Sijbers, J.

    2009-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data that are corrupted by temporally colored noise are generally preprocessed (i.e., prewhitened or precolored) prior to functional activation detection. In this paper, we propose likelihood-based hypothesis tests that account for colored noise directly

  4. Discovery Radiomics for Multi-Parametric MRI Prostate Cancer Detection

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Audrey G; Kumar, Devinder; Khalvati, Farzad; Haider, Masoom A; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed form of cancer in Canadian men, and is the third leading cause of cancer death. Despite these statistics, prognosis is relatively good with a sufficiently early diagnosis, making fast and reliable prostate cancer detection crucial. As imaging-based prostate cancer screening, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires an experienced medical professional to extensively review the data and perform a diagnosis, radiomics-driven methods help streamline the process and has the potential to significantly improve diagnostic accuracy and efficiency, and thus improving patient survival rates. These radiomics-driven methods currently rely on hand-crafted sets of quantitative imaging-based features, which are selected manually and can limit their ability to fully characterize unique prostate cancer tumour phenotype. In this study, we propose a novel \\textit{discovery radiomics} framework for generating custom radiomic sequences tailored for prostate cancer detection. Discover...

  5. Passive ventricular mechanics modelling using MRI of structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, V Y; Lam, H I; Ennis, D B; Young, A A; Nash, M P

    2008-01-01

    Patients suffering from dilated cardiomyopathy or myocardial infarction can develop left ventricular (LV) diastolic impairment. The LV remodels its structure and function to adapt to pathophysiological changes in geometry and loading conditions and this remodeling process can alter the passive ventricular mechanics. In order to better understand passive ventricular mechanics, a LV finite element model was developed to incorporate physiological and mechanical information derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tissue tagging, in vivo LV cavity pressure recording and ex vivo diffusion tensor MRI (DTMRI) of a canine heart. MRI tissue tagging enables quantitative evaluation of cardiac mechanical function with high spatial and temporal resolution, whilst the direction of maximum water diffusion (the primary eigenvector) in each voxel of a DTMRI directly correlates with the myocardial fibre orientation. This model was customized to the geometry of the canine LV during diastasis by fitting the segmented epicardial and endocardial surface data from tagged MRI using nonlinear finite element fitting techniques. Myofibre orientations, extracted from DTMRI of the same heart, were incorporated into this geometric model using a free form deformation methodology. Pressure recordings, temporally synchronized to the tissue tagging MRI data, were used to simulate the LV deformation during diastole. Simulation of the diastolic LV mechanics allowed us to estimate the stiffness of the passive LV myocardium based on kinematic data obtained from tagged MRI. This integrated physiological model will allow more insight into the regional passive diastolic mechanics of the LV on an individualized basis, thereby improving our understanding of the underlying structural basis of mechanical dysfunction in pathological conditions.

  6. The Neural Basis of Typewriting: A Functional MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Higashiyama

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrate of typewriting Japanese words and to detect the difference between the neural substrate of typewriting and handwriting, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study in 16 healthy volunteers. All subjects were skillful touch typists and performed five tasks: a typing task, a writing task, a reading task, and two control tasks. Three brain regions were activated during both the typing and the writing tasks: the left superior parietal lobule, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the left premotor cortex close to Exner's area. Although typing and writing involved common brain regions, direct comparison between the typing and the writing task revealed greater left posteromedial intraparietal cortex activation in the typing task. In addition, activity in the left premotor cortex was more rostral in the typing task than in the writing task. These findings suggest that, although the brain circuits involved in Japanese typewriting are almost the same as those involved in handwriting, there are brain regions that are specific for typewriting.

  7. Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke;

    2017-01-01

    predictive values of MRI in ruling out any prostate cancer and significant prostate cancer defined as: a) any core with Gleason score (GS) > 6 or b) > 2 positive cores/cancerous core ≥ 50%. RESULTS: Prostate cancer was detected in 38/194 (20%) patients during the median study period of 47 months...... (interquartile range 43-52). The overall negative predictive value of MRI in ruling out any and significant prostate cancer was 80% (156/194) and 95% (184/194), respectively. No patient with a low-suspicion MRI had intermediate/high grade cancer (Gleason score > 6). The majority of patients with no cancer during...

  8. Combination of functional MRI with SAS and MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Takeshita, Shinichirou; Kutsuna, Munenori; Akimitsu, Tomohide; Arita, Kazunori; Kurisu, Kaoru [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    For presurgical diagnosis of brain surface, combination of functional MRI (fMRI) with the MR angiography was examined. This method could visualize brain bay, convolution and vein as index of surface. Five normal adults (male, mean age: 28-year-old) and 7 patients with brain tumor on the main locus to surface (male: 4, female: 3, mean age: 52.3-year-old) were studied. fMRI was performed by SPGR method (TR 70, TE 40, flip angle 60, one slice, thickness 10 mm, FOV 20 cm, matrix 128 x 128). The brain surface was visualized by SAS (surface anatomy scanning). SAS was performed by FSE method (TR 6000, TE 200, echo train 16, thickness 20 mm, slice 3, NEX 2). Cortical veins near superior sagittal sinus were visualized by MRA with 2D-TOF method (TR 50, TE 20, flip angle 60, thickness 2 mm, slice 28, NEX 1). These images were superimposed and functional image of peripheral sensorimotor region was evaluated anatomically. In normal adults, high signal was visualized at another side of near sensorimotor region at 8 of 10 sides. All high signal area of fMRI agreed with cortical vein near sensorimotor region that was visualized by MRA. In patients with brain tumor, signal was visualized at another side of sensorimotor region of tumor without 2 cases with palsy. In another side of tumor, signal of fMRI was visualized in 5 of 7 cases. The tumor was visualized as opposite low signal field in SAS. Locational relation between tumor and brain surface and brain function was visualized distinctly by combination of MRA, SAS and MRA. This method could become useful for presurgical diagnosis. (K.H.)

  9. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: case study and cautionary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: case study and cautionary notes. ... Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging ... Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been ...

  10. Increasing cancer detection yield of breast MRI using a new CAD scheme of mammograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Stough, Rebecca G.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality to detect early breast cancer, its cancer detection yield in breast cancer screening is quite low (women) to date. The purpose of this preliminary study is to test the potential of developing and applying a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme of digital mammograms to identify women at high risk of harboring mammography-occult breast cancers, which can be detected by breast MRI. For this purpose, we retrospectively assembled a dataset involving 30 women who had both mammography and breast MRI screening examinations. All mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 5 cancers were detected using breast MRI. We developed a CAD scheme of mammograms, which include a new quantitative mammographic image feature analysis based risk model, to stratify women into two groups with high and low risk of harboring mammography-occult cancer. Among 30 women, 9 were classified into the high risk group by CAD scheme, which included all 5 women who had cancer detected by breast MRI. All 21 low risk women remained negative on the breast MRI examinations. The cancer detection yield of breast MRI applying to this dataset substantially increased from 16.7% (5/30) to 55.6% (5/9), while eliminating 84% (21/25) unnecessary breast MRI screenings. The study demonstrated the potential of applying a new CAD scheme to significantly increase cancer detection yield of breast MRI, while simultaneously reducing the number of negative MRIs in breast cancer screening.

  11. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Fabri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and motor tasks. We reviewed our published and unpublished fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging data on the cortical representation of tactile, gustatory, auditory, and visual sensitivity and of motor activation, obtained in 36 normal volunteers and in 6 patients with partial callosotomy. Activation foci were consistently detected in discrete CC regions: anterior (taste stimuli, central (motor tasks, central and posterior (tactile stimuli, and splenium (auditory and visual stimuli. Reconstruction of callosal fibers connecting activated primary gustatory, motor, somatosensory, auditory, and visual cortices by diffusion tensor tracking showed bundles crossing, respectively, through the genu, anterior and posterior body, and splenium, at sites harboring fMRI foci. These data confirm that the CC commissure has a topographical organization and demonstrate that its functional topography can be explored with fMRI.

  12. Functional MRI studies in disruptive behaviour disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellani, M; Garzitto, M; Brambilla, P

    2012-03-01

    Aggressive or antisocial behaviours with violations of social rules are the main features of disruptive behaviour disorders (DBDs), which are developmental diseases and include conduct disorder and oppositional defiant disorder. In the last decade, several efforts have been made to shed light on the biological underpinnings of DBDs. In this context, the main findings of functional magnetic resonance imaging studies in DBD are reported here. There are indications of neural dysfunctions in response to affective stimuli, especially regarding medial and orbitofrontal prefrontal cortex and connected subcortical structures.

  13. Functional MRI demonstrates pain perception in hand osteoarthritis has features of central pain processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofat, Nidhi; Smee, Cori; Hermansson, Monika; Howard, Matthew; Baker, Emma H; Howe, Franklyn A; Barrick, Thomas R

    2013-11-01

    Hand osteoarthritis (HOA) is typified by pain and reduced function. We hypothesised that people with HOA have enhanced sensitivity and activation of peripheral nociceptors in the hand, thereby potentiating chronic pain. In our study we aimed to assess if central sensitisation mediates pain perception in osteoarthritis of the hand. Participants with proximal and distal interphalangeal joint (PIP/DIP) HOA and non-OA controls were recruited. Clinical pain scores using the visual analogue scale (VAS) were recorded before and after performing a painful hand task. Central pain processing was evaluated with functional brain neuroimaging (fMRI) using a finger flexion-extension (FFE) task performed over 3 minutes. Data was analysed with FMRIB software (www.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl). Group mean activation of functional MRI signal between hand osteoarthritis and control non-arthritic participants was compared. Our group of hand OA participants reported high pain levels compared with non-arthritic controls as demonstrated by the mean VAS in hand OA participants of 59.31± 8.19 mm compared to 4.00 ± 1.89 mm in controls (p central sensitisation. People with hand osteoarthritis demonstrated features of central sensitisation that was evident after a finger flexion-extension task using functional MRI. Functional MRI is a useful biomarker in detecting pain in hand osteoarthritis and could be used in future hand osteoarthritis pain studies to evaluate pain modulation strategies.

  14. Bayesian Inference for Functional Dynamics Exploring in fMRI Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xuan; Liu, Bing; Chen, Le; Chen, Guantao; Pan, Yi; Zhang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to review state-of-the-art Bayesian-inference-based methods applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. Particularly, we focus on one specific long-standing challenge in the computational modeling of fMRI datasets: how to effectively explore typical functional interactions from fMRI time series and the corresponding boundaries of temporal segments. Bayesian inference is a method of statistical inference which has been shown to be a powerful tool to encode dependence relationships among the variables with uncertainty. Here we provide an introduction to a group of Bayesian-inference-based methods for fMRI data analysis, which were designed to detect magnitude or functional connectivity change points and to infer their functional interaction patterns based on corresponding temporal boundaries. We also provide a comparison of three popular Bayesian models, that is, Bayesian Magnitude Change Point Model (BMCPM), Bayesian Connectivity Change Point Model (BCCPM), and Dynamic Bayesian Variable Partition Model (DBVPM), and give a summary of their applications. We envision that more delicate Bayesian inference models will be emerging and play increasingly important roles in modeling brain functions in the years to come.

  15. Bayesian Inference for Functional Dynamics Exploring in fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review state-of-the-art Bayesian-inference-based methods applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Particularly, we focus on one specific long-standing challenge in the computational modeling of fMRI datasets: how to effectively explore typical functional interactions from fMRI time series and the corresponding boundaries of temporal segments. Bayesian inference is a method of statistical inference which has been shown to be a powerful tool to encode dependence relationships among the variables with uncertainty. Here we provide an introduction to a group of Bayesian-inference-based methods for fMRI data analysis, which were designed to detect magnitude or functional connectivity change points and to infer their functional interaction patterns based on corresponding temporal boundaries. We also provide a comparison of three popular Bayesian models, that is, Bayesian Magnitude Change Point Model (BMCPM, Bayesian Connectivity Change Point Model (BCCPM, and Dynamic Bayesian Variable Partition Model (DBVPM, and give a summary of their applications. We envision that more delicate Bayesian inference models will be emerging and play increasingly important roles in modeling brain functions in the years to come.

  16. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    to both the results of the contrast sensitivity test and to the Snellen visual acuity. Our results indicate that fMRI is a useful method for the study of ON, even in cases where the visual acuity is severely impaired. The reduction in activated volume could be explained as a reduced neuronal input......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...... of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...

  17. Detection of Lesions Underlying Intractable Epilepsy on T1-Weighted MRI as an Outlier Detection Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azami, Meriem; Hammers, Alexander; Jung, Julien; Costes, Nicolas; Bouet, Romain; Lartizien, Carole

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition methods, such as computer aided diagnosis (CAD) systems, can help clinicians in their diagnosis by marking abnormal regions in an image. We propose a machine learning system based on a one-class support vector machine (OC-SVM) classifier for the detection of abnormalities in magnetic resonance images (MRI) applied to patients with intractable epilepsy. The system learns the features associated with healthy control subjects, allowing a voxelwise assessment of the deviation of a test subject pattern from the learned patterns. While any number of various features can be chosen and learned, here we focus on two texture parameters capturing image patterns associated with epileptogenic lesions on T1-weighted brain MRI e.g. heterotopia and blurred junction between the grey and white matter. The CAD output consists of patient specific 3D maps locating clusters of suspicious voxels ranked by size and degree of deviation from control patterns. System performance was evaluated using realistic simulations of challenging detection tasks as well as clinical data of 77 healthy control subjects and of eleven patients (13 lesions). It was compared to that of a mass univariate statistical parametric mapping (SPM) single subject analysis based on the same set of features. For all simulations, OC-SVM yielded significantly higher values of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and higher sensitivity at low false positive rate. For the clinical data, both OC-SVM and SPM successfully detected 100% of the lesions in the MRI positive cases (3/13). For the MRI negative cases (10/13), OC-SVM detected 7/10 lesions and SPM analysis detected 5/10 lesions. In all experiments, OC-SVM produced fewer false positive detections than SPM. OC-SVM may be a versatile system for unbiased lesion detection. PMID:27603778

  18. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcar, V.L. [University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Treichlerstrasse 10, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Girard, F. [GE Medical Systems SA, 283, rue de la Miniere B.P. 34, 78533 Buc Cedex (France); Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E. [University Children' s Hospital, Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-11-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  19. Congenital heart disease. Evaluation of anatomy and function by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebergen, S.A.; Roos, A. de [Dept. of Radiology, Leiden Univ. Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2000-06-01

    With the increasing number of patients surviving after therapeutic intervention for congenital heart disease (CHD), accurate and frequent follow-up of their morphologic and functional cardiovascular status is required, preferably with a noninvasive imaging technique. Echocardiography, either transthoracic or transesophageal, has been the first choice for this purpose, and will probably keep that status, at least in a large segment of the CHD spectrum. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an established method for high-resolution visualization of cardiovascular morphology. In the past decade, newer MRI techniques have been developed that allow functional evaluation of CHD patients. Particularly the introduction of breath-hold imaging, contrast-enhanced MRA and user-friendly computer software for image analysis may move functional MRI of CHD from the science laboratory to clinical use. It is already evident that MRI is superior to echocardiography in certain areas of limited echocardiographic acces, such as the pulmonary artery branches and the aortic arch in adult patients. But MRI has also a unique potential for accurate volumetric analysis of ventricular function and cardiovascular blood flow, without any geometric assumptions. If supported by increased cooperation between cardiologists and radiologists, MRI will grow into a useful noninvasive imaging tool that, together with echocardiography, will obviate the need for invasive catheter studies for diagnostic purposes. (orig.) [German] Weltweit werden jaehrlich etwa 1,5 Millionen Kinder mit kongenitalen Herzerkrankungen (CHD, congenital heart disease) geboren. Durch Verbesserung der verschiedenen chirurgischen und interventionellen Techniken ist die Ueberlebensrate von CHD-Patienten drastisch gestiegen. Immer mehr Patienten mit postoperativen Residuen, Folgezustaenden und Komplikationen benoetigen eine umfassende Nachsorge. Die Darstellung und Quantifizierung morphologischer und funktioneller kardiovaskulaerer

  20. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell W Chan

    Full Text Available Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline and seventeen days after mating (G17. G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  1. Structural and Functional Brain Remodeling during Pregnancy with Diffusion Tensor MRI and Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Russell W; Ho, Leon C; Zhou, Iris Y; Gao, Patrick P; Chan, Kevin C; Wu, Ed X

    2015-01-01

    Although pregnancy-induced hormonal changes have been shown to alter the brain at the neuronal level, the exact effects of pregnancy on brain at the tissue level remain unclear. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state functional MRI (rsfMRI) were employed to investigate and document the effects of pregnancy on the structure and function of the brain tissues. Fifteen Sprague-Dawley female rats were longitudinally studied at three days before mating (baseline) and seventeen days after mating (G17). G17 is equivalent to the early stage of the third trimester in humans. Seven age-matched nulliparous female rats served as non-pregnant controls and were scanned at the same time-points. For DTI, diffusivity was found to generally increase in the whole brain during pregnancy, indicating structural changes at microscopic levels that facilitated water molecular movement. Regionally, mean diffusivity increased more pronouncedly in the dorsal hippocampus while fractional anisotropy in the dorsal dentate gyrus increased significantly during pregnancy. For rsfMRI, bilateral functional connectivity in the hippocampus increased significantly during pregnancy. Moreover, fractional anisotropy increase in the dentate gyrus appeared to correlate with the bilateral functional connectivity increase in the hippocampus. These findings revealed tissue structural modifications in the whole brain during pregnancy, and that the hippocampus was structurally and functionally remodeled in a more marked manner.

  2. Time Slice Analysis Method Based on OTCA Used in fMRI Weak Signal Function Extraction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Sen-lin; LI Li; ZHANG Xin-li; ZHANG Tie-mei

    2007-01-01

    The original temporal clustering analysis (OTCA) is an effective technique for obtaining brain activation maps when the timing and location of the activation are completely unknown, but its deficiency of sensitivity is exposed in processing brain activation signal which is relatively weak. The time slice analysis method based on OTCA is proposed considering the weakness of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signal of the rat model. By dividing the stimulation period into several time slices and analyzing each slice to detect the activated pixels respectively after the background removal, the sensitivity is significantly improved. The inhibitory response in the hypothalamus after glucose loading is detected successfully with this method in the experiment on rat. Combined with the OTCA method, the time slice analysis method based on OTCA is effective on detecting when, where and which type of response will happen after stimulation, even if the fMRI signal is weak.

  3. Functional MRI in Patients with Intracranial Lesions near Language Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakyemez, B; Erdogan, C; Yildirim, N; Bora, I; Bekar, A; Parlak, M

    2006-06-30

    We aimed to depict Broca's area and Wernicke's area by word generation and sentence formation paradigms in patients with various intracranial lesions adjacent to language areas using functional MRI technique and to evaluate the ability of functional MRI to lateralize the hemispheric dominance for language. Twenty-three right-handed patients were included in this study. Lesions were classified as low-grade glioma (n=8), high-grade glioma (n=9), metastasis (n=1), meningioma (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=2) and mesial temporal sclerosis (n=2). We performed blood-oxygenated-level-dependant functional MRI using a 1.5-T unit. Word generation and sentence formation tasks were used to activate language areas. Language areas were defined as Brodmann 44, 45 (Broca's area) and Brodmann 22 area (Wernicke's area). Laterality index was used to show the dominant hemisphere. Two poorly cooperative patients showed no activation and were excluded from the study. Broca's area was localized in 21 patients (100 %). Wernicke's area, on the other hand, could only be localized in eight of the 21 patients (38 %).The left hemisphere was dominant in 86% of patients while atypical language lateralization (right or bilateral) was demonstrated in 14% of the patients. Bilateral activation areas were shown in 10% of those patients while right cerebral hemisphere was dominant in 4% of the patients. Word generation and sentence formation tasks are especially helpful in localizing Broca's area. Wernicke's area could also be demonstrated in some of the cases. Functional MRI can be used as an important and useful means of demonstrating language areas in patients with lesions adjacent to those areas and depicting the hemispheric dominance.

  4. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  5. Exploring brainstem function in multiple sclerosis by combining brainstem reflexes, evoked potentials, clinical and MRI investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnano, Immacolata; Pes, Giovanni Mario; Pilurzi, Giovanna; Cabboi, Maria Paola; Ginatempo, Francesca; Giaconi, Elena; Tolu, Eusebio; Achene, Antonio; Salis, Antonio; Rothwell, John C; Conti, Maurizio; Deriu, Franca

    2014-11-01

    To investigate vestibulo-masseteric (VMR), acoustic-masseteric (AMR), vestibulo-collic (VCR) and trigemino-collic (TCR) reflexes in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS); to relate abnormalities of brainstem reflexes (BSRs) to multimodal evoked potentials (EPs), clinical and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings. Click-evoked VMR, AMR and VCR were recorded from active masseter and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively; TCR was recorded from active sternocleidomastoid muscles, following electrical stimulation of the infraorbital nerve. EPs and MRI were performed with standard techniques. Frequencies of abnormal BSRs were: VMR 62.1%, AMR 55.1%, VCR 25.9%, TCR 58.6%. Brainstem dysfunction was identified by these tests, combined into a four-reflex battery, in 86.9% of cases, by EPs in 82.7%, MRI in 71.7% and clinical examination in 37.7% of cases. The sensitivity of paired BSRs/EPs (93.3%) was significantly higher than combined MRI/clinical testing (70%) in patients with disease duration ⩽6.4years. BSR alterations significantly correlated with clinical, EP and MRI findings. The four-BSR battery effectively increases the performance of standard EPs in early detection of brainstem impairment, otherwise undetected by clinical examination and neuroimaging. Multiple BSR assessment usefully supplements conventional testing and monitoring of brainstem function in MS, especially in newly diagnosed patients. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Mapping the mouse brain with rs-fMRI: An optimized pipeline for functional network identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbi, Valerio; Grandjean, Joanes; Rudin, Markus; Wenderoth, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The use of resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) in translational research is a powerful tool to assess brain connectivity and investigate neuropathology in mouse models. However, despite encouraging initial results, the characterization of consistent and robust resting state networks in mice remains a methodological challenge. One key reason is that the quality of the measured MR signal is degraded by the presence of structural noise from non-neural sources. Notably, in the current pipeline of the Human Connectome Project, a novel approach has been introduced to clean rs-fMRI data, which involves automatic artifact component classification and data cleaning (FIX). FIX does not require any external recordings of physiology or the segmentation of CSF and white matter. In this study, we evaluated the performance of FIX for analyzing mouse rs-fMRI data. Our results showed that FIX can be easily applied to mouse datasets and detects true signals with 100% accuracy and true noise components with very high accuracy (>98%), thus reducing both within- and between-subject variability of rs-fMRI connectivity measurements. Using this improved pre-processing pipeline, maps of 23 resting state circuits in mice were identified including two networks that displayed default mode network-like topography. Hierarchical clustering grouped these neural networks into meaningful larger functional circuits. These mouse resting state networks, which are publicly available, might serve as a reference for future work using mouse models of neurological disorders.

  7. Detecting regional changes in myocardial contraction patterns using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Ortiz, Gerardo I.; Chandrashekara, Raghavendra; Rhode, Kawal S.; Razavi, Reza; Hill, Derek L. G.; Rueckert, Daniel

    2004-04-01

    Measuring changes in cardiac motion patterns can assist in diagnosing the onset of arrhythmia and ischaemia and in the follow-up of treatment. This work presents a methodology for measuring such motion changes from MR images. Non-rigid registration is used to track cardiac motion in a sequence of 3D tagged MR images. We use a cylindrical coordinate system to subdivide the myocardium into smaller anatomically meaningful regions and to express motion derived measurements such as displacement and strain for each myocardial region during the cardiac cycle. In the first experiment we have evaluated the proposed methods using synthetic image sequences where the ground truth was available. These images were generated using a cardiac motion simulator for tagged MRI. Normal and abnormal motion fields were produced by modifying parameters in a small region of the myocardium. In the second experiment we have acquired two separate tagged MR image sequences from five healthy volunteers. Both acquisitions have been carried out without moving the volunteer inside the scanner, thus avoiding potential misregistration errors due to subject motion between scans. In addition, one of volunteers was subjected to stress during one of the scans. In the final experiment we acquired tagged MR images from a patient with super-ventricular tachyarrhythmia, before and after radio frequency ablation. The image acquisition and catheter intervention were performed with a combined X-ray and MRI system. Detection results were correct on synthetic data and no region was incorrectly classified as having significant changes in the repetition studies. Significant changes in motion pattern were measured in the stress and ablation studies. Furthermore, results seem to corroborate that the ablation regularised cardiac contraction.

  8. Large-scale Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the information flow between each pair of time series in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human brain and subsequently recover its underlying network structure. By integrating dimensionality reduction into predictive time series modeling, large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) analysis method can reveal directed information flow suggestive of causal influence at an individual voxel level, unlike other multivariate approaches. This method quantifies the influence each voxel time series has on every other voxel time series in a multivariate sense and hence contains information about the underlying dynamics of the whole system, which can be used to reveal functionally connected networks within the brain. To identify such networks, we perform non-metric network clustering, such as accomplished by the Louvain method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to recover the motor and visual cortex from resting state human brain fMRI data and compare it with the network recovered from a visuomotor stimulation experiment, where the similarity is measured by the Dice Coefficient (DC). The best DC obtained was 0.59 implying a strong agreement between the two networks. In addition, we thoroughly study the effect of dimensionality reduction in lsGC analysis on network recovery. We conclude that our approach is capable of detecting causal influence between time series in a multivariate sense, which can be used to segment functionally connected networks in the resting-state fMRI.

  9. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alvarez Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume.

  10. Incremental Activation Detection for Real-Time fMRI Series Using Robust Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  11. Incremental activation detection for real-time fMRI series using robust Kalman filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yan, Bin; Tong, Li; Wang, Linyuan; Li, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI) is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  12. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    MRI does not use ionizing radiation. No side effects from the magnetic fields and radio waves have been reported. The most common type of contrast (dye) used is gadolinium. It is very safe. Allergic reactions rarely ...

  13. Enhanced subject-specific resting-state network detection and extraction with fast fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Burak; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Hennig, Jürgen; LeVan, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Resting-state networks have become an important tool for the study of brain function. An ultra-fast imaging technique that allows to measure brain function, called Magnetic Resonance Encephalography (MREG), achieves an order of magnitude higher temporal resolution than standard echo-planar imaging (EPI). This new sequence helps to correct physiological artifacts and improves the sensitivity of the fMRI analysis. In this study, EPI is compared with MREG in terms of capability to extract resting-state networks. Healthy controls underwent two consecutive resting-state scans, one with EPI and the other with MREG. Subject-level independent component analyses (ICA) were performed separately for each of the two datasets. Using Stanford FIND atlas parcels as network templates, the presence of ICA maps corresponding to each network was quantified in each subject. The number of detected individual networks was significantly higher in the MREG data set than for EPI. Moreover, using short time segments of MREG data, such as 50 seconds, one can still detect and track consistent networks. Fast fMRI thus results in an increased capability to extract distinct functional regions at the individual subject level for the same scan times, and also allow the extraction of consistent networks within shorter time intervals than when using EPI, which is notably relevant for the analysis of dynamic functional connectivity fluctuations. Hum Brain Mapp 38:817-830, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The role of conventional and functional MRI in diagnosis of breast masses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atef Hammad Teama

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: DCE-MRI of the breast had a higher sensitivity for breast cancer detection and more accurate in delineation of the disease extension. The breast MRI with three parameters (DCE-MRI, DWI, and MRS increased the diagnostic accuracy of the breast cancer.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density. RESULTS: The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005. CONCLUSION: Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  16. Cerebral Functional Reorganization in Ischemic Stroke after Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: An fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Xue-Wei; Zuo, Zhen-Tao; Lu, Jie; Meng, Chun-Ling; Fang, Hong-Ying; Xue, Rong; Fan, Yong; Guan, Yu-Zhou; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2016-12-01

    Our study aimed to figure out brain functional reorganization evidence after repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) using the resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI). Twelve patients with unilateral subcortex lesion in the middle cerebral artery territory were recruited. Seven of them received a 10-day rTMS treatment beginning at about 5 days after stroke onset. The remaining five received sham treatment. RsfMRI and motor functional scores were obtained before and after rTMS or sham rTMS. The rTMS group showed motor recovery according to the behavioral testing scores, while there was no significant difference of motor functional scores in the sham group before and after the sham rTMS. It proved that rTMS facilitates motor recovery of early ischemic stroke patients. Compared with the sham, the rTMS treatment group achieved increased functional connectivity (FC) between ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1, supplementary motor area, bilateral thalamus, and contralesional postcentral gyrus. And decreased FC was found between ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional M1, postcentral gyrus and inferior and middle frontal gyrus. Increased or decreased FC detected by rsfMRI is an important finding to understand the mechanism of brain functional reorganization. The rTMS treatment is a promising therapeutic approach to facilitate motor rehabilitation for early stroke patients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Quantitative evaluation of statistical inference in resting state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xue; Kang, Hakmook; Newton, Allen; Landman, Bennett A

    2012-01-01

    Modern statistical inference techniques may be able to improve the sensitivity and specificity of resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) connectivity analysis through more realistic characterization of distributional assumptions. In simulation, the advantages of such modern methods are readily demonstrable. However quantitative empirical validation remains elusive in vivo as the true connectivity patterns are unknown and noise/artifact distributions are challenging to characterize with high fidelity. Recent innovations in capturing finite sample behavior of asymptotically consistent estimators (i.e., SIMulation and EXtrapolation - SIMEX) have enabled direct estimation of bias given single datasets. Herein, we leverage the theoretical core of SIMEX to study the properties of inference methods in the face of diminishing data (in contrast to increasing noise). The stability of inference methods with respect to synthetic loss of empirical data (defined as resilience) is used to quantify the empirical performance of one inference method relative to another. We illustrate this new approach in a comparison of ordinary and robust inference methods with rs-fMRI.

  18. Functional MRI for immediate monitoring stereotactic thalamotomy in a patient with essential tremor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Schaaf, Maike; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [University of Cologne, Department of Radiology, Cologne (Germany); Maarouf, Mohammed; Hunsche, Stefan; Sturm, Volker [University of Cologne, Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, Cologne (Germany); Lasek, Kathrin [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig Holstein, Klinik fuer Neurologie, Luebeck (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Akademisches Lehrkrankenhaus der Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Belegabteilung fuer Neurochirurgie, Klinikum Bamberg, Bamberg (Germany)

    2006-10-15

    The effect of stereotactic thalamotomy was assessed with pre- and postoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under motor stimulation. A patient with unilateral essential tremor (ET) of the left arm underwent stereotactically guided thalamotomy of the right ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM). FMRI was done directly before and after surgery on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. The stimulation paradigm was maintainance of the affected arm in an extended position and hand clenching being performed in a block design manner. Statistical analysis was done with Brain Voyager 2000. After thalamotomy the tremor diminished completely. As a difference between the pre- and postoperative fMRI, a significant activation was found in the VIM contralateral to the activation site, adjacent to the inferior olivary nucleus contralateral to the activation site and in the dorsal cingulum. In conclusion, fMRI can detect the functional effect of thalamotomy for tremor treatment. Direct postoperative fMRI provides a sufficient method for estimating the effect of thalamotomy immediately after intervention. The importance of the intermediate thalamic nucleus and the olivary nucleus in tremor generation is supported by our findings. (orig.)

  19. HIV Infection Is Associated with Impaired Striatal Function during Inhibition with Normal Cortical Functioning on Functional MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Plessis, Stéfan; Vink, Matthijs; Joska, John A; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Bagadia, Asif; Stein, Dan J; Emsley, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HIV infection on cortical and subcortical regions of the frontal-striatal system involved in the inhibition of voluntary movement. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with

  20. Detection of Cortical Laminar Architecture Using Manganese-Enhanced MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Afonso C.; Lee, Junghee; Wu, Carolyn W.-H.; Tucciarone, Jason; Pelled, Galit; Aoki, Ichio; Koretsky, Alan P.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) contrast across the rodent somatosensory cortex were compared to the cortical laminae as identified by tissue histology and administration of an anatomical tracer to cortex and thalamus. Across the cortical thickness, MEMRI signal intensity was low in layer I, increased in layer II, decreased in layer III until mid-layer IV, and increased again, peaking in layer V, before decreasing through layer VI. The reeler mouse mutant was used to confirm that the cortical alternation in MEMRI contrast was related to laminar architecture. Unlike in wild-type mice, the reeler cortex showed no appreciable changes in MEMRI signal, consistent[ACS1] with absence of cortical laminae in histological slides. The tract-tracing ability of MEMRI was used to further confirm assignments and demonstrate laminar specificity. Twelve to sixteen hours after stereotaxic injections of MnCl2 to the ventroposterior thalamic nuclei, an overall increase in signal intensity was detected in primary somatosensory cortex compared to other brain regions. Maximum intensity projection images revealed a distinctly bright stripe located 600 − 700 μm below the pial surface, in layer IV. The data show that both systemic and tract-tracing forms of MEMRI are useful for studying laminar architecture in the brain. PMID:17936913

  1. Alterations in renal morphology and function after ESWL therapy: evaluation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestin, G.P. [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Fischbach, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Vorreuther, R. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Schulthess, G.K. von [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    1993-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced gradient-echo MRI was used to evaluate morphological and functional alterations in the kidneys after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Dynamic MRI with a temporal resolution of 10 s per image was performed by repeated imaging in the coronal plane after administration of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) before and after ESWL for renal calculi in 25 patients. Before ESWL 22 patients had normally functioning kidneys, characterised by a marked decrease in signal intensity in the renal medulla 30-40 s after the onset of cortical perfusion. After ESWL 8 patients had functional abnormalities: in 2 cases the medullary signal decrease was disturbed throughout the whole organ, while 6 kidneys demonstrated regional loss of concentrating ability in the medulla. Morphological alterations (oedema with blurred contours and loss of corticomedullary differentiation; parenchymal haemorrhage and haemorrhage in a cortical cyst; subcapsular, perirenal and pararenal haematoma) were detected in 9 cases. Haemorrhage was encountered more often after administration of more than 2500 shock waves; however, no such correlation was seen in the kidneys with functional disturbances following ESWL therapy. MRI proved to be a sensitive method for the assessment of morphological and functional alterations after ESWL, but longer follow-up studies are required to identify the clinical impact of these early changes. (orig.)

  2. Considerations for Resting State Functional MRI and Functional Connectivity Studies in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Ju ePan

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI and functional connectivity mapping have become widely used tools in the human neuroimaging community and their use is rapidly spreading into the realm of rodent research as well. One of the many attractive features of rs-fMRI is that it is readily translatable from humans to animals and back again. Changes in functional connectivity observed in human studies can be followed by more invasive animal experiments to determine the neurophysiological basis for the alterations, while exploratory work in animal models can identify possible biomarkers for further investigation in human studies. These types of interwoven human and animal experiments have a potentially large impact on neuroscience and clinical practice. However, impediments exist to the optimal application of rs-fMRI in small animals, some similar to those encountered in humans and some quite different. In this review we identify the most prominent of these barriers, discuss differences between rs-fMRI in rodents and in humans, highlight best practices for animal studies, and review selected applications of rs-fMRI in rodents. Our goal is to facilitate the integration of human and animal work to the benefit of both fields.

  3. Prenatal detection of microtia by MRI in a fetus with trisomy 22

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milic, Andrea; Blaser, Susan; Robinson, Ashley [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Viero, Sandra; Halliday, William [University of Toronto, Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Winsor, Elizabeth [University of Toronto, Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Toi, Ants [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Thomas, Micki [University of Toronto, The Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Rm. 3292 Toronto, ON (Canada); Chitayat, David [University of Toronto, The Prenatal Diagnosis and Medical Genetics Program, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mount Sinai Hospital, Rm. 3292 Toronto, ON (Canada); University of Toronto, Clinical and Metabolic Genetics, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)

    2006-07-15

    Trisomy 22 is a rare chromosomal abnormality infrequently detected prenatally. External ear abnormalities, in particular microtia, are often associated with trisomy 22, but prenatal detection of microtia has not been reported in association with trisomy 22. We report a fetus with trisomy 22, with fetal MRI findings of microtia, craniofacial dysmorphism, and polygyria. Fetal MRI is a useful tool for auricular assessment and might have utility in the prenatal detection of chromosomal abnormalities, especially among fetuses with structural anomalies. (orig.)

  4. Visualization and analysis of functional cardiac MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Elliot R.; Guttman, Michael A.; Poon, Eric; Pisupati, Chandrasekhar; Moore, Christopher C.; Zerhouni, Elias A.; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Heng, PhengAnn

    1994-05-01

    Rapid analysis of large multi-dimensional data sets is critical for the successful implementation of a comprehensive MR cardiac exam. We have developed a software package for the analysis and visualization of cardiac MR data. The program allows interactive visualization of time and space stacks of MRI data, automatic segmentation of myocardial borders and myocardial tagging patterns, and visualization of functional parameters such a motion, strain, and blood flow, mapped as colors in an interactive dynamic 3D volume rendering of the beating heart.

  5. US correlation for MRI-detected breast lesions in women with familial risk of breast cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sim, L.S.; Hendriks, J.H.C.L.; Bult, P.; Fook-Chong, S.M.

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To examine the value of US correlation for MRI-detected breast lesions in women with familial risk of breast cancer. METHODS: From an initial dataset of 245 women with positive family history who had breast cancer surveillance involving mammography or MRI between November 1994 and February 2001

  6. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  7. MRI脑测谎实验方法学%Brain-Based MRI lie detection experiment methodology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李文石; 张好; 胡清泉; 苏香; 郭亮

    2006-01-01

    The brain-based MRI lie detection experiment methodology is reviewed for the first time, including the magnetic resonance imaging paradigm,the double-block deign,the equidistance hit-ball and the test mechanice,This paper illustrates the research results of 3D MRI lie detection and the contrastive experiment of otopoint mapping brain signature lie detection,ingeminates the lie-Truth Law(PT/PL ≤0.618)which we get from the statistic of the world MRI reports. The conclusion points out the essence of this technology,its advantages and disadvantages,and the evolution of this methodology.

  8. Label-free CEST MRI Detection of Citicoline-Liposome Drug Delivery in Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanling; Jablonska, Anna; Li, Yuguo; Cao, Suyi; Liu, Dexiang; Chen, Hanwei; Van Zijl, Peter Cm; Bulte, Jeff W M; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citicoline (CDPC) is a natural supplement with well-documented neuroprotective effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we sought to exploit citicoline as a theranostic agent with its inherent chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI signal, which can be directly used as an MRI guidance in the citicoline drug delivery. Our in vitro CEST MRI results showed citicoline has two inherent CEST signals at +1 and +2 ppm, attributed to exchangeable hydroxyl and amine protons, respectively. To facilitate the targeted drug delivery of citicoline to ischemic regions, we prepared liposomes encapsulating citicoline (CDPC-lipo) and characterized the particle properties and CEST MRI properties. The in vivo CEST MRI detection of liposomal citicoline was then examined in a rat brain model of unilateral transient ischemia induced by a two-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion. The results showed that the delivery of CPDC-lipo to the brain ischemic areas could be monitored and quantified by CEST MRI. When administered intra-arterially, CDPC-lipo clearly demonstrated a detectable CEST MRI contrast at 2 ppm. CEST MRI revealed that liposomes preferentially accumulated in the areas of ischemia with a disrupted blood-brain-barrier. We furthermore used CEST MRI to detect the improvement in drug delivery using CDPC-lipo targeted against vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in the same animal model. The MRI findings were validated using fluorescence microscopy. Hence, liposomal citicoline represents a prototype theranostic system, where the therapeutic agent can be detected directly by CEST MRI in a label-free fashion.

  9. Label-free CEST MRI Detection of Citicoline-Liposome Drug Delivery in Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanling; Jablonska, Anna; Li, Yuguo; Cao, Suyi; Liu, Dexiang; Chen, Hanwei; Van Zijl, Peter CM; Bulte, Jeff W.M.; Janowski, Miroslaw; Walczak, Piotr; Liu, Guanshu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Citicoline (CDPC) is a natural supplement with well-documented neuroprotective effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we sought to exploit citicoline as a theranostic agent with its inherent chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI signal, which can be directly used as an MRI guidance in the citicoline drug delivery. Our in vitro CEST MRI results showed citicoline has two inherent CEST signals at +1 and +2 ppm, attributed to exchangeable hydroxyl and amine protons, respectively. To facilitate the targeted drug delivery of citicoline to ischemic regions, we prepared liposomes encapsulating citicoline (CDPC-lipo) and characterized the particle properties and CEST MRI properties. The in vivo CEST MRI detection of liposomal citicoline was then examined in a rat brain model of unilateral transient ischemia induced by a two-hour middle cerebral artery occlusion. The results showed that the delivery of CPDC-lipo to the brain ischemic areas could be monitored and quantified by CEST MRI. When administered intra-arterially, CDPC-lipo clearly demonstrated a detectable CEST MRI contrast at 2 ppm. CEST MRI revealed that liposomes preferentially accumulated in the areas of ischemia with a disrupted blood-brain-barrier. We furthermore used CEST MRI to detect the improvement in drug delivery using CDPC-lipo targeted against vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in the same animal model. The MRI findings were validated using fluorescence microscopy. Hence, liposomal citicoline represents a prototype theranostic system, where the therapeutic agent can be detected directly by CEST MRI in a label-free fashion. PMID:27446492

  10. A least angle regression method for fMRI activation detection in phase-encoded experimental designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingfeng; Coyle, Damien; Maguire, Liam; McGinnity, Thomas M; Watson, David R; Benali, Habib

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new regression method for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation detection. Unlike general linear models (GLM), this method is based on selecting models for activation detection adaptively which overcomes the limitation of requiring a predefined design matrix in GLM. This limitation is because GLM designs assume that the response of the neuron populations will be the same for the same stimuli, which is often not the case. In this work, the fMRI hemodynamic response model is selected from a series of models constructed online by the least angle regression (LARS) method. The slow drift terms in the design matrix for the activation detection are determined adaptively according to the fMRI response in order to achieve the best fit for each fMRI response. The LARS method is then applied along with the Moore-Penrose pseudoinverse (PINV) and fast orthogonal search (FOS) algorithm for implementation of the selected model to include the drift effects in the design matrix. Comparisons with GLM were made using 11 normal subjects to test method superiority. This paper found that GLM with fixed design matrix was inferior compared to the described LARS method for fMRI activation detection in a phased-encoded experimental design. In addition, the proposed method has the advantage of increasing the degrees of freedom in the regression analysis. We conclude that the method described provides a new and novel approach to the detection of fMRI activation which is better than GLM based analyses.

  11. Evaluation of global left ventricular function assessment by dual-source computed tomography compared with MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vleuten, Pieter A. van der; Tio, Rene A.; Zijlstra, Felix [University Medical Centre Groningen, Thoraxcenter, Department of Cardiology, P.O. Box 30001, Groningen (Netherlands); Jonge, Gonda J. de; Lubbers, Daniel D.; Willems, Tineke P.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Centre Groningen, Department of Radiology, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2009-02-15

    Left ventricular (LV) function assessment by dual-source computed tomography (DSCT) was compared with the reference standard method using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Accurate assessment of LV function is essential for the prediction of prognosis in cardiac disease. Thirty-four patients undergoing DSCT examination of the heart for various clinical indications underwent MRI after DSCT. Short-axis cine images were reconstructed from the DSCT datasets and were analyzed using a dedicated post-processing software-tool to generate global left ventricular function parameters. Five DSCT datasets were considered to be of insufficient image quality. DSCT showed a small overestimation of end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes of 11.0 ml and 3.5 ml, nrespectively. Myocardial mass assessed by DSCT showed an average underestimation of 0.2 g. DSCT showed a small overestimation of LV ejection fraction (LVEF) of 0.4%-point with a Bland-Altman interval of [-8.67 (0.40) 9.48]. Global LV functional parameters calculated from DSCT datasets acquired in daily clinical practice correlated well with MRI and may be considered interchangeable. However, visual assessment of the image quality of the short-axis cine slices should be performed to detect any artifacts in the DSCT data which could influence accuracy. (orig.)

  12. Multivariate spatial Gaussian mixture modeling for statistical clustering of hemodynamic parameters in functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouque, A.L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Risser, L. [NeuroSpin/CEA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Fouque, A.L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Risser, L. [IFR 49, Institut d' Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, Paris (France)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, a novel statistical parcellation of intra-subject functional MRI (fMRI) data is proposed. The key idea is to identify functionally homogenous regions of interest from their hemodynamic parameters. To this end, a non-parametric voxel-based estimation of hemodynamic response function is performed as a prerequisite. Then, the extracted hemodynamic features are entered as the input data of a Multivariate Spatial Gaussian Mixture Model (MSGMM) to be fitted. The goal of the spatial aspect is to favor the recovery of connected components in the mixture. Our statistical clustering approach is original in the sense that it extends existing works done on univariate spatially regularized Gaussian mixtures. A specific Gibbs sampler is derived to account for different covariance structures in the feature space. On realistic artificial fMRI datasets, it is shown that our algorithm is helpful for identifying a parsimonious functional parcellation required in the context of joint detection estimation of brain activity. This allows us to overcome the classical assumption of spatial stationarity of the BOLD signal model. (authors)

  13. Resting-state functional MRI in an intraoperative MRI setting: proof of feasibility and correlation to clinical outcome of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roder, Constantin; Charyasz-Leks, Edyta; Breitkopf, Martin; Decker, Karlheinz; Ernemann, Ulrike; Klose, Uwe; Tatagiba, Marcos; Bisdas, Sotirios

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors' aim in this paper is to prove the feasibility of resting-state (RS) functional MRI (fMRI) in an intraoperative setting (iRS-fMRI) and to correlate findings with the clinical condition of patients pre- and postoperatively. METHODS Twelve patients underwent intraoperative MRI-guided resection of lesions in or directly adjacent to the central region and/or pyramidal tract. Intraoperative RS (iRS)-fMRI was performed pre- and intraoperatively and was correlated with patients' postoperative clinical condition, as well as with intraoperative monitoring results. Independent component analysis (ICA) was used to postprocess the RS-fMRI data concerning the sensorimotor networks, and the mean z-scores were statistically analyzed. RESULTS iRS-fMRI in anesthetized patients proved to be feasible and analysis revealed no significant differences in preoperative z-scores between the sensorimotor areas ipsi- and contralateral to the tumor. A significant decrease in z-score (p < 0.01) was seen in patients with new neurological deficits postoperatively. The intraoperative z-score in the hemisphere ipsilateral to the tumor had a significant negative correlation with the degree of paresis immediately after the operation (r = -0.67, p < 0.001) and on the day of discharge from the hospital (r = -0.65, p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis demonstrated moderate prognostic value of the intraoperative z-score (area under the curve 0.84) for the paresis score at patient discharge. CONCLUSIONS The use of iRS-fMRI with ICA-based postprocessing and functional activity mapping is feasible and the results may correlate with clinical parameters, demonstrating a significant negative correlation between the intensity of the iRS-fMRI signal and the postoperative neurological changes.

  14. Multisite functional connectivity MRI classification of autism: ABIDE results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared A Nielsen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Systematic differences in functional connectivity MRI metrics have been consistently observed in autism, with predominantly decreased cortico-cortical connectivity. Previous attempts at single subject classification in high-functioning autism using whole brain point-to-point functional connectivity have yielded about 80% accurate classification of autism vs. control subjects across a wide age range. We attempted to replicate the method and results using the Autism Brain Imaging Data Exchange including resting state fMRI data obtained from 964 subjects and 16 separate international sites.Methods: For each of 964 subjects, we obtained pairwise functional connectivity measurements from a lattice of 7266 regions of interest covering the gray matter (26.4 million "connections" after preprocessing that included motion and slice timing correction, coregistration to an anatomic image, normalization to standard space, and voxelwise removal by regression of motion parameters, soft tissue, CSF, and white matter signals. Connections were grouped into multiple bins, and a leave-one-out classifier was evaluated on connections comprising each set of bins. Age, age-squared, gender, handedness, and site were included as covariates for the classifier.Results: Classification accuracy significantly outperformed chance but was much lower for multisite prediction than for previous single site results. As high as 60% accuracy was obtained for whole brain classification, with the best accuracy from connections involving regions of the default mode network, parahippocampal and fusiform gyri, insula, Wernicke Area, and intraparietal sulcus. The classifier score was related to symptom severity, social function, daily living skills, and verbal IQ. Classification accuracy was significantly higher for sites with longer BOLD imaging times.Conclusions: Multisite functional connectivity classification of autism outperformed chance using a simple leave

  15. Simultaneous resting-state functional MRI and electroencephalography recordings of functional connectivity in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirino, Eiji; Tanaka, Shoji; Fukuta, Mayuko; Inami, Rie; Arai, Heii; Inoue, Reiichi; Aoki, Shigeki

    2017-04-01

    It remains unclear how functional connectivity (FC) may be related to specific cognitive domains in neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we used simultaneous resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI) and electroencephalography (EEG) recording in patients with schizophrenia, to evaluate FC within and outside the default mode network (DMN). Our study population included 14 patients with schizophrenia and 15 healthy control participants. From all participants, we acquired rsfMRI data, and simultaneously recorded EEG data using an MR-compatible amplifier. We analyzed the rsfMRI-EEG data, and used the CONN toolbox to calculate the FC between regions of interest. We also performed between-group comparisons of standardized low-resolution electromagnetic tomography-based intracortical lagged coherence for each EEG frequency band. FC within the DMN, as measured by rsfMRI and EEG, did not significantly differ between groups. Analysis of rsfMRI data showed that FC between the right posterior inferior temporal gyrus and medial prefrontal cortex was stronger among patients with schizophrenia compared to control participants. Analysis of FC within the DMN using rsfMRI and EEG data revealed no significant differences between patients with schizophrenia and control participants. However, rsfMRI data revealed over-modulated FC between the medial prefrontal cortex and right posterior inferior temporal gyrus in patients with schizophrenia compared to control participants, suggesting that the patients had altered FC, with higher correlations across nodes within and outside of the DMN. Further studies using simultaneous rsfMRI and EEG are required to determine whether altered FC within the DMN is associated with schizophrenia. © 2016 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  16. Comparison of Ultrasound and MRI in Detecting Fetal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Abdi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Background: Ultrasound (US and MRI are considered complementary technologies, and MRI is utilized as an adjunct to US in the evaluation of fetal anomalies. Overall ultrasound remains the prime mo-dality for evaluating disorders of the fetus and pregnancy. Ultrasound continues to have several obvious advan-tages over MRI. It is safe and relatively inexpensive and is widely available It also allows for real-time imaging. However, US does have important limitations. First, it is uniquely operator-and interpreter-dependent. In ad-dition, compared to MRI, US provides a smaller field-of-view, and the resolution of US images is restricted by penetration through soft tissues and bone. Thus, the sensitivity of US in evaluating the fetus is reduced in obese patients and in women whose pregnancies are complicated by low amniotic fluid volume. There is a growing body of literature on the use of MRI and has documented its usefulness in confirming or expanding upon US findings. On the contrary, MRI visualization of the fetus is not significantly limited by maternal obe-sity, fetal position, or oligohydramnios, and visualization of the brain is not restricted by the ossified skull. It provides superior soft-tissue contrast resolution and the ability to distinguish individual structures such as lung, liver, kidney, bowel, and gray and white matter. Patients & Methods: In this study, patients in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy were recruited on the basis of abnormal fetal US results within 2 days of MR imaging by another radiologist. Results: In some cases such as anencephaly which is associated with polyhydraminous or in multicystic dys-plastic kidney disease, MRI added no more information to ultrasonography; but in the following cases MRI had more data. In a fetus with bilateral hydronephrosis, MRI could differentiate PUV from UPJ stenosis by visualizing distention of the ureters. MRI allowed better depiction of complex anomalies

  17. Functional MRI of language lateralization during development in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott K; Vannest, Jennifer; Mecoli, Marc; Jacola, Lisa M; Tillema, Jan-Mendelt; Karunanayaka, Prasanna R; Schmithorst, Vincent J; Yuan, Weihong; Plante, Elena; Byars, Anna W

    2007-09-01

    Changes in the distribution of language function in the brain have been documented from infancy through adulthood. Even macroscopic measures of language lateralization reflect a dynamic process of language development. In this review, we summarize a series of functional MRI studies of language skills in children ages of five to 18 years, both typically-developing children and children with brain injuries or neurological disorders that occur at different developmental stages with different degrees of severity. These studies used a battery of fMRI-compatible language tasks designed to tap sentential and lexical language skills that develop early and later in childhood. In typically-developing children, lateralization changes with age are associated with language skills that have a protracted period of development, reflecting the developmental process of skill acquisition rather than general maturation of the brain. Normative data, across the developmental period, acts as a reference for disentangling developmental patterns in brain activation from changes due to developmental or acquired abnormalities. This review emphasizes the importance of considering age and child development in neuroimaging studies of language.

  18. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  19. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  20. Acquisition and analysis strategies in functional MRI at high fields

    CERN Document Server

    Windischberger, C

    2001-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging represents a non-invasive technique to examine neuronal activity in the brain. It applies radio waves to excite nuclear spins, using the emitted signal during relaxation for image generation. Signal modulations from local blood flow and oxygenation level changes caused by neuronal activity are the basis for calculating functional brain maps with high spatial resolution. The present work discusses concepts for improving the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as sophisticated analysis approaches. Besides an exhaustive description of image reconstruction algorithms, computational simulations on echo-shifting in echo-planar imaging are presented and effects on spatial resolution are quantified. The results demonstrate that echo-shifting causes only minimal resolution losses for high signal-to-noise data, but leads to severe resolution degradation (up to 30 %) in images with low signal-to-noise ratios. After an overview of the mechanisms that cause fMRI signal changes su...

  1. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niskanen, Eini [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kaelviaeinen, Reetta [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  2. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...... a reduced blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increase and a greater asymmetry in the visual cortex, compared with controls. The volume of visual cortical activation was significantly correlated to the result of the contrast sensitivity test. The BOLD signal increase correlated significantly...... of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...

  3. Infimal convolution of total generalized variation functionals for dynamic MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegl, Matthias; Holler, Martin; Schwarzl, Andreas; Bredies, Kristian; Stollberger, Rudolf

    2017-07-01

    To accelerate dynamic MR applications using infimal convolution of total generalized variation functionals (ICTGV) as spatio-temporal regularization for image reconstruction. ICTGV comprises a new image prior tailored to dynamic data that achieves regularization via optimal local balancing between spatial and temporal regularity. Here it is applied for the first time to the reconstruction of dynamic MRI data. CINE and perfusion scans were investigated to study the influence of time dependent morphology and temporal contrast changes. ICTGV regularized reconstruction from subsampled MR data is formulated as a convex optimization problem. Global solutions are obtained by employing a duality based non-smooth optimization algorithm. The reconstruction error remains on a low level with acceleration factors up to 16 for both CINE and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI data. The GPU implementation of the algorithm suites clinical demands by reducing reconstruction times of one dataset to less than 4 min. ICTGV based dynamic magnetic resonance imaging reconstruction allows for vast undersampling and therefore enables for very high spatial and temporal resolutions, spatial coverage and reduced scan time. With the proposed distinction of model and regularization parameters it offers a new and robust method of flexible decomposition into components with different degrees of temporal regularity. Magn Reson Med 78:142-155, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Quantitative NumART2* mapping in functional MRI studies at 1.5 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagberg, Gisela E; Bianciardi, Marta; Patria, Fabiana; Indovina, Iole

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative mapping of the effective transverse relaxation time, T2* and proton density was performed in a motor activation functional MRI (fMRI) study using multi-echo, echo planar imaging (EPI) and NumART2* (Numerical Algorithm for Real time T2*). Comparisons between NumART2* and conventional single echo EPI with an echo time of 64 ms were performed for five healthy participants examined twice. Simulations were also performed to address specific issues associated with the two techniques, such as echo time-dependent signal variation. While the single echo contrast varied with the baseline T2* value, relative changes in T2* remained unaffected. Statistical analysis of the T2* maps yielded fMRI activation patterns with an improved statistical detection relative to conventional EPI but with less activated voxels, suggesting that NumART2* has superior spatial specificity. Two effects, inflow and dephasing, that may explain this finding were investigated. Particularly, a statistically significant increase in proton density was found in a brain area that was detected as activated by conventional EPI but not by NumART2* while no such changes were observed in brain areas that showed stimulus correlated signal changes on T2* maps.

  5. Gadoxetic Acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-Enhanced MRI versus Gadobenate Dimeglumine (Gd-BOPTA)-Enhanced MRI for Preoperatively Detecting Hepatocellular Carcinoma: an Initial Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yu Lri; Kim, Seong Hyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Choi, Dong Il; Lee, Won Jae; Kim, Hee Jung; Koo, Ji Hyun; Lim, Hyo Keun [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Hwan [Kangwon National University Hospital, Chuncheon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong Mee; Kim, Min Ju [Korea University College of Medicine, Korea University Guro Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare the diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI for preoperatively detecting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Eighteen consecutive patients (17 men and one woman, age range: 31-73 years) with 22 HCCs underwent examinations with gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI on a 3.0-Tesla unit. The diagnosis of HCC was established after surgical resection and pathological conformation. Three observers independently reviewed each MR image in a random order on a tumor-by-tumor basis. The diagnostic accuracy of these techniques for the detection of HCC was assessed by performing an alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. The sensitivity and positive predictive values were evaluated. The average value of the area under the ROC curve (Az) for gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI (0.887) was not significantly different from the Az (0.899) for gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI (p > 0.05). The overall sensitivities of gadoxetic acid enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI were 80% and 83%, respectively, with no significant difference (p > 0.05). The differences of the positive predictive values for the two contrast agents for each observer were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The diagnostic performance of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and gadobenate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI for preoperatively detecting HCC is quite similar

  6. Functional MRI in medulloblastoma survivors supports prophylactic reading intervention during tumor treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ping; Conklin, Heather M; Scoggins, Matthew A; Li, Yimei; Li, Xingyu; Jones, Melissa M; Palmer, Shawna L; Gajjar, Amar; Ogg, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Development of reading skills is vulnerable to disruption in children treated for brain tumors. Interventions, remedial and prophylactic, are needed to mitigate reading and other learning difficulties faced by survivors. A functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was conducted to investigate long-term effects of a prophylactic reading intervention administered during radiation therapy in children treated for medulloblastoma. The fMRI study included 19 reading-intervention (age 11.7 ± 0.6 years) and 21 standard-of-care (age 12.1 ± 0.6 years) medulloblastoma survivors, and 21 typically developing children (age 12.3 ± 0.6 years). The survivors were 2.5 [1.2, 5.4] years after completion of tumor therapies and reading-intervention survivors were 2.9 [1.6, 5.9] years after intervention. Five fMRI tasks (Rapid Automatized Naming, Continuous Performance Test using faces and letters, orthographic and phonological processing of letter pairs, implicit word reading, and story reading) were used to probe reading-related neural activation. Woodcock-Johnson Reading Fluency, Word Attack, and Sound Awareness subtests were used to evaluate reading abilities. At the time of fMRI, Sound Awareness scores were significantly higher in the reading-intervention group than in the standard-of-care group (p = 0.046). Brain activation during the fMRI tasks was detected in left inferior frontal, temporal, ventral occipitotemporal, and subcortical regions, and differed among the groups (p reading-intervention group. Standardized reading scores and patterns of brain activation provide evidence of long-term effects of prophylactic reading intervention in children treated for medulloblastoma.

  7. Early detection of Alzheimer's disease using MRI hippocampal texture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lauge; Igel, Christian; Hansen, Naja Liv

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) is associated with reduction in hippocampal volume in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, it is unknown whether hippocampal texture changes in persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) that does not have a change...... in hippocampal volume. We tested the hypothesis that hippocampal texture has association to early cognitive loss beyond that of volumetric changes. The texture marker was trained and evaluated using T1-weighted MRI scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) database, and subsequently...

  8. Brain functions after sports-related concussion: insights from event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, Nadia; Saluja, Rajeet Singh; Chen, Jen-Kai; Bottari, Carolina; Johnston, Karen; Ptito, Alain

    2010-10-01

    The high incidence of concussions in contact sports and their impact on brain functions are a major cause for concern. To improve our understanding of brain functioning after sports-related concussion, advanced functional assessment techniques, namely event-related potentials (ERPs) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), have been recently used in research studies. Contrary to neuropsychological tests that measure verbal and/or motor responses, ERPs and fMRI assess the neural activities associated with cognitive/behavioral demands, and thus provide access to better comprehension of brain functioning. In fact, ERPs have excellent temporal resolution, and fMRI identifies the involved structures during a task. This article describes ERP and fMRI techniques and reviews the results obtained with these tools in sports-related concussion. Although these techniques are not yet readily available, they offer a unique clinical approach, particularly for complex cases (ie, athletes with multiple concussions, chronic symptoms) and objective measures that provide valuable information to guide management and return-to-play decision making.

  9. Constructing Carbon Fiber Motion-Detection Loops for Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, David F; Masterton, Richard A J; Archer, John S; Fleming, Steven W; Warren, Aaron E L; Jackson, Graeme D

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant impediments to high-quality EEG recorded in an MRI scanner is subject motion. Availability of motion artifact sensors can substantially improve the quality of the recorded EEG. In the study of epilepsy, it can also dramatically increase the confidence that one has in discriminating true epileptiform activity from artifact. This is due both to the reduction in artifact and the ability to visually inspect the motion sensor signals when reading the EEG, revealing whether or not head motion is present. We have previously described the use of carbon fiber loops for detecting and correcting artifact in EEG acquired simultaneously with MRI. The loops, attached to the subject's head, are electrically insulated from the scalp. They provide a simple and direct measure of specific artifact that is contaminating the EEG, including both subject motion and residual artifact arising from magnetic field gradients applied during MRI. Our previous implementation was used together with a custom-built EEG-fMRI system that differs substantially from current commercially available EEG-fMRI systems. The present technical note extends this work, describing in more detail how to construct the carbon fiber motion-detection loops, and how to interface them with a commercially available simultaneous EEG-fMRI system. We hope that the information provided may help those wishing to utilize a motion-detection/correction solution to improve the quality of EEG recorded within an MRI scanner.

  10. Constructing carbon fibre motion detection loops for simultaneous EEG-fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. Abbott

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most significant impediments to high-quality EEG recorded in an MRI scanner is subject motion. Availability of motion artefact sensors can substantially improve the quality of the recorded EEG. In the study of epilepsy, it can also dramatically increase the confidence one has in discriminating true epileptiform activity from artefact. This is due both to the reduction in artefact and the ability to visually inspect the motion sensor signals when reading the EEG, revealing whether or not head motion is present.We have previously described the use of carbon-fibre loops for detecting and correcting artefact in EEG acquired simultaneously with MRI. The loops, attached to the subject’s head, are electrically insulated from the scalp. They provide a simple and direct measure of specific artefact that is contaminating the EEG, including both subject motion and residual artefact arising from magnetic field gradients applied during MRI. Our previous implementation was used together with a custom-built EEG-fMRI system that differs substantially from current commercially available EEG-fMRI systems. The present technical note extends this work, describing in more detail how to construct the carbon-fibre motion detection loops, and how to interface them with a commercially available simultaneous EEG-fMRI system. We hope that the information provided may help those wishing to utilise a motion-detection / correction solution to improve the quality of EEG recorded within an MRI scanner.

  11. Interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in intrinsic fMRI networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuciu, Philippe; Abry, Patrice; He, Biyu J

    2014-07-15

    Studies employing functional connectivity-type analyses have established that spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals are organized within large-scale brain networks. Meanwhile, fMRI signals have been shown to exhibit 1/f-type power spectra - a hallmark of scale-free dynamics. We studied the interplay between functional connectivity and scale-free dynamics in fMRI signals, utilizing the fractal connectivity framework - a multivariate extension of the univariate fractional Gaussian noise model, which relies on a wavelet formulation for robust parameter estimation. We applied this framework to fMRI data acquired from healthy young adults at rest and while performing a visual detection task. First, we found that scale-invariance existed beyond univariate dynamics, being present also in bivariate cross-temporal dynamics. Second, we observed that frequencies within the scale-free range do not contribute evenly to inter-regional connectivity, with a systematically stronger contribution of the lowest frequencies, both at rest and during task. Third, in addition to a decrease of the Hurst exponent and inter-regional correlations, task performance modified cross-temporal dynamics, inducing a larger contribution of the highest frequencies within the scale-free range to global correlation. Lastly, we found that across individuals, a weaker task modulation of the frequency contribution to inter-regional connectivity was associated with better task performance manifesting as shorter and less variable reaction times. These findings bring together two related fields that have hitherto been studied separately - resting-state networks and scale-free dynamics, and show that scale-free dynamics of human brain activity manifest in cross-regional interactions as well.

  12. Correlation of CT-based regional cardiac function (SQUEEZ) with myocardial strain calculated from tagged MRI: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourmorteza, Amir; Chen, Marcus Y; van der Pals, Jesper; Arai, Andrew E; McVeigh, Elliot R

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the correlation between local myocardial function estimates from CT and myocardial strain from tagged MRI in the same heart. Accurate detection of regional myocardial dysfunction can be an important finding in the diagnosis of functionally significant coronary artery disease. Tagged MRI is currently a reference standard for noninvasive regional myocardial function analysis; however, it has practical drawbacks. We have developed a CT imaging protocol and automated image analysis algorithm for estimating regional cardiac function from a few heartbeats. This method tracks the motion of the left ventricular (LV) endocardial surface to produce local function maps: we call the method Stretch Quantification of Endocardial Engraved Zones (SQUEEZ). Myocardial infarction was created by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery for 2 h followed by reperfusion in canine models. Tagged and cine MRI scans were performed during the reperfusion phase and first-pass contrast enhanced CT scans were acquired. The average delay between the CT and MRI scans was myocardial strain (Ecc) was calculated from the tagged MRI data. The agreement between peak systolic Ecc and SQUEEZ was investigated in 162 segments in the 9 hearts. Linear regression and Bland-Altman analysis was used to assess the correlation between the two metrics of local LV function. The results show good agreement between SQUEEZ and Ecc: (r = 0.71, slope = 0.78, p function. The good agreement between the estimates of local myocardial function obtained from CT SQUEEZ and tagged MRI provides encouragement to investigate the use of SQUEEZ for measuring regional cardiac function at a low clinical dose in humans.

  13. Evolution and current challenges in the teaching of functional MRI and functional brain imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoy, Robert L

    2012-08-15

    The report of any new and successful method for studying the world triggers the need to train people in the use of that method. In the case of functional magnetic resonance imaging and its use for examining human brain function in vivo, expertise is required in a greater collection of domains than usual. Development of fMRI training programs started shortly after the announcement of BOLD-based fMRI in humans. These programs had a variety of durations and primary content areas. All programs had to deal with the challenge of bringing interested researchers from a wide variety of areas-many of whom had little or no understanding of MR physics, and/or experimental psychology, and/or the nuances of data analysis and modeling-to a sufficiently detailed level of knowledge that both the funding agencies, and the existing proprietors of the technology (often radiologists or MR physicists at hospitals) would take the research proposals of new investigators seriously. Now that fMRI-based research is well established, there are new educational challenges. Some have to do with the growing list of technologies used to study human brain function in vivo. But perhaps more daunting is the challenge of training consumers of the reports and claims based on fMRI and other brain imaging modalities. As fMRI becomes influential in contexts beyond the research environment-from the clinic to the courtroom to the legislature-training consumers of fMRI-based claims will take on increasing importance, and represents its own unique challenges for education.

  14. A potential MRI contract agent for tumor detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Since the first successful attempt in the early 1970s, the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a non-invasive diagnostic tool has seen rapid and wide applications in clinical practice. However,new types of contrast agents remain to be developed for further improving the sensitivity and specificity of the technology.

  15. [Functional MRI at 1 Tesla. Basic paradigms and clinical application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarcz, Attila; Auer, Tibor; Komoly, Sámuel; Dóczi, Tamás; Janszky, József

    2007-07-30

    To perform functional MRI experiments at low magnetic field, and to set up routine protocol to help the planning of neurosurgical operations and the examination of epilepsy patients. An optimized 2D EPI sequence was applied to yield functional MR images in basic paradigms such as finger tapping and internal word generation. Further, activation was induced also by a task involving mental navigation based on the retrieval of individually familiar visuo-spatial knowledge. Low resolution (matrix of 64x64) functional MR images satisfactorily visualized moto-sensor strip and speech centers. In the mental navigation task bilateral activation of the hippocampal formation was observed. Determination of motor area was also performed in an epilepsy patient whose seizure focus had been found in the area of pre- and post-central gyrus. The dislocation of the motor cortex was demonstrated. Functional MR images with fine quality can be obtained in basic paradigms even at low magnetic field if MR imaging parameters and paradigms are optimized.

  16. Structure and function relationship of human heart from DENSE MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Abbas N.; Gharib, Morteza

    2007-03-01

    The study here, suggests a macroscopic structure for the Left Ventricle (LV), based on the heart kinematics which is obtained through imaging. The measurement of the heart muscle deformation using the Displacement ENcoding with Stimulated Echoes (DENSE) MRI, which describes the heart kinematics in the Lagrangian frame work, is used to determine the high resolution patterns of true myocardial strain. Subsequently, the tangential Shortening Index (SI) and the thickening of the LV wall are calculated for each data point. Considering the heart as a positive-displacement pump, the contribution of each segment of LV in the heart function, can be determined by the SI and thickening of the wall in the same portion. Hence the SI isosurfaces show the extent and spatial distribution of the heart activity and reveals its macro structure. The structure and function of the heart are, therefore, related which in turn results in a macroscopic model for the LV. In particular, it was observed that the heart functionality is not uniformly distributed in the LV, and the regions with greater effect on the pumping process, form a band which wraps around the heart. These results, which are supported by the established histological evidence, may be considered as a landmark in connecting the structure and function of the heart through imaging. Furthermore, the compatibility of this model with microscopic observations about the fiber direction is investigated. This method may be used for planning as well as post evaluation of the ventriculoplasty.

  17. Lying in the scanner: covert countermeasures disrupt deception detection by functional magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganis, G.; Rosenfeld, J.P.; Meixner, J.; Kievit, R.A.; Schendan, H.E.

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have documented differences between deceptive and honest responses. Capitalizing on this research, companies marketing fMRI-based lie detection services have been founded, generating methodological and ethical concerns in scientific and legal comm

  18. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  19. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoetker, Andreas M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazaheri, Yousef [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, Leonard B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K{sup trans} on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  20. Accuracy of [18F]FDG PET/MRI for the Detection of Liver Metastases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Beiderwellen

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of [18F]FDG-PET/MRI with PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.32 patients with solid malignancies underwent [18F]FDG-PET/CT and subsequent PET/MRI of the liver. Two readers assessed both datasets regarding lesion characterization (benign, indeterminate, malignant, conspicuity and diagnostic confidence. An imaging follow-up (mean interval: 185±92 days and/-or histopathological specimen served as standards of reference. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV and negative predictive value (NPV were calculated for both modalities. Accuracy was determined by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve. Values of conspicuity and diagnostic confidence were compared using Wilcoxon-signed-rank test.The standard of reference revealed 113 liver lesions in 26 patients (malignant: n = 45; benign: n = 68. For PET/MRI a higher accuracy (PET/CT: 82.4%; PET/MRI: 96.1%; p<0.001 as well as sensitivity (67.8% vs. 92.2%, p<0.01 and NPV (82.0% vs. 95.1%, p<0.05 were observed. PET/MRI offered higher lesion conspicuity (PET/CT: 2.0±1.1 [median: 2; range 0-3]; PET/MRI: 2.8±0.5 [median: 3; range 0-3]; p<0.001 and diagnostic confidence (PET/CT: 2.0±0.8 [median: 2; range: 1-3]; PET/MRI 2.6±0.6 [median: 3; range: 1-3]; p<0.001. Furthermore, PET/MRI enabled the detection of additional PET-negative metastases (reader 1: 10; reader 2: 12.PET/MRI offers higher diagnostic accuracy compared to PET/CT for the detection of liver metastases.

  1. MB-SWIFT functional MRI during deep brain stimulation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Lauri J; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Zhang, Jinjin; Utecht, Lynn; Adriany, Gregor; Garwood, Michael; Gröhn, Olli; Michaeli, Shalom; Mangia, Silvia

    2017-08-07

    Recently introduced 3D radial MRI pulse sequence entitled Multi-Band SWeep Imaging with Fourier Transformation (MB-SWIFT) having virtually zero acquisition delay was used to obtain functional MRI (fMRI) contrast in rat's brain at 9.4 T during deep brain stimulation (DBS). The results demonstrate that MB-SWIFT allows functional images free of susceptibility artifacts, and provides an excellent fMRI activation contrast in the brain. Flip angle dependence of the MB-SWIFT fMRI signal and elimination of the fMRI contrast while using saturation bands, indicate a blood flow origin of the observed fMRI contrast. MB-SWIFT fMRI modality permits activation studies in the close proximity to an implanted lead, which is not possible to achieve with conventionally used gradient echo and spin echo - echo planar imaging fMRI techniques. We conclude that MB-SWIFT fMRI is a powerful imaging modality for investigations of functional responses during DBS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-time QRS detection using integrated variance for ECG gated cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a patient’s vital signs are required for different purposes. In cardiac MRI (CMR, an electrocardiogram (ECG of the patient is required for triggering the image acquisition process. However, a reliable QRS detection of an ECG signal acquired inside an MRI scanner is a challenging task due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effect which interferes with the ECG. The aim of this work was to develop a reliable QRS detector usable inside the MRI which also fulfills the standards for medical devices (IEC 60601-2-27. Therefore, a novel real-time QRS detector based on integrated variance measurements is presented. The algorithm was trained on ANSI/AAMI EC13 test waveforms and was then applied to two databases with 12-lead ECG signals recorded inside and outside an MRI scanner. Reliable results for both databases were achieved for the ECG signals recorded inside (DBMRI: sensitivity Se = 99.94%, positive predictive value +P = 99.84% and outside (DBInCarT: Se = 99.29%, +P = 99.72% the MRI. Due to the accurate R-peak detection in real-time this can be used for monitoring and triggering in MRI exams.

  3. Diffusion MRI and the detection of alterations following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Elizabeth B; Schwerin, Susan C; Avram, Alexandru V; Juliano, Sharon L; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2017-06-13

    This article provides a review of brain tissue alterations that may be detectable using diffusion magnetic resonance imaging MRI (dMRI) approaches and an overview and perspective on the modern dMRI toolkits for characterizing alterations that follow traumatic brain injury (TBI). Noninvasive imaging is a cornerstone of clinical treatment of TBI and has become increasingly used for preclinical and basic research studies. In particular, quantitative MRI methods have the potential to distinguish and evaluate the complex collection of neurobiological responses to TBI arising from pathology, neuroprotection, and recovery. dMRI provides unique information about the physical environment in tissue and can be used to probe physiological, architectural, and microstructural features. Although well-established approaches such as diffusion tensor imaging are known to be highly sensitive to changes in the tissue environment, more advanced dMRI techniques have been developed that may offer increased specificity or new information for describing abnormalities. These tools are promising, but incompletely understood in the context of TBI. Furthermore, model dependencies and relative limitations may impact the implementation of these approaches and the interpretation of abnormalities in their metrics. The objective of this paper is to present a basic review and comparison across dMRI methods as they pertain to the detection of the most commonly observed tissue and cellular alterations following TBI. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Neuroscience Research Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functional MRI of sustained attention in bipolar mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D E; Eliassen, J C; Durling, M; Lamy, M; Adler, C M; DelBello, M P; Shear, P K; Cerullo, M A; Lee, J-H; Strakowski, S M

    2012-03-01

    We examined sustained attention deficits in bipolar disorder and associated changes in brain activation assessed by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We hypothesized that relative to healthy participants, those with mania or mixed mania would (1) exhibit incremental decrements in sustained attention over time, (2) overactivate brain regions required for emotional processing and (3) progressively underactivate attentional regions of prefrontal cortex. Fifty participants with manic/mixed bipolar disorder (BP group) and 34 healthy comparison subjects (HC group) received an fMRI scan while performing a 15-min continuous performance task (CPT). The data were divided into three consecutive 5-min vigilance periods to analyze sustained attention. Composite brain activation maps indicated that both groups activated dorsal and ventral regions of an anterior-limbic network, but the BP group exhibited less activation over time relative to baseline. Consistent with hypotheses 1 and 2, the BP group showed a marginally greater behavioral CPT sustained attention decrement and more bilateral amygdala activation than the HC group, respectively. Instead of differential activation in prefrontal cortex over time, as predicted in hypothesis 3, the BP group progressively decreased activation in subcortical regions of striatum and thalamus relative to the HC group. These results suggest that regional activation decrements in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex accompany sustained attention decrements in both bipolar and healthy individuals. Stable amygdala overactivation across prolonged vigils may interfere with sustained attention and exacerbate attentional deficits in bipolar disorder. Differential striatal and thalamic deactivation in bipolar disorder is interpreted as a loss of amygdala (emotional brain) modulation by the ventrolateral prefrontal-subcortical circuit, which interferes with attentional maintenance.

  5. Older age is associated with more MRI-detected inflammation in hand and foot joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; Mangnus, Lukas; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Newsum, Elize C; Huizinga, Tom W J; Reijnierse, Monique; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2016-12-01

    Although MRI is recommended for diagnostic use in detecting joint inflammation, its value in clinical practice has not been settled. Older symptom-free persons show more MRI-detected inflammation in their hands and feet. Within arthritis patients, a similar effect could be present (a general age effect). The association of age with MRI inflammation could also be enhanced by disease (disease-dependent age effect). Because both effects could have diagnostic consequences, we evaluated the association between age-at-onset and MRI-detected inflammation in early arthritis and RA. Unilateral contrast-enhanced MRI of the MCP joint, wrist and MTP joints was performed in 589 newly presenting early arthritis patients, of whom 229 had RA. Bone marrow oedema, synovitis and tenosynovitis were summed, yielding the MRI inflammation score. MRI findings were associated with age and compared with those of 193 (previously reported) symptom-free controls. Early arthritis and RA-patients had, respectively, 2.6 (95% CI: 2.3, 3.0, P < 0.001) and 3.7 times (95% CI: 3.2, 4.3, P < 0.001) higher MRI inflammation scores than controls (adjusted for age). At higher age of onset, early arthritis and RA patients had higher MRI inflammation scores (1.03/year, P < 0.001). A similar effect was observed in controls (1.03/year, P < 0.001). The interaction term age*group (arthritis/RA vs controls) was non-significant (P = 0.80 and P = 0.23), suggesting that the age effect was not disease dependent. At the joint level, older RA patients had more extended MRI inflammation, but the preferential locations were similar. Older age is associated with more MRI-detected inflammation, and the effect was similar in arthritis and controls. This age effect should be considered when interpreting hand and foot MRI for diagnostic purposes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. MRI detected prevalence of abnormalities in patients of knee pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Mehta

    2015-10-01

    Results: In this present study 72% patients were males and 28% patients females and their ages ranging from (11-80 years. Knee pain was found common in age group 31-40 years. Menisci lesions (44% were more common as compared to ligament lesions (14% in patients of knee pain. Osteoarthritis was found in 40 % of patients of knee pain. Joint effusion and marrow edema was found with incidence of 74% and 62% respectively. 4% patients were suffering from intraarticular tumors. Conclusions: Knee pain can occur at any stage of life due to various causative factors. MRI can demonstrate the exact nature and extent of bony as well as soft tissue abnormality. This has increase the use of MRI in evaluation of patients of knee pain. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2572-2575

  7. Detecting Fleeting MRI Signals with Frequency-Modulated Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curtis; Moeller, Steen; Chamberlain, Ryan; O'Connell, Robert; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Garwood, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fundamentally different approach to MRI referred to as SWIFT (sweep imaging with Fourier transformation). SWIFT exploits time-shared RF excitation and signal acquisition, allowing capture of signal from spins with extremely short transverse relaxation time, T2*. The MR signal is acquired in gaps inserted into a broadband frequency-swept excitation pulse, which results in acquisition delays of only 1 – 2 microseconds. In SWIFT, 3D k-space is sampled in a radial manner, whereby one projection of the object is acquired in the gaps of each frequency-swept pulse, allowing a repetition time (TR) on the order of the pulse length (typically 1 – 3 milliseconds). Since the orientation of consecutive projections varies in a smooth manner (i.e., only small increments in the values of the x, y, z gradients occur from view to view), SWIFT scanning is close to inaudible and is insensitive to gradient timing errors and eddy currents. SWIFT images can be acquired in scan times similar to and sometimes faster than conventional 3D gradient echo techniques. With its ability to capture signals from ultrashort T2* spins, SWIFT promises to expand the role of MRI in areas of research where MRI previously played no or negligible role. In this article, we show wood and tooth images obtained with SWIFT as examples of materials with ultrashort T2*. Early experience suggests SWIFT can play a role in materials science and porous media research. PMID:22661791

  8. Haptic fMRI: combining functional neuroimaging with haptics for studying the brain's motor control representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Samir; Brantner, Gerald; Aholt, Chris; Kay, Kendrick; Khatib, Oussama

    2013-01-01

    A challenging problem in motor control neuroimaging studies is the inability to perform complex human motor tasks given the Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanner's disruptive magnetic fields and confined workspace. In this paper, we propose a novel experimental platform that combines Functional MRI (fMRI) neuroimaging, haptic virtual simulation environments, and an fMRI-compatible haptic device for real-time haptic interaction across the scanner workspace (above torso ∼ .65×.40×.20m(3)). We implement this Haptic fMRI platform with a novel haptic device, the Haptic fMRI Interface (HFI), and demonstrate its suitability for motor neuroimaging studies. HFI has three degrees-of-freedom (DOF), uses electromagnetic motors to enable high-fidelity haptic rendering (>350Hz), integrates radio frequency (RF) shields to prevent electromagnetic interference with fMRI (temporal SNR >100), and is kinematically designed to minimize currents induced by the MRI scanner's magnetic field during motor displacement (Tesla fMRI scanner's baseline noise variation (∼.85±.1%). Finally, HFI is haptically transparent and does not interfere with human motor tasks (tested for .4m reaches). By allowing fMRI experiments involving complex three-dimensional manipulation with haptic interaction, Haptic fMRI enables-for the first time-non-invasive neuroscience experiments involving interactive motor tasks, object manipulation, tactile perception, and visuo-motor integration.

  9. Comparative study of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balliu, E., E-mail: eballiu@gmail.co [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Boada, M.; Pelaez, I. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, J.C. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, Clinica Girona - Hospital Sta Caterina, Girona (Spain); Barcelo-Vidal, C. [Department of Computer Science and Applied Mathematics, University of Girona (Spain); Rubio, A.; Galofre, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Castro, A. [Department of Internal Medicine, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain); Pedraza, S. [Department of Magnetic Resonance, IDI Girona, Hospital Universitari de Girona Dr Josep Trueta, Girona (Spain)

    2010-12-15

    Aim: To assess and compare the diagnostic accuracy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and bone scintigraphy in the detection of metastases to bone. Material and methods: Forty randomly selected patients with known malignant tumours were prospectively studied using bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI. Two patients were excluded. Symptoms of bone metastasis were present in 29 (76%) patients and absent in nine (24%). Findings were classified into four categories according to the probability of bone metastasis: (1) negative, (2) probably negative, (3) probably positive, and (4) positive. Diagnostic accuracy was determined according to the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The definitive diagnosis was reached using other imaging techniques, biopsy, or 12 months clinical follow-up. Results: Metastases were present in 18 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic accuracy were 94, 90, and 92%, respectively, for whole-body MRI and 72, 75, and 74%, respectively, for bone scintigraphy. Diagnostic accuracy measured by the area under the ROC curve was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (96%) than for bone scintigraphy (77%; p<0.05). Interobserver agreement measured by the kappa index was significantly higher for whole-body MRI (0.895) than for bone scintigraphy (0.524; p<0.05). Whole-body MRI detected lesions in tissues other than bone in 17 (45%) patients. Conclusions: Whole-body MRI is more accurate and more objective than bone scintigraphy for the detection of bone metastases. Whole-body MRI can also detect lesions in tissues other than bone.

  10. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus [Department of Radiology, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker [Department of Stereotaxy and Functional Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Wedekind, Christoph [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Cologne, Joseph-Stelzmann-Strasse 9, 50924, Cologne (Germany); Bunke, Juergen [Philips Medical Systems, Hamburg (Germany)

    2004-04-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  11. A robust independent component analysis (ICA) model for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Jingqi; Mitra, Sunanda; Liu, Zheng; Nutter, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The coupling of carefully designed experiments with proper analysis of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data provides us with a powerful as well as noninvasive tool to help us understand cognitive processes associated with specific brain regions and hence could be used to detect abnormalities induced by a diseased state. The hypothesisdriven General Linear Model (GLM) and the data-driven Independent Component Analysis (ICA) model are the two most commonly used models for fMRI data analysis. A hybrid ICA-GLM model combines the two models to take advantages of benefits from both models to achieve more accurate mapping of the stimulus-induced activated brain regions. We propose a modified hybrid ICA-GLM model with probabilistic ICA that includes a noise model. In this modified hybrid model, a probabilistic principle component analysis (PPCA)-based component number estimation is used in the ICA stage to extract the intrinsic number of original time courses. In addition, frequency matching is introduced into the time course selection stage, along with temporal correlation, F-test based model fitting estimation, and time course combination, to produce a more accurate design matrix for GLM. A standard fMRI dataset is used to compare the results of applying GLM and the proposed hybrid ICA-GLM in generating activation maps.

  12. Robust preprocessing for stimulus-based functional MRI of the moving fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wonsang; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Zun, Zungho; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Fetal motion manifests as signal degradation and image artifact in the acquired time series of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. We present a robust preprocessing pipeline to specifically address fetal and placental motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI with slowly cycled block design in the living fetus. In the proposed pipeline, motion correction is optimized to the experimental paradigm, and it is performed separately in each phase as well as in each region of interest (ROI), recognizing that each phase and organ experiences different types of motion. To obtain the averaged BOLD signals for each ROI, both misaligned volumes and noisy voxels are automatically detected and excluded, and the missing data are then imputed by statistical estimation based on local polynomial smoothing. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline was effective in mitigating the motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI data of the fetal brain and placenta.

  13. Masking level differences--a diffusion tensor imaging and functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Wack

    Full Text Available In our previous study we investigated Masking Level Differences (MLD using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, but were unable to confirm neural correlations for the MLD within the auditory cortex and inferior colliculus. Here we have duplicated conditions from our previous study, but have included more participants and changed the study site to a new location with a newer scanner and presentation system. Additionally, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI is included to allow investigation of fiber tracts that may be involved with MLDs. Twenty participants were included and underwent audiometric testing and MRI scanning. The current study revealed regions of increased and decreased activity within the auditory cortex when comparing the combined noise and signal of the dichotic MLD stimuli (N0Sπ and NπS0 with N0S0. Furthermore, we found evidence of inferior colliculus involvement. Our DTI findings show strong correlations between DTI measures within the brainstem and signal detection threshold levels. Patterns of correlation when the signal was presented only to the right ear showed an extensive network in the left hemisphere; however, the opposite was not true for the signal presented only to the left ear. Our current study was able to confirm what we had previously hypothesized using fMRI, while extending our investigation of MLDs to include the characteristics of connecting neural pathways.

  14. Mentalizing in schizophrenia: A multivariate functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Andrew K; Dzafic, Ilvana; Robinson, Gail A; Reutens, David; Mowry, Bryan

    2016-12-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with mentalizing deficits that impact on social functioning and quality of life. Recently, schizophrenia has been conceptualized as a disorder of neural dysconnectivity and network level analyses offers a means of understanding the underlying deficits leading to mentalizing difficulty. Using an established mentalizing task (The Triangles Task), functional magnetic resonance images (fMRI) were acquired from 19 patients with schizophrenia and 17 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCs). Participants were required to watch short animations of two triangles interacting with each other with the interactions either random (no interaction), physical (patterned movement), or mental (intentional movement). Task-based Partial Least Squares (PLS) was used to analyze activation differences and commonalities between the three conditions and the two groups. Seed-based PLS was used to assess functional connectivity with peaks identified in the task-based PLS. Behavioural PLS was then performed using the accuracy from the mental conditions. Patients with schizophrenia performed worse on the mentalizing condition compared to HCs. Task-based PLS revealed one significant latent variable (LV) that explained 42.9% of the variance in the task, with theLV separating the mental condition from the physical and random conditions in patients with schizophrenia, but only the mental from physical in healthy controls. The mental animations were associated with increased modulation of the inferior frontal gyri bilaterally, left superior temporal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, and left caudate nucleus. The physical/random animations were associated with increased modulation of the right medial frontal gyrus and left superior frontal gyrus. Seed-based PLS identified increased functional connectivity with the left inferior frontal gyrus (liFG) and caudate nucleus in patients with schizophrenia, during the mental and physical interactions, with functional connectivity

  15. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the "glymphatic system" of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain.

  16. Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI for the Detection of Prostate Cancer: Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Cher Heng; Hobbs, Brian Paul; Wei, Wei; Kundra, Vikas

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to systematically review and meta-analyze dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) for the detection of prostate cancer in comparison with standard evaluation with T2-weighted imaging. Materials and Methods A PubMed electronic database search for the terms “dynamic contrast-enhanced,” “prostate,” and “MRI” was completed for articles up to September 17, 2013. All included studies had histopathologic correlation. Two by two contingency data were constructed for each study. A binormal bayesian ROC model was used to estimate and compare sensitivity, specificity, and AUC among eligible modalities. Results Both DCE-MRI (0.82–0.86) and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) (0.84–0.88) yielded significantly better AUC than T2-weighted imaging (0.68–0.77). Moreover, partial AUC for the combination of DCE-MRI, DWI, and T2-weighted imaging was improved significantly (0.111; 0.103–0.119) when compared with DCE-MRI alone (0.079; 0.072–0.085) and T2-weighted imaging alone (0.079; 0.074–0.084) but not DWI alone (0.099; 0.091–0.108). Sensitivity and specificity were similar among the four modalities. Conclusion DCE-MRI improves AUC of tumor detection overall compared with T2-weighted imaging alone. Methods for DCE-MRI analysis require standardization, but visual analysis performs similar to semiquantitative methods. A two-parameter approach using DCE-MRI and T2-weighted imaging or DWI and T2-weighted imaging may be sufficient, and the latter may be more favorable for most routine prostate cancer imaging. PMID:25794093

  17. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mangano, Francesco T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rozhkov, Leonid; Greiner, Hansel M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Treatment Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Miles, Lili [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children. (orig.)

  18. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies.

  19. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology: a combined structural and functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opmeer, Esther M; van Tol, Marie-José; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J A; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A; Penninx, Brenda W; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISC1 differentially modulates brain function during executive and memory processing, and morphology in regions relevant for depression and anxiety disorders (affective disorders). 128 participants, with (n = 103) and without (controls; n = 25) affective disorders underwent genotyping for Ser704Cys (with Cys-allele considered as risk-allele) and structural and functional (f) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) during visuospatial planning and emotional episodic memory tasks. For both voxel-based morphometry and fMRI analyses, we investigated the effect of genotype in controls and explored genotypeXdiagnosis interactions. Results are reported at p < 0.05 FWE small volume corrected. In controls, Cys-carriers showed smaller bilateral (para)hippocampal volumes compared with Ser-homozygotes, and lower activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral PFC during visuospatial planning. In anxiety patients, Cys-carriers showed larger (para)hippocampal volumes and more ACC activation during visuospatial planning. In depressive patients, no effect of genotype was observed and overall, no effect of genotype on episodic memory processing was detected. We demonstrated that Ser704Cys-genotype influences (para)hippocampal structure and functioning the dorsal PFC during executive planning, most prominently in unaffected controls. Results suggest that presence of psychopathology moderates Ser704Cys effects.

  20. Visual Detection and Identification Are Not the Same: Evidence from Psychophysics and fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straube, Sirko; Fahle, Manfred

    2011-01-01

    Sometimes object detection as opposed to identification is sufficient to initiate the appropriate action. To explore the neural origin of behavioural differences between the two tasks, we combine psychophysical measurements and fMRI, specifically contrasting shape detection versus identification of a figure. This figure consisted of Gabor elements…

  1. Chronotype Modulates Language Processing-Related Cerebral Activity during Functional MRI (fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rosenberg

    Full Text Available Based on individual daily physiological cycles, humans can be classified as early (EC, late (LC and intermediate (IC chronotypes. Recent studies have verified that chronotype-specificity relates to performance on cognitive tasks: participants perform more efficiently when tested in the chronotype-specific optimal time of day than when tested in their non-optimal time. Surprisingly, imaging studies focussing on the underlying neural mechanisms of potential chronotype-specificities are sparse. Moreover, chronotype-specific alterations of language-related semantic processing have been neglected so far.16 male, healthy ECs, 16 ICs and 16 LCs participated in a fast event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI paradigm probing semantic priming. Subjects read two subsequently presented words (prime, target and were requested to determine whether the target word was an existing word or a non-word. Subjects were tested during their individual evening hours when homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian alertness levels are high to ensure equal entrainment.Chronotype-specificity is associated with task-performance and brain activation. First, ECs exhibited slower reaction times than LCs. Second, ECs showed attenuated BOLD responses in several language-related brain areas, e.g. in the left postcentral gyrus, left and right precentral gyrus and in the right superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, increased BOLD responses were revealed for LCs as compared to ICs in task-related areas, e.g. in the right inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral gyrus.These findings reveal that even basic language processes are associated with chronotype-specific neuronal mechanisms. Consequently, results might change the way we schedule patient evaluations and/or healthy subjects in e.g. experimental research and adding "chronotype" as a statistical covariate.

  2. An Automated, Adaptive Framework for Optimizing Preprocessing Pipelines in Task-Based Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan W Churchill

    Full Text Available BOLD fMRI is sensitive to blood-oxygenation changes correlated with brain function; however, it is limited by relatively weak signal and significant noise confounds. Many preprocessing algorithms have been developed to control noise and improve signal detection in fMRI. Although the chosen set of preprocessing and analysis steps (the "pipeline" significantly affects signal detection, pipelines are rarely quantitatively validated in the neuroimaging literature, due to complex preprocessing interactions. This paper outlines and validates an adaptive resampling framework for evaluating and optimizing preprocessing choices by optimizing data-driven metrics of task prediction and spatial reproducibility. Compared to standard "fixed" preprocessing pipelines, this optimization approach significantly improves independent validation measures of within-subject test-retest, and between-subject activation overlap, and behavioural prediction accuracy. We demonstrate that preprocessing choices function as implicit model regularizers, and that improvements due to pipeline optimization generalize across a range of simple to complex experimental tasks and analysis models. Results are shown for brief scanning sessions (<3 minutes each, demonstrating that with pipeline optimization, it is possible to obtain reliable results and brain-behaviour correlations in relatively small datasets.

  3. An Automated, Adaptive Framework for Optimizing Preprocessing Pipelines in Task-Based Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Nathan W; Spring, Robyn; Afshin-Pour, Babak; Dong, Fan; Strother, Stephen C

    2015-01-01

    BOLD fMRI is sensitive to blood-oxygenation changes correlated with brain function; however, it is limited by relatively weak signal and significant noise confounds. Many preprocessing algorithms have been developed to control noise and improve signal detection in fMRI. Although the chosen set of preprocessing and analysis steps (the "pipeline") significantly affects signal detection, pipelines are rarely quantitatively validated in the neuroimaging literature, due to complex preprocessing interactions. This paper outlines and validates an adaptive resampling framework for evaluating and optimizing preprocessing choices by optimizing data-driven metrics of task prediction and spatial reproducibility. Compared to standard "fixed" preprocessing pipelines, this optimization approach significantly improves independent validation measures of within-subject test-retest, and between-subject activation overlap, and behavioural prediction accuracy. We demonstrate that preprocessing choices function as implicit model regularizers, and that improvements due to pipeline optimization generalize across a range of simple to complex experimental tasks and analysis models. Results are shown for brief scanning sessions (<3 minutes each), demonstrating that with pipeline optimization, it is possible to obtain reliable results and brain-behaviour correlations in relatively small datasets.

  4. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  5. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment between echocardiography and MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddhe, Sujatha; Lewin, Mark; Olson, Aaron; Soriano, Brian D. [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Ferguson, Mark [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with death in approximately 40% of patients. Echocardiography is routinely used to assess left ventricular (LV) function; however, it has limitations in these patients. We compared echocardiographic measures of cardiac function assessment to cardiac MRI. We included children and young adults with DMD who had MRI performed between January 2010 and July 2015. We measured echocardiographic and MRI parameters of function assessment, including strain. Presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by MRI. Subjects were divided into two groups based on MRI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): group I, LVEF ≥55% and group II, LVEF <55%. We included 41 studies in 33 subjects, with 25 in group I and 16 in group II. Mean age of subjects was 13.6 ± 2.8 years and mean duration between echocardiogram and MRI was 7.6 ± 4.1 months. Only 8 of 16 (50%) patients in group II had diminished function on echocardiogram. Echocardiographic images were suboptimal in 16 subjects (39%). Overall, echocardiographic parameters had weak correlation with MRI-derived ejection fraction percentage. MRI-derived myocardial strain assessment has better correlation with MRI ejection fraction as compared to echocardiography-derived strain parameters. Echocardiography-based ventricular functional assessment has weak correlation with MRI parameters in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. While this correlation improves in the subset of subjects with adequate echocardiographic image quality, it remains modest and potentially suboptimal for clinical management. Accordingly, we conclude that MRI should be performed routinely and early in children with DMD, not only for LGE imaging but also for functional assessment. (orig.)

  6. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease: first experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bettina; Karstoft, Kristian; Jørgensen, Troels Munch;

    2010-01-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides....

  7. Fractional Gaussian noise, functional MRI and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxim, Voichiţa; Sendur, Levent; Fadili, Jalal; Suckling, John; Gould, Rebecca; Howard, Rob; Bullmore, Ed

    2005-03-01

    Fractional Gaussian noise (fGn) provides a parsimonious model for stationary increments of a self-similar process parameterised by the Hurst exponent, H, and variance, sigma2. Fractional Gaussian noise with H 0.5 demonstrates 1/f, long memory or persistent behaviour; and the special case of fGn with H = 0.5 corresponds to classical Gaussian white noise. We comparatively evaluate four possible estimators of fGn parameters, one method implemented in the time domain and three in the wavelet domain. We show that a wavelet-based maximum likelihood (ML) estimator yields the most efficient estimates of H and sigma2 in simulated fGn with 0 0.5 tend to be concentrated in cortex whereas voxels with H vector beta for general linear modelling (GLM) of a physiological response to experimental stimulation and we demonstrate nominal type I error control in multiple testing of beta, divided by its standard error, in simulated and biological data under the null hypothesis beta = 0. We illustrate these methods principally by showing that there are significant differences between patients with early Alzheimer's disease (AD) and age-matched comparison subjects in the persistence of fGn in the medial and lateral temporal lobes, insula, dorsal cingulate/medial premotor cortex, and left pre- and postcentral gyrus: patients with AD had greater persistence of resting fMRI noise (larger H) in these regions. Comparable abnormalities in the AD patients were also identified by a permutation test of local differences in the first-order autoregression AR(1) coefficient, which was significantly more positive in patients. However, we found that the Hurst exponent provided a more sensitive metric than the AR(1) coefficient to detect these differences, perhaps because neurophysiological changes in early AD are naturally better described in terms of abnormal salience of long memory dynamics than a change in the strength of association between immediately consecutive time points. We conclude that

  8. Whole-body MRI including diffusion-weighted MRI compared with 5-HTP PET/CT in the detection of neuroendocrine tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbom, Lina; Caballero-Corbalán, José; Granberg, Dan; Sörensen, Jens; Eriksson, Barbro; Ahlström, Håkan

    2017-03-01

    We wanted to explore if whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) including diffusion-weighted (DW) and liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging could be valuable in lesion detection of neuroendocrine tumors (NET). [11C]-5-Hydroxytryptophan positron emission tomography/computed tomography (5-HTP PET/CT) was used for comparison. Twenty-one patients with NET were investigated with whole-body MRI, including DW imaging (DWI) and contrast-enhanced imaging of the liver, and whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Seven additional patients underwent upper abdomen MRI including DWI, liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging, and 5-HTP PET/CT. There was a patient-based concordance of 61% and a lesion-based concordance of 53% between the modalities. MRI showed good concordance with PET in detecting bone metastases but was less sensitive in detecting metastases in mediastinal lymph nodes. MRI detected more liver metastases than 5-HTP PET/CT. Whole-body MRI with DWI did not detect all NET lesions found with whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT. Our findings indicate that MRI of the liver including liver-specific contrast agent-enhanced imaging and DWI could be a useful complement to whole-body 5-HTP PET/CT.

  9. Imaging of Her2-targeted magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer detection: comparison of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry and MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolphi, Natalie L; Butler, Kimberly S; Lovato, Debbie M; Tessier, T E; Trujillo, Jason E; Hathaway, Helen J; Fegan, Danielle L; Monson, Todd C; Stevens, Tyler E; Huber, Dale L; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L; Altobelli, Stephen A; Bryant, Howard C; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, noninvasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 (breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125 000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T(2)-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15 600 cells in a 150 µl volume, with r(1) = 1.1 mm(-1) s(-1) and r(2) = 166 mm(-1) s(-1). Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies.

  10. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation.

  11. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and MRI-Transrectal Ultrasound Fusion Biopsy for Index Tumor Detection: Correlation with Radical Prostatectomy Specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Jan P; Schwab, Constantin; Wolf, Maya B; Freitag, Martin T; Alt, Celine D; Kesch, Claudia; Popeneciu, Ionel V; Huettenbrink, Clemens; Gasch, Claudia; Klein, Tilman; Bonekamp, David; Duensing, Stefan; Roth, Wilfried; Schueler, Svenja; Stock, Christian; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Roethke, Matthias; Hohenfellner, Markus; Hadaschik, Boris A

    2016-11-01

    Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) and MRI fusion targeted biopsy (FTB) detect significant prostate cancer (sPCa) more accurately than conventional biopsies alone. To evaluate the detection accuracy of mpMRI and FTB on radical prostatectomy (RP) specimen. From a cohort of 755 men who underwent transperineal MRI and transrectal ultrasound fusion biopsy under general anesthesia between 2012 and 2014, we retrospectively analyzed 120 consecutive patients who had subsequent RP. All received saturation biopsy (SB) in addition to FTB of lesions with Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS) score ≥2. The index lesion was defined as the lesion with extraprostatic extension, the highest Gleason score (GS), or the largest tumor volume (TV) if GS were the same, in order of priority. GS 3+3 and TV ≥1.3ml or GS ≥3+4 and TV ≥0.55ml were considered sPCa. We assessed the detection accuracy by mpMRI and different biopsy approaches and analyzed lesion agreement between mpMRI and RP specimen. Overall, 120 index and 71 nonindex lesions were detected. Overall, 107 (89%) index and 51 (72%) nonindex lesions harbored sPCa. MpMRI detected 110 of 120 (92%) index lesions, FTB (two cores per lesion) alone diagnosed 96 of 120 (80%) index lesions, and SB alone diagnosed 110 of 120 (92%) index lesions. Combined SB and FTB detected 115 of 120 (96%) index foci. FTB performed significantly less accurately compared with mpMRI (p=0.02) and the combination for index lesion detection (p=0.002). Combined FTB and SB detected 97% of all sPCa lesions and was superior to mpMRI (85%), FTB (79%), and SB (88%) alone (pcorrelation coefficient for index lesion agreement between mpMRI and RP was 0.87 (p<0.001). Limitations included the retrospective design, multiple operators, and nonblinding of radiologists. MpMRI identified 92% of index lesions compared with RP histopathology. The combination of FTB and SB was superior to both approaches alone, reliably detecting 97% of s

  12. Treatment planning with functional MRI; Strahlentherapieplanung mit der funktionellen MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg, P. [EBG MedAustron GmbH, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Andrzejewski, P.; Georg, D. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer medizinische Strahlenphysik, Univ. Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wien (Austria); Pinker, K. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Christian Doppler Labor fuer die Medizinische Strahlenforschung, Wien (Austria); Medizinische Universitaet Wien, Abteilung fuer molekulare Bildgebung, Univ. Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Wien (Austria)

    2015-12-15

    The aim of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy is high precision in treatment delivery. With new developments it is possible to focus the high dose irradiation on the tumor while sparing the surrounding tissue. The achievements in precision of the treatment planning and delivery warrant equally precise tumor definition. In conventional radiation therapy it is necessary to carry out a planning computed tomography (CT). For many tumors there is also need for an additional morphological MRI because of more accurate tumor definition. In standard radiotherapy the tumor volume is irradiated with a homogeneous dose. The aim of functional multiparametric MRI is to visualize and quantify biological, physiological and pathological processes at the cellular and molecular levels. Based on this information it is possible to elucidate tumor biology and identify subvolumes of more aggressive behavior. They are often radiotherapy-resistant, leading to tumor recurrence thus requiring further dose escalation. The concept of inhomogeneous tumor irradiation according to its biological behavior is called dose painting. Dose painting is technically feasible. The expected clinical benefit is motivated by selective treatment adaptations based on biological tumor characteristics. Tumors show variable response to therapy underlining the need for individual treatment plans. This approach may lead not only to higher local control but also to better sparing of normal surrounding tissue. With the clinical implementation of dose painting, improvements in the therapeutic outcome can be expected. Due to the existing technical challenges, extensive collaboration between radiation oncologists, radiologists, medical physicists and radiation biologists is needed. (orig.) [German] Die Strahlentherapieplanung mit der funktionellen Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) zielt auf eine Hochpraezisionsradiotherapie ab. Mit den modernen Technologien ist es moeglich, die Strahlentherapie nahezu

  13. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo Davide Edoardo [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo [IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  14. MRI-alone radiation therapy planning for prostate cancer: Automatic fiducial marker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, Soumya, E-mail: soumya.ghose@case.edu; Mitra, Jhimli [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Fazlollahi, Amir; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A. [CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Stanwell, Peter [School of health sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia); Sun, Jidi; Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning using substitute computed tomography (sCT) generated from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) has been demonstrated by a number of research groups. One challenge with an MRI-alone workflow is the accurate identification of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers, which are frequently used for prostate localization prior to each dose delivery fraction. This paper investigates a template-matching approach for the detection of these seeds in MRI. Methods: Two different gradient echo T1 and T2* weighted MRI sequences were acquired from fifteen prostate cancer patients and evaluated for seed detection. For training, seed templates from manual contours were selected in a spectral clustering manifold learning framework. This aids in clustering “similar” gold fiducial markers together. The marker with the minimum distance to a cluster centroid was selected as the representative template of that cluster during training. During testing, Gaussian mixture modeling followed by a Markovian model was used in automatic detection of the probable candidates. The probable candidates were rigidly registered to the templates identified from spectral clustering, and a similarity metric is computed for ranking and detection. Results: A fiducial detection accuracy of 95% was obtained compared to manual observations. Expert radiation therapist observers were able to correctly identify all three implanted seeds on 11 of the 15 scans (the proposed method correctly identified all seeds on 10 of the 15). Conclusions: An novel automatic framework for gold fiducial marker detection in MRI is proposed and evaluated with detection accuracies comparable to manual detection. When radiation therapists are unable to determine the seed location in MRI, they refer back to the planning CT (only available in the existing clinical framework); similarly, an automatic quality control is built into the automatic software to ensure that all gold

  15. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Søren; Poulsen, Jákup M;

    2016-01-01

    -FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with (18)F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in (18)F-FDG uptake and MRI T......PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T 2 changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. METHODS: Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 - 28 years) were injected with (18)F...... 2 values. RESULTS: A significant linear correlation between (18)F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T 2 (R (2) = 0.71) was found. for both small and large muscles and in voxel to voxel comparisons. Despite large intersubject differences in muscle recruitment, the linear correlation between (18)F...

  16. Correcting partial volume artifacts of the arterial input function in quantitative cerebral perfusion MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Osch, MJP; Vonken, EJPA; Bakker, CJG; Viergever, MA

    2001-01-01

    To quantify cerebral perfusion with dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI), one needs to measure the arterial input function (AIF). Conventionally, one derives the contrast concentration from the DSC sequence by monitoring changes in either the amplitude or the phase signal on the assumption

  17. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  18. In vivo visuotopic brain mapping with manganese-enhanced MRI and resting-state functional connectivity MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kevin C; Fan, Shu-Juan; Chan, Russell W; Cheng, Joe S; Zhou, Iris Y; Wu, Ed X

    2014-04-15

    The rodents are an increasingly important model for understanding the mechanisms of development, plasticity, functional specialization and disease in the visual system. However, limited tools have been available for assessing the structural and functional connectivity of the visual brain network globally, in vivo and longitudinally. There are also ongoing debates on whether functional brain connectivity directly reflects structural brain connectivity. In this study, we explored the feasibility of manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) via 3 different routes of Mn(2+) administration for visuotopic brain mapping and understanding of physiological transport in normal and visually deprived adult rats. In addition, resting-state functional connectivity MRI (RSfcMRI) was performed to evaluate the intrinsic functional network and structural-functional relationships in the corresponding anatomical visual brain connections traced by MEMRI. Upon intravitreal, subcortical, and intracortical Mn(2+) injection, different topographic and layer-specific Mn enhancement patterns could be revealed in the visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei along retinal, callosal, cortico-subcortical, transsynaptic and intracortical horizontal connections. Loss of visual input upon monocular enucleation to adult rats appeared to reduce interhemispheric polysynaptic Mn(2+) transfer but not intra- or inter-hemispheric monosynaptic Mn(2+) transport after Mn(2+) injection into visual cortex. In normal adults, both structural and functional connectivity by MEMRI and RSfcMRI was stronger interhemispherically between bilateral primary/secondary visual cortex (V1/V2) transition zones (TZ) than between V1/V2 TZ and other cortical nuclei. Intrahemispherically, structural and functional connectivity was stronger between visual cortex and subcortical visual nuclei than between visual cortex and other subcortical nuclei. The current results demonstrated the sensitivity of MEMRI and RSfcMRI for assessing the

  19. Optimization of Visual Tasks for Detecting Visual Cortex Activity in fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "A. Mirzajani

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: functional magnetic resonance imaging is a useful non-invasive technique for the evaluation and mapping of human brain, especially the visual cortex. One of the most important subjects in this background is optimizing visual stimuli in various forms of visual tasks for acquiring significant and ro-bust signals. Materials and methods: The effects of physical pa-rameters of visual stimuli on 14 healthy volunteers for detecting visual cortical activity were evaluated by functional magnetic resonance imaging. These pa-rameters were temporal frequency (TF, different pat-terns of activation including, square wave and sine wave grating, and two different states of rest includ-ing black and white screens. Results: The results showed that BOLD signal will be maximally in the TF of 8 Hz, and use the black screen in the rest state. However there was not significant difference between square-¬wave and sine-wave grat-ings in producing visual activation in the cortex. Conclusion: Physical parameters of visual tasks are effective in detecting visual cortical activity, and it is necessary to pay attention to them in order to get sig-nificant and robust signal. Visual tasks with TF of 8 Hz and one pattern of square-wave or sine-wave in activation state, and black screen in rest state are op-timally suitable for fMRI studies.

  20. Comparison of detection pattern of HCC by ferumoxide-enhanced MRI and intratumoral blood flow pattern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itou, Naoki; Kotake, Fumio [Tokyo Medical Coll., Ami, Ibaraki (Japan). Kasumigaura Hospital; Saitou, Kazuhiro; Abe, Kimihiko

    2000-08-01

    We compared the detection rate and pattern of ferumoxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Fe-MRI) with the intratumoral blood flow pattern determined by CT angiography (CTA) and CT portography (CTAP) in 124 nodes (34 cases) diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or borderline HCC, based on the clinical course. Sequences to obtain a T1-weighted images (T1W), proton density-weighted images (PDW), T2-weighted images (T2W), T2*-weighted images (T2*W) were used in Fe-MRI. In nodes shown to be hypervascular on CTA, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 69.7%. In nodes shown to be avascular by CTAP, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 67.3%. These rates were higher than with other flow patterns. In nodes showing high signal intensity (HSI) on any sequences, arterial blood flow was increased and portal blood flow decreased in comparison with nodes without high signal intensity. All nodes showing HSI, both on Fe-MRI T2W and T2*W, were hypervascular on CTA, and portal blood flow was absent on CTAP. Nodes showing HSI on both T2*W and T2W were considered to have greater arterial blood flow and decreased portal blood flow compared with nodes appearing as HSI on T2*W, but only as iso- or low signal intensity on T2W (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05). (author)

  1. MRI for troubleshooting detection of prostate cancer; MRT zur Problemloesung beim Nachweis des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Charite Mitte (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in males. Men aged 50 and older are recommended to undergo an annual digital rectal examination (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum for early detection. However, prostate biopsies guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) come up negative for cancer in many patients despite having PSA levels above 4 ng/ml. T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is able to represent the prostate including the surrounding anatomy and depict suspicious areas of low intensity within a high-intensity peripheral zone. MRI has a higher sensitivity for detecting prostate carcinomas than DRE and TRUS in patients having an elevated PSA value and a negative core biopsy. However, its specificity is poor since other abnormalities such as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), prostatitis, scars, or haemmorrhage have a similar MRI appearance. The use of additional techniques such as MR spectroscopy and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI improves sensitivity, but in particular it improves the specificity of tumor detection. Newly developed biopsy devices enable the performance of targeted biopsies in areas that appear suspicious in the MRI. (orig.)

  2. Implementation of time-efficient adaptive sampling function design for improved undersampled MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jinhyeok; Kim, Hyeonjin

    2016-12-01

    To improve the efficacy of undersampled MRI, a method of designing adaptive sampling functions is proposed that is simple to implement on an MR scanner and yet effectively improves the performance of the sampling functions. An approximation of the energy distribution of an image (E-map) is estimated from highly undersampled k-space data acquired in a prescan and efficiently recycled in the main scan. An adaptive probability density function (PDF) is generated by combining the E-map with a modeled PDF. A set of candidate sampling functions are then prepared from the adaptive PDF, among which the one with maximum energy is selected as the final sampling function. To validate its computational efficiency, the proposed method was implemented on an MR scanner, and its robust performance in Fourier-transform (FT) MRI and compressed sensing (CS) MRI was tested by simulations and in a cherry tomato. The proposed method consistently outperforms the conventional modeled PDF approach for undersampling ratios of 0.2 or higher in both FT-MRI and CS-MRI. To fully benefit from undersampled MRI, it is preferable that the design of adaptive sampling functions be performed online immediately before the main scan. In this way, the proposed method may further improve the efficacy of the undersampled MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  4. Functional MRI using robotic MRI compatible devices for monitoring rehabilitation from chronic stroke in the molecular medicine era (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASTRAKAS, LOUKAS G.; NAQVI, SYED HASSAN ABBAS; KATEB, BABAK; TZIKA, A. ARIA

    2012-01-01

    The number of individuals suffering from stroke is increasing daily, and its consequences are a major contributor to invalidity in today’s society. Stroke rehabilitation is relatively new, having been hampered from the longstanding view that lost functions were not recoverable. Nowadays, robotic devices, which aid by stimulating brain plasticity, can assist in restoring movement compromised by stroke-induced pathological changes in the brain which can be monitored by MRI. Multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of stroke patients participating in a training program with a novel Magnetic Resonance Compatible Hand-Induced Robotic Device (MR_CHIROD) could yield a promising biomarker that, ultimately, will enhance our ability to advance hand motor recovery following chronic stroke. Using state-of-the art MRI in conjunction with MR_CHIROD-assisted therapy can provide novel biomarkers for stroke patient rehabilitation extracted by a meta-analysis of data. Successful completion of such studies may provide a ground breaking method for the future evaluation of stroke rehabilitation therapies. Their results will attest to the effectiveness of using MR-compatible hand devices with MRI to provide accurate monitoring during rehabilitative therapy. Furthermore, such results may identify biomarkers of brain plasticity that can be monitored during stroke patient rehabilitation. The potential benefit for chronic stroke patients is that rehabilitation may become possible for a longer period of time after stroke than previously thought, unveiling motor skill improvements possible even after six months due to retained brain plasticity. PMID:22426741

  5. Detection and Demarcation of Tumor using Vector Quantization in MRI images

    CERN Document Server

    Kekre, H B; Gharge, Saylee M

    2010-01-01

    Segmenting a MRI images into homogeneous texture regions representing disparate tissue types is often a useful preprocessing step in the computer-assisted detection of breast cancer. That is why we proposed new algorithm to detect cancer in mammogram breast cancer images. In this paper we proposed segmentation using vector quantization technique. Here we used Linde Buzo-Gray algorithm (LBG) for segmentation of MRI images. Initially a codebook of size 128 was generated for MRI images. These code vectors were further clustered in 8 clusters using same LBG algorithm. These 8 images were displayed as a result. This approach does not leads to over segmentation or under segmentation. For the comparison purpose we displayed results of watershed segmentation and Entropy using Gray Level Co-occurrence Matrix along with this method.

  6. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    1989-08-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author).

  7. Morphological and functional imaging in COPD with CT and MRI: present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg-University Hospital, University of Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany); Ruprecht-Karls-University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [German Cancer Research Center, Department of Radiology (E010), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is defined by irreversible airflow obstruction. It is a heterogeneous disease affecting the airways (i.e. chronic bronchitis, airway collapse), the parenchyma (i.e. hyperinflation, air trapping and emphysematous destruction) as well as the vasculature (i.e. hypoxic vasoconstriction, rarefication and pulmonary arterial hypertension) with different severity during the course of the disease. These different aspects of COPD can be best addressed by imaging using a combination of morphological and functional techniques. Three-dimensional high-resolution computed tomography (3D-HRCT) is the technique of choice for morphological imaging of the lung parenchyma and airways. This morphological information is to be accomplished by functional information about perfusion, regional lung mechanics, and ventilation mainly provided by MRI. The comprehensive diagnostic possibilities of CT complemented by MRI will allow for a more sensitive detection, phenotype-driven characterization and dedicated therapy monitoring of COPD as presented in this review. (orig.)

  8. Entorhinal cortex structure and functional MRI response during an associative verbal memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braskie, Meredith N; Small, Gary W; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2009-12-01

    Entorhinal cortex (ERC) volume in adults with mild cognitive impairment has been shown to predict prodromal Alzheimer's disease (AD). Likewise, neuronal loss in ERC has been associated with AD, but not with normal aging. Because ERC is part of a major pathway modulating input to the hippocampus, structural changes there may result in changes to cognitive performance and functional brain activity during memory tasks. In 32 cognitively intact older adults, we examined the relationship between left ERC thickness and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activity during an associative verbal memory task. This task has been shown previously to activate regions that are sensitive to aging and AD risk. ERC was manually defined on native space, high resolution, oblique coronal MRI scans. Subjects having thicker left ERC showed greater activation in anterior cingulate and medial frontal regions during memory retrieval, but not encoding. This result was independent of hippocampal volume. Anterior cingulate cortex is directly connected to ERC, and is, along with medial frontal cortex, implicated in error detection, which is impaired in AD. Our results suggest that in healthy older adults, processes that engage frontal regions during memory retrieval are related to ERC structure.

  9. Normothermic Mouse Functional MRI of Acute Focal Thermostimulation for Probing Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Henning Matthias; Hentschel, Jan; Marek, Jaroslav; Huelnhagen, Till; Todiras, Mihail; Kox, Stefanie; Waiczies, Sonia; Hodge, Russ; Bader, Michael; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Combining mouse genomics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a promising tool to unravel the molecular mechanisms of chronic pain. Probing murine nociception via the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is still challenging due to methodological constraints. Here we report on the reproducible application of acute noxious heat stimuli to examine the feasibility and limitations of functional brain mapping for central pain processing in mice. Recent technical and procedural advances were applied for enhanced BOLD signal detection and a tight control of physiological parameters. The latter includes the development of a novel mouse cradle designed to maintain whole-body normothermia in anesthetized mice during fMRI in a way that reflects the thermal status of awake, resting mice. Applying mild noxious heat stimuli to wildtype mice resulted in highly significant BOLD patterns in anatomical brain structures forming the pain matrix, which comprise temporal signal intensity changes of up to 6% magnitude. We also observed sub-threshold correlation patterns in large areas of the brain, as well as alterations in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in response to the applied stimulus.

  10. Normothermic Mouse Functional MRI of Acute Focal Thermostimulation for Probing Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Henning Matthias; Hentschel, Jan; Marek, Jaroslav; Huelnhagen, Till; Todiras, Mihail; Kox, Stefanie; Waiczies, Sonia; Hodge, Russ; Bader, Michael; Pohlmann, Andreas; Niendorf, Thoralf

    2016-01-01

    Combining mouse genomics and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) provides a promising tool to unravel the molecular mechanisms of chronic pain. Probing murine nociception via the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) effect is still challenging due to methodological constraints. Here we report on the reproducible application of acute noxious heat stimuli to examine the feasibility and limitations of functional brain mapping for central pain processing in mice. Recent technical and procedural advances were applied for enhanced BOLD signal detection and a tight control of physiological parameters. The latter includes the development of a novel mouse cradle designed to maintain whole-body normothermia in anesthetized mice during fMRI in a way that reflects the thermal status of awake, resting mice. Applying mild noxious heat stimuli to wildtype mice resulted in highly significant BOLD patterns in anatomical brain structures forming the pain matrix, which comprise temporal signal intensity changes of up to 6% magnitude. We also observed sub-threshold correlation patterns in large areas of the brain, as well as alterations in mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) in response to the applied stimulus. PMID:26821826

  11. EEG-fMRI integration for the study of human brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, João; van der Zwaag, Wietske; Figueiredo, Patrícia

    2014-11-15

    Electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have proved to be extremely valuable tools for the non-invasive study of human brain function. Moreover, due to a notable degree of complementarity between the two modalities, the combination of EEG and fMRI data has been actively sought in the last two decades. Although initially focused on epilepsy, EEG-fMRI applications were rapidly extended to the study of healthy brain function, yielding new insights into its underlying mechanisms and pathways. Nevertheless, EEG and fMRI have markedly different spatial and temporal resolutions, and probe neuronal activity through distinct biophysical processes, many aspects of which are still poorly understood. The remarkable conceptual and methodological challenges associated with EEG-fMRI integration have motivated the development of a wide range of analysis approaches over the years, each relying on more or less restrictive assumptions, and aiming to shed further light on the mechanisms of brain function along with those of the EEG-fMRI coupling itself. Here, we present a review of the most relevant EEG-fMRI integration approaches yet proposed for the study of brain function, supported by a general overview of our current understanding of the biophysical mechanisms coupling the signals obtained from the two modalities.

  12. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease. First experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Bettina; Froekiaer, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Michael [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). MR Research Centre; Joergensen, Troels Munch [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Urology; Rittig, Soeren [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Paediatrics

    2010-07-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides. We included renal impaired children who were recruited for clinical radioisotopic GFR measurements (n=8). MRI was performed 2 hours after Cr-EDTA measurements and was conducted using a protocol involving both anatomical/structural sequences and a dynamic contrast-enhanced sequence. Data obtained with the dynamic MRI sequence were processed using the graphical Patlak approach to obtain estimates of GFR. We were able to characterize the intrarenal configuration (cortex, medulla, pelvicalyceal arrangement) in all cases. Functional analyses of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealed an overall underestimation of GFR measured by MRI compared to Cr-EDTPA measures (range: -2% to -43%). We advocate the use of MRI as a single-modality approach in the structural and functional evaluation of impaired kidneys in children, and concurrently, we presented a clinically available strategy for estimations of renal cortical volume and single kidney function. However, the use of MRI contrast agents have recently become controversial in renal patients due to the risk of NSF. (orig.)

  13. Investigating repetition and change in musical rhythm by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, A; Otnæss, M K; Jensen, J; Williams, S C R; Ostberg, B C

    2014-09-05

    Groove-based rhythm is a basic and much appreciated feature of Western popular music. It is commonly associated with dance, movement and pleasure and is characterized by the repetition of a basic rhythmic pattern. At various points in the musical course, drum breaks occur, representing a change compared to the repeated pattern of the groove. In the present experiment, we investigated the brain response to such drum breaks in a repetitive groove. Participants were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to a previously unheard naturalistic groove with drum breaks at uneven intervals. The rhythmic pattern and the timing of its different parts as performed were the only aspects that changed from the repetitive sections to the breaks. Differences in blood oxygen level-dependent activation were analyzed. In contrast to the repetitive parts, the drum breaks activated the left cerebellum, the right inferior frontal gyrus (RIFG), and the superior temporal gyri (STG) bilaterally. A tapping test using the same stimulus showed an increase in the standard deviation of inter-tap-intervals in the breaks versus the repetitive parts, indicating extra challenges for auditory-motor integration in the drum breaks. Both the RIFG and STG have been associated with structural irregularity and increase in musical-syntactical complexity in several earlier studies, whereas the left cerebellum is known to play a part in timing. Together these areas may be recruited in the breaks due to a prediction error process whereby the internal model is being updated. This concurs with previous research suggesting a network for predictive feed-forward control that comprises the cerebellum and the cortical areas that were activated in the breaks.

  14. Assessing the spatiotemporal evolution of neuronal activation with single-trial event-related potentials and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichele, Tom; Specht, Karsten; Moosmann, Matthias; Jongsma, Marijtje L A; Quiroga, Rodrigo Quian; Nordby, Helge; Hugdahl, Kenneth

    2005-12-06

    The brain acts as an integrated information processing system, which methods in cognitive neuroscience have so far depicted in a fragmented fashion. Here, we propose a simple and robust way to integrate functional MRI (fMRI) with single trial event-related potentials (ERP) to provide a more complete spatiotemporal characterization of evoked responses in the human brain. The idea behind the approach is to find brain regions whose fMRI responses can be predicted by paradigm-induced amplitude modulations of simultaneously acquired single trial ERPs. The method was used to study a variant of a two-stimulus auditory target detection (odd-ball) paradigm that manipulated predictability through alternations of stimulus sequences with random or regular target-to-target intervals. In addition to electrophysiologic and hemodynamic evoked responses to auditory targets per se, single-trial modulations were expressed during the latencies of the P2 (170-ms), N2 (200-ms), and P3 (320-ms) components and predicted spatially separated fMRI activation patterns. These spatiotemporal matches, i.e., the prediction of hemodynamic activation by time-variant information from single trial ERPs, permit inferences about regional responses using fMRI with the temporal resolution provided by electrophysiology.

  15. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-10-25

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46.

  16. MRI Brain Tumor Segmentation and Necrosis Detection Using Adaptive Sobolev Snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhmani, Arie; Kikinis, Ron; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2014-01-01

    Brain tumor segmentation in brain MRI volumes is used in neurosurgical planning and illness staging. It is important to explore the tumor shape and necrosis regions at different points of time to evaluate the disease progression. We propose an algorithm for semi-automatic tumor segmentation and necrosis detection. Our algorithm consists of three parts: conversion of MRI volume to a probability space based on the on-line learned model, tumor probability density estimation, and adaptive segmentation in the probability space. We use manually selected acceptance and rejection classes on a single MRI slice to learn the background and foreground statistical models. Then, we propagate this model to all MRI slices to compute the most probable regions of the tumor. Anisotropic 3D diffusion is used to estimate the probability density. Finally, the estimated density is segmented by the Sobolev active contour (snake) algorithm to select smoothed regions of the maximum tumor probability. The segmentation approach is robust to noise and not very sensitive to the manual initialization in the volumes tested. Also, it is appropriate for low contrast imagery. The irregular necrosis regions are detected by using the outliers of the probability distribution inside the segmented region. The necrosis regions of small width are removed due to a high probability of noisy measurements. The MRI volume segmentation results obtained by our algorithm are very similar to expert manual segmentation. PMID:25302005

  17. Involvement patterns in myotilinopathy and desminopathy detected by a novel neuromuscular whole-body MRI protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, Nicolai; Born, Christine; Weckbach, Sabine; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Reilich, Peter; Walter, Maggie C. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Friedrich-Baur-Institute, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany)

    2008-12-15

    Whole-body MRI (WB-MRI) has been successfully applied for oncologic and cardiovascular diagnostics, whereas imaging in myopathies usually employs dedicated protocols restricted to areas of specific interest. In this study, we propose a comprehensive neuromuscular WB-MRI protocol. Eighteen patients with degenerative and inflammatory muscle diseases were included. Whole-body imaging was performed on a 1.5-T MR system using parallel imaging. Examination time was 41:26 min. Coronal and axial T1-weighted and coronal short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences of the whole body were acquired. Images were analysed by two radiologists. With this protocol we could detect characteristic involvement patterns in different myofibrillar myopathies (MFMs): Patients with myotilinopathy showed frequent involvement of the rhomboid muscles (4/5), the erector spinae (5/5), the biceps femoris and the semimembranosus (5/5), while the semitendinosus was relatively spared (2/5). In contrast, in desminopathy patients the ilipsoas (3/4), the sartorius, (3/4), the gracilis (3/4) and the semitendinosus (3/4) were frequently involved, while the semimembranosus was spared (1/4). As shown for MFMs, WB-MRI is an appropriate modality to detect fatty infiltration and oedema in skeletal muscles. WB-MRI could be more useful than dedicated examinations for differential diagnosis, muscle biopsy planning and noninvasive follow-up examinations. (orig.)

  18. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  19. Comprehensive presurgical functional MRI language evaluation in adult patients with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Holland, Scott K; Jacola, Lisa M; Lindsell, Christopher; Privitera, Michael D; Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has the potential to replace the intracarotid amobarbital procedure (IAP) in presurgical evaluation of patients with epilepsy. In this study, we compared fMRI verb generation (VG) and semantic decision/tone decision (SDTD) tasks and the IAP in their ability to localize language functions in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation. We enrolled 50 healthy controls to establish normal language activation patterns for VG and SDTD tasks at 3 or 4 T, and to design language regions of interest (ROIs) that were later applied to 38 patients with epilepsy (28 of 38 also underwent the IAP). We calculated laterality indices (LIs) for each task for each subject based on the ROIs, and we used general linear modeling to analyze the fMRI data. All healthy and epileptic subjects activated language areas with both fMRI tasks. We found significant correlations in language lateralization between the fMRI tasks (r=0.495, Planguage. In the general linear modeling, only the SDTD task significantly contributed to the determination of language lateralization in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation. Results indicate a moderate convergent validity between both fMRI language tasks and between IAP and fMRI tasks. The results of this study indicate that either of these fMRI tasks can be used for language lateralization in patients with epilepsy undergoing presurgical evaluation, but that the SDTD task is likely to provide more information regarding language lateralization than the VG task.

  20. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS a

  1. Computer-aided detection in breast MRI : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrius, Monique D.; Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    To evaluate the additional value of computer-aided detection (CAD) in breast MRI by assessing radiologists' accuracy in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions. A literature search was performed with inclusion of relevant studies using a commercially available CAD system with automatic

  2. [Progress of clinical application of functional MRI in the localization of brain language area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Lu, Junfeng; Wu, Jinsong

    2016-02-01

    For surgical operation in the functional area in the brain, it's commonly demanded to resect the lesion to the maximal extent on the basis of preserve the normal neural function, thus the precise localization of functional area is extremely important. As for the advantages of being widely available, easy to grasp and non-invasive, the functional MRI (fMRI) has come into wide use, while the application of language fMRI is still in the initial stage. It's important to choose appropriate fMRI task according to the individual condition of the subject, the commonly-adopted tasks include verb generation, picture naming, word recognition, word generation, etc. However, the effectiveness of using fMRI to localize language area is not totally satisfactory, adopting multiple task is an effective approach to improve the sensitivity of this technique. The application of resting state fMRI in the localization of language area and the further research of the role of fMRI in localizing the Chinese language area are the important future directions.

  3. Variable Selection for Functional Logistic Regression in fMRI Data Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedret BILLOR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was motivated by classification problem in Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI, a noninvasive imaging technique which allows an experimenter to take images of a subject's brain over time. As fMRI studies usually have a small number of subjects and we assume that there is a smooth, underlying curve describing the observations in fMRI data, this results in incredibly high-dimensional datasets that are functional in nature. High dimensionality is one of the biggest problems in statistical analysis of fMRI data. There is also a need for the development of better classification methods. One of the best things about fMRI technique is its noninvasiveness. If statistical classification methods are improved, it could aid the advancement of noninvasive diagnostic techniques for mental illness or even degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's. In this paper, we develop a variable selection technique, which tackles high dimensionality and correlation problems in fMRI data, based on L1 regularization-group lasso for the functional logistic regression model where the response is binary and represent two separate classes; the predictors are functional. We assess our method with a simulation study and an application to a real fMRI dataset.

  4. Value of functional MRI in evaluation of patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed Mostafa Elian

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Functional MRI provided a highly sensitive method in diagnosing and localizing prostate cancer. Being noninvasive, highly sensitive with wider spectrum in nearby pelvic organs assessment in one imaging session, it may totally replace TRUS-guided biopsy.

  5. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paola, V., E-mail: dipaola.valerio@libero.it; Manfredi, R.; Castelli, F.; Negrelli, R.; Mehrabi, S.; Pozzi Mucelli, R.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  6. Multiparametric MRI in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futterer, Jurgen J. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 50 years and older in developed countries and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Multiparametric prostate MR imaging is currently the most accurate imaging modality to detect, localize, and stage prostate cancer. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer are discussed. In addition, insights are provided in imaging techniques, protocol, and interpretation.

  7. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Raut, Ryan V.; Nair, Veena A.; Sattin, Justin A.; Vivek Prabhakaran

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a br...

  8. Combining fMRI and SNP Data to Investigate Connections Between Brain Function and Genetics Using Parallel ICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingyu; Pearlson, Godfrey; Windemuth, Andreas; Ruano, Gualberto; Perrone-Bizzozero, Nora I.; Calhoun, Vince

    2009-01-01

    There is current interest in understanding genetic influences on both healthy and disordered brain function. We assessed brain function with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data collected during an auditory oddball task—detecting an infrequent sound within a series of frequent sounds. Then, task-related imaging findings were utilized as potential intermediate phenotypes (endophenotypes) to investigate genomic factors derived from a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array. Our target is the linkage of these genomic factors to normal/abnormal brain functionality. We explored parallel independent component analysis (paraICA) as a new method for analyzing multimodal data. The method was aimed to identify simultaneously independent components of each modality and the relationships between them. When 43 healthy controls and 20 schizophrenia patients, all Caucasian, were studied, we found a correlation of 0.38 between one fMRI component and one SNP component. This fMRI component consisted mainly of parietal lobe activations. The relevant SNP component was contributed to significantly by 10 SNPs located in genes, including those coding for the nicotinic α-7cholinergic receptor, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, disrupted in schizophrenia 1, among others. Both fMRI and SNP components showed significant differences in loading parameters between the schizophrenia and control groups (P = 0.0006 for the fMRI component; P = 0.001 for the SNP component). In summary, we constructed a framework to identify interactions between brain functional and genetic information; our findings provide a proof-of-concept that genomic SNP factors can be investigated by using endophenotypic imaging findings in a multivariate format. PMID:18072279

  9. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  10. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  11. Detection of Sulfatase Enzyme Activity with a CatalyCEST MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinharay, Sanhita; Fernández-Cuervo, Gabriela; Acfalle, Jasmine P; Pagel, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    A chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI contrast agent has been developed that detects sulfatase enzyme activity. The agent produces a CEST signal at δ=5.0 ppm before enzyme activity, and a second CEST signal appears at δ=9.0 ppm after the enzyme cleaves a sulfate group from the agent. The comparison of the two signals improved detection of sulfatase activity.

  12. High frame rate retrospectively triggered Cine MRI for assessment of murine diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Motaal, Abdallah G; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-03-01

    To assess left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in mice with Cine MRI, a high frame rate (>60 frames per cardiac cycle) is required. For conventional electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, the frame rate is inversely proportional to the pulse repetition time (TR). However, TR cannot be lowered at will to increase the frame rate because of gradient hardware, spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise limitations. To overcome these limitations associated with electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, in this paper, we introduce a retrospectively triggered Cine MRI protocol capable of producing high-resolution high frame rate Cine MRI of the mouse heart for addressing left ventricular diastolic function. Simulations were performed to investigate the influence of MRI sequence parameters and the k-space filling trajectory in relation to the desired number of frames per cardiac cycle. An optimized protocol was applied in vivo and compared with electrocardiography-triggered Cine for which a high-frame rate could only be achieved by several interleaved acquisitions. Retrospective high frame rate Cine MRI proved superior to the interleaved electrocardiography-triggered protocols. High spatial-resolution Cine movies with frames rates up to 80 frames per cardiac cycle were obtained in 25 min. Analysis of left ventricular filling rate curves allowed accurate determination of early and late filling rates and revealed subtle impairments in left ventricular diastolic function of diabetic mice in comparison with nondiabetic mice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Enhancing the Detection of BOLD Signal in fMRI by Reducing the Partial Volume Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiping P. Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the advantages of reducing the partial volume effect (PVE to enhance the detection of the BOLD signal in fMRI. Methods. A linear phase term was added in k-space to obtain half-voxel shifting of 64 × 64 T2*-weighted echo-planar images. Three sets of image data shifted in the x, y, and diagonal direction, respectively, are combined with the original 64 × 64 data to form the 128 × 128 voxel-shifted interpolated data. Results. A simulation of a synthetic fMRI dataset shows that the voxel-shifted interpolation (VSI can increase the t-score up to 50% in single-voxel activations. An fMRI study (n=7 demonstrates that 20.4% of the interpolated voxels have higher t-scores than their nearest neighboring voxels in the original maps. The average increase of the t-score in these interpolated voxels is 13.3%. Conclusion. VSI yields increased sensitivity in detecting voxel-size BOLD activations, improved spatial accuracy of activated regions, and improved detection of the peak BOLD signal of an activated region. VSI can potentially be used as an alternative to the high-resolution fMRI studies in which reduction in SNR and increase in imaging time become prohibitive.

  14. Diffusion fMRI detects white-matter dysfunction in mice with acute optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tsen-Hsuan; Spees, William M; Chiang, Chia-Wen; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Cross, Anne H; Song, Sheng-Kwei

    2014-07-01

    Optic neuritis is a frequent and early symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS). Conventional magnetic resonance (MR) techniques provide means to assess multiple MS-related pathologies, including axonal injury, demyelination, and inflammation. A method to directly and non-invasively probe white-matter function could further elucidate the interplay of underlying pathologies and functional impairments. Previously, we demonstrated a significant 27% activation-associated decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient of water perpendicular to the axonal fibers (ADC⊥) in normal C57BL/6 mouse optic nerve with visual stimulation using diffusion fMRI. Here we apply this approach to explore the relationship between visual acuity, optic nerve pathology, and diffusion fMRI in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model of optic neuritis. Visual stimulation produced a significant 25% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease in sham EAE optic nerves, while only a 7% (vs. baseline) ADC⊥ decrease was seen in EAE mice with acute optic neuritis. The reduced activation-associated ADC⊥ response correlated with post-MRI immunohistochemistry determined pathologies (including inflammation, demyelination, and axonal injury). The negative correlation between activation-associated ADC⊥ response and visual acuity was also found when pooling EAE-affected and sham groups under our experimental criteria. Results suggest that reduction in diffusion fMRI directly reflects impaired axonal-activation in EAE mice with optic neuritis. Diffusion fMRI holds promise for directly gauging in vivo white-matter dysfunction or therapeutic responses in MS patients.

  15. 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI as a tool to improve detection of focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veersema, Tim J; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Zwanenburg, Jaco J M; Spliet, Wim G M; Aronica, Eleonora; Braun, Kees P J; Ferrier, Cyrille H

    2016-09-01

    Focal cortical dysplasia is one of the most common underlying pathologies in patients who undergo surgery for refractory epilepsy. Absence of a MRI-visible lesion necessitates additional diagnostic tests and is a predictor of poor surgical outcome. We describe a series of six patients with refractory epilepsy due to histopathologically-confirmed focal cortical dysplasia, for whom pre-surgical 7 tesla T2*-weighted MRI was acquired. In four of six patients, T2* sequences showed areas of marked superficial hypointensity, co-localizing with the epileptogenic lesion. 7 tesla T2* hypointensities overlying focal cortical dysplasia may represent leptomeningeal venous vascular abnormalities associated with the underlying dysplastic cortex. Adding T2* sequences to the MRI protocol may aid in the detection of focal cortical dysplasias.

  16. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, Victoria L., E-mail: vlm2125@columbia.edu [Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Pavilion, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Morris, Elizabeth A., E-mail: morrise@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); David Dershaw, D., E-mail: dershawd@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Abramson, Andrea, E-mail: abramsoa@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Fry, Charles, E-mail: charles_fry@nymc.edu [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Hughes, Mary, E-mail: hughesm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaplan, Jennifer, E-mail: kaplanj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S., E-mail: jochelsm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  17. Optimization of anesthesia protocol for resting-state fMRI in mice based on differential effects of anesthetics on functional connectivity patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandjean, Joanes; Schroeter, Aileen; Batata, Imene; Rudin, Markus

    2014-11-15

    Resting state-fMRI (rs-fMRI) in mice allows studying mechanisms underlying functional connectivity (FC) as well as alterations of FC occurring in murine models of neurological diseases. Mouse fMRI experiments are typically carried out under anesthesia to minimize animal movement and potential distress during examination. Yet, anesthesia inevitably affects FC patterns. Such effects have to be understood for proper interpretation of data. We have compared the influence of four commonly used anesthetics on rs-fMRI. Rs-fMRI data acquired under isoflurane, propofol, and urethane presented similar patterns when accounting for anesthesia depth. FC maps displayed bilateral correlation with respect to cortical seeds, but no significant inter-hemispheric striatal connectivity. In contrast, for medetomidine, we detected bilateral striatal but compromised inter-hemispheric cortical connectivity. The spatiotemporal patterns of the rs-fMRI signal have been rationalized considering anesthesia depth and pharmacodynamic properties of the anesthetics. Our results bridge the results from different studies from the burgeoning field of mouse rs-fMRI and offer a framework for understanding the influences of anesthetics on FC patterns. Utilizing this information, we suggest the combined use of medetomidine and isoflurane representing the two proposed classes of anesthetics; the combination of low doses of the two anesthetics retained strong correlations both within cortical and subcortical structures, without the potential seizure-inducing effects of medetomidine, rendering this regimen an attractive anesthesia for rs-fMRI in mice.

  18. Transient and sustained BOLD signal time courses affect the detection of emotion-related brain activation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paret, Christian; Kluetsch, Rosemarie; Ruf, Matthias; Demirakca, Traute; Kalisch, Raffael; Schmahl, Christian; Ende, Gabriele

    2014-12-01

    A tremendous amount of effort has been dedicated to unravel the functional neuroanatomy of the processing and regulation of emotion, resulting in a well-described picture of limbic, para-limbic and prefrontal regions involved. Studies applying functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) often use the block-wise presentation of stimuli with affective content, and conventionally model brain activation as a function of stimulus or task duration. However, there is increasing evidence that regional brain responses may not always translate to task duration and rather show stimulus onset-related transient time courses. We assume that brain regions showing transient responses cannot be detected in block designs using a conventional fMRI analysis approach. At the same time, the probability of detecting these regions with conventional analyses may be increased when shorter stimulus timing or a more intense stimulation during a block is used. In a within-subject fMRI study, we presented aversive pictures to 20 healthy subjects and investigated the effect of experimental design (i.e. event-related and block design) on the detection of brain activation in limbic and para-limbic regions of interest of emotion processing. In addition to conventional modeling of sustained activation during blocks of stimulus presentation, we included a second response function into the general linear model (GLM), suited to detect transient time courses at block onset. In the conventional analysis, several regions like the amygdala, thalamus and periaqueductal gray were activated irrespective of design. However, we found a positive BOLD response in the anterior insula (AI) in event-related but not in block-design analyses. GLM analyses suggest that this difference may result from a transient response pattern which cannot be captured by the conventional fMRI analysis approach. Our results indicate that regions with a transient response profile like the AI can be missed in block designs if analyses

  19. Diffusion-weighted MRI for uveal melanoma liver metastasis detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Petras, Slavomir; Servois, Vincent [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mariani, Pascale; Cassoux, Nathalie [Institut Curie, Department of Surgery, Paris (France); Bidard, Francois Clement; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie [Institut Curie, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Farkhondeh, Fereshteh [Institut Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to assess the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of pathologically confirmed uveal melanoma liver metastases (UMLM). Twenty patients who underwent complete surgical resection of their UMLM (N = 83) were included. Pre-surgery liver MR imaging included T2-weighted, T1-weighted, DW and dynamic-gadolinium-enhanced MR sequences. Two radiologists independently reviewed three sets of images (DW / morphologic-dynamic / combined) for each patient using intraoperative and pathological findings as a standard of reference. The sensitivities of the morphologic-dynamic and DW images for UMLM detection were 63 % and 59 %, respectively, for reader 1 (R1) and 64 % and 53 %, for reader 2 (R2). Sensitivity of the combined set was higher than sensitivity in the two other sets (R1:69 %, R2:67 %), but was only significantly different than the sensitivity of the DW images (McNemar test). For the three sets and the two readers, the sensitivity for UMLM smaller than 5 mm (37-46 %) was significantly lower than that for UMLM larger than 5 mm (67-90 %). The sensitivity for UMLM located in the subcapsular area (41-54 %) was significantly lower than that for intraparenchymal UMLM (68-86 %) (Chi-square test). Our study shows that the addition of DW imaging to morphologic-dynamic images does not significantly increase MR sensitivities for UMLM detection. (orig.)

  20. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  1. Detection of cranial meningiomas: comparison of {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afshar-Oromieh, Ali; Giesel, Frederik L.; Haberkorn, Uwe; Haufe, Sabine; Kratochwil, Clemens [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heidelberg (Germany); Linhart, Heinz G. [DKFZ, National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT), Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [University Hospital of Heidelberg, Department of Radiation Oncology and Therapy, Heidelberg (Germany); Podlesek, Dino [University Hospital of Dresden, Department of Neurosurgery, Dresden (Germany); Eisenhut, Michael [DKFZ, Department of Radiopharmacy, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    PET imaging with somatostatin receptor ligands, such as {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC, is a well-established method for detection and target volume definition of meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Since DOTATOC PET delivers a higher contrast between meningiomas and surrounding tissues than MRI, we conducted a retrospective analysis to compare the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) with {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT in patients with cranial meningiomas prior to radiotherapy. Over a period of 6 years, 134 patients (20-82 years of age, 107 women and 27 men) underwent cranial CE-MRI and {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT. To compare the two methods, the lesions considered typical of meningiomas visually were counted and analysed with respect to their location and SUVmax. In the 134 patients investigated by both modalities, 190 meningiomas were detected by {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT and 171 by CE-MRI. With knowledge of the PET/CT data, the MRI scans were reinvestigated, which led to the detection of 4 of the 19 incidental meningiomas, resulting in an overall detection rate of 92 % of the meningioma lesions that were found by PET/CT. Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT demonstrated an improved sensitivity in meningioma detection when compared to CE-MRI. Tumours adjacent to the falx cerebri, located at the skull base or obscured by imaging artefacts or calcification are particularly difficult to detect by MRI. Therefore {sup 68}Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT may provide additional information in patients with uncertain or equivocal results on MRI or could help to confirm a diagnosis of meningioma based on MRI or could help to confirm MRI-based diagnosis of meningiomas in cases of biopsy limitations. It is possible that not only radiotherapy and surgical planning, but also follow-up strategies would benefit from this imaging modality. (orig.)

  2. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease; Stress-Cine-MRT zur Primaeridagnostik der koronaren Herzkrankheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik; Omran, H. [Medizinische Universitaetsklinik II Bonn (Germany)

    2002-05-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta{sub 1}-agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 {mu}g/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p < 0.05) and specificity (85.7% vs. 69.8% p < 0.05) as compared to dobutamine stress echocardiography. The superior results of MRI can

  3. Classification of cognitive states using functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ye; Pal, Ranadip; O'Boyle, Michael

    2010-03-01

    A fundamental goal of the analysis of fMRI data is to locate areas of brain activation that can differentiate various cognitive tasks. Traditionally, researchers have approached fMRI analysis through characterizing the relationship between cognitive variables and individual brain voxels. In recent years, multivariate approaches (analyze more than one voxel at once) to fMRI data analysis have gained importance. But in majority of the multivariate approaches, the voxels used for classification are selected based on prior biological knowledge or discriminating power of individual voxels. We used sequential floating forward search (SFFS) feature selection approach for selecting the voxels and applied it to distinguish the cognitive states of whether a subject is doing a reasoning or a counting task. We obtained superior classifier performance by using the sequential approach as compared to selecting the features with best individual classifier performance. We analyzed the problem of over-fitting in this extremely high dimensional feature space with limited training samples. For estimating the accuracy of the classifier, we employed various estimation methods and discussed their importance in this small sample scenario. Also we modified the feature selection algorithm by adding spatial information to incorporate the biological constraint that spatially nearby voxels tends to represent similar things.

  4. Functional MRI of the brain: localisation of eloquent cortex in focal brain lesion therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dymarkowski, S.; Sunaert, S.; Oostende, S. van; Hecke, P. van; Wilms, G.; Demaerel, P.; Marchal, G. [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium); Nuttin, B.; Plets, C. [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospitals, Leuven (Belgium)

    1998-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of functional MRI (fMRI) in a clinical environment on a large patient group, and to evaluate the pretherapeutic value of localisation of eloquent cortex. Forty patients with focal brain lesions of different origin were studied using fMRI. Functional information was obtained using motor, somatosensory, auditory and phonological stimuli depending on the localisation of the lesions. To obtain information about the spatial accuracy of fMRI, the results were compared with postoperative electrocortical stimulation. Two patients with secondary trigeminal neuralgia were scanned using a motor protocol and were implanted with an extradural plate electrode. Imaging was successful in 40 of 42 patients (including the 2 with trigeminal neuralgia). These patients were analysed for strength of activation, the relation of the lesion to activation sites and the presence of mass effect. The correlation between these data and surgical findings provided significant additional clinical information. Functional MRI can be accurately performed in patients with focal brain lesions using a dedicated approach. Functional MRI offers important clinical information as a contribution to a decrease in posttherapeutic morbidity. The accuracy of the technique can be confirmed by other modalities, including invasive cortical electrostimulation. (orig.) With 7 figs., 2 tabs., 25 refs.

  5. The impact of "physiological correction" on functional connectivity analysis of pharmacological resting state fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili-Mahani, Najmeh; Chang, Catie; van Osch, Matthias J; Veer, Ilya M; van Buchem, Mark A; Dahan, Albert; Beckmann, Christian F; van Gerven, Joop M A; Rombouts, Serge A R B

    2013-01-15

    Growing interest in pharmacological resting state fMRI (RSfMRI) necessitates developing standardized and robust analytical approaches that are insensitive to spurious correlated physiological signals. However, in pharmacological experiments physiological variations constitute an important aspect of the pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic profile of drug action; therefore retrospective corrective methods that discard physiological signals as noise may not be suitable. Previously, we have shown that template-based dual regression analysis is a sensitive method for model-free and objective detection of drug-specific effects on functional brain connectivity. In the current study, the robustness of this standard approach to physiological variations in a placebo controlled, repeated measures pharmacological RSfMRI study of morphine and alcohol in 12 healthy young men is tested. The impact of physiology-related variations on statistical inferences has been studied by: 1) modeling average physiological rates in higher level group analysis; 2) Regressing out the instantaneous respiration variation (RV); 3) applying retrospective image correction (RETROICOR) in the preprocessing stage; and 4) performing combined RV and heart rate correction (RVHRCOR) by regressing out physiological pulses convolved with canonical respiratory and cardiac hemodynamic response functions. Results indicate regional sensitivity of the BOLD signal to physiological variations, especially in the vicinity of large vessels, plus certain brain structures that are reported to be involved in physiological regulation, such as posterior cingulate, precuneus, medial prefrontal and insular cortices, as well as the thalamus, cerebellum and the brainstem. The largest impact of "correction" on final statistical test outcomes resulted from including the average respiration frequency and heart rate in the higher-level group analysis. Overall, the template-based dual regression method seems robust against physical

  6. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  7. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  8. Visualization of the eloquent motor system by integration of MEG, functional, and anisotropic diffusion-weighted MRI in functional neuronavigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Kyousuke; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Takeuchi, Fumiya; Ishii, Nobuaki; Ikeda, Jun; Sawamura, Yutaka; Kuriki, Shinya; Kawaguchi, Hideaki; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2003-05-01

    In this study, we visualized the eloquent motor system including the somatosensory-motor cortex and corticospinal tract on a neuronavigation system, integrating magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), and anisotropic diffusion-weighted MRI (ADWI). Four patients with brain lesions adjacent to the eloquent motor system were studied. Motor-evoked responses (MER) by finger-tapping paradigm were acquired with a 1.5-Tesla MR scanner, and somatosensory-evoked magnetic fields (SEF) by median nerve stimulation were measured with a 204-channel MEG system. In the same fMRI examination, ADWI and anatomic three-dimensional T1-weighted imaging (3-D MRI) were obtained. Activated areas of MER, estimated SEF dipoles, and the corticospinal tract on ADWI were coregistered to 3-D MRI, and the combined MR data were transferred to a neuronavigation system (functional neuronavigation). Intraoperative recording of cortical somatosensory-evoked potentials was performed for confirmation of the central sulcus. Combination of fMRI and MEG enabled firm identification of the central sulcus. Functional neuronavigation facilitated extensive tumor resection, having the advantage of sparing the motor cortex and corticospinal tract in all cases. The proposed functional neuronavigation allows neurosurgeons to perform effective and maximal resection of brain lesions, identifying and sparing eloquent cortical components and their subcortical connections. Potential clinical application of this technique is discussed.

  9. Blood Flow and Brain Function: Investigations of neurovascular coupling using BOLD fMRI at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, J.C.W.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultra high field (7 tesla) MRI systems has opened the possibility to probe biological processes of the human body in great detail. Especially for studying brain function using BOLD fMRI there is a large benefit from the increased magnetic field strength. BOLD fMRI is the working horse

  10. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors A critical review of functional MRI studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Xiao; Dongfeng Huang; Bryan O'Young

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimotor cortex, supplementary motor area and cingulate motor area after treadmill training. These findings suggest that treadmill training likely improves ischemic stroke patients' lower limb functions and gait performance and promotes stroke recovery by changing patients' brain plasticity; meanwhile, the novel treadmill training methods can better training effects.

  11. Contextualizing neuro-collaborations: reflections on a transdisciplinary fMRI lie detection experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littlefield, Melissa M; Fitzgerald, Des; Knudsen, Kasper; Tonks, James; Dietz, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Recent neuroscience initiatives (including the E.U.'s Human Brain Project and the U.S.'s BRAIN Initiative) have reinvigorated discussions about the possibilities for transdisciplinary collaboration between the neurosciences, the social sciences, and the humanities. As STS scholars have argued for decades, however, such inter- and transdisciplinary collaborations are potentially fraught with tensions between researchers. This essay build on such claims by arguing that the tensions of transdisciplinary research also exist within researchers' own experiences of working between disciplines - a phenomenon that we call "disciplinary double consciousness" (DDC). Building on previous work that has characterized similar spaces (and especially on the Critical Neuroscience literature), we argue that "neuro-collaborations" inevitably engage researchers in DDC - a phenomenon that allows us to explore the useful dissonance that researchers can experience when working between a "home" discipline and a secondary discipline. Our case study is a five-year research project in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) lie detection involving a transdisciplinary research team made up of social scientists, a neuroscientist, and a humanist. In addition to theorizing neuro-collaborations from the inside-out, this essay presents practical suggestions for developing transdisciplinary infrastructures that could support future neuro-collaborations.

  12. Robust detection of multiple sclerosis lesions from intensity-normalized multi-channel MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpate, Yogesh; Commowick, Olivier; Barillot, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disease with heterogeneous evolution among the patients. Quantitative analysis of longitudinal Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) provides a spatial analysis of the brain tissues which may lead to the discovery of biomarkers of disease evolution. Better understanding of the disease will lead to a better discovery of pathogenic mechanisms, allowing for patient-adapted therapeutic strategies. To characterize MS lesions, we propose a novel paradigm to detect white matter lesions based on a statistical framework. It aims at studying the benefits of using multi-channel MRI to detect statistically significant differences between each individual MS patient and a database of control subjects. This framework consists in two components. First, intensity standardization is conducted to minimize the inter-subject intensity difference arising from variability of the acquisition process and different scanners. The intensity normalization maps parameters obtained using a robust Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) estimation not affected by the presence of MS lesions. The second part studies the comparison of multi-channel MRI of MS patients with respect to an atlas built from the control subjects, thereby allowing us to look for differences in normal appearing white matter, in and around the lesions of each patient. Experimental results demonstrate that our technique accurately detects significant differences in lesions consequently improving the results of MS lesion detection.

  13. Detection of rheumatoid arthritis bone erosions by 2 different dedicated extremity MRI units and conventional radiography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duer, Anne; Vestergaard, Aage; Døhn, Uffe Møller;

    2008-01-01

    and carpal bones. MagneVu and CR detected 100% and 89%, respectively, of large erosions (OMERACT-RAMRIS-score > 1 on Artoscan) in MCP-joints, and 69% and 15.8% of large erosions in wrists. CONCLUSIONS: Both E-MRI units detected more erosions than CR, particularly due to a higher sensitivity in metacarpal...... heads and carpal bones. The MagneVu detected fewer erosions than the Artoscan, due to a lower average image quality and a smaller proportion of bones being visualized....

  14. Morphometric MRI analysis improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jan; Weber, Bernd; Urbach, Horst; Elger, Christian E; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen

    2011-10-01

    Focal cortical dysplasias type II (FCD II) are highly epileptogenic lesions frequently causing pharmacoresistant epilepsy. Detection of these lesions on MRI is still challenging as FCDs may be very subtle in appearance and might escape conventional visual analysis. Morphometric MRI analysis is a voxel-based post-processing method based on algorithms of the statistical parametric mapping software (SPM5). It creates three dimensional feature maps highlighting brain areas with blurred grey-white matter junction and abnormal gyration, and thereby may help to detect FCD. In this study, we evaluated the potential diagnostic value of morphometric analysis as implemented in a morphometric analysis programme, compared with conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist in 91 patients with histologically proven FCD II operated on at the University Hospital of Bonn between 2000 and 2010 (FCD IIa, n = 17; IIb, n = 74). All preoperative MRI scans were evaluated independently (i) based on conventional visual analysis by an experienced neuroradiologist and (ii) using morphometric analysis. Both evaluators had the same clinical information (electroencephalography and semiology), but were blinded to each other's results. The detection rate of FCD using morphometric analysis was superior to conventional visual analysis in the FCD IIa subgroup (82% versus 65%), while no difference was found in the FCD IIb subgroup (92% versus 91%). However, the combination of conventional visual analysis and morphometric analysis provided complementary information and detected 89 out of all 91 FCDs (98%). The combination was significantly superior to conventional visual analysis alone in both subgroups resulting in a higher diagnostic sensitivity (94% versus 65%, P = 0.031 for FCD IIa; 99% versus 91%, P = 0.016 for FCD IIb). In conclusion, the additional application of morphometric MRI analysis increases the diagnostic sensitivity for FCD II in comparison with conventional visual

  15. Susceptibility Contrast in High Field MRI of Human Brain as a Function of Tissue Iron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Bing; Li, Tie-Qiang; van Gelderen, Peter; Shmueli, Karin; de Zwart, Jacco A.; Duyn, Jeff H.

    2009-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility provides an important contrast mechanism for MRI. Increasingly, susceptibility-based contrast is being exploited to investigate brain tissue microstructure and to detect abnormal levels of brain iron as these have been implicated in a variety of neuro-degenerative diseases. However, it remains unclear to what extent magnetic susceptibility-related contrast at high field relates to actual brain iron concentrations. In this study, we performed susceptibility weighted imaging as a function of field strength on healthy brains in vivo and post-mortem brain tissues at 1.5T, 3T and 7T. Iron histology was performed on the tissue samples for comparison. The calculated susceptibility-related parameters R2* and signal frequency shift in four iron-rich regions (putamen, globus pallidus, caudate, and thalamus) showed an almost linear dependence (r=0.90 for R2*; r=0.83 for phase, p<0.01) on field strength, suggesting that potential ferritin saturation effects are not relevant to susceptibility-weighted contrast for field strengths up to 7T. The R2* dependence on the putative (literature-based) iron concentration was 0.048 Hz/Tesla/ppm. The histological data from brain samples confirmed the linear dependence of R2* on field strength and showed a slope against iron concentration of 0.0099 Hz/Tesla/ppm dry-weight, which is equivalent to 0.05 Hz/Tesla/ppm wet-weight and closely matched the calculated value in vivo. These results confirm the validity of using susceptibility-weighted contrast as an indicator of iron content in iron-rich brain regions. The absence of saturation effects opens the way to exploit the benefits of MRI at high field strengths for the detection of iron distributions with high sensitivity and resolution. PMID:19027861

  16. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state A functional MRI study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Huang; Tongjun Zeng; Guifeng Zhang; Ganlong Li; Na Lu; Xinsheng Lai; Yangjia Lu; Jiarong Chen

    2012-01-01

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state,as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture.Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint.Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling,true needling activated Brodmann areas 3,6,8,9,10,11,13,20,21,37,39,40,43,and 47,the head of the caudate nucleus,the parahippocampal gyrus,thalamus and red nucleus.True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1,2,3,4,5,6,7,9,10,18,24,31,40 and 46.

  17. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O' Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Awan, Atif [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Dublin (Ireland)

    2005-03-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  18. Usefulness of MRI in detecting occult breast cancer associated with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarria, J J; Lopez-Ruiz, J A; Martin, D; Imaz, I; Martin, M

    2004-12-01

    MRI allows for the detection of mammographically and clinically occult breast neoplasms. We analysed the ability of MRI to detect occult breast cancer in three patients with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex, proven histologically. In all three cases we observed differences in the morphological and dynamic features of healthy and pathological nipples, and we also found enhancement foci in breast tissue, with suspicious kinetic and morphological characteristics, which in the case of two patients corresponded to ductal carcinoma in situ. The detection and location with MRI of underlying neoplastic foci may be of help in choosing the most reasonable and conservative treatment in these patients.

  19. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan V. Raut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR, which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a breath-hold fMRI task to evaluate CVR across gray matter in a group of acute stroke patients (<10 days from stroke; N = 22 to address this question. These estimates were compared with those from both age-matched (N = 22 and younger (N = 22 healthy controls. As expected, young controls had the greatest mean CVR, as indicated by magnitude and extent of fMRI activation; however, stroke patients did not differ from age-matched controls. Moreover, the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres of stroke patients did not differ with respect to any of these measures. These findings suggest that fMRI remains a valid tool within the first few days of a stroke, particularly for group fMRI studies in which findings are compared with healthy subjects of similar age. However, given the relatively high variability in CVR observed in our stroke sample, caution is warranted when interpreting fMRI data from individual patients or a small cohort. We conclude that a breath-hold task can be a useful addition to functional imaging protocols for stroke patients.

  20. Multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection: Preliminary results on quantitative analysis of dynamic contrast enhanced imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging and spectroscopy imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Roberta; Sansone, Mario; Petrillo, Mario; Setola, Sergio Venanzio; Granata, Vincenza; Botti, Gerardo; Perdonà, Sisto; Borzillo, Valentina; Muto, Paolo; Petrillo, Antonella

    2016-09-01

    Early promising data suggest that combined use of both morphological and functional MRI (multi-parametric MR, mpMRI) including MRSI, DWI and DCE may be of additional value for prostate cancer localization and its local staging. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the diagnostic performance of mpMRI in the detection of prostate cancer. Thirty-one consecutive male patients were screened to be enrolled in a single center prospective observational study. All eligible patients underwent multi-parametric MRI and TRUS (Trans Rectal Ultra Sound) guided prostate biopsies. A register, approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee, included patients enrolled in this study. All patients who decided to undergo the MRI examination signed an explicit informed consensus. MRI data were aligned on a common spatial grid and several functional parameters (perfusion, diffusion and metabolic parameters) were computed. Statistical analysis was conducted in order to compare mpMRI with biopsy-based analysis. Statistically significant differences between median values in high Gleason score (≥5) and low Gleason score (<5) to Wilcox on rank sum test were obtained for MRSI parameters and for plasma fraction (Tofts model) of DCE-MRI. The area under curve obtained with ROC analysis showed that the best-performing single-parameter was vp (plasma fraction of Tofts model), while the best parameters combination to discriminate the area with high Gleason score were (Cho+Cr)/Cit and Cho+Cr. Linear Discrimination Analysis showed that the best results were obtained considering the linear combination of all MRSI parameters and the linear combination of all features (perfusion, diffusion and metabolic parameters). In conclusion, our findings showed that by combining morphological MRI, DWI, DCE-MRI and MRSI, an increase in sensitivity and specificity correlated to biopsy Gleason grade could be obtained. Furthermore, morphological and functional MRI could have a diagnostic role in patients with

  1. Lung MRI and impairment of diaphragmatic function in Pompe disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wens, Stephan C A; Ciet, Pierluigi; Perez-Rovira, Adria

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pompe disease is a progressive metabolic myopathy. Involvement of respiratory muscles leads to progressive pulmonary dysfunction, particularly in supine position. Diaphragmatic weakness is considered to be the most important component. Standard spirometry is to some extent indicative...... weakness. This variable strongly correlated with forced vital capacity in supine position (r = 0.88) and postural drop (r = 0.89). While anterior-posterior length ratios also differed between patients and volunteers (p = 0.04), left-right length ratios did not (p = 0.1). Conclusions: MRI is an innovative...

  2. Finding a way in: a review and practical evaluation of fMRI and EEG for detection and assessment in disorders of consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Amabilis H; Connolly, John F

    2013-09-01

    Diagnoses and assessments of cognitive function in disorders of consciousness (DOC) are notoriously prone to error due to their reliance on behavioural measures. As a result, researchers have turned to functional neuroimaging and electrophysiological techniques with the goal of developing more effective methods of detecting awareness and assessing cognition in these patients. This article reviews functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and electroenchphalography (EEG)-based studies of cognition and consciousness in DOC, including assessment of basic sensory, perceptual, language, and emotional processing; studies for detection of conscious awareness; paradigms for the establishment of communication in the absence of behaviour; and functional connectivity studies. The advantages and limitations of fMRI and EEG-based measures are examined as research and clinical tools in this population and an explanation offered for the rediscovery of the unique advantages of EEG in the study of DOC.

  3. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  4. Intra-articular membranous interposition detected by MRI in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, W.; Itoi, Eiji; Sato, Kozo [Akita Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2000-12-01

    Intra-articular membranous interposition was detected by MRI in the hip joint with residual subluxation of a girl aged 5 years 10 months. This structure, which had low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images, separated the femoral head from the acetabulum. Histological examination revealed chondrometaplasia, which suggested that this interposition might be transformed to a surface cartilaginous tissue of the secondary acetabulum often observed in residual subluxation of the hip. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  6. On the averaging of cardiac diffusion tensor MRI data: the effect of distance function selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) metrics were judged by quantitative—rather than qualitative—criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the ‘swelling effect’ occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration.

  7. The use of an MEG/fMRI compatible finger motion sensor in detecting different finger actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyi eYong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the use of a novel device in detecting different finger actions among healthy individuals and individuals with stroke. The device is magnetoencephalography (MEG and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI compatible. It was prototyped to have four air-filled chambers that are made of silicone elastomer, which contains low magnetizing materials. When an individual compresses the device with his/her fingers, each chamber experiences a change in pressure, which is detected by a pressure sensor. In a previous recent work, our device was shown to be MEG/fMRI compatible. In this study, our research effort focuses on using the device to detect different finger actions (e.g. grasping and pinching in non-shielded rooms. This is achieved by applying a support vector machine to the sensor data collected from the device when participants are resting and executing the different finger actions. The total number of possible finger actions that can be executed using the device is 31. The healthy participants could perform all the 31 different finger actions and the average classification accuracy achieved is 95.53 ± 2.63%. The stroke participants could perform all the 31 different finger actions with their healthy hand and the average classification accuracy achieved is 83.13 ± 6.69%. Unfortunately, the functions of their affected hands are compromised due to stroke. Thus, the number of finger actions they could perform ranges from 2 to 24, depending on the level of impairments. The average classification accuracy for the affected hand is 83.99 ± 16.38%. The ability to identify different finger actions using the device can provide a mean to researchers to label the data automatically in MEG/fMRI studies. In addition, the sensor data acquired from the device provide sensorimotor-related information such as speed and force when the device is compressed. Thus, brain activations can be correlated with this information during different

  8. Reviews of functional MRI: the ethical dimensions of methodological critique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Anderson

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies involving human subjects raise a range of ethics issues. Many of these issues are heightened in the context of neuroimaging research involving persons with mental health disorders. There has been growing interest in these issues among legal scholars, philosophers, social scientists, and as well as neuroimagers over the last decade. Less clear, however, is the extent to which members of the neuroimaging community are engaged with these issues when they undertake their research and report results. In this study, we analyze the peer-reviewed review literature involving fMRI as applied to the study of mental health disorders. Our hypothesis is that, due to the critical orientation of reviews, and the vulnerability of mental health population, the penetrance of neuroethics will be higher in the review literature in this area than it is in the primary fMRI research literature more generally. We find that while authors of reviews do focus a great deal of attention on the methodological limitations of the studies they discussed, contrary to our hypothesis, they do not frame concerns in ethical terms despite their ethical significance. We argue that an ethics lens on such discussion would increase the knowledge-value of this scholarly work.

  9. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeneke, Susan; Pedroni, Andreas F; Dieckmann, Anja; Bosch, Volker; Jäncke, Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value). Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations. PMID:19032746

  10. Functional MRI in Awake Dogs Predicts Suitability for Assistance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S.; Brooks, Andrew M.; Spivak, Mark; Levy, Kerinne

    2017-03-01

    The overall goal of this work was to measure the efficacy of fMRI for predicting whether a dog would be a successful service dog. The training and imaging were performed in 49 dogs entering service training at 17–21 months of age. 33 dogs completed service training and were matched with a person, while 10 were released for behavioral reasons (4 were selected as breeders and 2 were released for medical reasons.) After 2 months of training, fMRI responses were measured while each dog observed hand signals indicating either reward or no reward and given by both a familiar handler and a stranger. Using anatomically defined ROIs in the caudate, amygdala, and visual cortex, we developed a classifier based on the dogs’ subsequent training outcomes. The classifier had a positive predictive value of 94% and a negative predictive value of 67%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.91 (0.80 with 4-fold cross-validation, P = 0.01), indicating a significant predictive capability. The magnitude of response in the caudate was positively correlated with a successful outcome, while the response in the amygdala depended on the interaction with the visual cortex during the stranger condition and was negatively correlated with outcome (higher being associated with failure). These results suggest that, as indexed by caudate activity, successful service dogs generalize associations to hand signals regardless who gives them but without excessive arousal as measured in the amygdala.

  11. Functional MRI in Awake Dogs Predicts Suitability for Assistance Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berns, Gregory S.; Brooks, Andrew M.; Spivak, Mark; Levy, Kerinne

    2017-01-01

    The overall goal of this work was to measure the efficacy of fMRI for predicting whether a dog would be a successful service dog. The training and imaging were performed in 49 dogs entering service training at 17–21 months of age. 33 dogs completed service training and were matched with a person, while 10 were released for behavioral reasons (4 were selected as breeders and 2 were released for medical reasons.) After 2 months of training, fMRI responses were measured while each dog observed hand signals indicating either reward or no reward and given by both a familiar handler and a stranger. Using anatomically defined ROIs in the caudate, amygdala, and visual cortex, we developed a classifier based on the dogs’ subsequent training outcomes. The classifier had a positive predictive value of 94% and a negative predictive value of 67%. The area under the ROC curve was 0.91 (0.80 with 4-fold cross-validation, P = 0.01), indicating a significant predictive capability. The magnitude of response in the caudate was positively correlated with a successful outcome, while the response in the amygdala depended on the interaction with the visual cortex during the stranger condition and was negatively correlated with outcome (higher being associated with failure). These results suggest that, as indexed by caudate activity, successful service dogs generalize associations to hand signals regardless who gives them but without excessive arousal as measured in the amygdala. PMID:28266550

  12. Individual preferences modulate incentive values: Evidence from functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Volker

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most studies on human reward processing, reward intensity has been manipulated on an objective scale (e.g., varying monetary value. Everyday experience, however, teaches us that objectively equivalent rewards may differ substantially in their subjective incentive values. One factor influencing incentive value in humans is branding. The current study explores the hypothesis that individual brand preferences modulate activity in reward areas similarly to objectively measurable differences in reward intensity. Methods A wheel-of-fortune game comprising an anticipation phase and a subsequent outcome evaluation phase was implemented. Inside a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, 19 participants played for chocolate bars of three different brands that differed in subjective attractiveness. Results Parametrical analysis of the obtained fMRI data demonstrated that the level of activity in anatomically distinct neural networks was linearly associated with the subjective preference hierarchy of the brands played for. During the anticipation phases, preference-dependent neural activity has been registered in premotor areas, insular cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, and in the midbrain. During the outcome phases, neural activity in the caudate nucleus, precuneus, lingual gyrus, cerebellum, and in the pallidum was influenced by individual preference. Conclusion Our results suggest a graded effect of differently preferred brands onto the incentive value of objectively equivalent rewards. Regarding the anticipation phase, the results reflect an intensified state of wanting that facilitates action preparation when the participants play for their favorite brand. This mechanism may underlie approach behavior in real-life choice situations.

  13. In vivo MRI biocompatibility evaluation of functionalized carbon fibers in reaction with soft tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokić B.B.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In modern medicine implants are very important and so is their design and choice of materials. Almost equally important is the choice of imaging technique used to in vivo monitor their fate and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in monitoring the biocompatibility of two newly designed carbon fibers. We have analyzed the interaction of surface functionalized carbon fibers (basic and acidic with muscle and subcutaneous tissues of rabbits. MRI techniques showed to be useful in longitudinal monitoring of the surrounding tissues, assessment of biocompatibility of new implants, and in the distinction of in vivo surgical edema from inflammation. Histopathology confirmed MRI results, thus showing that MRI has a great potential for in vivo studies of such materials. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 45006 and III 41005

  14. Would the field of cognitive neuroscience be advanced by sharing functional MRI data?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weissman Daniel H

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During the past two decades, the advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has fundamentally changed our understanding of brain-behavior relationships. However, the data from any one study add only incrementally to the big picture. This fact raises important questions about the dominant practice of performing studies in isolation. To what extent are the findings from any single study reproducible? Are researchers who lack the resources to conduct a fMRI study being needlessly excluded? Is pre-existing fMRI data being used effectively to train new students in the field? Here, we will argue that greater sharing and synthesis of raw fMRI data among researchers would make the answers to all of these questions more favorable to scientific discovery than they are today and that such sharing is an important next step for advancing the field of cognitive neuroscience.

  15. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I....... Language comprehension and visual tasks can be added to visualize Wernicke’s area or the visual cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used to map nerve tract course relative to the tumour. Conclusion FMRI has proven its clinical utility in locating eloquent brain areas with relation to tumor site...... be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system (Achieva TX...

  16. [fMRI functional connectivity analysis of anxiety disease patients based on spatiotemporal Lyapunov exponent method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhikang; Lou, Haifang; Sun, Jianzhong

    2011-07-01

    Attempting to use nonlinear spatiotemporal Lyapunov exponent to characterize fMRI brain functional connectivity of anxiety disease patients, we adopted the methods of nonlinear spatiotemporal Lyapunov exponent and linear correlation coefficients to analyses fMRI datum of 11 anxiety disease patients and 11 healthy volunteers, respectively. The results show that there are significant normalized variance exponent (NVE) differences in Inferior Frontal Gyrus (rIFG) and Medial Frontal Gyrus (MFG) between the two groups (PLyapunov exponent method had higher sensitivity than the correlation coefficient method in the characterization of functional connectivity; Anxiety disease patients have abnormal functional connectivity in rIFG and MFG during our experiment.

  17. Determination of language lateralization using functional MRI during the performance of shiritori tasks in neurosurgery patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isesaki, Gunma (Japan); Sugishita, Morihiro; Onozuka, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi

    2001-03-01

    Assessment of language lateralization is crucial in patients considered for neurological surgery. The authors used functional MRI (fMRI) in conjunction with shiritori, a kind of word-generation task as paradigms, to determine language lateralization in the patients. We used a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging devise with an echo-planar imaging sequence. Thirty-two patients undergoing neurological surgery would alternately rest and silently perform shiritori during fMRI acquisition. Language lateralization was determined in 29 out of 32 patients. Twenty-two patients were considered as left-hemisphere dominant and seven were right-hemisphere dominant. Brain activation was seen in the prefrontal area, premotor area, superior temporal gyrus and parietal lobe of the dominant hemisphere, which is consistent with the results in normal adults. Language lateralization was particularly useful in a case of meningioma in the left lateral ventricle and in a case of AVM in the left temporoparietal region. fMRI with shiritori tasks revealed right-hemisphere dominance in both cases, which was also confirmed by intracarotid amobarbital (Wada) testing. Both lesions were treated successfully without causing any further deficit to the patients' language function. These results suggest that fMRI with shiritori tasks can be used to assess language lateralization non-invasively, compared with the current techniques, such as intracarotid amobarbital testing and cortical electrostimulation mapping. Thus, fMRI with shiritori tasks has significant clinical potential as a presurgical evaluation tool. (author)

  18. Enhanced disease characterization through multi network functional normalization in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Mustafa S; Khullar, Siddharth; Damaraju, Eswar; Michael, Andrew M; Baum, Stefi A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, structural topology is used for spatial normalization during the pre-processing of fMRI. The co-existence of multiple intrinsic networks which can be detected in the resting brain are well-studied. Also, these networks exhibit temporal and spatial modulation during cognitive task vs. rest which shows the existence of common spatial excitation patterns between these identified networks. Previous work (Khullar et al., 2011) has shown that structural and functional data may not have direct one-to-one correspondence and functional activation patterns in a well-defined structural region can vary across subjects even for a well-defined functional task. The results of this study and the existence of the neural activity patterns in multiple networks motivates us to investigate multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization for multi groups of subjects. We extend the previous approach (Khullar et al., 2011) by co-registering multi group of subjects (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and by utilizing multiple resting-state networks (instead of just one) as a single fusion template for functional normalization. In this paper we describe the initial steps toward using multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization. A simple wavelet-based image fusion approach is presented in order to evaluate the feasibility of combining multiple functional networks. Our results showed improvements in both the significance of group statistics (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and the spatial extent of activation when a multiple resting-state network applied as a single fusion template for functional normalization after the conventional structural normalization. Also, our results provided evidence that the improvement in significance of group statistics lead to better accuracy results for classification of healthy controls and schizophrenia patients.

  19. Functional MRI of the olfactory system in conscious dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jia

    Full Text Available We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology.

  20. Assignment Confidence in Localization of the Hand Motor Cortex: Comparison of Structural Imaging With Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Neslin; Mohan, Suyash; Maralani, Pejman J; Duddukuri, Srikalyan; O'Rourke, Donald M; Melhem, Elias R; Wolf, Ronald L

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assign confidence levels to structural MRI and functional MRI (fMRI) for localization of the primary motor cortex. Ninety-one fMRI studies with at least one motor task (178 hemispheres) were identified. Three anatomic assessments were used to localize the primary motor cortex: relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus; cortical thickness; and configuration of the precentral knob. In 105 hemispheres, interreader agreement was assessed for two investigators with different experience levels. Confidence ratings from 0 to 5 (0, no confidence; 5, 100% confidence) were assigned for fMRI and each anatomic localization method. Cortical thickness had the highest confidence rating (mean, 4.90 ± 0.47 [SD]) with only one failure. The relation between the superior frontal sulcus and precentral sulcus had the lowest confidence rating (4.33 ± 0.91) with three failures. The greatest statistical significance was observed for the cortical thickness and superior frontal sulcus-precentral sulcus methods (post hoc Bonferroni test, p Confidence rating scores were significantly higher for the cortical thickness sign than for fMRI results (4.72 ± 0.54) for a single motor task (post hoc Bonferroni test, p = 0.006); however, the mean confidence rating for fMRI improved to 4.87 ± 0.36 when additional motor tasks were performed. Interreader differences were least for the cortical thickness sign (paired t test, t = 4.25, p confidence regarding localization of the primary motor cortex; however, localization of motor function is more specific when combined with fMRI findings. Multiple techniques can be used to increase confidence in identifying the hand motor cortex.

  1. Comparison of post-surgical MRI presentation of the pituitary gland and its hormonal function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladowska, Joanna; Sokolska, Violetta; Sozański, Tomasz; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Summary Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change of anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of a tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of filling material used and time of its resorption.The aim of the study was to compare MR image of the pituitary gland after surgery with clinical findings and to establish a correlation between MRI presentation of spared pituitary and its hormonal function. Material/Methods: 124 patients after resection of pituitary adenomas – 409 MRI results in total – were studied. With a 1.5-T unit, T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images were obtained. Results: The pituitary gland seemed to be normal in MRI in 11 patients, 8 of them had completely regular pituitary function but in 3 of them we noticed a partial hypopituitarism. In 99 patients only a part of the pituitary gland was recognised, 53 of them had hypopituitarism but 46 of them were endocrinologically healthy. 14 patients seemed to have no persistent pituitary gland in MRI, in comparison to hormonal studies: there was panhypopituitarism in 6 and hypopituitarism in 8 cases. Conclusions: MRI presentation of post – surgical pituitary gland doesn’t necessarily correlate with its hormonal function – there was a significant statistical difference. Some patients with partial pituitary seems normal hormonal function. In some cases the pituitary seem normal in MRI but these patients have hormonal disorders and need substitution therapy. PMID:22802758

  2. Tracking Adult Literacy Acquisition with Functional MRI: A Single-Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Lucia W.; Amemiya, Eduardo; Tauil, Alexandre; Suguieda, Denis; Lacerda, Carolina; Klein, Elise; Dehaene-Lambertz, Ghislaine; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated neuro-functional changes associated with late acquisition of reading in an illiterate adult who underwent 20 longitudinal functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scans during 2 years, while the participant progressed from complete illiteracy to a modest level of alphabetical decoding. Initially, the participant did not activate…

  3. Functional imaging of the lung by CT und MRI; Funktionelle Lungendiagnostik mit CT und MRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, M.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungsinstitut Heidelberg (Germany). Abt. Radiologie

    2005-06-01

    Imaging techniques are indispensable for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary diseases. In the past the interest was focused on morphological aspects of pulmonary tissue. With the development of novel CT and MRI techniques functional pulmonary imaging became available. In this review the value of cross sectional functional imaging in pulmonary diseases is presented and its potential clinical applications are discussed. (orig.)

  4. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  5. Neural Activity Elicited by a Cognitive Task can be Detected in Single-Trials with Simultaneous Intracerebral EEG-fMRI Recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saignavongs, Mani; Ciumas, Carolina; Petton, Mathilde; Bouet, Romain; Boulogne, Sébastien; Rheims, Sylvain; Carmichael, David W; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe; Ryvlin, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that it is feasible to record simultaneously intracerebral EEG (icEEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with epilepsy. While it has mainly been used to explore the hemodynamic changes associated with epileptic spikes, this approach could also provide new insight into human cognition. However, the first step is to ensure that cognitive EEG components, that have lower amplitudes than epileptic spikes, can be appropriately detected under fMRI. We compared the high frequency activities (HFA, 50-150[Formula: see text]Hz) elicited by a reading task in icEEG-only and subsequent icEEG-fMRI in the same patients ([Formula: see text]), implanted with depth electrodes. Comparable responses were obtained, with 71% of the recording sites that responded during the icEEG-only session also responding during the icEEG-fMRI session. For all the remaining sites, nearby clusters (distant of 7[Formula: see text]mm or less) also demonstrated significant HFA increase during the icEEG-fMRI session. Significant HFA increases were also observable at the single-trial level in icEEG-fMRI recordings. Our results show that low-amplitude icEEG signal components such as cognitive-induced HFAs can be reliably recorded with simultaneous fMRI. This paves the way for the use of icEEG-fMRI to address various fundamental and clinical issues, notably the identification of the neural correlates of the BOLD signal.

  6. Decoding lifespan changes of the human brain using resting-state functional connectivity MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubin Wang

    Full Text Available The development of large-scale functional brain networks is a complex, lifelong process that can be investigated using resting-state functional connectivity MRI (rs-fcMRI. In this study, we aimed to decode the developmental dynamics of the whole-brain functional network in seven decades (8-79 years of the human lifespan. We first used parametric curve fitting to examine linear and nonlinear age effect on the resting human brain, and then combined manifold learning and support vector machine methods to predict individuals' "brain ages" from rs-fcMRI data. We found that age-related changes in interregional functional connectivity exhibited spatially and temporally specific patterns. During brain development from childhood to senescence, functional connections tended to linearly increase in the emotion system and decrease in the sensorimotor system; while quadratic trajectories were observed in functional connections related to higher-order cognitive functions. The complex patterns of age effect on the whole-brain functional network could be effectively represented by a low-dimensional, nonlinear manifold embedded in the functional connectivity space, which uncovered the inherent structure of brain maturation and aging. Regression of manifold coordinates with age further showed that the manifold representation extracted sufficient information from rs-fcMRI data to make prediction about individual brains' functional development levels. Our study not only gives insights into the neural substrates that underlie behavioral and cognitive changes over age, but also provides a possible way to quantitatively describe the typical and atypical developmental progression of human brain function using rs-fcMRI.

  7. Automatic denoising of functional MRI data: combining independent component analysis and hierarchical fusion of classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Beckmann, Christian F; Glasser, Matthew F; Griffanti, Ludovica; Smith, Stephen M

    2014-04-15

    Many sources of fluctuation contribute to the fMRI signal, and this makes identifying the effects that are truly related to the underlying neuronal activity difficult. Independent component analysis (ICA) - one of the most widely used techniques for the exploratory analysis of fMRI data - has shown to be a powerful technique in identifying various sources of neuronally-related and artefactual fluctuation in fMRI data (both with the application of external stimuli and with the subject "at rest"). ICA decomposes fMRI data into patterns of activity (a set of spatial maps and their corresponding time series) that are statistically independent and add linearly to explain voxel-wise time series. Given the set of ICA components, if the components representing "signal" (brain activity) can be distinguished form the "noise" components (effects of motion, non-neuronal physiology, scanner artefacts and other nuisance sources), the latter can then be removed from the data, providing an effective cleanup of structured noise. Manual classification of components is labour intensive and requires expertise; hence, a fully automatic noise detection algorithm that can reliably detect various types of noise sources (in both task and resting fMRI) is desirable. In this paper, we introduce FIX ("FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier"), which provides an automatic solution for denoising fMRI data via accurate classification of ICA components. For each ICA component FIX generates a large number of distinct spatial and temporal features, each describing a different aspect of the data (e.g., what proportion of temporal fluctuations are at high frequencies). The set of features is then fed into a multi-level classifier (built around several different classifiers). Once trained through the hand-classification of a sufficient number of training datasets, the classifier can then automatically classify new datasets. The noise components can then be subtracted from (or regressed out of) the original

  8. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  9. Clustering of Dependent Components: A New Paradigm for fMRI Signal Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurdal Monica K

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Exploratory data-driven methods such as unsupervised clustering and independent component analysis (ICA are considered to be hypothesis-generating procedures and are complementary to the hypothesis-led statistical inferential methods in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. Recently, a new paradigm in ICA emerged, that of finding "clusters" of dependent components. This intriguing idea found its implementation into two new ICA algorithms: tree-dependent and topographic ICA. For fMRI, this represents the unifying paradigm of combining two powerful exploratory data analysis methods, ICA and unsupervised clustering techniques. For the fMRI data, a comparative quantitative evaluation between the two methods, tree-dependent and topographic ICA, was performed. The comparative results were evaluated by (1 task-related activation maps, (2 associated time courses, and (3 ROC study. The most important findings in this paper are that (1 both tree-dependent and topographic ICA are able to identify signal components with high correlation to the fMRI stimulus, and that (2 topographic ICA outperforms all other ICA methods including tree-dependent ICA for 8 and 9 ICs. However for 16 ICs, topographic ICA is outperformed by tree-dependent ICA (KGV using as an approximation of the mutual information the kernel generalized variance. The applicability of the new algorithm is demonstrated on experimental data.

  10. Progress on detection of liquid explosives using ultra-low field MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espy, Michelle A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matlashov, Andrei N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Volegov, Petr L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schuttz, Larry M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baguisa, Shermiyah [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dunkerley, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magnelind, Per [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Owens, Tuba [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandin, Henrik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbaitis, Algis [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are widely used in medicine, chemistry and industry. Over the past several years there has been increasing interest in performing NMR and MRI in the ultra-low field (ULF) regime, with measurement field strengths of 10-100 microTesla and pre-polarization fields of 30-50 mTesla. The real-time signal-to-noise ratio for such measurements is about 100. Our group at LANL has built and demonstrated the performance of SQUID-based ULF NMR/MRI instrumentation for classification of materials and detection of liquid explosives via their relaxation properties measured at ULF, using T{sub 1}, and T{sub 2}, and T{sub 1} frequency dispersion. We are also beginning to investigate the performance of induction coils as sensors. Here we present recent progress on the applications of ULF MR to the detection of liquid explosives, in imaging and relaxometry.

  11. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  12. Detection of rib metastases in patients with lung cancer: a comparative study of MRI, CT and bone scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Yang, Yang; Xing, Yan-Fen; Jiang, Sen; Sun, Xi-Wen

    2012-01-01

    We retrospectively investigated the imaging findings of bone scintigraphy, chest CT and chest MRI in 55 cases of lung cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the detection of rib metastases were compared between imaging modalities on both a per-lesion and a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion basis, MRI sensitivity and accuracy were significantly higher than that of bone scintigraphy and CT (Pscintigraphy did not differ on either a per-lesion or per-patient basis (P>0.05). MRI appears to be superior for the detection of ribs metastases in lung cancer.

  13. Detection of rib metastases in patients with lung cancer: a comparative study of MRI, CT and bone scintigraphy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Qing Chen

    Full Text Available We retrospectively investigated the imaging findings of bone scintigraphy, chest CT and chest MRI in 55 cases of lung cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the detection of rib metastases were compared between imaging modalities on both a per-lesion and a per-patient basis. On a per-lesion basis, MRI sensitivity and accuracy were significantly higher than that of bone scintigraphy and CT (P0.05. MRI appears to be superior for the detection of ribs metastases in lung cancer.

  14. Pharmaco fMRI: Determining the functional anatomy of the effects of medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Wandschneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI studies have helped to elucidate underlying mechanisms in complex neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Disease processes often involve complex large-scale network interactions, extending beyond the presumed main disease focus. Given both the complexity of the clinical phenotype and the underlying dysfunctional brain circuits, so called pharmaco-fMRI (ph-MRI studies probe pharmacological effects on functional neuro-anatomy, and can help to determine early treatment response, mechanisms of drug efficacy and side effects, and potentially advance CNS drug development. In this review, we discuss recent ph-MRI research in three major neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders and associated network alterations, namely selective serotonin and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors in affective disorders and emotional processing circuits; antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy and cognitive networks; and stimulants in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and networks of attention control. We conclude that ph-MRI studies show consistent and reproducible changes on disease relevant networks, and prove sensitive to early pharmacological effects on functional anatomy associated with disease. Further CNS drug research and development would benefit greatly from improved disease phenotyping, or biomarkers, using advanced imaging techniques.

  15. Altered small-world efficiency of brain functional networks in acupuncture at ST36: a functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acupuncture in humans can produce clinical effects via the central nervous system. However, the neural substrates of acupuncture's effects remain largely unknown. RESULTS: We utilized functional MRI to investigate the topological efficiency of brain functional networks in eighteen healthy young adults who were scanned before and after acupuncture at the ST36 acupoints (ACUP and its sham point (SHAM. Whole-brain functional networks were constructed by thresholding temporal correlations matrices of ninety brain regions, followed by a graph theory-based analysis. We showed that brain functional networks exhibited small-world attributes (high local and global efficiency regardless of the order of acupuncture and stimulus points, a finding compatible with previous studies of brain functional networks. Furthermore, the brain networks had increased local efficiency after ACUP stimulation but there were no significant differences after SHAM, indicating a specificity of acupuncture point in coordinating local information flow over the whole brain. Moreover, significant (P<0.05, corrected by false discovery rate approach effects of only acupuncture point were detected on nodal degree of the left hippocampus (higher nodal degree at ACUP as compared to SHAM. Using an uncorrected P<0.05, point-related effects were also observed in the anterior cingulate cortex, frontal and occipital regions while stimulation-related effects in various brain regions of frontal, parietal and occipital cortex regions. In addition, we found that several limbic and subcortical brain regions exhibited point- and stimulation-related alterations in their regional homogeneity (P<0.05, uncorrected. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that acupuncture modulates topological organization of whole-brain functional brain networks and the modulation has point specificity. These findings provide new insights into neuronal mechanism of acupuncture from the perspective of functional

  16. Interrelations of muscle functional MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and (31) P-MRS in exercised lower back muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiepe, Patrick; Gussew, Alexander; Rzanny, Reinhard; Anders, Christoph; Walther, Mario; Scholle, Hans-Christoph; Reichenbach, Jürgen R

    2014-08-01

    Exercise-induced changes of transverse proton relaxation time (T2 ), tissue perfusion and metabolic turnover were investigated in the lower back muscles of volunteers by applying muscle functional MRI (mfMRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) before and after as well as dynamic (31) P-MRS during the exercise. Inner (M. multifidus, MF) and outer lower back muscles (M. erector spinae, ES) were examined in 14 healthy young men performing a sustained isometric trunk-extension. Significant phosphocreatine (PCr) depletions ranging from 30% (ES) to 34% (MF) and Pi accumulations between 95% (left ES) and 120%-140% (MF muscles and right ES) were observed during the exercise, which were accompanied by significantly decreased pH values in all muscles (∆pH ≈ -0.05). Baseline T2 values were similar across all investigated muscles (approximately 27 ms at 3 T), but revealed right-left asymmetric increases (T2 ,inc ) after the exercise (right ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 11.8/9.7%; left ES/MF: T2 ,inc  = 4.6/8.9%). Analyzed muscles also showed load-induced increases in molecular diffusion D (p = .007) and perfusion fraction f (p = .002). The latter parameter was significantly higher in the MF than in the ES muscles both at rest and post exercise. Changes in PCr (p = .03), diffusion (p muscles.

  17. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballinger Michelle R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed.

  18. MRI for the detection of anorectal fistulas; MRT in der Diagnostik anorektaler Fisteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.O.; Baumann, T.; Langer, M. [Abt. Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany)

    2006-11-15

    MRI is accepted as one of the major diagnostic tools for the detection of anorectal fistulas and abscesses. Noninvasiveness and high accuracy are advantageous hallmarks of this technique. In general, the purpose of imaging anal fistulas is to reduce the risk of recurrence, incontinence and non-healing. To achieve these goals, the applied method must provide the proctologist with detailed information. In this context, MRI acts as a guide for surgeons to accurately plan fistula operations. Another aspect is the follow-up of conservatively treated patients with fistulizing Crohn's disease. In 2000, subtraction MR fistulography was introduced as new imaging technique. This review provides an overview of the entire spectrum of diagnostic modalities for anorectal fistulas with emphasis on subtraction MR fistulography. (orig.)

  19. Combined (18)F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI shows potential for detection and characterization of high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Selnæs, Kirsten M; Sandsmark, Elise; Krüger-Stokke, Brage; Størkersen, Øystein; Giskeødegård, Guro F; Tessem, May-Britt; Moestue, Siver A; Bertilsson, Helena; Bathen, Tone F

    2017-10-06

    The objective of this study is to investigate if quantitative imaging features derived from combined (18)F-Fluciclovine Positron Emission Tomograpy (PET) / multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) show potential for detection and characterization of primary prostate cancer. Methods: Twenty-eight (28) patients diagnosed with high-risk prostate cancer underwent simultaneous (18)F-Fluciclovine PET/MRI before radical prostatectomy. Volumes-of-interest (VOIs) of prostate tumors, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) nodules, prostatitis, and healthy tissue were delineated on T2-weighted images using histology as a reference. Tumor VOIs were marked as high-grade (≥ Gleason Grade group 3) or not. MRI and PET features were extracted on the voxel and VOI-level. Partial least-squared discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) with double leave-one-patient-out cross validation was performed to classify tumor from benign tissue (BPH, prostatitis, healthy tissue) and high-grade tumor from other tissue (low-grade tumor, benign tissue). The performances of PET, MRI, and combined PET/MRI features were compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results: Voxel and VOI features were extracted from 40 tumor (26 high-grade), 36 BPH, 6 prostatitis, and 37 healthy tissue VOIs. PET/MRI performed better than MRI and PET for classification of tumor vs benign tissue (voxel: AUC 87%, 81%, and 83%; VOI: AUC 96%, 93%, and 93%, respectively) and high-grade tumor vs other tissue (voxel: AUC 85%, 79%, and 81%; VOI: AUC 93%, 93%, and 91%, respectively). T2-weighted MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and PET features were most important for classification. Conclusion: Combined (18)F-Fluciclovine PET/multiparametric MRI shows potential for improving detection and characterization of high-risk prostate cancer, in comparison to MRI and PET alone. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Detection of epileptogenic cortical malformations with surface-based MRI morphometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Thesen

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging has revolutionized the detection of structural abnormalities in patients with epilepsy. However, many focal abnormalities remain undetected in routine visual inspection. Here we use an automated, surface-based method for quantifying morphometric features related to epileptogenic cortical malformations to detect abnormal cortical thickness and blurred gray-white matter boundaries. Using MRI morphometry at 3T with surface-based spherical averaging techniques that precisely align anatomical structures between individual brains, we compared single patients with known lesions to a large normal control group to detect clusters of abnormal cortical thickness, gray-white matter contrast, local gyrification, sulcal depth, jacobian distance and curvature. To assess the effects of threshold and smoothing on detection sensitivity and specificity, we systematically varied these parameters with different thresholds and smoothing levels. To test the effectiveness of the technique to detect lesions of epileptogenic character, we compared the detected structural abnormalities to expert-tracings, intracranial EEG, pathology and surgical outcome in a homogeneous patient sample. With optimal parameters and by combining thickness and GWC, the surface-based detection method identified 92% of cortical lesions (sensitivity with few false positives (96% specificity, successfully discriminating patients from controls 94% of the time. The detected structural abnormalities were related to the seizure onset zones, abnormal histology and positive outcome in all surgical patients. However, the method failed to adequately describe lesion extent in most cases. Automated surface-based MRI morphometry, if used with optimized parameters, may be a valuable additional clinical tool to improve the detection of subtle or previously occult malformations and therefore could improve identification of patients with intractable focal epilepsy who may benefit from

  1. A practical MRI technique for detecting Abdominal Aorta Aneurism and Peripheral Arterial Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Aktas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Peripheral Arterial Disease(PAD and abdominal aorta aneurysm(AAA are frequent problems in geriatric population. In DSA, CTA or MRA techniques contrast agents has to be used for diagnosis that can be nephrotoxic for elderly patients. Magnetic resonans imaging (MRI is the most powerful, non-ionising radiological diagnostic tool that has the highest soft tissue contrast resolution. The aim of our study was to investigate the effectivity of MRI by the means of detecting the AAA and PAD in comparison with DSA. Material and Method: After getting ethical commitee approvel and informed consent, we have performed Balanced turbo field echo(B-TFE MRI technique without contrast agent in 1.5 Tesla MRI device before DSA examination. The luminal diameters of renal arteries, infrarenal abdominal aorta, iliac and femoral arteries was measured by using Philips DICOM Viewer R2.2 application. The intraclass corelation coefficient and reliability used to check if the techniques could be used for each other and the t-test was used to measure the differences between them. Results: There has been a high relationship between B-TFE and DSA in detecting the pathologies of larger arteries like aorta. In the case of small arterial pathologies, there is relatively lower relationship between BTFE and DSA. Discussion: For the diagnosis of AAA and PAD, DSA is the gold standart technique but it is invasive and patients have radiation exposure. In the follow up of geriatric patients with larger arterial pathologies B-TFE can be used instead of contrast enhanced MRA and invasive DSA.

  2. Presumptive subarticular stress reactions of the knee: MRI detection and association with meniscal tear patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Lawrence [Diagnostic Radiology Department, National Institutes of Health, Building 10, Room 1C640, 10 Center Drive, MSC 1182, MD 20892-1182, Bethesda (United States); Stanczak, Jeffrey [Fairfax Radiological Consultants, PC, 2722 Merrilee Drive, Suite 230, VA 22031, Fairfax (United States); Boutin, Robert D. [MedTel International, 1430 Spring Hill Road, State 500, VA 22102, Mclean (United States)

    2004-05-01

    MRI detects subchondral marrow findings in painful knees which bear resemblance to spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee (SONK). Gathering evidence suggests that the primary or predominant pathogenesis of these lesions is physical stress. This study analyzes the patient characteristics and meniscal pathology associated with these lesions - herein referred to as ''presumptive subarticular stress related'' (PSSR) lesions. All patients were scanned using a standardized imaging protocol. The criterion for a PSSR lesion was a subchondral marrow edema pattern encompassing a more focal, low-signal zone adjacent to or contiguous with the subchondral cortex. Patients were identified using an electronic database search of cases reported by one experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. Twenty-five PSSR lesions were identified among 1,948 MRI evaluations of the knee. Twenty-one PSSR lesions occurred in the medial compartment, and four occurred in the lateral compartment. There was no sex predilection. Patients with PSSR lesions were older than other patients undergoing MRI evaluation (mean 66 years versus 52 years, P<0.001). Meniscal tears occurred more commonly in cases with PSSR lesions than in the group as a whole (76% versus 45%, P<0.001). Radial and posterior root tears were more common in knees with PSSR lesions than in other knees with meniscal tears (53% versus 26%, P<0.01). PSSR lesions are associated with meniscal tears and, more specifically, with meniscal tear patterns that dramatically increase contact forces across the knee joint. This observation supports the hypothesis that mechanical stress is important in the pathogenesis of these subarticular lesions that are detected by MRI. (orig.)

  3. Cognitive rehabilitation of working memory in juvenile multiple sclerosis-effects on cognitive functioning, functional MRI and network related connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubacher, Martina; DeLuca, John; Weber, Peter; Steinlin, Maja; Kappos, Ludwig; Opwis, Klaus; Penner, Iris-Katharina

    2015-01-01

    To assess possible effects of working memory (WM) training on cognitive functionality, functional MRI and brain connectivity in patients with juvenile MS. Cognitive status, fMRI and inter-network connectivity were assessed in 5 cases with juvenile MS aged between 12 and 18 years. Afterwards they received a computerized WM training for four weeks. Primary cognitive outcome measures were WM (visual and verbal) and alertness. Activation patterns related to WM were assessed during fMRI using an N-Back task with increasing difficulty. Inter-network connectivity analyses were focused on fronto-parietal (left and right), default-mode (dorsal and ventral) and the anterior salience network. Cognitive functioning, fMRI and inter-network connectivity were reassessed directly after the training and again nine months following training. Response to treatment was seen in two patients. These patients showed increased performance in WM and alertness after the training. These behavioural changes were accompanied by increased WM network activation and systematic changes in inter-network connectivity. The remaining participants were non-responders to treatment. Effects on cognitive performance were maintained up to nine months after training, whereas effects observed by fMRI disappeared. Responders revealed training effects on all applied outcome measures. Disease activity and general intelligence may be factors associated with response to treatment.

  4. Clinical functional MRI of sensorimotor cortex using passive motor and sensory stimulation at 3 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatow, Maria; Reinhardt, Julia; Riffel, Katharina; Nennig, Ernst; Wengenroth, Martina; Stippich, Christoph

    2011-08-01

    To establish a passive motor paradigm for clinical functional MRI (fMRI) that could be beneficial for patients with motor or attention deficits who are not able to perform active motor tasks. A novel standardized sensorimotor fMRI protocol was applied in 16 healthy volunteers at 3 Tesla (T) using active and passive motor tasks as well as sensory stimulation of hands and feet. Data analysis was carried out individually using a dynamic thresholding routine. Active motor tasks yielded time efficient and robust blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in primary motor cortex. Noteworthy, it was possible to achieve equal activation levels within identical anatomical localization for passive and active motor tasks with these paradigms. Patients unable to perform active movements can benefit from paradigms with passive motor and sensory stimulation. Therefore, we recommend these paradigms for functional somatotopic mapping of the central region at 3T in clinical routine. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Connectivity of the amygdala, piriform, and orbitofrontal cortex during olfactory stimulation: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigri, Anna; Ferraro, Stefania; D'Incerti, Ludovico; Critchley, Hugo D; Bruzzone, Maria Grazia; Minati, Ludovico

    2013-03-06

    The majority of existing functional MRI studies on olfactory perception have addressed the relationship between stimulus features and the intensity of activity in separate regions considered in isolation. However, anatomical studies as well as neurophysiological recordings in rats and insects suggest that odor features may also be represented in a sparse manner through the simultaneous activity of multiple cortical areas interacting as a network. Here, we aimed to map the interdependence of neural activity among regions of the human brain, representing functional connectivity, during passive smelling. Seventeen healthy participants were scanned while performing a blocked-design task alternating exposure to two unpleasant odorants and breathing fresh air. High efferent connectivity was detected for the piriform cortex and the amygdala bilaterally. By contrast, the medial orbitofrontal cortex was characterized by high afferent connectivity, notably in the absence of an overall change in the intensity of hemodynamic activity during olfactory stimulation. Our results suggest that, even in the context of an elementary task, information on olfactory stimuli is scattered by the amygdala and piriform cortex onto an anatomically sparse representation and then gathered and integrated in the medial orbitofrontal cortex.

  6. Enhanced Thalamic Functional Connectivity with No fMRI Responses to Affected Forelimb Stimulation in Stroke-Recovered Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shim, Woo H.; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jeong K.; Jeong, Jaeseung; Kim, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological recovery after stroke has been extensively investigated to provide better understanding of neurobiological mechanism, therapy, and patient management. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly functional MRI (fMRI), have widely contributed to unravel the relationship between the altered neural function and stroke-affected brain areas. As results of previous investigations, the plastic reorganization and/or gradual restoration of the hemodynamic fMRI responses to ne...

  7. Assessing hippocampal functional reserve in temporal lobe epilepsy: A multi-voxel pattern analysis of fMRI data

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnici, Heidi M; Sidhu, Meneka; Chadwick, Martin J.; Duncan, John S.; Maguire, Eleanor A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Assessing the functional reserve of key memory structures in the medial temporal lobes (MTL) of pre-surgical patients with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains a challenge. Conventional functional MRI (fMRI) memory paradigms have yet to fully convince of their ability to confidently assess the risk of a post-surgical amnesia. An alternative fMRI analysis method, multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA), focuses on the patterns of activity across voxels in specific brain regions...

  8. Combined evaluation of FDG-PET and MRI improves detection and differentiation of dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juergen Dukart

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Various biomarkers have been reported in recent literature regarding imaging abnormalities in different types of dementia. These biomarkers have helped to significantly improve early detection and also differentiation of various dementia syndromes. In this study, we systematically applied whole-brain and region-of-interest (ROI based support vector machine classification separately and on combined information from different imaging modalities to improve the detection and differentiation of different types of dementia. METHODS: Patients with clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease (AD: n = 21, with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD: n = 14 and control subjects (n = 13 underwent both [F18]fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, together with clinical and behavioral assessment. FDG-PET and MRI data were commonly processed to get a precise overlap of all regions in both modalities. Support vector machine classification was applied with varying parameters separately for both modalities and to combined information obtained from MR and FDG-PET images. ROIs were extracted from comprehensive systematic and quantitative meta-analyses investigating both disorders. RESULTS: Using single-modality whole-brain and ROI information FDG-PET provided highest accuracy rates for both, detection and differentiation of AD and FTLD compared to structural information from MRI. The ROI-based multimodal classification, combining FDG-PET and MRI information, was highly superior to the unimodal approach and to the whole-brain pattern classification. With this method, accuracy rate of up to 92% for the differentiation of the three groups and an accuracy of 94% for the differentiation of AD and FTLD patients was obtained. CONCLUSION: Accuracy rate obtained using combined information from both imaging modalities is the highest reported up to now for differentiation of both types of

  9. Select and Cluster: A Method for Finding Functional Networks of Clustered Voxels in fMRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    DonGiovanni, Danilo

    2016-01-01

    Extracting functional connectivity patterns among cortical regions in fMRI datasets is a challenge stimulating the development of effective data-driven or model based techniques. Here, we present a novel data-driven method for the extraction of significantly connected functional ROIs directly from the preprocessed fMRI data without relying on a priori knowledge of the expected activations. This method finds spatially compact groups of voxels which show a homogeneous pattern of significant connectivity with other regions in the brain. The method, called Select and Cluster (S&C), consists of two steps: first, a dimensionality reduction step based on a blind multiresolution pairwise correlation by which the subset of all cortical voxels with significant mutual correlation is selected and the second step in which the selected voxels are grouped into spatially compact and functionally homogeneous ROIs by means of a Support Vector Clustering (SVC) algorithm. The S&C method is described in detail. Its performance assessed on simulated and experimental fMRI data is compared to other methods commonly used in functional connectivity analyses, such as Independent Component Analysis (ICA) or clustering. S&C method simplifies the extraction of functional networks in fMRI by identifying automatically spatially compact groups of voxels (ROIs) involved in whole brain scale activation networks. PMID:27656202

  10. Targeted gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles for CD163 detection in atherosclerosis by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarin, Carlos; Carril, Monica; Martin-Ventura, Jose Luis; Markuerkiaga, Irati; Padro, Daniel; Llamas-Granda, Patricia; Moreno, Juan Antonio; García, Isabel; Genicio, Nuria; Plaza-Garcia, Sandra; Blanco-Colio, Luis Miguel; Penades, Soledad; Egido, Jesus

    2015-11-30

    CD163 is a membrane receptor expressed by macrophage lineage. Studies performed in atherosclerosis have shown that CD163 expression is increased at inflammatory sites, pointing at the presence of intraplaque hemorrhagic sites or asymptomatic plaques. Hence, imaging of CD163 expressing macrophages is an interesting strategy in order to detect atherosclerotic plaques. We have prepared a targeted probe based on gold-coated iron oxide nanoparticles vectorized with an anti-CD163 antibody for the specific detection of CD163 by MRI. Firstly, the specificity of the targeted probe was validated in vitro by incubation of the probe with CD163(+) or (-) macrophages. The probe was able to selectively detect CD163(+) macrophages both in human and murine cells. Subsequently, the targeted probe was injected in 16 weeks old apoE deficient mice developing atherosclerotic lesions and the pararenal abdominal aorta was imaged by MRI. The accumulation of probe in the site of interest increased over time and the signal intensity decreased significantly 48 hours after the injection. Hence, we have developed a highly sensitive targeted probe capable of detecting CD163-expressing macrophages that could provide useful information about the state of the atheromatous lesions.

  11. Functional cine MR imaging for the detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions: method and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann-Kirchhoff, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian; Lienemann, Andreas [University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lang, Reinhold; Steitz, Heinrich O.; Jauch, Karl W. [University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [University Hospital Munich-Innenstadt, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and localization of intraabdominal adhesions using functional cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MR findings with intraoperative results. In a retrospective study, patients who had undergone previous abdominal surgery with suspected intraabdominal adhesions were examined. A true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence in transverse/sagittal orientation was used for a section-by-section dynamic depiction of visceral slide on a 1.5-Tesla system. After MRI, all patients underwent anew surgery. A nine-segment abdominal map was used to document the location and type of the adhesions. The intraoperative results were taken as standard of reference. Ninety patients were enrolled. During surgery 71 adhesions were detected, MRI depicted 68 intraabdominal adhesions. The most common type of adhesion in MRI was found between the anterior abdominal wall and small bowel loops (n = 22, 32.5%) and between small bowel loops and pelvic organs (n = 14, 20.6%). Comparing MRI with the intraoperative findings, sensitivity varied between 31 and 75% with a varying specificity between 65 and 92% in the different segments leading to an overall MRI accuracy of 89%. Functional cine MRI proved to be a useful examination technique for the identification of intraabdominal adhesions in patients with acute or chronic pain and corresponding clinical findings providing accurate results. However, no differentiation for symptomatic versus asymptomatic adhesions is possible. (orig.)

  12. Automatic determination of the arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI: comparison of different reproducible clustering algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jiandong; Yang, Jiawen; Guo, Qiyong [Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Department of Radiology, Shenyang (China)

    2015-05-01

    Arterial input function (AIF) plays an important role in the quantification of cerebral hemodynamics. The purpose of this study was to select the best reproducible clustering method for AIF detection by comparing three algorithms reported previously in terms of detection accuracy and computational complexity. First, three reproducible clustering methods, normalized cut (Ncut), hierarchy (HIER), and fast affine propagation (FastAP), were applied independently to simulated data which contained the true AIF. Next, a clinical verification was performed where 42 subjects participated in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI (DSC-MRI) scanning. The manual AIF and AIFs based on the different algorithms were obtained. The performance of each algorithm was evaluated based on shape parameters of the estimated AIFs and the true or manual AIF. Moreover, the execution time of each algorithm was recorded to determine the algorithm that operated more rapidly in clinical practice. In terms of the detection accuracy, Ncut and HIER method produced similar AIF detection results, which were closer to the expected AIF and more accurate than those obtained using FastAP method; in terms of the computational efficiency, the Ncut method required the shortest execution time. Ncut clustering appears promising because it facilitates the automatic and robust determination of AIF with high accuracy and efficiency. (orig.)

  13. Estimation of the cortical functional connectivity with the multimodal integration of high-resolution EEG and fMRI data by directed transfer function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiloni, F; Cincotti, F; Babiloni, C; Carducci, F; Mattia, D; Astolfi, L; Basilisco, A; Rossini, P M; Ding, L; Ni, Y; Cheng, J; Christine, K; Sweeney, J; He, B

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, several types of brain imaging device are available to provide images of the functional activity of the cerebral cortex based on hemodynamic, metabolic, or electromagnetic measurements. However, static images of brain regions activated during particular tasks do not convey the information of how these regions communicate with each other. In this study, advanced methods for the estimation of cortical connectivity from combined high-resolution electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data are presented. These methods include a subject's multicompartment head model (scalp, skull, dura mater, cortex) constructed from individual magnetic resonance images, multidipole source model, and regularized linear inverse source estimates of cortical current density. Determination of the priors in the resolution of the linear inverse problem was performed with the use of information from the hemodynamic responses of the cortical areas as revealed by block-designed (strength of activated voxels) fMRI. We estimate functional cortical connectivity by computing the directed transfer function (DTF) on the estimated cortical current density waveforms in regions of interest (ROIs) on the modeled cortical mantle. The proposed method was able to unveil the direction of the information flow between the cortical regions of interest, as it is directional in nature. Furthermore, this method allows to detect changes in the time course of information flow between cortical regions in different frequency bands. The reliability of these techniques was further demonstrated by elaboration of high-resolution EEG and fMRI signals collected during visually triggered finger movements in four healthy subjects. Connectivity patterns estimated for this task reveal an involvement of right parietal and bilateral premotor and prefrontal cortical areas. This cortical region involvement resembles that revealed in previous studies where visually triggered finger

  14. In vivo detection of neuroarchitecture in the rodent brain using manganese-enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ichio; Wu, Yi-Jen Lin; Silva, Afonso C; Lynch, Ronald M; Koretsky, Alan P

    2004-07-01

    Visualizing brain anatomy in vivo could provide insight into normal and pathophysiology. Here it is demonstrated that neuroarchitecture can be detected in the rodent brain using MRI after systemic MnCl2. Administration of MnCl2 leads to rapid T1 enhancement in the choroid plexus and circumventricular organs, which spreads to the CSF space in ventricles and periventricular tissue. After 1 day, there was MRI enhancement throughout the brain with high intensity in the pituitary, olfactory bulb, cortex, basal forebrain, hippocampus, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, amygdala, and cerebellum. Contrast obtained enabled visualization of specific features of neuroarchitecture. The arrowhead structure of the dentate gyrus as well as the CA1-CA3 region of the hippocampus and layers in cortex, cerebellum, as well as the olfactory bulb could be readily observed. Preliminary assignments of olfactory bulb layers, cortical layers in frontal and somatosensory cortex, and cerebellum were made. Systemic MnCl2 leads to MRI visualization of neuroarchitecture nondestructively. Copyright 2004 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Nanoparticle Enhanced MRI Scanning to Detect Cellular Inflammation in Experimental Chronic Renal Allograft Rejection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Alam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. We investigated whether ultrasmall paramagnetic particles of iron oxide- (USPIO- enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can detect experimental chronic allograft damage in a murine renal allograft model. Materials and Methods. Two cohorts of mice underwent renal transplantation with either a syngeneic isograft or allograft kidney. MRI scanning was performed prior to and 48 hours after USPIO infusion using T2∗-weighted protocols. R2∗ values were calculated to indicate the degree of USPIO uptake. Native kidneys and skeletal muscle were imaged as reference tissues and renal explants analysed by histology and electron microscopy. Results. R2∗ values in the allograft group were higher compared to the isograft group when indexed to native kidney (median 1.24 (interquartile range: 1.12 to 1.36 versus 0.96 (0.92 to 1.04, P<0.01. R2∗ values were also higher in the allograft transplant when indexed to skeletal muscle (6.24 (5.63 to 13.51 compared to native kidney (2.91 (1.11 to 6.46 P<0.05. Increased R2∗ signal in kidney allograft was associated with macrophage and iron staining on histology. USPIO were identified within tissue resident macrophages on electron microscopy. Conclusion. USPIO-enhanced MRI identifies macrophage.

  16. Computer-aided detection in breast MRI: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorrius, Monique D.; Weide, Marijke C.J. der; Ooijen, Peter M.A. van; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Radiology, Center for Medical Imaging, Hanzeplein 1, PO box 30.001, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate the additional value of computer-aided detection (CAD) in breast MRI by assessing radiologists' accuracy in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions. A literature search was performed with inclusion of relevant studies using a commercially available CAD system with automatic colour mapping. Two independent researchers assessed the quality of the studies. The accuracy of the radiologists' performance with and without CAD was presented as pooled sensitivity and specificity. Of 587 articles, 10 met the inclusion criteria, all of good methodological quality. Experienced radiologists reached comparable pooled sensitivity and specificity before and after using CAD (sensitivity: without CAD: 89%; 95% CI: 78-94%, with CAD: 89%; 95%CI: 81-94%) (specificity: without CAD: 86%; 95% CI: 79-91%, with CAD: 82%; 95% CI: 76-87%). For residents the pooled sensitivity increased from 72% (95% CI: 62-81%) without CAD to 89% (95% CI: 80-94%) with CAD, however, not significantly. Concerning specificity, the results were similar (without CAD: 79%; 95% CI: 69-86%, with CAD: 78%; 95% CI: 69-84%). CAD in breast MRI has little influence on the sensitivity and specificity of experienced radiologists and therefore their interpretation remains essential. However, residents or inexperienced radiologists seem to benefit from CAD concerning breast MRI evaluation. (orig.)

  17. Enhanced Thalamic Functional Connectivity with No fMRI Responses to Affected Forelimb Stimulation in Stroke-Recovered Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Woo H.; Suh, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Jeong K.; Jeong, Jaeseung; Kim, Young R.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological recovery after stroke has been extensively investigated to provide better understanding of neurobiological mechanism, therapy, and patient management. Recent advances in neuroimaging techniques, particularly functional MRI (fMRI), have widely contributed to unravel the relationship between the altered neural function and stroke-affected brain areas. As results of previous investigations, the plastic reorganization and/or gradual restoration of the hemodynamic fMRI responses to neural stimuli have been suggested as relevant mechanisms underlying the stroke recovery process. However, divergent study results and modality-dependent outcomes have clouded the proper interpretation of variable fMRI signals. Here, we performed both evoked and resting state fMRI (rs-fMRI) to clarify the link between the fMRI phenotypes and post-stroke functional recovery. The experiments were designed to examine the altered neural activity within the contra-lesional hemisphere and other undamaged brain regions using rat models with large unilateral stroke, which despite the severe injury, exhibited nearly full recovery at ∼6 months after stroke. Surprisingly, both blood oxygenation level-dependent and blood volume-weighted (CBVw) fMRI activities elicited by electrical stimulation of the stroke-affected forelimb were completely absent, failing to reveal the neural origin of the behavioral recovery. In contrast, the functional connectivity maps showed highly robust rs-fMRI activity concentrated in the contra-lesional ventromedial nucleus of thalamus (VM). The negative finding in the stimuli-induced fMRI study using the popular rat middle cerebral artery model denotes weak association between the fMRI hemodynamic responses and neurological improvement. The results strongly caution the indiscreet interpretation of stroke-affected fMRI signals and demonstrate rs-fMRI as a complementary tool for efficiently characterizing stroke recovery. PMID:28119575

  18. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Qiu, Mingguo [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Hongliang; Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yang, Jun; Wang, Jian [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia. (orig.)

  19. Visual recovery after perinatal stroke evidenced by functional and diffusion MRI: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saudan-Frei Sonja

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After perinatal brain injury, clinico-anatomic correlations of functional deficits and brain plasticity remain difficult to evaluate clinically in the young infant. Thus, new non-invasive methods capable of early functional diagnosis are needed in young infants. Case Presentation The visual system recovery in an infant with perinatal stroke is assessed by combining diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and event-related functional MRI (ER-fMRI. All experiments were done at 1.5T. A first DTI experiment was performed at 12 months of age. At 20 months of age, a second DTI experiment was performed and combined with an ER-fMRI experiment with visual stimuli (2 Hz visual flash. At 20 months of age, ER-fMRI showed significant negative activation in the visual cortex of the injured left hemisphere that was not previously observed in the same infant. DTI maps suggest recovery of the optic radiation in the vicinity of the lesion. Optic radiations in the injured hemisphere are more prominent in DTI at 20 months of age than in DTI at 12 months of age. Conclusion Our data indicate that functional cortical recovery is supported by structural modifications that concern major pathways of the visual system. These neuroimaging findings might contribute to elaborate a pertinent strategy in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation.

  20. The Association of MRI Findings and Neuropsychological Functioning after the First Recognized Seizure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars, Anna W.; deGrauw, Ton J.; Johnson, Cynthia S.; Fastenau, Philip S.; Perkins, Susan M.; Egelhoff, John C.; Kalnin, Andrew; Dunn, David W.; Austin, Joan K.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Purpose To explore relationships between MRI abnormalities of the brain and neuropsychological functioning in children who were evaluated following their first recognized seizure. Methods Subjects were children aged 6 to 14 years with a first recognized seizure within the past 3 months who participated in a larger prospective study of child adaptation. The 249 children with neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging were studied. Children underwent neuropsychological examination an average of 2.8 months and MRI examination an average of 1.3 months after the first recognized seizure. On factor analysis four factors were found for neuropsychological function: LANG = Language, PS = Processing Speed, EC = Executive/Construction, VMEM = Verbal Memory and Learning. For analysis, structural abnormalities found on MRI were classified as significant (yes/no) based on whether they were presumed to be related to the seizure condition. Results On MRI, 34 (14%) had structural abnormalities that were judged to be significant in that they were possibly related to their seizures. Children with significant abnormalities had significantly lower estimated IQ scores and significantly lower language, processing speed, executive/constructional ability, and verbal memory and learning factor scores than did children without significant abnormalities. Conclusions Children who have structural brain abnormalities at onset have slightly lower cognitive functioning overall, and all neuropsychological domains seemed to be affected relatively equally. This pattern was apparent even when we restricted the analysis to children with intellectual functioning in the broadly normal range. PMID:17442004

  1. Functional MRI study of mild Alzheimer's disease using amplitude of low frequency fluctuation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XI Qian; ZHAO Xiao-hu; WANG Pei-jun; GUO Qi-hao; YAN Chao-gan; HE Yong

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous studies have shown that the functional brain activity in the resting state is impaired in Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients.However,most studies focused on the relationship between different brain areas,rather than the amplitude or strength of the regional brain activity.The purpose of this study was to explore the functional brain changes in AD patients by measuring the amplitude of the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signals.Methods Twenty mild AD patients and twenty healthy elderly subjects participated in the fMRI scan.The amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) was calculated using REST software.Results Compared with the healthy elderly subjects,the mild AD patients showed decreased ALFF in the right posterior cingulate cortex,right ventral medial prefrontal cortex,and in the bilateral dorsal medial prefrontal cortex.No brain region with increased ALFF was found in the AD group compared with the control group.Conclusions The reduced activity in the posterior cingulate cortex and medial prefrontal cortex observed in the present study suggest that the functional abnormalities of those areas are at an early stage of AD.The ALFF analysis may provide a useful tool in fMRI study of AD.

  2. Simultaneous EMG-Functional MRI Recordings Can Directly Relate Hyperkinetic Movements to Brain Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rootselaar, Anne-Fleur; Maurits, Natasha M.; Renken, Remco; Koelman, Johannes H. T. M.; Hoogduin, Johannes M.; Leenders, Klaus L.; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To apply and validate the use of electromyogram (EMG) recorded during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with movement disorders, to directly relate involuntary movements to brain activity. Methods: Eight "familial cortical myoclonic tremor with epilepsy" (FCMTE) pat

  3. Motor function deficits in schizophrenia: an fMRI and VBM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Namita; Khushu, Subash [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Center, Delhi (India); Goyal, Satnam; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N. [RML Hospital, PGIMER, New Delhi (India)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate whether the motor functional alterations in schizophrenia (SZ) are also associated with structural changes in the related brain areas using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 right-handed SZ patients and 14 right-handed healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during right index finger-tapping task in the same session. fMRI results showed reduced functional activation in the motor areas (contralateral precentral and postcentral gyrus) and ipsilateral cerebellum in SZ subjects as compared to healthy controls (n = 14). VBM analysis also revealed reduced grey matter in motor areas and white matter reduction in cerebellum of SZ subjects as compared to controls. The present study provides an evidence for a possible association between structural alterations in the motor cortex and disturbed functional activation in the motor areas in persons affected with SZ during a simple finger-tapping task. (orig.)

  4. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland); Luetschg, Juerg [University Children' s Hospital (UKBB), Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  5. Subject specific BOLD fMRI respiratory and cardiac response functions obtained from global signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falahpour, Maryam; Refai, Hazem; Bodurka, Jerzy

    2013-05-15

    Subtle changes in either breathing pattern or cardiac pulse rate alter blood oxygen level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging signal (BOLD fMRI). This is problematic because such fluctuations could possibly not be related to underlying neuronal activations of interest but instead the source of physiological noise. Several methods have been proposed to eliminate physiological noise in BOLD fMRI data. One such method is to derive a template based on average multi-subject data for respiratory response function (RRF) and cardiac response function (CRF) by simultaneously utilizing an external recording of cardiac and respiratory waveforms with the fMRI. Standard templates can then be used to model, map, and remove respiration and cardiac fluctuations from fMRI data. Utilizing these does not, however, account for intra-subject variations in physiological response. Thus, performing a more individualized approach for single subject physiological noise correction becomes more desirable, especially for clinical purposes. Here we propose a novel approach that employs subject-specific RRF and CRF response functions obtained from the whole brain or brain tissue-specific global signals (GS). Averaging multiple voxels in global signal computation ensures physiological noise dominance over thermal and system noise in even high-spatial-resolution fMRI data, making the GS suitable for deriving robust estimations of both RRF and CRF for individual subjects. Using these individualized response functions instead of standard templates based on multi-subject averages judiciously removes physiological noise from the data, assuming that there is minimal neuronal contribution in the derived individualized filters. Subject-specific physiological response functions obtained from the GS better maps individuals' physiological characteristics.

  6. A fully Bayesian approach to the parcel-based detection-estimation of brain activity in fMRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makni, S. [Univ Oxford, John Radcliffe Hosp, Oxford Ctr Funct Magnet Resonance Imaging Brain, Oxford OX3 9DU (United Kingdom); Idier, J. [IRCCyN CNRS, Nantes (France); Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P. [CEA, NeuroSpin, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Vincent, T.; Dehaene-Lambertz, G.; Ciuciu, P. [Inst Imagerie Neurofonctionnelle, IFR 49, Paris (France); Thirion, B. [INRIA Futurs, Orsay (France); Dehaene-Lambertz, G. [INSERM, NeuroSpin, U562, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    Within-subject analysis in fMRI essentially addresses two problems, i. e., the detection of activated brain regions in response to an experimental task and the estimation of the underlying dynamics, also known as the characterisation of Hemodynamic response function (HRF). So far, both issues have been treated sequentially while it is known that the HRF model has a dramatic impact on the localisation of activations and that the HRF shape may vary from one region to another. In this paper, we conciliate both issues in a region-based joint detection-estimation framework that we develop in the Bayesian formalism. Instead of considering function basis to account for spatial variability, spatially adaptive General Linear Models are built upon region-based non-parametric estimation of brain dynamics. Regions are first identified as functionally homogeneous parcels in the mask of the grey matter using a specific procedure [Thirion, B., Flandin, G., Pinel, P., Roche, A., Ciuciu, P., Poline, J.B., August 2006. Dealing with the shortcomings of spatial normalization: Multi-subject parcellation of fMRI datasets. Hum. Brain Mapp. 27 (8), 678-693.]. Then, in each parcel, prior information is embedded to constrain this estimation. Detection is achieved by modelling activating, deactivating and non-activating voxels through mixture models within each parcel. From the posterior distribution, we infer upon the model parameters using Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques. Bayesian model comparison allows us to emphasize on artificial datasets first that inhomogeneous gamma-Gaussian mixture models outperform Gaussian mixtures in terms of sensitivity/specificity trade-off and second that it is worthwhile modelling serial correlation through an AR(1) noise process at low signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio. Our approach is then validated on an fMRI experiment that studies habituation to auditory sentence repetition. This phenomenon is clearly recovered as well as the hierarchical temporal

  7. Abbreviated MRI protocols for detecting breast cancer in women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shung Qing; Huang, Min; Shen, Yu Ying; Liu, Chen Lu; Xu, Chuan Xiao [The Affiliated Suzhou Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the validity of two abbreviated protocols (AP) of MRI in breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. This was a retrospective study in 356 participants with dense breast tissue and negative mammography results. The study was approved by the Nanjing Medical University Ethics Committee. Patients were imaged with a full diagnostic protocol (FDP) of MRI. Two APs (AP-1 consisting of the first post-contrast subtracted [FAST] and maximum-intensity projection [MIP] images, and AP-2 consisting of AP-1 combined with diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) and FDP images were analyzed separately, and the sensitivities and specificities of breast cancer detection were calculated. Of the 356 women, 67 lesions were detected in 67 women (18.8%) by standard MR protocol, and histological examination revealed 14 malignant lesions and 53 benign lesions. The average interpretation time of AP-1 and AP-2 were 37 seconds and 54 seconds, respectively, while the average interpretation time of the FDP was 3 minutes and 25 seconds. The sensitivities of the AP-1, AP-2, and FDP were 92.9, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the specificities of the three MR protocols were 86.5, 95.0, and 96.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference among the three MR protocols in the diagnosis of breast cancer (p > 0.05). However, the specificity of AP-1 was significantly lower than that of AP-2 (p = 0.031) and FDP (p = 0.035), while there was no difference between AP-2 and FDP (p > 0.05). The AP may be efficient in the breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. FAST and MIP images combined with DWI of MRI are helpful to improve the specificity of breast cancer detection.

  8. Combined gadoxetic acid and gadofosveset enhanced liver MRI for detection and characterization of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, Peter [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Bookwalter, Candice A.; Ziemlewicz, Tim; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Potretzke, Theodora A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Motosugi, Utaroh [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Yamanashi (Japan); Nagle, Scott K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To compare gadoxetic acid alone and combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced liver MRI for detection of metastases and differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas. Ninety-one patients underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI before and after additional injection of gadofosveset. First, two readers retrospectively identified metastases on gadoxetic acid alone enhanced delayed hepatobiliary phase T1-weighted images together with all other MR images (dynamic images, T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images). Second, readers assessed additional T1-weighted images obtained after administration of gadofosveset trisodium. For both interpretations, readers rated lesion conspicuity and confidence in differentiating metastases from haemangiomas. Results were compared using alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (AFROC) and conventional ROC methods. Histology and follow-up served as reference standard. There were 145 metastases and 16 haemangiomas. Both readers detected more metastases using combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 130; reader 2 = 124) compared to gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 104; reader 2 = 103). Sensitivity of combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 90 %; reader 2 = 86 %) was higher than that of gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 72 %; reader 2 = 71 %, both P < 0.01). AFROC-AUC was higher for the combined technique (0.92 vs. 0.86, P < 0.001). Sensitivity for correct differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas was higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 98 %; reader 2 = 99 % vs. reader 1 = 86 %; reader 2 = 91 %, both P < 0.01). ROC-AUC was significantly higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 1.00; reader 2 = 1.00 vs. reader 1 = 0.87; reader 2 = 0.92, both P < 0.01). Combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset-enhanced MRI improves detection and characterization of liver metastases compared to gadoxetic acid alone. (orig.)

  9. Assessment of metastatic colorectal cancer with hybrid imaging: comparison of reading performance using different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT in a short case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendle, C.; Schwenzer, N.F.; Rempp, H.; Schmidt, H.; Pfannenberg, C.; Nikolaou, K.; Schraml, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose was to investigate the diagnostic performance of different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT for the evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer lesions. Image data of 15 colorectal cancer patients (FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MRI) were retrospectively evaluated by two readers in five reading sessions: MRI (morphology) alone, MRI/diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), MRI/PET, MRI/DWI/PET; and PET/CT. Diagnostic performance of lesion detection with each combination was assessed in general and organ-based. The reference standard was given by histology and/or follow-up imaging. Separate analysis of mucinous tumours was performed. One hundred and eighty lesions (110 malignant) were evaluated (intestine n = 6, liver n = 37, lymph nodes n = 55, lung n = 4, and peritoneal n = 74). The overall lesion-based diagnostic accuracy was 0.46 for MRI, 0.47 for MRI/DWI, 0.57 for MRI/PET, 0.69 for MRI/DWI/PET and 0.66 for PET/CT. In the organ-based assessment, MRI/DWI/PET showed the highest accuracy for liver metastases (0.74), a comparable accuracy to PET/CT in peritoneal lesions (0.55), and in lymph node metastases (0.84). The accuracy in mucinous tumour lesions was limited in all modalities (MRI/DWI/PET = 0.52). PET/MRI including DWI is comparable to PET/CT in the evaluation of colorectal cancer metastases, with a markedly higher accuracy when using combined imaging data than the modalities separately. Further improvement is needed in the imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis and mucinous tumours. (orig.)

  10. Detection of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Experimental Atherosclerosis with the USPIO-Enhanced MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Chun-Mei; Du, Lili; Wu, Wei-Heng; Li, Dong-Ye; Hao, Ji; Gong, Lei; Deng, Liangrong; Zhang, Tao; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Yu

    2015-11-01

    This study's goal was to assess the diagnostic value of the USPIO-(ultra-small superparamagnetic iron oxide) enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques in abdominal aorta in experimental atherosclerosis. Thirty New Zealand rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, Group A and Group B. Each group comprised 15 animals which were fed with high cholesterol diet for 8 weeks and then subjected to balloon-induced endothelial injury of the abdominal aorta. After another 8 weeks, animals in Group B received adenovirus carrying p53 gene that was injected through a catheter into the aortic segments rich in plaques. Two weeks later, all rabbits were challenged with the injection of Chinese Russell's viper venom and histamine. Pre-contrast images and USPIO-enhanced MRI images were obtained after pharmacological triggering with injection of USPIO for 5 days. Blood specimens were taken for biochemical and serological tests at 0 and 18 weeks. Abdominal aorta was histologically studied. The levels of serum ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 were quantified by ELISA. Vulnerable plaques appeared as a local hypo-intense signal on the USPIO-enhanced MRI, especially on T2*-weighted sequences. The signal strength of plaques reached the peak at 96 h. Lipid levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in both Group A and B compared with the levels before the high cholesterol diet. The ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 levels were significantly (p < 0.05) higher in Group B compared with Group A. The USPIO-enhanced MRI efficiently identifies vulnerable plaques due to accumulation of USPIO within macrophages in abdominal aorta plaques.

  11. Neural correlate of vernier acuity tasks assessed by functional MRI (FMRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Kevin N; Walker, B Michael; Modestino, Edward J; Miki, Atsushi; Terhune, Kyla P; Francis, Ellie L; Haselgrove, John C; Liu, Grant T

    2007-01-01

    Vernier acuity refers to the ability to discern a small offset within a line. However, while Vernier acuity has been extensively studied psychophysically, its neural correlates are uncertain. Based upon previous psychophysical and electrophysiologic data, we hypothesized that extrastriate areas of the brain would be involved in Vernier acuity tasks, so we designed event-related functional MRI (fMRI) paradigms to identify cortical regions of the brain involved in this behavior. Normal subjects identified suprathreshold and subthreshold Vernier offsets. The results suggest a cortical network including frontal, parietal, occipital, and cerebellar regions subserves the observation, processing, interpretation, and acknowledgment of briefly presented Vernier offsets.

  12. Spinal fMRI during proprioceptive and tactile tasks in healthy subjects: activity detected using cross-correlation, general linear model and independent component analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valsasina, P.; Agosta, F.; Filippi, M. [Scientific Institute Ospedale San Raffaele, Neuroimaging Research Unit, Milan (Italy); Caputo, D. [Scientific Institute Fondazione Don Gnocchi, Department of Neurology, Milan (Italy); Stroman, P.W. [Queen' s University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Centre for Neuroscience Studies, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    2008-10-15

    Functional MRI (fMRI) of the spinal cord is able to provide maps of neuronal activity. Spinal fMRI data have been analyzed in previous studies by calculating the cross-correlation (CC) between the stimulus and the time course of every voxel and, more recently, by using the general linear model (GLM). The aim of this study was to compare three different approaches (CC analysis, GLM and independent component analysis (ICA)) for analyzing fMRI scans of the cervical spinal cord. We analyzed spinal fMRI data from healthy subjects during a proprioceptive and a tactile stimulation by using two model-based approaches, i.e., CC analysis between the stimulus shape and the time course of every voxel, and the GLM. Moreover, we applied independent component analysis, a model-free approach which decomposes the data in a set of source signals. All methods were able to detect cervical cord areas of activity corresponding to the expected regions of neuronal activations. Model-based approaches (CC and GLM) revealed similar patterns of activity. ICA could identify a component correlated to fMRI stimulation, although with a lower statistical threshold than model-based approaches, and many components, consistent across subjects, which are likely to be secondary to noise present in the data. Model-based approaches seem to be more robust for estimating task-related activity, whereas ICA seems to be useful for eliminating noise components from the data. Combined use of ICA and GLM might improve the reliability of spinal fMRI results. (orig.)

  13. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue permeabilization by electroporation (EP) is a promising technique to treat certain cancers. Non-invasive methods for verification of induced permeabilization are important, especially in deep-seated cancers. In this study we evaluated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging...... (DW-MRI) as a quantitative method for detecting EP-induced membrane permeabilization of brain tissue using a rat brain model. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fifty-four anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats were electroporated in the right hemisphere, using different voltage levels to induce no permeabilization......-induced permeabilization of brain tissue and to some extent of differentiating NP, TMP and PMP using appropriate scan timing....

  14. Comparison of MRI and PET-CT in detecting the loco-regional recurrence of soft tissue sarcomas during surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Sun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of MRI and PET-CT for the detection of loco-regional recurrences after soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision. From Dec 2003 to Aug 2014, 394 patients with STSs, who were included in the electronic patient registry for initial or repeated surgery at our hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 152 patients who underwent regular postoperative follow-ups with both MRI and PET-CT, obtained within a 3 month period of each other. We analyzed differences in the performance of MRI and PET-CT for the diagnosis of loco-regional recurrences using McNemar's test. The receiver-operating characteristic curves and calculations of the area under the curve were used. Twenty patients were found to have a loco-regional recurrence after tumor excision. For MRI and PET-CT, the sensitivities were 90.0 and 95.0 %, and the specificities 97.7 and 95.5 %, respectively, with positive predictive values of 85.7 and 76.0 % and negative predictive values of 98.5 and 99.2 %, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the sensitivities of MRI and PET-CT (p = 0.125). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for PET-CT (0.952) was not significantly greater than that for MRI (0.939; p = 0.6). MRI of the area of interest is recommended for evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical excision of STS. PET-CT was shown to be effective for detection of STS recurrence, and comparable to MRI. However, if PET-CT or MRI findings are inconclusive, the other modality may be helpful in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-therapeutic tissue change. (orig.)

  15. Functional brain activation differences in stuttering identified with a rapid fMRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech motor and auditory brain activity in children who stutter closer to the age at which recovery from stuttering is documented. Rapid sequences may be preferred for individuals or populations who do not tolerate long scanning sessions. In this report, we document the application of a picture naming and phoneme monitoring task in three minute fMRI sequences with adults who stutter (AWS). If relevant brain differences are found in AWS with these approaches that conform to previous reports, then these approaches can be extended to younger populations. Pairwise contrasts of brain BOLD activity between AWS and normally fluent adults indicated the AWS showed higher BOLD activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right temporal lobe and sensorimotor cortices during picture naming and and higher activity in the right IFG during phoneme monitoring. The right lateralized pattern of BOLD activity together with higher activity in sensorimotor cortices is consistent with previous reports, which indicates rapid fMRI sequences can be considered for investigating stuttering in younger participants. PMID:22133409

  16. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    motor as well as higher cognitive functions (i.e. language). Pre-operative fMRI can be used to identify the brain regions that are activated during specific sensorimotor or language tasks. TMS is able to disrupt neuronal processing in the targeted brain area which in turn may affect task performance......Neurosurgical resection of brain lesions aims to maximize excision while minimizing the risk of permanent injury to the surrounding intact brain tissue and resulting neurological deficits. While direct electrical cortical stimulation at the time of surgery allows the precise identification......MRI is well established although the number of studies on presurgical language fMRI is still limited. In contrast, the reliability and accuracy of preoperative TMS remains to be determined....

  17. Functional MRI and Response Inhibition in Children Exposed to Cocaine in utero

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheinkopf, Stephen J.; Lester, Barry M.; Sanes, Jerome N.; Eliassen, James C.; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Seifer, Ronald; LaGasse, Linda L.; Durston, Sarah; Casey, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the potential long-term effects of cocaine exposure on brain functioning using fMRI in school-aged children. The sample included 12 children with prenatal cocaine exposure and 12 non-exposed children (8–9 years old). Groups did not differ on IQ, socioeconomic status, or perinatal risk factors. A response inhibition task was administered during an fMRI scan using a 1.5-T MRI system. Task performance did not differentiate groups, but groups were differentiated by patterns of task-related brain activity. Cocaine-exposed children showed greater activation in the right inferior frontal cortex and caudate during response inhibition, whereas non-exposed children showed greater activations in temporal and occipital regions. These preliminary findings suggest that prenatal cocaine may affect the development of brain systems involved in the regulation of attention and response inhibition. PMID:19372696

  18. Comparison of functional MRI image realignment tools using a computer-generated phantom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, V L; Pickens, D R; Hartmann, S L; Price, R R

    2001-09-01

    This study discusses the development of a computer-generated phantom to compare the effects of image realignment programs on functional MRI (fMRI) pixel activation. The phantom is a whole-head MRI volume with added random noise, activation, and motion. It allows simulation of realistic head motions with controlled areas of activation. Without motion, the phantom shows the effects of realignment on motion-free data sets. Prior to realignment, the phantom illustrates some activation corruption due to motion. Finally, three widely used realignment packages are examined. The results showed that the most accurate algorithms are able to increase specificity through accurate realignment while maintaining sensitivity through effective resampling techniques. In fact, accurate realignment alone is not a powerful indicator of the most effective algorithm in terms of true activation.

  19. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  20. A Novel GBM Saliency Detection Model Using Multi-Channel MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashis Banerjee

    Full Text Available The automatic computerized detection of regions of interest (ROI is an important step in the process of medical image processing and analysis. The reasons are many, and include an increasing amount of available medical imaging data, existence of inter-observer and inter-scanner variability, and to improve the accuracy in automatic detection in order to assist doctors in diagnosing faster and on time. A novel algorithm, based on visual saliency, is developed here for the identification of tumor regions from MR images of the brain. The GBM saliency detection model is designed by taking cue from the concept of visual saliency in natural scenes. A visually salient region is typically rare in an image, and contains highly discriminating information, with attention getting immediately focused upon it. Although color is typically considered as the most important feature in a bottom-up saliency detection model, we circumvent this issue in the inherently gray scale MR framework. We develop a novel pseudo-coloring scheme, based on the three MRI sequences, viz. FLAIR, T2 and T1C (contrast enhanced with Gadolinium. A bottom-up strategy, based on a new pseudo-color distance and spatial distance between image patches, is defined for highlighting the salient regions in the image. This multi-channel representation of the image and saliency detection model help in automatically and quickly isolating the tumor region, for subsequent delineation, as is necessary in medical diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed model is evaluated on MRI of 80 subjects from the BRATS database in terms of the saliency map values. Using ground truth of the tumor regions for both high- and low- grade gliomas, the results are compared with four highly referred saliency detection models from literature. In all cases the AUC scores from the ROC analysis are found to be more than 0.999 ± 0.001 over different tumor grades, sizes and positions.

  1. [Detection of oculomotor nerve compression by 3D-FIESTA MRI in a patient with pituitary apoplexy and diabetes mellitus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kitai, Ryuhei; Neishi, Hiroyuki; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Matsuda, Ken; Arishima, Hidetaka; Kodera, Toshiaki; Arai, Yoshikazu; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-ichiro

    2014-02-01

    We report the usefulness of 3D-FIESTA magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)for the detection of oculomotor nerve palsy in a case of pituitary apoplexy. A 69-year-old man with diabetes mellitus presented with complete left-side blepharoptosis. Computed tomography of the brain showed an intrasellar mass with hemorrhage. MRI demonstrated a pituitary adenoma with a cyst toward the left cavernous sinus, which was diagnosed as pituitary apoplexy. 3D-FIESTA revealed that the left oculomotor nerve was compressed by the cyst. He underwent trans-sphenoid tumor resection at 5 days after his hospitalization. Post-operative 3D-FIESTA MRI revealed decrease in compression of the left oculomotor nerve by the cyst. His left oculomotor palsy recovered completely within a few months. Oculomotor nerve palsy can occur due to various diseases, and 3D-FIESTA MRI is useful for detection of oculomotor nerve compression, especially in the field of parasellar lesions.

  2. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. Purpose: fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. Materials and Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery. Results: In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, middle frontal gyrus (MFG, and superior temporal gyrus (STG, during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Conclusion: Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease.

  3. BOLDSync: a MATLAB-based toolbox for synchronized stimulus presentation in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jitesh; Saharan, Sumiti; Mandal, Pravat K

    2014-02-15

    Precise and synchronized presentation of paradigm stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is central to obtaining accurate information about brain regions involved in a specific task. In this manuscript, we present a new MATLAB-based toolbox, BOLDSync, for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI. BOLDSync provides a user friendly platform for design and presentation of visual, audio, as well as multimodal audio-visual (AV) stimuli in functional imaging experiments. We present simulation experiments that demonstrate the millisecond synchronization accuracy of BOLDSync, and also illustrate the functionalities of BOLDSync through application to an AV fMRI study. BOLDSync gains an advantage over other available proprietary and open-source toolboxes by offering a user friendly and accessible interface that affords both precision in stimulus presentation and versatility across various types of stimulus designs and system setups. BOLDSync is a reliable, efficient, and versatile solution for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: Case study and cautionary notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Spottiswoode

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has greatly advanced our knowledge of human brain function. Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been encouraging advances for its use in pre-operative functional cortical mapping to identify potentially eloquent areas prior to neurosurgery. Objectives. We explore the potential use of this emerging technique by presenting a neurosurgical case study, as performed at the Cape Universities Brain Imaging Centre (CUBIC, Tygerberg, Cape Town. We conclude with a brief summary of the potential pitfalls of this technique, as well as cautionary guidelines based on our experience. Methods and results. A 22-year-old male patient from Tygerberg Hospital underwent the successful resection of an anaplastic astrocytoma after fMRI presurgical planning at our facility. The subject was able to leave the ward unassisted. Conclusion. If consideration is given to the many limitations of this emerging technique, fMRI can be useful in aiding the neurosurgeon in pre-operative planning of his surgical approach.

  5. Vascular Differences Detected by MRI for Metastatic Versus Nonmetastatic Breast and Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaver M. Bhujwalla

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have linked vascular density, identified in histologic sections, to “metastatic risk.” Functional information of the vasculature, not readily available from histologic sections, can be obtained with contrast-enhanced MRI to exploit for therapy or metastasis prevention. Our aims were to determine if human breast and prostate cancer xenograffs preselected for differences in invasive and metastatic characteristics established correspondingly different vascular volume and permeability, quantified here with noninvasive MRI of the intravascular contrast agent albumin-GdDTPA. Tumor vascular volume and permeability of human breast and prostate cancer xenografts were characterized using MRI. Parallel studies confirmed the invasive behavior of these cell lines. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression in the cell lines was measured using ELISA and Western blots. Metastasis to the lungs was evaluated with spontaneous as well as experimental assay. Metastatic tumors formed vasculature with significantly higher permeability or vascular volume (P < .05, two-sided unpaired t test. The permeability profile matched VEGF expression. Within tumors, regions of high vascular volume usually exhibited low permeability whereas regions of low vascular volume exhibited high permeability. We observed that although invasion was necessary, without adequate vascularization it was not sufficient for metastasis to occur.

  6. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe3O4-SiO2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting.

  7. Multiparametric 3T Prostate MR Imaging to Detect Cancer: Histopathologic Correlation Using Prostatectomy Specimens Processed in Customized MRI-Based Molds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Shah, Vijay; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R.; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Pang, Yuxi; Daar Dagane, R.T.; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L.; Trivedi, Hari; Chua, Celene; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Shih, Joanna H.; Linehan, William M.; Merino, Maria J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Pinto, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the prostate cancer detection rate of multi-parametric (MP) MRI at 3T. Precise one to one histopathologic correlation with MRI was possible using prostate MRI based custom-printed specimen molds following radical prostatectomy. Materials and methods This IRB approved prospective study included forty-five patients (mean age 60.2 years, range 49–75 years) with a mean PSA of 6.37ng/mL (range 2.3–23.7ng/mL), who had biopsy proven prostate cancer (mean Gleason score of 6.7; range 6 to 9). Prior to prostatectomy, all patients underwent prostate MRI on a 3T scanner which included tri-plane T2 weighted MRI, apparent diffusion coefficient maps of diffusion weighted MRI, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, and spectroscopy.. The prostate specimen was whole mount sectioned in the mold allowing geometric alignment to MRI. Tumors were mapped on MRI and histopathology.. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of MRI for cancer detection were calculated. Additionally, the effects of tumor size and Gleason score on sensitivity of MP-MRI were evaluated. Results PPV of MP-MRI to detect prostate cancer was 98%, 98%, and 100% in overall prostate, peripheral zone, and central gland, respectively. Sensitivities of MRI sequences were higher for tumors >5mm in diameter, as well as for tumors with higher Gleason scores (>7) (p<0.05). Conclusion Prostate MRI at 3T allows for the detection of prostate cancer. A multi-parametric approach increases the predictive power of MRI for diagnosis. In this study, accurate correlation between MP-MRI and histopathology was obtained by the patient specific MRI-based mold technique. PMID:21944089

  8. Localization of the brain calculation function area with MRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study is to define the anatomical localization of corresponding brain function area during calculating. The activating modes in brain during continuous silent calculating subtraction and repeated silent reading multiplication table were compared and investigated. Fourteen volunteers of right-handedness were enrolled in this experiment. The quite difference of reaction modes in brain area during the two modes of calculation reveal that there are different processing pathways in brain during these two operating actions. During continuous silent calculating, the function area is localized on the posterior portion of superior and middle gyrus of frontal lobe and the Iobule of posterior parietal lobe (P < 0.01, T = 5.41). It demonstrates that these function areas play an important role in the performance of calculation and working memory. Whereas the activating of visual cortex shows that even in mental arithmetic processing the brain action is having the aid of vision and visual space association.

  9. Contrast agents for functional and cellular MRI of the kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grenier, Nicolas [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France) and Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)]. E-mail: nicolas.grenier@chu-bordeaux.fr; Pedersen, Michael [MR Research Center, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Hauger, Olivier [ERT CNRS ' Imagerie Moleculaire et Fonctionnelle' , Universite Victor Segalen-Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux (France); Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle de l' Adulte, Groupe Hospitalier Pellegrin, Place Amelie Raba-Leon, 33076 Bordeaux Cedex (France)

    2006-12-15

    Low-molecular-weight gadolinium (Gd) chelates are glomerular tracers but their role in evaluation of renal function with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging is still marginal. Because of their small size, they diffuse freely into the interstitium and the relationship between measured signal intensity and concentration is complex. New categories of contrast agents, such as large Gd-chelates or iron oxide particules, with different pharmacokinetic and magnetic properties have been developed. These large molecules could be useful for both functional (quantification of perfusion, quantification of glomerular filtration rate, estimation of tubular function) and cellular imaging (intrarenal phagocytosis in inflammatory renal diseases). Continuous development of new contrast agents remains worthwhile to get the best adequacy between the physiological phenomenon of interest and the pharmacokinetic of the agent.

  10. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko [Waseda Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Science and Engineering; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  11. MRI-detected extramural vascular invasion is an independent prognostic factor for synchronous metastasis in patients with rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohn, Beomseok; Lim, Joon-seok; Kim, Honsoul; Kim, Myeong-Jin [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiological Science, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Myoung, Sungmin [Jungwon University, Department of Medical Information, Goesan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Junjeong [Yonsei University Wonju College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Wonju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nam Kyu [Yonsei University, College of Medicine, Department of Surgery, Severance Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-detected extramural vascular invasion (EMVI) could predict synchronous distant metastases in rectal cancer. Patients who underwent rectal MRI between July 2011 and December 2012 were screened. This study included 447 patients with pathologically confirmed rectal adenocarcinoma who had undergone MRI without previous treatment. Distant metastases were recorded at the initial work-up and over a 6-month follow-up. Univariate/multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the risk of metastasis. The diagnostic performance was calculated using pathologic lymphovascular invasion (LVI) as a gold standard. Among 447 patients, 79 patients (17.7 %) were confirmed to have distant metastases. Three MRI features are significantly associated with a high risk of distant metastasis: positive EMVI (odds ratio 3.02), high T stage (odds ratio 2.10) and positive regional lymph node metastasis (odds ratio 6.01). EMVI in a large vessel (≥3 mm) had a higher risk for metastasis than EMVI in a small vessel (<3 mm). Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of MRI-detected EMVI were 28.2 %, 94.0 % and 80.3 %, respectively. MRI-detected EMVI is an independent risk factor for synchronous metastasis in rectal cancer. EMVI in large vessels is a stronger risk factor for distant metastasis than EMVI in small vessels. (orig.)

  12. Brain reorganization after experimental stroke: functional and structural MRI correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, M.P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in the Western society. The disease leads to debilitating effects like neuronal death, loss of anatomical connections between neurons and subsequent loss of function. Although such ischemic stroke damage can be devastating, many pati

  13. Brain reorganization after experimental stroke: functional and structural MRI correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meer, M.P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Ischemic stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability in the Western society. The disease leads to debilitating effects like neuronal death, loss of anatomical connections between neurons and subsequent loss of function. Although such ischemic stroke damage can be devastating, many

  14. Functional MRI studies in human Ecstasy and cannabis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G.

    2006-01-01

    Cannabis and ecstasy are among the most widely used illicit drugs in the world. However, there are substantial concerns about their neurotoxic potential for brain and brain function. Despite previous research, some crucial questions regarding the causality, course and clinical relevance have remaine

  15. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional

  16. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional M

  17. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional M

  18. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  19. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yazdani, Farshad, E-mail: fyazdani@ccerci.ac.ir; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-05-15

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–SiO{sub 2}-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r{sub 2} relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  20. Impaired sensory processing measured by functional MRI in Bipolar disorder manic and depressed mood states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Joseph J; Johnson, Casey P; Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Christensen, Gary E; Wemmie, John A; Magnotta, Vincent A

    2017-07-03

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by recurring episodes of depression and mania. Defining differences in brain function during these states is an important goal of bipolar disorder research. However, few imaging studies have directly compared brain activity between bipolar mood states. Herein, we compare functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) responses during a flashing checkerboard stimulus between bipolar participants across mood states (euthymia, depression, and mania) in order to identify functional differences between these states. 40 participants with bipolar I disorder and 33 healthy controls underwent fMRI during the presentation of the stimulus. A total of 23 euthymic-state, 16 manic-state, 15 depressed-state, and 32 healthy control imaging sessions were analyzed in order to compare functional activation during the stimulus between mood states and with healthy controls. A reduced response was identified in the visual cortex in both the depressed and manic groups compared to euthymic and healthy participants. Functional differences between bipolar mood states were also observed in the cerebellum, thalamus, striatum, and hippocampus. Functional differences between mood states occurred in several brain regions involved in visual and other sensory processing. These differences suggest that altered visual processing may be a feature of mood states in bipolar disorder. The key limitations of this study are modest mood-state group size and the limited temporal resolution of fMRI which prevents the segregation of primary visual activity from regulatory feedback mechanisms.

  1. Implicit reference-based group-wise image registration and its application to structural and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Xiujuan; Christensen, Gary E; Gu, Hong; Ross, Thomas J; Yang, Yihong

    2009-10-01

    In this study, an implicit reference group-wise (IRG) registration with a small deformation, linear elastic model was used to jointly estimate correspondences between a set of MRI images. The performance of pair-wise and group-wise registration algorithms was evaluated for spatial normalization of structural and functional MRI data. Traditional spatial normalization is accomplished by group-to-reference (G2R) registration in which a group of images are registered pair-wise to a reference image. G2R registration is limited due to bias associated with selecting a reference image. In contrast, implicit reference group-wise (IRG) registration estimates correspondences between a group of images by jointly registering the images to an implicit reference corresponding to the group average. The implicit reference is estimated during IRG registration eliminating the bias associated with selecting a specific reference image. Registration performance was evaluated using segmented T1-weighted magnetic resonance images from the Nonrigid Image Registration Evaluation Project (NIREP), DTI and fMRI images. Implicit reference pair-wise (IRP) registration-a special case of IRG registration for two images-is shown to produce better relative overlap than IRG for pair-wise registration using the same small deformation, linear elastic registration model. However, IRP-G2R registration is shown to have significant transitivity error, i.e., significant inconsistencies between correspondences defined by different pair-wise transformations. In contrast, IRG registration produces consistent correspondence between images in a group at the cost of slightly reduced pair-wise RO accuracy compared to IRP-G2R. IRG spatial normalization of the fractional anisotropy (FA) maps of DTI is shown to have smaller FA variance compared with G2R methods using the same elastic registration model. Analyses of fMRI data sets with sensorimotor and visual tasks show that IRG registration, on average, increases the

  2. Functional brain imaging in irritable bowel syndrome with rectal balloon-distention by using fMRI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao-Zong Yuan; Ran-Jun Tao; Bin Xu; Jing Sun; Ke-Min Chen; Fei Miao; Zhong-Wei Zhang; Jia-Yu Xu

    2003-01-01

    AIM: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and changes in stool habits. Visceral hypersensitivity is a key factor in the pathophysiology of IBS. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of rectal balloon-distention stimulus by blood oxygenation leveldependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLDfMRI) in visceral pain center and to compare the distribution,extent, and intensity of activated areas between IBS patients and normal controls. METHODS: Twenty-six patients with IBS and eleven normal controls were tested for rectal sensation, and the subjective pain intensity at 90 ml and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention was reported by using Visual Analogue Scale. Then, BOLDfMRI was performed at 30 ml, 60 ml, 90 ml, and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention in all subjects. RESULTS: Rectal distention stimulation increased the activity of anterior cingulate cortex (35/37), insular cortex (37/37),prefrontal cortex (37/37), and thalamus (35/37) in most cases.At 120 ml of rectal balloon-distention, the activation area and percentage change in MR signal intensity of the regions of interest (ROI) at IC, PFC, and THAL were significantly greater in patients with IBS than that in controls. Score of pain sensation at 90 ml and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention was significantly higher in patients with IBS than that in controls. CONCLUSION: Using fMRI, some patients with IBS can be detected having visceral hypersensitivity in response to painful rectal balloon-distention. fMRI is an objective brain imaging technique to measure the change in regional cerebral activation more precisely. In this study, IC and PFC of the IBS patients were the major loci of the CNS processing of visceral perception.

  3. Functional cardiac MRI for assessment of aortic valve disease; Aortenklappenstenose im MRT mit Dynamik und 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagmeister, F.; Ritter, C.; Machann, W.; Koestler, H.; Hahn, D.; Beer, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Wuerzburg (Germany); Herrmann, S.; Voelker, W.; Weidemann, F. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Medizinische Klinik I, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    Aortic valve disease shows a rising incidence with the increasing mean age of Western populations. The detection of hemodynamic parameters, which transcends the mere assessment of valve morphology, has an important future potential concerning classification of the severity of disease. MRI allows a non-invasive and a spatially flexible view of the aortic valve and the adjacent anatomic region, left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) and ascending aorta. Moreover, the technique allows the determination of functional hemodynamic parameters, such as flow velocities and effective orifice areas. The new approach of a serial systolic planimetry velocity-encoded MRI sequence (VENC-MRI) facilitates the sizing of blood-filled cardiac structures with the registration of changes in magnitude during systole. Additionally, the subvalvular VENC-MRI measurements improve the clinically important exact determination of the LVOT area with respect to its specific eccentric configuration and its systolic deformity. (orig.) [German] Erworbene Erkrankungen der Aortenklappe wie die Aortenklappenstenose zeigen mit zunehmender Alterungstendenz unserer Gesellschaft eine ansteigende Inzidenz. Die Erfassung ueber die reine Klappenmorphologie hinausgehender haemodynamischer Parameter hat ein wichtiges zukuenftiges Potenzial zur Schweregradeinschaetzung. Die MRT erlaubt eine nichtinvasive und raeumlich flexible Darstellung der Aortenklappe sowie ihrer benachbarten anatomischen Strukturen (linksventrikulaerer Ausflusstrakt/LVOT, Aorta ascendens). Darueber hinaus ist eine Bestimmung funktioneller haemodynamischer Parameter wie Flussgeschwindigkeiten und effektiven Oeffnungsflaechen (EOeF) moeglich. Der neue Ansatz einer seriellen Planimetrie geschwindigkeitskodierter MRT-Sequenzen (Velocity-encoding- [VENC-]MRT) erlaubt die Groessenbestimmung flussdurchstroemter kardialer Strukturen und die Aufzeichnung ihrer dynamischen Groessenveraenderung waehrend der Systole. Zusaetzlich ermoeglicht die

  4. Amide proton transfer-weighted MRI detection of traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Wang, Wenzhu; Jiang, Shanshan; Zhang, Yi; Heo, Hye-Young; Wang, Xianlong; Peng, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Jinyuan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the capability and uniqueness of amide proton transfer-weighted (APTw) imaging in the detection of primary and secondary injury after controlled cortical impact (CCI)-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Eleven adult rats had craniotomy plus CCI surgery under isoflurane anesthesia. Multi-parameter MRI data were acquired at 4.7 T, at eight time points (1, 6 h, and 1, 2, 3, 7, 14, and 28 days after TBI). At one and six hours post-injury, average APTw signal intensities decreased significantly in the impacted and peri-lesional areas due to tissue acidosis. A slightly high APTw signal was seen in the core lesion area with respect to the peri-lesional area, which was due to hemorrhage, as shown by T2*w. After the initial drop, the APTw signals dramatically increased in some peri-lesional areas at two and three days post-injury, likely due to the secondary inflammatory response. The use of APTw MRI has the potential to introduce a novel molecular neuroimaging approach for the simultaneous detection of ischemia, hemorrhage, and neuroinflammation in TBI.

  5. A functional MRI study of language disturbances in subjects with migraine headache during treatment with topiramate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciantis, Alessio; Muti, Marco; Piccolini, Carlo; Principi, Massimo; Di Renzo, Antonio; De Ciantis, Rita; Frondizi, Domenico; Iannone, Gregorio; Ottaviano, Pierfausto; Piccirilli, Massimo

    2008-05-01

    Topiramate (TPM) is a new antiepileptic drug approved for the prevention of migraine headache. However its use is limited by treatment-emergent adverse events; in particular, therapy can exert profound impact on language function. In this investigation, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the anatomofunctional correlates of language disturbances in TPM patients experiencing subjective cognitive impairment. Ten right-handed individuals receiving therapy (five with and five without language disfluency) and five matched healthy control subjects took part in this study. During fMRI subjects alternately rested and performed a word-generating task. The task comprised the silent generation of words beginning with a different input letter visually presented. The activation paradigm consisted of six activation blocks alternating with six baseline rest blocks. The main fMRI measure was the pattern activation of the prefrontal regions (Brodmann's areas 44, 45, and 46) in both left and right hemispheres. Patients receiving TPM (50-100 mg/day) significantly reduced mean monthly migraine frequency. However several differences in fMRI activation were evident in the subject group comparison. Notably, changes in brain activity were observed during the phonemic task in patients with language disturbances. It is likely that TPM therapy is associated with a "remapping" of the language cerebral network.

  6. Functional MRI for Assessment of the Default Mode Network in Acute Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Fisher, Patrick M; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée; Hauerberg, John; Fabricius, Martin; Møller, Kirsten; Knudsen, Gitte Moos

    2017-05-08

    Assessment of the default mode network (DMN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may improve assessment of the level of consciousness in chronic brain injury, and therefore, fMRI may also have prognostic value in acute brain injury. However, fMRI is much more challenging in critically ill patients because of cardiovascular vulnerability, intravenous sedation, and artificial ventilation. Using resting-state fMRI, we investigated the DMN in a convenience sample of patients with acute brain injury admitted to the intensive care unit. The DMN was classified dichotomously into "normal" and "grossly abnormal." Clinical outcome was assessed at 3 months. Seven patients with acute brain injury (4 females; median age 37 years [range 14-71 years]; 1 traumatic brain injury [TBI]; 6 non-TBI) were investigated by fMRI a median of 15 days after injury (range 5-25 days). Neurological presentation included 2 coma, 1 vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS), 3 minimal conscious state (MCS) minus, and 1 MCS plus. Clinical outcomes at 3 months included 1 death, 1 VS/UWS, 1 MCS plus, and 4 conscious states (CS; 1 modified Rankin Scale 0; 2 mRS 4; 1 mRS 5). Normal DMNs were seen in 4 out of 7 patients (1 MCS plus, 3 CS at follow-up). It is feasible to assess the DMN by resting-state fMRI in patients with acute brain injury already in the very early period of intensive care unit admission. Although preliminary data, all patients with a preserved DMN regained consciousness levels at follow-up compatible with MCS+ or better.

  7. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain’s spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain’s intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  8. Functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in multiple sclerosis: A multicenter fMRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocca, Maria A; Valsasina, Paola; Hulst, Hanneke E; Abdel-Aziz, Khaled; Enzinger, Christian; Gallo, Antonio; Pareto, Debora; Riccitelli, Gianna; Muhlert, Nils; Ciccarelli, Olga; Barkhof, Frederik; Fazekas, Franz; Tedeschi, Gioacchino; Arévalo, Maria J; Filippi, Massimo

    2014-12-01

    In this multicenter study, we applied functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to define the functional correlates of cognitive dysfunction in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). fMRI scans during the performance of the N-back task were acquired from 42 right-handed relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients and 52 sex-matched right-handed healthy controls, studied at six European sites using 3.0 Tesla scanners. Patients with at least two abnormal (<2 standard deviations from the normative values) neuropsychological tests at a standardized evaluation were considered cognitively impaired (CI). FMRI data were analyzed using the SPM8 software, modeling regions showing load-dependent activations/deactivations with increasing task difficulty. Twenty (47%) MS patients were CI. During the N-back load condition, compared to controls and CI patients, cognitively preserved (CP) patients had increased recruitment of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. As a function of increasing task difficulty, CI MS patients had reduced activations of several areas located in the fronto-parieto-temporal lobes as well as reduced deactivations of regions which are part of the default mode network compared to the other two groups. Significant correlations were found between abnormal fMRI patterns of activations and deactivations and behavioral measures, cognitive performance, and brain T2 and T1 lesion volumes. This multicenter study supports the theory that a preserved fMRI activity of the frontal lobe is associated with a better cognitive profile in MS patients. It also indicates the feasibility of fMRI to monitor disease evolution and treatment effects in future studies.

  9. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhui; Zuo, Xinian; He, Yong

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain's spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free) activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain's intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging, and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  10. Diagnostic performance of MRI for detection of intestinal fistulas in patients with complicated inflammatory bowel conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, S.; Meuwly, J.Y.; Meuli, R.; Schnyder, P.; Denys, A. [Universitaire Vaudois - CHUV, Service de radiodiagnostic et radiologie interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier, Lausanne (Switzerland); Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet II, Imagerie Medicale, Nice (France); Bessoud, B. [Hopital Kremlin-Bicetre, Radiologie Generale, Kremlin-Bicetre (France); Felley, C. [University Hospital, CHUV, Service de Gastroenterologie, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2007-11-15

    The diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of intestinal fistulas, other than perianal, in patients with known complicated inflammatory bowel conditions (CIBC) was investigated. Our study group consisted of 20 patients (12 women, mean age 43 years) with CIBC, including Crohn's disease (n=13), colonic diverticulitis (n=3), colitis after radiotherapy (n=3) and of postoperative origin (n=1). Eleven surgically proven enteral fistulas were known in ten (50%) of these patients, being of enterovesical (n=3), enterocolic (n=2), enteroenteral (n=2), rectovaginal (n=2), rectovaginovesical (n=1) and of entercutaneous (n=1) localisation. The other ten patients (50%), used as the control group, showed MR features of CIBC, although without any fistulous tract. Multiplanar T1- and T2-weighted sequences had been performed, including gadolinium-enhanced acquisition with fat saturation (1.5 T). MR findings were independently blindly and retrospectively reviewed by three radiologists for the presence and etiology of any fistula, as well as visualization and characterization of the fistulous tract. Results were compared with surgical findings (n=16) and clinical evolution (n=4). Interobserver agreement was calculated. Interobserver agreement kappa for fistula detection was 0.71. Overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for fistula detection were 78.6%, 75% and 77.2%, respectively. Sensitivity for fistula characterization was 80.6%, with visualization of the fistulous tract in all cases, whereby T1-weighted gadolinium-enhanced fat-saturated images were considered the most useful sequences. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI is a reliable and reproducible tool for detection of enteral fistulas secondary to inflammatory conditions. (orig.)

  11. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  12. Orofacial complex regional pain syndrome: pathophysiologic mechanisms and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hyug-Gi; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Auh, Q-Schick; Hong, Jyung-Pyo; Chun, Yang-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the most challenging chronic pain conditions and is characterized by burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, autonomic changes, trophic changes, edema, and functional loss involving mainly the extremities. Until recently, very few reports have been published concerning CRPS involving the orofacial area. We report on a 50-year-old female patient who presented with unbearable pain in all of her teeth and hypersensitivity of the facial skin. She also reported intractable pain in both extremities accompanied by temperature changes and orofacial pain that increased when the other pains were aggravated. In the case of CRPS with trigeminal neuropathic pain, protocols for proper diagnosis and prompt treatment have yet to be established in academia or in the clinical field. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging for a thorough analysis of the cortical representation of the affected orofacial area immediately before and immediately after isolated light stimulus of the affected hand and foot and concluded that CRPS can be correlated with trigeminal neuropathy in the orofacial area. Furthermore, the patient was treated with carbamazepine administration and stellate ganglion block, which can result in a rapid improvement of pain in the trigeminal region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric cardiac MRI: automated left-ventricular volumes and function analysis and effects of manual adjustments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammon, Matthias; Janka, Rolf; Dankerl, Peter; Kammerer, Ferdinand J.; Uder, Michael; Rompel, Oliver [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Gloeckler, Martin; Dittrich, Sven [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Pediatric Cardiology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Cardiac MRI is an accurate and reproducible technique for the assessment of left ventricular volumes and function. The accuracy of automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments have not been determined in children. To evaluate automated segmentation and the effects of manual adjustments for left ventricular parameter quantification in pediatric cardiac MR images. Left ventricular parameters were evaluated in 45 children with suspected myocarditis (age 13.4 ± 3.5 years, range 4-17 years) who underwent cardiac MRI. Dedicated software was used to automatically segment and adjust the parameters. Results of end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, stroke volume, myocardial mass, and ejection fraction were documented before and after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment. The software successfully detected the left ventricle in 42 of 45 (93.3%) children; failures occurred in the smallest and youngest children. Of those 42 children, automatically segmented end-diastolic volume (EDV) was 151 ± 47 ml, and after apex/base adjustment it was 146 ± 45 ml, after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment 146 ± 45 ml. The corresponding results for end-systolic volume (ESV) were 66 ± 32 ml, 63 ± 29 ml and 64 ± 28 ml; for stroke volume (SV) they were 85 ± 25 ml, 83 ± 23 ml and 83 ± 23 ml; for ejection fracture (EF) they were 57 ± 10%, 58 ± 9% and 58 ± 9%, and for myocardial mass (MM) they were 104 ± 31 g, 95 ± 31 g and 94 ± 30 g. Statistically significant differences were found when comparing the EDV/ESV/MM results, the EF results after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment and the SV results (except for comparing the SVs after apex/base adjustment and after apex/base/myocardial contour adjustment). Automated segmentation for the evaluation of left ventricular parameters in pediatric MR images proved to be feasible. Automated segmentation + apex/base adjustment provided clinically

  14. Reciprocal Benefits of Mass-Univariate and Multivariate Modeling in Brain Mapping: Applications to Event-Related Functional MRI, H215O-, and FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Moeller

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In brain mapping studies of sensory, cognitive, and motor operations, specific waveforms of dynamic neural activity are predicted based on theoretical models of human information processing. For example in event-related functional MRI (fMRI, the general linear model (GLM is employed in mass-univariate analyses to identify the regions whose dynamic activity closely matches the expected waveforms. By comparison multivariate analyses based on PCA or ICA provide greater flexibility in detecting spatiotemporal properties of experimental data that may strongly support alternative neuroscientific explanations. We investigated conjoint multivariate and mass-univariate analyses that combine the capabilities to (1 verify activation of neural machinery we already understand and (2 discover reliable signatures of new neural machinery. We examined combinations of GLM and PCA that recover latent neural signals (waveforms and footprints with greater accuracy than either method alone. Comparative results are illustrated with analyses of real fMRI data, adding to Monte Carlo simulation support.

  15. A polynomial approach for extracting the extrema of a spherical function and its application in diffusion MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Aurobrata; Tsigaridas, Elias; Mourrain, Bernard; Deriche, Rachid

    2013-07-01

    Antipodally symmetric spherical functions play a pivotal role in diffusion MRI in representing sub-voxel-resolution microstructural information of the underlying tissue. This information is described by the geometry of the spherical function. In this paper we propose a method to automatically compute all the extrema of a spherical function. We then classify the extrema as maxima, minima and saddle-points to identify the maxima. We take advantage of the fact that a spherical function can be described equivalently in the spherical harmonic (SH) basis, in the symmetric tensor (ST) basis constrained to the sphere, and in the homogeneous polynomial (HP) basis constrained to the sphere. We extract the extrema of the spherical function by computing the stationary points of its constrained HP representation. Instead of using traditional optimization approaches, which are inherently local and require exhaustive search or re-initializations to locate multiple extrema, we use a novel polynomial system solver which analytically brackets all the extrema and refines them numerically, thus missing none and achieving high precision. To illustrate our approach we consider the Orientation Distribution Function (ODF). In diffusion MRI the ODF is a spherical function which represents a state-of-the-art reconstruction algorithm whose maxima are aligned with the dominant fiber bundles. It is, therefore, vital to correctly compute these maxima to detect the fiber bundle directions. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed polynomial approach we compute the extrema of the ODF to extract all its maxima. This polynomial approach is, however, not dependent on the ODF and the framework presented in this paper can be applied to any spherical function described in either the SH basis, ST basis or the HP basis.

  16. ''Textural analysis of multiparametric MRI detects transition zone prostate cancer''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Harbir S.; Johnston, Edward W.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Benigno, Salvatore; Dikaios, Nikos [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ganeshan, Balaji [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Allen, Clare; Kirkham, Alex [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M. [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Research Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Punwani, Shonit [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London and University College London Hospitals NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate multiparametric-MRI (mpMRI) derived histogram textural-analysis parameters for detection of transition zone (TZ) prostatic tumour. Sixty-seven consecutive men with suspected prostate cancer underwent 1.5T mpMRI prior to template-mapping-biopsy (TPM). Twenty-six men had 'significant' TZ tumour. Two radiologists in consensus matched TPM to the single axial slice best depicting tumour, or largest TZ diameter for those with benign histology, to define single-slice whole TZ-regions-of-interest (ROIs). Textural-parameter differences between single-slice whole TZ-ROI containing significant tumour versus benign/insignificant tumour were analysed using Mann Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis cross-validated with leave-one-out (LOO) analysis. ADC kurtosis was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in TZ containing significant tumour with ROC-AUC 0.80 (LOO-AUC 0.78); the difference became non-significant following exclusion of significant tumour from single-slice whole TZ-ROI (p = 0.23). T1-entropy was significantly lower (p = 0.004) in TZ containing significant tumour with ROC-AUC 0.70 (LOO-AUC 0.66) and was unaffected by excluding significant tumour from TZ-ROI (p = 0.004). Combining these parameters yielded ROC-AUC 0.86 (LOO-AUC 0.83). Textural features of the whole prostate TZ can discriminate significant prostatic cancer through reduced kurtosis of the ADC-histogram where significant tumour is included in TZ-ROI and reduced T1 entropy independent of tumour inclusion. (orig.)

  17. Configurable automatic detection and registration of fiducial frames for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Junichi; Song, Sang-Eun; Tuncali, Kemal; Tempany, Clare; Hata, Nobuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose a novel automatic fiducial frame detection and registration method for device-to-image registration in MRI-guided prostate interventions. The proposed method does not require any manual selection of markers, and can be applied to a variety of fiducial frames, which consist of multiple cylindrical MR-visible markers placed in different orientations. The key idea is that automatic extraction of linear features using a line filter is more robust than that of bright spots by thresholding; by applying a line set registration algorithm to the detected markers, the frame can be registered to the MRI. The method was capable of registering the fiducial frame to the MRI with an accuracy of 1.00 +/- 0.73 mm and 1.41 +/- 1.06 degrees in a phantom study, and was sufficiently robust to detect the fiducial frame in 98% of images acquired in clinical cases despite the existence of anatomical structures in the field of view.

  18. A central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture for migraine An ongoing functional MRI study**

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Lan; Yujie Gao; Fang Zeng; Wei Qin; Mingkai Dong; Mailan Liu; Taipin Guo; Fanrong Liang

    2013-01-01

    Shaoyang acupoints are the most frequently used in migraine treatment. However, the central anal-gesic mechanism remains poorly understood. Studies have demonstrated that single stimulus of the verum acupuncture in healthy subjects can induce significant connectivity or activity changes in pain-related central networks compared with sham acupuncture. However, these findings are not indicative of the central analgesic mechanism of acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints. Thus, we recruited 100 migraine sufferers and randomly assigned them into five groups: Shaoyang uncommon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, non-acupoint control, and blank control groups. Subjects were subjected to evaluation of curative effects and functional MRI prior to and after 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. Al subjects were diagnosed by physicians and enrol ed fol owing clinical physical examination. Subjects were observed during 1-4 weeks after inclusion. At the fifth week, the first clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI were conducted. The Shaoyang uncom-mon acupoint, Shaoyang common acupoint, Yangming uncommon acupoint, and non-acupoint control grousp then were treated with acupuncture, five times per week, 20 times in total over 4 weeks. The second and third clinical evaluations and resting functional MRI screenings were conducted fol owing 10 and 20 acupuncture treatments. The blank control group was observed during the 5 to 8 week pe-riod, fol owed by clinical evaluation and resting functional MRI. The aim of this study was to examine changes in brain functional activity and central networks in subjects with migraine undergoing acu-puncture at Shaoyang uncommon acupoints. This study provides a further explanation of the central analgesic mechanism by which acupuncture at Shaoyang acupoints treats migraine.

  19. Resting state functional MRI reveals abnormal network connectivity in orthostatic tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito-León, Julián; Louis, Elan D; Manzanedo, Eva; Hernández-Tamames, Juan Antonio; Álvarez-Linera, Juan; Molina-Arjona, José Antonio; Matarazzo, Michele; Romero, Juan Pablo; Domínguez-González, Cristina; Domingo-Santos, Ángela; Sánchez-Ferro, Álvaro

    2016-07-01

    Very little is known about the pathogenesis of orthostatic tremor (OT). We have observed that OT patients might have deficits in specific aspects of neuropsychological function, particularly those thought to rely on the integrity of the prefrontal cortex, which suggests a possible involvement of frontocerebellar circuits. We examined whether resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) might provide further insights into the pathogenesis on OT. Resting-state fMRI data in 13 OT patients (11 women and 2 men) and 13 matched healthy controls were analyzed using independent component analysis, in combination with a "dual-regression" technique, to identify group differences in several resting-state networks (RSNs). All participants also underwent neuropsychological testing during the same session. Relative to healthy controls, OT patients showed increased connectivity in RSNs involved in cognitive processes (default mode network [DMN] and frontoparietal networks), and decreased connectivity in the cerebellum and sensorimotor networks. Changes in network integrity were associated not only with duration (DMN and medial visual network), but also with cognitive function. Moreover, in at least 2 networks (DMN and medial visual network), increased connectivity was associated with worse performance on different cognitive domains (attention, executive function, visuospatial ability, visual memory, and language). In this exploratory study, we observed selective impairments of RSNs in OT patients. This and other future resting-state fMRI studies might provide a novel method to understand the pathophysiological mechanisms of motor and nonmotor features of OT.

  20. Structural MRI studies of language function in the undamaged brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Fiona M; Price, Cathy J

    2009-10-01

    In recent years, the demonstration that structural changes can occur in the human brain beyond those associated with development, ageing and neuropathology has revealed a new approach to studying the neural basis of behaviour. In this review paper, we focus on structural imaging studies of language that have utilised behavioural measures in order to investigate the neural correlates of language skills in the undamaged brain. We report studies that have used two different techniques: voxel-based morphometry of whole brain grey or white matter images and diffusion tensor imaging. At present, there are relatively few structural imaging studies of language. We group them into those that investigated (1) the perception of novel speech sounds, (2) the links between speech sounds and their meaning, (3) speech production, and (4) reading. We highlight the validity of the findings by comparing the results to those from functional imaging studies. Finally, we conclude by summarising the novel contribution of these studies to date and potential directions for future research.

  1. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moisés Mera Iglesias

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets.

  2. Multimodality Functional Imaging in Radiation Therapy Planning: Relationships between Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, Diffusion-Weighted MRI, and 18F-FDG PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mera Iglesias, Moisés; Aramburu Núñez, David; del Olmo Claudio, José Luis; Salvador Gómez, Francisco; Driscoll, Brandon; Coolens, Catherine; Alba Castro, José L.; Muñoz, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Biologically guided radiotherapy needs an understanding of how different functional imaging techniques interact and link together. We analyse three functional imaging techniques that can be useful tools for achieving this objective. Materials and Methods. The three different imaging modalities from one selected patient are ADC maps, DCE-MRI, and 18F-FDG PET/CT, because they are widely used and give a great amount of complementary information. We show the relationship between these three datasets and evaluate them as markers for tumour response or hypoxia marker. Thus, vascularization measured using DCE-MRI parameters can determine tumour hypoxia, and ADC maps can be used for evaluating tumour response. Results. ADC and DCE-MRI include information from 18F-FDG, as glucose metabolism is associated with hypoxia and tumour cell density, although 18F-FDG includes more information about the malignancy of the tumour. The main disadvantage of ADC maps is the distortion, and we used only low distorted regions, and extracellular volume calculated from DCE-MRI can be considered equivalent to ADC in well-vascularized areas. Conclusion. A dataset for achieving the biologically guided radiotherapy must include a tumour density study and a hypoxia marker. This information can be achieved using only MRI data or only PET/CT studies or mixing both datasets. PMID:25788972

  3. Identification by functional MRI of human cerebral region activated by taste stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimoto, Naoya [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Dentistry

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this study was the examination of possible imaging of the primary taste region of human cerebral cortex by functional MRI (fMRI). Subjects were 19-36 years old, healthy adult male and female volunteers given information concerning the purpose, significance and method of the study. MRI equipment was 1.5 T Signa Horizon (GE) with Head Coil. Images were processed by the software FuncTool on the Advantage Windows Workstation (GE). Taste stimulation was done by swab bearing the solution of 4% quinine hydrochloride, 20% sodium chloride or distilled water (control) or by dripping from the syringe of the solutions, 8% tartaric acid or 80% sugar. Preliminary examinations with the swab suggested the possibility of the identification. Further, with use of dripping apparatus, the taste active region was shown to be identified by fMRI and of which area tended to be larger in male than in female: a significant difference was seen for the quinine hydrochloride. As above, the method was suggested to be a diagnostic mean for the taste perception. (K.H.)

  4. An iterative two-threshold analysis for single-subject functional MRI of the human brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auer, Tibor; Schweizer, Renate; Frahm, Jens [Biomedizinische NMR Forschungs GmbH am Max-Planck-Institut fuer Biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-11-15

    Current thresholding strategies for the analysis of functional MRI (fMRI) datasets may suffer from specific limitations (e.g. with respect to the required smoothness) or lead to reduced performance for a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Although a previously proposed two-threshold (TT) method offers a promising solution to these problems, the use of preset settings limits its performance. This work presents an optimised TT approach that estimates the required parameters in an iterative manner. The iterative TT (iTT) method is compared with the original TT method, as well as other established voxel-based and cluster-based thresholding approaches and spatial mixture modelling (SMM) for both simulated data and fMRI of a hometown walking task at different experimental settings (spatial resolution, filtering and SNR). In general, the iTT method presents with remarkable sensitivity and good specificity that outperforms all conventional approaches tested except for SMM in a few cases. This also holds true for challenging conditions such as high spatial resolution, the absence of filtering, high noise level, or a low number of task repetitions. Thus, iTT emerges as a good candidate for both scientific fMRI studies at high spatial resolution and more routine applications for clinical purposes. (orig.)

  5. Accurate alignment of functional EPI data to anatomical MRI using a physics-based distortion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studholme, C; Constable, R T; Duncan, J S

    2000-11-01

    Mapping of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to conventional anatomical MRI is a valuable step in the interpretation of fMRI activations. One of the main limits on the accuracy of this alignment arises from differences in the geometric distortion induced by magnetic field inhomogeneity. This paper describes an approach to the registration of echo planar image (EPI) data to conventional anatomical images which takes into account this difference in geometric distortion. We make use of an additional spin echo EPI image and use the known signal conservation in spin echo distortion to derive a specialized multimodality nonrigid registration algorithm. We also examine a plausible modification using log-intensity evaluation of the criterion to provide increased sensitivity in areas of low EPI signal. A phantom-based imaging experiment is used to evaluate the behavior of the different criteria, comparing nonrigid displacement estimates to those provided by a imagnetic field mapping acquisition. The algorithm is then applied to a range of nine brain imaging studies illustrating global and local improvement in the anatomical alignment and localization of fMRI activations.

  6. Cerebral lateralization of language in normal left-handed people studied by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol, J; Deus, J; Losilla, J M; Capdevila, A

    1999-03-23

    To use functional MRI (fMRI) to further define the occurrence of left-hemisphere, bilateral, and right-hemisphere language in a normal left-handed population. A total of 100 healthy volunteers, consisting of 50 left-handed subjects and a reference group of 50 right-handed subjects, were studied by fMRI of the frontal cortex during silent word generation. Ninety-six percent of right-handed subjects showed fMRI changes lateralized to the left hemisphere, whereas 4% showed a bilateral activation pattern. In contrast, left-hemisphere lateralization occurred in 76% of left-handers, bilateral activation in 14%, and right-hemisphere lateralization in the remaining 10%. The predominance of right-hemisphere activation, however, was weak in these cases; only a single left-handed subject (2%) showed complete right-hemisphere lateralization. Silent word generation lateralizes to the left cerebral hemisphere in both handedness groups, but right-hemisphere participation is frequent in normal left-handed subjects. Exclusive right-hemisphere activation rarely occurred in the frontal lobe region studied.

  7. Functional Imaging of Broca’s Area in Native Persian Speakers: An fMRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mahdavi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Objective: The problem of localization of speech associated cortices using noninvasive methods has been of utmost importance in many neuroimaging studies, but the results are difficult to resolve for specific neurosurgical applications. In this study, we used fMRI to delineate language-related brain activation patterns with emphasis on the Broca's area during the execution of two Persian language tasks."nPatients and Methods: The subjects comprised of nine healthy right-handed men who participated voluntarily in this study. They performed two consequent fMRI paradigms namely; "Word Production" and "Reverse Word Reading". The fMRI data were collected and analyzed. Then, functional images were registered to anatomical images using FSL software. The laterality indices were also calculated in regions of interest with different threshold levels."nResults: The results indicate that Broca's area, as the classical language-production center, was robustly activated while performing these two tasks. In eight out of nine subjects, the left hemisphere dominancy and Broca's area activation were observed and in one case activation was prominent in the homologous area in the right hemisphere."nConclusion: Similar pattern of cortical activation during Persian word production and Anglophone languages such as English was revealed. fMRI is a valuable means for brain mapping in language studies.

  8. Detection of thrombus size and protein content by ex vivo magnetization transfer and diffusion weighted MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phinikaridou Alkystis

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To utilize a rabbit model of plaque disruption to assess the accuracy of different magnetic resonance sequences [T1-weighted (T1W, T2-weighted (T2W, magnetization transfer (MT and diffusion weighting (DW] at 11.7 T for the ex vivo detection of size and composition of thrombus associated with disrupted plaques. Methods Atherosclerosis was induced in the aorta of male New Zealand White rabbits (n = 17 by endothelial denudation and high-cholesterol diet. Subsequently, plaque disruption was induced by pharmacological triggering. Segments of infra-renal aorta were excised fixed in formalin and examined by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI at 11.7 T and histology. Results MRI at 11.7 T showed that: (i magnetization transfer contrast (MTC and diffusion weighted images (DWI detected thrombus with higher sensitivity compared to T1W and T2W images [sensitivity: MTC = 88.2%, DWI = 76.5%, T1W = 66.6% and T2W = 43.7%, P P (ii MTC and DWI provided a more accurate detection of thrombus area with histology as the gold-standard [underestimation of 6% (MTC and 17.6% (DWI compared to an overestimation of thrombus area of 53.7% and 46.4% on T1W and T2W images, respectively]; (iii the percent magnetization transfer rate (MTR correlated with the fibrin (r = 0.73, P = 0.003 and collagen (r = 0.9, P = 0.004 content of the thrombus. Conclusions The conspicuity of the thrombus was increased on MTC and DW compared to T1W and T2W images. Changes in the %MTR and apparent diffusion coefficient can be used to identify the organization stage of the thrombus.

  9. Topology of whole-brain functional MRI networks: Improving the truncated scale-free model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Vargas, E.; Mitchell, D. G. V.; Greening, S. G.; Wahl, L. M.

    2014-07-01

    Networks of connections within the human brain have been the subject of intense recent research, yet their topology is still only partially understood. We analyze weighted networks calculated from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data acquired during task performance. Expanding previous work in the area, our analysis retains all of the connections between all of the voxels in the full brain fMRI data, computing correlations between approximately 200,000 voxels per subject for 10 subjects. We evaluate the extent to which this rich dataset can be described by existing models of scale-free or exponentially truncated scale-free topology, comparing results across a large number of more complex topological models as well. Our results suggest that the novel “log quadratic” model presented in this paper offers a significantly better fit to networks of functional connections at the voxel level in the human brain.

  10. The effects of hippocampal lesions on MRI measures of structural and functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Richard N; Greve, Andrea; Cooper, Elisa; Gregori, Mariella; Simons, Jon S; Geerligs, Linda; Erzinçlioğlu, Sharon; Kapur, Narinder; Browne, Georgina

    2016-11-01

    Focal lesions can affect connectivity between distal brain regions (connectional diaschisis) and impact the graph-theoretic properties of major brain networks (connectomic diaschisis). Given its unique anatomy and diverse range of functions, the hippocampus has been claimed to be a critical "hub" in brain networks. We investigated the effects of hippocampal lesions on structural and functional connectivity in six patients with amnesia, using a range of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) analyses. Neuropsychological assessment revealed marked episodic memory impairment and generally intact performance across other cognitive domains. The hippocampus was the only brain structure exhibiting reduced grey-matter volume that was consistent across patients, and the fornix was the only major white-matter tract to show altered structural connectivity according to both diffusion metrics. Nonetheless, functional MRI revealed both increases and decreases in functional connectivity. Analysis at the level of regions within the default-mode network revealed reduced functional connectivity, including between nonhippocampal regions (connectional diaschisis). Analysis at the level of functional networks revealed reduced connectivity between thalamic and precuneus networks, but increased connectivity between the default-mode network and frontal executive network. The overall functional connectome showed evidence of increased functional segregation in patients (connectomic diaschisis). Together, these results point to dynamic reorganization following hippocampal lesions, with both decreased and increased functional connectivity involving limbic-diencephalic structures and larger-scale networks. © 2016 The Authors Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Brain Tumor Detection and Classification Using Deep Learning Classifier on MRI Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Gladis Pushpa Rathi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI has become an effective tool for clinical research in recent years and has found itself in applications such as brain tumour detection. In this study, tumor classification using multiple kernel-based probabilistic clustering and deep learning classifier is proposed. The proposed technique consists of three modules, namely segmentation module, feature extraction module and classification module. Initially, the MRI image is pre-processed to make it fit for segmentation and de-noising process is carried out using median filter. Then, pre-processed image is segmented using Multiple Kernel based Probabilistic Clustering (MKPC. Subsequently, features are extracted for every segment based on the shape, texture and intensity. After features extraction, important features will be selected using Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA for classification purpose. Finally, deep learning classifier is employed for classification into tumor or non-tumor. The proposed technique is evaluated using sensitivity, specificity and accuracy. The proposed technique results are also compared with existing technique which uses Feed-Forward Back Propagation Network (FFBN. The proposed technique achieved an average sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of 0.88, 0.80 and 0.83, respectively with the highest values as about 1, 0.85 and 0.94. Improved results show the efficiency of the proposed technique.

  12. Blood oxygenation-level dependent functional MRI in evaluating the selective activation of motor cortexes associated with recovery of motor function in hemiplegic patients with ischemic stroke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuechun Li; Xiaoyan Liu; Guorong Liu; Ying He; Baojun Wang; Furu Liang; Li Wang; Hui Zhang; Jingfen Zhang; Ruiming Li

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies about blood oxygenation-level dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) have indicated that the poststroke recovery of motor function is accompanied by the selective activation of motor cor texes with high correlation.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the short-term outcomes after rehabilitative interventions with BOLD fMRI in hemi plegic patients with acute stroke, and analyze the correlation of the excitement of brain function in the passive and active movements of the affected limb with the recovery of motor function. DESIGN : A case observation. SETTING: Department of Neurology, Baotou Central Hospital. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty hemiplegic inpatients with ischemic stroke were selected from the Department of Neurology, Baotou Central Hospital from January to December in 2005, including 16 males and 14 females, aging 44-71 years with an average age of (56±5) years, and the disease course ranged from 12 to 72 hours. Inclusive criteria: In accordance with the diagnostic standard of ischemic stroke revised by the Fourth National Academic Meeting for Cerebrovascular Disease; Confirmed by cranial CT or MRI. They were all informed agreed with the detected items.METHODS: ① The Bobath technique was adopted in the rehabilitative interventions of the 30 patients, 30 minutes for each time, twice a day for three weeks continuously. ② The hand motor recovery of the stroke patients was graded by the Brunnstrom,stages ( Ⅰ -Ⅵ), and be able to grasp various objects and extend for the whole range was taken as grade Ⅵ. ③ The patients were examined with fMRI BOLD before rehabilitation and 3 weeks after rehabilitation. All the patients were trained with finger movements, the distracting thoughts should be eliminated as much as possible especially during the movement phase, the patients should highly concentrate on the hand movements. The range for the finger movements should be as large as possible with moderate frequency. The hand movements should be 10 s with

  13. Semi-automatic detection of Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules for colonic transit time assessment in MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrer, Christian; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Keil, Andreas; Kirchhoff, Chlodwig; Mussack, Thomas; Lienemann, Andreas; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders result in a significant number of consultations in primary care facilities. Chronic constipation and diarrhea are regarded as two of the most common diseases affecting between 2% and 27% of the population in western countries 1-3. Defecatory disorders are most commonly due to dysfunction of the pelvic floor or the anal sphincter. Although an exact differentiation of these pathologies is essential for adequate therapy, diagnosis is still only based on a clinical evaluation1. Regarding quantification of constipation only the ingestion of radio-opaque markers or radioactive isotopes and the consecutive assessment of colonic transit time using X-ray or scintigraphy, respectively, has been feasible in clinical settings 4-8. However, these approaches have several drawbacks such as involving rather inconvenient, time consuming examinations and exposing the patient to ionizing radiation. Therefore, conventional assessment of colonic transit time has not been widely used. Most recently a new technique for the assessment of colonic transit time using MRI and MR-contrast media filled capsules has been introduced 9. However, due to numerous examination dates per patient and corresponding datasets with many images, the evaluation of the image data is relatively time-consuming. The aim of our study was to develop a computer tool to facilitate the detection of the capsules in MRI datasets and thus to shorten the evaluation time. We present a semi-automatic tool which provides an intensity, size 10, and shape-based 11,12 detection of ingested Gd-DTPA-saline filled capsules. After an automatic pre-classification, radiologists may easily correct the results using the application-specific user interface, therefore decreasing the evaluation time significantly.

  14. Joint estimation of shape and deformation for the detection of lesions in dynamic contrast-enhanced breast MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Byung-Woo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a mathematical framework for simultaneously delineating the boundary of object and estimating its temporal motion in the application of lesion detection in a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) breast MRI sequence where both the appearance and the shape of region of interest is assumed to change in time. A unified energy functional for a joint segmentation and registration is proposed based on the assumption that the statistical properties of dynamic intensity curves within a region of interest are homogeneous. Our algorithm is designed to provide the morphological properties of the enhanced region and its dynamic intensity profiles, called kinetic signatures, in the analysis of DCE imagery since these features are considered as significant cues in understanding images. The proposed energy comprises a combination of a segmentation energy and a registration energy. The segmentation energy is developed based on a convex formulation being insensitive to the initialization. The registration energy is designed to compensate motion artifacts that are usually involved in the temporal imaging procedure. The major objective of this work is to provide a mathematical framework for a joint segmentation and registration on a dynamic sequence of images, and we demonstrate the mutual benefit of the estimation of temporal deformations for the registration step and the localization of regions of interest for the segmentation step. The effectiveness of the developed algorithm has been demonstrated on a number of clinical DCE breast MRI data in the application of breast lesion detection and the results show its potential to improve the accuracy and the efficiency in the diagnosis of breast cancer.

  15. Insights into the mechanisms of absence seizure generation provided by EEG with Functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick William Carney

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Absence seizures are brief epileptic events characterized by loss of awareness with subtle motor features. They may be very frequent, and impact on attention, learning and memory. A number of pathophysiological models have been developed to explain the mechanism of absence seizure generation which rely heavily on observations from animal studies. Studying the structural and functional relationships between large-scale brain networks in humans is only practical with non-invasive whole brain techniques. EEG with functional MRI (EEG-fMRI is one such technique that provides an opportunity to explore the interactions between brain structures involved in AS generation. A number of fMRI techniques including event-related analysis, time course analysis and functional connectivity have identified a common network of structures involved in AS seizures. This network comprises the thalamus, midline and lateral parietal cortex (the default mode network [DMN], caudate nuclei and the reticular structures of the pons. The main component displaying an increase in BOLD signal relative to the resting state, in group studies, is the thalamus while the most consistent cortical change is reduced BOLD signal in the DMN. Time course analysis shows that, rather than some structures being activated or inactivated during AS, there appears to be increase in activity across components of the network preceding or following the electro-clinical onset of the seizure. The earliest change in BOLD signal occurs in the DMN, prior to the onset of epileptiform events. This region also shows altered functional connectivity in patients with absence seizures. Hence it appears that engagement of this network is central to absence seizures. In this review we will explore the insights EEG-fMRI studies into the mechanisms of AS and considers how the DMN is likely to be the major large scale brain network central to both seizure generation and the seizure manifestations.

  16. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N Boubela

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to true neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TR< 0.5s scanning may help to identify and eliminate physiologic components, increasing tSNR and functional contrast. In addition, biological variability can be studied and task performance better correlated to other measures. This should increase specificity and reliability in fMRI studies. Furthermore, physiological signal changes during scanning may then be recognized as a source of information rather than a nuisance. As we are currently still undersampling the complexity of the brain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.. From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  17. Cellular therapy of tumor angiogenesis : morphological and functional imaging using MRI and videomicroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Faye, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Introduction : Tumor angiogenesis leads to the development of new vessels enabling the growth of the tumor. Tumor vessels are characterized by abnormalities including mural cells (perivascular muscular cells) responsible for abnormal vessel function and maturation. In this thesis, we studied cellular therapy in a tumor model by injection of mural cells using MRI and fluorescence videomicroscopy. Materiels and methods: Nude mice were injected with squamous cell TC1 tumors and animals were divi...

  18. Genetic and Diagnostic Biomarker Development in ASD Toddlers Using Resting State Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD); functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI); connectivity modeling 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...hired, David Neal Brown, a doctoral student in the Clinical Neuro -Psychology program at Fielding Graduate University, to resume analysis of the ASD...a doctoral student in the Clinical Neuro -Psychology program at Fielding Graduate University, to resume analysis of the ASD data. Since coming on to

  19. Comparative evaluation of chest radiography, low-field MRI, the Shwachman-Kulczycki score and pulmonary function tests in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjorin, Angela; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schmidt, Helga [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Posselt, Hans-Georg [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Clinics for Pediatry, Gastroenterology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Smaczny, Christina [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Medical Clinics I, Pneumology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Biomathematics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Deimling, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay - Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parenchymal lung damage in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) can be equivalently quantified by the Chrispin-Norman (CN) scores determined with low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional chest radiography (CXR). Both scores were correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the Shwachman-Kulczycki method (SKM). To evaluate the comparability of MRI and CXR for different states of the disease, all scores were applied to patients divided into three age groups. Seventy-three CF patients (mean SKM score: 62 {+-} 8) with a median age (range) of 14 years (7-32) were included. The mean CN scores determined with both imaging methods were comparable (CXR: 12.1 {+-} 4.7; MRI: 12.0 {+-} 4.5) and showed high correlation (P < 0.05, R = 0.97). Only weak correlations were found between imaging, PFT, and SKM. Both imaging modalities revealed significantly more severe disease expression with age, while PFT and SKM failed to detect early signs of disease. We conclude that imaging of the lung in CF patients is capable of detecting subtle and early parenchymal destruction before lung function or clinical scoring is affected. Furthermore, low-field MRI revealed high consistency with chest radiography and may be used for a thorough follow-up while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  20. Detection of hepatocellular carcinoma in gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ah Yeong; Kim, Young Kon; Lee, Min Woo; Park, Min Jung; Hwang, Jiyoung; Lee, Mi Hee; Lee, Jae Won [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan Univ. School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], e-mail: jmyr@dreamwiz.com

    2012-10-15

    Background As gadoxetic acid-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) have been widely used for the evaluation of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), it is clinically relevant to determine the diagnostic efficacy of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Purpose To compare the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity of gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI for detection of HCCs with respect to the severity of liver cirrhosis. Material and Methods A total of 189 patients with 240 HCCs ({<=}3.0 cm) (Child-Pugh A, 81 patients with 90 HCCs; Child-Pugh B, 65 patients with 85 HCCs; Child-Pugh C, 43 patients with 65 HCCs) underwent DWI and gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI at 3.0 T. A gadoxetic acid set (dynamic and hepatobiliary phase plus T2-weighted image) and DWI set (DWI plus unenhanced MRIs) for each Child-Pugh class were analyzed independently by two observers for detecting HCCs using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity were calculated. Results There was a trend toward decreased diagnostic accuracy for gadoxetic acid and DWI set with respect to the severity of cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A [mean 0.974, 0.961], B [mean 0.904, 0.863], C [mean 0.779, 0.760]). For both observers, the sensitivities of both image sets were highest in Child-Pugh class A (mean 95.6%, 93.9%), followed by class B (mean 83.0%, 77.1%), and class C (mean 60.6%, 60.0%) (P < 0.05). Conclusion In HCC detection, the diagnostic accuracy and sensitivity for gadoxetic acid-enhanced MRI and DWI were highest in Child-Pugh class A, followed by Child-Pugh class B, and Child-Pugh class C, indicating a tendency toward decreased diagnostic capability with the severity of cirrhosis.

  1. Cerebral basis of visual hallucinations in Parkinson's disease: structural and functional MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarretxe-Bilbao, Naroa; Junque, Carme; Marti, Maria J; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-11-15

    The presence of visual hallucinations (VH) is a significant predictor of dementia in Parkinson's disease (PD) and it is associated with a more rapid cognitive decline. Non-demented PD patients with VH present greater neuropsychological impairment than those without VH in domains such as verbal and visual memory, language comprehension, and visuospatial and visuoperceptive functions. Frontal dysfunction has also been described in PD with VH, including deficits in verbal fluency, sustained attention, and inhibition. In PD with VH, structural and functional abnormalities within the primary visual system and visual association areas, including ventral and dorsal pathways, have been reported. Structural MRI studies have shown that non-demented PD patients with VH present grey matter reduction in parieto-occipital areas and the hippocampal head. A follow-up study performed at a mean of 30 months revealed that unlike PD patients without VH, PD patients with VH frequently develop dementia associated with progressive atrophy in limbic, paralimbic and neocortical areas. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies have revealed altered activation in occipito-temporal and frontal areas in response to simple and complex visual stimuli in PD patients with VH, suggesting a marked impairment in bottom-up visual processing, as well as an attentional deficit in the pathophysiology of VH in PD.

  2. Multimodal functional network connectivity: an EEG-fMRI fusion in network space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Lei

    Full Text Available EEG and fMRI recordings measure the functional activity of multiple coherent networks distributed in the cerebral cortex. Identifying network interaction from the complementary neuroelectric and hemodynamic signals may help to explain the complex relationships between different brain regions. In this paper, multimodal functional network connectivity (mFNC is proposed for the fusion of EEG and fMRI in network space. First, functional networks (FNs are extracted using spatial independent component analysis (ICA in each modality separately. Then the interactions among FNs in each modality are explored by Granger causality analysis (GCA. Finally, fMRI FNs are matched to EEG FNs in the spatial domain using network-based source imaging (NESOI. Investigations of both synthetic and real data demonstrate that mFNC has the potential to reveal the underlying neural networks of each modality separately and in their combination. With mFNC, comprehensive relationships among FNs might be unveiled for the deep exploration of neural activities and metabolic responses in a specific task or neurological state.

  3. Functional MRI of the cervical spine after distortion injury; MR-Funktionsdiagnostik der Halswirbelsaeule nach Schleudertrauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnarkowski, P. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Weidenmaier, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Heuck, A. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik; Reiser, M.F. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik

    1995-04-01

    50 patients with a history of distortion injury of the cervical spine were examined with static and functional MRI. Functional MRI consisted of different patient`s positions from maximal extension to maximal flexion (30 , 0 , 25 , 40 , 50 ). T{sub 2}*-weighted gradient echo sequences were performed in a sagittal view for the different positions. Ligamentous instabilities and disc protrusions were seen only in functional MRI in 17 patients. These findings correlated with the neurological symptoms. Two patients were treated by operative fusion because of these findings. (orig.) [Deutsch] Bei 50 Patienten mit einem Schleudertrauma der Halswirbelsaeule wurden zu den statischen Magnetresonanztomogrammen der Halswirbelsaeule MR-Funktionsaufnahmen durchgefuehrt. Diese Funktionsaufnahmen erfolgten in 5 verschiedenen Flexionsgraden von maximaler Reklination bis zur maximalen Inklination (30 , 0 , 25 , 40 , 50 ). T{sub 2}*-gewichtete Gradienten-Echo-Sequenzen in sagittaler Schnittfuehrung wurden fuer jeden Flexionsgrad angefertigt. Bandinstabilitaeten und Bandscheibenvorwoelbungen konnten bei 17 Patienten nur in bestimmten Flexionsgraden erfasst werden. Diese 17 Patienten zeigten eine umschriebene neurologische Symptomatik, die von ihrer Lokalisation mit den in der MR-Funktionsdiagnostik erhobenen Befunden korrelierten. Zwei Patienten wurden aufgrund diese Befunde mit einer operativen Fusion therapiert. (orig.)

  4. Blood oxygen-level dependent functional assessment of cerebrovascular reactivity: Feasibility for intraoperative 3 Tesla MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierstra, Jorn; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; van Niftrik, Christiaan Hendrik Bas; Piccirelli, Marco; Pangalu, Athina; Kocian, Roman; Neidert, Marian Christoph; Valavanis, Antonios; Regli, Luca; Bozinov, Oliver

    2017-02-01

    To assess the feasibility of functional blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) MRI to evaluate intraoperative cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) at 3 Tesla field strength. Ten consecutive neurosurgical subjects scheduled for a clinical intraoperative MRI examination were enrolled in this study. In addition to the clinical protocol a BOLD sequence was implemented with three cycles of 44 s apnea to calculate CVR values on a voxel-by-voxel basis throughout the brain. The CVR range was then color-coded and superimposed on an anatomical volume to create high spatial resolution CVR maps. Ten subjects (mean age 34.8 ± 13.4; 2 females) uneventfully underwent the intraoperative BOLD protocol, with no complications occurring. Whole-brain CVR for all subjects was (mean ± SD) 0.69 ± 0.42, whereas CVR was markedly higher for tumor subjects as compared to vascular subjects, 0.81 ± 0.44 versus 0.33 ± 0.10, respectively. Furthermore, color-coded functional maps could be robustly interpreted for a whole-brain assessment of CVR. We demonstrate that intraoperative BOLD MRI is feasible in creating functional maps to assess cerebrovascular reactivity throughout the brain in subjects undergoing a neurosurgical procedure. Magn Reson Med 77:806-813, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  5. The Use of Functional MRI to Study Appetite Control in the CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akila De Silva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has provided the opportunity to safely investigate the workings of the human brain. This paper focuses on its use in the field of human appetitive behaviour and its impact in obesity research. In the present absence of any safe or effective centrally acting appetite suppressants, a better understanding of how appetite is controlled is vital for the development of new antiobesity pharmacotherapies. Early functional imaging techniques revealed an attenuation of brain reward area activity in response to visual food stimuli when humans are fed—in other words, the physiological state of hunger somehow increases the appeal value of food. Later studies have investigated the action of appetite modulating hormones on the fMRI signal, showing how the attenuation of brain reward region activity that follows feeding can be recreated in the fasted state by the administration of anorectic gut hormones. Furthermore, differences in brain activity between obese and lean individuals have provided clues about the possible aetiology of overeating. The hypothalamus acts as a central gateway modulating homeostatic and nonhomeostatic drives to eat. As fMRI techniques constantly improve, functional data regarding the role of this small but hugely important structure in appetite control is emerging.

  6. Scanning fast and slow: current limitations of 3 Tesla functional MRI and future potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boubela, Roland N.; Kalcher, Klaudius; Nasel, Christian; Moser, Ewald

    2014-02-01

    Functional MRI at 3T has become a workhorse for the neurosciences, e.g., neurology, psychology, and psychiatry, enabling non-invasive investigation of brain function and connectivity. However, BOLD-based fMRI is a rather indirect measure of brain function, confounded by fluctuation related signals, e.g. head or brain motion, brain pulsation, blood flow, intermixed with susceptibility differences close or distant to the region of neuronal activity. Even though a plethora of preprocessing strategies have been published to address these confounds, their efficiency is still under discussion. In particular, physiological signal fluctuations closely related to brain supply may mask BOLD signal changes related to "true" neuronal activation. Here we explore recent technical and methodological advancements aimed at disentangling the various components, employing fast multiband vs. standard EPI, in combination with fast temporal ICA.Our preliminary results indicate that fast (TRbrain, even at a rather coarse macroscopic level, we should be very cautious in the interpretation of neuroscientific findings, in particular when comparing different groups (e.g., age, sex, medication, pathology, etc.). From a technical point of view our goal should be to sample brain activity at layer specific resolution with low TR, covering as much of the brain as possible without violating SAR limits. We hope to stimulate discussion towards a better understanding and a more quantitative use of fMRI.

  7. Learn the effective connectivity pattern of attention networks: a resting functional MRI and Bayesian network study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Juan; Li, Rui; Yao, Li; Wu, Xia

    2011-03-01

    Task-based neuroimaging studies revealed that different attention operations were carried out by the functional interaction and cooperation between two attention systems: the dorsal attention network (DAN) and the ventral attention network (VAN), which were respectively involved in the "top-down" endogenous attention orienting and the "bottomup" exogenous attention reorienting process. Recent focused resting functional MRI (fMRI) studies found the two attention systems were inherently organized in the human brain regardless of whether or not the attention process were required, but how the two attention systems interact with each other in the absence of task is yet to be investigated. In this study, we first separated the DAN and VAN by applying the group independent component analysis (ICA) to the resting fMRI data acquired from 12 healthy young subjects, then used Gaussian Bayesian network (BN) learning approach to explore the plausible effective connectivity pattern of the two attention systems. It was found regions from the same attention network were strongly intra-dependent, and all the connections were located in the information flow from VAN to DAN, which suggested that an orderly functional interactions and information exchanges between the two attention networks existed in the intrinsic spontaneous brain activity, and the inherent connections might benefit the efficient cognitive process between DAN and VAN, such as the "top-down" and "bottom-up" reciprocal interaction when attention-related tasks were involved.

  8. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Roganovic

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities.  We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p < 0.001, while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20. 

  9. Bold-Independent Computational Entropy Assesses Functional Donut-Like Structures in Brain fMRI Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, James F.; Ramanna, Sheela; Tozzi, Arturo; İnan, Ebubekir

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for the measurement of information level in fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging) neural data sets, based on image subdivision in small polygons equipped with different entropic content. We show how this method, called maximal nucleus clustering (MNC), is a novel, fast and inexpensive image-analysis technique, independent from the standard blood-oxygen-level dependent signals. MNC facilitates the objective detection of hidden temporal patterns of entropy/information in zones of fMRI images generally not taken into account by the subjective standpoint of the observer. This approach befits the geometric character of fMRIs. The main purpose of this study is to provide a computable framework for fMRI that not only facilitates analyses, but also provides an easily decipherable visualization of structures. This framework commands attention because it is easily implemented using conventional software systems. In order to evaluate the potential applications of MNC, we looked for the presence of a fourth dimension's distinctive hallmarks in a temporal sequence of 2D images taken during spontaneous brain activity. Indeed, recent findings suggest that several brain activities, such as mind-wandering and memory retrieval, might take place in the functional space of a four dimensional hypersphere, which is a double donut-like structure undetectable in the usual three dimensions. We found that the Rényi entropy is higher in MNC areas than in the surrounding ones, and that these temporal patterns closely resemble the trajectories predicted by the possible presence of a hypersphere in the brain. PMID:28203153

  10. Preoperative functional MRI localization of language areas in Chinese patients with brain tumors Validation with intraoperative electrocortical mapping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hechun Xia; Wei Huang; Liang Wu; Hui Ma; Xiaodong Wang; Xuexin Chen; Shengyu Sun; Xiaoxiong Jia

    2012-01-01

    Ten Chinese patients with brain tumors involving language regions were selected. Preoperative functional MRI was performed to locate Broca's or Wernicke's area, and the cortex that was essential for language function was determined by electrocortical mapping. A site-by-site comparison between functional MRI and electrocortical mapping was performed with the aid of a neuronavigation device. Results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of preoperative functional MRI were 80.0% and 85.0% in Broca's area and 66.6% and 85.2% in Wernicke's area, respectively. These experimental findings indicate that functional MRI is an accurate, reliable technique with which to identify the location of Wernicke's area or Broca's area in patients with brain tumors.

  11. Higher Prostate Cancer Grade Groups Are Detected in Patients Undergoing Multiparametric MRI-targeted Biopsy Compared With Standard Biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordetsky, Jennifer B; Thomas, John V; Nix, Jeffrey W; Rais-Bahrami, Soroush

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)/ultrasound (US) fusion-guided prostate biopsy can detect more clinically significant prostate cancers, which could impact patient management. As many of the studies evaluating MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy were conducted in specialized quaternary care centers, the question remains whether this technology is transferable to general practice. Our study assesses the diagnostic ability of MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy compared with standard biopsy in the new era of prostate cancer Grade Grouping. We reviewed our prostate biopsy database evaluating men who underwent MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy with concurrent standard 12-core extended-sextant biopsy. Patient demographics and pathologic findings were reviewed. All patient biopsies were performed by 1 of 2 urologic oncologists. Tumors were given a Grade Group for each biopsy based on the core with the highest grade in each case. A total of 191 patients underwent MRI/US fusion-guided biopsy with concurrent 12-core extended sextant biopsy, with a cancer detection rate of 56%. The average number of biopsy cores obtained via the targeted approach was significantly less than those obtained by standard biopsy, 4.8 cores versus 12 cores, respectively, Pbiopsy, 41.4% and 49.2%, respectively, P=0.15. However, when comparing the 2 techniques, the degree of detection of ≥Grade Group 3 tumors significantly favored targeted biopsy over standard biopsy (P=0.009). MRI/US fusion-guided prostate biopsy is equivalent to the standard-of-care 12-core biopsy in terms of cancer detection and superior in detecting higher grade disease.

  12. Arcuate fasciculus laterality by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with language laterality by functional MRI in preadolescent children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu [Government Medical College Hospital, Department of Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India); Menon, Amitha C.; Thomas, Sanjeev V. [Sree Chitra, Thirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala (India); James, Jija S.; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan [SCTIMST, Department of Imaging Science and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum, Kerala (India)

    2015-03-01

    Language lateralization is unique to humans. Functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable the study of language areas and white matter fibers involved in language, respectively. The objective of this study was to correlate arcuate fasciculus (AF) laterality by diffusion tensor imaging with that by fMRI in preadolescent children which has not yet been reported. Ten children between 8 and 12 years were subjected to fMRI and DTI imaging using Siemens 1.5 T MRI. Two language fMRI paradigms - visual verb generation and word pair task - were used. Analysis was done using SPM8 software. In DTI, the fiber volume of the arcuate fasciculus (AFV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured. The fMRI Laterality Index (fMRI-LI) and DTI Laterality Index (DTI-LI) were calculated and their correlation assessed using the Pearson Correlation Index. Of ten children, mean age 10.6 years, eight showed left lateralization while bilateral language lateralization was seen in two. AFV by DTI was more on the left side in seven of the eight children who had left lateralization by fMRI. DTI could not trace the AF in one child. Of the two with bilateral language lateralization on fMRI, one showed larger AFV on the right side while the other did not show any asymmetry. There was a significant correlation (p < 0.02) between fMRI-LI and DTI-LI. Group mean of AFV by DTI was higher on the left side (2659.89 ± 654.75 mm{sup 3}) as compared to the right (1824.11 ± 582.81 mm{sup 3}) (p < 0.01). Like fMRI, DTI also reveals language laterality in children with a high degree of correlation between the two imaging modalities. (orig.)

  13. Enhancing motor network activity using real-time functional MRI neurofeedback of left premotor cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo Ferreira Marins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurofeedback by functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is a technique of potential therapeutic relevance that allows individuals to be aware of their own neurophysiological responses and to voluntarily modulate the activity of specific brain regions, such as the premotor cortex (PMC, important for motor recovery after brain injury. We investigated (i whether healthy human volunteers are able to up-regulate the activity of the left PMC during a right hand finger tapping motor imagery (MI task while receiving continuous fMRI-neurofeedback, and (ii whether successful modulation of brain activity influenced non-targeted motor control regions. During the MI task, participants of the neurofeedback group (NFB received ongoing visual feedback representing the level of fMRI responses within their left PMC. Control (CTL group participants were shown similar visual stimuli, but these were non-contingent on brain activity. Both groups showed equivalent levels of behavioral ratings on arousal and motor imagery, before and during the fMRI protocol. In the NFB, but not in CLT group, brain activation during the last run compared to the first run revealed increased activation in the left PMC. In addition, the NFB group showed increased activation in motor control regions extending beyond the left PMC target area, including the supplementary motor area, basal ganglia and cerebellum. Moreover, in the last run, the NFB group showed stronger activation in the left PMC/inferior frontal gyrus when compared to the CTL group. Our results indicate that modulation of PMC and associated motor control areas can be achieved during a single neurofeedback-fMRI session. These results contribute to a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms of MI-based neurofeedback training, with direct implications for rehabilitation strategies in severe brain disorders, such as stroke.

  14. Neural correlates of the popular music phenomenon: evidence from functional MRI and PET imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiaozhen [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Hangzhou (China); Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Zhang, Ying; Hou, Haifeng; Du, Fenglei; Wu, Shuang; Chen, Lin; Shen, Yehua; Chao, Fangfang; Zhang, Hong; Tian, Mei [Zhejiang University Medical PET Center, Hangzhou (China); Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Key Laboratory of Medical Molecular Imaging of Zhejiang Province, Hangzhou (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Chung, June-key [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Music can induce different emotions. However, its neural mechanism remains unknown. The aim of this study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and position emission tomography (PET) imaging for mapping of neural changes under the most popular music in healthy volunteers. Blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) fMRI and monoamine receptor PET imaging with {sup 11}C-N-methylspiperone ({sup 11}C-NMSP) were conducted under the popular music Gangnam Style and light music A Comme Amour in healthy subjects. PET and fMRI images were analyzed by using the Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM). Significantly increased fMRI BOLD signals were found in the bilateral superior temporal cortices, left cerebellum, left putamen and right thalamus cortex. Monoamine receptor availability was increased significantly in the left superior temporal gyrus and left putamen, but decreased in the bilateral superior occipital cortices under the Gangnam Style compared with the light music condition. Significant positive correlation was found between {sup 11}C-NMSP binding and fMRI BOLD signals in the left temporal cortex. Furthermore, increased {sup 11}C-NMSP binding in the left putamen was positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Popular music Gangnam Style can arouse pleasure experience and strong emotional response. The left putamen is positively correlated with the mood arousal level score under the Gangnam Style condition. Our results revealed characteristic patterns of brain activity associated with Gangnam Style, and may also provide more general insights into the music-induced emotional processing. (orig.)

  15. Dynamic Causal Modelling and physiological confounds: a functional MRI study of vagus nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyt, Sébastien; Picq, Chloé; Sinniger, Valérie; Clarençon, Didier; Bonaz, Bruno; David, Olivier

    2010-10-01

    Dynamic Causal Modelling (DCM) has been proposed to estimate neuronal connectivity from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) using a biophysical model that links synaptic activity to hemodynamic processes. However, it is well known that fMRI is sensitive not only to neuronal activity, but also to many other psychophysiological responses which may be task-related, such as changes in cardio-respiratory activity. They are not explicitly taken into account in the generative models of DCM and their effects on estimated neuronal connectivity are not known. The main goal of this study was to report the face validity of DCM in the presence of strong physiological confounds that presumably cannot be corrected for, using an fMRI experiment of vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) performed in rats. First, a simple simulation was used to evaluate the principled ability of DCM to recover directed connectivity in the presence of a confounding factor. Second, we tested the experimental validity using measures of the BOLD correlates of left 5Hz VNS. Because VNS mostly activates the central autonomic regulation system, fMRI signals were likely to represent both direct and indirect vascular responses to such activation. In addition to the inference of standard statistical parametric maps, DCM was thus used to estimate directed neural connectivity in a small brain network including the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS) known to receive vagal afferents. Though blood pressure changes may constitute a major physiological confound in this dataset, model comparison of DCMs still allowed the identification of the NTS as the input station of the VNS pathway to the brain. Our study indicates that current developments of DCM are robust to psychophysiological responses to some extent, but does not exclude the need to develop specific models of brain - body interactions within the DCM framework to better estimate neuronal connectivity from fMRI time series. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/165576367; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a populati

  17. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, J.W. van; Scuric, E.E.; Veluw, S.J. van; Caan, M.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. METHODS: We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a popula

  18. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a

  19. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 Tesla MRI: clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalen, J.W. van; Scuric, E.E.; Veluw, S.J. van; Caan, M.W.; Nederveen, A.J.; Biessels, G.J.; Gool, W.A. van; Richard, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. METHODS: We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a

  20. Cortical microinfarcts detected in vivo on 3 tesla MRI : Clinical and radiological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Dalen, Jan Willem; Scuric, Eva E M; Van Veluw, Susanne J.; Caan, Matthan W A; Nederveen, Aart J.; Biessels, Geert Jan; Van Gool, Willem A.; Richard, Edo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose-Cortical microinfarcts (CMIs) are a common postmortem finding associated with vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia. Recently, CMIs identified in vivo on 7 Tesla MRI also proved retraceable on 3 Tesla MRI. Methods-We evaluated CMIs on 3 Tesla MRI in a populati

  1. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy; Klinischer Einsatz der funktionellen MRT bei chronischer Epilepsie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K. [Krankenhaus Mara, Epilepsiezentrum Bethel, Abteilung fuer Magentresonanztomographie, Bielefeld (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [German] Die funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) wird im Rahmen der Epilepsiediagnostik vor epilepsiechirurgischen Eingriffen insbesondere zur Lateralisation von Sprache und Gedaechtnis und zur Lokalisation der Zentralregion eingesetzt, um den eloquenten Kortex von der epilepsieverursachenden, chirurgisch zugaenglichen Laesion abzugrenzen. Dabei ist die fMRT Teil einer Sequenz nichtinvasiver klinischer Tests (Anamnese, Anfall-Semiologie, neurologischer Status, interiktales und iktales EEG, strukturelles MRT, Video-EEG-Monitoring, Neuropsychologie). Das Ergebnis dieser Sequenz ist die Entscheidung fuer oder gegen einen

  2. Implementing Tumor Detection and Area Calculation in Mri Image of Human Brain Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil L. Bangare

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the research on Human Brain Tumor which uses the MRI imaging technique to capture the image. In this proposed work Brain Tumor area is calculated to define the Stage or level of seriousness of the tumor. Image Processing techniques are used for the brain tumor area calculation and Neural Network algorithms for the tumor position calculation. Also in the further advancement the classification of the tumor based on few parameters is also expected. Proposed work is divided in to following Modules: Module 1: Image Pre-Processing Module 2: Feature Extraction, Segmentation using K-Means Algorithm and Fuzzy C-Means Algorithm Module 3: Tumor Area calculation & Stage detection Module 4: Classification and position calculation of tumor using Neural Network

  3. Breast segmentation in MRI using Poisson surface reconstruction initialized with random forest edge detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, Anne L.; Gallego-Ortiz, Cristina; Lu, YingLi

    2016-03-01

    Segmentation of breast tissue in MRI images is an important pre-processing step for many applications. We present a new method that uses a random forest classifier to identify candidate edges in the image and then applies a Poisson reconstruction step to define a 3D surface based on the detected edge points. Using a leave one patient out cross validation we achieve a Dice overlap score of 0.96 +/- 0.02 for T1 weighted non-fat suppressed images in 8 patients. In a second dataset of 332 images acquired using a Dixon sequence, which was not used in training the random classifier, the mean Dice score was 0.90 +/- 0.03. Using this approach we have achieved accurate, robust segmentation results using a very small training set.

  4. Infinite Relational Modeling of Functional Connectivity in Resting State fMRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten; Madsen, Kristoffer H.; Dogonowski, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    of resting state as functional coherent groups we search for functional units of the brain that communicate with other parts of the brain in a coherent manner as measured by mutual information. We use the infinite relational model (IRM) to quantify functional coherent groups of resting state networks......Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be applied to study the functional connectivity of the neural elements which form complex network at a whole brain level. Most analyses of functional resting state networks (RSN) have been based on the analysis of correlation between the temporal...... dynamics of various regions of the brain. While these models can identify coherently behaving groups in terms of correlation they give little insight into how these groups interact. In this paper we take a different view on the analysis of functional resting state networks. Starting from the definition...

  5. Goal-Directed Modulation of Neural Memory Patterns: Implications for fMRI-Based Memory Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncapher, Melina R; Boyd-Meredith, J Tyler; Chow, Tiffany E; Rissman, Jesse; Wagner, Anthony D

    2015-06-03

    Remembering a past event elicits distributed neural patterns that can be distinguished from patterns elicited when encountering novel information. These differing patterns can be decoded with relatively high diagnostic accuracy for individual memories using multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA) of fMRI data. Brain-based memory detection--if valid and reliable--would have clear utility beyond the domain of cognitive neuroscience, in the realm of law, marketing, and beyond. However, a significant boundary condition on memory decoding validity may be the deployment of "countermeasures": strategies used to mask memory signals. Here we tested the vulnerability of fMRI-based memory detection to countermeasures, using a paradigm that bears resemblance to eyewitness identification. Participants were scanned while performing two tasks on previously studied and novel faces: (1) a standard recognition memory task; and (2) a task wherein they attempted to conceal their true memory state. Univariate analyses revealed that participants were able to strategically modulate neural responses, averaged across trials, in regions implicated in memory retrieval, including the hippocampus and angular gyrus. Moreover, regions associated with goal-directed shifts of attention and thought substitution supported memory concealment, and those associated with memory generation supported novelty concealment. Critically, whereas MVPA enabled reliable classification of memory states when participants reported memory truthfully, the ability to decode memory on individual trials was compromised, even reversing, during attempts to conceal memory. Together, these findings demonstrate that strategic goal states can be deployed to mask memory-related neural patterns and foil memory decoding technology, placing a significant boundary condition on their real-world utility.

  6. Detection of parenchymal abnormalities in experimentally induced acute pyelonephritis in rabbits using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, CT, and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jeong Ah; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kim, Seung Kwon; Seo, Jin Won [Dept. of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Sung [Laboratory Animal Research Center, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We evaluated the efficacy of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (CEUS) in detecting acute pyelonephritis (APN) using the rabbit kidney model and compared it with CT and MRI. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board. In a total of 20 New Zealand White rabbits, APN was induced experimentally. CEUS, CT, and MRI were performed on the first, third, and seventh postoperative days. After imaging studies, the subjects were sacrificed and the pathological diagnosis of APN was confirmed in each animal by a pathologist. Imaging studies were obtained in eight animals, including eight CEUS, four computed tomography (CT), and four magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images. CEUS depicted diffuse renal enlargement (7), diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement (6), and focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement (6). These findings were well correlated with the CT and MRI findings in five cases in which these studies were available. CT and MRI showed diffuse renal enlargement, diffuse heterogeneous parenchymal enhancement, focal areas of decreased parenchymal enhancement, focal contour bulging, and the finding of perinephric spread of infection. In a rabbit model, CEUS could depict the parenchymal lesions of APN similar to CT or MRI; however, it was limited in depicting the perinephric extension of inflammation.

  7. The predictive value of MRI in detecting thyroid gland invasion in patients with advanced laryngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peiliang; Huang, Xiaoming; Zheng, Chushan; Cai, Qian; Guan, Zhong; Liang, Faya; Zheng, Yiqing

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting thyroid gland invasion (TGI) in patients with advanced laryngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma. In a retrospective chart review, 41 patients with advanced laryngeal or hypopharyngeal carcinoma underwent MRI scan before total laryngectomy and ipsilateral or bilateral thyroidectomy during the past 5 years. The MRI findings were compared with the postoperative pathological results. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. Among the 41 patients, 3 had thyroid gland invasion in postoperative pathological results. MRI correctly predicted the absence of TGI in 37 of 38 patients and TGI in all 3 patients. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, and NPV of MRI were 100.0, 97.4, 75.0, and 100 %, respectively, with the diagnostic accuracy of 97.6 %. In consideration of the high negative predictive value of MRI, it may help surgeons selectively preserve thyroid gland in total laryngectomy and reduce the incidence of hypothyroidism and hypoparathyroidism postoperatively.

  8. High spatial resolution brain functional MRI using submillimeter balanced steady-state free precession acquisition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Pei-Hsin; Chung, Hsiao-Wen [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ping-Huei [Imaging Research Center, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan and Department of Medical Imaging, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 11031, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Long, E-mail: minglong.wu@csie.ncku.edu.tw [Institute of Medical Informatics, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan and Department of Computer Science and Information Engineering, National Cheng-Kung University, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chuang, Tzu-Chao [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 80424, Taiwan (China); Shih, Yi-Yu [Siemens Limited Healthcare Sector, Taipei 11503, Taiwan (China); Huang, Teng-Yi [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology, Taipei 10607, Taiwan (China)

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: One of the technical advantages of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is its precise localization of changes from neuronal activities. While current practice of fMRI acquisition at voxel size around 3 × 3 × 3 mm{sup 3} achieves satisfactory results in studies of basic brain functions, higher spatial resolution is required in order to resolve finer cortical structures. This study investigated spatial resolution effects on brain fMRI experiments using balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) imaging with 0.37 mm{sup 3} voxel volume at 3.0 T. Methods: In fMRI experiments, full and unilateral visual field 5 Hz flashing checkerboard stimulations were given to healthy subjects. The bSSFP imaging experiments were performed at three different frequency offsets to widen the coverage, with functional activations in the primary visual cortex analyzed using the general linear model. Variations of the spatial resolution were achieved by removing outerk-space data components. Results: Results show that a reduction in voxel volume from 3.44 × 3.44 × 2 mm{sup 3} to 0.43 × 0.43 × 2 mm{sup 3} has resulted in an increase of the functional activation signals from (7.7 ± 1.7)% to (20.9 ± 2.0)% at 3.0 T, despite of the threefold SNR decreases in the original images, leading to nearly invariant functional contrast-to-noise ratios (fCNR) even at high spatial resolution. Activation signals aligning nicely with gray matter sulci at high spatial resolution would, on the other hand, have possibly been mistaken as noise at low spatial resolution. Conclusions: It is concluded that the bSSFP sequence is a plausible technique for fMRI investigations at submillimeter voxel widths without compromising fCNR. The reduction of partial volume averaging with nonactivated brain tissues to retain fCNR is uniquely suitable for high spatial resolution applications such as the resolving of columnar organization in the brain.

  9. Cine-MRI versus two-dimensional echocardiography to measure in vivo left ventricular function in rat heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckey, Daniel J; Carr, Carolyn A; Tyler, Damian J; Clarke, Kieran

    2008-08-01

    Two-dimensional echocardiography is the most commonly used non-invasive method for measuring in vivo cardiac function in experimental animals. In humans, measurements of cardiac function made using cine-MRI compare favourably with those made using echocardiography. However, no rigorous comparison has been made in small animals. Here, standard short-axis two-dimensional (2D) echocardiography (2D-echo) and cine-MRI measurements were made in the same rats, both control and after chronic myocardial infarction. Correlations between the two techniques were found for end diastolic area, stroke area and ejection fraction, but cine-MRI measurements of ejection fraction were 12+/-6% higher than those made using 2D-echo, because of the 1.8-fold higher temporal resolution of the MRI technique (4.6 ms vs 8.3 ms). Repeated measurements on the same group of rats over several days showed that the cine-MRI technique was more reproducible than 2D-echo, in that 2D-echo would require five times more animals to find a statistically significant difference. In summary, caution should be exercised when comparing functional results acquired using short-axis 2D-echo vs cine-MRI. The accuracy of cine-MRI allows identification of alterations in heart function that may be missed when using 2D-echo.

  10. Motor association cortex activity in Parkinson`s disease. A functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Yukiko [Yamaguchi Univ., Ube (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the activation of motor association cortex using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in patients with Parkinson`s disease (PD) and control subjects during performed hand movements. There were 26 patients with PD (12 patients with Hoehn and Yahr stage I-II, 14 patients with stage III) and 8 control subjects. Functional imaging was performed using a 1.5 tesla MRI system equipped with a single-shot, echo-planar pulse sequence. The significant signal changes were observed within the primary sensorimotor area, the supplementary motor area (SMA), and the parietal association area in both PD and control subjects. In PD subjects, the SMA was less activated than in control subjects; there were significant differences in the number of pixels activated in SMA between control and Yahr III group (p<0.01), and between Yahr I-II and Yahr III group (p<0.01). Our results demonstrated that movement related cerebral activity in the SMA is reduced in PD subjects, consistent with previously published data using other methods. It is well known from anatomical studies that one of the major cortical outputs of the basal ganglia is the SMA. This may explain the hypoactivation of the SMA in PD. Studies using fMRI provide a promising method not only for localizing cortical activation related to voluntary movements but also for investigating pathophysiology of movement disorders. (author)

  11. Investigation of acupoint specificity by multivariate granger causality analysis from functional MRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuanyuan; Bai, Lijun; Zhang, Wensheng; Xue, Ting; Ren, Yanshuang; Zhong, Chongguang; Wang, Hu; You, Youbo; Liu, Zhenyu; Dai, Jianping; Liu, Yijun; Tian, Jie

    2011-07-01

    To investigate the acupoint specificity by exploring the effective connectivity patterns of the poststimulus resting brain networks modulated by acupuncture at the PC6, with the same meridian acupoint PC7 and different meridian acupoint GB37. The functional MRI (fMRI) study was performed in 36 healthy right-handed subjects receiving acupuncture at three acupoints, respectively. Due to the sustained effects of acupuncture, a novel experimental paradigm using the nonrepeated event-related (NRER) design was adopted. Psychophysical responses (deqi sensations) were also assessed. Finally, a newly multivariate Granger causality analysis (mGCA) was used to analyze effective connectivity patterns of the resting fMRI data taken following acupuncture at three acupoints. Following acupuncture at PC6, the red nucleus and substantia nigra emerged as central hubs, in comparison with the fusiform gyrus following acupuncture at GB37. Red nucleus was also a target following acupuncture at PC7, but with fewer inputs than those of PC6. In addition, the most important target following acupuncture at PC7 was located at the parahippocampus. Our findings demonstrated that acupuncture at different acupoints may exert heterogeneous modulatory effects on the causal interactions of brain areas during the poststimulus resting state. These preliminary findings provided a clue to elucidate the relatively function-oriented specificity of acupuncture effects. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Memory Deficits in Schizophrenia: A Selective Review of Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrienne C. Lahti

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a complex chronic mental illness that is characterized by positive, negative and cognitive symptoms. Cognitive deficits are most predictive of long-term outcomes, with abnormalities in memory being the most robust finding. The advent of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has allowed exploring neural correlates of memory deficits in vivo. In this article, we will give a selective review of fMRI studies probing brain regions and functional networks that are thought to be related to abnormal memory performance in two memory systems prominently affected in schizophrenia; working memory and episodic memory. We revisit the classic “hypofrontality” hypothesis of working memory deficits and explore evidence for frontotemporal dysconnectivity underlying episodic memory abnormalities. We conclude that fMRI studies of memory deficits in schizophrenia are far from universal. However, the current literature does suggest that alterations are not isolated to a few brain regions, but are characterized by abnormalities within large-scale brain networks.

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging-detected inflammation is associated with functional disability in early arthritis-results of a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgers, Leonie E; Nieuwenhuis, Wouter P; van Steenbergen, Hanna W; Newsum, Elize C; Huizinga, Tom W J; Reijnierse, Monique; le Cessie, Saskia; van der Helm-van Mil, Annette H M

    2016-12-01

    MRI sensitively detects inflammation, but the clinical relevance of MRI-detected inflammation is undetermined in early arthritis. Therefore, the aim of this cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between MRI-detected inflammation of hands and feet and functional disability in early arthritis. Five hundred and fourteen early arthritis patients, consecutively included in the Leiden Early Arthritis Clinic, were studied. At baseline a unilateral 1.5 T MRI of the wrist, MCP and MTP joints was performed and functional disability was measured using the HAQ. MRIs were scored for tenosynovitis, synovitis and bone marrow oedema (BME) by two readers. The sum of these types of MRI-detected inflammation yielded the total MRI-inflammation score. Linear and nonlinear regression analyses were performed with HAQ as outcome. The total MRI-inflammation score was associated with the HAQ score (β = 0.014, P < 0.001), as were tenosynovitis (β = 0.046, P < 0.001), synovitis (β = 0.039, P < 0.001) and bone marrow oedema scores (β = 0.015, P < 0.001) separately. Analysing these three types of MRI-detected inflammation in one multivariable model revealed that only tenosynovitis was independently associated with the HAQ score (β = 0.039, P < 0.001). Also after correction for age, gender, joint counts, CRP and auto-antibodies, this association remained significant (β = 0.034, P < 0.001). MRI-detected inflammation at wrists or MCP joints associated significantly with impairments in hand functioning (e.g. difficulties with opening milk cartons or jars). Exploring the relation between MRI-detected inflammation and HAQ scores showed no evidence of a floor effect, suggesting that even low scores of MRI-detected inflammation are functionally relevant. MRI-detected inflammation, and tenosynovitis in particular, is associated with functional disability. This demonstrates the functional relevance of MRI-detected inflammation in early arthritis. © The Author 2016. Published by

  14. Exploring the brain network: a review on resting-state fMRI functional connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2010-08-01

    Our brain is a network. It consists of spatially distributed, but functionally linked regions that continuously share information with each other. Interestingly, recent advances in the acquisition and analysis of functional neuroimaging data have catalyzed the exploration of functional connectivity in the human brain. Functional connectivity is defined as the temporal dependency of neuronal activation patterns of anatomically separated brain regions and in the past years an increasing body of neuroimaging studies has started to explore functional connectivity by measuring the level of co-activation of resting-state fMRI time-series between brain regions. These studies have revealed interesting new findings about the functional connections of specific brain regions and local networks, as well as important new insights in the overall organization of functional communication in the brain network. Here we present an overview of these new methods and discuss how they have led to new insights in core aspects of the human brain, providing an overview of these novel imaging techniques and their implication to neuroscience. We discuss the use of spontaneous resting-state fMRI in determining functional connectivity, discuss suggested origins of these signals, how functional connections tend to be related to structural connections in the brain network and how functional brain communication may form a key role in cognitive performance. Furthermore, we will discuss the upcoming field of examining functional connectivity patterns using graph theory, focusing on the overall organization of the functional brain network. Specifically, we will discuss the value of these new functional connectivity tools in examining believed connectivity diseases, like Alzheimer's disease, dementia, schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Methodological problems with clinical functional MRI investigations; Methodische Probleme klinischer funktioneller MRT-Untersuchungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foki, T.; Beisteiner, R. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien, AG Klinische fMRT, Universitaetsklinik fuer Neurologie, Exzellenzzentrum Hochfeld-MR, Wien (Austria)

    2010-02-15

    During presurgical diagnostics clinical functional magnetic resonance imaging is increasingly being performed to improve the management of epilepsy and tumor patients. Rapid technical developments in fMRI technology continuously further new diagnostic applications. Safe clinical application requires a profound and critical handling of the various methodological problems inherent with this complex technique. This article reviews relevant problems and solutions for patient investigations up to the preparation of an individual clinical fMRI report. (orig.) [German] Die klinische funktionelle Magnetresonanztomographie (fMRT) hat als individuelles Untersuchungsverfahren v. a. in der praeoperativen Diagnostik bei Epilepsie- und Tumorpatienten einen zunehmenden Stellenwert, da sie hier zu einer klinischen Entscheidung beitragen kann. Die rasche Entwicklung der fMRT-Technologie eroeffnet dabei kontinuierlich neue diagnostische Moeglichkeiten, erfordert aber auch einen kritischen Umgang mit den zahlreichen methodischen Problemen dieses komplexen Verfahrens. Dieser Artikel beschreibt patientenrelevante Probleme und Loesungsmoeglichkeiten von der Untersuchung bis zur Erstellung des individuellen fMRT-Befundes. (orig.)

  16. A Green's function approach to local rf heating in interventional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, C J; Atalar, E

    2001-05-01

    Current safety regulations for local radiofrequency (rf) heating, developed for externally positioned rf coils, may not be suitable for internal rf coils that are being increasingly used in interventional MRI. This work presents a two-step model for rf heating in an interventional MRI setting: (1) the spatial distribution of power in the sample from the rf pulse (Maxwell's equations); and (2) the transformation of that power to temperature change according to thermal conduction and tissue perfusion (tissue bioheat equation). The tissue bioheat equation is approximated as a linear, shift-invariant system in the case of local rf heating and is fully characterized by its Green's function. Expected temperature distributions are calculated by convolving (averaging) transmit coil specific absorption rate (SAR) distributions with the Green's function. When the input SAR distribution is relatively slowly varying in space, as is the case with excitation by external rf coils, the choice of averaging methods makes virtually no difference on the expected heating as measured by temperature change (deltaT). However, for highly localized SAR distributions, such as those encountered with internal coils in interventional MRI, the Green's function method predicts heating that is significantly different from the averaging method in current regulations. In our opinion, the Green's function method is a better predictor since it is based on a physiological model. The Green's function also elicits a time constant and scaling factor between SAR and deltaT that are both functions of the tissue perfusion rate. This emphasizes the critical importance of perfusion in the heating model. The assumptions made in this model are only valid for local rf heating and should not be applied to whole body heating.

  17. Bayesian Switching Factor Analysis for Estimating Time-varying Functional Connectivity in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghia, Jalil; Ryali, Srikanth; Chen, Tianwen; Supekar, Kaustubh; Cai, Weidong; Menon, Vinod

    2017-03-03

    There is growing interest in understanding the dynamical properties of functional interactions between distributed brain regions. However, robust estimation of temporal dynamics from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data remains challenging due to limitations in extant multivariate methods for modeling time-varying functional interactions between multiple brain areas. Here, we develop a Bayesian generative model for fMRI time-series within the framework of hidden Markov models (HMMs). The model is a dynamic variant of the static factor analysis model (Ghahramani and Beal, 2000). We refer to this model as Bayesian switching factor analysis (BSFA) as it integrates factor analysis into a generative HMM in a unified Bayesian framework. In BSFA, brain dynamic functional networks are represented by latent states which are learnt from the data. Crucially, BSFA is a generative model which estimates the temporal evolution of brain states and transition probabilities between states as a function of time. An attractive feature of BSFA is the automatic determination of the number of latent states via Bayesian model selection arising from penalization of excessively complex models. Key features of BSFA are validated using extensive simulations on carefully designed synthetic data. We further validate BSFA using fingerprint analysis of multisession resting-state fMRI data from the Human Connectome Project (HCP). Our results show that modeling temporal dependencies in the generative model of BSFA results in improved fingerprinting of individual participants. Finally, we apply BSFA to elucidate the dynamic functional organization of the salience, central-executive, and default mode networks-three core neurocognitive systems with central role in cognitive and affective information processing (Menon, 2011). Across two HCP sessions, we demonstrate a high level of dynamic interactions between these networks and determine that the salience network has the highest temporal

  18. An Optimized Clustering Approach for Automated Detection of White Matter Lesions in MRI Brain Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anitha

    2012-