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Sample records for functional mri detection

  1. Detection of focal epileptic activity using combined simultaneous electroencephalogram-functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhiqiang; Lu Guangming; Tian Lei; Sun Kanjian; Tan Qifu; Zhu Jianguo; Nie Cong; Hao Shaowei; Jiang Li; Liu Yijun

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To observe the brain activation of interictal epiletiform discharges (IEDs) and to localize the epileptogenic foci of epilepsy. Methods: The electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional MRI data of 12 focal epileptic patients were acquired using a combination of EEG and functional MRI simultaneously. The IEDs onset time detected with EEG were set as the time parameters in an event- related paradigm of functional MRI analysis. The spatial and temporal characters of IEDs activation were analyzed in detail. In order to confirm the consistency of this method, all patients were scanned repeatedly and the results were correlated with clinical evaluation. Results: Of the 12 patients, valid data from EEG- fMRI were obtained from 10 patients in a total of 18 sessions. Compared with the structural foci, the epileptic foci localization results of eleven sessions were good, five sessions were fairly good, and two sessions were poor. The results obtained from six patients in two separate sessions were concordant, respectively. Moreover, thalamic activation was detected in ten sessions, cerebellar activation was detected in all sessions, and the deactivation was found in the default mode loci in nine sessions. Conclusion: The method of performing EEG and fMRI simultaneously can potentially be a useful tool in epilepsy research. (authors)

  2. A SVM-based quantitative fMRI method for resting-state functional network detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaomu; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-09-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) aims to measure baseline neuronal connectivity independent of specific functional tasks and to capture changes in the connectivity due to neurological diseases. Most existing network detection methods rely on a fixed threshold to identify functionally connected voxels under the resting state. Due to fMRI non-stationarity, the threshold cannot adapt to variation of data characteristics across sessions and subjects, and generates unreliable mapping results. In this study, a new method is presented for resting-state fMRI data analysis. Specifically, the resting-state network mapping is formulated as an outlier detection process that is implemented using one-class support vector machine (SVM). The results are refined by using a spatial-feature domain prototype selection method and two-class SVM reclassification. The final decision on each voxel is made by comparing its probabilities of functionally connected and unconnected instead of a threshold. Multiple features for resting-state analysis were extracted and examined using an SVM-based feature selection method, and the most representative features were identified. The proposed method was evaluated using synthetic and experimental fMRI data. A comparison study was also performed with independent component analysis (ICA) and correlation analysis. The experimental results show that the proposed method can provide comparable or better network detection performance than ICA and correlation analysis. The method is potentially applicable to various resting-state quantitative fMRI studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Automatic detection of arterial input function in dynamic contrast enhanced MRI based on affinity propagation clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Liu, Wen; Fang, Kui; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Huang, Wenhua; King, Ann D; Heng, Pheng Ann; Ahuja, Anil T

    2014-05-01

    To automatically and robustly detect the arterial input function (AIF) with high detection accuracy and low computational cost in dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). In this study, we developed an automatic AIF detection method using an accelerated version (Fast-AP) of affinity propagation (AP) clustering. The validity of this Fast-AP-based method was proved on two DCE-MRI datasets, i.e., rat kidney and human head and neck. The detailed AIF detection performance of this proposed method was assessed in comparison with other clustering-based methods, namely original AP and K-means, as well as the manual AIF detection method. Both the automatic AP- and Fast-AP-based methods achieved satisfactory AIF detection accuracy, but the computational cost of Fast-AP could be reduced by 64.37-92.10% on rat dataset and 73.18-90.18% on human dataset compared with the cost of AP. The K-means yielded the lowest computational cost, but resulted in the lowest AIF detection accuracy. The experimental results demonstrated that both the AP- and Fast-AP-based methods were insensitive to the initialization of cluster centers, and had superior robustness compared with K-means method. The Fast-AP-based method enables automatic AIF detection with high accuracy and efficiency. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    including the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC-IV) for verbal and non-verbal intelligence; the Boston Naming Test , which evaluates a...demonstrated congruency between fMRI mappings and patient performance; 2) testing of the fMRI methods we developed for use in POMS patients was carried out...adaptive functional reorganization as a way to explain how some early-stage MS patients are able to perform well in clinical cognitive testing

  5. Does functional MRI detect activation in white matter? A review of emerging evidence, issues, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawryluk, Jodie R.; Mazerolle, Erin L.; D'Arcy, Ryan C. N.

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that allows for visualization of activated brain regions. Until recently, fMRI studies have focused on gray matter. There are two main reasons white matter fMRI remains controversial: (1) the blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI signal depends on cerebral blood flow and volume, which are lower in white matter than gray matter and (2) fMRI signal has been associated with post-synaptic potentials (mainly localized in gray matter) as opposed to action potentials (the primary type of neural activity in white matter). Despite these observations, there is no direct evidence against measuring fMRI activation in white matter and reports of fMRI activation in white matter continue to increase. The questions underlying white matter fMRI activation are important. White matter fMRI activation has the potential to greatly expand the breadth of brain connectivity research, as well as improve the assessment and diagnosis of white matter and connectivity disorders. The current review provides an overview of the motivation to investigate white matter fMRI activation, as well as the published evidence of this phenomenon. We speculate on possible neurophysiologic bases of white matter fMRI signals, and discuss potential explanations for why reports of white matter fMRI activation are relatively scarce. We end with a discussion of future basic and clinical research directions in the study of white matter fMRI. PMID:25152709

  6. Detection of Brain Reorganization in Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis Using Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    7.5 years). Pediatric temporal lobe epilepsy patients who undergo clinically-indicated Wada test and/or implantation of subdural electrodes with...cohort. 2.6. Validation of fMRI in temporal lobe epilepsy patients: The validation of passive language fMRI was carried out on patient cohort 1...made up of 15 pediatric-onset temporal lobe epilepsy surgical patients all of whom had some form of invasive mapping for comparisons against fMRI

  7. Research progress of functional MRI in depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Shenghui; Niu Guangming; Han Xiaodong; Qiao Pengfei

    2013-01-01

    The mood disorders of depression are associated with abnormalities of brain structure and function, and exploring their pathological mechanism has important significance for the choice of treatment and the curative effect evaluation. In recent years, the research of MRI on brain structure and function of depression has made great progress, especially in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). fMRI can detect the functional change in real time, and also can display the activity of brain and changes in the nerve pathways in patients with depression. This article summarizes the present research situation and progress of MRI in the diagnosis of depression. (authors)

  8. Impact of functional MRI data preprocessing pipeline on default-mode network detectability in patients with disorders of consciousness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian eAndronache

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging application of resting-state functional MRI is the study of patients with disorders of consciousness (DoC, where integrity of default-mode network (DMN activity is associated to the clinical level of preservation of consciousness. Due to the inherent inability to follow verbal instructions, arousal induced by scanning noise and postural pain, these patients tend to exhibit substantial levels of movement. This results in spurious, non-neural fluctuations of the blood-oxygen level-dependent (BOLD signal, which impair the evaluation of residual functional connectivity. Here, the effect of data preprocessing choices on the detectability of the DMN was systematically evaluated in a representative cohort of 30 clinically and etiologically heterogeneous DoC patients and 33 healthy controls. Starting from a standard preprocessing pipeline, additional steps were gradually inserted, namely band-pass filtering, removal of co-variance with the movement vectors, removal of co-variance with the global brain parenchyma signal, rejection of realignment outlier volumes and ventricle masking. Both independent-component analysis (ICA and seed-based analysis (SBA were performed, and DMN detectability was assessed quantitatively as well as visually. The results of the present study strongly show that the detection of DMN activity in the sub-optimal fMRI series acquired on DoC patients is contingent on the use of adequate filtering steps. ICA and SBA are differently affected but give convergent findings for high-grade preprocessing. We propose that future studies in this area should adopt the described preprocessing procedures as a minimum standard to reduce the probability of wrongly inferring that DMN activity is absent.

  9. Quality assurance in functional MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Thomas T; Glover, Gary H; Mueller, Bryon A

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has ben- efited greatly from improvements in MRI hardware and software. At the same time, fMRI researchers have pushed the technical limits of MRI systems and greatly in- fluenced the development of state-of-the-art systems...... consistent data throughout the course of a study, and consistent stability across time and sites is needed to allow data from different time periods or acquisition sites to be optimally integrated....

  10. Functional MRI of the kidneys

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jeff L.; Rusinek, Henry; Chandarana, Hersh; Lee, Vivian S.

    2013-01-01

    Renal function is characterized by different physiologic aspects, including perfusion, glomerular filtration, interstitial diffusion and tissue oxygenation. MRI shows great promise in assessing these renal tissue characteristics noninvasively. The last decade has witnessed a dramatic progress in MRI techniques for renal function assessment. This article briefly describes relevant renal anatomy and physiology, reviews the applications of functional MRI techniques for the diagnosis of renal dis...

  11. Lateralization effects on functional connectivity of the auditory network in patients with unilateral pulsatile tinnitus as detected by functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Han; Zhao, Pengfei; Liu, Zhaohui; Liu, Xuehuan; Ding, Heyu; Liu, Liheng; Wang, Guopeng; Xie, Jing; Zeng, Rong; Chen, Yuchen; Yang, Zhenghan; Gong, Shusheng; Wang, Zhenchang

    2018-02-02

    Unilateral pulsatile tinnitus (PT) was proved to be a kind of disease with brain functional abnormalities within and beyond the auditory network (AN). However, changes in patterns of the lateralization effects of PT are yet to be established. Relationship between the AN and other brain networks in PT patients is also a scientific question need to be answered. In this study, we recruited 23 left-sided, 23 right-sided PT (LSPT, RSPT) patients and 23 normal controls (NC). We combined applied independent component analysis and seed-based functional connectivity (FC) analysis to investigate alteration feature of the FC of the AN by using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI). Compared with NC, LSPT patients demonstrated disconnected FC within the AN on both sides. Disrupted network integrity between AN and several brain functional networks, including executive control network, self-perceptual network and the limbic network, was also demonstrated in LSPT patient group bilaterally. In contrast, compared with NC, RSPT demonstrated decreased FC within the AN on the left side, but significant increased FC within the AN on the right side (symptomatic side). Enhanced FC between AN and executive control network, self-perceptual network and limbic network was also found mainly on the right side in patients with RSPT. Positive FC between the auditory network and the limbic network may be a reason to explain why RSPT patients are willing to be in the clinic. Briefly, LSPT exhibit disrupted network integrity in brain functional networks. But RSPT is featured by enhanced FC within AN and between networks, especially on the right (symptomatic) side. Corroboration of featured FC helps to reveal the pathophysiological changing process of the brain in patients with PT, providing imaging-based biomarker to distinguish PT from other kind of tinnitus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  13. Comparative sensitivities of functional MRI sequences in detection of local recurrence of prostate carcinoma after radical prostatectomy or external-beam radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Catherine; Foudi, Fatah; Charton, Jeanne; Jung, Michel; Lang, Hervé; Saussine, Christian; Jacqmin, Didier

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the respective accuracies of three types of functional MRI sequences-diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI, and 3D (1)H-MR spectroscopy (MRS)-in the depiction of local prostate cancer recurrence after two different initial therapy options. From a cohort of 83 patients with suspicion of local recurrence based on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) kinetics who were imaged on a 3-T MRI unit using an identical protocol including the three functional sequences with an endorectal coil, we selected 60 patients (group A, 28 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy; group B, 32 patients who underwent external-beam radiation) who had local recurrence ascertained on the basis of a transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy results and a reduction in PSA level after salvage therapy. All patients presented with a local relapse. Sensitivity with T2-weighted MRI and 3D (1)H-MRS sequences was 57% and 53%, respectively, for group A and 71% and 78%, respectively, for group B. DCE-MRI alone showed a sensitivity of 100% and 96%, respectively, for groups A and B. DWI alone had a higher sensitivity for group B (96%) than for group A (71%). The combination of T2-weighted imaging plus DWI plus DCE-MRI provided a sensitivity as high as 100% in group B. The performance of functional imaging sequences for detecting recurrence is different after radical prostatectomy and external-beam radiotherapy. DCE-MRI is a valid and efficient tool to detect prostate cancer recurrence in radical prostatectomy as well as in external-beam radiotherapy. The combination of DCE-MRI and DWI is highly efficient after radiation therapy. Three-dimensional (1)H-MRS needs to be improved. Even though it is not accurate enough, T2-weighted imaging remains essential for the morphologic analysis of the area.

  14. Role of the precuneus in the detection of incongruency between tactile and visual texture information: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitada, Ryo; Sasaki, Akihiro T; Okamoto, Yuko; Kochiyama, Takanori; Sadato, Norihiro

    2014-11-01

    Visual clues as to the physical substance of manufactured objects can be misleading. For example, a plastic ring can appear to be made of gold. However, we can avoid misidentifying an object׳s substance by comparing visual and tactile information. As compared to the spatial properties of an object (e.g., orientation), however, little information regarding physical object properties (material properties) is shared between vision and touch. How can such different kinds of information be compared in the brain? One possibility is that the visuo-tactile comparison of material information is mediated by associations that are previously learned between the two modalities. Previous studies suggest that a cortical network involving the medial temporal lobe and precuneus plays a critical role in the retrieval of information from long-term memory. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test whether these brain regions are involved in the visuo-tactile comparison of material properties. The stimuli consisted of surfaces in which an oriented plastic bar was placed on a background texture. Twenty-two healthy participants determined whether the orientations of visually- and tactually-presented bar stimuli were congruent in the orientation conditions, and whether visually- and tactually-presented background textures were congruent in the texture conditions. The texture conditions revealed greater activation of the fusiform gyrus, medial temporal lobe and lateral prefrontal cortex compared with the orientation conditions. In the texture conditions, the precuneus showed greater response to incongruent stimuli than to congruent stimuli. This incongruency effect was greater for the texture conditions than for the orientation conditions. These results suggest that the precuneus is involved in detecting incongruency between tactile and visual texture information in concert with the medial temporal lobe, which is tightly linked with long-term memory. Copyright

  15. Clinical application of functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniwaki, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Described is the present state of clinical application of fMRI in the preoperative assessment of brain tumors, and plasticity in and pathophysiology of central diseases. For the tumor resection, fMRI is useful for risk assessment of postoperative nerve dysfunction, for selection of the patient rather suitable for brain mapping at the invasive surgery than at the pre-operation and for guidance of the operation itself. Preoperative fMRI alone can neither distinguish the regions of the primary and secondary functions nor exhibit the relation between the tumor and white matter fibers but there are compensatory means for these drawbacks. Benefit of preoperative fMRI has not yet been based on the evidence on double blind trials. Combination of fMRI imaging and electroencephalography (EEG) finding has shown that, in generalized epilepsy, extensive and stimulated activation occurs in both frontal/occipital regions and in thalamus area, respectively, and that the concomitant lowered activities are conceivably the reflection of burst discharge in normal brain functions. Plasticity in the human brain has been demonstrated by fMRI in cerebral vascular diseases, multiple sclerosis and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Pathogenesis of Parkinson disease and depression has been better understood by fMRI investigations revealing regions with elevated and reduced activities. Studies of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder have shown similar change of activities with functional reductions of the right dorsolateral frontal anterior area and of dorsal frontal cingulate gyrus, together with stimulated wider regions to given tasks. As above, fMRI has greatly contributed to our understanding of diseases of central nervous system and is to be expected to expand wider in this field. (T.T.)

  16. Adaptive Analysis of Functional MRI Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friman, Ola

    2003-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a recently developed neuro-imaging technique with capacity to map neural activity with high spatial precision. To locate active brain areas, the method utilizes local blood oxygenation changes which are reflected as small intensity changes in a special type of MR images. The ability to non-invasively map brain functions provides new opportunities to unravel the mysteries and advance the understanding of the human brain, as well as to perform pre-surgical examinations in order to optimize surgical interventions. This dissertation introduces new approaches for the analysis of fMRI data. The detection of active brain areas is a challenging problem due to high noise levels and artifacts present in the data. A fundamental tool in the developed methods is Canonical Correlation Analysis (CCA). CCA is used in two novel ways. First as a method with the ability to fully exploit the spatio-temporal nature of fMRI data for detecting active brain areas. Established analysis approaches mainly focus on the temporal dimension of the data and they are for this reason commonly referred to as being mass-univariate. The new CCA detection method encompasses and generalizes the traditional mass-univariate methods and can in this terminology be viewed as a mass-multivariate approach. The concept of spatial basis functions is introduced as a spatial counterpart of the temporal basis functions already in use in fMRI analysis. The spatial basis functions implicitly perform an adaptive spatial filtering of the fMRI images, which significantly improves detection performance. It is also shown how prior information can be incorporated into the analysis by imposing constraints on the temporal and spatial models and a constrained version of CCA is devised to this end. A general Principal Component Analysis technique for generating and constraining temporal and spatial subspace models is proposed to be used in combination with the constrained CCA

  17. Cerebral activity mapped by functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, R.; Danek, A.; Wu, R.H.; Berchtenbreiter, C.; Reiser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a method to noninvasively measure the changes in cerebral activation during sensitive, cognitive or motor activity. fMRI detects activity by subtraction of states of activity and rest. During activity the signal is increased presumably due to a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin in the capillary and venous structures. Using a full field visual stimulation by flashlight goggles, a signal increase of 3% was detected in the primary visual cortex (V1). Different sequences and postprocessing algorythms will be discussed. Data from the primary cortical areas suggest a high reproducability of the experiments. Successfull experiments highly depend on cooperation of subjects. Despite success in experiments fMRI still has to be established for clinical purposes. (orig.) [de

  18. Mandarin functional MRI Language paradigms

    OpenAIRE

    Ci, He; van Graan, Andre; Gonz?lvez, Gloria; Thompson, Pamela; Hill, Andrea; Duncan, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective The objective of this study was to implement convenient, fast, and accurate Mandarin task paradigms for functional MRI, and to locate the Chinese language functional areas in frontal and temporal lobes. Materials and Methods Nineteen healthy Chinese volunteers participated in this study, which utilized a block design with four language tasks: auditory naming (AN), picture naming (PN), verbal fluency?character (VFC), and verbal fluency?letter (VFL). All functional images wer...

  19. Distinct Neural Signatures Detected for ADHD Subtypes After Controlling for Micro-Movements in Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien eFair

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been growing enthusiasm that functional MRI could achieve clinical utility for a broad range of neuropsychiatric disorders. However, several barriers remain. For example, the acquisition of large-scale datasets capable of clarifying the marked heterogeneity that exists in psychiatric illnesses will need to be realized. In addition, there continues to be a need for the development of image processing and analysis methods capable of separating signal from artifact. As a prototypical hyperkinetic disorder, and movement related artifact being a significant confound in functional imaging studies, ADHD offers a unique challenge. As part of the ADHD-200 Global Competition and this special edition of Frontiers, the ADHD-200 Consortium demonstrates the utility of an aggregate dataset pooled across five institutions in addressing these challenges. The work aimed to A examine the impact of emerging techniques for controlling for micro-movements, and B provide novel insights into the neural correlates of ADHD subtypes. Using SVM based MVPA we show that functional connectivity patterns in individuals are capable of differentiating the two most prominent ADHD subtypes. The application of graph-theory revealed that the Combined (ADHD-C and Inattentive (ADHD-I subtypes demonstrated some overlapping (particularly sensorimotor systems, but unique patterns of atypical connectivity. For ADHD-C, atypical connectivity was prominent in midline default network components, as well as insular cortex; in contrast, the ADHD-I group exhibited atypical patterns within the dlPFC regions and cerebellum. Systematic motion-related artifact was noted, and highlighted the need for stringent motion correction. Findings reported were robust to the specific motion correction strategy employed. These data suggest that rs-fcMRI data can be used to characterize individual patients with ADHD and to identify neural distinctions underlying the clinical

  20. Characterization of image heterogeneity using 2D Minkowski functionals increases the sensitivity of detection of a targeted MRI contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canuto, Holly C; McLachlan, Charles; Kettunen, Mikko I; Velic, Marko; Krishnan, Anant S; Neves, Andre' A; de Backer, Maaike; Hu, D-E; Hobson, Michael P; Brindle, Kevin M

    2009-05-01

    A targeted Gd(3+)-based contrast agent has been developed that detects tumor cell death by binding to the phosphatidylserine (PS) exposed on the plasma membrane of dying cells. Although this agent has been used to detect tumor cell death in vivo, the differences in signal intensity between treated and untreated tumors was relatively small. As cell death is often spatially heterogeneous within tumors, we investigated whether an image analysis technique that parameterizes heterogeneity could be used to increase the sensitivity of detection of this targeted contrast agent. Two-dimensional (2D) Minkowski functionals (MFs) provided an automated and reliable method for parameterization of image heterogeneity, which does not require prior assumptions about the number of regions or features in the image, and were shown to increase the sensitivity of detection of the contrast agent as compared to simple signal intensity analysis. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Application of functional MRI in breast diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Yun; Liu Shiyuan; Wang Chenguang; Tao Xiaofeng; Wang Jinlin; Wang Jian

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of functional MRI in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of breast diseases. Methods: Sixty-five patients with 68 lesions were enrolled in this study. Conventional T 1 WI and T 2 WI scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI, diffusion weighted imaging and 1 H single voxel MR spectroscopy were performed consequently. All lesions were verified by pathology, including 4 cases of breast adenosis, 22 fibroadenomas, 2 chronic inflammations, 3 cysts, 33 infitrating ductal carcinomas, 1 intraductal carcinoma and 3 cystosarcoma phyllodes tumors. Morphological features, maximum enhancement ratio, time-intensity curve, apparent diffusion coefficient and Choline peak were analyzed. Results: The detection rates of T 1 WI and T 2 WI were 14.7% (n=10) and 51.5% (n=35). The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy of dynamic contrast enhanced MRI for the malignant tumor were 94. 6%, 71.4% and 76.5% respectively. Retrospective study showed that diffusion weighted imaging, with the b value from 800 s/mm 2 to 1000 s/mm 2 , could be used to differentiate various types of breast lesions. 1 H signal voxel spectroscopy had a sensitivity of 51.4%, specificity of 82.6%, and accuracy of 67.6% for the malignent. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy could reach 97.3%, 90.0% and 92.6% respectively by combining conventional scan, dynamic contrast enhanced MRI and MR spectroscopy. Conclusion: Functional MRI, with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy, can be used widely in the diagnosis of malignant breast lesions. (authors)

  2. Effective artifact removal in resting state fMRI data improves detection of DMN functional connectivity alteration in Alzheimer’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovica eGriffanti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Artefact removal from resting state fMRI data is an essential step for a better identification of the resting state networks and the evaluation of their functional connectivity (FC, especially in pathological conditions. There is growing interest in the development of cleaning procedures, especially those not requiring external recordings (data-driven, which are able to remove multiple sources of artefacts. It is important that only inter-subject variability due to the artefacts is removed, preserving the between-subject variability of interest - crucial in clinical applications using clinical scanners to discriminate different pathologies and monitor their staging. In Alzheimer’s disease (AD patients, decreased FC is usually observed in the posterior cingulate cortex within the default mode network (DMN, and this is becoming a possible biomarker for AD. The aim of this study was to compare four different data-driven cleaning procedures (regression of motion parameters; regression of motion parameters, mean white matter and cerebrospinal fluid signal; FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier –FIX- cleanup with soft and aggressive options on data acquired at 1.5T. The approaches were compared using data from 20 elderly healthy subjects and 21 AD patients in a mild stage, in terms of their impact on within-group consistency in FC and ability to detect the typical FC alteration of the DMN in AD patients. Despite an increased within-group consistency across subjects after applying any of the cleaning approaches, only after cleaning with FIX the expected DMN FC alteration in AD was detectable. Our study validates the efficacy of artefact removal even in a relatively small clinical population, and supports the importance of cleaning fMRI data for sensitive detection of FC alterations in a clinical environment.

  3. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhle, C. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Brossmann, J. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Melchert, U.H. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Schroeder, C. [Radiologische Abt., Universitaets-Kinderklinik, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, Kiel (Germany); Boer, R. de [Philips Medical Systems, Best (Netherlands); Spielmann, R.P. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany); Heller, M. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Univ. Kiel (Germany)

    1995-12-31

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  4. Functional MRI of the patellofemoral joint: comparison of ultrafast MRI, motion-triggered cine MRI and static MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhle, C.; Brossmann, J.; Melchert, U.H.; Schroeder, C.; Boer, R. de; Spielmann, R.P.; Heller, M.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility and usefulness of ultrafast MRI (u), patellar tracking from 30 of flexion to knee extension (0 ) was analysed and compared with motion-triggered cine MRI (m) and a static MRI technique (s). The different imaging methods were compared in respect of the patellofemoral relationship, the examination time and image quality. Eight healthy subjects and four patients (in total 18 joints) with patellar subluxation or luxation were examined. Significant differences between the static MRI series without quadriceps contraction and the functional MRI studies (motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI) were found for the patellar tilt angle. In the dynamic joint studies there was no statistical difference of the regression coefficients between the motion-triggered cine MRI studies and the ultrafast MRI studies. The findings of the functional MRI studies compared with the static MRI images were significantly different for the lateralisation of the patella, expressed by the lateral patellar displacement and bisect offset. No significant differences in patellar lateralisation were found between motion-triggered cine MRI and ultrafast MRI. Ultrafast MRI was superior to motion-triggered cine MRI in terms of the reduction in imaging time and improvement of the image quality. (orig.)

  5. Detection of angiogenesis-dependent parameters by functional MRI: Correlation between histomorphology and evaluation of clinical relevance as prognostic factor for the example of cervical carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawighorst, H.; Knopp, M.V.; Schoenberg, S.O.; Essig, M.; Kaick, G. van; Schaeffer, U.; Knapstein, P.G.; Weikel, W.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this study is to compare functional MRI parameters with histomorphological markers of tumor microvessel density (MVD) and permeability (vascular endothelial growth factor) and to determine the ultimate value of both approaches by correlation with disease outcome in patients with primary cancer of the uterine cervix. Method: Pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated from contrast-enhanced dynamic MR imaging series in 37 patients with biopsy-proven primary cervical cancer. On the operative whole mount specimens, histomorphological markers of tumor angiogenesis (MVD, VEGF) were compared with the MRI-derived parameters. For MRI and histomorphological data, Kaplan-Meier survival curves were calculated and compared using logrank statistics. Results: Significant (p [de

  6. Functional MRI of Multilingual Subjects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Jae Min; Ryoo, Jae Wook; Choi, Dae Seob; Shin, Tae Beom; Chung, Sung Hoon; Kim, Ji Eun; Han, Heon; Kim, Sam Soo; Jeon, Yong Hwan

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate brain activation areas during the processing of languages in multilingual volunteers by functional MRI and to examine the differences between the mother and foreign languages. Nine multilingual (Korean, French, and English speaking) Korean individuals were enrolled in this study. Functional images were acquired during a lexical decision task (LDT) and picture naming task (PNT) in each of the Korean, French and English languages. The areas activated were analyzed topographically in each language and task, and compared between languages. Activation was noted in Broca's area, supramarginal gyrus, fusiform gyrus during the LDT. During the PNT, activation was noted in Broca's area, left prefrontal area, cerebellum, right extrastriated cortex. While Broca's area activation was observed for all languages during LDT, there was more activation in Broca's area and additional activation in the right prefrontal area with foreign languages. During the PNT, there was more activation in the left prefrontal area with foreign languages. Broca's area, which is known as a major language region, was activated by all languages and tasks. The brain activation areas were largely overlapping with the mother and foreign languages. However, there were wider areas of activation and additional different activation areas with foreign languages. These results suggest more cerebral effort during foreign language processing

  7. Activation Detection in fMRI Using Jeffrey Divergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghouane, Abd-Krim

    2009-12-01

    A statistical test for detecting activated pixels in functional MRI (fMRI) data is proposed. For the derivation of this test, the fMRI time series measured at each voxel is modeled as the sum of a response signal which arises due to the experimentally controlled activation-baseline pattern, a nuisance component representing effects of no interest, and Gaussian white noise. The test is based on comparing the dimension of the voxels fMRI time series fitted data models with and without controlled activation-baseline pattern. The Jeffrey divergence is used for this comparison. The test has the advantage of not requiring a level of significance or a threshold to be provided.

  8. MRI in Optic Neuritis: Structure, Function, Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglø, Dan

    2011-01-01

    resonance imaging (MRI), and the visual evoked potential (VEP) continues to show a delayed P100 indicating persistent demyelination. The explanation for this apparent discrepancy between structure and function could be due to either a redundancy in the visual pathways so that some degree of signal loss...... will have very few or no clinical symptoms, or it could be due to compensatory mechanisms in the visual pathway or the visual cortex. In order to understand the pathophysiology and recovery processes in ON it is essential to have sensitive methods to asses both structure and function. These methods...... are low. Functional MRI (fMRI) is a non-invasive technique that can measure brain activity with a high spatial resolution. Recently, technical and methodological advancements have made it feasible to record VEPs and fMRI simultaneously and the relationship between averaged VEPs and averaged fMRI signals...

  9. Fast and direct detection of neuronal activation with diffusion MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bihan, D.; Urayama, S.; Aso, T.; Hanakawa, T.; Fukuyama, H.

    2006-01-01

    Over the last 30 years functional neuroimaging has emerged as a revolutionary path to study the brain and the mind. This has been possible because of significant advances mainly in two imaging modalities, namely Positron Emission Tomograph y (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Amazingly, although those two modalities are based on radically different physical approaches (detection of 1 3 radioactivity for the first one and nuclear magnetization for the second), both allo w brain activation images to be obtained through measurements involving water molecules. So far, PET and MRI functional imaging have relied on the same principle that neuronal activation and blood flow are coupled through metabolism: Blood flow increases locally in activated brain regions. In the case of PET one uses H 2 O radioactive water which is produced by using a cyclotron and injected to the subject vasculature. In activated brain regions the increase in blood flow leads to a local increase in the tissue radioactive water content detected and localized by the PE T camera. With MRI the hydrogen nuclei of brain endogenous water molecules are magnetized by a strong external magnetic field. In activated regions the increase in blood flow results in an increase of blood oxygenation which induces a slight perturbation of the magnetization relaxation properties of the water molecules around blood vessels detected by the MRI scanner (so called 'BOLD' effect). I n both approaches water is, thus, merely an indirect means to look at changes in cerebral blood flow which accompany brain activation, and although PET and BOLD f MRI have been extremely successful for the functional neuroimaging community, present well known limitations. While the coupling between neuronal activation, metabolism and blood flow has been verified in most instances including BOLD f MRI, the degree and the mechanism of coupling remains largely debated (Magistratt, Pellerin, Mangia) and may fail in some pathological

  10. Brain activation studies with PET and functional MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu [Fukui Medical Univ., Matsuoka (Japan). Biomedical Imaging Research Center; Sadato, Norihiro [Okazaki National Research Inst., Aichi (Japan). National Inst. for Physiological Sciences

    2002-01-01

    Application of PET and functional MRI in brain activation studies is reviewed. 3D-PET images obtained repeatedly after intravenous injection of about 370 MBq of H{sub 2}{sup 15}O can detect a faint blood flow change in the brain. Functional MRI can also detect the blood flow change in the brain due to blood oxygen level-dependent effect. Echo-planar imaging is popular in MRI with 1.5 or 3 T. Images are analyzed by statistical parametric mapping with correction of cerebral regions, anatomical normalization and statistics. PET data give the blood flow change by the H{sub 2}{sup 15}O incorporation into the brain and MRI data, by the scarce tissue oxygen consumption despite the change. Actual images during the cognition task-performance and of frequent artifacts are given. PET is suitable for studies of brain functions like sensibility and emotion and functional MRI, like cortex functions and clinical practices in identification of functional regions prior to surgery and evaluation of functional recovery of damaged brain. (K.H.)

  11. Brain activation studies with PET and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yonekura, Yoshiharu; Sadato, Norihiro

    2002-01-01

    Application of PET and functional MRI in brain activation studies is reviewed. 3D-PET images obtained repeatedly after intravenous injection of about 370 MBq of H 2 15 O can detect a faint blood flow change in the brain. Functional MRI can also detect the blood flow change in the brain due to blood oxygen level-dependent effect. Echo-planar imaging is popular in MRI with 1.5 or 3 T. Images are analyzed by statistical parametric mapping with correction of cerebral regions, anatomical normalization and statistics. PET data give the blood flow change by the H 2 15 O incorporation into the brain and MRI data, by the scarce tissue oxygen consumption despite the change. Actual images during the cognition task-performance and of frequent artifacts are given. PET is suitable for studies of brain functions like sensibility and emotion and functional MRI, like cortex functions and clinical practices in identification of functional regions prior to surgery and evaluation of functional recovery of damaged brain. (K.H.)

  12. Stress cine MRI for detection of coronary artery disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Hofer, U.; Schild, H.

    2002-01-01

    Stress testing is the cornerstone in the diagnosis of patients with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD). Stress echocardiography has become a well-established modality for the detection of ischemia-induced wall motion abnormalities. However, display and reliable interpretation of stress echocardiography studies are user-dependent, the test reproducibility is low, and 10 to 15% of patients yield suboptimal or non-diagnostic images. Due to its high spatial and contrast resolution, MRI is known to permit an accurate determination of left ventricular function and wall thickness at rest. Early stress MRI studies provided promising results with respect to the detection of CAD. However, the clinical impact was limited due to long imaging time and problematic patient monitoring in the MRI environment. Recent technical improvements - namely ultrafast MR image acquisition - led to a significant reduction of imaging time and improved patient safety. Stress can be induced by physical exercise or pharmacologically by administration of a beta 1 -agonist (dobutamine) or vasodilatator (dipyridamole and adenosine). The best developed and most promising stress MRI technique is a high-dose dobutamine/atropine stress protocol (10, 20, 30, 40 μg/kg/min; optionally 0.25-mg fractions of atropine up to maximal dose 1 mg). Severe complications (myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation and sustained tachycardia, cardiogenic shock) may be expected in 0.25% of patients. Currently, data of three high-dose dobutamine stress MRI studies are available, revealing a good sensitivity (83 - 87%) and specificity (83 - 86%) in the assessment of CAD. The direct comparison between echocardiography and MRI for the detection of stress-induced wall motion abnormalities yielded better results for dobutamine-MRI in terms of sensitivity (86.2% vs. 74.3%; p [de

  13. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito

    1991-01-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author)

  14. Asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage detected by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Yumi; Ohsuga, Hitoshi; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Shinohara, Yukito [Tokai Univ., Isehara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1991-03-01

    Detection of previous cerebral infarction on CT films of patients with no history of stroke is a common occurrence. The incidence of silent cerebral infarction was reported to be about 10 to 11 percent, but very few reports concerning asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage available. However, recent clinical application of MRI has resulted in the detection of old asymptomatic hemorrhage in patients with no history known stroke-like episodes. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the incidence, the cause and the character of the asymptomatic cerebral hemorrhage among patients who had undergone MRI examinations. From September 1987 through June 1990, 2757 patients have undergone 3474 MR scans of the brain with 1.0 Tesla Siemens Magneton unit in our hospital. Seventeen patients showed no clinical signs or symptoms suggesting a stroke episode corresponding to the detected hemorrhagic lesion. The 17 patients corresponded to 0.6% of the patients who underwent MRI, 1.5% of the patients with cerebrovascular disease and 9.5% of the patients with intracerebral hemorrhage(ICH), which was rather higher than expected. Among the 17 patients, 12 were diagnosed as primary ICH and 5 as secondary ICH. Most of the primary asymptomatic hemorrhage were hypertensive ones and slit-like curvilinear lesions between the putamen and claustrum or external capsule. The secondary asymptomatic hemorrhage were due to AVM and angiomas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and pons. (author).

  15. Multicentre structural and functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Gountouna, Viktoria-Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Neuroimaging techniques are likely to continue to improve our understanding of the brain in health and disease, but studies tend to be small, based in one imaging centre and of uncertain generalisability. Multicentre imaging studies therefore have great appeal but it is not yet clear under which circumstances data from different scanners can be combined. The successful harmonisation of multiple Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) machines will increase study power, flexibility and...

  16. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabeth eJonckers; Disha eShah; Julie eHamaide; Marleen eVerhoye; Annemie eVan Der Linden

    2015-01-01

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI), stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI), and pharmacological MRI (phMRI). Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimu...

  17. Methodological principles for optimising functional MRI experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, T.; Giesel, F.L.; Strasburger, H.

    2005-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the most common methods for localising neuronal activity in the brain. Even though the sensitivity of fMRI is comparatively low, the optimisation of certain experimental parameters allows obtaining reliable results. In this article, approaches for optimising the experimental design, imaging parameters and analytic strategies will be discussed. Clinical neuroscientists and interested physicians will receive practical rules of thumb for improving the efficiency of brain imaging experiments. (orig.) [de

  18. Development of functional MRI in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Shao Guoliang

    2013-01-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in digestive tract functional MRI can represent the functional changes of the tumor. DWI not only provides a new way to diagnosis the gastric cancer, but also reflect the pathology changes of the tumor, which has great value to predict the therapeutic effect and prognosis of the tumor. MRS is the only method to test the chemical composition of tissues in live without injury, which has great value in the early diagnosis of gastric tumor and in the research of tumor mechanism. This review is mainly focused on the status and development of functional MRI in gastric cancer. (authors)

  19. MRI to assess renal structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artunc, Ferruh; Rossi, Cristina; Boss, Andreas

    2011-11-01

    In addition to excellent anatomical depiction, MRI techniques have expanded to study functional aspects of renal physiology, such as renal perfusion, glomerular filtration rate (GFR) or tissue oxygenation. This review will focus on current developments with an emphasis on clinical applicability. The method of GFR determination is largely heterogeneous and still has weaknesses. However, the technique of employing liver disappearance curves has been shown to be accurate in healthy persons and patients with chronic kidney disease. In potential kidney donors, complete evaluation of kidney anatomy and function can be accomplished in a single-stop investigation. Techniques without contrast media can be utilized to measure renal tissue oxygenation (blood oxygen level-dependent MRI) or perfusion (arterial spin labeling) and could aid in the diagnosis and treatment of ischemic renal diseases, such as renal artery stenosis. Diffusion imaging techniques may provide information on spatially restricted water diffusion and tumor cellularity. Functional MRI opens new horizons in studying renal physiology and pathophysiology in vivo. Although extensively utilized in research, labor-intensive postprocessing and lack of standardization currently limit the clinical applicability of functional MRI. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the clinical value of functional magnetic resonance techniques for early discovery and characterization of kidney disease.

  20. Extraction of temporal information in functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Sungkarat, W.; Jeong, Jeong-Won; Zhou, Yongxia

    2002-10-01

    The temporal resolution of functional MRI (fMRI) is limited by the shape of the haemodynamic response function (hrf) and the vascular architecture underlying the activated regions. Typically, the temporal resolution of fMRI is on the order of 1 s. We have developed a new data processing approach to extract temporal information on a pixel-by-pixel basis at the level of 100 ms from fMRI data. Instead of correlating or fitting the time-course of each pixel to a single reference function, which is the common practice in fMRI, we correlate each pixel's time-course to a series of reference functions that are shifted with respect to each other by 100 ms. The reference function yielding the highest correlation coefficient for a pixel is then used as a time marker for that pixel. A Monte Carlo simulation and experimental study of this approach were performed to estimate the temporal resolution as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in the time-course of a pixel. Assuming a known and stationary hrf, the simulation and experimental studies suggest a lower limit in the temporal resolution of approximately 100 ms at an SNR of 3. The multireference function approach was also applied to extract timing information from an event-related motor movement study where the subjects flexed a finger on cue. The event was repeated 19 times with the event's presentation staggered to yield an approximately 100-ms temporal sampling of the haemodynamic response over the entire presentation cycle. The timing differences among different regions of the brain activated by the motor task were clearly visualized and quantified by this method. The results suggest that it is possible to achieve a temporal resolution of /spl sim/200 ms in practice with this approach.

  1. Methodology for functional MRI of simulated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Karen; Schweizer, Tom A; Tam, Fred; Graham, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    The developed world faces major socioeconomic and medical challenges associated with motor vehicle accidents caused by risky driving. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of individuals using virtual reality driving simulators may provide an important research tool to assess driving safety, based on brain activity and behavior. A fMRI-compatible driving simulator was developed and evaluated in the context of straight driving, turning, and stopping in 16 young healthy adults. Robust maps of brain activity were obtained, including activation of the primary motor cortex, cerebellum, visual cortex, and parietal lobe, with limited head motion (driving is a feasible undertaking.

  2. Functional Imaging: CT and MRI

    OpenAIRE

    van Beek, Edwin JR; Hoffman, Eric A

    2008-01-01

    Numerous imaging techniques permit evaluation of regional pulmonary function. Contrast-enhanced CT methods now allow assessment of vasculature and lung perfusion. Techniques using spirometric controlled MDCT allow for quantification of presence and distribution of parenchymal and airway pathology, Xenon gas can be employed to assess regional ventilation of the lungs and rapid bolus injections of iodinated contrast agent can provide quantitative measure of regional parenchymal perfusion. Advan...

  3. Neuro-pharmacological functional MRI of epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiriyama, Hideki; Makabe, Tetsuo; Tomita, Susumu; Omoto, Takashi; Asari, Shoji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Aihara, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Ito, Takahiko

    2000-03-01

    We studied patients with epilepsy by neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam. Five normal volunteers and 7 patients with epilepsy were investigated. MRI was performed by a 1.5 T unit (SIGNA Horizon, GE) using the following parameters: TR/TE 5000 msec/80 msec, FA 90 deg, FOV 200 mm, matrix 128 x 128, slice thickness 7 mm. We performed MRI scanning over 5 minutes (2 minutes before and 3 minutes after injection of diazepam) for each 1 session; we scanned 3 sessions for each patient at intervals of 5 minutes. The diazepam was injected rapidly from the antecubital vein. The dose of diazepam was 0.05 mg/kg/injection (total dose was 0.15 mg/kg). The data were analyzed statistically using t-test. Signal change after administration of diazepam was less than 1 to 2% in healthy volunteers. By contrast, in patient with epilepsy, the signal change was almost 3%, which was significantly greater than that of the normal area (p=0.01). The neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam might be a useful method to identify epileptic foci. (author)

  4. Neuro-pharmacological functional MRI of epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriyama, Hideki; Makabe, Tetsuo; Tomita, Susumu; Omoto, Takashi; Asari, Shoji; Aihara, Hiroshi; Kinugasa, Kazushi; Nishimoto, Akira; Ito, Takahiko

    2000-01-01

    We studied patients with epilepsy by neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam. Five normal volunteers and 7 patients with epilepsy were investigated. MRI was performed by a 1.5 T unit (SIGNA Horizon, GE) using the following parameters: TR/TE 5000 msec/80 msec, FA 90 deg, FOV 200 mm, matrix 128 x 128, slice thickness 7 mm. We performed MRI scanning over 5 minutes (2 minutes before and 3 minutes after injection of diazepam) for each 1 session; we scanned 3 sessions for each patient at intervals of 5 minutes. The diazepam was injected rapidly from the antecubital vein. The dose of diazepam was 0.05 mg/kg/injection (total dose was 0.15 mg/kg). The data were analyzed statistically using t-test. Signal change after administration of diazepam was less than 1 to 2% in healthy volunteers. By contrast, in patient with epilepsy, the signal change was almost 3%, which was significantly greater than that of the normal area (p=0.01). The neuro-pharmacological functional MRI technique using diazepam might be a useful method to identify epileptic foci. (author)

  5. Clinical functional MRI. Persurgical functional neuroimaging. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stippich, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The second, revised edition of this successful textbook provides an up-to-date description of the use of preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of practical aspects, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, and diagnostic possibilities and limitations. Relevant information on brain physiology, functional neuroanatomy, imaging technique, and methodology is provided by recognized experts in these fields. Compared with the first edition, chapters have been updated to reflect the latest developments and in particular the current use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Entirely new chapters are included on resting-state presurgical fMRI and the role of DTI and tractography in brain tumor surgery. Further chapters address multimodality functional neuroimaging, brain plasticity, and pitfalls, tips, and tricks.

  6. Clinical functional MRI. Persurgical functional neuroimaging. 2. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stippich, Christoph (ed.) [Univ. Hospitals Basel (Switzerland). Division of Diagnostic and Inventional Neuroradiology

    2015-06-01

    The second, revised edition of this successful textbook provides an up-to-date description of the use of preoperative fMRI in patients with brain tumors and epilepsies. State of the art fMRI procedures are presented, with detailed consideration of practical aspects, imaging and data processing, normal and pathological findings, and diagnostic possibilities and limitations. Relevant information on brain physiology, functional neuroanatomy, imaging technique, and methodology is provided by recognized experts in these fields. Compared with the first edition, chapters have been updated to reflect the latest developments and in particular the current use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and resting-state fMRI. Entirely new chapters are included on resting-state presurgical fMRI and the role of DTI and tractography in brain tumor surgery. Further chapters address multimodality functional neuroimaging, brain plasticity, and pitfalls, tips, and tricks.

  7. Functional Proton MRI in Emphysematous Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Andrea; Tibiletti, Marta; Kjørstad, Åsmund; Birk, Gerald; Schad, Lothar R; Stierstorfer, Birgit; Stiller, Detlef; Rasche, Volker

    2015-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of proton magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation-related maps in rodents for the evaluation of lung function in the presence of pancreatic porcine elastase (PPE)-induced emphysema. Twelve rats were equally divided into 3 groups: group 1 (no administration of PPE); group 2 (PPE selectively only in the left lung); and group 3 (PPE administered in both lungs). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomographic (CT) data were acquired at baseline, at 2 weeks and 4 weeks after administration, after which the animals were euthanized. The MRI protocol comprised a golden angle 2-dimensional ultrashort echo time MRI sequence [echo time, 0.343 millisecond (ms); repetition time, 120 ms; 12 slides with thickness, 1 mm; acquisition time, 30 minutes], from which inspiration and expiration images were reconstructed after the extraction of a self-gating signal. Inspiration images were registered to images at expiration, and expansion maps were created by calculating the specific difference in signal intensity. The lungs were segmented, and the mean specific expansion (MSE) calculated as an established surrogate for fractional ventilation. Computed tomographic data provided lung density (peak of the Hounsfield unit histogram, HU_P), whereas histology provided the mean linear intercept for each lung. Two weeks after administration, the control group had a mean MSE in both lungs corresponding to 96% of the baseline. Group 2 had 85% of the baseline, and group 3 had 57%. Considering the PPE-treated lungs alone, a significant reduction in MSE of 27% at 2 weeks and 40% at 4 weeks was found with respect to nontreated lungs. Significant correlations between HU_P and MSE were found at all time points (baseline: r = 0.606, P = 0.0017; 2 weeks: r = 0.837, P ≤ 0.0001; 4 weeks: r = 0.765, P Mean linear intercept values significantly correlated both with MRI MSE (r = -0.770, P The calculated ventilation-related maps showed a reduction of function in

  8. Prediction of clinical depression scores and detection of changes in whole-brain using resting-state functional MRI data with partial least squares regression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosuke Yoshida

    Full Text Available In diagnostic applications of statistical machine learning methods to brain imaging data, common problems include data high-dimensionality and co-linearity, which often cause over-fitting and instability. To overcome these problems, we applied partial least squares (PLS regression to resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI data, creating a low-dimensional representation that relates symptoms to brain activity and that predicts clinical measures. Our experimental results, based upon data from clinically depressed patients and healthy controls, demonstrated that PLS and its kernel variants provided significantly better prediction of clinical measures than ordinary linear regression. Subsequent classification using predicted clinical scores distinguished depressed patients from healthy controls with 80% accuracy. Moreover, loading vectors for latent variables enabled us to identify brain regions relevant to depression, including the default mode network, the right superior frontal gyrus, and the superior motor area.

  9. Fast and direct detection of neuronal activation with diffusion MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Bihan, D. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot (CEA/DSV/DRM), Lab. Anatomical and Functional Neuroimaging, 91 - Orsay (France); Urayama, S.; Aso, T.; Hanakawa, T.; Fukuyama, H. [Kyoto Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Human Brain Research Center, Kyoto (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    Over the last 30 years functional neuroimaging has emerged as a revolutionary path to study the brain and the mind. This has been possible because of significant advances mainly in two imaging modalities, namely Positron Emission Tomograph y (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Amazingly, although those two modalities are based on radically different physical approaches (detection of 1 3 radioactivity for the first one and nuclear magnetization for the second), both allo w brain activation images to be obtained through measurements involving water molecules. So far, PET and MRI functional imaging have relied on the same principle that neuronal activation and blood flow are coupled through metabolism: Blood flow increases locally in activated brain regions. In the case of PET one uses H{sub 2}O radioactive water which is produced by using a cyclotron and injected to the subject vasculature. In activated brain regions the increase in blood flow leads to a local increase in the tissue radioactive water content detected and localized by the PE T camera. With MRI the hydrogen nuclei of brain endogenous water molecules are magnetized by a strong external magnetic field. In activated regions the increase in blood flow results in an increase of blood oxygenation which induces a slight perturbation of the magnetization relaxation properties of the water molecules around blood vessels detected by the MRI scanner (so called 'BOLD' effect). I n both approaches water is, thus, merely an indirect means to look at changes in cerebral blood flow which accompany brain activation, and although PET and BOLD f MRI have been extremely successful for the functional neuroimaging community, present well known limitations. While the coupling between neuronal activation, metabolism and blood flow has been verified in most instances including BOLD f MRI, the degree and the mechanism of coupling remains largely debated (Magistratt, Pellerin, Mangia) and may fail in some

  10. Evaluation of various somatosensory stimulations for functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Kazushi; Nakasato, Nobukazu; Mizoi, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Takashi; Shimizu, Hiroaki.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study was to test detectability of activated area using various somatosensory stimulations. The following stimulations were performed in normal volunteers: regular or irregular electrical median nerve stimulation (n=5, each), tactile stimulation to the palm and fingers (n=8), pain stimulation to the index finger (n=5) or to the palm and fingers (n=5). fMRI was acquired with a spoiled gradient echo sequence at 1.5 T. Detectability of activated area was the highest when the pain stimulation was applied to the palm and fingers (80%). A successful rate for the tactile stimulation was 25%, and the other stimulations failed to demonstrate any activation. When successful, the highest signal activation on fMRI was seen on a sulcus, which presumably arose from a vein. The sulcus was defined as the central sulcus by somatosensory evoked field using a median nerve stimulation. Our study indicates that the pain stimulation to the palm and fingers may be a choice for the sensory fMRI. (author)

  11. Functional MRI for planning in neurosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erb, M.; Saur, R.

    2007-01-01

    Beside structural images from CT and MR, functional data about localization of brain activations with different tasks becomes more and more important for presurgical planning. With this method, it's possible to depict mainly primary sensory and motoric areas, but also higher functions like speech and memory. To judge this information adequately, one has to be aware of the variability of activation pattern dependent on chosen threshold. Especially, the absence of such activation at a given location does not necessary mean that this area has no function. The reliability of a measurement strongly depends on efficiency of experimental design and cooperation of the patient. Therefore, short and easy tasks which can be performed in a block design should be preferred. Information about localization of functions determined by fMRI can mainly be used for presurgical planning. Intraoperative usage in the navigation system is problematic due to the brain shift. Therefore, intraoperative imaging together with dynamic adaptation using nonlinear deformation algorithms may improve the value of fMRI in the future. (orig.)

  12. Imaging tools to study pharmacology: functional MRI on small rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eJonckers

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI, stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI, and pharmacological MRI (phMRI. Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sensory stimulation and/or a pharmacological challenge. The first part of this review describes the physiological basis of BOLD fMRI and the hemodynamic response on which the MRI contrast is based. Specific emphasis goes to possible effects of anaesthesia and the animal’s physiological conditions on neural activity and the hemodynamic response. The second part of this review describes applications of the aforementioned techniques in pharmacologically-induced, as well as in traumatic and transgenic disease models and illustrates how multiple fMRI methods can be applied successfully to evaluate different aspects of a specific disorder. For example, fMRI techniques can be used to pinpoint the neural substrate of a disease beyond previously defined hypothesis-driven regions-of-interest (ROIs. In addition, fMRI techniques allow one to dissect how specific modifications (e.g. treatment, lesion etc. modulate the functioning of specific brain areas (st-fMRI, phMRI and how functional connectivity (rsfMRI between several brain regions is affected, both in acute and extended time frames. Furthermore, fMRI techniques can be used to assess/explore the efficacy of novel treatments in depth, both in fundamental research as well as in preclinical settings. In conclusion, by describing several exemplary studies, we aim to highlight the advantages of functional MRI in exploring the acute and long-term effects of pharmacological substances and/or pathology on brain functioning along with

  13. Incidental MRI Findings in Patients with Impaired Cognitive Function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yoon Joon

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the incidental findings on brain MRI of patients with cognitive function impairments. We analyzed magnetic resonance (MR) findings of 236 patients with decreased cognitive function. MR protocols include conventional T2 weighted axial images, fluid attenuated inversion recovery axial images, T1 weighted coronal 3-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition of gradient echo and diffusion tensor images. We retrospectively evaluated the signal changes that suggest acute/subacute infarction and space occupying lesions which show mass effect. Incidental MR findings were seen in 16 patients. Nine patients (3.8%) showed increased signal intensity on trace map of diffusion tensor images suggesting acute/subacute infarctions. Space occupying lesions were detected in 7 patients, and 3 lesions (1.27%) had mass effect and edema and were considered clinically significant lesions that diminish cognitive functions. Several incidental MR findings were detected in patients with decreased cognitive function, and the incidence of aucte/subacute infarctions were higher. Proper evaluations of MRI in patients with impaired cognitive functions will be helpful in early detection and management of ischemic lesions and space occupying lesions.

  14. [Role of MRI for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, G; Koenigkam-Santos, M; Biederer, J; Puderbach, M

    2014-05-01

    Due to physical and technical limitations, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has hitherto played only a minor role in image-based diagnostics of the lungs. However, as a consequence of important methodological developments during recent years, MRI has developed into a technically mature and clinically well-proven method for specific pulmonary questions. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview on the currently available sequences and techniques for assessment of pulmonary nodules and analyzes the clinical significance according to the current literature. The main focus is on the detection of lung metastases, the detection of primary pulmonary malignancies in high-risk individuals and the differentiation between pulmonary nodules of benign and malignant character. The MRI technique has a sensitivity of approximately 80 % for detection of malignant pulmonary nodules compared to the reference standard low-dose computed tomography (CT) and is thus somewhat inferior to CT. Advantages of MRI on the other hand are a higher specificity in differentiating malignant and benign pulmonary nodules and the absence of ionizing radiation exposure. A systematic use of MRI as a primary tool for detection and characterization of pulmonary nodules is currently not recommended due to insufficient data. The diagnostic potential of MRI for early detection and staging of malignant pulmonary diseases, however, seems promising. Therefore, further evaluation of MRI as a secondary imaging modality in clinical trials is highly warranted.

  15. In situ targeted MRI detection of Helicobacter pylori with stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunjie; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Ding, Ding; Zou, Yuxiu; Xu, Yiting; Wang, Xuewei; Zhang, Yin; Chen, Long; Chen, Zhuo; Tan, Weihong

    2017-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is implicated in the aetiology of many diseases. Despite numerous studies, a painless, fast and direct method for the in situ detection of H. pylori remains a challenge, mainly due to the strong acidic/enzymatic environment of the gastric mucosa. Herein, we report the use of stable magnetic graphitic nanocapsules (MGNs), for in situ targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection of H. pylori. Several layers of graphene as the shell effectively protect the magnetic core from corrosion while retaining the superior contrast effect for MRI in the gastric environment. Boronic-polyethylene glycol molecules were synthesized and modified on the MGN surface for targeted MRI detection. In a mouse model of H. pylori-induced infection, H. pylori was specifically detected through both T2-weighted MR imaging and Raman gastric mucosa imaging using functionalized MGNs. These results indicated that enhancement of MRI using MGNs may be a promising diagnostic and bioimaging platform for very harsh conditions.

  16. Functional MRI experiments : acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsey, NF; Hoogduin, H; Jansma, JM

    2002-01-01

    Functional MRI is widely used to address basic and clinical neuroscience questions. In the key domains of fMRI experiments, i.e. acquisition, processing and analysis, and interpretation of data, developments are ongoing. The main issues are sensitivity for changes in fMRI signal that are associated

  17. “Awake” intraoperative functional MRI (ai-fMRI) for mapping the eloquent cortex: Is it possible in awake craniotomy?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Han; Wu, Jin-Song; Yao, Cheng-Jun; Zhuang, Dong-Xiao; Qiu, Tian-Ming; Jia, Wen-Bin; Mao, Ying; Zhou, Liang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    As a promising noninvasive imaging technique, functional MRI (fMRI) has been extensively adopted as a functional localization procedure for surgical planning. However, the information provided by preoperative fMRI (pre-fMRI) is hampered by the brain deformation that is secondary to surgical procedures. Therefore, intraoperative fMRI (i-fMRI) becomes a potential alternative that can compensate for brain shifts by updating the functional localization information during craniotomy. However, previous i-fMRI studies required that patients be under general anesthesia, preventing the wider application of such a technique as the patients cannot perform tasks unless they are awake. In this study, we propose a new technique that combines awake surgery and i-fMRI, named “awake” i-fMRI (ai-fMRI). We introduced ai-fMRI to the real-time localization of sensorimotor areas during awake craniotomy in seven patients. The results showed that ai-fMRI could successfully detect activations in the bilateral primary sensorimotor areas and supplementary motor areas for all patients, indicating the feasibility of this technique in eloquent area localization. The reliability of ai-fMRI was further validated using intraoperative stimulation mapping (ISM) in two of the seven patients. Comparisons between the pre-fMRI-derived localization result and the ai-fMRI derived result showed that the former was subject to a heavy brain shift and led to incorrect localization, while the latter solved that problem. Additionally, the approaches for the acquisition and processing of the ai-fMRI data were fully illustrated and described. Some practical issues on employing ai-fMRI in awake craniotomy were systemically discussed, and guidelines were provided. PMID:24179766

  18. MRI for the detection of calcific features of vertebral haemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Y Y; Böker, S M; Diederichs, G; Walter, T; Wagner, M; Fallenberg, E; Liebig, T; Rickert, M; Hamm, B; Makowski, M R

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic performance of susceptibility-weighted-magnetic-resonance imaging (SW-MRI) for the detection of vertebral haemangiomas (VHs) compared to T1/T2-weighted MRI sequences, radiographs, and computed tomography (CT). The study was approved by the local ethics review board. An SW-MRI sequence was added to the clinical spine imaging protocol. The image-based diagnosis of 56 VHs in 46 patients was established using T1/T2 MRI in combination with radiography/CT as the reference standard. VHs were assessed based on T1/T2-weighted MRI images alone and in combination with SW-MRI, while radiographs/CT images were excluded from the analysis. Fifty-one of 56 VHs could be identified on T1/T2 MRI images alone, if radiographs/CT images were excluded from analysis. In five cases (9.1%), additional radiographs/CT images were required for the imaging-based diagnosis. If T1/T2 and SW-MRI images were used in combination, all VHs could be diagnosed, without the need for radiography/CT. Size measurements revealed a close correlation between CT and SW-MRI (R 2 =0.94; pspine, as the use of additional CT/radiography can be minimized. Copyright © 2017 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Functional MRI and CT biomarkers in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winfield, J.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom); Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden Hospital, MRI Unit, Sutton (United Kingdom); Payne, G.S.; DeSouza, N.M. [Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, CRUK Imaging Centre at the Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Imaging biomarkers derived from MRI or CT describe functional properties of tumours and normal tissues. They are finding increasing numbers of applications in diagnosis, monitoring of response to treatment and assessment of progression or recurrence. Imaging biomarkers also provide scope for assessment of heterogeneity within and between lesions. A wide variety of functional parameters have been investigated for use as biomarkers in oncology. Some imaging techniques are used routinely in clinical applications while others are currently restricted to clinical trials or preclinical studies. Apparent diffusion coefficient, magnetization transfer ratio and native T{sub 1} relaxation time provide information about structure and organization of tissues. Vascular properties may be described using parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, dynamic contrast-enhanced CT, transverse relaxation rate (R{sub 2}*), vessel size index and relative blood volume, while magnetic resonance spectroscopy may be used to probe the metabolic profile of tumours. This review describes the mechanisms of contrast underpinning each technique and the technical requirements for robust and reproducible imaging. The current status of each biomarker is described in terms of its validation, qualification and clinical applications, followed by a discussion of the current limitations and future perspectives. (orig.)

  20. High temporal resolution functional MRI using parallel echo volumar imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabrait, C.; Ciuciu, P.; Ribes, A.; Poupon, C.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.; LeBihan, D.; Lethimonnier, F.; Le Roux, P.; Dehaine-Lambertz, G.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To combine parallel imaging with 3D single-shot acquisition (echo volumar imaging, EVI) in order to acquire high temporal resolution volumar functional MRI (fMRI) data. Materials and Methods: An improved EVI sequence was associated with parallel acquisition and field of view reduction in order to acquire a large brain volume in 200 msec. Temporal stability and functional sensitivity were increased through optimization of all imaging parameters and Tikhonov regularization of parallel reconstruction. Two human volunteers were scanned with parallel EVI in a 1.5 T whole-body MR system, while submitted to a slow event-related auditory paradigm. Results: Thanks to parallel acquisition, the EVI volumes display a low level of geometric distortions and signal losses. After removal of low-frequency drifts and physiological artifacts,activations were detected in the temporal lobes of both volunteers and voxel-wise hemodynamic response functions (HRF) could be computed. On these HRF different habituation behaviors in response to sentence repetition could be identified. Conclusion: This work demonstrates the feasibility of high temporal resolution 3D fMRI with parallel EVI. Combined with advanced estimation tools,this acquisition method should prove useful to measure neural activity timing differences or study the nonlinearities and non-stationarities of the BOLD response. (authors)

  1. Min-max Extrapolation Scheme for Fast Estimation of 3D Potts Field Partition Functions. Application to the Joint Detection-Estimation of Brain Activity in fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risser, L.; Vincent, T.; Ciuciu, P.; Risser, L.; Idier, J.; Risser, L.; Forbes, F.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a fast numerical scheme to estimate Partition Functions (PF) of symmetric Potts fields. Our strategy is first validated on 2D two-color Potts fields and then on 3D two- and three-color Potts fields. It is then applied to the joint detection-estimation of brain activity from functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) data, where the goal is to automatically recover activated, deactivated and inactivated brain regions and to estimate region dependent hemodynamic filters. For any brain region, a specific 3D Potts field indeed embodies the spatial correlation over the hidden states of the voxels by modeling whether they are activated, deactivated or inactive. To make spatial regularization adaptive, the PFs of the Potts fields over all brain regions are computed prior to the brain activity estimation. Our approach is first based upon a classical path-sampling method to approximate a small subset of reference PFs corresponding to pre-specified regions. Then, we propose an extrapolation method that allows us to approximate the PFs associated to the Potts fields defined over the remaining brain regions. In comparison with preexisting methods either based on a path sampling strategy or mean-field approximations, our contribution strongly alleviates the computational cost and makes spatially adaptive regularization of whole brain fMRI datasets feasible. It is also robust against grid inhomogeneities and efficient irrespective of the topological configurations of the brain regions. (authors)

  2. Management of breast lesions detectable only on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann-Luz, K.C.; Bahrs, S.D.; Preibsch, H.; Hattermann, V.; Claussen, C.D.

    2014-01-01

    Breast MR imaging has become established as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosing breast cancer. As a result of the increasing examination volume and improved image quality, the number of breast lesions detected only on MRI and requiring further clarification has risen in recent years. According to the S3-guideline 'Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Breast Cancer' as revised in July 2012, institutions performing breast MRI should provide the option of an MRI-guided intervention for clarification. This review describes the indications, methods and results of MRI-guided interventions for the clarification of breast lesions only visible on MRI. Recent guidelines and study results are also addressed and alternative methods and pitfalls are presented. (orig.)

  3. To see bruxism: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, S

    2015-01-01

    Since the pathophysiology of bruxism is not clearly understood, there exists no possible treatment. The aim of this study is to investigate the cerebral activation differences between healthy subjects and patients with bruxism on behalf of possible aetiological factors. 12 healthy subjects and 12 patients with bruxism, a total of 24 right-handed female subjects (aged 20-27 years) were examined using functional MRI during tooth-clenching and resting tasks. Imaging was performed with 3.0-T MRI scanner with a 32-channel head coil. Differences in regional brain activity between patients with bruxism and healthy subjects (control group) were observed with BrainVoyager QX 2.8 (Brain Innovation, Maastricht, Netherlands) statistical data analysis program. Activation maps were created using the general linear model: single study and multistudy multisubject for statistical group analysis. This protocol was approved by the ethics committee of medical faculty of Kirikkale University, Turkey (02/04), based on the guidelines set forth in the Declaration of Helsinki. The group analysis revealed a statistically significant increase in blood oxygenation level-dependent signal of three clusters in the control group (pbruxism. Our findings indicate that there was a decrease of cortical activation pattern in patients with bruxism in clenching tasks. This indicates decreased blood flow and activation in regional neuronal activity. Bruxism, as an oral motor disorder concerns dentistry, neurology and psychiatry. These results might improve the understanding and physiological handling of sleep bruxism.

  4. Measurement and imaging of brain function using MRI, MEG, and TMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iramina, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews functional imaging techniques in neuroscience such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) functional MRI (fMRI), magnetoencephalogray (MEG), and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). fMRI and MEG allow the neuronal activity of the brain to be measured non-invasively. MEG detects an electrical activity as neuronal activity, while, fMRI detects a hemodynamic response as neuronal activity. TMS is the application of a brief magnetic pulse or a train of pulses to the skull, which results in the induction of a local electric current in the underlying surface of the brain, thereby producing a localized axonal depolarization. As a non-invasive and effective method to make reversible lesions in the human brain, TMS has a long and successful history. All of these techniques have major potential for applications in the neuroscience and medicine. (author)

  5. Poly(I:C) model of schizophrenia in rats induces sex-dependent functional brain changes detected by MRI that are not reversed by aripiprazole treatment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dražanová, Eva; Rudá-Kučerová, J.; Krátká, Lucie; Horská, K.; Demlová, R.; Starčuk jr., Zenon; Kašpárek, T.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 137, MAR (2018), s. 146-155 ISSN 0361-9230 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015062; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : aripiprazole * arterial spin labelling * wistar rats * schizophrenia * sex * MRI Impact factor: 3.033, year: 2016

  6. IClinfMRI Software for Integrating Functional MRI Techniques in Presurgical Mapping and Clinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ai-Ling; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Wu, Changwei W; Noll, Kyle R; Prabhu, Sujit S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Kumar, Vinodh A; Schomer, Donald F; Hazle, John D; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Ho-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Task-evoked and resting-state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have been applied to the clinical management of neurological diseases, exemplified by presurgical localization of eloquent cortex, to assist neurosurgeons in maximizing resection while preserving brain functions. In addition, recent studies have recommended incorporating cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) imaging into clinical fMRI to evaluate the risk of lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU). Although each of these imaging techniques possesses its own advantage for presurgical mapping, a specialized clinical software that integrates the three complementary techniques and promptly outputs the analyzed results to radiology and surgical navigation systems in a clinical format is still lacking. We developed the Integrated fMRI for Clinical Research (IClinfMRI) software to facilitate these needs. Beyond the independent processing of task-fMRI, rs-fMRI, and CVR mapping, IClinfMRI encompasses three unique functions: (1) supporting the interactive rs-fMRI mapping while visualizing task-fMRI results (or results from published meta-analysis) as a guidance map, (2) indicating/visualizing the NVU potential on analyzed fMRI maps, and (3) exporting these advanced mapping results in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format that are ready to export to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and a surgical navigation system. In summary, IClinfMRI has the merits of efficiently translating and integrating state-of-the-art imaging techniques for presurgical functional mapping and clinical fMRI studies.

  7. Comparision the value of detecting myocardial viability between low dose dobutamine stress MRI and echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Yi; Zhang Zhaoqi; Yu Wei; Miao Cuilian; Zhao Yike; Yan Zixu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To Compare the diagnostic value between low dose dobutamine stress transthrotic echocardiography and low dose dobutamine stress MRI in detecting myocardial viability of chronic myocardial infarction. Methods: Rest and low dose dobutamine (5, 10 μg·kg -1 ·min -1 ) stress transthrotic echocardiography and cine-MRI were performed in 30 patients with chronic myocardial infarction. 24 patients underwent successful revascularization and 10 of them underwent another rest cine-MRI study to assess segmental myocardial functional recovery. Left ventricular were divided into 16 segments, the criteria of viability in different techniques is: MRI: dobutamine induced systolic wall thickening was ≥2 mm in akinetic or diskinetic segments at rest; Echocardiography: wall motion score reduced at least 1 after dobutamine stress in akinetic or' diskinetic segments at rest. Results: One hundren and eight segments showed wall motion abnormalities of 30 patients, 65 and 56 segments shows positive reaction, 43 and 52 segments shows negativereaction in MRI and echocardiography after dobutamine stress respectively. Kappa value of the two techniques is 0.75, concordance in both techniques is 88%. Twenty-four segments showed functional recovery, 14 segments remained dysfunction 3-6 months after revascularization, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of detecting myocardial viability in chronic myocardial infarction in MRI and echocardiography is 95.8% vs 79.2% (P>0.05), 85.7% vs 85.7% (P>0.05), 92.1% vs 81.6% (P>0.05) respectively. The sensitivity and accuracy of MRI is a little higher. Conclusion: The ability of detecting myocardial viability by both low dose dobutamine stress transthrotic echocardiography and low dose dobutamine stress MRI is similer, the sensitivity and accuracy of MRI is a little higher. (authors)

  8. Functional MRI in children: clinical and research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leach, James L.; Holland, Scott K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional MRI has become a critical research tool for evaluating brain function and developmental trajectories in children. Its clinical use in children is becoming more common. This presentation will review the basic underlying physiologic and technical aspects of fMRI, review research applications that have direct clinical relevance, and outline the current clinical uses of this technology. (orig.)

  9. Functional imaging of the kidneys with fast MRI techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, Pottumarthi V.; Priatna, Agus

    1999-01-01

    Availability of faster and stronger gradient systems have given rise to a multitude of fast MRI data acquisition strategies which have tremendously increased the scope of MRI applications. These have led to the realization of long desired comprehensive approaches to evaluate anatomy and function using a single modality. In this work, we describe some of our own experiences with functional evaluation of the kidneys using MRI. Examples that suggest the feasibility of comprehensive approaches for evaluation of renal disease are also provided. We also introduce BOLD renal MRI, a method that may allow basic understanding of human renal physiology and pathophysiology in a way that has not been previously possible

  10. Multiparametric MRI in detection and staging of prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    progression, the diagnosis and subsequent treatment planning can be challenging. The current diagnostic approach with PSA testing and digital rectal examination followed by transrectal ultrasound biopsies (TRUS-bx) lack in both sensitivity and specificity in PCa detection and offers limited information about......-MRI-targeted biopsies (mp-MRI-bx) under TRUS-guidance of any mp-MRI-suspicious lesion not hit on systematic TRUS-bx. Study II included patients with clinically localised PCa (cT1-T2) determined by digital rectal examination and/or TRUS and scheduled for radical prostatectomy (RP). Mp-MRI was performed prior to RP...... divided by ADCbenign). The ADC measurements (ADCtumour and ADCratio values) were correlated with the Gleason score (GS) from each tumour foci. RESULTS: Eighty-three patients were included in study I. PCa was found in 39/83 (47%) and both the PIRADS summation score and the over-all Likert classification...

  11. Functional MRI of Language Processing and Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Méndez Orellana (Carolina)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ My thesis describe the utility of implementing fMRI to investigate how the language system is reorganized in brain damaged patients. Specifically for aphasia research fMRI allows to show how specific language treatment methods have the potential to enhance language

  12. Physiological and technical limitations of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) - consequences for clinical use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuestenberg, T.; Jordan, K.; Giesel, F.L.; Villringer, A.

    2003-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is the most common noninvasive technique in functional neuroanatomy. The capabilities and limitations of the method will be discussed based on a short review of the current knowledge about the neurovascular relationship. The focus of this article is on current methodical and technical problems regarding fMRI-based detection and localization of neuronal activity. Main error sources and their influence on the reliability and validity of fMRI-methods are presented. Appropriate solution strategies will be proposed and evaluated. Finally, the clinical relevance of MR-based diagnostic methods are discussed. (orig.) [de

  13. Quantitation of global and regional left ventricular function by MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, RJ; Reiber, JHC; Reiber, JHC; VanDerWall, EE

    1998-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several imaging strategies for assessing left ventricular function. As a three-dimensional imaging technique, all measurements can be performed without relying on geometrical assumptions. Global and regional function parameters can be derived from

  14. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi; Valls, Laia; Vilanova, Joan C.; Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis; Rovira, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  15. Automated detection of multiple sclerosis lesions in serial brain MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llado, Xavier; Ganiler, Onur; Oliver, Arnau; Marti, Robert; Freixenet, Jordi [University of Girona, Computer Vision and Robotics Group, Girona (Spain); Valls, Laia [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Girona (Spain); Vilanova, Joan C. [Girona Magnetic Resonance Center, Girona (Spain); Ramio-Torrenta, Lluis [Dr. Josep Trueta University Hospital, Institut d' Investigacio Biomedica de Girona, Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Unit, Girona (Spain); Rovira, Alex [Vall d' Hebron University Hospital, Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Radiology, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-08-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a serious disease typically occurring in the brain whose diagnosis and efficacy of treatment monitoring are vital. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is frequently used in serial brain imaging due to the rich and detailed information provided. Time-series analysis of images is widely used for MS diagnosis and patient follow-up. However, conventional manual methods are time-consuming, subjective, and error-prone. Thus, the development of automated techniques for the detection and quantification of MS lesions is a major challenge. This paper presents an up-to-date review of the approaches which deal with the time-series analysis of brain MRI for detecting active MS lesions and quantifying lesion load change. We provide a comprehensive reference source for researchers in which several approaches to change detection and quantification of MS lesions are investigated and classified. We also analyze the results provided by the approaches, discuss open problems, and point out possible future trends. Lesion detection approaches are required for the detection of static lesions and for diagnostic purposes, while either quantification of detected lesions or change detection algorithms are needed to follow up MS patients. However, there is not yet a single approach that can emerge as a standard for the clinical practice, automatically providing an accurate MS lesion evolution quantification. Future trends will focus on combining the lesion detection in single studies with the analysis of the change detection in serial MRI. (orig.)

  16. Hidden Markov event sequence models: toward unsupervised functional MRI brain mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisan, Sylvain; Thoraval, Laurent; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Foucher, Jack R; Metz-Lutz, Marie-Noëlle; Heitz, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    Most methods used in functional MRI (fMRI) brain mapping require restrictive assumptions about the shape and timing of the fMRI signal in activated voxels. Consequently, fMRI data may be partially and misleadingly characterized, leading to suboptimal or invalid inference. To limit these assumptions and to capture the broad range of possible activation patterns, a novel statistical fMRI brain mapping method is proposed. It relies on hidden semi-Markov event sequence models (HSMESMs), a special class of hidden Markov models (HMMs) dedicated to the modeling and analysis of event-based random processes. Activation detection is formulated in terms of time coupling between (1) the observed sequence of hemodynamic response onset (HRO) events detected in the voxel's fMRI signal and (2) the "hidden" sequence of task-induced neural activation onset (NAO) events underlying the HROs. Both event sequences are modeled within a single HSMESM. The resulting brain activation model is trained to automatically detect neural activity embedded in the input fMRI data set under analysis. The data sets considered in this article are threefold: synthetic epoch-related, real epoch-related (auditory lexical processing task), and real event-related (oddball detection task) fMRI data sets. Synthetic data: Activation detection results demonstrate the superiority of the HSMESM mapping method with respect to a standard implementation of the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) approach. They are also very close, sometimes equivalent, to those obtained with an "ideal" implementation of SPM in which the activation patterns synthesized are reused for analysis. The HSMESM method appears clearly insensitive to timing variations of the hemodynamic response and exhibits low sensitivity to fluctuations of its shape (unsustained activation during task). Real epoch-related data: HSMESM activation detection results compete with those obtained with SPM, without requiring any prior definition of the expected

  17. Normal pancreatic exocrine function does not exclude MRI/MRCP chronic pancreatitis findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaade, Samer; Cem Balci, Numan; Momtahen, Amir Javad; Burton, Frank

    2008-09-01

    Abnormal pancreatic function tests have been reported to precede the imaging findings of chronic pancreatitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP) is increasingly accepted as the primary imaging modality for the detection of structural changes of early mild chronic pancreatitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate MRI/MRCP findings in patients with symptoms consistent with chronic pancreatitis who have normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function test. A retrospective study of 32 patients referred for evaluation of chronic abdominal pain consistent with chronic pancreatitis and reported normal standard abdominal imaging (ultrasound, computed tomography, or MRI). All patients underwent Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing and pancreatic MRI/MRCP at our institution. We reviewed the MRI/MRCP images in patients who had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing. MRI/MRCP images were assessed for pancreatic duct morphology, gland size, parenchymal signal and morphology, and arterial contrast enhancement. Of the 32 patients, 23 had normal Secretin Endoscopic Pancreatic Function testing, and 8 of them had mild to marked spectrum of abnormal MRI/MRCP findings that were predominantly focal. Frequencies of the findings were as follows: pancreatic duct stricture (n=3), pancreatic duct dilatation (n=3), side branch ectasia (n=4), atrophy (n=5), decreased arterial enhancement (n=5), decreased parenchymal signal (n=1), and cavity formation (n=1). The remaining15 patients had normal pancreatic structure on MRI/MRCP. Normal pancreatic function testing cannot exclude abnormal MRI/MRCP especially focal findings of chronic pancreatitis. Further studies needed to verify significance of these findings and establish MRI/MRCP imaging criteria for the diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis.

  18. Functional MRI language mapping in pre-surgical epilepsy patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is commonly applied to study the neural substrates of language in clinical research and for neurosurgical planning. fMRI language mapping is used to assess language lateralisation, or determine hemispheric dominance, and to localise regions of the brain ...

  19. Effects of Field-Map Distortion Correction on Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Togo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field inhomogeneities cause geometric distortions of echo planar images used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. To reduce this problem, distortion correction (DC with field map is widely used for both task and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI. Although DC with field map has been reported to improve the quality of task fMRI, little is known about its effects on rs-fMRI. Here, we tested the influence of field-map DC on rs-fMRI results using two rs-fMRI datasets derived from 40 healthy subjects: one with DC (DC+ and the other without correction (DC−. Independent component analysis followed by the dual regression approach was used for evaluation of resting-state functional connectivity networks (RSN. We also obtained the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency signal power (0.01–0.1 Hz and above 0.1 Hz, respectively; LFHF ratio to assess the quality of rs-fMRI signals. For comparison of RSN between DC+ and DC− datasets, the default mode network showed more robust functional connectivity in the DC+ dataset than the DC− dataset. Basal ganglia RSN showed some decreases in functional connectivity primarily in white matter, indicating imperfect registration/normalization without DC. Supplementary seed-based and simulation analyses supported the utility of DC. Furthermore, we found a higher LFHF ratio after field map correction in the anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and cerebellum. In conclusion, field map DC improved detection of functional connectivity derived from low-frequency rs-fMRI signals. We encourage researchers to include a DC step in the preprocessing pipeline of rs-fMRI analysis.

  20. Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion detected by MRI; The relationship between Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle and functional recovery of paresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waragai, Masaaki; Iwabuchi, Sadamu (Nanasawa Rehabilitation Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan))

    1993-11-01

    We studied Wallerian degeneration of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle following a supratentorial cerebrovascular lesion by MRI. A total of 57 patients with palsy following a supratenotorial cerebrovascular lesion were prospectively studied. Wallerian degeneration was detected as a high signal intensity (HSI) in 37 patients between 70 days and 100 days after the onset, but not detected in the remaining 27 patients. Patient with as HSI in all areas of the cerebral peduncle had a large lesion involving the hemisphere. Patient with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion confined to the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. Patient with an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle had a lesion of parietal lobe or temporal lobe which spares the corticospinal tract originating from the paracentral gyrus, precentral gyrus, corona radiata or posterior limb of the internal capsule. These findings suggest that as HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle may reveal Wallerian degeneration of the corticospinal tract, and an HSI at the lateral side of the cerebral peduncle may show Wallerian degeneration of the corticopontine tract. The functional recovery of paresis was poor in all patients with an HSI at the center of the cerebral peduncle, while it was good in all patients without an HSI in that region. Our data suggested that somatotopical localization of the corticodescending tract in the cerebral peduncle may be identified by detecting Wallerian degeneration following a supratentorial lesion, and the functional recovery of patients with paresis could be predicted according to presence or absence of Wallerian degeneration at the center of the cerebral peduncle. (author).

  1. Reporting and management of breast lesions detected using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dall, B.J.G.; Vinnicombe, S.; Gilbert, F.J.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the most accurate technique for diagnosing and delineating the extent of both invasive and in-situ breast cancer and is increasingly being used as part of the preoperative work-up to assess the local extent of disease. It is proving invaluable in providing information that allows successful single-stage surgery. An inevitable consequence of the high sensitivity of MRI is that it will identify additional lesions that may or may not represent significant extra disease. This may complicate and delay the preoperative process. This paper outlines a strategy for managing MRI-detected lesions to optimize the benefits of breast MRI as a local staging tool while minimizing the false-positive diagnoses. It discusses the importance of good technique to reduce the number of indeterminate lesions. Methods to refine the patient pathway to minimize delays are discussed. The format of MRI reporting is discussed in detail as is the usefulness of discussion of cases at multidisciplinary meetings. Illustrative cases are used to clarify the points made.

  2. Multi-flux-transformer MRI detection with an atomic magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savukov, Igor; Karaulanov, Todor

    2014-12-01

    Recently, anatomical ultra-low field (ULF) MRI has been demonstrated with an atomic magnetometer (AM). A flux-transformer (FT) has been used for decoupling MRI fields and gradients to avoid their negative effects on AM performance. The field of view (FOV) was limited because of the need to compromise between the size of the FT input coil and MRI sensitivity per voxel. Multi-channel acquisition is a well-known solution to increase FOV without significantly reducing sensitivity. In this paper, we demonstrate twofold FOV increase with the use of three FT input coils. We also show that it is possible to use a single atomic magnetometer and single acquisition channel to acquire three independent MRI signals by applying a frequency-encoding gradient along the direction of the detection array span. The approach can be generalized to more channels and can be critical for imaging applications of non-cryogenic ULF MRI where FOV needs to be large, including head, hand, spine, and whole-body imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, Keiichiro

    2002-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  4. Functional MRI in human motor control studies and clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toma, Keiichiro [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Nakai, Toshiharu [Inst. of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been a useful tool for the noninvasive mapping of brain function associated with various motor and cognitive tasks. Because fMRI is based on the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) effect, it does not directly record neural activity. With the fMRI technique, distinguishing BOLD signals creased by cortical projection neurons from those created by intracortical neurons appears to be difficult. Two major experimental designs are used in fMRI studies: block designs and event-related designs. Block-designed fMRI presupposes the steady state of regional cerebral blood flow and has been applied to examinations of brain activation caused by tasks requiring sustained or repetitive movements. By contrast, the more recently developed event-related fMRI with time resolution of a few seconds allows the mapping of brain activation associated with a single movement according to the transient aspects of the hemodynamic response. Increasing evidence suggests that multiple motor areas are engaged in a networked manner to execute various motor acts. In order to understand functional brain maps, it is important that one understands sequential and parallel organizations of anatomical connections between multiple motor areas. In fMRI studies of complex motor tasks, elementary parameters such as movement length, force, velocity, acceleration and frequency should be controlled, because inconsistency in those parameters may alter the extent and intensity of motor cortical activation, confounding interpretation of the findings obtained. In addition to initiation of movements, termination of movements plays an important role in the successful achievement of complex movements. Brain areas exclusively related to the termination of movements have been, for the first time, uncovered with an event-related fMRI technique. We propose the application of fMRI to the elucidation of the pathophysiology of movement disorders, particularly dystonia

  5. Detection of early subclinical lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis by lung ventilation imaging with hyperpolarised gas MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Helen; Horsley, Alex; Taylor, Chris J; Smith, Laurie; Hughes, David; Horn, Felix C; Swift, Andrew J; Parra-Robles, Juan; Hughes, Paul J; Norquay, Graham; Stewart, Neil J; Collier, Guilhem J; Teare, Dawn; Cunningham, Steve; Aldag, Ina; Wild, Jim M

    2017-08-01

    Hyperpolarised 3 He ventilation-MRI, anatomical lung MRI, lung clearance index (LCI), low-dose CT and spirometry were performed on 19 children (6-16 years) with clinically stable mild cystic fibrosis (CF) (FEV 1 >-1.96), and 10 controls. All controls had normal spirometry, MRI and LCI. Ventilation-MRI was the most sensitive method of detecting abnormalities, present in 89% of patients with CF, compared with CT abnormalities in 68%, LCI 47% and conventional MRI 22%. Ventilation defects were present in the absence of CT abnormalities and in patients with normal physiology, including LCI. Ventilation-MRI is thus feasible in young children, highly sensitive and provides additional information about lung structure-function relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  6. Functional imaging of the kidneys with fast MRI techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, P.V.; Priatna, A.

    1999-01-01

    Availability of faster and stronger gradient systems have given rise to a multitude of fast MRI data acquisition strategies which have tremendously increased the scope of MRI applications. These have led to the realization of long desired comprehensive approaches to evaluate anatomy and function using a single modality. In this work, we describe some of our own experiences with functional evaluation of the kidneys using MRI. Examples that suggest the feasibility of comprehensive approaches for evaluation of renal disease are also provided. We also introduce BOLD renal MRI, a method that may allow basic understanding of human renal physiology and pathophysiology in a way that has not been previously possible. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  7. Functional imaging of the kidneys with fast MRI techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, P.V.; Priatna, A. [AN-234, MRI Research, Department of Radiology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, 330 Brookline Ave., Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-02-01

    Availability of faster and stronger gradient systems have given rise to a multitude of fast MRI data acquisition strategies which have tremendously increased the scope of MRI applications. These have led to the realization of long desired comprehensive approaches to evaluate anatomy and function using a single modality. In this work, we describe some of our own experiences with functional evaluation of the kidneys using MRI. Examples that suggest the feasibility of comprehensive approaches for evaluation of renal disease are also provided. We also introduce BOLD renal MRI, a method that may allow basic understanding of human renal physiology and pathophysiology in a way that has not been previously possible. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  8. Methodological Improvements in Combining TMS and Functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Moisa, Marius

    2011-01-01

    Since 1997, when Bohning and colleagues demonstrated for the first time the feasibility of interleaving transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) with blood oxygenation level dependency functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD fMRI), this combination became a very promising techniques to study brain connectivity. However, the implementation of a reliable setup for interleaved TMS/fMRI is still technically challenging. In this thesis, I intended to further explore and develop methodological i...

  9. Unexpected Coexisting Myocardial Infarction Detected by Delayed Enhancement MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard Gerbaud

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of an unexpected coexisting anterior myocardial infarction detected by delayed enhancement MRI in a 41-year-old man following a presentation with a first episode of chest pain during inferior acute myocardial infarction. This second necrotic area was not initially suspected because there were no ECG changes in the anterior leads and the left descending coronary artery did not present any significant stenoses on emergency coronary angiography. Unrecognised myocardial infarction may carry important prognostic implications. CMR is currently the best imaging technique to detect unexpected infarcts.

  10. Clinical application of functional MRI for chronic epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woermann, F.G.; Labudda, K.

    2010-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is frequently used in the presurgical diagnostic procedure of epilepsy patients, in particular for lateralization of speech and memory and for localization of the primary motor cortex to delineate the epileptogenic lesion from eloquent brain areas. fMRI is one of the non-invasive procedures in the presurgical diagnostic process, together with medical history, seizure semiology, neurological examination, interictal and ictal EEG, structural MRI, video EEG monitoring and neuropsychology. This diagnostic sequence leads either to the decision for or against elective epilepsy surgery or to the decision to proceed with invasive diagnostic techniques (Wada test, intra-operative or extra-operative cortical stimulation). It is difficult to evaluate the contribution of the fMRI test in isolation to the validity of the entire diagnostic sequence. Complications such as memory loss and aphasia in temporal lobe resections or paresis after frontal lobe resections are rare and rarely of disastrous extent. This further complicates the evaluation of the clinical relevance of fMRI as a predictive tool. In this article studies which investigated the concordance between fMRI and other diagnostic gold standards will be presented as well as the association between presurgical fMRI and postsurgical morbidity. (orig.) [de

  11. Sensitivity of MRI in detecting alveolar infiltrates. Experimental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biederer, J.; Busse, I.; Grimm, J.; Reuter, M.; Heller, M.; Muhle, C.; Freitag, S.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: An experimental study using porcine lung explants and a dedicated chest phantom to evaluate the signal intensity of artificial alveolar infiltrates with T 1 - and T 2 -weighted MRI sequences. Material and Methods: 10 porcine lung explants were intubated, transferred into the cavity of a MRI-compatible chest phantom and inflated by continuous evacuation of the artificial pleural space. All lungs were examined with MRI at 1.5 T before and after intra-tracheal instillation of either 100 or 200 ml gelatine-stabilised liquid to simulate alveolar infiltrates. MR-examination comprised gradient echo (2D- and 3D-GRE) and fast spin echo sequences (T 2 -TSE and T 2 -HASTE). The signal intensity of lung parenchyma was evaluated at representative cross sections using a standardised scheme. Control studies were acquired with helical CT. Results: The instilled liquid caused patchy confluent alveolar infiltrates resembling the findings in patients with pneumonia or ARDS. CT revealed typical ground-glass opacities. Before the application of the liquid, only T 2 -HASTE and T 2 -TSE displayed lung parenchyma signals with a signal/noise ratio of 3.62 and 1.39, respectively. After application of the liquid, both T 2 -weighted sequences showed clearly visible infiltrates with an increase in signal intensity of approx. 30% at 100 ml (p 2 -weighted sequences detects artificial alveolar infiltrates with high signal intensity and may be a highly sensitive tool to detect pneumonia in patients. (orig.) [de

  12. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  13. Functional MRI and neurophysiological aspects of obesity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sztrokay, A.; Reiser, M.; Meindl, T.; Gutyrchik, E.

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have revealed that metabolic signals and food stimuli activate the mesocorticolimbic neural network involved in processing the reward system. Activation is influenced by obesity and hunger and many recent brain imaging studies have detected that food and drug stimuli activate many of the same reward circuits. These findings have implications for obesity prevention and therapy. Educational efforts need to be directed towards those at increased risk of becoming obese and the food industry has to be involved in providing and promoting healthier food options. Given that visual food stimuli are potent triggers of desire, seductive advertising of high calorie foods directed towards children should be curtailed. The application of non-invasive brain imaging methodologies to the study of hedonic and homeostatic eating behavior represents a novel and important experimental approach. Further advances in imaging technology and improved experimental designs will provide new and important insights into human ingestive behavior that may lead to new developments in behavioral and pharmacological therapies. (orig.) [de

  14. MRI detection of soleus muscle injuries in professional football players

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pezzotta, G.; Querques, G.; Pecorelli, A.; Nani, R.; Sironi, S. [Papa Giovanni XXIII Hospital, University Milano-Bicocca, Department of Radiology, Bergamo (Italy)

    2017-11-15

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of soleus muscle injuries in symptomatic professional football players stratified according to both the Munich consensus statement and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification (BAMIC), and to investigate the association between specific MRI features and the ''return to play'' (RTP). Professional football players with an episode of acute posterior calf pain and impaired function, subsequent to sports activity, underwent ultrasound followed by MRI examination reviewed by two different radiologists with more than 10 years of experience in the musculoskeletal system. MRI features and RTP outcome were evaluated for all types of injuries. During a 36-month period, a total of 20 professional football players were evaluated. According to the Munich consensus, 11 were type 3A, 8 were type 3B, and 1 was type 4, whereas according to the BAMIC, 11 lesions were considered grade 1, 4 grade 2, 4 grade 3, and 1 grade 4. RTP data were available for all patients (mean 3.3 ± 1.6 weeks). Both the Munich consensus and the BAMIC correlated with RTP (Spearman correlation = 0.982 and p < 0.0001 and 0.886 and p < 0.0001 respectively). Extension of edema was an independent prognostic factor for RTP in two different models of multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.044 model A; p = 0.031 model B). The Munich consensus and BAMIC grading systems are useful tools for defining the patient's prognosis and proper rehabilitation time after injury. The MRI feature that we should carefully look for is the extension of edema, as it seems to significantly affect the RTP. (orig.)

  15. MRI detection of soleus muscle injuries in professional football players

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzotta, G.; Querques, G.; Pecorelli, A.; Nani, R.; Sironi, S.

    2017-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of soleus muscle injuries in symptomatic professional football players stratified according to both the Munich consensus statement and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification (BAMIC), and to investigate the association between specific MRI features and the ''return to play'' (RTP). Professional football players with an episode of acute posterior calf pain and impaired function, subsequent to sports activity, underwent ultrasound followed by MRI examination reviewed by two different radiologists with more than 10 years of experience in the musculoskeletal system. MRI features and RTP outcome were evaluated for all types of injuries. During a 36-month period, a total of 20 professional football players were evaluated. According to the Munich consensus, 11 were type 3A, 8 were type 3B, and 1 was type 4, whereas according to the BAMIC, 11 lesions were considered grade 1, 4 grade 2, 4 grade 3, and 1 grade 4. RTP data were available for all patients (mean 3.3 ± 1.6 weeks). Both the Munich consensus and the BAMIC correlated with RTP (Spearman correlation = 0.982 and p < 0.0001 and 0.886 and p < 0.0001 respectively). Extension of edema was an independent prognostic factor for RTP in two different models of multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.044 model A; p = 0.031 model B). The Munich consensus and BAMIC grading systems are useful tools for defining the patient's prognosis and proper rehabilitation time after injury. The MRI feature that we should carefully look for is the extension of edema, as it seems to significantly affect the RTP. (orig.)

  16. MRI detection of soleus muscle injuries in professional football players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotta, G; Querques, G; Pecorelli, A; Nani, R; Sironi, S

    2017-11-01

    To describe magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of soleus muscle injuries in symptomatic professional football players stratified according to both the Munich consensus statement and the British Athletics Muscle Injury Classification (BAMIC), and to investigate the association between specific MRI features and the "return to play" (RTP). Professional football players with an episode of acute posterior calf pain and impaired function, subsequent to sports activity, underwent ultrasound followed by MRI examination reviewed by two different radiologists with more than 10 years of experience in the musculoskeletal system. MRI features and RTP outcome were evaluated for all types of injuries. During a 36-month period, a total of 20 professional football players were evaluated. According to the Munich consensus, 11 were type 3A, 8 were type 3B, and 1 was type 4, whereas according to the BAMIC, 11 lesions were considered grade 1, 4 grade 2, 4 grade 3, and 1 grade 4. RTP data were available for all patients (mean 3.3 ± 1.6 weeks). Both the Munich consensus and the BAMIC correlated with RTP (Spearman correlation = 0.982 and p < 0.0001 and 0.886 and p < 0.0001 respectively). Extension of edema was an independent prognostic factor for RTP in two different models of multivariate regression analysis (p = 0.044 model A; p = 0.031 model B). The Munich consensus and BAMIC grading systems are useful tools for defining the patient's prognosis and proper rehabilitation time after injury. The MRI feature that we should carefully look for is the extension of edema, as it seems to significantly affect the RTP.

  17. Validating excised rodent lungs for functional hyperpolarized xenon-129 MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M L Lilburn

    Full Text Available Ex vivo rodent lung models are explored for physiological measurements of respiratory function with hyperpolarized (hp (129Xe MRI. It is shown that excised lung models allow for simplification of the technical challenges involved and provide valuable physiological insights that are not feasible using in vivo MRI protocols. A custom designed breathing apparatus enables MR images of gas distribution on increasing ventilation volumes of actively inhaled hp (129Xe. Straightforward hp (129Xe MRI protocols provide residual lung volume (RV data and permit for spatially resolved tracking of small hp (129Xe probe volumes during the inhalation cycle. Hp (129Xe MRI of lung function in the excised organ demonstrates the persistence of post mortem airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine challenges. The presented methodology enables physiology of lung function in health and disease without additional regulatory approval requirements and reduces the technical and logistical challenges with hp gas MRI experiments. The post mortem lung functional data can augment histological measurements and should be of interest for drug development studies.

  18. Human brain functional MRI and DTI visualization with virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Moreland, John; Zhang, Jingyu

    2011-12-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional MRI (fMRI) are two active research areas in neuroimaging. DTI is sensitive to the anisotropic diffusion of water exerted by its macromolecular environment and has been shown useful in characterizing structures of ordered tissues such as the brain white matter, myocardium, and cartilage. The diffusion tensor provides two new types of information of water diffusion: the magnitude and the spatial orientation of water diffusivity inside the tissue. This information has been used for white matter fiber tracking to review physical neuronal pathways inside the brain. Functional MRI measures brain activations using the hemodynamic response. The statistically derived activation map corresponds to human brain functional activities caused by neuronal activities. The combination of these two methods provides a new way to understand human brain from the anatomical neuronal fiber connectivity to functional activities between different brain regions. In this study, virtual reality (VR) based MR DTI and fMRI visualization with high resolution anatomical image segmentation and registration, ROI definition and neuronal white matter fiber tractography visualization and fMRI activation map integration is proposed. Rationale and methods for producing and distributing stereoscopic videos are also discussed.

  19. Functional MRI in awake unrestrained dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S Berns

    Full Text Available Because of dogs' prolonged evolution with humans, many of the canine cognitive skills are thought to represent a selection of traits that make dogs particularly sensitive to human cues. But how does the dog mind actually work? To develop a methodology to answer this question, we trained two dogs to remain motionless for the duration required to collect quality fMRI images by using positive reinforcement without sedation or physical restraints. The task was designed to determine which brain circuits differentially respond to human hand signals denoting the presence or absence of a food reward. Head motion within trials was less than 1 mm. Consistent with prior reinforcement learning literature, we observed caudate activation in both dogs in response to the hand signal denoting reward versus no-reward.

  20. Cognitive function and MRI findings in very low birth weight infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imamura, Atsuko; Takagishi, Yuka; Takada, Satoru; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Toru; Nakamura, Hajime [Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Inagaki, Yuko

    1996-07-01

    Twenty-two very low birth weight infants at preschool ages of 5-6 years were studied to clarify the correlation between cognitive function and MRI findings. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Frostig developmental test of visual perception. Ventricular enlargement, assessed by the bioccipital index (B.I.) measured on MRI, was correlated to cognitive disorders. Children with periventricular high intensity areas (T{sub 2}-weighted images) extending from the posterior periventricular region to the parietal lobe tend to highly suffer from cerebral palsy and visuoperceptual impairment. These results indicate that the disorders of cognitive function in very low birth weight infants were caused by a damage of association fibers in periventricular areas which was detectable by MRI. (author)

  1. Cognitive function and MRI findings in very low birth weight infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, Atsuko; Takagishi, Yuka; Takada, Satoru; Uetani, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Toru; Nakamura, Hajime; Inagaki, Yuko.

    1996-01-01

    Twenty-two very low birth weight infants at preschool ages of 5-6 years were studied to clarify the correlation between cognitive function and MRI findings. Cognitive function was evaluated by the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised (WISC-R) and the Frostig developmental test of visual perception. Ventricular enlargement, assessed by the bioccipital index (B.I.) measured on MRI, was correlated to cognitive disorders. Children with periventricular high intensity areas (T 2 -weighted images) extending from the posterior periventricular region to the parietal lobe tend to highly suffer from cerebral palsy and visuoperceptual impairment. These results indicate that the disorders of cognitive function in very low birth weight infants were caused by a damage of association fibers in periventricular areas which was detectable by MRI. (author)

  2. Functional MRI: Genesis, State of the art and the Sequel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharath, Rose Dawn

    2014-01-01

    The last 25 years have seen functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) grow from an interesting experimental imaging technique in the hands of some to a primary investigation of choice in the localization and lateralization of brain function prior to surgery. Developments in the field of computational neurosciences have transformed fMRI analysis from classical subtractive type analysis to dynamic casual modeling, and now to graph theory analysis. This has widened the scope of fMRI, and is therefore finding applications in understanding neural correlates of diseases like autism and Alzheimer's disease, prognostication of diseases like traumatic brain injury, and has the potential to direct therapy. It is unfortunately true that this widened ambit has not received the clinical attention it deserves, probably because fMRI is susceptible to artifacts from skull base and blood products and has reduced sensitivity in patients with vascular malformations, or because a change in medical practice usually lags behind the technological and scientific developments that make it possible. This review focuses on the developmental chronology of fMRI image analysis in the last 25 years with highlights on major milestones like developments in the field of paradigms, analysis methods, resting state fMRI, and functional connectivity. To make the statistical images of brain at work more colorful, the article starts with genesis of fMRI and ends with the hope of a promising bright future. Many inputs for this article are obtained from a series of 103 review articles edited by Bandettini et al., compiling personal experiences of pioneers in this field. Interested readers are encouraged to refer to these for a more complete overview.

  3. "Textural analysis of multiparametric MRI detects transition zone prostate cancer".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Harbir S; Benigno, Salvatore; Ganeshan, Balaji; Dikaios, Nikos; Johnston, Edward W; Allen, Clare; Kirkham, Alex; Groves, Ashley M; Ahmed, Hashim U; Emberton, Mark; Taylor, Stuart A; Halligan, Steve; Punwani, Shonit

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate multiparametric-MRI (mpMRI) derived histogram textural-analysis parameters for detection of transition zone (TZ) prostatic tumour. Sixty-seven consecutive men with suspected prostate cancer underwent 1.5T mpMRI prior to template-mapping-biopsy (TPM). Twenty-six men had 'significant' TZ tumour. Two radiologists in consensus matched TPM to the single axial slice best depicting tumour, or largest TZ diameter for those with benign histology, to define single-slice whole TZ-regions-of-interest (ROIs). Textural-parameter differences between single-slice whole TZ-ROI containing significant tumour versus benign/insignificant tumour were analysed using Mann Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis cross-validated with leave-one-out (LOO) analysis. ADC kurtosis was significantly lower (p Textural features of the whole prostate TZ can discriminate significant prostatic cancer through reduced kurtosis of the ADC-histogram where significant tumour is included in TZ-ROI and reduced T1 entropy independent of tumour inclusion. • MR textural features of prostate transition zone may discriminate significant prostatic cancer. • Transition zone (TZ) containing significant tumour demonstrates a less peaked ADC histogram. • TZ containing significant tumour reveals higher post-contrast T1-weighted homogeneity. • The utility of MR texture analysis in prostate cancer merits further investigation.

  4. Intrinsically radiolabelled [(59)Fe]-SPIONs for dual MRI/radionuclide detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, David; Sun, Minghao; Yang, Likun; McDonagh, Philip R; Corwin, Frank; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Wang, Li; Vijayaragavan, Vimalan; Thadigiri, Celina; Lamichhane, Narottam; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Towards the development of iron oxide nanoparticles with intrinsically incorporated radionuclides for dual Positron Emission Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (PET/MRI) and more recently of Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Magnetic Resonance Imaging (SPECT/MRI), we have developed intrinsically radiolabeled [(59)Fe]-superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles ([(59)Fe]-SPIONs) as a proof of concept for an intrinsic dual probe strategy. (59)Fe was incorporated into Fe3O4 nanoparticle crystal lattice with 92±3% efficiency in thermal decomposition synthesis. Multidentate poly(acrylic acid)-dopamine-poly(ethylene-glycol-2000) (PAA-DOP-PEG) ligands were designed and synthesized based on facile EDC chemistry and utilized to functionalize the [(59)Fe]-SPIONs. The transverse relaxivity of [(59)Fe]-SPIONs (97±3 s(-1)mM(-1)) was characterized and found to be similar to non-radioactive SPIONs (72±10 s(-1)mM(-1)), indicating that (59)Fe incorporation does not alter the SPIONs' MRI contrast properties. [(59)Fe]-SPIONs were used to evaluate the nanoparticle biodistribution by ex vivo gamma counting and MRI. Nude mice (n=15) were injected with [(59)Fe]-SPIONs and imaged at various time points with 7T small animal MRI scanner. Ex vivo biodistribution was evaluated by tissue-based gamma counting. MRI signal contrast qualitatively correlates with the %ID/g of [(59)Fe]-SPIONs, with high contrast in liver (45±6%), medium contrast in kidneys (21±5%), and low contrast in brain (4±6%) at 24 hours. This work demonstrates the synthesis and in vivo application of intrinsically radiolabeled [(59)Fe]-SPIONs for bimodal detection and provides a proof of concept for incorporation of both gamma- and positron-emitting inorganic radionuclides into the core of metal based MRI contrast agent nanoparticles.

  5. Research progress of BOLD-functional MRI of hepatic encephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Zhang Longjiang; Lu Guangming

    2013-01-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (HE), characterized by a wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, ranging from behavior abnormality, conscious disorder and even coma, is a consequence of liver dysfunction in both acute and chronic hepatic diseases. Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) refers to a subgroup of cirrhotic patients without clinical overt hepatic encephalopathy symptoms hut with abnormalities in neuro -cognitive functions. HE/MHE can have a far-reaching impact on quality of life and prognosis. The exact neuropathology mechanism was still unclear. Recently, functional MRI (fMRI) has been increasingly applied for investigating the neuro-pathophysiological mechanism of HE. This paper will review the fMRI research applied on uncovering the neuropathology mechanism of HE. (authors)

  6. Adrenal phaeochromocytoma: correlation of MRI appearances with histology and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacques, Audrey E.T.; Sahdev, Anju; Sandrasagara, Madrika; Rockall, Andrea G.; Reznek, Rodney H.; Goldstein, Rick; Chew, Shern; Berney, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the range of appearances of adrenal phaeochromocytomas on T2-weighted MRI, correlate appearances with histopathology, and quantify the incidence of the previously described hyperintense appearance. The appearance and MR characteristics of 44 phaeochromocytomas were reviewed retrospectively. T2-weighted appearances were grouped: (1) 'classical', homogeneous, high signal intensity, isointense to CSF; (2) homogeneous, isointense or minimally hyperintense to spleen, hypointense to CSF; (3) heterogeneous, marbled appearance; (4) heterogeneous, multiple high signal intensity pockets. All 44 adrenal phaeochromocytomas were well circumscribed, 1.2-15 cm in maximum diameter, with no visual or quantitative signal loss on chemical shift imaging. On T2-weighted MRI 5/44 (11%) had group 1 appearance; 15/44 (34%) group 2, 7/44 (16%) group 3; and 17/44 (39%) group 4. Homogeneous group 1 and 2 lesions were smaller (mean 4.5 cm) than heterogeneous group 3 and 4 lesions (mean 6.3 cm). Increasing MRI heterogeneity correlated pathologically with increasing amounts of haemorrhage, necrosis and fibrosis. No MRI features were predictive of malignancy. Non-functioning phaeochromocytomas were larger than functioning lesions. No size difference was seen between syndrome and sporadic lesions. In this large series we report a wide range of appearances of adrenal phaeochromocytomas on T2-weighted MRI. The previously described classical hyperintense phaeochromocytoma is relatively uncommon. (orig.)

  7. Functional MRI (fMRI) on lesions in and around the motor and the eloquent cortices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Yoshie; Nakamura, Mitsugu; Tamura, Shogo; Tamaki, Norihiko; Kitamura, Junji

    1999-01-01

    From the view point of neurosurgeons, to aim the preoperative localized diagnosis on the motor and the eloquent cortices and postoperative preservation of neurological functions, fMRI was carried for patients with lesions in and around the motor and the eloquent cortices. Even in cases of mechanical oppression or brain edema, the motor and the eloquent cortices are localized on cerebral gyri. In perioperative period, identification and preserving the motor and the eloquent cortices are important for keeping brain function. Twenty six preoperative cases and 3 normal healthy subjects were observed. Exercise enhanced fMRI was performed on 3 normal healthy subjects, fMRI with motor stimulation in 24 cases and fMRI with speech stimulation in 4 cases. The signal intensity increased in all cases responsing to both stimulations. But the signal intensity in 8 cases decreased in some regions by motor stimulation and 1 case by speech stimulation. The decrease of signal intensity in this study seems to be a clinically important finding and it will be required to examine the significance in future. (K.H.)

  8. Hemorrhage detection in MRI brain images using images features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Luminita; Moldovanu, Simona; Bibicu, Dorin; Stratulat (Visan), Mirela

    2013-11-01

    The abnormalities appear frequently on Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) of brain in elderly patients presenting either stroke or cognitive impairment. Detection of brain hemorrhage lesions in MRI is an important but very time-consuming task. This research aims to develop a method to extract brain tissue features from T2-weighted MR images of the brain using a selection of the most valuable texture features in order to discriminate between normal and affected areas of the brain. Due to textural similarity between normal and affected areas in brain MR images these operation are very challenging. A trauma may cause microstructural changes, which are not necessarily perceptible by visual inspection, but they could be detected by using a texture analysis. The proposed analysis is developed in five steps: i) in the pre-processing step: the de-noising operation is performed using the Daubechies wavelets; ii) the original images were transformed in image features using the first order descriptors; iii) the regions of interest (ROIs) were cropped from images feature following up the axial symmetry properties with respect to the mid - sagittal plan; iv) the variation in the measurement of features was quantified using the two descriptors of the co-occurrence matrix, namely energy and homogeneity; v) finally, the meaningful of the image features is analyzed by using the t-test method. P-value has been applied to the pair of features in order to measure they efficacy.

  9. Muscle MRI and functional outcome measures in Becker muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barp, Andrea; Bello, Luca; Caumo, Luca; Campadello, Paola; Semplicini, Claudio; Lazzarotto, Annalisa; Sorarù, Gianni; Calore, Chiara; Rampado, Alessandro; Motta, Raffaella; Stramare, Roberto; Pegoraro, Elena

    2017-11-22

    Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) is a neuromuscular disorder allelic to Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), caused by in-frame mutations in the dystrophin gene, and characterized by a clinical progression that is both milder and more heterogeneous than DMD. Muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been proposed as biomarker of disease progression in dystrophinopathies. Correlation with clinically meaningful outcome measures such as North Star Ambulatory Assessment (NSAA) and 6 minute walk test (6MWT) is paramount for biomarker qualification. In this study, 51 molecularly confirmed BMD patients (aged 7-69 years) underwent muscle MRI and were evaluated with functional measures (NSAA and 6MWT) at the time of the MRI, and subsequently after one year. We confirmed a pattern of fatty substitution involving mainly the hip extensors and most thigh muscles. Severity of muscle fatty substitution was significantly correlated with specific DMD mutations: in particular, patients with an isolated deletion of exon 48, or deletions bordering exon 51, showed milder involvement. Fat infiltration scores correlated with baseline functional measures, and predicted changes after 1 year. We conclude that in BMD, skeletal muscle MRI not only strongly correlates with motor function, but also helps in predicting functional deterioration within a 12-month time frame.

  10. An Introduction to Normalization and Calibration Methods in Functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T.; Glover, Gary H.; Mueller, Bryon A.; Greve, Douglas N.; Brown, Gregory G.

    2013-01-01

    In functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), the blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal is often interpreted as a measure of neural activity. However, because the BOLD signal reflects the complex interplay of neural, vascular, and metabolic processes, such an interpretation is not always valid. There is growing evidence that changes…

  11. Functional MRI of human hypothalamic responses following glucose ingestion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, C. de; Stafleu, A.; Osch, M.J.P. van; Grond, J. van der

    2005-01-01

    The hypothalamus is intimately involved in the regulation of food intake, integrating multiple neural and hormonal signals. Several hypothalamic nuclei contain glucose-sensitive neurons, which play a crucial role in energy homeostasis. Although a few functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

  12. Novel fMRI working memory paradigm accurately detects cognitive impairment in Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Flavia; Akhtar, Mohammad A.; Zúñiga, Edward; Perez, Carlos A.; Hasan, Khader M.; Wilken, Jeffrey; Wolinsky, Jerry S.; Narayana, Ponnada A.; Steinberg, Joel L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cognitive impairment (CI) cannot be diagnosed by MRI. Functional MRI (fMRI) paradigms such as the immediate/delayed memory task (I/DMT), detect varying degrees of working memory. Preliminary findings using I/DMT, showed differences in Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) activation between impaired (MSCI, n=12) and non-impaired (MSNI, n=9) MS patients. Objectives To confirm CI detection based on I/DMT’ BOLD activation in a larger cohort of MS patients. The role of T2 lesion volume (LV) and EDSS in magnitude of BOLD signal were also sought. Methods Fifty patients [EDSS mean (m) = 3.2, DD m =12 yr., age m =40yr.] underwent the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in MS (MACFIMS) and the I/DMT. Working-memory activation (WMa) represents BOLD signal during DMT minus signal during IMT. CI was based on MACFIMS. Results 10 MSNI, 30 MSCI and 4 borderline patients were included in analyses. ANOVA showed MSNI had significantly greater WMa than MSCI, in the left (L) prefrontal cortex and L supplementary motor area (p = 0.032). Regression analysis showed significant inverse correlations between WMa and T2 LV/EDSS in similar areas (p = 0.005, 0.004 respectively). Conclusion I/DMT-based BOLD activation detects CI in MS, larger studies are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:27613119

  13. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker; Wedekind, Christoph; Bunke, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  14. The Neural Basis of Typewriting: A Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashiyama, Yuichi; Takeda, Katsuhiko; Someya, Yoshiaki; Kuroiwa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Fumiaki

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the neural substrate of typewriting Japanese words and to detect the difference between the neural substrate of typewriting and handwriting, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in 16 healthy volunteers. All subjects were skillful touch typists and performed five tasks: a typing task, a writing task, a reading task, and two control tasks. Three brain regions were activated during both the typing and the writing tasks: the left superior parietal lobule, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the left premotor cortex close to Exner's area. Although typing and writing involved common brain regions, direct comparison between the typing and the writing task revealed greater left posteromedial intraparietal cortex activation in the typing task. In addition, activity in the left premotor cortex was more rostral in the typing task than in the writing task. These findings suggest that, although the brain circuits involved in Japanese typewriting are almost the same as those involved in handwriting, there are brain regions that are specific for typewriting.

  15. The Neural Basis of Typewriting: A Functional MRI Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Higashiyama

    Full Text Available To investigate the neural substrate of typewriting Japanese words and to detect the difference between the neural substrate of typewriting and handwriting, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI study in 16 healthy volunteers. All subjects were skillful touch typists and performed five tasks: a typing task, a writing task, a reading task, and two control tasks. Three brain regions were activated during both the typing and the writing tasks: the left superior parietal lobule, the left supramarginal gyrus, and the left premotor cortex close to Exner's area. Although typing and writing involved common brain regions, direct comparison between the typing and the writing task revealed greater left posteromedial intraparietal cortex activation in the typing task. In addition, activity in the left premotor cortex was more rostral in the typing task than in the writing task. These findings suggest that, although the brain circuits involved in Japanese typewriting are almost the same as those involved in handwriting, there are brain regions that are specific for typewriting.

  16. Clinical outcome following a low-suspicion multiparametric prostate MRI or benign MRI-guided biopsy to detect prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Lars; Nørgaard, Nis; Løgager, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    follow-up [132/156 (85%)] had decreasing levels of prostate-specific-antigen and could be monitored in primary care. CONCLUSION: A low-suspicion MRI in men with prior negative systematic biopsies has a high negative predictive value in ruling out longer term significant cancer. Therefore, immediate...... repeated biopsies are of limited clinical value and could be avoided even if prostate-specific-antigen levels are persistently elevated.......PURPOSE: To assess the future risk of detecting significant prostate cancer following either a low-suspicion MRI or suspicious MRI with benign MRI-guided biopsies in men with prior negative systematic biopsies. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 289 prospectively enrolled men underwent MRI followed by repeated...

  17. Cortical language activation in aphasia: a functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaojun; Zhang Minming; Shang Desheng; Wang Qidong; Luo Benyan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the differences of the underlying neural basis of language processing between normal subjects and aphasics, and to study the feasibility for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in examining the cortical language activation in clinical aphasics. Methods: fMRI was used to map language network in 6 normal subjects and 3 patients with aphasia who were in the stage of recovery from acute stroke. The participants performed word generation task during fMRI scanning, which measured the signal changes associated with regional neural activity induced by the task. These signal changes were processed to statistically generate the activation map that represented the language area. Results: In normal subjects, a distributed language network was activated. Activations were present in the frontal, temporal, parietal and occipital regions in normal group. In the patient group, however, no activation was showed in the left inferior frontal gyrus whether or not the patient had lesion in the left frontal lobe. Two patients showed activations in some right hemisphere regions where no activation appeared in normal subjects. Conclusion: The remote effect of focal lesion and functional redistribution or reorganization was found in aphasic patients. fMRI was useful in evaluating the language function in aphasic patients. (authors)

  18. Remotely detected high-field MRI of porous samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Juliette A.; Han, Song-I.; Pines, Alexander

    2004-04-01

    Remote detection of NMR is a novel technique in which an NMR-active sensor surveys an environment of interest and retains memory of that environment to be recovered at a later time in a different location. The NMR or MRI information about the sensor nucleus is encoded and stored as spin polarization at the first location and subsequently moved to a different physical location for optimized detection. A dedicated probe incorporating two separate radio frequency (RF)—circuits was built for this purpose. The encoding solenoid coil was large enough to fit around the bulky sample matrix, while the smaller detection solenoid coil had not only a higher quality factor, but also an enhanced filling factor since the coil volume comprised purely the sensor nuclei. We obtained two-dimensional (2D) void space images of two model porous samples with resolution less than 1.4 mm 2. The remotely reconstructed images demonstrate the ability to determine fine structure with image quality superior to their directly detected counterparts and show the great potential of NMR remote detection for imaging applications that suffer from low sensitivity due to low concentrations and filling factor.

  19. Bayesian Inference for Functional Dynamics Exploring in fMRI Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to review state-of-the-art Bayesian-inference-based methods applied to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI data. Particularly, we focus on one specific long-standing challenge in the computational modeling of fMRI datasets: how to effectively explore typical functional interactions from fMRI time series and the corresponding boundaries of temporal segments. Bayesian inference is a method of statistical inference which has been shown to be a powerful tool to encode dependence relationships among the variables with uncertainty. Here we provide an introduction to a group of Bayesian-inference-based methods for fMRI data analysis, which were designed to detect magnitude or functional connectivity change points and to infer their functional interaction patterns based on corresponding temporal boundaries. We also provide a comparison of three popular Bayesian models, that is, Bayesian Magnitude Change Point Model (BMCPM, Bayesian Connectivity Change Point Model (BCCPM, and Dynamic Bayesian Variable Partition Model (DBVPM, and give a summary of their applications. We envision that more delicate Bayesian inference models will be emerging and play increasingly important roles in modeling brain functions in the years to come.

  20. Combination of functional MRI with SAS and MRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Masayuki; Takeshita, Shinichirou; Kutsuna, Munenori; Akimitsu, Tomohide; Arita, Kazunori; Kurisu, Kaoru [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-02-01

    For presurgical diagnosis of brain surface, combination of functional MRI (fMRI) with the MR angiography was examined. This method could visualize brain bay, convolution and vein as index of surface. Five normal adults (male, mean age: 28-year-old) and 7 patients with brain tumor on the main locus to surface (male: 4, female: 3, mean age: 52.3-year-old) were studied. fMRI was performed by SPGR method (TR 70, TE 40, flip angle 60, one slice, thickness 10 mm, FOV 20 cm, matrix 128 x 128). The brain surface was visualized by SAS (surface anatomy scanning). SAS was performed by FSE method (TR 6000, TE 200, echo train 16, thickness 20 mm, slice 3, NEX 2). Cortical veins near superior sagittal sinus were visualized by MRA with 2D-TOF method (TR 50, TE 20, flip angle 60, thickness 2 mm, slice 28, NEX 1). These images were superimposed and functional image of peripheral sensorimotor region was evaluated anatomically. In normal adults, high signal was visualized at another side of near sensorimotor region at 8 of 10 sides. All high signal area of fMRI agreed with cortical vein near sensorimotor region that was visualized by MRA. In patients with brain tumor, signal was visualized at another side of sensorimotor region of tumor without 2 cases with palsy. In another side of tumor, signal of fMRI was visualized in 5 of 7 cases. The tumor was visualized as opposite low signal field in SAS. Locational relation between tumor and brain surface and brain function was visualized distinctly by combination of MRA, SAS and MRA. This method could become useful for presurgical diagnosis. (K.H.)

  1. Brain MRI Tumor Detection using Active Contour Model and Local Image Fitting Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabizadeh, Nooshin; John, Nigel

    2014-03-01

    Automatic abnormality detection in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is an important issue in many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Here an automatic brain tumor detection method is introduced that uses T1-weighted images and K. Zhang et. al.'s active contour model driven by local image fitting (LIF) energy. Local image fitting energy obtains the local image information, which enables the algorithm to segment images with intensity inhomogeneities. Advantage of this method is that the LIF energy functional has less computational complexity than the local binary fitting (LBF) energy functional; moreover, it maintains the sub-pixel accuracy and boundary regularization properties. In Zhang's algorithm, a new level set method based on Gaussian filtering is used to implement the variational formulation, which is not only vigorous to prevent the energy functional from being trapped into local minimum, but also effective in keeping the level set function regular. Experiments show that the proposed method achieves high accuracy brain tumor segmentation results.

  2. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    to both the results of the contrast sensitivity test and to the Snellen visual acuity. Our results indicate that fMRI is a useful method for the study of ON, even in cases where the visual acuity is severely impaired. The reduction in activated volume could be explained as a reduced neuronal input......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...... of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...

  3. Annexin V–CLIO: A Nanoparticle for Detecting Apoptosis by MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyk A. Schellenberger

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Annexin V, which recognizes the phosphatidylserine of apoptotic cells, was conjugated to crosslinked iron oxide (CLIO nanoparticles, a functionalized superparamagnetic preparation developed for target-specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The resulting nanoparticle had an average of 2.7 annexin V proteins linked per CLIO nanoparticle through disulfide bonds. Using camptothecin to induce apoptosis, a mixture of Jurkat T cells (69% healthy and 31% apoptotic was incubated with annexin V–CLIO and was applied to magnetic columns. The result was an almost complete removal of the apoptotic cells (>99%. In a phantom MRI experiment, untreated control cells (12% apoptotic cells, 88% healthy cells and camptothecin-treated cells (65% apoptotic cells, 35% healthy cells were incubated with either annexin V–CLIO (1.0, 0.5, and 0.1 μg Fe/mL or with unlabeled CLIO. A significant signal decrease of camptothecin-treated cells relative to untreated cells was observed even at the lowest concentration tested. Unmodified CLIO failed to cause a significant signal change of apoptotic cells. Hence, annexin V–CLIO allowed the identification of cell suspensions containing apoptotic cells by MRI even at very low concentrations of magnetic substrate. Conjugation of annexin V to CLIO affords a strategy for the development of a MRI imaging probe for detecting apoptosis.

  4. Altered resting-state functional connectivity in post-traumatic stress disorder: a perfusion MRI study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojuan; Liu, Jian; Liu, Yang; Lu, Hong-Bing; Yin, Hong

    2013-03-01

    The majority of studies on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) so far have focused on delineating patterns of activations during cognitive processes. Recently, more and more researches have started to investigate functional connectivity in PTSD subjects using BOLD-fMRI. Functional connectivity analysis has been demonstrated as a powerful approach to identify biomarkers of different brain diseases. This study aimed to detect resting-state functional connectivity abnormities in patients with PTSD using arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI. As a completely non-invasive technique, ASL allows quantitative estimates of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Compared with BOLD-fMRI, ASL fMRI has many advantages, including less low-frequency signal drifts, superior functional localization, etc. In the current study, ASL images were collected from 10 survivors in mining disaster with recent onset PTSD and 10 survivors without PTSD. Decreased regional CBF in the right middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus, and postcentral gyrus was detected in the PTSD patients. Seed-based resting-state functional connectivity analysis was performed using an area in the right middle temporal gyrus as region of interest. Compared with the non-PTSD group, the PTSD subjects demonstrated increased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right superior temporal gyrus, the left middle temporal gyrus. Meanwhile, decreased functional connectivity between the right middle temporal gyrus and the right postcentral gyrus, the right superior parietal lobule was also found in the PTSD patients. This is the first study which investigated resting-state functional connectivity in PTSD using ASL images. The results may provide new insight into the neural substrates of PTSD.

  5. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcar, V.L.; Girard, F.; Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E.

    2002-01-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  6. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcar, V.L. [University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Treichlerstrasse 10, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Girard, F. [GE Medical Systems SA, 283, rue de la Miniere B.P. 34, 78533 Buc Cedex (France); Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E. [University Children' s Hospital, Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-11-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  7. Study of human brain functions by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and spectroscopy (fMRS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagannathan, N.R.

    1998-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has become a powerful tool in the detection and assessment of cerebral pathophysiology and the regional mapping and characterization of cognitive processes such as motor skills, vision, language and memory. The results of the effect of motor cortex stimulation during repetitive hand squeezing task activation using in-vivo single voxel NMR spectroscopy carried out on normal volunteer subjects are presented

  8. Comparative studies of brain activation with MEG and functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Aine, C.J.; Sanders, J.A.; Lewine, J.D.; Caprihan, A.

    1993-01-01

    The past two years have witnessed the emergence of MRI as a functional imaging methodology. Initial demonstrations involved the injection of a paramagnetic contrast agent and required ultrafast echo planar imaging capability to adequately resolve the passage of the injected bolus. By measuring the local reduction in image intensity due to magnetic susceptibility, it was possible to calculate blood volume, which changes as a function of neural activation. Later developments have exploited endogenous contrast mechanisms to monitor changes in blood volume or in venous blood oxygen content. Recently, we and others have demonstrated that it is possible to make such measurements in a clinical imager, suggesting that the large installed base of such machines might be utilized for functional imaging. Although it is likely that functional MRI (fMRI) will subsume some of the clinical and basic neuroscience applications now touted for MEG, it is also clear that these techniques offer different largely complementary, capabilities. At the very least, it is useful to compare and cross-validate the activation maps produced by these techniques. Such studies will be valuable as a check on results of neuromagnetic distributed current reconstructions and will allow better characterization of the relationship between neurophysiological activation and associated hemodynamic changes. A more exciting prospect is the development of analyses that combine information from the two modalities to produce a better description of underlying neural activity than is possible with either technique in isolation. In this paper we describe some results from initial comparative studies and outline several techniques that can be used to treat MEG and fMRI data within a unified computational framework

  9. Functional MRI in Patients with Intracranial Lesions near Language Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakyemez, B; Erdogan, C; Yildirim, N; Bora, I; Bekar, A; Parlak, M

    2006-06-30

    We aimed to depict Broca's area and Wernicke's area by word generation and sentence formation paradigms in patients with various intracranial lesions adjacent to language areas using functional MRI technique and to evaluate the ability of functional MRI to lateralize the hemispheric dominance for language. Twenty-three right-handed patients were included in this study. Lesions were classified as low-grade glioma (n=8), high-grade glioma (n=9), metastasis (n=1), meningioma (n=1), arteriovenous malformation (n=2) and mesial temporal sclerosis (n=2). We performed blood-oxygenated-level-dependant functional MRI using a 1.5-T unit. Word generation and sentence formation tasks were used to activate language areas. Language areas were defined as Brodmann 44, 45 (Broca's area) and Brodmann 22 area (Wernicke's area). Laterality index was used to show the dominant hemisphere. Two poorly cooperative patients showed no activation and were excluded from the study. Broca's area was localized in 21 patients (100 %). Wernicke's area, on the other hand, could only be localized in eight of the 21 patients (38 %).The left hemisphere was dominant in 86% of patients while atypical language lateralization (right or bilateral) was demonstrated in 14% of the patients. Bilateral activation areas were shown in 10% of those patients while right cerebral hemisphere was dominant in 4% of the patients. Word generation and sentence formation tasks are especially helpful in localizing Broca's area. Wernicke's area could also be demonstrated in some of the cases. Functional MRI can be used as an important and useful means of demonstrating language areas in patients with lesions adjacent to those areas and depicting the hemispheric dominance.

  10. Diagnostic imaging strategy for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions: use of targeted sonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Satoko; Ohtsuka, Masahiko; Mibu, Akemi; Karikomi, Masato; Sakata, Hitomi; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Leading-edge technology such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT) often reveals mammographically and ultrasonographically occult lesions. MRI is a well-documented, effective tool to evaluate these lesions; however, the detection rate of targeted sonography varies for MRI detected lesions, and its significance is not well established in diagnostic strategy of MRI detected lesions. We assessed the utility of targeted sonography for multidetector-row CT (MDCT)- or MRI-detected lesions in practice. We retrospectively reviewed 695 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who were candidates for breast conserving surgery and underwent MDCT or MRI in our hospital between January 2004 and March 2011. Targeted sonography was performed in all MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions followed by imaging-guided biopsy. Patient background, histopathology features and the sizes of the lesions were compared among benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Of the 695 patients, 61 lesions in 56 patients were detected by MDCT or MRI. The MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography in 58 out of 61 lesions (95.1%). Patients with pathological diagnoses were significantly older and more likely to be postmenopausal than the follow-up patients. Pathological diagnosis proved to be benign in 20 cases and malignant in 25. The remaining 16 lesions have been followed up. Lesion size and shape were not significantly different among the benign, malignant and follow-up groups. Approximately 95% of MDCT- or MRI-detected lesions were identified by targeted sonography, and nearly half of these lesions were pathologically proven malignancies in this study. Targeted sonography is a useful modality for MDCT- or MRI-detected breast lesions

  11. Sensitivity of enhanced MRI for the detection of breast cancer: new, multicentric, residual, and recurrent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, P.L.; McCarty, K.S. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the breast brings the advantages of high resolution cross-sectional imaging to breast cancer diagnosis, treatment and research: improved cancer detection, staging, selection of therapy, evaluation of therapeutic response in vivo, detection of recurrence, and even the development of new therapies. Until now breast cancer treatment and research has been impeded by the limited means of evaluating the breast cancer in vivo: primarily clinical palpation and mammography of the breast tumor. A review of the initial studies shows that with the use of paramagnetic contrast agents, MRI has a sensitivity of 96 % for detecting breast cancers. MRI detects multicentric disease with a sensitivity of 98 %, superior to any other modality. The ability of MRI to detect recurrent local breast cancer in the conservatively treated breast is nearly 100 %. MRI is capable of monitoring tumor response to chemotherapy and actually guiding therapeutic interventions such as interstitial laser photocoagulation. (orig.)

  12. Incremental Activation Detection for Real-Time fMRI Series Using Robust Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Real-time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI is a technique that enables us to observe human brain activations in real time. However, some unexpected noises that emerged in fMRI data collecting, such as acute swallowing, head moving and human manipulations, will cause much confusion and unrobustness for the activation analysis. In this paper, a new activation detection method for rt-fMRI data is proposed based on robust Kalman filter. The idea is to add a variation to the extended kalman filter to handle the additional sparse measurement noise and a sparse noise term to the measurement update step. Hence, the robust Kalman filter is designed to improve the robustness for the outliers and can be computed separately for each voxel. The algorithm can compute activation maps on each scan within a repetition time, which meets the requirement for real-time analysis. Experimental results show that this new algorithm can bring out high performance in robustness and in real-time activation detection.

  13. Acquisition and analysis strategies in functional MRI at high fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windischberger, C.

    2001-08-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging represents a non-invasive technique to examine neuronal activity in the brain. It applies radio waves to excite nuclear spins, using the emitted signal during relaxation for image generation. Signal modulations from local blood flow and oxygenation level changes caused by neuronal activity are the basis for calculating functional brain maps with high spatial resolution. The present work discusses concepts for improving the spatial and temporal resolution, as well as sophisticated analysis approaches. Besides an exhaustive description of image reconstruction algorithms, computational simulations on echo-shifting in echo-planar imaging are presented and effects on spatial resolution are quantified. The results demonstrate that echo-shifting causes only minimal resolution losses for high signal-to-noise data, but leads to severe resolution degradation (up to 30 %) in images with low signal-to-noise ratios. After an overview of the mechanisms that cause fMRI signal changes subsequent to neuronal activity, explorative analysis algorithms like Fuzzy Cluster Analysis, as well as parametric approaches are described and discussed. In the context of fMRI artifacts, effects of respiratory motion are examined. For the first time, well-defined breathing patterns are used to quantify the influences on fMRI signal intensity. Also, the variability of fMRI activation in a mental rotation paradigm are investigated, using single-trial analysis. Such, intra-subject activation consistency was determined successfully. Finally, in a second study on mental rotation explorative data analysis was applied to retrieve neuro-functional hypotheses. (author)

  14. Large-scale Granger causality analysis on resting-state functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Adora M.; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate an approach to measure the information flow between each pair of time series in resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) data of the human brain and subsequently recover its underlying network structure. By integrating dimensionality reduction into predictive time series modeling, large-scale Granger Causality (lsGC) analysis method can reveal directed information flow suggestive of causal influence at an individual voxel level, unlike other multivariate approaches. This method quantifies the influence each voxel time series has on every other voxel time series in a multivariate sense and hence contains information about the underlying dynamics of the whole system, which can be used to reveal functionally connected networks within the brain. To identify such networks, we perform non-metric network clustering, such as accomplished by the Louvain method. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach to recover the motor and visual cortex from resting state human brain fMRI data and compare it with the network recovered from a visuomotor stimulation experiment, where the similarity is measured by the Dice Coefficient (DC). The best DC obtained was 0.59 implying a strong agreement between the two networks. In addition, we thoroughly study the effect of dimensionality reduction in lsGC analysis on network recovery. We conclude that our approach is capable of detecting causal influence between time series in a multivariate sense, which can be used to segment functionally connected networks in the resting-state fMRI.

  15. Enhanced subject-specific resting-state network detection and extraction with fast fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Burak; Lee, Hsu-Lei; Hennig, Jürgen; LeVan, Pierre

    2017-02-01

    Resting-state networks have become an important tool for the study of brain function. An ultra-fast imaging technique that allows to measure brain function, called Magnetic Resonance Encephalography (MREG), achieves an order of magnitude higher temporal resolution than standard echo-planar imaging (EPI). This new sequence helps to correct physiological artifacts and improves the sensitivity of the fMRI analysis. In this study, EPI is compared with MREG in terms of capability to extract resting-state networks. Healthy controls underwent two consecutive resting-state scans, one with EPI and the other with MREG. Subject-level independent component analyses (ICA) were performed separately for each of the two datasets. Using Stanford FIND atlas parcels as network templates, the presence of ICA maps corresponding to each network was quantified in each subject. The number of detected individual networks was significantly higher in the MREG data set than for EPI. Moreover, using short time segments of MREG data, such as 50 seconds, one can still detect and track consistent networks. Fast fMRI thus results in an increased capability to extract distinct functional regions at the individual subject level for the same scan times, and also allow the extraction of consistent networks within shorter time intervals than when using EPI, which is notably relevant for the analysis of dynamic functional connectivity fluctuations. Hum Brain Mapp 38:817-830, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Role of New Functional MRI Techniques in the Diagnosis, Staging, and Followup of Gynecological Cancer: Comparison with PET-CT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Alvarez Moreno

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in diagnostic imaging techniques have magnified the role and potential of both MRI and PET-CT in female pelvic imaging. This article reviews the techniques and clinical applications of new functional MRI (fMRI including diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI, dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI, comparing with PET-CT. These new emerging provide not only anatomic but also functional imaging, allowing detection of small volumes of active tumor at diagnosis and early disease relapse, which may not result in detectable morphological changes at conventional imaging. This information is useful in distinguishing between recurrent/residual tumor and post-treatment changes and assessing treatment response, with a clear impact on patient management. Both PET-CT and now fMRI have proved to be very valuable tools for evaluation of gynecologic tumors. Most papers try to compare these techniques, but in our experience both are complementary in management of these patients. Meanwhile PET-CT is superior in diagnosis of ganglionar disease; fMRI presents higher accuracy in local preoperative staging. Both techniques can be used as biomarkers of tumor response and present high accuracy in diagnosis of local recurrence and peritoneal dissemination, with complementary roles depending on histological type, anatomic location and tumoral volume.

  17. MRI evaluation and functional assessment of brain injury after hypoxic ischemia in neonatal mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adén, Ulrika; Dahlberg, Viktoria; Fredholm, Bertil B; Lai, Li-Ju; Chen, Zhengguan; Bjelke, Börje

    2002-05-01

    Severe perinatal asphyxia is an important cause of brain injury in the newborn infant. We examined early events after hypoxic ischemia (HI) in the 7-day-old mouse brain by MRI and related them to long-term functional effects and histopathology in the same animals at 4 to 5 weeks of age. HI was induced in 7-day-old CD1 mice by exposure to 8% oxygen for 30 minutes after occlusion of the left common carotid artery. The resulting unilateral focal lesion was evaluated in vivo by MRI (T2 maps and apparent diffusion coefficient maps) at 3, 6, and 24 hours and 5 days after hypoxia. Locomotion and sensorimotor function were analyzed after 3 weeks. Four weeks after HI, the mice were killed, and cresyl violet-stained brain sections were examined morphologically. A decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient values in cortex on the affected side was found at 3 hours after HI. T2 values were significantly increased after 6 hours and remained so for 5 days. Maximal size of the lesion was attained at 3 to 6 hours after HI and declined thereafter. Animals with MRI-detected lesions had decreased forward locomotion, performed worse than controls in the beam-walking test, and showed a unilateral hypotrophy in the cresyl violet-stained brain sections 4 weeks later. The temporal progression of the damage after HI in 7-day-old mice differs from that of the adult brain as judged by MRI. The early lesions detected by MRI were related to functional impairments for these mice in near-adult life.

  18. Functional MRI studies in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lei; Jin Zhen; Zeng Yawei; Wang Yan; Zang Yufeng

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the brain activation map during Go-NoGo tasks in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and matched controls using functional MRI. Methods: Block designed BOLD functional MRI scan covering the whole brain was performed on 10 boys having ADHD and 11 healthy boys. The 2 groups were matched by age, sex, and handedness. Executing advanced inhibitory Go-NoGo tasks served as stimuli for all subjects. The fMRI data was analyzed by SPM99 (Statistical Parametric Mapping) software with statistic t-test to generate the activation map. Results: (1) The normal children showed significant activations in left thalamus and right cingulate gyrus and fewer activations in right middle frontal gyrus during stimulate controlled Go task, but the children with ADHD showed less activations in left thalamus. (2) In response controlled Go task, the normal children showed activations in right insula, cingulate gyrus and left frontal gyrus, while the ADHD children showed lower power of response in the right middle frontal gyrus.(3) In NoGo task, right middle frontal gyrus was the dominant activated regions, and left anterior cingulate, left middle frontal gyrus and right thalamus also had some activations in normal children, while the activations of right prefrontal decreased and the thalamus increased in ADHD boys. Conclusion: In children with ADHD, some dysfunctional brain areas, mainly the prefrontal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus were found. Thalamus was also involved according to the brain activation map

  19. Functional MRI studies in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Zhang; Zhen, Jin; Yawei, Zeng; Yan, Wang [fMRI Center, Lab of Cognition Science and Learning, National Education Ministry and Department of Radiology, 306 Hospital of PLA, Beijing (China); Yufeng, Zang

    2004-06-01

    Objective: To investigate the brain activation map during Go-NoGo tasks in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and matched controls using functional MRI. Methods: Block designed BOLD functional MRI scan covering the whole brain was performed on 10 boys having ADHD and 11 healthy boys. The 2 groups were matched by age, sex, and handedness. Executing advanced inhibitory Go-NoGo tasks served as stimuli for all subjects. The fMRI data was analyzed by SPM99 (Statistical Parametric Mapping) software with statistic t-test to generate the activation map. Results: (1) The normal children showed significant activations in left thalamus and right cingulate gyrus and fewer activations in right middle frontal gyrus during stimulate controlled Go task, but the children with ADHD showed less activations in left thalamus. (2) In response controlled Go task, the normal children showed activations in right insula, cingulate gyrus and left frontal gyrus, while the ADHD children showed lower power of response in the right middle frontal gyrus.(3) In NoGo task, right middle frontal gyrus was the dominant activated regions, and left anterior cingulate, left middle frontal gyrus and right thalamus also had some activations in normal children, while the activations of right prefrontal decreased and the thalamus increased in ADHD boys. Conclusion: In children with ADHD, some dysfunctional brain areas, mainly the prefrontal lobe and anterior cingulate gyrus were found. Thalamus was also involved according to the brain activation map.

  20. Detecting Brain State Changes via Fiber-Centered Functional Connectivity Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Lim, Chulwoo; Li, Kaiming; Guo, Lei; Liu, Tianming

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have been widely used to study structural and functional brain connectivity in recent years. A common assumption used in many previous functional brain connectivity studies is the temporal stationarity. However, accumulating literature evidence has suggested that functional brain connectivity is under temporal dynamic changes in different time scales. In this paper, a novel and intuitive approach is proposed to model and detect dynamic changes of functional brain states based on multimodal fMRI/DTI data. The basic idea is that functional connectivity patterns of all fiber-connected cortical voxels are concatenated into a descriptive functional feature vector to represent the brain’s state, and the temporal change points of brain states are decided by detecting the abrupt changes of the functional vector patterns via the sliding window approach. Our extensive experimental results have shown that meaningful brain state change points can be detected in task-based fMRI/DTI, resting state fMRI/DTI, and natural stimulus fMRI/DTI data sets. Particularly, the detected change points of functional brain states in task-based fMRI corresponded well to the external stimulus paradigm administered to the participating subjects, thus partially validating the proposed brain state change detection approach. The work in this paper provides novel perspective on the dynamic behaviors of functional brain connectivity and offers a starting point for future elucidation of the complex patterns of functional brain interactions and dynamics. PMID:22941508

  1. Comparison of AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in the detection of hepatic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saitou, Kazuhiro; Matsuda, Hiromichi; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Hirose, Takashi; Karizaki, Dai; Abe, Kimihiko; Amino, Saburou

    1994-01-01

    We performed AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT in 12 cases of hepatic lesions. Nine of these were hepatocellular carcinomas. Two cases were metastatic liver tumors (the primary lesion was gastric in one and the other was gallbladder cancer). One case was suspected to be adenomatous hyperplasia. Thirty-two lesions were detected in T2-weighted SE images before AMI-25 administration, while 46 lesions were detected in AMI-25 enhanced MRI images. In particular, AMI-25 enhanced MRI was superior to plain MRI in lesions less than 10 mm in size. A total of 48 lesions were detected in helical dynamic CT. Although AMI-25 enhanced MRI almost equaled helical dynamic CT in the detection of liver tumors, helical dynamic CT was slightly superior to AMI-25 enhanced MRI in the detection of subphrenic lesions. It was possible to know the hemodynamics in each hepatic lesion by helical dynamic CT. AMI-25 enhanced MRI was useful to know the inclusion of reticuloendothelial system, and that yielded different diagnoses in adenomatous hyperplasia and well differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma. Helical dynamic CT was useful for qualitative diagnosis. Both AMI-25 enhanced MRI and helical dynamic CT contributed to the detection of liver tumor and qualitative diagnosis. (author)

  2. MRI surveillance for the detection of local recurrence in rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hupkens, Britt J.P.; Martens, Milou H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Maastricht (Netherlands); GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maas, Monique [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G. [Laurentius Hospital, Department of Radiology, Roermond (Netherlands); Leijtens, Jeroen W.A. [Laurentius Hospital, Department of Surgery, Roermond (Netherlands); Nelemans, Patty J. [Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bakers, Frans C.H. [Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Lambregts, Doenja M.J. [The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beets, Geerard L. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Surgery, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Beets-Tan, Regina G.H. [GROW School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht (Netherlands); The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI for detection of local recurrence of rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Between January 2006 and February 2014, 81 patients who underwent TEM were included. Two expert readers (R1 and R2), independently evaluated T2-weighted (T2W) MRI and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI for the detection of local recurrence, retrospectively, and recorded confidence on a five-point scale. Diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI was assessed using ROC-curve analysis and kappa statistics for the reproducibility between readers. 293 MRIs were performed, 203 included DWI. 18 (22%) patients developed a local recurrence: luminal 11, nodal two and both five. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for local recurrence detection were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. For DWI, AUCs were 0.70 (R1) and 0.89 (R2). For nodal recurrence AUCs were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. Reproducibility was good for T2W-MRI (κ0.68 for luminal and κ0.71 for nodal recurrence) and moderate for DWI (κ0.57). AUCs and reproducibility for recurrence detection increased during follow-up. Follow-up with MRI after TEM for rectal cancer is feasible. Postoperative changes can be confusing at the first postoperative MRI, but during follow-up diagnostic performance and reproducibility increase. (orig.)

  3. MRI surveillance for the detection of local recurrence in rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hupkens, Britt J.P.; Martens, Milou H.; Maas, Monique; Deserno, Willem M.L.L.G.; Leijtens, Jeroen W.A.; Nelemans, Patty J.; Bakers, Frans C.H.; Lambregts, Doenja M.J.; Beets, Geerard L.; Beets-Tan, Regina G.H.

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI for detection of local recurrence of rectal cancer after transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEM). Between January 2006 and February 2014, 81 patients who underwent TEM were included. Two expert readers (R1 and R2), independently evaluated T2-weighted (T2W) MRI and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI for the detection of local recurrence, retrospectively, and recorded confidence on a five-point scale. Diagnostic performance of follow-up MRI was assessed using ROC-curve analysis and kappa statistics for the reproducibility between readers. 293 MRIs were performed, 203 included DWI. 18 (22%) patients developed a local recurrence: luminal 11, nodal two and both five. Areas under the curve (AUCs) for local recurrence detection were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. For DWI, AUCs were 0.70 (R1) and 0.89 (R2). For nodal recurrence AUCs were 0.72 (R1) and 0.80 (R2) for T2W-MRI. Reproducibility was good for T2W-MRI (κ0.68 for luminal and κ0.71 for nodal recurrence) and moderate for DWI (κ0.57). AUCs and reproducibility for recurrence detection increased during follow-up. Follow-up with MRI after TEM for rectal cancer is feasible. Postoperative changes can be confusing at the first postoperative MRI, but during follow-up diagnostic performance and reproducibility increase. (orig.)

  4. Practical Introduction to Cerebral Functional Magnetic Resonance (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Jorge Andres; Rascovsky Simon; Sanz, Alexander; Castrillon, Juan Gabriel

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR ) imaging holds a privileged position within neuroimaging techniques owing to its high anatomic detail and its capacity to study many physiological processes. The appearance of functional magnetic resonance (fMR I) brings more relevance to MR , turning it into a powerful tool with the ability to group, in a single exam, high-resolution anatomy and cerebral function. In this article we describe the principles and some advantages of fMRI compared to other neuro functional imaging modalities. In addition, we present the site wide and analysis requisites for the performance and post-processing of the most common neuro functional experiments in clinical practice. We also include neuro functional images obtained at Instituto de Alta Tecnologia Medica of Antioquia (IATM ) on a healthy volunteer group and two pathological cases. Lastly, we mention some of the practical indications of this technique which is still in an intense development, research and validation phase.

  5. HIV Infection Is Associated with Impaired Striatal Function during Inhibition with Normal Cortical Functioning on Functional MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    du Plessis, Stéfan; Vink, Matthijs; Joska, John A; Koutsilieri, Eleni; Bagadia, Asif; Stein, Dan J; Emsley, Robin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of HIV infection on cortical and subcortical regions of the frontal-striatal system involved in the inhibition of voluntary movement. Functional MRI (fMRI) studies suggest that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is associated with

  6. Quantitative evaluation of the reticuloendothelial system function with dynamic MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate the reticuloendothelial system (RES function by real-time imaging blood clearance as well as hepatic uptake of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPIO using dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI with two-compartment pharmacokinetic modeling.Kinetics of blood clearance and hepatic accumulation were recorded in young adult male 01b74 athymic nude mice by dynamic T2* weighted MRI after the injection of different doses of SPIO nanoparticles (0.5, 3 or 10 mg Fe/kg. Association parameter, Kin, dissociation parameter, Kout, and elimination constant, Ke, derived from dynamic data with two-compartment model, were used to describe active binding to Kupffer cells and extrahepatic clearance. The clodrosome and liposome were utilized to deplete macrophages and block the RES function to evaluate the capability of the kinetic parameters for investigation of macrophage function and density.The two-compartment model provided a good description for all data and showed a low sum squared residual for all mice (0.27±0.03. A lower Kin, a lower Kout and a lower Ke were found after clodrosome treatment, whereas a lower Kin, a higher Kout and a lower Ke were observed after liposome treatment in comparison to saline treatment (P<0.005.Dynamic SPIO-enhanced MR imaging with two-compartment modeling can provide information on RES function on both a cell number and receptor function level.

  7. Exploring structure and function of sensory cortex with 7T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluppeck, Denis; Sanchez-Panchuelo, Rosa-Maria; Francis, Susan T

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we present an overview of 7T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies of the detailed function and anatomy of sensory areas of the human brain. We discuss the motivation for the studies, with particular emphasis on increasing the spatial resolution of functional MRI (fMRI) using reduced field-of-view (FOV) data acquisitions. MRI at ultra-high-field (UHF) - defined here as 7T and above - has several advantages over lower field strengths. The intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of images is higher at UHF, and coupled with the increased blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal change, this results in increased BOLD contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), which can be exploited to improve spatial resolution or detect weaker signals. Additionally, the BOLD signal from the intra-vascular (IV) compartment is relatively diminished compared to lower field strengths. Together, these properties make 7T functional MRI an attractive proposition for high spatial specificity measures. But with the advantages come some challenges. For example, increased vulnerability to susceptibility-induced geometric distortions and signal loss in EPI acquisitions tend to be much larger. Some of these technical issues can be addressed with currently available tools and will be discussed. We highlight the key methodological considerations for high resolution functional and structural imaging at 7 T. We then present recent data using the high spatial resolution available at UHF in studies of the visual and somatosensory cortex to highlight promising developments in this area. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Functional MRI for immediate monitoring stereotactic thalamotomy in a patient with essential tremor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Schaaf, Maike; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammed; Hunsche, Stefan; Sturm, Volker; Lasek, Kathrin; Wedekind, Christoph

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stereotactic thalamotomy was assessed with pre- and postoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) under motor stimulation. A patient with unilateral essential tremor (ET) of the left arm underwent stereotactically guided thalamotomy of the right ventral intermediate thalamic nucleus (VIM). FMRI was done directly before and after surgery on a 1.5-Tesla scanner. The stimulation paradigm was maintainance of the affected arm in an extended position and hand clenching being performed in a block design manner. Statistical analysis was done with Brain Voyager 2000. After thalamotomy the tremor diminished completely. As a difference between the pre- and postoperative fMRI, a significant activation was found in the VIM contralateral to the activation site, adjacent to the inferior olivary nucleus contralateral to the activation site and in the dorsal cingulum. In conclusion, fMRI can detect the functional effect of thalamotomy for tremor treatment. Direct postoperative fMRI provides a sufficient method for estimating the effect of thalamotomy immediately after intervention. The importance of the intermediate thalamic nucleus and the olivary nucleus in tremor generation is supported by our findings. (orig.)

  9. Alterations in renal morphology and function after ESWL therapy: evaluation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krestin, G.P.; Fischbach, R.; Vorreuther, R.; Schulthess, G.K. von

    1993-01-01

    Contrast-enhanced gradient-echo MRI was used to evaluate morphological and functional alterations in the kidneys after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Dynamic MRI with a temporal resolution of 10 s per image was performed by repeated imaging in the coronal plane after administration of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) before and after ESWL for renal calculi in 25 patients. Before ESWL 22 patients had normally functioning kidneys, characterised by a marked decrease in signal intensity in the renal medulla 30-40 s after the onset of cortical perfusion. After ESWL 8 patients had functional abnormalities: in 2 cases the medullary signal decrease was disturbed throughout the whole organ, while 6 kidneys demonstrated regional loss of concentrating ability in the medulla. Morphological alterations (oedema with blurred contours and loss of corticomedullary differentiation; parenchymal haemorrhage and haemorrhage in a cortical cyst; subcapsular, perirenal and pararenal haematoma) were detected in 9 cases. Haemorrhage was encountered more often after administration of more than 2500 shock waves; however, no such correlation was seen in the kidneys with functional disturbances following ESWL therapy. MRI proved to be a sensitive method for the assessment of morphological and functional alterations after ESWL, but longer follow-up studies are required to identify the clinical impact of these early changes. (orig.)

  10. Alterations in renal morphology and function after ESWL therapy: evaluation with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krestin, G.P. [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland); Fischbach, R. [Dept. of Radiology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Vorreuther, R. [Dept. of Urology, Univ. of Cologne (Germany); Schulthess, G.K. von [Dept. of Medical Radiology, University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland)

    1993-06-01

    Contrast-enhanced gradient-echo MRI was used to evaluate morphological and functional alterations in the kidneys after extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Dynamic MRI with a temporal resolution of 10 s per image was performed by repeated imaging in the coronal plane after administration of gadolinium-DTPA (0.1 mmol/kg) before and after ESWL for renal calculi in 25 patients. Before ESWL 22 patients had normally functioning kidneys, characterised by a marked decrease in signal intensity in the renal medulla 30-40 s after the onset of cortical perfusion. After ESWL 8 patients had functional abnormalities: in 2 cases the medullary signal decrease was disturbed throughout the whole organ, while 6 kidneys demonstrated regional loss of concentrating ability in the medulla. Morphological alterations (oedema with blurred contours and loss of corticomedullary differentiation; parenchymal haemorrhage and haemorrhage in a cortical cyst; subcapsular, perirenal and pararenal haematoma) were detected in 9 cases. Haemorrhage was encountered more often after administration of more than 2500 shock waves; however, no such correlation was seen in the kidneys with functional disturbances following ESWL therapy. MRI proved to be a sensitive method for the assessment of morphological and functional alterations after ESWL, but longer follow-up studies are required to identify the clinical impact of these early changes. (orig.)

  11. Functional MRI in schizophrenia. Diagnostics and therapy monitoring of cognitive deficits of schizophrenic patients by functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtner, J.; Prayer, D.; Sachs, G.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive impairments are core psychopathological components of the symptomatic of schizophrenic patients. These dysfunctions are generally related to attention, executive functions and memory. This report provides information on the importance of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the diagnostics and therapy monitoring of the different subtypes of cognitive dysfunctions. Furthermore, it describes the typical differences in the activation of individual brain regions between schizophrenic patients and healthy control persons. This information should be helpful in identifying the deficit profile of each patient and create an individual therapy plan. (orig.) [de

  12. Detection of Acute Tubular Necrosis Using Blood Oxygenation Level-Dependent (BOLD MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Bauer

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: To date, there is no imaging technique to assess tubular function in vivo. Blood oxygen level-dependent magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD MRI measures tissue oxygenation based on the transverse relaxation rate (R2*. The present study investigates whether BOLD MRI can assess tubular function using a tubule-specific pharmacological maneuver. Methods: Cross sectional study with 28 participants including 9 subjects with ATN-induced acute kidney injury (AKI, 9 healthy controls, and 10 subjects with nephron sparing tumor resection (NSS with clamping of the renal artery serving as a model of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R-induced subclinical ATN (median clamping time 15 min, no significant decrease of eGFR, p=0.14. BOLD MRI was performed before and 5, 7, and 10 min after intravenous administration of 40 mg furosemide. Results: Urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin was significantly higher in ATN-induced AKI and NSS subjects than in healthy controls (p=0.03 and p=0.01, respectively. Before administration of furosemide, absolute medullary R2*, cortical R2*, and medullary/cortical R2* ratio did not significantly differ between ATN-induced AKI vs. healthy controls and between NSS-I/R vs. contralateral healthy kidneys (p>0.05 each. Furosemide led to a significant decrease in the medullary and cortical R2* of healthy subjects and NSS contralateral kidneys (p<0.05 each, whereas there was no significant change of R2* in ATN-induced AKI and the NSS-I/R kidneys (p>0.05 each. Conclusion: BOLD-MRI is able to detect even mild tubular injury but necessitates a tubule-specific pharmacological maneuver, e.g. blocking the Na+-K+-2Cl- transporter by furosemide.

  13. Prenatal detection of microtia by MRI in a fetus with trisomy 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milic, Andrea; Blaser, Susan; Robinson, Ashley; Viero, Sandra; Halliday, William; Winsor, Elizabeth; Toi, Ants; Thomas, Micki; Chitayat, David

    2006-01-01

    Trisomy 22 is a rare chromosomal abnormality infrequently detected prenatally. External ear abnormalities, in particular microtia, are often associated with trisomy 22, but prenatal detection of microtia has not been reported in association with trisomy 22. We report a fetus with trisomy 22, with fetal MRI findings of microtia, craniofacial dysmorphism, and polygyria. Fetal MRI is a useful tool for auricular assessment and might have utility in the prenatal detection of chromosomal abnormalities, especially among fetuses with structural anomalies. (orig.)

  14. Evaluation of pulmonary arterial morphology and function in cyanotic congenital heart disease by MRI and cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Ichida, Fukiko; Okada, Toshio; Murakami, Arata; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Nakajima, Kenshuu; Nakajima, Akio

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial anatomy was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and two-dimensional echocardiography in 20 patients with cyanotic heart disease associated with decreased pulmonary blood flow. Excellent correlation between MRI and angiographic estimates of pulmonary artery diameter was obtained (main pulmonary artery, r=0.87; right pulmonary artery, r=0.96; left pulmonary artery, r=0.95). However, echocardiography could not describe peripheral pulmonary arteries obviously, especially left pulmonary artery. In the assessment of peripheral pulmonary stenosis or obstruction, cine MRI was superior to echocardiography. We conclude that MRI and cine MRI will play an important role in the serial evaluation of pulmonary arterial morphology and function in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease before and after surgical repair. (author)

  15. Evaluation of pulmonary arterial morphology and function in cyanotic congenital heart disease by MRI and cine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Ikuo; Tsubata, Shinichi; Miyazaki, Ayumi; Ichida, Fukiko; Okada, Toshio; Murakami, Arata; Futatsuya, Ryuusuke; Nakajima, Kenshuu; Nakajima, Akio [Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical Univ. (Japan)

    1993-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial anatomy was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), angiography and two-dimensional echocardiography in 20 patients with cyanotic heart disease associated with decreased pulmonary blood flow. Excellent correlation between MRI and angiographic estimates of pulmonary artery diameter was obtained (main pulmonary artery, r=0.87; right pulmonary artery, r=0.96; left pulmonary artery, r=0.95). However, echocardiography could not describe peripheral pulmonary arteries obviously, especially left pulmonary artery. In the assessment of peripheral pulmonary stenosis or obstruction, cine MRI was superior to echocardiography. We conclude that MRI and cine MRI will play an important role in the serial evaluation of pulmonary arterial morphology and function in patients with cyanotic congenital heart disease before and after surgical repair. (author).

  16. Seven tesla MRI improves detection of focal cortical dysplasia in patients with refractory focal epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veersema, Tim J; Ferrier, Cyrille H; van Eijsden, Pieter; Gosselaar, Peter H; Aronica, Eleonora; Visser, Fredy; Zwanenburg, Jaco M; de Kort, Gerard A P; Hendrikse, Jeroen; Luijten, Peter R; Braun, Kees P J

    Objective: The aim of this study is to determine whether the use of 7 tesla (T) MRI in clinical practice leads to higher detection rates of focal cortical dysplasias in possible candidates for epilepsy surgery. Methods: In our center patients are referred for 7 T MRI if lesional focal epilepsy is

  17. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J.; Loon, Ton van; Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  18. Detection of rotator cuff tears: the value of MRI following ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Spaargaren, Gert-Jan; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Radiology, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Ziekenhuis, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, NL' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Waal Malefijt, Maarten C. de [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Kiemeney, Lambertus A.L.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and HTA, Geert Grooteplein Noord 21, P.O. Box 9101, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-02-15

    To evaluate the need for additional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following ultrasound (US) in patients with shoulder pain and/or disability and to compare the accuracy of both techniques for the detection of partial-thickness and full-thickness rotator cuff tears (RCT). In 4 years, 5,216 patients underwent US by experienced musculoskeletal radiologists. Retrospectively, patient records were evaluated if MRI and surgery were performed within 5 months of US. US and MRI findings were classified into intact cuff, partial-thickness and full-thickness RCT, and were correlated with surgical findings. Additional MR imaging was performed in 275 (5.2%) patients. Sixty-eight patients underwent surgery within 5 months. US and MRI correctly depicted 21 (95%) and 22 (100%) of the 22 full-thickness tears, and 8 (89%) and 6 (67%) of the 9 partial-thickness tears, respectively. The differences in performance of US and MRI were not statistically significant (p = 0.15). MRI following routine shoulder US was requested in only 5.2% of the patients. The additional value of MRI was in detecting intra-articular lesions. In patients who underwent surgery, US and MRI yielded comparably high sensitivity for detecting full-thickness RCT. US performed better in detecting partial-thickness tears, although the difference was not significant. (orig.)

  19. The power of using functional fMRI on small rodents to study brain pharmacology and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Jonckers, Elisabeth; Shah, Disha; Hamaide, Julie; Verhoye, Marleen; Van der Linden, Annemie

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is an excellent tool to study the effect of pharmacological modulations on brain function in a non-invasive and longitudinal manner. We introduce several blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) fMRI techniques, including resting state (rsfMRI), stimulus-evoked (st-fMRI), and pharmacological MRI (phMRI). Respectively, these techniques permit the assessment of functional connectivity during rest as well as brain activation triggered by sen...

  20. Multivariate spatial Gaussian mixture modeling for statistical clustering of hemodynamic parameters in functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fouque, A.L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Risser, L.; Fouque, A.L.; Ciuciu, Ph.; Risser, L.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a novel statistical parcellation of intra-subject functional MRI (fMRI) data is proposed. The key idea is to identify functionally homogenous regions of interest from their hemodynamic parameters. To this end, a non-parametric voxel-based estimation of hemodynamic response function is performed as a prerequisite. Then, the extracted hemodynamic features are entered as the input data of a Multivariate Spatial Gaussian Mixture Model (MSGMM) to be fitted. The goal of the spatial aspect is to favor the recovery of connected components in the mixture. Our statistical clustering approach is original in the sense that it extends existing works done on univariate spatially regularized Gaussian mixtures. A specific Gibbs sampler is derived to account for different covariance structures in the feature space. On realistic artificial fMRI datasets, it is shown that our algorithm is helpful for identifying a parsimonious functional parcellation required in the context of joint detection estimation of brain activity. This allows us to overcome the classical assumption of spatial stationarity of the BOLD signal model. (authors)

  1. Comparison of methods for detecting nondeterministic BOLD fluctuation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiviniemi, Vesa; Kantola, Juha-Heikki; Jauhiainen, Jukka; Tervonen, Osmo

    2004-02-01

    Functional MR imaging (fMRI) has been used in detecting neuronal activation and intrinsic blood flow fluctuations in the brain cortex. This article is aimed for comparing the methods for analyzing the nondeterministic flow fluctuations. Fast Fourier Transformation (FFT), cross correlation (CC), spatial principal component analysis (sPCA), and independent component analysis (sICA) were compared. 15 subjects were imaged at 1.5 T. Three quantitative measures were compared: (1) The number of subjects with identifiable fluctuation, (2) the volume, and (3) mean correlation coefficient (MCC) of the detected voxels. The focusing on cortical structures and the overall usability were qualitatively assessed. sICA was spatially most accurate but time consuming, robust, and detected voxels with high temporal synchrony. The CC and FFT were fast suiting primary screening. The CC detected highest temporal synchrony but the subjective detection for reference vector produced excess variance of the detected volumes. The FFT and sPCA were not spatially accurate and did not detect adequate temporal synchrony of the voxels.

  2. Detection and quantification of regional cortical gray matter damage in multiple sclerosis utilizing gradient echo MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cortical gray matter (GM damage is now widely recognized in multiple sclerosis (MS. The standard MRI does not reliably detect cortical GM lesions, although cortical volume loss can be measured. In this study, we demonstrate that the gradient echo MRI can reliably and quantitatively assess cortical GM damage in MS patients using standard clinical scanners. High resolution multi-gradient echo MRI was used for regional mapping of tissue-specific MRI signal transverse relaxation rate values (R2* in 10 each relapsing–remitting, primary-progressive and secondary-progressive MS subjects. A voxel spread function method was used to correct artifacts induced by background field gradients. R2* values from healthy controls (HCs of varying ages were obtained to establish baseline data and calculate ΔR2* values – age-adjusted differences between MS patients and HC. Thickness of cortical regions was also measured in all subjects. In cortical regions, ΔR2* values of MS patients were also adjusted for changes in cortical thickness. Symbol digit modalities (SDMT and paced auditory serial addition (PASAT neurocognitive tests, as well as Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg test results were also obtained on all MS subjects. We found that ΔR2* values were lower in multiple cortical GM and normal appearing white matter (NAWM regions in MS compared with HC. ΔR2* values of global cortical GM and several specific cortical regions showed significant (p < 0.05 correlations with SDMT and PASAT scores, and showed better correlations than volumetric measures of the same regions. Neurological tests not focused on cognition (Expanded Disability Status Score, 25-foot timed walk and nine-hole peg tests showed no correlation with cortical GM ΔR2* values. The technique presented here is robust and reproducible. It requires less than 10 min and can be implemented on any MRI scanner. Our results show that quantitative tissue-specific R2

  3. High-resolution MRI in detecting subareolar breast abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Peifen; Kurihara, Yasuyuki; Kanemaki, Yoshihide; Okamoto, Kyoko; Nakajima, Yasuo; Fukuda, Mamoru; Maeda, Ichiro

    2007-06-01

    Because subareolar breast abscess has a high recurrence rate, a more effective imaging technique is needed to comprehensively visualize the lesions and guide surgery. We performed a high-resolution MRI technique using a microscopy coil to reveal the characteristics and extent of subareolar breast abscess. High-resolution MRI has potential diagnostic value in subareolar breast abscess. This technique can be used to guide surgery with the aim of reducing the recurrence rate.

  4. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohana, Mickael; Durand, Marie-Christine; Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe; Maisonobe, Thierry; Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves

    2014-01-01

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  5. Whole-body muscle MRI to detect myopathies in non-extrapyramidal bent spine syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohana, Mickael [Nouvel Hopital Civil - Hopitaux Universitaires de Strasbourg, Service de Radiologie B, Strasbourg (France); Durand, Marie-Christine [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Neurologie, Garches (France); Marty, Catherine; Lazareth, Jean-Philippe [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Rhumatologie, Garches (France); Maisonobe, Thierry [APH-HP - Hopital de la Pitie-Salpetriere, Service de Neuropathologie, Paris (France); Mompoint, Dominique; Carlier, Robert-Yves [AP-HP - Hopital Raymond Poincare, Service de Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2014-08-15

    Bent spine syndrome (BSS), defined as an abnormal forward flexion of the trunk resolving in supine position, is usually related to parkinsonism, but can also be encountered in myopathies. This study evaluates whole-body muscle MRI (WB-mMRI) as a tool for detecting underlying myopathy in non-extrapyramidal BSS. Forty-three patients (90 % women; 53-86 years old) with a non-extrapyramidal BSS were prospectively included. All underwent a 1.5-T WB-mMRI and a nerve conduction study. Muscle biopsy was performed if a myopathy could not be eliminated based on clinical examination and all tests. Systematic MRI interpretation focused on peripheral and axial muscle injury; spinal posture and incidental findings were also reported. WB-mMRI was completed for all patients, with 13 muscle biopsies ultimately needed and myopathy revealed as the final etiological diagnosis in five cases (12 %). All biopsy-proven myopathies were detected by the WB-mMRI. Relevant incidental MRI findings were made in seven patients. This study supports WB-mMRI as a sensitive and feasible tool for detecting myopathy in BSS patients. Associated with electroneuromyography, it can better indicate when a muscle biopsy is needed and guide it when required. Rigorous radiological interpretation is mandatory, so as not to miss incidental findings of clinical consequence. (orig.)

  6. A novel passive paradigm for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to localize brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasser, T.; Sandalcioglu, I.E.; Skwarek, V.; Gizewski, E.; Stolke, D.; Hans, V.

    2003-01-01

    The design of a shielded stimulation-device for electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves in the MRI-environment as passive fMRI-paradigm is content of this study. Especially the technical aspects and selection criteria of the stimulation-parameters are discussed. The clinical value for neurosurgical patients is outlined by supplying data from clinical studies, evaluating this novel paradigm. Thus neurosurgeons are supplied with superior information about functional anatomy, therefore being able to preserve functionally relevant brain-structures. (orig.) [de

  7. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niskanen, Eini [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Koenoenen, Mervi [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi [University of Eastern Finland, Department of Applied Physics, Kuopio (Finland); Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology, Kuopio (Finland); Kaelviaeinen, Reetta [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Neurology, Kuopio (Finland); Vanninen, Ritva [Kuopio University Hospital, Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland); University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, Clinical Radiology, Kuopio (Finland)

    2012-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  8. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niskanen, Eini; Koenoenen, Mervi; Villberg, Ville; Aeikiae, Marja; Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-aho, Perttu; Karjalainen, Pasi; Saeisaenen, Laura; Mervaala, Esa; Kaelviaeinen, Reetta; Vanninen, Ritva

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients. (orig.)

  9. The effect of fMRI task combinations on determining the hemispheric dominance of language functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niskanen, Eini; Könönen, Mervi; Villberg, Ville; Nissi, Mikko; Ranta-Aho, Perttu; Säisänen, Laura; Karjalainen, Pasi; Aikiä, Marja; Kälviäinen, Reetta; Mervaala, Esa; Vanninen, Ritva

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the most suitable combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) language tasks for clinical use in determining language dominance and to define the variability in laterality index (LI) and activation power between different combinations of language tasks. Activation patterns of different fMRI analyses of five language tasks (word generation, responsive naming, letter task, sentence comprehension, and word pair) were defined for 20 healthy volunteers (16 right-handed). LIs and sums of T values were calculated for each task separately and for four combinations of tasks in predefined regions of interest. Variability in terms of activation power and lateralization was defined in each analysis. In addition, the visual assessment of lateralization of language functions based on the individual fMRI activation maps was conducted by an experienced neuroradiologist. A combination analysis of word generation, responsive naming, and sentence comprehension was the most suitable in terms of activation power, robustness to detect essential language areas, and scanning time. In general, combination analyses of the tasks provided higher overall activation levels than single tasks and reduced the number of outlier voxels disturbing the calculation of LI. A combination of auditory and visually presented tasks that activate different aspects of language functions with sufficient activation power may be a useful task battery for determining language dominance in patients.

  10. MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schroeter, Aileen; Rudin, Markus; Gianolio, Eliana

    2017-01-01

    This chapter discusses principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and MRI followed by a survey on the major classes of MRI contrast agents (CA), their modes of action, and some of the most significative applications. The two more established classes of MRI-CA are represented by paramagnetic...... been attained that markedly increase the number and typology of systems with CEST properties. Currently much attention is also devoted to hyperpolarized molecules that display a sensitivity enhancement sufficient for their direct exploitation for the formation of the MR image. A real breakthrough...

  11. Functional MRI of the visual cortex and visual testing in patients with previous optic neuritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Frederiksen, J.L.; Rostrup, Egill

    2002-01-01

    of the activated area and the signal change following ON, and compared the results with results of neuroophthalmological testing. We studied nine patients with previous acute ON and 10 healthy persons served as controls using fMRI with visual stimulation. In addition to a reduced activated volume, patients showed...... a reduced blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signal increase and a greater asymmetry in the visual cortex, compared with controls. The volume of visual cortical activation was significantly correlated to the result of the contrast sensitivity test. The BOLD signal increase correlated significantly......The volume of cortical activation as detected by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the visual cortex has previously been shown to be reduced following optic neuritis (ON). In order to understand the cause of this change, we studied the cortical activation, both the size...

  12. MRI with DWI for the Detection of Posttreatment Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Why Morphologic MRI Criteria Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ailianou, A; Mundada, P; De Perrot, T; Pusztaszieri, M; Poletti, P-A; Becker, M

    2018-04-01

    Although diffusion-weighted imaging combined with morphologic MRI (DWIMRI) is used to detect posttreatment recurrent and second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, the diagnostic criteria used so far have not been clarified. We hypothesized that precise MRI criteria based on signal intensity patterns on T2 and contrast-enhanced T1 complement DWI and therefore improve the diagnostic performance of DWIMRI. We analyzed 1.5T MRI examinations of 100 consecutive patients treated with radiation therapy with or without additional surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. MRI examinations included morphologic sequences and DWI ( b =0 and b =1000 s/mm 2 ). Histology and follow-up served as the standard of reference. Two experienced readers, blinded to clinical/histologic/follow-up data, evaluated images according to clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis of recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment, post-radiation therapy inflammatory edema, and late fibrosis. DWI analysis included qualitative (visual) and quantitative evaluation with an ADC threshold. Recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment was present in 36 patients, whereas 64 patients had post-radiation therapy lesions only. The Cohen κ for differentiating tumor from post-radiation therapy lesions with MRI and qualitative DWIMRI was 0.822 and 0.881, respectively. Mean ADCmean in recurrent head and neck squamous cell carcinoma/second primary head and neck squamous cell carcinoma occurring after treatment (1.097 ± 0.295 × 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower ( P .05). Although ADCs were similar in tumors and late fibrosis, morphologic MRI criteria facilitated distinction between the 2 conditions. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and positive and negative likelihood ratios (95% CI) of

  13. MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the room. Pins, hairpins, metal zippers, and similar metallic items can distort the images. Removable dental work ... an MRI can cause heart pacemakers and other implants not to work as well. The magnets can ...

  14. Preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in fatty liver: MDCT or MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulemann, Vanessa; Schima, Wolfgang; Tamandl, Dietmar; Kaczirek, Klaus; Gruenberger, Thomas; Wrba, Friedrich; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the diagnostic value of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the preoperative detection of colorectal liver metastases in diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, associated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Materials and methods: Twenty preoperative tri-phasic MDCT (4-64-row, Siemens) and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (1.5 T or 3.0 T, Siemens) examinations of patients with colorectal cancer and liver metastases in diffuse steatosis were retrospectively evaluated. All patients underwent surgical resection for liver metastases (time interval 1-60 days). The amount of fatty infiltration of the liver was determined histopathologically by semi-quantitative percent-wise estimation and ranged from 25 to 75%. Results: Overall, 51 metastases were found by histopathology of the resected liver segments/lobes. The size of the metastases ranged from 0.4 to 13 cm, with 18 (35%) being up to 1 cm in diameter. In the overall rating, MDCT detected 33/51 lesions (65%), and MRI 45/51 (88%). For lesions up to 1 cm, MDCT detected only 2/18 (11%) and MRI 12/18 (66%). One false positive lesion was detected by MDCT. Statistical analysis showed that MRI is markedly superior to MDCT, with a statistically significant difference (p 1 cm. Conclusion: For the detection of colorectal liver metastases after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and consecutive diffuse fatty infiltration of the liver, MRI is superior to MDCT, especially for the detection of small lesions.

  15. Function-specific and Enhanced Brain Structural Connectivity Mapping via Joint Modeling of Diffusion and Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Parhi, Keshab K; Lenglet, Christophe

    2018-03-16

    A joint structural-functional brain network model is presented, which enables the discovery of function-specific brain circuits, and recovers structural connections that are under-estimated by diffusion MRI (dMRI). Incorporating information from functional MRI (fMRI) into diffusion MRI to estimate brain circuits is a challenging task. Usually, seed regions for tractography are selected from fMRI activation maps to extract the white matter pathways of interest. The proposed method jointly analyzes whole brain dMRI and fMRI data, allowing the estimation of complete function-specific structural networks instead of interactively investigating the connectivity of individual cortical/sub-cortical areas. Additionally, tractography techniques are prone to limitations, which can result in erroneous pathways. The proposed framework explicitly models the interactions between structural and functional connectivity measures thereby improving anatomical circuit estimation. Results on Human Connectome Project (HCP) data demonstrate the benefits of the approach by successfully identifying function-specific anatomical circuits, such as the language and resting-state networks. In contrast to correlation-based or independent component analysis (ICA) functional connectivity mapping, detailed anatomical connectivity patterns are revealed for each functional module. Results on a phantom (Fibercup) also indicate improvements in structural connectivity mapping by rejecting false-positive connections with insufficient support from fMRI, and enhancing under-estimated connectivity with strong functional correlation.

  16. Tablet-Based Functional MRI of the Trail Making Test: Effect of Tablet Interaction Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta Karimpoor

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The Trail Making Test (TMT is widely used for assessing executive function, frontal lobe abilities, and visual motor skills. Part A of this pen-and-paper test (TMT-A involves linking numbers randomly distributed in space, in ascending order. Part B (TMT-B alternates between linking numbers and letters. TMT-B is more demanding than TMT-A, but the mental processing that supports the performance of this test remains incompletely understood. Functional MRI (fMRI may help to clarify the relationship between TMT performance and brain activity, but providing an environment that supports real-world pen-and-paper interactions during fMRI is challenging. Previously, an fMRI-compatible tablet system was developed for writing and drawing with two modes of interaction: the original cursor-based, proprioceptive approach, and a new mode involving augmented reality to provide visual feedback of hand position (VFHP for enhanced user interaction. This study characterizes the use of the tablet during fMRI of young healthy adults (n = 22, with half of the subjects performing TMT with VFHP and the other half performing TMT without VFHP. Activation maps for both TMT-A and TMT-B performance showed considerable overlap between the two tablet modes, and no statistically differences in brain activity were detected when contrasting TMT-B vs. TMT-A for the two tablet modes. Behavioral results also showed no statistically different interaction effects for TMT-B vs. TMT-A for the two tablet modes. Tablet-based TMT scores showed reasonable convergent validity with those obtained by administering the standard pen-and-paper TMT to the same subjects. Overall, the results suggest that despite the slightly different mechanisms involved for the two modes of tablet interaction, both are suitable for use in fMRI studies involving TMT performance. This study provides information for using tablet-based TMT methods appropriately in future fMRI studies involving patients and healthy

  17. Can breast MRI computer-aided detection (CAD) improve radiologist accuracy for lesions detected at MRI screening and recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arazi-Kleinman, T.; Causer, P.A.; Jong, R.A.; Hill, K.; Warner, E.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) computer-aided detection (CAD) for breast MRI screen-detected lesions recommended for biopsy in a high-risk population. Material and methods: Fifty-six consecutive Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) 3-5 lesions with histopathological correlation [nine invasive cancers, 13 ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and 34 benign] were retrospectively evaluated using a breast MRI CAD prototype (CAD-Gaea). CAD evaluation was performed separately and in consensus by two radiologists specializing in breast imaging, blinded to the histopathology. Thresholds of 50, 80, and 100% and delayed enhancement were independently assessed with CAD. Lesions were rated as malignant or benign according to threshold and delayed enhancement only and in combination. Sensitivities, specificities, and negative predictive values (NPV) were determined for CAD assessments versus pathology. Initial MRI BI-RADS interpretation without CAD versus CAD assessments were compared using paired binary diagnostic tests. Results: Threshold levels for lesion enhancement were: 50% to include all malignant (and all benign) lesions; and 100% for all invasive cancer and high-grade DCIS. Combined use of threshold and enhancement patterns for CAD assessment was best (73% sensitivity, 56% specificity and 76% NPV for all cancer). Sensitivities and NPV were better for invasive cancer (100%/100%) than for all malignancies (54%/76%). Radiologists' MRI interpretation was more sensitive than CAD (p = 0.05), but less specific (p = 0.001) for cancer detection. Conclusion: The breast MRI CAD system used could not improve the radiologists' accuracy for distinguishing all malignant from benign lesions, due to the poor sensitivity for DCIS detection.

  18. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: case study and cautionary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has greatly advanced our knowledge of human brain function. Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been encouraging advances for its use in pre-operative functional cortical mapping ...

  19. Dynamic MRI-based computer aided diagnostic systems for early detection of kidney transplant rejection: A survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostapha, Mahmoud; Khalifa, Fahmi; Alansary, Amir; Soliman, Ahmed; Gimel'farb, Georgy; El-Baz, Ayman

    2013-10-01

    Early detection of renal transplant rejection is important to implement appropriate medical and immune therapy in patients with transplanted kidneys. In literature, a large number of computer-aided diagnostic (CAD) systems using different image modalities, such as ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and radionuclide imaging, have been proposed for early detection of kidney diseases. A typical CAD system for kidney diagnosis consists of a set of processing steps including: motion correction, segmentation of the kidney and/or its internal structures (e.g., cortex, medulla), construction of agent kinetic curves, functional parameter estimation, diagnosis, and assessment of the kidney status. In this paper, we survey the current state-of-the-art CAD systems that have been developed for kidney disease diagnosis using dynamic MRI. In addition, the paper addresses several challenges that researchers face in developing efficient, fast and reliable CAD systems for the early detection of kidney diseases.

  20. Pathophysiological changes detected by MRI within 24 hours after head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Tsukasa; Wakabayashi, Shinichi; Nariai, Tadashi; Ohno, Kikuo; Hirakawa, Kimiyoshi; Fukui, Shinsuke; Takei, Hidenori.

    1995-01-01

    This report concerns the evaluation of the usefulness of high-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the diagnosis and prognosis of patients with head injuries. For this purpose we compared the CT and MRI results obtained on 48 such patients. MRI of all cases was taken within 24 hours after head injury using a 1.5-Tesla unit. The sensitivity of the two modalities in the detection of small traumatic lesions was compared. Traumatic lesions of 23 patients (47.9%) were not detected by CT, but they were demonstrated on MRI. Overall, MRI was significantly more sensitive than CT in detecting early and/or subtle traumatic changes of the brain parenchyma (P 1 -WI and T 2 -WI. (B) Corpus callosum lesions with hyperintensity on T 2 -WI were in fact hemorrhagic contusions by signal changes on sequential MRI. The follow-up of chronological changes of a given corpus callosum lesion was essential for confirmation of its pathology. (C) In one case, scratch-like lesions with strong hypointensity on T 1 -WI and hyperintensity on T 2 -WI were clearly demonstrated in the white matter. These observations appeared to indicate axonal damages. (D) Even if initial GCS score is low ( 2 -WI and subsequently disappeared completely. We conclude that performing MRI in the early stage of a head injury is of utility for the understanding of pertinent pathophysiological changes and for predicting outcome. (author)

  1. Detection and grading of dAVF: prospects and limitations of 3T MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bink, Andrea; Berkefeld, Joachim; Wagner, Marlies; You, Se-Jong; Ackermann, Hanns; Lorenz, Matthias W; Senft, Christian; du Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard

    2012-02-01

    DSA is currently the criterion standard for the assessment of dural arteriovenous fistulas (dAVF). Recently, evolving MRA techniques have emerged as a non-invasive alternative. The aim of this study is to assess the value of 3 T MRI in detecting and describing dAVF and to determine whether MRI can replace DSA as diagnostic procedure. A total of 19 patients with dAVF and 19 without dAVF underwent the same MRI protocol, including 3D time-of-flight MRA and time-resolved contrast-enhanced MRA. The images were evaluated retrospectively by three independent readers with different levels of experience blinded to clinical information. The readers assessed the presence, the site, the venous drainage and the feeders of dAVF. Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, intertechnique and interobserver agreements were calculated. DAVF can be detected with high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy by experienced and also by less experienced readers. However, MRI has limitations when used for grading and evaluation of the angioarchitecture of the dAVF. Different experience, the limited resolution of MRI and its inability to selectively display arteries were the reasons for these limitations. With MRI dAVF can be detected reliably. Nevertheless, at present MRI can not fully replace DSA, especially for treatment planning.

  2. T1-weighted MRI for the detection of coronary artery plaque haemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, May Lin; Ozgun, Murat; Seifarth, Harald; Bunck, Alexander; Fischbach, Roman; Heindel, Walter; Maintz, David; Orwat, Stefan; Botnar, Rene

    2010-01-01

    Hyperintense areas in atherosclerotic plaques on pre-contrast T1-weighted MRI have been shown to correlate with intraplaque haemorrhage. We evaluated the presence of T1 hyperintensity in coronary artery plaques in coronary artery disease (CAD) patients and correlated results with multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) findings. Fifteen patients with CAD were included. Plaques detected by MDCT were categorised based on their Hounsfield number. T1-weighted inversion recovery (IR) MRI prepared coronary MRI for the detection of plaque and steady-state free-precession coronary MR-angiography for anatomical correlation was performed. After registration of MDCT and MRI, regions of interest were defined on MDCT-visible plaques and in corresponding vessel segments acquired with MRI. MDCT density and MR signal measurement were performed in each plaque. Forty-three plaques were identified with MDCT. With IR-MRI 5/43 (12%) plaques were hyperintense, 2 of which were non-calcified and 3 mixed. Average signal-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratios of hyperintense plaques were 15.7 and 9.1, compared with 5.6 and 1.2 for hypointense plaques. Hyperintense plaques exhibited a significantly lower CT density than hypointense plaques (63.6 vs. 140.8). There was no correlation of plaque signal intensity with degree of stenosis. T1-weighted IR-MRI may be useful for non-invasive detection and characterisation of intraplaque haemorrhage in coronary artery plaques. (orig.)

  3. Novel fMRI working memory paradigm accurately detects cognitive impairment in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Flavia; Akhtar, Mohammad A; Zúñiga, Edward; Perez, Carlos A; Hasan, Khader M; Wilken, Jeffrey; Wolinsky, Jerry S; Narayana, Ponnada A; Steinberg, Joel L

    2017-05-01

    Cognitive impairment (CI) cannot be diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) paradigms, such as the immediate/delayed memory task (I/DMT), detect varying degrees of working memory (WM). Preliminary findings using I/DMT showed differences in blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) activation between impaired (MSCI, n = 12) and non-impaired (MSNI, n = 9) multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The aim of the study was to confirm CI detection based on I/DMT BOLD activation in a larger cohort of MS patients. The role of T2 lesion volume (LV) and Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) in magnitude of BOLD signal was also sought. A total of 50 patients (EDSS mean ( m) = 3.2, disease duration (DD) m = 12 years, and age m = 40 years) underwent the Minimal Assessment of Cognitive Function in Multiple Sclerosis (MACFIMS) and I/DMT. Working memory activation (WMa) represents BOLD signal during DMT minus signal during IMT. CI was based on MACFIMS. A total of 10 MSNI, 30 MSCI, and 4 borderline patients were included in the analyses. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed MSNI had significantly greater WMa than MSCI, in the left prefrontal cortex and left supplementary motor area ( p = 0.032). Regression analysis showed significant inverse correlations between WMa and T2 LV/EDSS in similar areas ( p = 0.005, 0.004, respectively). I/DMT-based BOLD activation detects CI in MS. Larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  4. Functional MRI studies of human vision on a clinical imager

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, J.S.; Lewine, J.D.; Aine, C.J.; van Hulsteyn, D.; Wood, C.C.; Sanders, J.; Maclin, E.; Belliveau, J.W.; Caprihan, A.

    1992-01-01

    During the past decade, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has become the method of choice for imaging the anatomy of the human brain. Recently, Belliveau and colleagues have reported the use of echo planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to image patterns of neural activity. Here, we report functional MR imaging in response to visual stimulation without the use of contrast agents, and without the extensive hardware modifications required for EPI. Regions of activity were observed near the expected locations of V1, V2 and possibly V3 and another active region was observed near the parietal-occipital sulcus on the superior surface of the cerebrum. These locations are consistent with sources observed in neuromagnetic studies of the human visual response

  5. Management of breast lesions detectable only on MRI; Abklaerung ausschliesslich MRT-detektierbarer Mammalaesionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegmann-Luz, K.C.; Bahrs, S.D.; Preibsch, H.; Hattermann, V.; Claussen, C.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Abt. Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-01-15

    Breast MR imaging has become established as the most sensitive imaging method for diagnosing breast cancer. As a result of the increasing examination volume and improved image quality, the number of breast lesions detected only on MRI and requiring further clarification has risen in recent years. According to the S3-guideline 'Diagnosis, Therapy, and Follow-Up of Breast Cancer' as revised in July 2012, institutions performing breast MRI should provide the option of an MRI-guided intervention for clarification. This review describes the indications, methods and results of MRI-guided interventions for the clarification of breast lesions only visible on MRI. Recent guidelines and study results are also addressed and alternative methods and pitfalls are presented. (orig.)

  6. Diagnostic reliability of 3.0-T MRI for detecting osseous abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kunihiko; Amemiya, Toshihiko; Hirai, Shigenori; Hayashi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Honda, Masahiko; Sisounthone, Johnny; Matsumoto, Kunihito; Honda, Kazuya

    2018-01-01

    We compared the diagnostic reliability of 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detection of osseous abnormalities of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) with that of the gold standard, cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Fifty-six TMJs were imaged with CBCT and MRI, and images of condyles and fossae were independently assessed for the presence of osseous abnormalities. The accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of 3.0-T MRI were 0.88, 1.0, and 0.73, respectively, in condyle evaluation and 0.91, 0.75, and 0.95 in fossa evaluation. The McNemar test showed no significant difference (P > 0.05) between MRI and CBCT in the evaluation of osseous abnormalities in condyles and fossae. The present results indicate that 3.0-T MRI is equal to CBCT in the diagnostic evaluation of osseous abnormalities of the mandibular condyle.

  7. Volume based DCE-MRI breast cancer detection with 3D visualization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, F.K.; Sim, K.S.; Chong, S.S.; Tan, S.T.; Ting, H.Y.; Abbas, S.F.; Omar, S.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a computer aided design auto probing system is presented to detect breast lesions based on Dynamic contrast enhanced Magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) images. The system is proposed in order to aid the radiologists and doctors in the interpretation of MRI breast images and enhance the detection accuracy. A series of approaches are presented to enhance the detection accuracy and refine the breast region of interest (Roil) automatically. Besides, a semi-quantitative analysis is used to segment the breast lesions from selected breast Roil and classify the detected tumour is whether benign, suspicious or malignant. The entire breast Roil including the detected tumour will display in 3D. The methodology has been applied on 104 sets of digital imaging and communications in medicine (Dico) breast MRI datasets images. The biopsy results are verified by 2 radiologists from Hospital Malaysia. The experimental results are demonstrated the proposed scheme can precisely identify breast cancer regions with 93% accuracy. (author)

  8. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, T.; Fujii, K.; Fukui, M.; Mizushima, A.; Matsumoto, S.; Hasuo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Tobimatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  9. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  10. Noninvasive determination of language dominance using functional MRI and near-infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ota, Takahiro; Kamada, Kyousuke; Saito, Nobuhito

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the language dominant hemisphere is important in cases necessary for partial encephalotomy due to epilepsy and tumor. Functional MRI (fMRI) essentially detects oxy-Hb/deoxy-Hb ratio in the brain region resulted from blood flow change and near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), the Hb level change in the tissue, in which the image can be detected by light-receiving proves of NIR-light (780-1500 nm wavelength) irradiated and passed through the tissues. This paper describes the comparison of the two methods for determination of language dominance with reference to that identified by Wada test, a gold standard but inconvenient for both operators and patients. Subjects are 11 brain tumor and 11 epilepsy patients (M 10/F 12, av. age of 36.7 y, 19 right-handed), whose dominances are successfully determined previously by Wada test. fMRI is conducted with 3T machine (General Electric, USA) with phased-array coil in patients receiving various language tasks, and data are processed by Dr. View (Asahi Kasei) to calculate the laterality index for the dominance. NIRS is conducted with Hitachi-Medico ETG-4000 with 695 and 830 nm IR in patients receiving other different language tasks, on whose frontotemporal region of head surface 12-channel probes are equipped. Data are processed by the equipped software to calculate the difference of oxy-Hb change rates between the two hemispheres for the dominance determination. Consistency of fMRI in determining the dominance with Wada test is found 86.3% and of NIRS, 72.7%, which suggests the latter can be only supplementary to the former. However, NIRS is noted to be useful in atypical cases like those with right or bilateral dominance. (K.T.)

  11. Diffusion-weighted MRI for detecting prostate tumour in men at increased genetic risk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Nandita M. de; Morgan, Veronica A.; Bancroft, Elizabeth; Sohaib, S. Aslam; Giles, Sharon L.; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Castro, Elena; Hazell, Steven; Jafar, Maysam; Eeles, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    •Endorectal T2W + DW-MRI is potentially useful for prostate cancer screening.•MRI is specific for detecting prostate cancer in men with increased genetic risk.•Detection of prostate cancer in men at genetically low risk with MRI is limited. Endorectal T2W + DW-MRI is potentially useful for prostate cancer screening. MRI is specific for detecting prostate cancer in men with increased genetic risk. Detection of prostate cancer in men at genetically low risk with MRI is limited. Diffusion-weighted (DW)-MRI is invaluable in detecting prostate cancer. We determined its sensitivity and specificity and established interobserver agreement for detecting tumour in men with a family history of prostate cancer stratified by genetic risk. 51 men with a family history of prostate cancer underwent T2-W + DW-endorectal MRI at 3.0 T. Presence of tumour was noted at right and left apex, mid and basal prostate sextants by 2 independent observers, 1 experienced and the other inexperienced in endorectal MRI. Sensitivity and specificity against a 10-core sampling technique (lateral and medial cores at each level considered together) in men with >2× population risk based on 71 SNP analysis versus those with lower genetic risk scores was established. Interobserver agreement was determined at a subject level. Biopsies indicated cancer in 28 sextants in 13/51 men; 32 of 51 men had twice the population risk (>0.25) based on 71 SNP profiling. Sensitivity/specificity per-subject for patients was 90.0%/86.4% (high-risk) vs. 66.7%/100% (low-risk, observer 1) and 60.0%/86.3% (high-risk) vs. 33.3%/93.8% (low-risk, observer 2) with moderate overall inter-observer agreement (kappa = 0.42). Regional sensitivities/specificities for high-risk vs. low-risk for observer 1 apex 72.2%/100% [33.3%/100%], mid 100%/93.1% [100%/97.3%], base 16.7%/98.3% [0%/100%] and for observer 2 apex 36.4%/98.1% [0%/100%], mid 28.6%/96.5% [100%/100%], base 20%/100% [0%/97.3%] were poorer as they failed to detect

  12. Real-time QRS detection using integrated variance for ECG gated cardiac MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Marcus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available During magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, a patient’s vital signs are required for different purposes. In cardiac MRI (CMR, an electrocardiogram (ECG of the patient is required for triggering the image acquisition process. However, a reliable QRS detection of an ECG signal acquired inside an MRI scanner is a challenging task due to the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD effect which interferes with the ECG. The aim of this work was to develop a reliable QRS detector usable inside the MRI which also fulfills the standards for medical devices (IEC 60601-2-27. Therefore, a novel real-time QRS detector based on integrated variance measurements is presented. The algorithm was trained on ANSI/AAMI EC13 test waveforms and was then applied to two databases with 12-lead ECG signals recorded inside and outside an MRI scanner. Reliable results for both databases were achieved for the ECG signals recorded inside (DBMRI: sensitivity Se = 99.94%, positive predictive value +P = 99.84% and outside (DBInCarT: Se = 99.29%, +P = 99.72% the MRI. Due to the accurate R-peak detection in real-time this can be used for monitoring and triggering in MRI exams.

  13. Can the painDETECT Questionnaire score and MRI help predict treatment outcome in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rifbjerg-Madsen, Signe; Christensen, Anton Wulf; Boesen, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) is performed. METHOD AND ANALYSIS: The painDETECT Questionnaire (PDQ), originally developed to screen for a neuropathic pain component, is applied to indicate the presence of central sensitisation. Adults diagnosed with RA are included when either (A) initiating disease......-inflammatory treatment, to explore the prognostic value of a screening questionnaire for central sensitisation, hand inflammation assessed by conventional MRI, and the interaction between them regarding treatment outcome evaluated by clinical status (DAS28-CRP). For the purpose of further exploratory analyses, dynamic...

  14. Detectability and detection rate of acute cerebral hemisphere infarcts on CT and diffusion-weighted MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbach, H.; Flacke, S.; Keller, E.; Textor, J.; Berlis, A.; Reul, J.; Schild, H.H.; Hartmann, A.; Solymosi, L.

    2000-01-01

    Our purpose was to compare the detectability and detection rate of acute ischaemic cerebral hemisphere infarcts on CT and diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI). We investigated 32 consecutive patients with acute hemisphere stroke with unenhanced CT and DWI within 6 h of stroke onset. The interval between CT and DWI ranged from 15 to 180 min (mean 60 min). Infarct detectability on CT and DWI was determined by comparing the initial CT, DWI and later reference images in a consensus reading of five independent examiners. The ''true'' detection rate was assessed by analysing all single readings. Two patients had intracerebral haematomas on DWI and CT and were excluded. There were 27 patients with ischaemic infarcts; all were visible on DWI and proven by follow-up. DWI was negative in three patients without a final diagnosis of infarct (100 % sensitivity, 100 % specificity, χ 2 = 30, P 2 = 1.48, P = 0.224). With regard to the single readings (30 examinations x 5 examiners = 150 readings), 63 CT readings were true positive and 72 false negative (sensitivity 47 %, specificity 86 %, χ 2 = 2.88, P = 0.089). Of the DWI readings 128 were true positive and 7 false negative (sensitivity 95 %, specificity 87 %, χ 2 = 70.67, P < 0.0001). Interobserver agreement was substantial for CT (χ= 0.72, 95 % confidence interval, 0.6-0.84) and DWI (χ= 0.82, 95 % confidence interval, 0.46-1). Taken together, detectability and detection rate of acute (< 6 h) hemisphere infarcts are significantly higher with DWI than with CT. (orig.)

  15. Detection of tobacco smoke deposition by hyperpolarized krypton-83 MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Zackary I; Pavlovskaya, Galina E; Stupic, Karl F; Wooten, Jan B; Repine, John E; Meersmann, Thomas

    2008-02-01

    Despite the importance of the tobacco smoke particulate matter in the lungs to the etiology of pulmonary disease in cigarette smokers, little is currently known about the spatial distribution of particle deposition or the persistence of the resulting deposits in humans, and no satisfactory technique currently exists to directly observe tobacco smoke condensate in airways. In this proof-of-principle work, hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr MRI and NMR spectroscopy are introduced as probes for tobacco smoke deposition in porous media. A reduction in the hp-83Kr longitudinal (T1) relaxation of up to 95% under near-ambient humidity, pressure and temperature conditions was observed when the krypton gas was brought into contact with surfaces that had been exposed to cigarette smoke. This smoke-induced acceleration of the 83Kr self-relaxation was observed for model glass surfaces that, in some experiments, were coated with bovine lung surfactant extract. However, a similar effect was not observed with hp-(129)Xe indicating that the 83Kr sensitivity to smoke deposition was not caused by paramagnetic species but rather by quadrupolar relaxation due to high adsorption affinity for the smoke deposits. The 83Kr T1 differences between smoke-treated and untreated surfaces were sufficient to produce a strong contrast in variable flip angle FLASH hp-83Kr MRI, suggesting that hp-83Kr may be a promising contrast agent for in vivo pulmonary MRI.

  16. Robust preprocessing for stimulus-based functional MRI of the moving fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Wonsang; Evangelou, Iordanis E; Zun, Zungho; Andescavage, Nickie; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-04-01

    Fetal motion manifests as signal degradation and image artifact in the acquired time series of blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies. We present a robust preprocessing pipeline to specifically address fetal and placental motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI with slowly cycled block design in the living fetus. In the proposed pipeline, motion correction is optimized to the experimental paradigm, and it is performed separately in each phase as well as in each region of interest (ROI), recognizing that each phase and organ experiences different types of motion. To obtain the averaged BOLD signals for each ROI, both misaligned volumes and noisy voxels are automatically detected and excluded, and the missing data are then imputed by statistical estimation based on local polynomial smoothing. Our experimental results demonstrate that the proposed pipeline was effective in mitigating the motion-induced artifacts in stimulus-based fMRI data of the fetal brain and placenta.

  17. A Functional Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Modified with PLA-PEG-DG as Tumor-Targeted MRI Contrast Agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fei; Hu, Ke; Yu, Haoli; Zhou, Lijun; Song, Lina; Zhang, Yu; Shan, Xiuhong; Liu, Jianping; Gu, Ning

    2017-08-01

    Tumor targeting could greatly promote the performance of magnetic nanomaterials as MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) agent for tumor diagnosis. Herein, we reported a novel magnetic nanoparticle modified with PLA (poly lactic acid)-PEG (polyethylene glycol)-DG (D-glucosamine) as Tumor-targeted MRI Contrast Agent. In this work, we took use of the D-glucose passive targeting on tumor cells, combining it on PLA-PEG through amide reaction, and then wrapped the PLA-PEG-DG up to the Fe 3 O 4 @OA NPs. The stability and anti phagocytosis of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG was tested in vitro; the MRI efficiency and toxicity was also detected in vivo. These functional magnetic nanoparticles demonstrated good biocompatibility and stability both in vitro and in vivo. Cell experiments showed that Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles exist good anti phagocytosis and high targetability. In vivo MRI images showed that the contrast effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG-DG nanoparticles prevailed over the commercial non tumor-targeting magnetic nanomaterials MRI agent at a relatively low dose. The DG can validly enhance the tumor-targetting effect of Fe 3 O 4 @OA@PLA-PEG nanoparticle. Maybe MRI agents with DG can hold promise as tumor-targetting development in the future.

  18. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoetker, Andreas M.; Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J.; Mazaheri, Yousef; Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat; Saltz, Leonard B.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Garcia-Aguilar, Julio

    2016-01-01

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K"t"r"a"n"s on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  19. Multiparametric MRI in the assessment of response of rectal cancer to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy: A comparison of morphological, volumetric and functional MRI parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoetker, Andreas M. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Universitaetsmedizin Mainz, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Mainz (Germany); Tarlinton, Lisa; Gollub, Marc J. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Mazaheri, Yousef [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Woo, Kaitlin M.; Goenen, Mithat [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, New York, NY (United States); Saltz, Leonard B. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medicine, Gastrointestinal Oncology Service, New York, NY (United States); Goodman, Karyn A. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Garcia-Aguilar, Julio [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Surgery, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-12-15

    To compare morphological and functional MRI metrics and determine which ones perform best in assessing response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in rectal cancer. This retrospective study included 24 uniformly-treated patients with biopsy-proven rectal adenocarcinoma who underwent MRI, including diffusion-weighted (DW) and dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) sequences, before and after completion of CRT. On all MRI exams, two experienced readers independently measured longest and perpendicular tumour diameters, tumour volume, tumour regression grade (TRG) and tumour signal intensity ratio on T2-weighted imaging, as well as tumour volume and apparent diffusion coefficient on DW-MRI and tumour volume and transfer constant K{sup trans} on DCE-MRI. These metrics were correlated with histopathological percent tumour regression in the resected specimen (%TR). Inter-reader agreement was assessed using the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC). For both readers, post-treatment DW-MRI and DCE-MRI volumetric tumour assessments were significantly associated with %TR; DCE-MRI volumetry showed better inter-reader agreement (CCC=0.700) than DW-MRI volumetry (CCC=0.292). For one reader, mrTRG, post-treatment T2 tumour volumetry and assessments of volume change made with T2, DW-MRI and DCE-MRI were also significantly associated with %TR. Tumour volumetry on post-treatment DCE-MRI and DW-MRI correlated well with %TR, with DCE-MRI volumetry demonstrating better inter-reader agreement. (orig.)

  20. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L.; Gelfand, Michael J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Mangano, Francesco T. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Rozhkov, Leonid; Greiner, Hansel M. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Comprehensive Epilepsy Treatment Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Miles, Lili [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Pathology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children. (orig.)

  1. Prospective detection of cortical dysplasia on clinical MRI in pediatric intractable epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rupa; Leach, James L.; Gelfand, Michael J.; Mangano, Francesco T.; Rozhkov, Leonid; Greiner, Hansel M.; Miles, Lili

    2016-01-01

    Cortical dysplasia is the most common cause of pediatric refractory epilepsy. MRI detection of epileptogenic lesion is associated with good postsurgical outcome. Additional electrophysiological information is suggested to be helpful in localization of cortical dysplasia. Educational measures were taken to increase the awareness of cortical dysplasia at our institution in the context of a recent International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE 2011) classification of cortical dysplasia. To determine changes in the rate of prospective identification of cortical dysplasia on an initial radiology report and also evaluate the benefit of MRI review as part of a multidisciplinary epilepsy conference in identifying previously overlooked MRI findings. We retrospectively evaluated surgically treated children with refractory epilepsy from 2007 to 2014 with cortical dysplasia on histopathology. We analyzed the initial radiology report, preoperative MRI interpretation at multidisciplinary epilepsy conference and subsequent retrospective MRI review with knowledge of the resection site. We recorded additional electrophysiological data and the presence of lobar concordance with the MRI findings. Of 78 children (44 MRI lesional) evaluated, 18 had initially overlooked MRI findings. Comparing 2007-2010 to 2011-2014, there was improvement in the rate of overlooked findings on the initial radiology report (54% vs. 13% of lesional cases, respectively; P = 0.008). The majority (72%) were identified at a multidisciplinary conference with lobar concordance of findings with at least one additional electrophysiological investigation in 89%. Awareness of current classification schemes of cortical dysplasia and image review in the context of a multidisciplinary conference can lead to improved MRI detection of cortical dysplasia in children. (orig.)

  2. An Automated, Adaptive Framework for Optimizing Preprocessing Pipelines in Task-Based Functional MRI.

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    Nathan W Churchill

    Full Text Available BOLD fMRI is sensitive to blood-oxygenation changes correlated with brain function; however, it is limited by relatively weak signal and significant noise confounds. Many preprocessing algorithms have been developed to control noise and improve signal detection in fMRI. Although the chosen set of preprocessing and analysis steps (the "pipeline" significantly affects signal detection, pipelines are rarely quantitatively validated in the neuroimaging literature, due to complex preprocessing interactions. This paper outlines and validates an adaptive resampling framework for evaluating and optimizing preprocessing choices by optimizing data-driven metrics of task prediction and spatial reproducibility. Compared to standard "fixed" preprocessing pipelines, this optimization approach significantly improves independent validation measures of within-subject test-retest, and between-subject activation overlap, and behavioural prediction accuracy. We demonstrate that preprocessing choices function as implicit model regularizers, and that improvements due to pipeline optimization generalize across a range of simple to complex experimental tasks and analysis models. Results are shown for brief scanning sessions (<3 minutes each, demonstrating that with pipeline optimization, it is possible to obtain reliable results and brain-behaviour correlations in relatively small datasets.

  3. Prostate cancer detection using multiparametric 3 – tesla MRI and fusion biopsy: preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Caldara Mussi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the diagnostic efficacy of transrectal ultrasonography (US biopsy with imaging fusion using multiparametric (mp magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients with suspicion of prostate cancer (PCa, with an emphasis on clinically significant tumors according to histological criteria. Materials and Methods: A total of 189 consecutive US/MRI fusion biopsies were performed obtaining systematic and guided samples of suspicious areas on mpMRI using a 3 Tesla magnet without endorectal coil. Clinical significance for prostate cancer was established based on Epstein criteria. Results: In our casuistic, the average Gleason score was 7 and the average PSA was 5.0ng/mL. Of the 189 patients that received US/MRI biopsies, 110 (58.2% were positive for PCa. Of those cases, 88 (80% were clinically significant, accounting for 46.6% of all patients. We divided the MRI findings into 5 Likert scales of probability of having clinically significant PCa. The positivity of US/MRI biopsy for clinically significant PCa was 0%, 17.6% 23.5%, 53.4% and 84.4% for Likert scores 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, respectively. There was a statistically significant difference in terms of biopsy results between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI and also when biopsy results were divided into groups of clinically non-significant versus clinically significant between different levels of suspicion on mpMRI (p-value <0.05 in both analyzes. Conclusion: We found that there is a significant difference in cancer detection using US/MRI fusion biopsy between low-probability and intermediate/high probability Likert scores using mpMRI.

  4. Functional MRI of music emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustus, Jennifer L; Mahoney, Colin J; Downey, Laura E; Omar, Rohani; Cohen, Miriam; White, Mark J; Scott, Sophie K; Mancini, Laura; Warren, Jason D

    2015-03-01

    Frontotemporal dementia is an important neurodegenerative disorder of younger life led by profound emotional and social dysfunction. Here we used fMRI to assess brain mechanisms of music emotion processing in a cohort of patients with frontotemporal dementia (n = 15) in relation to healthy age-matched individuals (n = 11). In a passive-listening paradigm, we manipulated levels of emotion processing in simple arpeggio chords (mode versus dissonance) and emotion modality (music versus human emotional vocalizations). A complex profile of disease-associated functional alterations was identified with separable signatures of musical mode, emotion level, and emotion modality within a common, distributed brain network, including posterior and anterior superior temporal and inferior frontal cortices and dorsal brainstem effector nuclei. Separable functional signatures were identified post-hoc in patients with and without abnormal craving for music (musicophilia): a model for specific abnormal emotional behaviors in frontotemporal dementia. Our findings indicate the potential of music to delineate neural mechanisms of altered emotion processing in dementias, with implications for future disease tracking and therapeutic strategies. © 2014 The Authors. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences published by Wiley Periodicals Inc. on behalf of The New York Academy of Sciences.

  5. Intrinsic network activity in tinnitus investigated using functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaver, Amber M.; Turesky, Ted K.; Seydell-Greenwald, Anna; Morgan, Susan; Kim, Hung J.; Rauschecker, Josef P.

    2016-01-01

    Tinnitus is an increasingly common disorder in which patients experience phantom auditory sensations, usually ringing or buzzing in the ear. Tinnitus pathophysiology has been repeatedly shown to involve both auditory and non-auditory brain structures, making network-level studies of tinnitus critical. In this magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study, we used two resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) approaches to better understand functional network disturbances in tinnitus. First, we demonstrated tinnitus-related reductions in RSFC between specific brain regions and resting-state networks (RSNs), defined by independent components analysis (ICA) and chosen for their overlap with structures known to be affected in tinnitus. Then, we restricted ICA to data from tinnitus patients, and identified one RSN not apparent in control data. This tinnitus RSN included auditory-sensory regions like inferior colliculus and medial Heschl’s gyrus, as well as classically non-auditory regions like the mediodorsal nucleus of the thalamus, striatum, lateral prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex. Notably, patients’ reported tinnitus loudness was positively correlated with RSFC between the mediodorsal nucleus and the tinnitus RSN, indicating that this network may underlie the auditory-sensory experience of tinnitus. These data support the idea that tinnitus involves network dysfunction, and further stress the importance of communication between auditory-sensory and fronto-striatal circuits in tinnitus pathophysiology. PMID:27091485

  6. Added value of diffusion-weighted MRI in detection of cervical cancer recurrence: comparison with morphologic and dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rita; Lopes Dias, João; Cunha, Teresa Margarida

    2015-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate the added value of diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) to standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting post-treatment cervical cancer recurrence. The detection accuracy of T2-weighted (T2W) images was compared with that of T2W MRI combined with either dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI or DWI. Thirty-eight women with clinically suspected uterine cervical cancer recurrence more than six months after treatment completion were examined with 1.5 Tesla MRI including T2W, DCE, and DWI sequences. Disease was confirmed histologically and correlated with MRI findings. The diagnostic performance of T2W imaging and its combination with either DCE or DWI were analyzed. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Thirty-six women had histologically proven recurrence. The accuracy for recurrence detection was 80% with T2W/DCE MRI and 92.1% with T2W/DWI. The addition of DCE sequences did not significantly improve the diagnostic ability of T2W imaging, and this sequence combination misclassified two patients as falsely positive and seven as falsely negative. The T2W/DWI combination revealed a positive predictive value of 100% and only three false negatives. The addition of DWI to T2W sequences considerably improved the diagnostic ability of MRI. Our results support the inclusion of DWI in the initial MRI protocol for the detection of cervical cancer recurrence, leaving DCE sequences as an option for uncertain cases.

  7. Functional brain segmentation using inter-subject correlation in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Pajula, Juha; Niemi, Jari; Hari, Riitta; Tohka, Jussi

    2017-05-01

    The human brain continuously processes massive amounts of rich sensory information. To better understand such highly complex brain processes, modern neuroimaging studies are increasingly utilizing experimental setups that better mimic daily-life situations. A new exploratory data-analysis approach, functional segmentation inter-subject correlation analysis (FuSeISC), was proposed to facilitate the analysis of functional magnetic resonance (fMRI) data sets collected in these experiments. The method provides a new type of functional segmentation of brain areas, not only characterizing areas that display similar processing across subjects but also areas in which processing across subjects is highly variable. FuSeISC was tested using fMRI data sets collected during traditional block-design stimuli (37 subjects) as well as naturalistic auditory narratives (19 subjects). The method identified spatially local and/or bilaterally symmetric clusters in several cortical areas, many of which are known to be processing the types of stimuli used in the experiments. The method is not only useful for spatial exploration of large fMRI data sets obtained using naturalistic stimuli, but also has other potential applications, such as generation of a functional brain atlases including both lower- and higher-order processing areas. Finally, as a part of FuSeISC, a criterion-based sparsification of the shared nearest-neighbor graph was proposed for detecting clusters in noisy data. In the tests with synthetic data, this technique was superior to well-known clustering methods, such as Ward's method, affinity propagation, and K-means ++. Hum Brain Mapp 38:2643-2665, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B.; Mussi, Thais C.; Melamed, Jonathan; Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  9. Bladder cancer: utility of MRI in detection of occult muscle-invasive disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)], E-mail: Andrew.rosenkrantz@nyumc.org; Mussi, Thais C. [Dept. of Radiology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Melamed, Jonathan [Dept. of Pathology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States); Taneja, Samir S.; Huang, William C. [Dept. of Urology, Div. of Urologic Oncology, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Background. The presence of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer is a key factor in prognosis and treatment decisions, although may be missed by biopsy due to sampling error. MRI has shown potential for detection of muscle invasion but has not specifically been evaluated for this purpose in the setting of bladder cancer patients without evidence of muscle invasion on initial biopsy. Purpose. To evaluate the role of MRI in detection of muscularis propria invasion by bladder cancer following a pathologic diagnosis of non-invasive tumor. Material and Methods. This retrospective study included 23 patients who underwent pelvic MRI following a pathologic diagnosis of bladder cancer without muscularis propria invasion and in whom additional histologic evaluation was performed following MRI. Two radiologists in consensus reviewed T2-weighted images to identify those cases suspicious for muscle invasion on MRI. The radiologists identified whether cases suspicious for invasion demonstrated disruption of the T2-hypointense muscularis layer of the bladder wall, peri-vesical fat stranding, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity. Findings were compared with pathologic results obtained after MRI. Results. Suspicion was raised for muscle invasion in eight of 23 cases, four of which exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. No case without suspicion on MRI exhibited invasion on follow-up pathology. Therefore, sensitivity and specificity were 100% and 79%, respectively. Among individual findings, muscularis disruption on T2WI exhibited sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 79%, peri-vesical fat stranding exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 50% and 84%, and peri-vesical soft tissue nodularity exhibited sensitivity and specificity of 25% and 100%. Conclusion. MRI demonstrated high sensitivity for detection of muscle invasion in cases of bladder cancer without invasion on initial histologic assessment. Muscularis disruption on T2WI appeared to exhibit a better

  10. Study of acupuncture point Liv 3 with functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wei; Li Kuncheng; Hao Jing; Yang Yanhui; Shan Baoci; Yan Bin; Li Ke; Xu Jianyang

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the mechanism of acupuncture point Liv3 (Taichong) and possible post-effect of acupuncture by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) Methods: Eighteen healthy right-handed volunteers participated in the experiment. The experiment used single block design, including rest state, stimulation state and post effect state (PE). Everyone only received acupuncture at one of the two stimulations, that was: true acupuncture (TA) at right Liv3 or sham acupoint (SA) near Liv3, in which 10 subjects participated in TA and other 8 subjects in SA. The fMRI data were obtained from scanning the whole brain and were analyzed using SPM99. Significant changes of stimulation state or post effect state compared to rest state were accessed using t-statistics. The t-ratios were used to form the statistical parametric maps which showed brain activation areas by acupuncture above P< 0.001. In order to remove the effects of other non-acupuncture factors, we used the mask function to exclude the areas activated by SA from the areas activated by TA. Results: The brain activation areas during TA for 10 subjects exclusive by SA for 8 subjects were showed on bilateral cerebella(t value is 10.06 and 9.82, respectively), prefrontal lobe (PF), superior parietal lobule (SPL, t value is 4.36 and 4.53, respectively) and inferior parietal lobule (IPL, t value is 3.94 and 4.95, respectively), occipital lobe, parahippocampal gyms, insula( t value is 3.82 and 5.51, respectively), thalamus, lentiform nucleus (t value is 3.24 and 4.40, respectively), contralateral temporal pole, anterior cingnlate cortex (ACC), and posterior cingulate cortex (PGC, all of P<0.01). The PE of TA for 10 subjects exclusive by 'PE' of SA for 8 subjects activated bilateral cerebella, PF, SPL, IPL, occipital lobe, lentiform nucleus, parahippocampal gyrus, ipsilateral tempoaral pole, hippocampus, insula, thalamus, contralateral head of nucleus caudate, corpus callosum, ACC, and PCC. Conclusion

  11. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the “glymphatic system” of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain

  12. MRI with intrathecal MRI gadolinium contrast medium administration: a possible method to assess glymphatic function in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Ringstad, Geir

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the "glymphatic system" of the brain has been discovered in rodents, which is a paravascular, transparenchymal route for clearance of excess brain metabolites and distribution of compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid. It has already been demonstrated that intrathecally administered gadolinium (Gd) contrast medium distributes along this route in rats, but so far not in humans. A 27-year-old woman underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with intrathecal administration of gadobutrol, which distributed throughout her entire brain after 1 and 4.5 h. MRI with intrathecal Gd may become a tool to study glymphatic function in the human brain.

  13. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment between echocardiography and MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddhe, Sujatha; Lewin, Mark; Olson, Aaron; Soriano, Brian D. [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Division of Cardiology, Department of Pediatrics, Seattle, WA (United States); Ferguson, Mark [University of Washington School of Medicine and Seattle Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with death in approximately 40% of patients. Echocardiography is routinely used to assess left ventricular (LV) function; however, it has limitations in these patients. We compared echocardiographic measures of cardiac function assessment to cardiac MRI. We included children and young adults with DMD who had MRI performed between January 2010 and July 2015. We measured echocardiographic and MRI parameters of function assessment, including strain. Presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by MRI. Subjects were divided into two groups based on MRI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): group I, LVEF ≥55% and group II, LVEF <55%. We included 41 studies in 33 subjects, with 25 in group I and 16 in group II. Mean age of subjects was 13.6 ± 2.8 years and mean duration between echocardiogram and MRI was 7.6 ± 4.1 months. Only 8 of 16 (50%) patients in group II had diminished function on echocardiogram. Echocardiographic images were suboptimal in 16 subjects (39%). Overall, echocardiographic parameters had weak correlation with MRI-derived ejection fraction percentage. MRI-derived myocardial strain assessment has better correlation with MRI ejection fraction as compared to echocardiography-derived strain parameters. Echocardiography-based ventricular functional assessment has weak correlation with MRI parameters in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. While this correlation improves in the subset of subjects with adequate echocardiographic image quality, it remains modest and potentially suboptimal for clinical management. Accordingly, we conclude that MRI should be performed routinely and early in children with DMD, not only for LGE imaging but also for functional assessment. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of left ventricular function assessment between echocardiography and MRI in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buddhe, Sujatha; Lewin, Mark; Olson, Aaron; Soriano, Brian D.; Ferguson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is associated with death in approximately 40% of patients. Echocardiography is routinely used to assess left ventricular (LV) function; however, it has limitations in these patients. We compared echocardiographic measures of cardiac function assessment to cardiac MRI. We included children and young adults with DMD who had MRI performed between January 2010 and July 2015. We measured echocardiographic and MRI parameters of function assessment, including strain. Presence of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) was assessed by MRI. Subjects were divided into two groups based on MRI left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF): group I, LVEF ≥55% and group II, LVEF <55%. We included 41 studies in 33 subjects, with 25 in group I and 16 in group II. Mean age of subjects was 13.6 ± 2.8 years and mean duration between echocardiogram and MRI was 7.6 ± 4.1 months. Only 8 of 16 (50%) patients in group II had diminished function on echocardiogram. Echocardiographic images were suboptimal in 16 subjects (39%). Overall, echocardiographic parameters had weak correlation with MRI-derived ejection fraction percentage. MRI-derived myocardial strain assessment has better correlation with MRI ejection fraction as compared to echocardiography-derived strain parameters. Echocardiography-based ventricular functional assessment has weak correlation with MRI parameters in children and young adults with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. While this correlation improves in the subset of subjects with adequate echocardiographic image quality, it remains modest and potentially suboptimal for clinical management. Accordingly, we conclude that MRI should be performed routinely and early in children with DMD, not only for LGE imaging but also for functional assessment. (orig.)

  15. MRI-alone radiation therapy planning for prostate cancer: Automatic fiducial marker detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghose, Soumya; Mitra, Jhimli; Rivest-Hénault, David; Fazlollahi, Amir; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A.; Stanwell, Peter; Pichler, Peter; Sun, Jidi; Greer, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning using substitute computed tomography (sCT) generated from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) has been demonstrated by a number of research groups. One challenge with an MRI-alone workflow is the accurate identification of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers, which are frequently used for prostate localization prior to each dose delivery fraction. This paper investigates a template-matching approach for the detection of these seeds in MRI. Methods: Two different gradient echo T1 and T2* weighted MRI sequences were acquired from fifteen prostate cancer patients and evaluated for seed detection. For training, seed templates from manual contours were selected in a spectral clustering manifold learning framework. This aids in clustering “similar” gold fiducial markers together. The marker with the minimum distance to a cluster centroid was selected as the representative template of that cluster during training. During testing, Gaussian mixture modeling followed by a Markovian model was used in automatic detection of the probable candidates. The probable candidates were rigidly registered to the templates identified from spectral clustering, and a similarity metric is computed for ranking and detection. Results: A fiducial detection accuracy of 95% was obtained compared to manual observations. Expert radiation therapist observers were able to correctly identify all three implanted seeds on 11 of the 15 scans (the proposed method correctly identified all seeds on 10 of the 15). Conclusions: An novel automatic framework for gold fiducial marker detection in MRI is proposed and evaluated with detection accuracies comparable to manual detection. When radiation therapists are unable to determine the seed location in MRI, they refer back to the planning CT (only available in the existing clinical framework); similarly, an automatic quality control is built into the automatic software to ensure that all gold

  16. MRI-alone radiation therapy planning for prostate cancer: Automatic fiducial marker detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghose, Soumya, E-mail: soumya.ghose@case.edu; Mitra, Jhimli [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio 44106 and CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Rivest-Hénault, David; Fazlollahi, Amir; Fripp, Jurgen; Dowling, Jason A. [CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, The Australian e-Health & Research Centre, Herston, QLD 4029 (Australia); Stanwell, Peter [School of health sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308 (Australia); Pichler, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia); Sun, Jidi; Greer, Peter B. [School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW 2308, Australia and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cavalry Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, NSW 2298 (Australia)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: The feasibility of radiation therapy treatment planning using substitute computed tomography (sCT) generated from magnetic resonance images (MRIs) has been demonstrated by a number of research groups. One challenge with an MRI-alone workflow is the accurate identification of intraprostatic gold fiducial markers, which are frequently used for prostate localization prior to each dose delivery fraction. This paper investigates a template-matching approach for the detection of these seeds in MRI. Methods: Two different gradient echo T1 and T2* weighted MRI sequences were acquired from fifteen prostate cancer patients and evaluated for seed detection. For training, seed templates from manual contours were selected in a spectral clustering manifold learning framework. This aids in clustering “similar” gold fiducial markers together. The marker with the minimum distance to a cluster centroid was selected as the representative template of that cluster during training. During testing, Gaussian mixture modeling followed by a Markovian model was used in automatic detection of the probable candidates. The probable candidates were rigidly registered to the templates identified from spectral clustering, and a similarity metric is computed for ranking and detection. Results: A fiducial detection accuracy of 95% was obtained compared to manual observations. Expert radiation therapist observers were able to correctly identify all three implanted seeds on 11 of the 15 scans (the proposed method correctly identified all seeds on 10 of the 15). Conclusions: An novel automatic framework for gold fiducial marker detection in MRI is proposed and evaluated with detection accuracies comparable to manual detection. When radiation therapists are unable to determine the seed location in MRI, they refer back to the planning CT (only available in the existing clinical framework); similarly, an automatic quality control is built into the automatic software to ensure that all gold

  17. Functional versus Nonfunctional Rehabilitation in Chronic Ischemic Stroke: Evidences from a Randomized Functional MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristela C. X. Pelicioni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Motor rehabilitation of stroke survivors may include functional and/or nonfunctional strategy. The present study aimed to compare the effect of these two rehabilitation strategies by means of clinical scales and functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI. Twelve hemiparetic chronic stroke patients were selected. Patients were randomly assigned a nonfunctional (NFS or functional (FS rehabilitation scheme. Clinical scales (Fugl-Meyer, ARA test, and modified Barthel and fMRI were applied at four moments: before rehabilitation (P1 and immediately after (P2, 1 month after (P3, and three months after (P4 the end of rehabilitation. The NFS group improved significantly and exclusively their Fugl-Meyer scores at P2, P3, and P4, when compared to P1. On the other hand, the FS group increased significantly in Fugl-Meyer at P2, when compared to P1, and also in their ARA and Barthel scores. fMRI inspection at the individual level revealed that both rehabilitation schemes most often led to decreased activation sparseness, decreased activity of contralesional M1, increased asymmetry of M1 activity to the ipsilesional side, decreased perilesional activity, and decreased SMA activity. Increased M1 asymmetry with rehabilitation was also confirmed by Lateralization Indexes. Our clinical analysis revealed subtle differences between FS and NFS.

  18. Chronotype Modulates Language Processing-Related Cerebral Activity during Functional MRI (fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Rosenberg

    Full Text Available Based on individual daily physiological cycles, humans can be classified as early (EC, late (LC and intermediate (IC chronotypes. Recent studies have verified that chronotype-specificity relates to performance on cognitive tasks: participants perform more efficiently when tested in the chronotype-specific optimal time of day than when tested in their non-optimal time. Surprisingly, imaging studies focussing on the underlying neural mechanisms of potential chronotype-specificities are sparse. Moreover, chronotype-specific alterations of language-related semantic processing have been neglected so far.16 male, healthy ECs, 16 ICs and 16 LCs participated in a fast event-related functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI paradigm probing semantic priming. Subjects read two subsequently presented words (prime, target and were requested to determine whether the target word was an existing word or a non-word. Subjects were tested during their individual evening hours when homeostatic sleep pressure and circadian alertness levels are high to ensure equal entrainment.Chronotype-specificity is associated with task-performance and brain activation. First, ECs exhibited slower reaction times than LCs. Second, ECs showed attenuated BOLD responses in several language-related brain areas, e.g. in the left postcentral gyrus, left and right precentral gyrus and in the right superior frontal gyrus. Additionally, increased BOLD responses were revealed for LCs as compared to ICs in task-related areas, e.g. in the right inferior parietal lobule and in the right postcentral gyrus.These findings reveal that even basic language processes are associated with chronotype-specific neuronal mechanisms. Consequently, results might change the way we schedule patient evaluations and/or healthy subjects in e.g. experimental research and adding "chronotype" as a statistical covariate.

  19. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truillet, Charles; Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos; Sancey, Lucie; Denat, Franck; Boschetti, Frédéric; Stellas, Dimitris; Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D; Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A; Lux, François; Perriat, P; Tillement, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  20. Innovative multimodal DOTA/NODA nanoparticles for MRI and PET imaging for tumor detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truillet, Charles [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Bouziotis, Penelope; Tsoukalas, Charalambos [Radiochemistry Studies Laboratory, Institute of Nuclear and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Energy and Safety, National Center for Scientific Research “Demokritos”, Athens (Greece); Sancey, Lucie [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Denat, Franck [Institut de Chimie Moléculaire de l’Université de Bourgogne, UMR CNRS 6302, University of Bourgogne, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France); Boschetti, Frédéric [CheMatech, 21000 Dijon (France); Stellas, Dimitris [Department of Cancer Biology, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Anagnostopoulos, Constantinos D [Center for Experimental Surgery, Clinical and Translational Research, Biomedical Research Foundation, Academy of Athens, Athens (Greece); Koutoulidis, Vassilis; Moulopoulos, Lia A [Department of Radiology, University of Athens Medical School, Areteion Hospital, Athens (Greece); Lux, François [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Perriat, P [Matériaux Ingénierie et Science, INSA Lyon, CNRS, University of Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne (France); Tillement, Olivier [ILM, UMR 5306, University of Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-29

    The knowledge of the exact tumor stage is essential to adapt therapeutic strategies or to follow the evolution of the tumor after therapy in order to increase the survival chance. The multi-tasking diagnostics that combine techniques such as PET and MRI could really improve imaging tumor stage. PET mainly offers functional information about the disease with high sensitivity. MRI offers predominantly morphological information, able to provide an excellent soft tissue contrasts due to its high resolution.

  1. Measuring Memory Reactivation With Functional MRI: Implications for Psychological Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Benjamin J; Wagner, Anthony D

    2013-01-01

    Environmental cues often remind us of earlier experiences by triggering the reactivation of memories of events past. Recent evidence suggests that memory reactivation can be observed using functional MRI and that distributed pattern analyses can even provide evidence of reactivation on individual trials. The ability to measure memory reactivation offers unique and powerful leverage on theoretical issues of long-standing interest in cognitive psychology, providing a means to address questions that have proven difficult to answer with behavioral data alone. In this article, we consider three instances. First, reactivation measures can indicate whether memory-based inferences (i.e., generalization) arise through the encoding of integrated cross-event representations or through the flexible expression of separable event memories. Second, online measures of memory reactivation may inform theories of forgetting by providing information about when competing memories are reactivated during competitive retrieval situations. Finally, neural reactivation may provide a window onto the role of replay in memory consolidation. The ability to track memory reactivation, including at the individual trial level, provides unique leverage that is not afforded by behavioral measures and thus promises to shed light on such varied topics as generalization, integration, forgetting, and consolidation. © The Author(s) 2013.

  2. Partially Adaptive STAP Algorithm Approaches to functional MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lejian; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Schmithorst, Vincent; Holland, Scott K.; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    In this work, the architectures of three partially adaptive STAP algorithms are introduced, one of which is explored in detail, that reduce dimensionality and improve tractability over fully adaptive STAP when used in construction of brain activation maps in fMRI. Computer simulations incorporating actual MRI noise and human data analysis indicate that element space partially adaptive STAP can attain close to the performance of fully adaptive STAP while significantly decreasing processing time and maximum memory requirements, and thus demonstrates potential in fMRI analysis. PMID:19272913

  3. Sensitivity quantification of remote detection NMR and MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granwehr, J.; Seeley, J. A.

    2006-04-01

    A sensitivity analysis is presented of the remote detection NMR technique, which facilitates the spatial separation of encoding and detection of spin magnetization. Three different cases are considered: remote detection of a transient signal that must be encoded point-by-point like a free induction decay, remote detection of an experiment where the transient dimension is reduced to one data point like phase encoding in an imaging experiment, and time-of-flight (TOF) flow visualization. For all cases, the sensitivity enhancement is proportional to the relative sensitivity between the remote detector and the circuit that is used for encoding. It is shown for the case of an encoded transient signal that the sensitivity does not scale unfavorably with the number of encoded points compared to direct detection. Remote enhancement scales as the square root of the ratio of corresponding relaxation times in the two detection environments. Thus, remote detection especially increases the sensitivity of imaging experiments of porous materials with large susceptibility gradients, which cause a rapid dephasing of transverse spin magnetization. Finally, TOF remote detection, in which the detection volume is smaller than the encoded fluid volume, allows partial images corresponding to different time intervals between encoding and detection to be recorded. These partial images, which contain information about the fluid displacement, can be recorded, in an ideal case, with the same sensitivity as the full image detected in a single step with a larger coil.

  4. A new diagnostic score to detect osteoporosis in patients undergoing lumbar spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandirali, Michele; Messina, Carmelo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Scuola di Specializzazione in Radiodiagnostica, Milano (Italy); Di Leo, Giovanni; Papini, Giacomo Davide Edoardo [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Sconfienza, Luca Maria; Sardanelli, Francesco [IRCCS Policlinico San Donato, Radiology Unit, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Scienze Biomediche per la Salute, San Donato Milanese (Italy); Ulivieri, Fabio Massimo [IRCCS Fondazione Ca' Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mineralometria Ossea Computerizzata e Ambulatorio Malattie Metabolismo Minerale e Osseo, Servizio di Medicina Nucleare, Milano (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Signal intensity of lumbar-spine at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) correlates to bone mineral density (BMD). Our aim was to define a quantitative MRI-based score to detect osteoporosis on lumbar-spine MRI. After Ethics Committee approval, we selected female patients who underwent both lumbar-spine MRI and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and a reference group of 131 healthy females (20-29 years) who underwent lumbar-spine MRI. We measured the intra-vertebral signal-to-noise ratio in L1-L4. We introduced an MRI-based score (M-score), on the model of T-score. M-score diagnostic performance in diagnosing osteoporosis was estimated against DXA using receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis. We included 226 patients (median age 65 years), 70 (31 %) being osteoporotic at DXA. MRI signal-to-noise ratio correlated to BMD (r = -0.677, P < 0.001). M-score negatively correlated to T-score (r = -0.682, P < 0.001). Setting a 90 %-specificity, an M-score threshold of 5.5 was found, distinguishing osteoporosis from non-osteoporosis (sensitivity 54 %; ROC AUC 0.844). Thirty-one (14 %) patients had a fragility fracture, with osteoporosis detected in 15 (48 %) according to M-score and eight (26 %) according to T-score (P = 0.016). M-score obtained on lumbar spine MRI is a quantitative method correlating with osteoporosis. Its diagnostic value remains to be demonstrated on a large prospective cohort of patients. (orig.)

  5. High frame rate retrospectively triggered Cine MRI for assessment of murine diastolic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, Bram F.; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Motaal, Abdallah G.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.

    2013-01-01

    To assess left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in mice with Cine MRI, a high frame rate (>60 frames per cardiac cycle) is required. For conventional electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, the frame rate is inversely proportional to the pulse repetition time (TR). However, TR cannot be lowered

  6. MRI for troubleshooting detection of prostate cancer; MRT zur Problemloesung beim Nachweis des Prostatakarzinoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyersdorff, D.; Hamm, B. [Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Charite Mitte (Germany)

    2005-06-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy in males. Men aged 50 and older are recommended to undergo an annual digital rectal examination (DRE) and determination of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in serum for early detection. However, prostate biopsies guided by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) come up negative for cancer in many patients despite having PSA levels above 4 ng/ml. T2-weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is able to represent the prostate including the surrounding anatomy and depict suspicious areas of low intensity within a high-intensity peripheral zone. MRI has a higher sensitivity for detecting prostate carcinomas than DRE and TRUS in patients having an elevated PSA value and a negative core biopsy. However, its specificity is poor since other abnormalities such as prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN), prostatitis, scars, or haemmorrhage have a similar MRI appearance. The use of additional techniques such as MR spectroscopy and contrast-enhanced dynamic MRI improves sensitivity, but in particular it improves the specificity of tumor detection. Newly developed biopsy devices enable the performance of targeted biopsies in areas that appear suspicious in the MRI. (orig.)

  7. Comparison of detection pattern of HCC by ferumoxide-enhanced MRI and intratumoral blood flow pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itou, Naoki; Kotake, Fumio; Saitou, Kazuhiro; Abe, Kimihiko

    2000-01-01

    We compared the detection rate and pattern of ferumoxide-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (Fe-MRI) with the intratumoral blood flow pattern determined by CT angiography (CTA) and CT portography (CTAP) in 124 nodes (34 cases) diagnosed as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) or borderline HCC, based on the clinical course. Sequences to obtain a T1-weighted images (T1W), proton density-weighted images (PDW), T2-weighted images (T2W), T2*-weighted images (T2*W) were used in Fe-MRI. In nodes shown to be hypervascular on CTA, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 69.7%. In nodes shown to be avascular by CTAP, the detection rate by Fe-MRI was 67.3%. These rates were higher than with other flow patterns. In nodes showing high signal intensity (HSI) on any sequences, arterial blood flow was increased and portal blood flow decreased in comparison with nodes without high signal intensity. All nodes showing HSI, both on Fe-MRI T2W and T2*W, were hypervascular on CTA, and portal blood flow was absent on CTAP. Nodes showing HSI on both T2*W and T2W were considered to have greater arterial blood flow and decreased portal blood flow compared with nodes appearing as HSI on T2*W, but only as iso- or low signal intensity on T2W (Mann-Whitney U-test; p<0.05). (author)

  8. Assessment of muscle function using hybrid PET/MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haddock, Bryan; Holm, Søren; Poulsen, Jákup M.

    2017-01-01

    -FDG while activating the quadriceps of one leg with repeated knee extension exercises followed by hand-grip exercises for one arm. Immediately following the exercises, the subjects were scanned simultaneously with 18F-FDG PET/MRI and muscle groups were evaluated for increases in 18F-FDG uptake and MRI T2......Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between relative glucose uptake and MRI T2 changes in skeletal muscles following resistance exercise using simultaneous PET/MRI scans. Methods: Ten young healthy recreationally active men (age 21 – 28 years) were injected with 18F...... values. Results: A significant linear correlation between 18F-FDG uptake and changes in muscle T2 (R2 = 0.71) was found. for both small and large muscles and in voxel to voxel comparisons. Despite large intersubject differences in muscle recruitment, the linear correlation between 18F-FDG uptake...

  9. Frequency-dependent changes in the regional amplitude and synchronization of resting-state functional MRI in stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfang Zhu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (R-fMRI has been intensively used to assess alterations of inter-regional functional connectivity in patients with stroke, but the regional properties of brain activity in stroke have not yet been fully investigated. Additionally, no study has examined a frequency effect on such regional properties in stroke patients, although this effect has been shown to play important roles in both normal brain functioning and functional abnormalities. Here we utilized R-fMRI to measure the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF and regional homogeneity (ReHo, two major methods for characterizing the regional properties of R-fMRI, in three different frequency bands (slow-5: 0.01-0.027 Hz; slow-4: 0.027-0.73 Hz; and typical band: 0.01-0.1 Hz in 19 stroke patients and 15 healthy controls. Both the ALFF and ReHo analyses revealed changes in brain activity in a number of brain regions, particularly the parietal cortex, in stroke patients compared with healthy controls. Remarkably, the regions with changed activity as detected by the slow-5 band data were more extensive, and this finding was true for both the ALFF and ReHo analyses. These results not only confirm previous studies showing abnormality in the parietal cortex in patients with stroke, but also suggest that R-fMRI studies of stroke should take frequency effects into account when measuring intrinsic brain activity.

  10. Partially Adaptive STAP Algorithm Approaches to functional MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Lejian; Thompson, Elizabeth A.; Schmithorst, Vincent; Holland, Scott K.; Talavage, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the architectures of three partially adaptive STAP algorithms are introduced, one of which is explored in detail, that reduce dimensionality and improve tractability over fully adaptive STAP when used in construction of brain activation maps in fMRI. Computer simulations incorporating actual MRI noise and human data analysis indicate that element space partially adaptive STAP can attain close to the performance of fully adaptive STAP while significantly decreasing processing tim...

  11. Mapping brain activity in gradient-echo functional MRI using principal component analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Deepak; Singh, Manbir; Don, Manuel

    1997-05-01

    The detection of sites of brain activation in functional MRI has been a topic of immense research interest and many technique shave been proposed to this end. Recently, principal component analysis (PCA) has been applied to extract the activated regions and their time course of activation. This method is based on the assumption that the activation is orthogonal to other signal variations such as brain motion, physiological oscillations and other uncorrelated noises. A distinct advantage of this method is that it does not require any knowledge of the time course of the true stimulus paradigm. This technique is well suited to EPI image sequences where the sampling rate is high enough to capture the effects of physiological oscillations. In this work, we propose and apply tow methods that are based on PCA to conventional gradient-echo images and investigate their usefulness as tools to extract reliable information on brain activation. The first method is a conventional technique where a single image sequence with alternating on and off stages is subject to a principal component analysis. The second method is a PCA-based approach called the common spatial factor analysis technique (CSF). As the name suggests, this method relies on common spatial factors between the above fMRI image sequence and a background fMRI. We have applied these methods to identify active brain ares during visual stimulation and motor tasks. The results from these methods are compared to those obtained by using the standard cross-correlation technique. We found good agreement in the areas identified as active across all three techniques. The results suggest that PCA and CSF methods have good potential in detecting the true stimulus correlated changes in the presence of other interfering signals.

  12. Activated and deactivated functional brain areas in the Deqi state: A functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yong; Zeng, Tongjun; Zhang, Guifeng; Li, Ganlong; Lu, Na; Lai, Xinsheng; Lu, Yangjia; Chen, Jiarong

    2012-10-25

    We compared the activities of functional regions of the brain in the Deqi versus non-Deqi state, as reported by physicians and subjects during acupuncture. Twelve healthy volunteers received sham and true needling at the Waiguan (TE5) acupoint. Real-time cerebral functional MRI showed that compared with non-sensation after sham needling, true needling activated Brodmann areas 3, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 20, 21, 37, 39, 40, 43, and 47, the head of the caudate nucleus, the parahippocampal gyrus, thalamus and red nucleus. True needling also deactivated Brodmann areas 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 18, 24, 31, 40 and 46.

  13. Morphological and functional imaging in COPD with CT and MRI: present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley-Zaporozhan, Julia; Ley, Sebastian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. COPD is defined by irreversible airflow obstruction. It is a heterogeneous disease affecting the airways (i.e. chronic bronchitis, airway collapse), the parenchyma (i.e. hyperinflation, air trapping and emphysematous destruction) as well as the vasculature (i.e. hypoxic vasoconstriction, rarefication and pulmonary arterial hypertension) with different severity during the course of the disease. These different aspects of COPD can be best addressed by imaging using a combination of morphological and functional techniques. Three-dimensional high-resolution computed tomography (3D-HRCT) is the technique of choice for morphological imaging of the lung parenchyma and airways. This morphological information is to be accomplished by functional information about perfusion, regional lung mechanics, and ventilation mainly provided by MRI. The comprehensive diagnostic possibilities of CT complemented by MRI will allow for a more sensitive detection, phenotype-driven characterization and dedicated therapy monitoring of COPD as presented in this review. (orig.)

  14. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with hemifacial spasm: a resting-state functional MRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Tu

    Full Text Available Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has been used to detect the alterations of spontaneous neuronal activity in various neurological and neuropsychiatric diseases, but rarely in hemifacial spasm (HFS, a nervous system disorder. We used resting-state fMRI with regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis to investigate changes in spontaneous brain activity of patients with HFS and to determine the relationship of these functional changes with clinical features. Thirty patients with HFS and 33 age-, sex-, and education-matched healthy controls were included in this study. Compared with controls, HFS patients had significantly decreased ReHo values in left middle frontal gyrus (MFG, left medial cingulate cortex (MCC, left lingual gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus (STG and right precuneus; and increased ReHo values in left precentral gyrus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, right brainstem, and right cerebellum. Furthermore, the mean ReHo value in brainstem showed a positive correlation with the spasm severity (r = 0.404, p = 0.027, and the mean ReHo value in MFG was inversely related with spasm severity in HFS group (r = -0.398, p = 0.028. This study reveals that HFS is associated with abnormal spontaneous brain activity in brain regions most involved in motor control and blinking movement. The disturbances of spontaneous brain activity reflected by ReHo measurements may provide insights into the neurological pathophysiology of HFS.

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging goes postmortem: noninvasive detection and assessment of myocardial infarction by postmortem MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackowski, Christian; Warntjes, Marcel J.B.; Persson, Anders; Berge, Johan; Baer, Walter

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the performance of postmortem magnetic resonance imaging (pmMRI) in identification and characterization of lethal myocardial infarction in a non-invasive manner on human corpses. Before forensic autopsy, 20 human forensic corpses were examined on a 1.5-T system for the presence of myocardial infarction. Short axis, transversal and longitudinal long axis images (T1-weighted; T2-weighted; PD-weighted) were acquired in situ. In subsequent autopsy, the section technique was adapted to short axis images. Histological investigations were conducted to confirm autopsy and/or radiological diagnoses. Nineteen myocardial lesions were detected and age staged with pmMRI, of which 13 were histologically confirmed (chronic, subacute and acute). Six lesions interpreted as peracute by pmMRI showed no macroscopic or histological finding. Five of the six peracute lesions correlated well to coronary pathology, and one case displayed a severe hypertrophic alteration. pmMRI reliably demonstrates chronic, subacute and acute myocardial infarction in situ. In peracute cases pmMRI may display ischemic lesions undetectable at autopsy and routine histology. pmMRI has the potential to substantiate autopsy and to counteract the loss of reliable information on causes of death due to the recent disappearance of the clinical autopsy. (orig.)

  16. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi

    1989-08-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author).

  17. The usefulness of MRI for detection of the thymus gland in myasthenia gravis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokezu, Youichi; Kaseda, Syun; Arimura, Kimiyoshi; Osame, Mitsuhiro; Baba, Kuniaki; Ohkubo, Koichi; Hagiwara, Hiroshi.

    1989-01-01

    Seven patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) were examined to find thymus or thymoma employing chest radiographs, computed tomography (CT), pneumomediastinography (PMG), computed tomography after pneumomediastinography (PMG-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). X-ray CT examination could reveal thymus only in half out of 6 cases scanned. On the other hand, MRI confirmed thymus or thymoma in 6 out of 7 patients. PMG and PMG-CT confirmed thymus or thymoma clearly in all of the 4 cases studied. PMG and PMG-CT examinations revealed thymus or thymoma more clearly than MRI. MRI is, however, an examination causing no pain to the patients and also more superior to X-ray CT in distinguishing between a thymus and mediastinal fat or vascular structure. In addition, MRI could reveal even capsules in thymoma which were never revealed by X-ray CT. We concluded that MRI could be an alternative method to CT and PMG in detection of thymus or thymoma in MG. (author)

  18. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  19. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  20. Structural and functional MRI in children with renal disease. First experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joergensen, Bettina; Froekiaer, Joergen [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Karstoft, Kristian; Pedersen, Michael [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Inst. of Clinical Medicine; Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). MR Research Centre; Joergensen, Troels Munch [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Urology; Rittig, Soeren [Aarhus Univ. Hospital (Denmark). Dept. of Paediatrics

    2010-07-01

    This MRI study demonstrates our first clinical experiences with structural and functional evaluation in children with renal dysfunction, and communicates our experience with quantitative measurements of renal function compared to reference values found employing radionucleotides. We included renal impaired children who were recruited for clinical radioisotopic GFR measurements (n=8). MRI was performed 2 hours after Cr-EDTA measurements and was conducted using a protocol involving both anatomical/structural sequences and a dynamic contrast-enhanced sequence. Data obtained with the dynamic MRI sequence were processed using the graphical Patlak approach to obtain estimates of GFR. We were able to characterize the intrarenal configuration (cortex, medulla, pelvicalyceal arrangement) in all cases. Functional analyses of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealed an overall underestimation of GFR measured by MRI compared to Cr-EDTPA measures (range: -2% to -43%). We advocate the use of MRI as a single-modality approach in the structural and functional evaluation of impaired kidneys in children, and concurrently, we presented a clinically available strategy for estimations of renal cortical volume and single kidney function. However, the use of MRI contrast agents have recently become controversial in renal patients due to the risk of NSF. (orig.)

  1. Hyperpolarized 129Xe MRI: A viable functional lung imaging modality?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patz, Samuel; Hersman, F. William; Muradian, Iga; Hrovat, Mirko I.; Ruset, Iulian C.; Ketel, Stephen; Jacobson, Francine; Topulos, George P.; Hatabu, Hiroto; Butler, James P.

    2007-01-01

    The majority of researchers investigating hyperpolarized gas MRI as a candidate functional lung imaging modality have used 3 He as their imaging agent of choice rather than 129 Xe. This preference has been predominantly due to, 3 He providing stronger signals due to higher levels of polarization and higher gyromagnetic ratio, as well as its being easily available to more researchers due to availability of polarizers (USA) or ease of gas transport (Europe). Most researchers agree, however, that hyperpolarized 129 Xe will ultimately emerge as the imaging agent of choice due to its unlimited supply in nature and its falling cost. Our recent polarizer technology delivers vast improvements in hyperpolarized 129 Xe output. Using this polarizer, we have demonstrated the unique property of xenon to measure alveolar surface area noninvasively. In this article, we describe our human protocols and their safety, and our results for the measurement of the partial pressure of pulmonary oxygen (pO 2 ) by observation of 129 Xe signal decay. We note that the measurement of pO 2 by observation of 129 Xe signal decay is more complex than that for 3 He because of an additional signal loss mechanism due to interphase diffusion of 129 Xe from alveolar gas spaces to septal tissue. This results in measurements of an equivalent pO 2 that accounts for both traditional T 1 decay from pO 2 and that from interphase diffusion. We also provide an update on new technological advancements that form the foundation for an improved compact design polarizer as well as improvements that provide another order-of-magnitude scale-up in xenon polarizer output

  2. Functional MRI study of cerebral cortical activation during volitional swallowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasa, Toru; Aiga, Hideki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Kawai, Noriko; Sugimoto, Tomosada; Kuboki, Takuo; Kishi, Kanji

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotropic distribution and lateralization of motor and sensory cortical activity during swallowing in healthy adult human subjects using functional MR imaging. Nine healthy right-handed adult volunteers (6 men, 3 women; ages 22-38) were examined. Their cortical activities were evoked by having them swallow, five times, a small bolus of water (3 ml) supplied through a plastic catheter. As a positive control, the subjects performed five repetitions of right-handed grasping tasks. Blood oxygenation level-dependent images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Germany; repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=0.96/0.66, flip angle (FA)=90 deg). T1 weighted anatomical images were obtained for the same slices in each subject. Cerebral activity was observed most notably in the primary motor cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, followed by the premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, and insula. The hand-grasping task activated relatively superior parts of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices. The swallowing task, on the other hand, activated the inferior parts of the pre- and postcentral gyri. The hand-grasping activation of motor and sensory cortices was localized absolutely on the contralateral side, whereas swallowing activated the motor cortex either bilaterally or unilaterally. Swallowing activated the sensory cortex almost always bilaterally. This study suggested that fMRI could be used to identify the specific areas of cortical activation caused by various tasks, and to differentiate the locations of cortical activation between tasks. (author)

  3. Functional MRI study of cerebral cortical activation during volitional swallowing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakasa, Toru; Aiga, Hideki; Yanagi, Yoshinobu; Kawai, Noriko; Sugimoto, Tomosada; Kuboki, Takuo; Kishi, Kanji [Okayama Univ. (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine and Dentistry

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the somatotropic distribution and lateralization of motor and sensory cortical activity during swallowing in healthy adult human subjects using functional MR imaging. Nine healthy right-handed adult volunteers (6 men, 3 women; ages 22-38) were examined. Their cortical activities were evoked by having them swallow, five times, a small bolus of water (3 ml) supplied through a plastic catheter. As a positive control, the subjects performed five repetitions of right-handed grasping tasks. Blood oxygenation level-dependent images were obtained using a 1.5 Tesla MR system (Magnetom Vision, Siemens Germany; repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=0.96/0.66, flip angle (FA)=90 deg). T1 weighted anatomical images were obtained for the same slices in each subject. Cerebral activity was observed most notably in the primary motor cortex and primary somatosensory cortex, followed by the premotor cortex, anterior cingulate cortex, frontal operculum, and insula. The hand-grasping task activated relatively superior parts of the primary motor and somatosensory cortices. The swallowing task, on the other hand, activated the inferior parts of the pre- and postcentral gyri. The hand-grasping activation of motor and sensory cortices was localized absolutely on the contralateral side, whereas swallowing activated the motor cortex either bilaterally or unilaterally. Swallowing activated the sensory cortex almost always bilaterally. This study suggested that fMRI could be used to identify the specific areas of cortical activation caused by various tasks, and to differentiate the locations of cortical activation between tasks. (author)

  4. Mutual Connectivity Analysis (MCA) Using Generalized Radial Basis Function Neural Networks for Nonlinear Functional Connectivity Network Recovery in Resting-State Functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Adora M; Abidin, Anas Zainul; Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-29

    We investigate the applicability of a computational framework, called mutual connectivity analysis (MCA), for directed functional connectivity analysis in both synthetic and resting-state functional MRI data. This framework comprises of first evaluating non-linear cross-predictability between every pair of time series prior to recovering the underlying network structure using community detection algorithms. We obtain the non-linear cross-prediction score between time series using Generalized Radial Basis Functions (GRBF) neural networks. These cross-prediction scores characterize the underlying functionally connected networks within the resting brain, which can be extracted using non-metric clustering approaches, such as the Louvain method. We first test our approach on synthetic models with known directional influence and network structure. Our method is able to capture the directional relationships between time series (with an area under the ROC curve = 0.92 ± 0.037) as well as the underlying network structure (Rand index = 0.87 ± 0.063) with high accuracy. Furthermore, we test this method for network recovery on resting-state fMRI data, where results are compared to the motor cortex network recovered from a motor stimulation sequence, resulting in a strong agreement between the two (Dice coefficient = 0.45). We conclude that our MCA approach is effective in analyzing non-linear directed functional connectivity and in revealing underlying functional network structure in complex systems.

  5. Whole-body MRI in comparison to skeletal scintigraphy for detection of skeletal metastases in patients with solid tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, N.; Altehoefer, C.; Winterer, J.; Schaefer, O.; Bley, T.A.; Langer, M.; Kelly, T.; Moser, E.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the diagnostic efficacy of whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) as a new and rapid examination technique with skeletal scintigraphy for detection of skeletal metastases from solid tumors. In 129 patients with solid malignant tumors, WB-MRI was performed for individual comparison with skeletal scintigraphy. Examinations were performed with the innovative AngioSURF trademark rolling table with integrated phased array surface coil and coronary TIRM sequences for different body regions. The results for WB-MRI and skeletal scintigraphy were concordant in 81% of the cases, whereby both procedures excluded skeletal metastases in 43%. WB-MRI and skeletal scintigraphy demonstrated skeletal metastases in 38% of the cases, whereby WB-MRI provided more comprehensive findings in 45%. In 12% of the cases, skeletal scintigraphy was superior to WB-MRI and in 19% the findings were discordant, whereby WB-MRI detected skeletal metastases in 15 cases which had not been found on skeletal scintigraphy. In nine cases, skeletal scintigraphy was positive when the WB-MRI was negative. In 60% of the cases, WB-MRI evidenced tumor-associated findings. WB-MRI represents a promising new staging technique for detection of skeletal metastases, which is more sensitive in many cases than skeletal scintigraphy in detecting and assessing the extent of skeletal metastases - and tumor-associated findings that are relevant for treatment strategy. (orig.) [de

  6. Raw Tumor MRI Edge Detection using Interval Type 2 Fuzzy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pc

    2018-03-22

    Mar 22, 2018 ... detectors are tested on images added with 0.001 white Gaussian noise and salt and ... noise removable and its effect on edge detection to various images contents. ..... Analysis and Machine Intelligence, vol. 36, no. 7, pp.

  7. Multiparametric MRI in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Futterer, Jurgen J. [Dept. of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2017-08-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men aged 50 years and older in developed countries and the third leading cause of cancer-related death in men. Multiparametric prostate MR imaging is currently the most accurate imaging modality to detect, localize, and stage prostate cancer. The role of multi-parametric MR imaging in the detection of clinically significant prostate cancer are discussed. In addition, insights are provided in imaging techniques, protocol, and interpretation.

  8. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P.; Delotte, J.; Bongain, A.; Toullalan, O.

    2010-01-01

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  9. Utility of vaginal and rectal contrast medium in MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chassang, M.; Novellas, S.; Bloch-Marcotte, C.; Chevallier, P. [Hopital Archet 2, Service d' Imagerie Diagnostique et Interventionnelle, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Delotte, J.; Bongain, A. [Hopital Archet 2, Service de Gynecologie-Obstetrique, Centre Hospitalier Regional et Universitaire de Nice, 151 route de Saint Antoine de Ginestiere, B.P. 3079, Nice Cedex 3 (France); Toullalan, O. [Hopital de Cannes, Service de Gynecologie, 15 avenue des Broussailles, B.P. 264, Cannes Cedex (France)

    2010-04-15

    To study the sensitivity of MRI performed utilising vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel in the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis. This was a prospective monocentric study. All patients evaluated by the gynaecologist for pelvic pain, endometriosis or infertility were included. Axial and sagittal T2-weighted images were performed both with and without vaginal and rectal opacification with ultrasound gel. Three radiologists, all blinded, interpreted the images with a minimum of 15 days between the two readings. MRI performance with and without vaginal and rectal opacification was evaluated by calculating sensitivity, specificity and both positive and negative predictive values. Seventy-eight patients were included. Among these, 31 patients had deep pelvic endometriosis of which 24 were confirmed by laparoscopy. Seventy-six locations of deep pelvic endometriosis were discovered on MRI. For the three reviewers there was a significant improvement in sensitivity between pre- and post-contrast MRI (p < 0.0002). Opacification of the vagina and rectum significantly improved the sensitivity of MRI for the detection of deep pelvic endometriosis by expanding the vagina and rectum, thus allowing better delineation of the pelvic organs. This was especially apparent for lesions localised to the vagina and rectovaginal septum. (orig.)

  10. Computer-aided detection in breast MRI : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrius, Monique D.; Jansen-van der Weide, Marijke C.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.; Pijnappel, Ruud M.; Oudkerk, Matthijs

    To evaluate the additional value of computer-aided detection (CAD) in breast MRI by assessing radiologists' accuracy in discriminating benign from malignant breast lesions. A literature search was performed with inclusion of relevant studies using a commercially available CAD system with automatic

  11. Serial cranial ultrasonography or early MRI for detecting preterm brain injury?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaisier, Annemarie; Raets, Marlou M A; Ecury-Goossen, Ginette M; Govaert, Paul; Feijen-Roon, Monique; Reiss, Irwin K M; Smit, Liesbeth S; Lequin, Maarten H; Dudink, Jeroen

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate detection ability and feasibility of serial cranial ultrasonography (CUS) and early MRI in preterm brain injury. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Level III neonatal intensive care unit. PATIENTS: 307 infants, born below 29 weeks of gestation. METHODS: Serial CUS

  12. MRI versus CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegner, Inge; Hooft, Lotty; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Pameijer, Frank A.; de Bree, Remco; Stegeman, Inge

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To determine and compare the diagnostic accuracy of preoperative conventional MRI and conventional CT for detecting cartilage invasion in patients with laryngeal and hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, who

  13. Real-time functional MR imaging (fMRI) for presurgical evaluation of paediatric epilepsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Kumar Gupta, Arun [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Imaging Sciences and Interventional Radiology, Trivandrum (India); Sujesh, Sreedharan [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Biomedical Technology Wing, Trivandrum (India); Ashalata, Radhakrishnan; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurology, Trivandrum (India); Abraham, Mathew [Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute for Medical Sciences and Technology, Department of Neurosurgery, Trivandrum (India)

    2007-10-15

    The role of fMRI in the presurgical evaluation of children with intractable epilepsy is being increasingly recognized. Real-time fMRI allows the clinician to visualize functional brain activation in real time. Since there is no off-line data analysis as in conventional fMRI, the overall time for the procedure is reduced, making it clinically feasible in a busy clinical sitting. (1) To study the accuracy of real-time fMRI in comparison to conventional fMRI with off-line processing; (2) to determine its effectiveness in mapping the eloquent cortex and language lateralization in comparison to invasive procedures such as intraoperative cortical stimulation and Wada testing; and (3) to evaluate the role of fMRI in presurgical decision making in children with epilepsy. A total of 23 patients (age range 6-18 years) underwent fMRI with sensorimotor, visual and language paradigms. Data processing was done in real time using in-line BOLD. The results of real-time fMRI matched those of off-line processing done using the well-accepted standard technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in all the initial ten patients in whom the two techniques were compared. Coregistration of the fMRI data on a 3-D FLAIR sequence rather than a T1-weighted image gave better information regarding the relationship of the lesion to the area of activation. The results of intraoperative cortical stimulation and fMRI matched in six out of six patients, while the Wada test and fMRI had similar results in four out of five patients in whom these techniques were performed. In the majority of patients in this series the technique influenced patient management. Real-time fMRI is an easily performed and reliable technique in the presurgical workup of children with epilepsy. (orig.)

  14. Real-time functional MR imaging (fMRI) for presurgical evaluation of paediatric epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Bejoy; Kumar Gupta, Arun; Sujesh, Sreedharan; Ashalata, Radhakrishnan; Radhakrishnan, Kurupath; Abraham, Mathew

    2007-01-01

    The role of fMRI in the presurgical evaluation of children with intractable epilepsy is being increasingly recognized. Real-time fMRI allows the clinician to visualize functional brain activation in real time. Since there is no off-line data analysis as in conventional fMRI, the overall time for the procedure is reduced, making it clinically feasible in a busy clinical sitting. (1) To study the accuracy of real-time fMRI in comparison to conventional fMRI with off-line processing; (2) to determine its effectiveness in mapping the eloquent cortex and language lateralization in comparison to invasive procedures such as intraoperative cortical stimulation and Wada testing; and (3) to evaluate the role of fMRI in presurgical decision making in children with epilepsy. A total of 23 patients (age range 6-18 years) underwent fMRI with sensorimotor, visual and language paradigms. Data processing was done in real time using in-line BOLD. The results of real-time fMRI matched those of off-line processing done using the well-accepted standard technique of statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in all the initial ten patients in whom the two techniques were compared. Coregistration of the fMRI data on a 3-D FLAIR sequence rather than a T1-weighted image gave better information regarding the relationship of the lesion to the area of activation. The results of intraoperative cortical stimulation and fMRI matched in six out of six patients, while the Wada test and fMRI had similar results in four out of five patients in whom these techniques were performed. In the majority of patients in this series the technique influenced patient management. Real-time fMRI is an easily performed and reliable technique in the presurgical workup of children with epilepsy. (orig.)

  15. Visualization and quantification of large bowel motility with functional cine-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, S.; Wielage, C.; Fischer, T.; Reiser, M.; Lienemann, A.; Kirchhoff, C.; Mussack, T.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: to develop and evaluate a method to visualize and quantify large bowel motility using functional cine MRI. Methods: fifteen healthy individuals (8males, 7 females, 20 to 45 years old) with no history or present symptoms of bowel disorders were enrolled in a functional cine MRI examination at 6 a. m. after a starving phase for at least eight hours before and after oral administration of Senna tea (mild stimulating purgative). Two consecutive sets of repeated measurements of the entire abdomen were performed using a 1.5T MRI system with coronal T2-weighted HASTE sequences anatomically adjusted to the course of the large bowel. A navigator technique was used for respiratory gating at the level of the right dorsal diaphragm. The changes in diameter (given in cm) were measured at 5 different locations of the ascending (AC), transverse (TC) and descending colon (DC), and assessed as parameters for the bowel motility. Results: the mean values as a statistical measure for large bowel relaxation were determined. Before ingestion of Senna tea, the mean diameter measured 3.41 cm (ascending colon), 3 cm (transverse colon) and 2.67 cm (descending colon). After the ingestion of Senna tea, the mean diameter increased to 3.69 cm (ascending colon) to 3.4 cm (transverse colon) and to 2.9 cm (descending colon). A statistically significant difference was demonstrated with the Wilcoxon test (level of confidence 0.05). For the determination of dynamic increase, the changes of the statistical scatter amplitude to the mean value were expressed as percentage before and after the ingestion of Senna tea. Thereby, an increase in variation and dynamic range was detected for the AC (112.9%) and DC (100%), but a decrease in the dynamics for the TC (69%). Conclusion: a non-invasive method for the assessment of bowel motility was developed for the first time. The use of functional cine MRI utilizing a prokinetic stimulus allowed visualisation and quantification of large bowel motility

  16. Progesterone mediates brain functional connectivity changes during the menstrual cycle - A pilot resting state MRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eArelin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing interest in intrinsic brain organization has sparked various innovative approaches to generating comprehensive connectivity-based maps of the human brain. Prior reports point to a sexual dimorphism of the structural and functional human connectome. However, it is uncertain whether subtle changes in sex hormones, as occur during the monthly menstrual cycle, substantially impact the functional architecture of the female brain. Here, we performed eigenvector centrality (EC mapping in 32 longitudinal resting state fMRI scans of a single healthy subject without oral contraceptive use, across four menstrual cycles, and assessed estrogen and progesterone levels. To investigate associations between cycle-dependent hormones and brain connectivity, we performed correlation analyses between the EC maps and the respective hormone levels. On the whole brain level, we found a significant positive correlation between progesterone and EC in the bilateral DLPFC and bilateral sensorimotor cortex. In a secondary region-of-interest analysis, we detected a progesterone-modulated increase in functional connectivity of both bilateral DLPFC and bilateral sensorimotor cortex with the hippocampus. Our results suggest that the menstrual cycle substantially impacts intrinsic functional connectivity, particularly in brain areas associated with contextual memory-regulation, such as the hippocampus. These findings are the first to link the subtle hormonal fluctuations that occur during the menstrual cycle, to significant changes in regional functional connectivity in the hippocampus in a longitudinal design, given the limitation of data acquisition in a single subject. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of such a longitudinal rs-fMRI design and illustrates a means of creating a personalized map of the human brain by integrating potential mediators of brain states, such as menstrual cycle phase.

  17. Detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Comparison of whole-body MRI and bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketelsen, D.; Roethke, M.; Aschoff, P.; Lichy, M.P.; Claussen, C.D.; Schlemmer, H.P.; Merseburger, A.S.; Reimold, M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: prostate cancer continues to be the third leading cancer-related mortality of western men. Early diagnosis of bone metastasis is important for the therapy regime and for assessing the prognosis. The standard method is bone scintigraphy. Whole-body MRI proved to be more sensitive for early detection of skeletal metastasis. However, studies of homogenous tumor entities are not available. The aim of the study was to compare bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI regarding the detection of bone metastasis of prostate cancer. Materials and methods: 14 patients with histologically confirmed prostate cancer and a bone scintigraphy as well as whole-body MRI within one month were included. The mean age was 68 years. Scintigraphy was performed using the planar whole-body technique (ventral and dorsal projections). Suspect areas were enlarged. Whole-body MRI was conducted using native T1w and STIR sequences in the coronary plane of the whole body, sagittal imaging of spine and breath-hold STIR and T1w-Flash-2D sequences of ribs and chest. Bone scintigraphy and whole-body MRI were evaluated retrospectively by experienced radiologists in a consensus reading on a lesion-based level. Results: whole-body MRI detected significantly more bone metastasis (p = 0.024). 96.4% of the demonstrated skeletal metastases in bone scintigraphy were founded in whole-body MRI while only 58.6% of the depicted metastases in MRI were able to be located in scintigraphy. There was no significant difference regarding bone metastasis greater than one centimeter (p = 0.082) in contrast to metastasis less than one centimeter (p = 0.035). Small osteoblastic metastases showed a considerably higher contrast in T1w sequences than in STIR imaging. Further advantages of whole-body MRI were additional information about extra-osseous tumor infiltration and their complications, for example stenosis of spinal canal or vertebral body fractures, found in 42.9% of patients. (orig.)

  18. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Paola, V.; Manfredi, R.; Castelli, F.; Negrelli, R.; Mehrabi, S.; Pozzi Mucelli, R.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  19. Detection and localization of deep endometriosis by means of MRI and correlation with the ENZIAN score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Paola, V., E-mail: dipaola.valerio@libero.it; Manfredi, R.; Castelli, F.; Negrelli, R.; Mehrabi, S.; Pozzi Mucelli, R.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •The accuracy of MRI for deep endometriosis was 95%. •The agreement between histopathological and MRI ENZIAN score was excellent (k = 0.824). •The highest agreement was for adenomyosis (1.000) and lesions of utero-sacral ligaments (0.890). •MRI ENZIAN score allows to obtain a correct preoperative staging of deep endometriosis. -- Abstract: Purpose: To determine the accuracy of ENZIAN score, as detected on MR imaging, compared to surgical-pathologic findings. Materials and methods: This retrospective study was approved by the investigational review board and the requirement for informed patient consent was waived. 115 patients were included according to following criteria: tubo-ovarian and/or deep endometriosis suspected at physical examination and transvaginal ultrasound; availability of MR examination; histopathological results from laparoscopic or surgical treatment. Exclusion criteria: lack of available MR examination, and/or (b) lack of a definitive histopathological results. Histopathological findings from bioptic specimens obtained during laparoscopic or laparotomic treatment were considered as reference standard. For all detected lesions a score according to ENZIAN score (revised 2010) was assigned both for MRI and histopathological findings. By comparing MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score the overall sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values in relation to presence/absence of deep endometriosis in each patient were calculated. k-Cohen to evaluate the degree of concordance between MRI-ENZIAN score and histopathological-ENZIAN score was also measured. Moreover the sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive and negative predictive values for each specific localization provided by ENZIAN score were also calculated. Results: At histopathology, the diagnosis of deep endometriosis was confirmed in 82/115 (71.3%) patients. The sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, PPV and NPV of MRI were 94%, 97

  20. Machine learning algorithm accurately detects fMRI signature of vulnerability to major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, João R; Moll, Jorge; Green, Sophie; Deakin, John F W; Thomaz, Carlos E; Zahn, Roland

    2015-08-30

    Standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analyses cannot assess the potential of a neuroimaging signature as a biomarker to predict individual vulnerability to major depression (MD). Here, we use machine learning for the first time to address this question. Using a recently identified neural signature of guilt-selective functional disconnection, the classification algorithm was able to distinguish remitted MD from control participants with 78.3% accuracy. This demonstrates the high potential of our fMRI signature as a biomarker of MD vulnerability. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Value of functional MRI in evaluation of patients with suspected prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Mohamed Mostafa Elian

    2015-12-01

    Conclusion: Functional MRI provided a highly sensitive method in diagnosing and localizing prostate cancer. Being noninvasive, highly sensitive with wider spectrum in nearby pelvic organs assessment in one imaging session, it may totally replace TRUS-guided biopsy.

  2. Automated detection of Lupus white matter lesions in MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloy Roura Perez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain magnetic resonance imaging provides detailed information which can be used to detect and segment white matter lesions (WML. In this work we propose an approach to automatically segment WML in Lupus patients by using T1w and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR images. Lupus WML appear as small focal abnormal tissue observed as hyperintensities in the FLAIR images. The quantification of these WML is a key factor for the stratification of lupus patients and therefore both lesion detection and segmentation play an important role. In our approach, the T1w image is first used to classify the three main tissues of the brain, white matter (WM, gray matter (GM and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, while the FLAIR image is then used to detect focal WML as outliers of its GM intensity distribution. A set of post-processing steps based on lesion size, tissue neighborhood, and location are used to refine the lesion candidates. The proposal is evaluated on 20 patients, presenting qualitative and quantitative results in terms of precision and sensitivity of lesion detection (True Positive Rate (62% and Positive Prediction Value (80% respectively as well as segmentation accuracy (Dice Similarity Coefficient (72%. Obtained results illustrate the validity of the approach to automatically detect and segment lupus lesions. Besides, our approach is publicly available as a SPM8/12 toolbox extension with a simple parameter configuration.

  3. Functional connectivity analysis of the brain network using resting-state fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Toshihiro

    2011-01-01

    Spatial patterns of spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals reflect the underlying neural architecture. The study of the brain network based on these self-organized patterns is termed resting-state functional MRI (fMRI). This review article aims at briefly reviewing a basic concept of this technology and discussing its implications for neuropsychological studies. First, the technical aspects of resting-state fMRI, including signal sources, physiological artifacts, image acquisition, and analytical methods such as seed-based correlation analysis and independent component analysis, are explained, followed by a discussion on the major resting-state networks, including the default mode network. In addition, the structure-function correlation studied using diffuse tensor imaging and resting-state fMRI is briefly discussed. Second, I have discussed the reservations and potential pitfalls of 2 major imaging methods: voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping and task fMRI. Problems encountered with voxel-based lesion-symptom mapping can be overcome by using resting-state fMRI and evaluating undamaged brain networks in patients. Regarding task fMRI in patients, I have also emphasized the importance of evaluating the baseline brain activity because the amplitude of activation in BOLD fMRI is hard to interpret as the same baseline cannot be assumed for both patient and normal groups. (author)

  4. Comparison of post-surgical MRI presentation of the pituitary gland and its hormonal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladowska, Joanna; Sokolska, Violetta; Sozański, Tomasz; Bednarek-Tupikowska, Grażyna; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2010-01-01

    Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change of anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of a tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of filling material used and time of its resorption.The aim of the study was to compare MR image of the pituitary gland after surgery with clinical findings and to establish a correlation between MRI presentation of spared pituitary and its hormonal function. 124 patients after resection of pituitary adenomas - 409 MRI results in total - were studied. With a 1.5-T unit, T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images were obtained. The pituitary gland seemed to be normal in MRI in 11 patients, 8 of them had completely regular pituitary function but in 3 of them we noticed a partial hypopituitarism. In 99 patients only a part of the pituitary gland was recognised, 53 of them had hypopituitarism but 46 of them were endocrinologically healthy. 14 patients seemed to have no persistent pituitary gland in MRI, in comparison to hormonal studies: there was panhypopituitarism in 6 and hypopituitarism in 8 cases. MRI presentation of post - surgical pituitary gland doesn't necessarily correlate with its hormonal function - there was a significant statistical difference. Some patients with partial pituitary seems normal hormonal function. In some cases the pituitary seem normal in MRI but these patients have hormonal disorders and need substitution therapy.

  5. Comparison of post-surgical MRI presentation of the pituitary gland and its hormonal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bladowska, J.; Sokolska, V.; Sasiadek, M.; Sozanski, T.; Bednarek-Tupikowska, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Post-surgical evaluation of the pituitary gland in MRI is difficult because of a change of anatomical conditions. It depends also on numerous other factors, including: size and expansion of a tumour before surgery, type of surgical access, quality and volume of filling material used and time of its resorption.The aim of the study was to compare MR image of the pituitary gland after surgery with clinical findings and to establish a correlation between MRI presentation of spared pituitary and its hormonal function. Material/Methods: 124 patients after resection of pituitary adenomas - 409 MRI results in total - were studied. With a 1.5-T unit, T1-weighted sagittal and coronal, enhanced and unenhanced images were obtained. Results: The pituitary gland seemed to be normal in MRI in 11 patients, 8 of them had completely regular pituitary function but in 3 of them we noticed a partial hypopituitarism. In 99 patients only a part of the pituitary gland was recognised, 53 of them had hypopituitarism but 46 of them were endocrinologically healthy. 14 patients seemed to have no persistent pituitary gland in MRI, in comparison to hormonal studies: there was panhypopituitarism in 6 and hypopituitarism in 8 cases. Conclusions: MRI presentation of post - surgical pituitary gland doesn't necessarily correlate with its hormonal function - there was a significant statistical difference. Some patients with partial pituitary seems normal hormonal function. In some cases the pituitary seem normal in MRI but these patients have hormonal disorders and need substitution therapy. (authors)

  6. Sensitivity of different MRI sequences in the early detection of melanoma brain metastases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckwoldt, Michael O.; Schwarz, Daniel; Radbruch, Alexander; Enk, Alexander; Bendszus, Martin; Hassel, Jessica; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2018-01-01

    Background After the emergence of new MRI techniques such as susceptibility- and diffusion-weighted imaging (SWI and DWI) and because of specific imaging characteristics of melanoma brain metastases (MBM), it is unclear which MRI sequences are most beneficial for detection of MBM. This study was performed to investigate the sensitivity of six clinical MRI sequences in the early detection of MBM. Methods Medical records of all melanoma patients referred to our center between November 2005 and December 2016 were reviewed for presence of MBM. Analysis encompassed six MRI sequences at the time of initial diagnosis of first or new MBM, including non-enhanced T1-weighted (T1w), contrast-enhanced T1w (ceT1w), T2-weighted (T2w), T2w-FLAIR, susceptibility-weighted (SWI) and diffusion-weighted (DWI) MRI. Each lesion was rated with respect to its conspicuity (score from 0—not detectable to 3—clearly visible). Results Of 1210 patients, 217 with MBM were included in the analysis and up to 5 lesions per patient were evaluated. A total of 720 metastases were assessed and all six sequences were available for 425 MBM. Sensitivity (conspicuity ≥2) was 99.7% for ceT1w, 77.0% for FLAIR, 64.7% for SWI, 61.0% for T2w, 56.7% for T1w, and 48.4% for DWI. Thirty-one (7.3%) of 425 lesions were only detectable by ceT1w but no other sequence. Conclusions Contrast-enhanced T1-weighting is more sensitive than all other sequences for detection of MBM. Disruption of the blood-brain-barrier is consistently an earlier sign in MBM than perifocal edema, signal loss on SWI or diffusion restriction. PMID:29596475

  7. A urinary biomarker-based risk score correlates with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Rianne J; van der Leest, Marloes M G; Dijkstra, Siebren; Barentsz, Jelle O; Van Criekinge, Wim; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, Christina A; Schalken, Jack A; Mulders, Peter F A; van Oort, Inge M

    2017-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) diagnostics would greatly benefit from more accurate, non-invasive techniques for the detection of clinically significant disease, leading to a reduction of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the association between a novel urinary biomarker-based risk score (SelectMDx), multiparametric MRI (mpMRI) outcomes, and biopsy results for PCa detection. This retrospective observational study used data from the validation study of the SelectMDx score, in which urine was collected after digital rectal examination from men undergoing prostate biopsies. A subset of these patients also underwent a mpMRI scan of the prostate. The indications for performing mpMRI were based on persistent clinical suspicion of PCa or local staging after PCa was found upon biopsy. All mpMRI images were centrally reviewed in 2016 by an experienced radiologist blinded for the urine test results and biopsy outcome. The PI-RADS version 2 was used. In total, 172 patients were included for analysis. Hundred (58%) patients had PCa detected upon prostate biopsy, of which 52 (52%) had high-grade disease correlated with a significantly higher SelectMDx score (P < 0.01). The median SelectMDx score was significantly higher in patients with a suspicious significant lesion on mpMRI compared to no suspicion of significant PCa (P < 0.01). For the prediction of mpMRI outcome, the area-under-the-curve of SelectMDx was 0.83 compared to 0.66 for PSA and 0.65 for PCA3. There was a positive association between SelectMDx score and the final PI-RADS grade. There was a statistically significant difference in SelectMDx score between PI-RADS 3 and 4 (P < 0.01) and between PI-RADS 4 and 5 (P < 0.01). The novel urinary biomarker-based SelectMDx score is a promising tool in PCa detection. This study showed promising results regarding the correlation between the SelectMDx score and mpMRI outcomes, outperforming PCA3. Our results suggest that this risk

  8. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L. [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Bronx, NY (United States); Hay, Arielle [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States); Miami Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Miami, FL (United States); Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn [Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  9. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berko, Netanel S; Hay, Arielle; Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn; Levin, Terry L

    2015-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P myositis were 75% and 31%, respectively, with a sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 67%. Compression-strain US

  10. Efficacy of ultrasound elastography in detecting active myositis in children: can it replace MRI?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berko, Netanel S.; Levin, Terry L.; Hay, Arielle; Sterba, Yonit; Wahezi, Dawn

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy is a rare yet potentially debilitating condition. MRI is used both for diagnosis and to assess response to treatment. No study has evaluated the performance of US elastography in the diagnosis of this condition in children. To assess the performance of compression-strain US elastography in detecting active myositis in children with clinically confirmed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and to compare its efficacy to MRI. Children with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy underwent non-contrast MR imaging as well as compression-strain US elastography of the quadriceps muscles. Imaging findings from both modalities were compared to each other as well as to the clinical determination of active disease based on physical examination and laboratory data. Active myositis on MR was defined as increased muscle signal on T2-weighted images. Elastography images were defined as normal or abnormal based on a previously published numerical scale of muscle elastography in normal children. Muscle echogenicity was graded as normal or abnormal based on gray-scale sonographic images. Twenty-one studies were conducted in 18 pediatric patients (15 female, 3 male; age range 3-19 years). Active myositis was present on MRI in ten cases. There was a significant association between abnormal MRI and clinically active disease (P = 0.012). US elastography was abnormal in 4 of 10 cases with abnormal MRI and in 4 of 11 cases with normal MRI. There was no association between abnormal elastography and either MRI (P > 0.999) or clinically active disease (P > 0.999). Muscle echogenicity was normal in 11 patients; all 11 had normal elastography. Of the ten patients with increased muscle echogenicity, eight had abnormal elastography. There was a significant association between muscle echogenicity and US elastography (P < 0.001). The positive and negative predictive values for elastography in the determination of active myositis were 75% and 31

  11. MRI: A method to detect minor brain damage following coronary bypass surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vik, A.; Brubakk, A.O. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). Dept. of Biomedical Engineering); Rinck, P.A. (Trondheim Univ. (Norway). MR Center); Sande, E.; Levang, O.W. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Surgery); Sellevold, O. (Trondheim Univ. Hospital (Norway). Dept. of Anaesthesiology)

    1991-10-01

    In order to assess the occurrence of minor focal brain lesions after coronary bypass surgery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used. Nine male patients (age 42-63) with angina pectoris were investigated at 0.5 Tesla. The investigation was performed one to seven weeks prior to the operation and one month after the operation. Before surgery, the images demonstrated more than five high intensity spots in the white matter of the brain in all but two patients. No additional spots were found after operation. This pilot study indicates that it might be difficult to use MRI to detect minor parenchymal lesions after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. (orig.).

  12. Novel MRI methodology to detect human whole-brain connectivity changes after ingestion of fructose or glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Wilkins, Bryce; Page, Kathleen A.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    A novel MRI protocol has been developed to investigate the differential effects of glucose or fructose consumption on whole-brain functional brain connectivity. A previous study has reported a decrease in the fMRI blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal of the hypothalamus following glucose ingestion, but due to technical limitations, was restricted to a single slice covering the hypothalamus, and thus unable to detect whole-brain connectivity. In another previous study, a protocol was devised to acquire whole-brain fMRI data following food intake, but only after restricting image acquisition to an MR sampling or repetition time (TR) of 20s, making the protocol unsuitable to detect functional connectivity above 0.025Hz. We have successfully implemented a continuous 36-min, 40 contiguous slices, whole-brain BOLD acquisition protocol on a 3T scanner with TR=4.5s to ensure detection of up to 0.1Hz frequencies for whole-brain functional connectivity analysis. Human data were acquired first with ingestion of water only, followed by a glucose or fructose drink within the scanner, without interrupting the scanning. Whole-brain connectivity was analyzed using standard correlation methodology in the 0.01-0.1 Hz range. The correlation coefficient differences between fructose and glucose ingestion among targeted regions were converted to t-scores using the water-only correlation coefficients as a null condition. Results show a dramatic increase in the hypothalamic connectivity to the hippocampus, amygdala, insula, caudate and the nucleus accumben for fructose over glucose. As these regions are known to be key components of the feeding and reward brain circuits, these results suggest a preference for fructose ingestion.

  13. New MRI technologies. Diffusion MRI and its application to functional neuroimaging and analyses of white matter integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Described is the technological aspect of MRI, MR diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI), principles of its measurement and application for imaging the cerebral function and for aiding the quantitative diagnosis of brain diseases. The author explains the principle of MR imaging process; diffusion properties of water molecules, MR-DWI based on them and DW-fMRI of the brain; MR-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI), its analysis and color acquisition, and tracking of white matter nerve fibers; analysis of white matter lesions by the tracking; and the new tracking method at the chiasm of nerve fascicles. The usual fMRI reflects the blood oxygen level depending (BOLD) signals whereas recently attracted DW-fMRI, the volume changes of nerve cells concomitant to nerve activation accompanying apparent changes of water diffusion coefficients in and out of cells which occur faster than BOLD signs, resulting in higher resolution of time and space. However, DWI requires the higher intensity of static magnetic field like 3T. MR-DTI acquires the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules using MR-DWI technique with application of 6 or more motion probing gradients, thus makes it possible to track the running directions of nerve fibers and capillary vessels, and is proposed to be a useful mean of specific fiber tracking in the white matter when displayed by 3 different colors exhibiting the directions like the right/left (x axis, red), anterior/posterior (y, green) and upper/lower (z, blue) sides of head. Recently, MR-DWI and MR-DTI have been found usable for pathogenic studies of brain diseases such as dementia. Tensor anisotropy is apparently lowered at the chiasm of nerve fascicles, the cause of tracking error, for which authors have developed a new method using the similarity of directional vector, not of tensor, before and behind the chiasm. As exemplified, MRI technology is further advancing even at present. (T.T.)

  14. The neural correlates of coloured music: a functional MRI investigation of auditory-visual synaesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, J; Sinke, C; Dillo, W; Emrich, H M; Szycik, G R; Dima, D; Bleich, S; Zedler, M

    2012-01-01

    In auditory-visual synaesthesia, all kinds of sound can induce additional visual experiences. To identify the brain regions mainly involved in this form of synaesthesia, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used during non-linguistic sound perception (chords and pure tones) in synaesthetes and non-synaesthetes. Synaesthetes showed increased activation in the left inferior parietal cortex (IPC), an area involved in multimodal integration, feature binding and attention guidance. No significant group-differences could be detected in area V4, which is known to be related to colour vision and form processing. The results support the idea of the parietal cortex acting as sensory nexus area in auditory-visual synaesthesia, and as a common neural correlate for different types of synaesthesia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. DISC1 gene and affective psychopathology: a combined structural and functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opmeer, Esther M; van Tol, Marie-José; Kortekaas, Rudie; van der Wee, Nic J A; Woudstra, Saskia; van Buchem, Mark A; Penninx, Brenda W; Veltman, Dick J; Aleman, André

    2015-02-01

    The gene Disrupted-In-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) has been indicated as a determinant of psychopathology, including affective disorders, and shown to influence prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus functioning, regions of major interest for affective disorders. We aimed to investigate whether DISC1 differentially modulates brain function during executive and memory processing, and morphology in regions relevant for depression and anxiety disorders (affective disorders). 128 participants, with (n = 103) and without (controls; n = 25) affective disorders underwent genotyping for Ser704Cys (with Cys-allele considered as risk-allele) and structural and functional (f) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) during visuospatial planning and emotional episodic memory tasks. For both voxel-based morphometry and fMRI analyses, we investigated the effect of genotype in controls and explored genotypeXdiagnosis interactions. Results are reported at p < 0.05 FWE small volume corrected. In controls, Cys-carriers showed smaller bilateral (para)hippocampal volumes compared with Ser-homozygotes, and lower activation in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and dorsolateral PFC during visuospatial planning. In anxiety patients, Cys-carriers showed larger (para)hippocampal volumes and more ACC activation during visuospatial planning. In depressive patients, no effect of genotype was observed and overall, no effect of genotype on episodic memory processing was detected. We demonstrated that Ser704Cys-genotype influences (para)hippocampal structure and functioning the dorsal PFC during executive planning, most prominently in unaffected controls. Results suggest that presence of psychopathology moderates Ser704Cys effects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Hybrid ICA-Seed-Based Methods for fMRI Functional Connectivity Assessment: A Feasibility Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert E. Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functional connectivity (FC is often assessed from fMRI data using seed-based methods, such as those of detecting temporal correlation between a predefined region (seed and all other regions in the brain; or using multivariate methods, such as independent component analysis (ICA. ICA is a useful data-driven tool, but reproducibility issues complicate group inferences based on FC maps derived with ICA. These reproducibility issues can be circumvented with hybrid methods that use information from ICA-derived spatial maps as seeds to produce seed-based FC maps. We report results from five experiments to demonstrate the potential advantages of hybrid ICA-seed-based FC methods, comparing results from regressing fMRI data against task-related a priori time courses, with “back-reconstruction” from a group ICA, and with five hybrid ICA-seed-based FC methods: ROI-based with (1 single-voxel, (2 few-voxel, and (3 many-voxel seed; and dual-regression-based with (4 single ICA map and (5 multiple ICA map seed.

  17. Gender differences in regional cerebral activity during the perception of emotion: a functional MRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Alex; Siedentopf, Christian M; Ischebeck, Anja; Rettenbacher, Maria A; Verius, Michael; Felber, Stephan; Fleischhacker, W Wolfgang

    2006-08-15

    Whether men activate different brain regions during various emotions compared to women or whether gender differences exist in transient emotional states has been the subject of only few studies. We used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate gender differences during the perception of positive or negative emotions. The experiment comprised two emotional conditions (pleasant/unpleasant visual stimuli) during which fMRI data were acquired. Altogether, 38 healthy volunteers (19 males, 19 females) were investigated. When subtracting the activation values of men from those of women, suprathreshold positive signal changes were detected in the right posterior cingulate, the left putamen and the left cerebellum during positive mood induction, and in bilateral superior temporal gyri and cerebellar vermis during negative mood induction. The subtraction of activation values of women from those of men yielded no significant differences. Our findings suggest gender-related neural responses to emotional stimuli and could contribute to the understanding of mechanisms underlying gender-related vulnerability of the prevalence and severity of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  18. Evaluation of a pre-surgical functional MRI workflow: From data acquisition to reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet, Cyril R; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J; Job, Dominic; Rodriguez, David; Storkey, Amos; Whittle, Ian; Wardlaw, Joanna

    2016-02-01

    Present and assess clinical protocols and associated automated workflow for pre-surgical functional magnetic resonance imaging in brain tumor patients. Protocols were validated using a single-subject reliability approach based on 10 healthy control subjects. Results from the automated workflow were evaluated in 9 patients with brain tumors, comparing fMRI results to direct electrical stimulation (DES) of the cortex. Using a new approach to compute single-subject fMRI reliability in controls, we show that not all tasks are suitable in the clinical context, even if they show meaningful results at the group level. Comparison of the fMRI results from patients to DES showed good correspondence between techniques (odds ratio 36). Providing that validated and reliable fMRI protocols are used, fMRI can accurately delineate eloquent areas, thus providing an aid to medical decision regarding brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. High frame rate retrospectively triggered Cine MRI for assessment of murine diastolic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolen, Bram F; Abdurrachim, Desiree; Motaal, Abdallah G; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J; Strijkers, Gustav J

    2013-03-01

    To assess left ventricular (LV) diastolic function in mice with Cine MRI, a high frame rate (>60 frames per cardiac cycle) is required. For conventional electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, the frame rate is inversely proportional to the pulse repetition time (TR). However, TR cannot be lowered at will to increase the frame rate because of gradient hardware, spatial resolution, and signal-to-noise limitations. To overcome these limitations associated with electrocardiography-triggered Cine MRI, in this paper, we introduce a retrospectively triggered Cine MRI protocol capable of producing high-resolution high frame rate Cine MRI of the mouse heart for addressing left ventricular diastolic function. Simulations were performed to investigate the influence of MRI sequence parameters and the k-space filling trajectory in relation to the desired number of frames per cardiac cycle. An optimized protocol was applied in vivo and compared with electrocardiography-triggered Cine for which a high-frame rate could only be achieved by several interleaved acquisitions. Retrospective high frame rate Cine MRI proved superior to the interleaved electrocardiography-triggered protocols. High spatial-resolution Cine movies with frames rates up to 80 frames per cardiac cycle were obtained in 25 min. Analysis of left ventricular filling rate curves allowed accurate determination of early and late filling rates and revealed subtle impairments in left ventricular diastolic function of diabetic mice in comparison with nondiabetic mice. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Detection of electroporation-induced membrane permeabilization states in the brain using diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmood, Faisal; Hansen, Rasmus H; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tissue permeabilization by electroporation (EP) is a promising technique to treat certain cancers. Non-invasive methods for verification of induced permeabilization are important, especially in deep-seated cancers. In this study we evaluated diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging...... (NP), transient membrane permeabilization (TMP), and permanent membrane permeabilization (PMP), respectively. DW-MRI was acquired 5 minutes, 2 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours after EP. Histology was performed for validation of the permeabilization states. Tissue content of water, Na+, K+, Ca2...... minutes after EP, compared to NP. Kurtosis was also significantly higher at 24 hours (pstates, supporting the DW-MRI findings. We conclude that DW-MRI is capable of detecting EP...

  1. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-02-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author).

  2. Comparison between air CT and MRI in the detection of small acoustic neurinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamei, Tetsuya; Nakashima, Aiko; Seto, Hikaru; Kakishita, Masao

    1989-01-01

    Air CT proved useful in yielding images of acoustic tumors as an air filling defect in 11 (24%) of 46 patients. Six of the 11 tumors were small ones of less than 1 cm in diameter. Air CT was also able to exclude an intracanalicular tumor in 29 patients (63%). MRI was performed for comparison in eight patients (nine tumors) already diagnosed by air CT as having an acoustic tumor. MRI detected eight (89%) of nine tumors. A false negative result on MRI was obtained only in one intracanalicular tumor (4.3 mm in size). This was considered to be attributable to limitations of spatial resolution including the wide slice thickness. A protocol for radiological investigation and management of patients whose clinical symptoms and/or audiovestibular examination are highly indicative of acoustic tumor is proposed and discussed. (author)

  3. Using fMRI to Detect Activation of the Cortical and Subcortical Auditory Centers: Development of a Standard Protocol for a Conventional 1.5-T MRI Scanner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tae, Woo Suk; Kim, Sam Soo; Lee, Kang Uk; Lee, Seung Hwan; Nam, Eui Cheol; Choi, Hyun Kyung

    2009-01-01

    We wanted to develop a standard protocol for auditory functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for detecting blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) responses at the cortical and subcortical auditory centers with using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Fourteen normal volunteers were enrolled in the study. The subjects were stimulated by four repetitions of 32 sec each with broadband white noise and silent period blocks as a run (34 echo planar images [EPIs]). Multiple regression analysis for the individual analysis and one-sample t-tests for the group analysis were applied (FDR, p <0.05). The auditory cortex was activated in most of the volunteers (left 100% and right 92.9% at an uncorrected p value <0.05, and left 92.9% and right 92.9% at an uncorreced p value <0.01). The cochlear nuclei (100%, 85.7%), inferior colliculi (71.4%, 64.3%), medial geniculate bodies (64.3%, 35.7%) and superior olivary complexes (35.7%, 35.7%) showed significant BOLD responses at uncorrected p values of <0.05 and p <0.01, respectively. On the group analysis, the cortical and subcortical auditory centers showed significant BOLD responses (FDR, p <0.05), except for the superior olivary complex. The signal intensity time courses of the auditory centers showed biphasic wave forms. We successfully visualized BOLD responses at the cortical and subcortical auditory centers using appropriate sound stimuli and an image acquisition method with a 1.5-T MRI scanner

  4. Implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system in a clinical MRI setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orchard, L.J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the implementation of a ferromagnetic detection system (FMDS) into a clinical MRI setting. Materials and methods: One thousand patients were considered for MRI safety screening using an FMDS. Equipment used was a Ferroguard ® Screener (Metrasens Ltd, Malvern, Worcestershire, UK). Fully gowned patients rotated 360° in front of the FMDS in a standardized manner following traditional MRI screening methods (the use of a written questionnaire (Fig. B.1) and verbal interview. Results: Final results included 1032 individual screening events performed in 977 patients. There were 922 (94%) initial passes using the FMDS; 34 (4%) failed initial screens but passed a subsequent screen; 21 (2%) failed the initial and subsequent screens. Thus, including all screening events (n = 1032), there were 956 (93%) true negatives (TN); 21 (2%) false positives (FP) and 55 (5%) true positives (TP). No false negatives (FN) were recorded. Therefore, sensitivity was 100% and specificity was 98%. Conclusion: Implementation and correct usage of an FMDS proved to increase safety within a clinical MRI environment by alerting staff to ferromagnetic items or implants not identified using traditional MRI screening methods. An FMDS should be used as an adjunct to these methods. The information in this study pertains to the specific equipment used in this investigation. - Highlights: • Ferromagnetic detection system sensitivity in this study was 100%. • Ferromagnetic detection system specificity in this study was 98%. • The additional screening procedure had little impact on throughput ie additional time taken was minimal. • Staff training, technique and compliance is important in implementing the screening procedures. • The ferromagnetic detection system identified objects that may have demonstrated projectile, heating or artefact effects

  5. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mango, Victoria L.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; David Dershaw, D.; Abramson, Andrea; Fry, Charles; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Hughes, Mary; Kaplan, Jennifer; Jochelson, Maxine S.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  6. Abbreviated protocol for breast MRI: Are multiple sequences needed for cancer detection?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mango, Victoria L., E-mail: vlm2125@columbia.edu [Columbia University Medical Center, Herbert Irving Pavilion, 161 Fort Washington Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10032 (United States); Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Morris, Elizabeth A., E-mail: morrise@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); David Dershaw, D., E-mail: dershawd@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Abramson, Andrea, E-mail: abramsoa@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Fry, Charles, E-mail: charles_fry@nymc.edu [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); New York Medical College, 40 Sunshine Cottage Rd, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Moskowitz, Chaya S. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Hughes, Mary, E-mail: hughesm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Kaplan, Jennifer, E-mail: kaplanj@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Jochelson, Maxine S., E-mail: jochelsm@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Breast and Imaging Center, 300 East 66th Street, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Abbreviated breast MR demonstrates high sensitivity for breast carcinoma detection. • Time to perform/interpret the abbreviated exam is shorter than a standard MRI exam. • An abbreviated breast MRI could reduce costs and make MRI screening more available. - Abstract: Objective: To evaluate the ability of an abbreviated breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol, consisting of a precontrast T1 weighted (T1W) image and single early post-contrast T1W image, to detect breast carcinoma. Materials and methods: A HIPAA compliant Institutional Review Board approved review of 100 consecutive breast MRI examinations in patients with biopsy proven unicentric breast carcinoma. 79% were invasive carcinomas and 21% were ductal carcinoma in situ. Four experienced breast radiologists, blinded to carcinoma location, history and prior examinations, assessed the abbreviated protocol evaluating only the first post-contrast T1W image, post-processed subtracted first post-contrast and subtraction maximum intensity projection images. Detection and localization of tumor were compared to the standard full diagnostic examination consisting of 13 pre-contrast, post-contrast and post-processed sequences. Results: All 100 cancers were visualized on initial reading of the abbreviated protocol by at least one reader. The mean sensitivity for each sequence was 96% for the first post-contrast sequence, 96% for the first post-contrast subtraction sequence and 93% for the subtraction MIP sequence. Within each sequence, there was no significant difference between the sensitivities among the 4 readers (p = 0.471, p = 0.656, p = 0.139). Mean interpretation time was 44 s (range 11–167 s). The abbreviated imaging protocol could be performed in approximately 10–15 min, compared to 30–40 min for the standard protocol. Conclusion: An abbreviated breast MRI protocol allows detection of breast carcinoma. One pre and post-contrast T1W sequence may be adequate for detecting

  7. Diffusion-weighted MRI for uveal melanoma liver metastasis detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Mathilde; Petras, Slavomir; Servois, Vincent [Institut Curie, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Mariani, Pascale; Cassoux, Nathalie [Institut Curie, Department of Surgery, Paris (France); Bidard, Francois Clement; Rodrigues, Manuel Jorge; Piperno-Neumann, Sophie [Institut Curie, Department of Medical Oncology, Paris (France); Farkhondeh, Fereshteh [Institut Curie, Department of Pathology, Paris (France)

    2015-08-15

    We aimed to assess the sensitivity of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for the detection of pathologically confirmed uveal melanoma liver metastases (UMLM). Twenty patients who underwent complete surgical resection of their UMLM (N = 83) were included. Pre-surgery liver MR imaging included T2-weighted, T1-weighted, DW and dynamic-gadolinium-enhanced MR sequences. Two radiologists independently reviewed three sets of images (DW / morphologic-dynamic / combined) for each patient using intraoperative and pathological findings as a standard of reference. The sensitivities of the morphologic-dynamic and DW images for UMLM detection were 63 % and 59 %, respectively, for reader 1 (R1) and 64 % and 53 %, for reader 2 (R2). Sensitivity of the combined set was higher than sensitivity in the two other sets (R1:69 %, R2:67 %), but was only significantly different than the sensitivity of the DW images (McNemar test). For the three sets and the two readers, the sensitivity for UMLM smaller than 5 mm (37-46 %) was significantly lower than that for UMLM larger than 5 mm (67-90 %). The sensitivity for UMLM located in the subcapsular area (41-54 %) was significantly lower than that for intraparenchymal UMLM (68-86 %) (Chi-square test). Our study shows that the addition of DW imaging to morphologic-dynamic images does not significantly increase MR sensitivities for UMLM detection. (orig.)

  8. Altered brain functions in HIV positive patients free of HIV- associated neurocognitive disorders: A MRI study during unilateral hand movements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhao

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to investigate the brain activity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV positive patients with normal cognition during unilateral hand movement and whether highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART could affect the brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was performed for 60 HIV positive (HIV+ subjects and −42 healthy age-matched right-handed control subjects. Each subject was evaluated by the neuropsychological test and examined with fMRI during left and right hand movement tasks. HIV+ subjects showed greater activation in anterior cingulum, precuneus, occipital lobes, ipsilateral postcentral gyrus and contralateral cerebellum compared with control group during right hand movement task. However, during left hand movement no statistically significant difference was detected between these two groups. HAART medication for HIV+ subjects lowered the increased activity to normal level. Meanwhile patients receiving the regimen of zidovudine, lamivudine and efavirenz showed lower activity at bilateral caudate and ipsilateral inferior frontal gyrus in comparison with subjects receiving other HAART regimens. Therefore, HIV+ subjects demonstrated brain asymmetry in motor cortex, with increased activity present during right hand movement but absent during left hand movement. HAART proves effective in HIV+ subjects even with normal cognition and the specific regimen of HAART could prevent cerebral abnormal functions. Meanwhile, this study validates that during motor tasks, fMRI can detect the brain signal changes prior to the occurrences of other HIV- associated dysfunctions.

  9. Development of contaminant detection system based on ultra-low field SQUID-NMR/MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunaki, S; Yamamoto, M; Hatta, J; Hatsukade, Y; Tanaka, S

    2014-01-01

    We have developed an ultra-low field (ULF) NMR/MRI system using an HTS-rf-SQUID and evaluated performance of the system as a contaminant detection system for foods and drinks. In this work, we measured 1D MRIs from water samples with or without various contaminants, such as aluminum and glass balls using the system. In the 1D MRIs, changes of the MRI spectra were detected, corresponding to positions of the contaminants. We measured 2D MRIs from food samples with and without a hole. In the 2D MRIs, the hole position in the sample was well visualized. These results show that the feasibility of the system to detect and localize contaminants in foods and drinks.

  10. Multiparametric MRI of the prostate. Method for early detection of prostate cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter

    2010-01-01

    Current approaches for the early detection of prostate cancer are controversially discussed because the disease is characterized by a high incidence rate with a relatively low morbidity rate, availability of only limited prognostic markers, and continued therapy-related morbidity. Conventional morphological MRI does not play a role in early detection since small tumor foci cannot be delineated. However, if there is clinical suspicion for prostate cancer, multiparametric MRI is currently the most accurate method for detecting and characterizing suspicious lesions in the prostate. The potential to identify the so-called 'index lesion', i.e., the tumor area that is most aggressive and determines treatment, is particularly important. This information can increase the accuracy of prostate biopsy and serve as a biomarker for follow-up during active surveillance. The method may considerably contribute to the urgently required separation of clinically significant from clinically insignificant prostate cancers. (orig.)

  11. Detection of white matter lesion regions in MRI using SLIC0 and convolutional neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Pedro Henrique Bandeira; Valente, Thales Levi Azevedo; Diniz, João Otávio Bandeira; Silva, Aristófanes Corrêa; Gattass, Marcelo; Ventura, Nina; Muniz, Bernardo Carvalho; Gasparetto, Emerson Leandro

    2018-04-19

    White matter lesions are non-static brain lesions that have a prevalence rate up to 98% in the elderly population. Because they may be associated with several brain diseases, it is important that they are detected as soon as possible. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) provides three-dimensional data with the possibility to detect and emphasize contrast differences in soft tissues, providing rich information about the human soft tissue anatomy. However, the amount of data provided for these images is far too much for manual analysis/interpretation, representing a difficult and time-consuming task for specialists. This work presents a computational methodology capable of detecting regions of white matter lesions of the brain in MRI of FLAIR modality. The techniques highlighted in this methodology are SLIC0 clustering for candidate segmentation and convolutional neural networks for candidate classification. The methodology proposed here consists of four steps: (1) images acquisition, (2) images preprocessing, (3) candidates segmentation and (4) candidates classification. The methodology was applied on 91 magnetic resonance images provided by DASA, and achieved an accuracy of 98.73%, specificity of 98.77% and sensitivity of 78.79% with 0.005 of false positives, without any false positives reduction technique, in detection of white matter lesion regions. It is demonstrated the feasibility of the analysis of brain MRI using SLIC0 and convolutional neural network techniques to achieve success in detection of white matter lesions regions. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Simultaneous detection of landmarks and key-frame in cardiac perfusion MRI using a joint spatial-temporal context model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoguang; Xue, Hui; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Guetter, Christoph; Kellman, Peter; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Arai, Andrew; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Littmann, Arne; Georgescu, Bogdan; Guehring, Jens

    2011-03-01

    Cardiac perfusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has proven clinical significance in diagnosis of heart diseases. However, analysis of perfusion data is time-consuming, where automatic detection of anatomic landmarks and key-frames from perfusion MR sequences is helpful for anchoring structures and functional analysis of the heart, leading toward fully automated perfusion analysis. Learning-based object detection methods have demonstrated their capabilities to handle large variations of the object by exploring a local region, i.e., context. Conventional 2D approaches take into account spatial context only. Temporal signals in perfusion data present a strong cue for anchoring. We propose a joint context model to encode both spatial and temporal evidence. In addition, our spatial context is constructed not only based on the landmark of interest, but also the landmarks that are correlated in the neighboring anatomies. A discriminative model is learned through a probabilistic boosting tree. A marginal space learning strategy is applied to efficiently learn and search in a high dimensional parameter space. A fully automatic system is developed to simultaneously detect anatomic landmarks and key frames in both RV and LV from perfusion sequences. The proposed approach was evaluated on a database of 373 cardiac perfusion MRI sequences from 77 patients. Experimental results of a 4-fold cross validation show superior landmark detection accuracies of the proposed joint spatial-temporal approach to the 2D approach that is based on spatial context only. The key-frame identification results are promising.

  13. Structural and functional abnormalities of default mode network in minimal hepatic encephalopathy: a study combining DTI and fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongfeng Qi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Live failure can cause brain edema and aberrant brain function in cirrhotic patients. In particular, decreased functional connectivity within the brain default-mode network (DMN has been recently reported in overt hepatic encephalopathy (HE patients. However, so far, little is known about the connectivity among the DMN in the minimal HE (MHE, the mildest form of HE. Here, we combined diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI to test our hypothesis that both structural and functional connectivity within the DMN were disturbed in MHE. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty MHE patients and 20 healthy controls participated in the study. We explored the changes of structural (path length, tracts count, fractional anisotropy [FA] and mean diffusivity [MD] derived from DTI tractography and functional (temporal correlation coefficient derived from rs-fMRI connectivity of the DMN in MHE patients. Pearson correlation analysis was performed between the structural/functional indices and venous blood ammonia levels/neuropsychological tests scores of patients. All thresholds were set at P<0.05, Bonferroni corrected. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, MHE patients showed both decreased FA and increased MD in the tract connecting the posterior cingulate cortex/precuneus (PCC/PCUN to left parahippocampal gyrus (PHG, and decreased functional connectivity between the PCC/PCUN and left PHG, and medial prefrontal cortex (MPFC. MD values of the tract connecting PCC/PCUN to the left PHG positively correlated to the ammonia levels, the temporal correlation coefficients between the PCC/PCUN and the MPFC showed positive correlation to the digital symbol tests scores of patients. CONCLUSION: MHE patients have both disturbed structural and functional connectivity within the DMN. The decreased functional connectivity was also detected between some regions without abnormal structural connectivity, suggesting that the

  14. Exploring connectivity with large-scale Granger causality on resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DSouza, Adora M; Abidin, Anas Z; Leistritz, Lutz; Wismüller, Axel

    2017-08-01

    Large-scale Granger causality (lsGC) is a recently developed, resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) connectivity analysis approach that estimates multivariate voxel-resolution connectivity. Unlike most commonly used multivariate approaches, which establish coarse-resolution connectivity by aggregating voxel time-series avoiding an underdetermined problem, lsGC estimates voxel-resolution, fine-grained connectivity by incorporating an embedded dimension reduction. We investigate application of lsGC on realistic fMRI simulations, modeling smoothing of neuronal activity by the hemodynamic response function and repetition time (TR), and empirical resting-state fMRI data. Subsequently, functional subnetworks are extracted from lsGC connectivity measures for both datasets and validated quantitatively. We also provide guidelines to select lsGC free parameters. Results indicate that lsGC reliably recovers underlying network structure with area under receiver operator characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.93 at TR=1.5s for a 10-min session of fMRI simulations. Furthermore, subnetworks of closely interacting modules are recovered from the aforementioned lsGC networks. Results on empirical resting-state fMRI data demonstrate recovery of visual and motor cortex in close agreement with spatial maps obtained from (i) visuo-motor fMRI stimulation task-sequence (Accuracy=0.76) and (ii) independent component analysis (ICA) of resting-state fMRI (Accuracy=0.86). Compared with conventional Granger causality approach (AUC=0.75), lsGC produces better network recovery on fMRI simulations. Furthermore, it cannot recover functional subnetworks from empirical fMRI data, since quantifying voxel-resolution connectivity is not possible as consequence of encountering an underdetermined problem. Functional network recovery from fMRI data suggests that lsGC gives useful insight into connectivity patterns from resting-state fMRI at a multivariate voxel-resolution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Compiler-Agnostic Function Detection in Binaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriesse, D.A.; Slowinska, J.M.; Bos, H.J.

    2017-01-01

    We propose Nucleus, a novel function detection algorithm for binaries. In contrast to prior work, Nucleus is compiler-agnostic, and does not require any learning phase or signature information. Instead of scanning for signatures, Nucleus detects functions at the Control Flow Graph-level, making it

  16. Detection of Spontaneous Schwannomas by MRI in a Transgenic Murine Model of Neurofibromatosis Type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Messerli

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous schwannomas were detected by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in a transgenic murine model of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2 expressing a dominant mutant form of merlin under the Schwann cell-specific PO promoter. Approximately 85% of the investigated mice showed putative tumors by 24 months of age. Specifically, 21% of the mice showed tumors in the intercostal muscles, 14% in the limb muscles, 7% in the spinal cord and spinal ganglia, 7% in the external ear, 14% in the muscle of the abdominal region, and 7% in the intestine; 66% of the female mice had uterine tumors. Multiple tumors were detected by MRI in 21% of mice. The tumors were isointense with muscle by T1-weighted MRI, showed strong enhancement following administration of gadolinium-DTPA, and were markedly hyperintense by T2-weighted MRI, all hallmarks of the clinical manifestation. Hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry indicated that the tumors consisted of schwannomas and Schwann cell hyperplasias. The lesions stained positively for S-100 protein and a marker antigen for the mutated transgenic NF2 protein, confirming that the imaged tumors and areas of hyperplasia were of Schwann cell origin and expressed the mutated NF2 protein. Tumors were highly infectable with a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 vector, hrR3, which contains the reporter gene, lacZ. The ability to develop schwannoma growth with a noninvasive imaging technique will allow assessment of therapeutic interventions.

  17. The potential of functional MRI as a biomarker in early Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Sperling, Reisa

    2011-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a relative newcomer in the field of biomarkers for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). fMRI has several potential advantages, particularly for clinical trials, as it is a non-invasive imaging technique that does not require the injection of contrast agent or radiation exposure and thus can be repeated many times during a longitudinal study. fMRI has relatively high spatial and reasonable temporal resolution, and can be acquired in the same session as stru...

  18. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  19. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul; Detsch, Oliver; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim; Schwindt, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  20. Windowed correlation: a suitable tool for providing dynamic fMRI-based functional connectivity neurofeedback on task difficulty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Zilverstand

    Full Text Available The goal of neurofeedback training is to provide participants with relevant information on their ongoing brain processes in order to enable them to change these processes in a meaningful way. Under the assumption of an intrinsic brain-behavior link, neurofeedback can be a tool to guide a participant towards a desired behavioral state, such as a healthier state in the case of patients. Current research in clinical neuroscience regarding the most robust indicators of pathological brain processes in psychiatric and neurological disorders indicates that fMRI-based functional connectivity measures may be among the most important biomarkers of disease. The present study therefore investigated the general potential of providing fMRI neurofeedback based on functional correlations, computed from short-window time course data at the level of single task periods. The ability to detect subtle changes in task performance with block-wise functional connectivity measures was evaluated based on imaging data from healthy participants performing a simple motor task, which was systematically varied along two task dimensions representing two different aspects of task difficulty. The results demonstrate that fMRI-based functional connectivity measures may provide a better indicator for an increase in overall (motor task difficulty than activation level-based measures. Windowed functional correlations thus seem to provide relevant and unique information regarding ongoing brain processes, which is not captured equally well by standard activation level-based neurofeedback measures. Functional connectivity markers, therefore, may indeed provide a valuable tool to enhance and monitor learning within an fMRI neurofeedback setup.

  1. Functional cine MR imaging for the detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions: method and surgical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buhmann-Kirchhoff, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian; Lienemann, Andreas [University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lang, Reinhold; Steitz, Heinrich O.; Jauch, Karl W. [University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [University Hospital Munich-Innenstadt, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the presence and localization of intraabdominal adhesions using functional cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to correlate the MR findings with intraoperative results. In a retrospective study, patients who had undergone previous abdominal surgery with suspected intraabdominal adhesions were examined. A true fast imaging with steady state precession sequence in transverse/sagittal orientation was used for a section-by-section dynamic depiction of visceral slide on a 1.5-Tesla system. After MRI, all patients underwent anew surgery. A nine-segment abdominal map was used to document the location and type of the adhesions. The intraoperative results were taken as standard of reference. Ninety patients were enrolled. During surgery 71 adhesions were detected, MRI depicted 68 intraabdominal adhesions. The most common type of adhesion in MRI was found between the anterior abdominal wall and small bowel loops (n = 22, 32.5%) and between small bowel loops and pelvic organs (n = 14, 20.6%). Comparing MRI with the intraoperative findings, sensitivity varied between 31 and 75% with a varying specificity between 65 and 92% in the different segments leading to an overall MRI accuracy of 89%. Functional cine MRI proved to be a useful examination technique for the identification of intraabdominal adhesions in patients with acute or chronic pain and corresponding clinical findings providing accurate results. However, no differentiation for symptomatic versus asymptomatic adhesions is possible. (orig.)

  2. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

    OpenAIRE

    Fabri, Mara; Polonara, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC) has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and moto...

  3. Gait improvement after treadmill training in ischemic stroke survivors: A critical review of functional MRI studies ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Xiang; Huang, Dongfeng; O’Young, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Stroke survivors often present with abnormal gait, movement training can improve the walking performance post-stroke, and functional MRI can objectively evaluate the brain functions before and after movement training. This paper analyzes the functional MRI changes in patients with ischemic stroke after treadmill training with voluntary and passive ankle dorsiflexion. Functional MRI showed that there are some changes in some regions of patients with ischemic stroke including primary sensorimot...

  4. Machine learning algorithm accurately detects fMRI signature of vulnerability to major depression

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Jo?o R.; Moll, Jorge; Green, Sophie; Deakin, John F.W.; Thomaz, Carlos E.; Zahn, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Standard functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) analyses cannot assess the potential of a neuroimaging signature as a biomarker to predict individual vulnerability to major depression (MD). Here, we use machine learning for the first time to address this question. Using a recently identified neural signature of guilt-selective functional disconnection, the classification algorithm was able to distinguish remitted MD from control participants with 78.3% accuracy. This demonstrates the hi...

  5. Unenhanced breast MRI (STIR, T2-weighted TSE, DWIBS): An accurate and alternative strategy for detecting and differentiating breast lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telegrafo, Michele; Rella, Leonarda; Stabile Ianora, Amato Antonio; Angelelli, Giuseppe; Moschetta, Marco

    2015-10-01

    To assess the role of STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences for detecting and characterizing breast lesions and to compare unenhanced (UE)-MRI results with contrast-enhanced (CE)-MRI and histological findings, having the latter as the reference standard. Two hundred eighty consecutive patients (age range, 27-73 years; mean age±standard deviation (SD), 48.8±9.8years) underwent MR examination with a diagnostic protocol including STIR, T2-weighted TSE, THRIVE and DWIBS sequences. Two radiologists blinded to both dynamic sequences and histological findings evaluated in consensus STIR, T2-weighted TSE and DWIBS sequences and after two weeks CE-MRI images searching for breast lesions. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and diagnostic accuracy for UE-MRI and CE-MRI were calculated. UE-MRI results were also compared with CE- MRI. UE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 94%, 79%, 86%, 79% and 94%, respectively. CE-MRI sequences obtained sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy, PPV and NPV values of 98%, 83%, 90%, 84% and 98%, respectively. No statistically significant difference between UE-MRI and CE-MRI was found. Breast UE-MRI could represent an accurate diagnostic tool and a valid alternative to CE-MRI for evaluating breast lesions. STIR and DWIBS sequences allow to detect breast lesions while T2-weighted TSE sequences and ADC values could be useful for lesion characterization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Large-scale functional MRI analysis to accumulate knowledge on brain functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Yannick

    2015-01-01

    How can we accumulate knowledge on brain functions? How can we leverage years of research in functional MRI to analyse finer-grained psychological constructs, and build a comprehensive model of the brain? Researchers usually rely on single studies to delineate brain regions recruited by mental processes. They relate their findings to previous works in an informal way by defining regions of interest from the literature. Meta-analysis approaches provide a more principled way to build upon the literature. This thesis investigates three ways to assemble knowledge using activation maps from a large amount of studies. First, we present an approach that uses jointly two similar fMRI experiments, to better condition an analysis from a statistical standpoint. We show that it is a valuable data-driven alternative to traditional regions of interest analyses, but fails to provide a systematic way to relate studies, and thus does not permit to integrate knowledge on a large scale. Because of the difficulty to associate multiple studies, we resort to using a single dataset sampling a large number of stimuli for our second contribution. This method estimates functional networks associated with functional profiles, where the functional networks are interacting brain regions and the functional profiles are a weighted set of cognitive descriptors. This work successfully yields known brain networks and automatically associates meaningful descriptions. Its limitations lie in the unsupervised nature of this method, which is more difficult to validate, and the use of a single dataset. It however brings the notion of cognitive labels, which is central to our last contribution. Our last contribution presents a method that learns functional atlases by combining several datasets. [Henson 2006] shows that forward inference, i.e. the probability of an activation given a cognitive process, is often not sufficient to conclude on the engagement of brain regions for a cognitive process

  7. EKG-based detection of deep brain stimulation in fMRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiveland, Eric; Madhavan, Radhika; Prusik, Julia; Linton, Renee; Dimarzio, Marisa; Ashe, Jeffrey; Pilitsis, Julie; Hancu, Ileana

    2018-04-01

    To assess the impact of synchronization errors between the assumed functional MRI paradigm timing and the deep brain stimulation (DBS) on/off cycling using a custom electrocardiogram-based triggering system METHODS: A detector for measuring and predicting the on/off state of cycling deep brain stimulation was developed and tested in six patients in office visits. Three-electrode electrocardiogram measurements, amplified by a commercial bio-amplifier, were used as input for a custom electronics box (e-box). The e-box transformed the deep brain stimulation waveforms into transistor-transistor logic pulses, recorded their timing, and propagated it in time. The e-box was used to trigger task-based deep brain stimulation functional MRI scans in 5 additional subjects; the impact of timing accuracy on t-test values was investigated in a simulation study using the functional MRI data. Following locking to each patient's individual waveform, the e-box was shown to predict stimulation onset with an average absolute error of 112 ± 148 ms, 30 min after disconnecting from the patients. The subsecond accuracy of the e-box in predicting timing onset is more than adequate for our slow varying, 30-/30-s on/off stimulation paradigm. Conversely, the experimental deep brain stimulation onset prediction accuracy in the absence of the e-box, which could be off by as much as 4 to 6 s, could significantly decrease activation strength. Using this detector, stimulation can be accurately synchronized to functional MRI acquisitions, without adding any additional hardware in the MRI environment. Magn Reson Med 79:2432-2439, 2018. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  8. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O' Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Awan, Atif [Children' s University Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Dublin (Ireland)

    2005-03-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  9. Can MRI replace DMSA in the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children with urinary tract infections?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, Eoin C.; Ryan, Stephanie; McCourbrey, Siobhan; O'Connor, Rachel; Donoghue, Veronica; Awan, Atif

    2005-01-01

    Renal parenchymal defects may be a consequence of urinary tract infections (UTI) in childhood. MRI is a non-radiation imaging modality compared with DMSA scanning. To compare DMSA with MRI for the detection of renal parenchymal defects in children presenting for radiological investigation after a first UTI. Both DMSA and MRI were performed at the same appointment in 37 children (aged 4 months-13 years; mean 4.5 years) with a history of UTI. Both planar and SPECT DMSA were performed. MRI of the kidneys employed axial and coronal T1-, T2- and fat-saturated T1-weighted (T1-W) sequences. Some children had imaging after IV contrast medium. The coronal fat-saturated T1-W sequence was the best sequence and it detected all the findings on MRI. MRI had a sensitivity of 77% and a specificity of 87% for the detection of a scarred kidney using DMSA as the gold standard. MRI diagnosed pyelonephritis in two children that had been interpreted as scarring on DMSA. Renal MRI using a single, coronal, fat-saturated T1-W sequence is a rapid, accurate and minimally invasive technique for the detection of renal scarring that does not employ ionizing radiation. (orig.)

  10. Blood Flow and Brain Function: Investigations of neurovascular coupling using BOLD fMRI at 7 tesla

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siero, J.C.W.

    2013-01-01

    The advent of ultra high field (7 tesla) MRI systems has opened the possibility to probe biological processes of the human body in great detail. Especially for studying brain function using BOLD fMRI there is a large benefit from the increased magnetic field strength. BOLD fMRI is the working horse

  11. Functional MRI of the pharynx in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with rapid 2-D flash sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeger, L.; Guenther, E.; Gauger, J.; Nitz, W.; Kastenbauer, E.; Reiser, M.

    1996-01-01

    Functional imaging of the pharynx used to be the domain of cineradiography, CT and ultrafast CT. The development of modern MRI techniques led to new access to functional disorders of the pharynx. The aim of this study was to implement a new MRI technique to examine oropharyngeal obstructive mechanisms in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sixteen patients suffering from OSA and 6 healthy volunteers were examined on a 1.5 T whole-body imager ('Vision', Siemens, Erlangen Medical Engineering, Germany) using a circular polarized head coil. Imaging was performed with 2D flash sequences in midsagittal and axial planes. Patients and volunteers were asked to breathe normally through the nose and to simulate snoring and the Mueller maneuver during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Prior to MRI, all patients underwent an ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, functional fiberoptic nasopharyngoscopy and polysomnography. A temporal resolution of 6 images/s and an in-plane resolution of 2.67x1.8 mm were achieved. The mobility of the tongue, soft palate and pharyngeal surface could be clearly delineated. The MRI findings correlated well with the clinical examinations. We propose ultrafast MRI as a reliable and non-invasive method of evaluating pharyngeal obstruction and their levels. (orig.) [de

  12. Enhanced disease characterization through multi network functional normalization in fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetin, Mustafa S; Khullar, Siddharth; Damaraju, Eswar; Michael, Andrew M; Baum, Stefi A; Calhoun, Vince D

    2015-01-01

    Conventionally, structural topology is used for spatial normalization during the pre-processing of fMRI. The co-existence of multiple intrinsic networks which can be detected in the resting brain are well-studied. Also, these networks exhibit temporal and spatial modulation during cognitive task vs. rest which shows the existence of common spatial excitation patterns between these identified networks. Previous work (Khullar et al., 2011) has shown that structural and functional data may not have direct one-to-one correspondence and functional activation patterns in a well-defined structural region can vary across subjects even for a well-defined functional task. The results of this study and the existence of the neural activity patterns in multiple networks motivates us to investigate multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization for multi groups of subjects. We extend the previous approach (Khullar et al., 2011) by co-registering multi group of subjects (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and by utilizing multiple resting-state networks (instead of just one) as a single fusion template for functional normalization. In this paper we describe the initial steps toward using multiple resting-state networks as a single fusion template for functional normalization. A simple wavelet-based image fusion approach is presented in order to evaluate the feasibility of combining multiple functional networks. Our results showed improvements in both the significance of group statistics (healthy control and schizophrenia patients) and the spatial extent of activation when a multiple resting-state network applied as a single fusion template for functional normalization after the conventional structural normalization. Also, our results provided evidence that the improvement in significance of group statistics lead to better accuracy results for classification of healthy controls and schizophrenia patients.

  13. Modic Type 1 Changes: Detection Performance of Fat-Suppressed Fluid-Sensitive MRI Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkenstaedt, Tim; Del Grande, Filippo; Bolog, Nicolae; Ulrich, Nils; Tok, Sina; Kolokythas, Orpheus; Steurer, Johann; Andreisek, Gustav; Winklhofer, Sebastian

    2018-02-01

     To assess the performance of fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences compared to T1-weighted (T1w) / T2w sequences for the detection of Modic 1 end-plate changes on lumbar spine MRI.  Sagittal T1w, T2w, and fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI images of 100 consecutive patients (consequently 500 vertebral segments; 52 female, mean age 74 ± 7.4 years; 48 male, mean age 71 ± 6.3 years) were retrospectively evaluated. We recorded the presence (yes/no) and extension (i. e., Likert-scale of height, volume, and end-plate extension) of Modic I changes in T1w/T2w sequences and compared the results to fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences (McNemar/Wilcoxon-signed-rank test).  Fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive sequences revealed significantly more Modic I changes compared to T1w/T2w sequences (156 vs. 93 segments, respectively; p definition of Modic I changes is not fully applicable anymore.. · Fat-suppressed fluid-sensitive MRI sequences revealed more/greater extent of Modic I changes.. · Finkenstaedt T, Del Grande F, Bolog N et al. Modic Type 1 Changes: Detection Performance of Fat-Suppressed Fluid-Sensitive MRI Sequences. Fortschr Röntgenstr 2018; 190: 152 - 160. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Intra-articular membranous interposition detected by MRI in developmental dysplasia of the hip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, W.; Itoi, Eiji; Sato, Kozo [Akita Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery

    2000-12-01

    Intra-articular membranous interposition was detected by MRI in the hip joint with residual subluxation of a girl aged 5 years 10 months. This structure, which had low signal intensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images, separated the femoral head from the acetabulum. Histological examination revealed chondrometaplasia, which suggested that this interposition might be transformed to a surface cartilaginous tissue of the secondary acetabulum often observed in residual subluxation of the hip. (orig.)

  15. Relationship between DCE-MRI morphological and functional features and histopathological characteristics of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemurro, Filippo; Redana, Stefania; Aglietta, Massimo; Martincich, Laura; Bertotto, Ilaria; Cellini, Lisa; Sarotto, Ivana; Ponzone, Riccardo; Sismondi, Piero; Regge, Daniele

    2007-01-01

    We studied whether dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) could identify histopathological characteristics of breast cancer. Seventy-five patients with breast cancer underwent DCE-MRI followed by core biopsy. DCE-MRI findings were evaluated following the scoring system published by Fischer in 1999. In this scoring system, five DCE-MRI features, three morphological (shape, margins, enhancement kinetic) and two functional (initial peak of signal intensity (SI) increase and behavior of signal intensity curve), are defined by 14 parameters. Each parameter is assigned points ranging from 0 to 1 or 0 to 2, with higher points for those that are more likely to be associated with malignancy. The sum of all the points defines the degree of suspicion of malignancy, with a score 0 representing the lowest and 8 the highest degree of suspicion. Associations between DCE-MRI features and tumor histopathological characteristics assessed on core biopsies (histological type, grading, estrogen and progesterone receptor status, Ki67 and HER2 status) were studied by contingency tables and logistic regression analysis. We found a significant inverse association between the Fischer's score and HER2-overexpression (odds ratio-OR 0.608, p = 0.02). Based on our results, we suggest that lesions with intermediate-low suspicious DCE-MRI parameters may represent a subset of tumor with poor histopathological characteristics. (orig.)

  16. Automated lesion detection on MRI scans using combined unsupervised and supervised methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Dazhou; Fridriksson, Julius; Fillmore, Paul; Rorden, Christopher; Yu, Hongkai; Zheng, Kang; Wang, Song

    2015-01-01

    Accurate and precise detection of brain lesions on MR images (MRI) is paramount for accurately relating lesion location to impaired behavior. In this paper, we present a novel method to automatically detect brain lesions from a T1-weighted 3D MRI. The proposed method combines the advantages of both unsupervised and supervised methods. First, unsupervised methods perform a unified segmentation normalization to warp images from the native space into a standard space and to generate probability maps for different tissue types, e.g., gray matter, white matter and fluid. This allows us to construct an initial lesion probability map by comparing the normalized MRI to healthy control subjects. Then, we perform non-rigid and reversible atlas-based registration to refine the probability maps of gray matter, white matter, external CSF, ventricle, and lesions. These probability maps are combined with the normalized MRI to construct three types of features, with which we use supervised methods to train three support vector machine (SVM) classifiers for a combined classifier. Finally, the combined classifier is used to accomplish lesion detection. We tested this method using T1-weighted MRIs from 60 in-house stroke patients. Using leave-one-out cross validation, the proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 73.1 % when compared to lesion maps hand-delineated by trained neurologists. Furthermore, we tested the proposed method on the T1-weighted MRIs in the MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. The proposed method can achieve an average Dice coefficient of 66.5 % in comparison to the expert annotated tumor maps provided in MICCAI BRATS 2012 dataset. In addition, on these two test datasets, the proposed method shows competitive performance to three state-of-the-art methods, including Stamatakis et al., Seghier et al., and Sanjuan et al. In this paper, we introduced a novel automated procedure for lesion detection from T1-weighted MRIs by combining both an unsupervised and a

  17. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raut, Ryan V; Nair, Veena A; Sattin, Justin A; Prabhakaran, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI (fMRI) is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a breath-hold fMRI task to evaluate CVR across gray matter in a group of acute stroke patients (< 10 days from stroke; N = 22) to address this question. These estimates were compared with those from both age-matched (N = 22) and younger (N = 22) healthy controls. As expected, young controls had the greatest mean CVR, as indicated by magnitude and extent of fMRI activation; however, stroke patients did not differ from age-matched controls. Moreover, the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres of stroke patients did not differ with respect to any of these measures. These findings suggest that fMRI remains a valid tool within the first few days of a stroke, particularly for group fMRI studies in which findings are compared with healthy subjects of similar age. However, given the relatively high variability in CVR observed in our stroke sample, caution is warranted when interpreting fMRI data from individual patients or a small cohort. We conclude that a breath-hold task can be a useful addition to functional imaging protocols for stroke patients.

  18. Hypercapnic evaluation of vascular reactivity in healthy aging and acute stroke via functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan V. Raut

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI (fMRI is well-established for the study of brain function in healthy populations, although its clinical application has proven more challenging. Specifically, cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR, which allows the assessment of the vascular response that serves as the basis for fMRI, has been shown to be reduced in healthy aging as well as in a range of diseases, including chronic stroke. However, the timing of when this occurs relative to the stroke event is unclear. We used a breath-hold fMRI task to evaluate CVR across gray matter in a group of acute stroke patients (<10 days from stroke; N = 22 to address this question. These estimates were compared with those from both age-matched (N = 22 and younger (N = 22 healthy controls. As expected, young controls had the greatest mean CVR, as indicated by magnitude and extent of fMRI activation; however, stroke patients did not differ from age-matched controls. Moreover, the ipsilesional and contralesional hemispheres of stroke patients did not differ with respect to any of these measures. These findings suggest that fMRI remains a valid tool within the first few days of a stroke, particularly for group fMRI studies in which findings are compared with healthy subjects of similar age. However, given the relatively high variability in CVR observed in our stroke sample, caution is warranted when interpreting fMRI data from individual patients or a small cohort. We conclude that a breath-hold task can be a useful addition to functional imaging protocols for stroke patients.

  19. Sources of variation influencing concordance between functional MRI and direct cortical stimulation in brain tumor surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A Morrison

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Object: Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI remains a promising method to aid in the surgical management of patients diagnosed with brain tumors. For patients that are candidates for awake craniotomies, surgical decisions can potentially be improved by fMRI but this depends on the level of concordance between preoperative brain maps and the maps provided by the gold standard intraoperative method, direct cortical stimulation (DCS. There have been numerous studies of the concordance between fMRI and DCS using sensitivity and specificity measures, however the results are variable across studies and the key factors influencing variability are not well understood. Thus, the present work addresses the influence of technical factors on fMRI and DCS concordance. Methods: Motor and language mapping data were collected for a group of glioma patients (n = 14 who underwent both preoperative fMRI and intraoperative DCS in an awake craniotomy procedure for tumor removal. Normative fMRI data were also acquired in a healthy control group (n = 12. The fMRI and DCS mapping data were co-registered; true positive (TP, true negative (TN, false positive (FP and false negative (FN occurrences were tabulated over the exposed brain surface. Sensitivity and specificity were measured for the total group, and the motor and language sub-groups. The influence of grid placement, fMRI statistical thresholding, and task standardization were assessed. Correlations between proportions of agreement and error were carefully scrutinized to evaluate concordance more in-depth. Results: Concordance was significantly better for motor versus language mapping. There was an inverse relationship between TP and TN with increasing statistical threshold, and FP dominated the total error. Sensitivity and specificity were reduced when tasks were not standardized across fMRI and DCS. Conclusions: Although the agreement between fMRI and DCS is good, variability is introduced

  20. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas [University College London, Centre for Medical Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D. [University College London Hospital, Department of Radiology, London (United Kingdom); Bainbridge, Alan [University College London, Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona [University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen [University College London Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  1. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI improves accuracy for detecting focal splenic involvement in children and adolescents with Hodgkin disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punwani, Shonit; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve; Cheung, King Kenneth; Skipper, Nicholas; Bell, Nichola; Humphries, Paul D.; Bainbridge, Alan; Groves, Ashley M.; Hain, Sharon F.; Ben-Haim, Simona; Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Accurate assessment of splenic disease is important for staging Hodgkin lymphoma. The purpose of this study was to assess T2-weighted imaging with and without dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI for evaluation of splenic Hodgkin disease. Thirty-one children with Hodgkin lymphoma underwent whole-body T2-weighted MRI with supplementary DCE splenic imaging, and whole-body PET-CT before and following chemotherapy. Two experienced nuclear medicine physicians derived a PET-CT reference standard for splenic disease, augmented by follow-up imaging. Unaware of the PET-CT, two experienced radiologists independently evaluated MRI exercising a locked sequential read paradigm (T2-weighted then DCE review) and recorded the presence/absence of splenic disease at each stage. Performance of each radiologist was determined prior to and following review of DCE-MRI. Incorrect MRI findings were ascribed to reader (lesion present on MRI but missed by reader) or technical (lesion not present on MRI) error. Seven children had splenic disease. Sensitivity/specificity of both radiologists for the detection of splenic involvement using T2-weighted images alone was 57%/100% and increased to 100%/100% with DCE-MRI. There were three instances of technical error on T2-weighted imaging; all lesions were visible on DCE-MRI. T2-weighted imaging when complemented by DCE-MRI imaging may improve evaluation of Hodgkin disease splenic involvement. (orig.)

  2. Functional MRI of the olfactory system in conscious dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Jia

    Full Text Available We depend upon the olfactory abilities of dogs for critical tasks such as detecting bombs, landmines, other hazardous chemicals and illicit substances. Hence, a mechanistic understanding of the olfactory system in dogs is of great scientific interest. Previous studies explored this aspect at the cellular and behavior levels; however, the cognitive-level neural substrates linking them have never been explored. This is critical given the fact that behavior is driven by filtered sensory representations in higher order cognitive areas rather than the raw odor maps of the olfactory bulb. Since sedated dogs cannot sniff, we investigated this using functional magnetic resonance imaging of conscious dogs. We addressed the technical challenges of head motion using a two pronged strategy of behavioral training to keep dogs' head as still as possible and a single camera optical head motion tracking system to account for residual jerky movements. We built a custom computer-controlled odorant delivery system which was synchronized with image acquisition, allowing the investigation of brain regions activated by odors. The olfactory bulb and piriform lobes were commonly activated in both awake and anesthetized dogs, while the frontal cortex was activated mainly in conscious dogs. Comparison of responses to low and high odor intensity showed differences in either the strength or spatial extent of activation in the olfactory bulb, piriform lobes, cerebellum, and frontal cortex. Our results demonstrate the viability of the proposed method for functional imaging of the olfactory system in conscious dogs. This could potentially open up a new field of research in detector dog technology.

  3. On the Averaging of Cardiac Diffusion Tensor MRI Data: The Effect of Distance Function Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) Metrics were judged by quantitative –rather than qualitative– criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the “swelling effect” occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration. PMID:27754986

  4. On the averaging of cardiac diffusion tensor MRI data: the effect of distance function selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) metrics were judged by quantitative—rather than qualitative—criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the ‘swelling effect’ occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration.

  5. Global Functional Connectivity Differences between Sleep-Like States in Urethane Anesthetized Rats Measured by fMRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Zhurakovskaya

    Full Text Available Sleep is essential for nervous system functioning and sleep disorders are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. However, the macroscale connectivity changes in brain networking during different sleep states are poorly understood. One of the hindering factors is the difficulty to combine functional connectivity investigation methods with spontaneously sleeping animals, which prevents the use of numerous preclinical animal models. Recent studies, however, have implicated that urethane anesthesia can uniquely induce different sleep-like brain states, resembling rapid eye movement (REM and non-REM (NREM sleep, in rodents. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess changes in global connectivity and topology between sleep-like states in urethane anesthetized rats, using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD functional magnetic resonance imaging. We detected significant changes in corticocortical (increased in NREM-like state and corticothalamic connectivity (increased in REM-like state. Additionally, in graph analysis the modularity, the measure of functional integration in the brain, was higher in NREM-like state than in REM-like state, indicating a decrease in arousal level, as in normal sleep. The fMRI findings were supported by the supplementary electrophysiological measurements. Taken together, our results show that macroscale functional connectivity changes between sleep states can be detected robustly with resting-state fMRI in urethane anesthetized rats. Our findings pave the way for studies in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases where sleep abnormalities are often one of the first markers for the disorder development.

  6. MRI of the Breast for the Detection and Assessment of the Size of Ductal Carcinoma in Situ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Do Youn; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and mammography for the detection and assessment of the size of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). The preoperative contrast-enhanced MRI and mammography were analyzed in respect of the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS in 72 patients (age range: 30 67 years, mean age: 47 years). The MRI and mammographic measurements were compared with the histopathologic size with using the Pearson's correlation coefficients and the Mann-Whitney u test. We evaluated whether the breast density, the tumor nuclear grade, the presence of comedo necrosis and microinvasion influenced the MRI and mammographic size estimates by using the chi-square test. Of the 72 DCIS lesions, 68 (94%) were detected by MRI and 62 (86%) were detected by mammography. Overall, the Pearson's correlation of the size between MRI and histopathology was 0.786 versus 0.633 between mammography and histopathology (p < 0.001). MRI underestimated the size by more than 1 cm (including false negative examination) in 12 patients (17%), was accurate in 52 patients (72%) and overestimated the size by more than 1 cm in eight patients (11%) whereas mammography underestimated the size in 25 patients (35%), was accurate in 31 patients (43%) and overestimated the size in 16 patients (22%). The MRI, but not the mammography, showed significant correlation for the assessment of the size of tumor in noncomedo DCIS (p < 0.001 vs p = 0.060). The assessment of tumor size by MRI was affected by the nuclear grade (p = 0.008) and the presence of comedo necrosis (p = 0.029), but not by the breast density (p 0.747) or microinvasion (p = 0.093). MRI was more accurate for the detection and assessment of the size of DCIS than mammography

  7. [MRI for brain structure and function in patients with first-episode panic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Duan, Lian; Liao, Mei; Yang, Fan; Liu, Jun; Shan, Baoci; Li, Lingjiang

    2011-12-01

    To determine the brain function and structure in patinets with first-episode panic disorder (PD). All subjects (24 PD patients and 24 healthy subjects) received MRI scan and emotional counting Stroop task during the functional magnetic resonance imaging. Blood oxygenation level dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometric technology were used to detect the gray matter volume. Compared with the healthy controls, left thalamus, left medial frontal gyrus, left anterior cingulate gyrus, left inferior frontal gyrus, left insula (panic-related words vs. neutral words) lacked activation in PD patients, but the over-activation were found in right brain stem, right occipital lobe/lingual gyrus in PD patients. Compared with the healthy controls, the gray matter volume in the PD patients significantly decreased in the left superior temporal gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, left medial occipital gyrus, dorsomedial nucleus of left thalamus and right anterior cingulate gyrus. There was no significantly increased gray matter volume in any brain area in PD patients. PD patients have selective attentional bias in processing threatening information due to the depression and weakening of the frontal cingulated gyrus.

  8. Diagnostic precision of PET imaging and functional MRI in disorders of consciousness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stender, Johan; Gosseries, Olivia; Bruno, Marie-Aurélie

    2014-01-01

    a validation study of two neuroimaging-based diagnostic methods: PET imaging and functional MRI (fMRI). METHODS: For this clinical validation study, we included patients referred to the University Hospital of Liège, Belgium, between January, 2008, and June, 2012, who were diagnosed by our unit...... with unresponsive wakefulness syndrome, locked-in syndrome, or minimally conscious state with traumatic or non-traumatic causes. We did repeated standardised clinical assessments with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised (CRS-R), cerebral (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET, and fMRI during mental activation tasks. We...... state (48=traumatic, 78=non-traumatic; 110=chronic, 16=subacute). (18)F-FDG PET had high sensitivity for identification of patients in a minimally conscious state (93%, 95% CI 85-98) and high congruence (85%, 77-90) with behavioural CRS-R scores. The active fMRI method was less sensitive at diagnosis...

  9. Emerging role of functional brain MRI in low-grade glioma surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friismose, Ancuta; Traise, Peter; Markovic, Ljubo

    Learning objectives 1. To describe the use of functional MRI (fMRI) in cranial surgery planning for patients with low-grade gliomas (LGG). 2. To show the increasing importance of fMRI in the clinical setting. Background LGG include brain tumors classified by the World Health Organization as grade I...... be used to map eloquent cortex areas, thus minimizing postoperative deficits and improving surgical performance. Findings and procedure details Patients diagnosed with low-grade gliomas located in eloquent brain areas undergo fMRI prior to surgery. The exams are performed on a 3T MR system (Achieva TX....... Language comprehension and visual tasks can be added to visualize Wernicke’s area or the visual cortex. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used to map nerve tract course relative to the tumour. Conclusion FMRI has proven its clinical utility in locating eloquent brain areas with relation to tumor site...

  10. Determination of language lateralization using functional MRI during the performance of shiritori tasks in neurosurgery patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito; Sugishita, Morihiro; Onozuka, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of language lateralization is crucial in patients considered for neurological surgery. The authors used functional MRI (fMRI) in conjunction with shiritori, a kind of word-generation task as paradigms, to determine language lateralization in the patients. We used a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging devise with an echo-planar imaging sequence. Thirty-two patients undergoing neurological surgery would alternately rest and silently perform shiritori during fMRI acquisition. Language lateralization was determined in 29 out of 32 patients. Twenty-two patients were considered as left-hemisphere dominant and seven were right-hemisphere dominant. Brain activation was seen in the prefrontal area, premotor area, superior temporal gyrus and parietal lobe of the dominant hemisphere, which is consistent with the results in normal adults. Language lateralization was particularly useful in a case of meningioma in the left lateral ventricle and in a case of AVM in the left temporoparietal region. fMRI with shiritori tasks revealed right-hemisphere dominance in both cases, which was also confirmed by intracarotid amobarbital (Wada) testing. Both lesions were treated successfully without causing any further deficit to the patients' language function. These results suggest that fMRI with shiritori tasks can be used to assess language lateralization non-invasively, compared with the current techniques, such as intracarotid amobarbital testing and cortical electrostimulation mapping. Thus, fMRI with shiritori tasks has significant clinical potential as a presurgical evaluation tool. (author)

  11. Estimation of gas and tissue lung volumes by MRI: functional approach of lung imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qanadli, S D; Orvoen-Frija, E; Lacombe, P; Di Paola, R; Bittoun, J; Frija, G

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to assess the accuracy of MRI for the determination of lung gas and tissue volumes. Fifteen healthy subjects underwent MRI of the thorax and pulmonary function tests [vital capacity (VC) and total lung capacity (TLC)] in the supine position. MR examinations were performed at inspiration and expiration. Lung volumes were measured by a previously validated technique on phantoms. Both individual and total lung volumes and capacities were calculated. MRI total vital capacity (VC(MRI)) was compared with spirometric vital capacity (VC(SP)). Capacities were correlated to lung volumes. Tissue volume (V(T)) was estimated as the difference between the total lung volume at full inspiration and the TLC. No significant difference was seen between VC(MRI) and VC(SP). Individual capacities were well correlated (r = 0.9) to static volume at full inspiration. The V(T) was estimated to be 836+/-393 ml. This preliminary study demonstrates that MRI can accurately estimate lung gas and tissue volumes. The proposed approach appears well suited for functional imaging of the lung.

  12. Determination of language lateralization using functional MRI during the performance of shiritori tasks in neurosurgery patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takayama, Hideichi; Kobayashi, Masahito [Mihara Memorial Hospital, Isesaki, Gunma (Japan); Sugishita, Morihiro; Onozuka, Satoshi; Kawase, Takeshi

    2001-03-01

    Assessment of language lateralization is crucial in patients considered for neurological surgery. The authors used functional MRI (fMRI) in conjunction with shiritori, a kind of word-generation task as paradigms, to determine language lateralization in the patients. We used a 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging devise with an echo-planar imaging sequence. Thirty-two patients undergoing neurological surgery would alternately rest and silently perform shiritori during fMRI acquisition. Language lateralization was determined in 29 out of 32 patients. Twenty-two patients were considered as left-hemisphere dominant and seven were right-hemisphere dominant. Brain activation was seen in the prefrontal area, premotor area, superior temporal gyrus and parietal lobe of the dominant hemisphere, which is consistent with the results in normal adults. Language lateralization was particularly useful in a case of meningioma in the left lateral ventricle and in a case of AVM in the left temporoparietal region. fMRI with shiritori tasks revealed right-hemisphere dominance in both cases, which was also confirmed by intracarotid amobarbital (Wada) testing. Both lesions were treated successfully without causing any further deficit to the patients' language function. These results suggest that fMRI with shiritori tasks can be used to assess language lateralization non-invasively, compared with the current techniques, such as intracarotid amobarbital testing and cortical electrostimulation mapping. Thus, fMRI with shiritori tasks has significant clinical potential as a presurgical evaluation tool. (author)

  13. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew; Finger, Elizabeth; Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John; Pavlosky, William; Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith

    2015-01-01

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of MRI-derived input function for quantitative measurement of glucose metabolism in an integrated PET-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anazodo, Udunna; Kewin, Matthew [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Finger, Elizabeth [Department of Clinical Neurological Sciences, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Thiessen, Jonathan; Hadway, Jennifer; Butler, John [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada); Pavlosky, William [Diagnostic Imaging, St Joseph' s Health Care, London, Ontario (Canada); Prato, Frank; Thompson, Terry; St Lawrence, Keith [Lawson Health Research Institute, Department of Medical Biophysics, Western University, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-05-18

    PET semi-quantitative methods such as relative uptake value can be robust but offer no biological information and do not account for intra-subject variability in tracer administration or clearance. Simultaneous multimodal measurements that combine PET and MRI not only permit crucial multiparametric measurements, it provides means of applying tracer kinetic modelling without the need for serial arterial blood sampling. In this study we adapted an image-derived input function (IDIF) method to improve characterization of glucose metabolism in an ongoing dementia study. Here we present preliminary results in a small group of frontotemporal dementia patients and controls. IDIF was obtained directly from dynamic PET data guided by regions of interest drawn on carotid vessels on high resolution T1-weighted MR Images. IDIF was corrected for contamination of non-arterial voxels. A validation of the method was performed in a porcine model in a PET-CT scanner comparing IDIF to direct arterial blood samples. Metabolic rate of glucose (CMRglc) was measured voxel-by-voxel in gray matter producing maps that were compared between groups. Net influx rate (Ki) and global mean CMRglc are reported. A good correlation (r = 0.9 p<0.0001) was found between corrected IDIF and input function measured from direct arterial blood sampling in the validation study. In 3 FTD and 3 controls, a trend towards hypometabolism was found in frontal, temporal and parietal lobes similar to significant differences previously reported by other groups. The global mean CMRglc and Ki observed in control subjects are in line with previous reports. In general, kinetic modelling of PET-FDG using an MR-IDIF can improve characterization of glucose metabolism in dementia. This method is feasible in multimodal studies that aim to combine PET molecular imaging with MRI as dynamic PET can be acquired along with multiple MRI measurements.

  15. Detection of osseous metastases of the spine: Comparison of high resolution multi-detector-CT with MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buhmann, Sonja; Becker, Christoph; Duerr, Hans Roland; Reiser, Maximilian; Baur-Melnyk, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of multi-slice-computed tomography (MDCT) for the detection of vertebral metastases in comparison to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, 639 vertebral bodies of 41 patients with various histologically confirmed primary malignancies were analysed. The MDCT-images were acquired on a 16/64-row-MDCT scanner (Siemens Somatom Sensation 16/64). MRI was performed on 1.5 T scanners (SIEMENS Symphony/Sonata). The MDCT- and MRI-images were evaluated separately by two experienced radiologists in a consensus reading. The combination of MDCT and MRI in an expert reading including follow-up examinations and/or histology as well as clinical data served as the gold standard. Results: 201/639 vertebral bodies were defined as metastatically affected by the gold standard. In MDCT 133/201 lesions, in MRI 198/201 lesions were detected. 68 vertebral bodies were false negative in MDCT, whereas 3 false negatives were found in MRI. 3 false positive results were obtained in MDCT, 5 in MRI. Sensitivity was significantly lower for MDCT (66.2%) than for MRI (98.5%) (p < 0.0001). Specificity was not significantly different for both methods (MDCT: 99.3%; MRI: 98.9%). The diagnostic accuracy resulted in 88.8% for MDCT and 98.7% for MRI. Conclusion: Although 16/64-row-MDCT provides excellent image quality and a high spatial resolution in the assessment of bony structures, metastatic lesions without significant bone destruction may be missed. The diagnostic accuracy of MRI proved to be significantly superior to 16/64-row-MDCT for the detection of osseous metastases.

  16. Quantifying functional connectivity in multi-subject fMRI data using component models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristoffer Hougaard; Churchill, Nathan William; Mørup, Morten

    2017-01-01

    of functional connectivity, evaluated on both simulated and experimental resting-state fMRI data. It was demonstrated that highly flexible subject-specific component subspaces, as well as very constrained average models, are poor predictors of whole-brain functional connectivity, whereas the best...

  17. Functional MRI studies of the neural mechanisms of human brain attentional networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Jing; Li Kuncheng; Chen Qi; Wang Yan; Peng Xiaozhe; Zhou Xiaolin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To identify the neural mechanisms of the anterior attention network (AAN) and posterior attention network (PAN) , investigate the possible interaction between them with event-related functional MRI(ER-fMRI). Methods: Eight right-handed healthy volunteers participated in the experiment designed with inhibition of return in visual orienting and Stroop color-word interference effect. The fMRI data were collected on Siemens 1.5 T Sonata MRI systems and analyzed by AFNI to generate the activation map. Results: The data sets from 6 of 8 subjects were used in the study. The functional localizations of the Stroop and IOR, which manifest the function of the AAN and PAN respectively, were consistent with previous imaging researches. On cued locations, left inferior parietal lobule (IPL), area MT/V5, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) and left anterior cingulated cortex (ACC) were significantly activated. On uncued locations, right superior parietal lobule (SPL) and bilateral area MT/V5 were significantly activated. Conclusion: The AAN exerts control over the PAN, while its function can be in turn modulated by the PAN. There are interaction between the AAN and PAN. In addition, it is also proved that ER-fMRI is a feasible method to revise preexisting cognitive model and theory. (authors)

  18. Limited role of gadolinium to detect active sacroiliitis on MRI in juvenile spondyloarthritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herregods, N.; Leus, A.; Verstraete, K.; Jans, L. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Ghent (Belgium); Jaremko, J.L. [University of Alberta Hospital, Department of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Baraliakos, X. [Ruhr-University Bochum, Rheumazentrum Ruhrgebiet, Herne (Germany); Dehoorne, J. [Ghent University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Rheumatology, Ghent (Belgium)

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to determine the added diagnostic value of contrast-enhanced (CE) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compared to routine non contrast-enhanced MRI to detect active sacroiliitis in clinically juvenile spondyloarthritis (JSpA). A total of 80 children clinically suspected for sacroiliitis prospectively underwent MRI of the sacroiliac (SI) joints. Axial and coronal T1-weighted (T1), Short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) and fat-saturated T1-weighted gadolinium-DTPA (Gd) contrast-enhanced (T1/Gd) sequences were obtained. The presence of bone marrow edema (BME), capsulitis, enthesitis, high intra-articular STIR signal, synovial enhancement and a global diagnostic impression of the MRI for diagnosis of sacroiliitis was recorded. STIR and T1/Gd sequences had 100 % agreement for depiction of BME, capsulitis and enthesitis. High intra-articular STIR signal was seen in 18/80 (22.5 %) patients, 15 (83 %) of whom also showed synovial enhancement in the T1/Gd sequence. Sensitivity (SN) and specificity (SP) for a clinical diagnosis of JSpA were similar for high STIR signal (SN = 33 %, SP = 85 %) and T1/Gd synovial enhancement (SN = 36 %, SP = 92 %). Positive likelihood ratio (LR+) for JSpA was twice as high for synovial enhancement than high STIR signal (4.5 compared to 2.2). Global diagnostic impression was similar (STIR: SN = 55 %, SP = 87 %, LR + =4.2; T1/Gd: SN = 55 %, SP = 92 %, LR + = 6.9). MRI without contrast administration is sufficient to identify bone marrow edema, capsulitis and retroarticular enthesitis as features of active sacroiliitis in juvenile spondyloarthritis. In selected cases when high STIR signal in the joint is the only finding, gadolinium-enhanced images may help to confirm the presence of synovitis. (orig.)

  19. A Tumor-Targeted Nanodelivery System to Improve Early MRI Detection of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen F. Pirollo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of improvements in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that would enhance sensitivity, leading to earlier detection of cancer and visualization of metastatic disease, is an area of intense exploration. We have devised a tumor-targeting, liposomal nanodelivery platform for use in gene medicine. This systemically administered nanocomplex has been shown to specifically and efficiently deliver both genes and oligonucleotides to primary and metastatic tumor cells, resulting in significant tumor growth inhibition and even tumor regression. Here we examine the effect on MRI of incorporating conventional MRI contrast agent Magnevist® into our anti-transferrin receptor single-chain antibody (TfRscFv liposomal complex. Both in vitro and in an in vivo orthotopic mouse model of pancreatic cancer, we show increased resolution and image intensity with the complexed Magnevist®. Using advanced microscopy techniques (scanning electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy, we also established that the Magnevist® is in fact encapsulated by the liposome in the complex and that the complex still retains its nanodimensional size. These results demonstrate that this TfRscFv-liposome-Magnevist® nanocomplex has the potential to become a useful tool in early cancer detection.

  20. Feasibility of shutter-speed DCE-MRI for improved prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Priest, Ryan A; Woodward, William J; Tagge, Ian J; Siddiqui, Faisal; Huang, Wei; Rooney, William D; Beer, Tomasz M; Garzotto, Mark G; Springer, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of shutter-speed model dynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI pharmacokinetic analyses for prostate cancer detection was investigated in a prebiopsy patient cohort. Differences of results from the fast-exchange-regime-allowed (FXR-a) shutter-speed model version and the fast-exchange-limit-constrained (FXL-c) standard model are demonstrated. Although the spatial information is more limited, postdynamic-contrast-enhanced MRI biopsy specimens were also examined. The MRI results were correlated with the biopsy pathology findings. Of all the model parameters, region-of-interest-averaged K(trans) difference [ΔK(trans) ≡ K(trans)(FXR-a) - K(trans)(FXL-c)] or two-dimensional K(trans)(FXR-a) vs. k(ep)(FXR-a) values were found to provide the most useful biomarkers for malignant/benign prostate tissue discrimination (at 100% sensitivity for a population of 13, the specificity is 88%) and disease burden determination. (The best specificity for the fast-exchange-limit-constrained analysis is 63%, with the two-dimensional plot.) K(trans) and k(ep) are each measures of passive transcapillary contrast reagent transfer rate constants. Parameter value increases with shutter-speed model (relative to standard model) analysis are larger in malignant foci than in normal-appearing glandular tissue. Pathology analyses verify the shutter-speed model (FXR-a) promise for prostate cancer detection. Parametric mapping may further improve pharmacokinetic biomarker performance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Non-invasive MRI detection of individual pellets in the human stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knörgen, Manfred; Spielmann, Rolf Peter; Abdalla, Ahmed; Metz, Hendrik; Mäder, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    MRI is a powerful and non-invasive method to follow the fate of oral drug delivery systems in humans. Until now, most MRI studies focused on monolithic dosage forms (tablets and capsules). Small-sized multi-particulate drug delivery systems are very difficult to detect due to the poor differentiation between the delivery system and the food. A new approach was developed to overcome the described difficulties and permit the selective imaging of small multi-particulate dosage forms within the stomach. We took advantage of the different sensitivities to susceptibility artefacts of T(2)-weighted spin-echo sequences and T(2)-weighted gradient echo pulse sequences. Using a combination of both methods within a breath hold followed by a specific mathematical image analysis involving co-registration, motion correction, voxel-by-voxel comparison of the maps from different pulse sequences and graphic 2D-/3D-presentation, we were able to obtain pictures with a high sensitivity due to susceptibility effects caused by a 1% magnetite load. By means of the new imaging sequence, single pellets as small as 1mm can be detected with high selectivity within surrounding heterogeneous food in the human stomach. The developed method greatly expands the use of MRI to study the fate of oral multi-particulate drug delivery systems and their food dependency in men. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Automatic denoising of functional MRI data: combining independent component analysis and hierarchical fusion of classifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Douaud, Gwenaëlle; Beckmann, Christian F; Glasser, Matthew F; Griffanti, Ludovica; Smith, Stephen M

    2014-04-15

    Many sources of fluctuation contribute to the fMRI signal, and this makes identifying the effects that are truly related to the underlying neuronal activity difficult. Independent component analysis (ICA) - one of the most widely used techniques for the exploratory analysis of fMRI data - has shown to be a powerful technique in identifying various sources of neuronally-related and artefactual fluctuation in fMRI data (both with the application of external stimuli and with the subject "at rest"). ICA decomposes fMRI data into patterns of activity (a set of spatial maps and their corresponding time series) that are statistically independent and add linearly to explain voxel-wise time series. Given the set of ICA components, if the components representing "signal" (brain activity) can be distinguished form the "noise" components (effects of motion, non-neuronal physiology, scanner artefacts and other nuisance sources), the latter can then be removed from the data, providing an effective cleanup of structured noise. Manual classification of components is labour intensive and requires expertise; hence, a fully automatic noise detection algorithm that can reliably detect various types of noise sources (in both task and resting fMRI) is desirable. In this paper, we introduce FIX ("FMRIB's ICA-based X-noiseifier"), which provides an automatic solution for denoising fMRI data via accurate classification of ICA components. For each ICA component FIX generates a large number of distinct spatial and temporal features, each describing a different aspect of the data (e.g., what proportion of temporal fluctuations are at high frequencies). The set of features is then fed into a multi-level classifier (built around several different classifiers). Once trained through the hand-classification of a sufficient number of training datasets, the classifier can then automatically classify new datasets. The noise components can then be subtracted from (or regressed out of) the original

  3. Cardiac function and myocardial perfusion immediately following maximal treadmill exercise inside the MRI room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballinger Michelle R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treadmill exercise stress testing is an essential tool in the prevention, detection, and treatment of a broad spectrum of cardiovascular disease. After maximal exercise, cardiac images at peak stress are typically acquired using nuclear scintigraphy or echocardiography, both of which have inherent limitations. Although CMR offers superior image quality, the lack of MRI-compatible exercise and monitoring equipment has prevented the realization of treadmill exercise CMR. It is critical to commence imaging as quickly as possible after exercise to capture exercise-induced cardiac wall motion abnormalities. We modified a commercial treadmill such that it could be safely positioned inside the MRI room to minimize the distance between the treadmill and the scan table. We optimized the treadmill exercise CMR protocol in 20 healthy volunteers and successfully imaged cardiac function and myocardial perfusion at peak stress, followed by viability imaging at rest. Imaging commenced an average of 30 seconds after maximal exercise. Real-time cine of seven slices with no breath-hold and no ECG-gating was completed within 45 seconds of exercise, immediately followed by stress perfusion imaging of three short-axis slices which showed an average time to peak enhancement within 57 seconds of exercise. We observed a 3.1-fold increase in cardiac output and a myocardial perfusion reserve index of 1.9, which agree with reported values for healthy subjects at peak stress. This study successfully demonstrates in-room treadmill exercise CMR in healthy volunteers, but confirmation of feasibility in patients with heart disease is still needed.

  4. The effects of changes in object location on object identity detection: A simultaneous EEG-fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ping; Fan, Chenggui; Wang, Min; Fogelson, Noa; Li, Ling

    2017-08-15

    Object identity and location are bound together to form a unique integration that is maintained and processed in visual working memory (VWM). Changes in task-irrelevant object location have been shown to impair the retrieval of memorial representations and the detection of object identity changes. However, the neural correlates of this cognitive process remain largely unknown. In the present study, we aim to investigate the underlying brain activation during object color change detection and the modulatory effects of changes in object location and VWM load. To this end we used simultaneous electroencephalography (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings, which can reveal the neural activity with both high temporal and high spatial resolution. Subjects responded faster and with greater accuracy in the repeated compared to the changed object location condition, when a higher VWM load was utilized. These results support the spatial congruency advantage theory and suggest that it is more pronounced with higher VWM load. Furthermore, the spatial congruency effect was associated with larger posterior N1 activity, greater activation of the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) and less suppression of the right supramarginal gyrus (SMG), when object location was repeated compared to when it was changed. The ERP-fMRI integrative analysis demonstrated that the object location discrimination-related N1 component is generated in the right SMG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Detecting Alzheimer’s disease by morphological MRI using hippocampal grading and cortical thickness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Simon Fristed; Coupé, Pierrick; Fonov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    effort has been dedicated to separate AD related modifications from normal ag-ing for the purpose of early detection and prediction. Several groups have re-ported promising results using automatic methods; however, it is very difficult to compare these methods due to varying cohorts and different...... validation frameworks. To address this issue, the public challenge on Computer-Aided Di-agnosis of Dementia based on structural MRI data (CADDementia) was pro-posed. The challenge calls for accurate classification of 354 MRI scans collect-ed among AD patients, subjects with mild cognitive impairment...... and cognitively normal control. The true diagnosis is hidden from the participating groups, thus making the validation truly objective. This paper describes our proposed meth-od to automatically classify the challenge data along with a validation on 30 scans with known diagnosis also provided for the challenge....

  6. Haemorrhage in intracerebral arteriovenous malformations: detection with MRI and comparison with clinical history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prayer, L. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Wimberger, D (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria) Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Stiglbauer, R. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Kramer, J. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Richling, B. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Bavinzski, G. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Czech, T. (Dept. of Neurosurgery, Univ. of Vienna (Austria)); Imhof, H. (Dept. of Radiology, and MR Inst., Univ. of Vienna (Austria))

    1993-01-01

    Fifty-one patients with 59 angiographically proven cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) were examined by high-field MRI to detect blood breakdown products. Results were correlated with the history of intracranial bleeding. Evidence of previous episodes of haemorrhage was seen in 10 of 12 patients (83.3%) with verified bleeding, 4 of 9 patients (44.4%) with symptoms which could suggest bleeding and in 6 of 30 patients (20%) with negative histories. Because of the known rebleeding rate and the increased risk of associated complications, identification of the subgroup who had had haemorrhage and should therefore be considered for surgery may be beneficial. MRI can make a contribution to management by demonstrating prior haemorrhage in patients with an inadequate clinical history. (orig.)

  7. Differential diagnosis of MRI detected intra cranial space occupying lesions (ICSOLS)-role of 99MTC tetrofosmin cerebral spect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmal, S.; Sundaram, P.S.; Kumar, S.

    2004-01-01

    Discriminating the correct etiology of Intra Cranial Space Occupying Lesions (ICSOLs) detected by MRI is of paramount importance in deciding the right therapeutic approach. Functional imaging like 99m Tc Tetrofosmin cerebral SPECT (C SPECT) can be used to differentiate malignant from other benign cerebral pathologies. Objective: Our aim was to assess the efficacy of C SPECT in differentiating various etiologies (i.e. Infective / Inflammatory, Neoplastic and Post Radiotherapy changes) of MRI detected ICSOLs. We also aimed to assess the incremental value of quantitative uptake ratios in identifying the exact nature of ICSOLs. Method: 26 Patients (M:F=20:6), age range 28-76 yrs, mean 42±7 yrs were evaluated by 99mTc Tetrofosmin cerebral SPECT. 14/26 patients were HIV positive cases while remaining 12 were treated patients of intracerebral malignancies. All these patients had one or more discrete MRI detected ICSOLs. 6/4 patients with HIV and 4/12 patients in the non HIV group showed more than 1 discrete ICSOLs. 20 mci of 99mTc Tetrofosmin was injected IV .15 min (early) and 2 hrs (delayed) post injection C SPECT images were acquired on a dual head variable angle Gamma camera. After reconstruction, transverse, coronal and sagittal images were co- registered with DICOM online available MRI images using aco- registration software. Focal Tetrofosmin uptake in MRI detected ICSOL was interpreted as abnormal. Tetrofosmin uptake index (Ix) was calculated in early and delayed images as ratio of counts in lesion to that of contra lateral region. A value of more than 1.3 was considered to be abnormal. Persistent Ix of more than 1.3 in initial and delayed images were considered to be malignant while Ix of more or less than 1.3 in initial but less than 1.3 in delayed images was considered to be benign in both groups. Results: In HIV group (14 pts), 4 patients showed an Ix of less than 1.3 in both early and delayed images and 7 patients showed an Ix of more than 1.3 in early but

  8. Functional MRI of the cervical spinal cord on 1.5 T with fingertapping: to what extent is it feasible?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govers, N.; Beghin, J.; Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Vandervliet, E.; Parizel, P.M.; Michiels, J.

    2007-01-01

    Until recently, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) with blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) contrast, was mainly used to study brain physiology. The activation signal measured with fMRI is based upon the changes in the concentration of deoxyhaemoglobin that arise from an increase in blood flow in the vicinity of neuronal firing. Technical limitations have impeded such research in the human cervical spinal cord. The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a reliable fMRI signal can be elicited from the cervical spinal cord during fingertapping, a complex motor activity. Furthermore, we wanted to determine whether the fMRI signal could be spatially localized to the particular neuroanatomical location specific for this task. A group of 12 right-handed healthy volunteers performed the complex motor task of fingertapping with their right hand. T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging on a 1.5-T clinical unit was used to image the cervical spinal cord. Motion correction was applied. Cord activation was measured in the transverse imaging plane, between the spinal cord levels C5 and T1. In all subjects spinal cord responses were found, and in most of them on the left and the right side. The distribution of the activation response showed important variations between the subjects. While regions of activation were distributed throughout the spinal cord, concentrated activity was found at the anatomical location of expected motor innervation, namely nerve root C8, in 6 of the 12 subjects. fMRI of the human cervical spinal cord on an 1.5-T unit detects neuronal activity related to a complex motor task. The location of the neuronal activation (spinal cord segment C5 through T1 with a peak on C8) corresponds to the craniocaudal anatomical location of the neurons that activate the muscles in use. (orig.)

  9. Pharmaco fMRI: Determining the functional anatomy of the effects of medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandschneider, Britta; Koepp, Matthias J

    2016-01-01

    Functional MRI studies have helped to elucidate underlying mechanisms in complex neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Disease processes often involve complex large-scale network interactions, extending beyond the presumed main disease focus. Given both the complexity of the clinical phenotype and the underlying dysfunctional brain circuits, so called pharmaco-fMRI (ph-MRI) studies probe pharmacological effects on functional neuro-anatomy, and can help to determine early treatment response, mechanisms of drug efficacy and side effects, and potentially advance CNS drug development. In this review, we discuss recent ph-MRI research in three major neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders and associated network alterations, namely selective serotonin and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors in affective disorders and emotional processing circuits; antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy and cognitive networks; and stimulants in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and networks of attention control. We conclude that ph-MRI studies show consistent and reproducible changes on disease relevant networks, and prove sensitive to early pharmacological effects on functional anatomy associated with disease. Further CNS drug research and development would benefit greatly from improved disease phenotyping, or biomarkers, using advanced imaging techniques.

  10. Pharmaco fMRI: Determining the functional anatomy of the effects of medication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Britta Wandschneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional MRI studies have helped to elucidate underlying mechanisms in complex neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Disease processes often involve complex large-scale network interactions, extending beyond the presumed main disease focus. Given both the complexity of the clinical phenotype and the underlying dysfunctional brain circuits, so called pharmaco-fMRI (ph-MRI studies probe pharmacological effects on functional neuro-anatomy, and can help to determine early treatment response, mechanisms of drug efficacy and side effects, and potentially advance CNS drug development. In this review, we discuss recent ph-MRI research in three major neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders and associated network alterations, namely selective serotonin and noradrenergic reuptake inhibitors in affective disorders and emotional processing circuits; antiepileptic drugs in epilepsy and cognitive networks; and stimulants in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and networks of attention control. We conclude that ph-MRI studies show consistent and reproducible changes on disease relevant networks, and prove sensitive to early pharmacological effects on functional anatomy associated with disease. Further CNS drug research and development would benefit greatly from improved disease phenotyping, or biomarkers, using advanced imaging techniques.

  11. Quantitative estimation of renal function with dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI using a modified two-compartment model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    Full Text Available To establish a simple two-compartment model for glomerular filtration rate (GFR and renal plasma flow (RPF estimations by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI.A total of eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in DCE-MRI. The two-compartment model was modified with the impulse residue function in this study. First, the reliability of GFR measurement of the proposed model was compared with other published models in Monte Carlo simulation at different noise levels. Then, functional parameters were estimated in six healthy rabbits to test the feasibility of the new model. Moreover, in order to investigate its validity of GFR estimation, two rabbits underwent acute ischemia surgical procedure in unilateral kidney before DCE-MRI, and pixel-wise measurements were implemented to detect the cortical GFR alterations between normal and abnormal kidneys.The lowest variability of GFR and RPF measurements were found in the proposed model in the comparison. Mean GFR was 3.03±1.1 ml/min and mean RPF was 2.64±0.5 ml/g/min in normal animals, which were in good agreement with the published values. Moreover, large GFR decline was found in dysfunction kidneys comparing to the contralateral control group.Results in our study demonstrate that measurement of renal kinetic parameters based on the proposed model is feasible and it has the ability to discriminate GFR changes in healthy and diseased kidneys.

  12. Working memory capacity and the functional connectome - insights from resting-state fMRI and voxelwise centrality mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markett, Sebastian; Reuter, Martin; Heeren, Behrend; Lachmann, Bernd; Weber, Bernd; Montag, Christian

    2018-02-01

    The functional connectome represents a comprehensive network map of functional connectivity throughout the human brain. To date, the relationship between the organization of functional connectivity and cognitive performance measures is still poorly understood. In the present study we use resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data to explore the link between the functional connectome and working memory capacity in an individual differences design. Working memory capacity, which refers to the maximum amount of context information that an individual can retain in the absence of external stimulation, was assessed outside the MRI scanner and estimated based on behavioral data from a change detection task. Resting-state time series were analyzed by means of voxelwise degree and eigenvector centrality mapping, which are data-driven network analytic approaches for the characterization of functional connectivity. We found working memory capacity to be inversely correlated with both centrality in the right intraparietal sulcus. Exploratory analyses revealed that this relationship was putatively driven by an increase in negative connectivity strength of the structure. This resting-state connectivity finding fits previous task based activation studies that have shown that this area responds to manipulations of working memory load.

  13. Supervised methods for detection and segmentation of tissues in clinical lumbar MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2014-10-01

    Lower back pain (LBP) is widely prevalent all over the world and more than 80% of the people suffer from LBP at some point of their lives. Moreover, a shortage of radiologists is the most pressing cause for the need of CAD (computer-aided diagnosis) systems. Automatic localization and labeling of intervertebral discs from lumbar MRI is the first step towards computer-aided diagnosis of lower back ailments. Subsequently, for diagnosis and characterization (quantification and localization) of abnormalities like disc herniation and stenosis, a completely automatic segmentation of intervertebral discs and the dural sac is extremely important. Contribution of this paper towards clinical CAD systems is two-fold. First, we propose a method to automatically detect all visible intervertebral discs in clinical sagittal MRI using heuristics and machine learning techniques. We provide a novel end-to-end framework that outputs a tight bounding box for each disc, instead of simply marking the centroid of discs, as has been the trend in the recent past. Second, we propose a method to simultaneously segment all the tissues (vertebrae, intervertebral disc, dural sac and background) in a lumbar sagittal MRI, using an auto-context approach instead of any explicit shape features or models. Past work tackles the lumbar segmentation problem on a tissue/organ basis, and which tend to perform poorly in clinical scans due to high variability in appearance. We, on the other hand, train a series of robust classifiers (random forests) using image features and sparsely sampled context features, which implicitly represent the shape and configuration of the image. Both these methods have been tested on a huge clinical dataset comprising of 212 cases and show very promising results for both disc detection (98% disc localization accuracy and 2.08mm mean deviation) and sagittal MRI segmentation (dice similarity indices of 0.87 and 0.84 for the dural sac and the inter-vertebral disc, respectively

  14. Assessment of language lateralization with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salagierska-Barwinska, A.; Goraj, B.

    2004-01-01

    fMRI offers powerful methods to delineate which brain regions are engaged in language processing in the intact brain. Until now hemisphere dominance for language has been usually assessed by means of the intraoperative methods: the Wada test or electrocortical stimulation mapping. Recently functional MRI becomes the valuable method in determining hemisphere dominance for language. fMRI study was proved to be concordant with invasive measures. fMRI was carried out in 30 healthy selected participants (15 females: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed; 15 males: 10 strongly right-handed and 5 strongly left-handed). The subject's handedness was assessed by standardized psychological tests inter alia the 'lateralization inventory'. Two different language tasks were used: a verb generation task and a phonological task. Subjects were scanned,while performing experimental block. The block contained alternately 8 active (language task) and 8 control conditions. Statistical analysis of evoked blood oxygenation level-dependent BOLD) responses, measured with echo planar imagining (1.5 T) were used. During a verb generation task in strongly right or left handed subjects the inferior frontal region was activated on the side opposite to the subject's handedness determined by the psychological test. Our fMRI studies demonstrated no gender effects on brain during these language tasks. Our study suggests that fMRI is a good device for the study of the language organization. The advantage of fMRI is its capacity for exact localization of activated areas. fMRI together with adequate neurolinguistic test could be promising routine preoperative tool in identification hemisphere dominance for language. These results encourage to further investigation for evaluating correlation in patients with brain injuries. (author)

  15. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Qiu, Mingguo [Third Military Medical University, Department of Medical Imaging, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing (China); Liu, Hongliang; Yan, Rubing [Third Military Medical University, Department of Rehabilitation, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China); Yang, Jun; Wang, Jian [Third Military Medical University, Department of Radiology, Southwest Hospital, Chongqing (China)

    2016-05-15

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia. (orig.)

  16. Relationship between functional connectivity and motor function assessment in stroke patients with hemiplegia: a resting-state functional MRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wang, Li; Zhang, Jingna; Sang, Linqiong; Li, Pengyue; Qiu, Mingguo; Liu, Hongliang; Yan, Rubing; Yang, Jun; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to examine the brain mechanisms of stroke patients with hemiplegia, but the relationship between functional connectivity (FC) and treatment-induced motor function recovery has not yet been fully investigated. This study aimed to identify the brain FC changes in stroke patients and study the relationship between FC and motor function assessment using the resting-state fMRI. Seventeen stroke patients with hemiplegia and fifteen healthy control subjects (HCSs) were recruited in this study. We compared the FC between the ipsilesional primary motor cortex (M1) and the whole brain of the patients with the FC of the HCSs and studied the FC changes in the patients before and after conventional rehabilitation and motor imagery therapy. Additionally, correlations between the FC change and motor function of the patients were studied. Compared to the HCSs, the FC in the patient group was significantly increased between the ipsilesional M1 and the ipsilesional inferior parietal cortex, frontal gyrus, supplementary motor area (SMA), and contralesional angular and decreased between the ipsilesional M1 and bilateral M1. After the treatment, the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and contralesional M1 increased while the FC between the ipsilesional M1 and ipsilesional SMA and paracentral lobule decreased. A statistically significant correlation was found between the FC change in the bilateral M1 and the Fugl-Meyer assessment (FMA) score change. Our results revealed an abnormal motor network after stroke and suggested that the FC could serve as a biomarker of motor function recovery in stroke patients with hemiplegia. (orig.)

  17. A functional MRI study of deception among offenders with antisocial personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, W; Liu, H; Liao, J; Ma, X; Rong, P; Tang, Y; Wang, W

    2013-08-06

    Deceit is a core feature of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD), and the study of deception in ASPD has important implications for identifying the underlying mechanism of ASPD. A great deal of functional neuroimaging literature has described the neural correlates of deception in healthy volunteers, but there have been few imaging studies examining people with ASPD. The neural correlates of lie-telling in ASPD, and which specific brain activities are related to the capacity to lie, are unclear. In this study, 32 offenders who satisfied the Personality Diagnostic Questionaire-4 and PDI-IV (Personality Disorder Interview) criteria for ASPD were divided into three groups based on their capacity for deception, which was evaluated based on the deceitfulness criterion of the PDI-IV ASPD. All offenders underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while responding to questions in a truthful, inverse, or deceitful manner. We primarily created contrasts in the brain activities between truth-telling and lie-telling, and then computed the Pearson's correlation coefficients between activities contrasts of individual, i.e. BOLD (blood-oxygen-level-dependent) strength during deception minus that during truth-telling, and the capacity for deception. Our results indicated that the bilateral dorsolateral prefrontal cortex extending to the middle frontal gyrus, the left inferior parietal lobule, and the bilateral anterior cingulate gyrus/medial superior frontal gyrus were associated with deception among people with ASPD. As the capacity for deception increased, the contrasted brain activities of the above regions decreased. This study found that truthful and untruthful communications of ASPD subjects can be differentiated in terms of brain BOLD activities, and more importantly, this study is the first to use fMRI to discover that BOLD activities during deception are correlated with the capacity to lie. The latter finding might challenge the diagnostic accuracy of lie

  18. Effects of anesthesia on renal function and metabolism in rats assessed by hyperpolarized MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qi, Haiyun; Mariager, Christian Østergaard; Lindhardt, Jakob

    2018-01-01

    . In the present study, we aimed to investigate the renal functional and metabolic consequences of 3 typical rodent anesthetics used in preclinical MRI: sevoflurane, inaction, and a mixture of fentanyl, fluanisone, and midazolam (FFM). METHODS: The renal effects of 3 different classes of anesthetics (inactin......, servoflurane, and FFM) were investigated using functional and metabolic MRI. The renal glucose metabolism and hemodynamics was characterized with hyperpolarized [1-13C]pyruvate MRI and by DCE imaging. RESULTS: Rats receiving sevoflurane or FFM had blood glucose levels that were 1.3-fold to 1.4-fold higher than...... rats receiving inactin. A 2.9-fold and 4.8-fold increased13C-lactate/13C-pyruvate ratio was found in the FFM mixture anesthetized group compared with the sevoflurane and the inactin anesthetized groups. The FFM anesthesia resulted in a 50% lower renal plasma flow compared with the sevoflurane...

  19. Functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia: An fMRI and VBM study

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Goyal, Satnam; Kaur, Prabhjot; Singh, Namita; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N; Khushu, Subash

    2015-01-01

    Empathy deficit is a core feature of schizophrenia which may lead to social dysfunction. The present study was carried out to investigate functional and structural abnormalities associated with empathy in patients with schizophrenia using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 healthy control subjects matched for age, sex and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI image...

  20. Functional MRI in the Investigation of Blast-Related Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graner, John; Oakes, Terrence R.; French, Louis M.; Riedy, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    This review focuses on the application of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to the investigation of blast-related traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Relatively little is known about the exact mechanisms of neurophysiological injury and pathological and functional sequelae of bTBI. Furthermore, in mild bTBI, standard anatomical imaging techniques (MRI and computed tomography) generally fail to show focal lesions and most of the symptoms present as subjective clinical functional deficits. Therefore, an objective test of brain functionality has great potential to aid in patient diagnosis and provide a sensitive measurement to monitor disease progression and treatment. The goal of this review is to highlight the relevant body of blast-related TBI literature and present suggestions and considerations in the development of fMRI studies for the investigation of bTBI. The review begins with a summary of recent bTBI publications followed by discussions of various elements of blast-related injury. Brief reviews of some fMRI techniques that focus on mental processes commonly disrupted by bTBI, including working memory, selective attention, and emotional processing, are presented in addition to a short review of resting state fMRI. Potential strengths and weaknesses of these approaches as regards bTBI are discussed. Finally, this review presents considerations that must be made when designing fMRI studies for bTBI populations, given the heterogeneous nature of bTBI and its high rate of comorbidity with other physical and psychological injuries. PMID:23460082

  1. Functional alterations of V1 cortex in patients with primary open angle glaucoma using functional MRI retinotopic mapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Linping; Cai Ping; Li Changying; Li Xueqin; Xie Bing; Li Sha; Liu Ting; Chen Xing; Shi Yanshu; Wang Jian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional changes of visual cortex (V1) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) by fMRI retinotopic mapping technology. Methods: Fifteen POAG patients and 15 healthy volunteers underwent stimulations with fMRI retinotopic mapping stimulus and contrast-reversing checkerboard patterns stimulus on a Siemens Trio 3.0 T MRI whole-body scanner for functional data collection. Comparisons of V1 fMRI responses between the glaucomatous eyes and the healthy eyes of the patients were carried out using paired samples t-test, while independent samples t-test was used to compare V1 fMRI responses and activations between the healthy eyes of patients and the age-, gender- and side- matched eyes of normal people. Differences of V1 cortical functions and visual functions were analyzed by linear correlation analysis when the glaucomatous and the healthy eyes were simulated individually., Results: (1) V1 fMRI responses of the individually stimulated glaucomatous eyes [(1.24±0.72)%] were weaker than those of the healthy eyes [(2.18±0.93)%] (t=4.757, P 0.05). (2) Differences of V1 cortical functions were negatively correlated with those of visual functions in the individually stimulated glaucomatous and healthy eyes (r=-0.887, P< 0.01). (3) The activated area indexes of V1 cortexes in the healthy eyes from patients (0.72±0.12) were lower than those in the matched eyes of normal people (0.85±0.09) (t=-3.801, P<0.01) . Conclusion: Cortical function impairment was in accordance with visual function impairment in glaucoma. Located and quantified measurement with fMRI retinotopic mapping was a useful method for clinical follow-up and evaluation of functional alteration of glaucomatous visual cortex, and a potentially useful means of studying trans-synaptic degeneration of visual pathways of in vivo glaucoma. (authors)

  2. Impact of real-time virtual sonography, a coordinated sonography and MRI system that uses an image fusion technique, on the sonographic evaluation of MRI-detected lesions of the breast in second-look sonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Shogo; Kousaka, Junko; Fujii, Kimihito; Yorozuya, Kyoko; Yoshida, Miwa; Mouri, Yukako; Akizuki, Miwa; Tetsuka, Rie; Ando, Takahito; Fukutomi, Takashi; Oshima, Yukihiko; Kimura, Junko; Ishiguchi, Tsuneo; Arai, Osamu

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the utility of second-look sonography using real-time virtual sonography (RVS)-a coordinated sonography with an MRI system that uses an image fusion technique with magnetic navigation-on the sonographic evaluation of MRI-detected lesions of the breast. Of the 196 consecutive patients who were examined with breast MRI in our hospital from 2006 to 2009, those patients who underwent second-look sonography to identify MRI-detected lesions were enrolled in this study. MRI was performed using a 1.5-T imager with the patient in a supine position. To assess the efficacy benefits of RVS, the correlations between lesion detection rates, MRI features, distribution, and histopathological classification on second-look sonography using conventional B-mode or RVS were analyzed. Of the 196 patients, 55 (28 %) demonstrated 67 lesions initially detected by MRI, followed by second-look sonography. Of the 67 MRI-detected lesions, 18 (30 %) were identified with second-look sonography using conventional B-mode alone, whereas 60 (90 %) lesions were detected with second-look sonography using RVS (p use of RVS on second-look sonography significantly increases the sonographic detection rate of MRI-detected lesions without operator dependence.

  3. Abbreviated MRI protocols for detecting breast cancer in women with dense breasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shung Qing; Huang, Min; Shen, Yu Ying; Liu, Chen Lu; Xu, Chuan Xiao [The Affiliated Suzhou Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Suzhou (China)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the validity of two abbreviated protocols (AP) of MRI in breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. This was a retrospective study in 356 participants with dense breast tissue and negative mammography results. The study was approved by the Nanjing Medical University Ethics Committee. Patients were imaged with a full diagnostic protocol (FDP) of MRI. Two APs (AP-1 consisting of the first post-contrast subtracted [FAST] and maximum-intensity projection [MIP] images, and AP-2 consisting of AP-1 combined with diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) and FDP images were analyzed separately, and the sensitivities and specificities of breast cancer detection were calculated. Of the 356 women, 67 lesions were detected in 67 women (18.8%) by standard MR protocol, and histological examination revealed 14 malignant lesions and 53 benign lesions. The average interpretation time of AP-1 and AP-2 were 37 seconds and 54 seconds, respectively, while the average interpretation time of the FDP was 3 minutes and 25 seconds. The sensitivities of the AP-1, AP-2, and FDP were 92.9, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the specificities of the three MR protocols were 86.5, 95.0, and 96.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference among the three MR protocols in the diagnosis of breast cancer (p > 0.05). However, the specificity of AP-1 was significantly lower than that of AP-2 (p = 0.031) and FDP (p = 0.035), while there was no difference between AP-2 and FDP (p > 0.05). The AP may be efficient in the breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. FAST and MIP images combined with DWI of MRI are helpful to improve the specificity of breast cancer detection.

  4. Combined gadoxetic acid and gadofosveset enhanced liver MRI for detection and characterization of liver metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannas, Peter; Bookwalter, Candice A.; Ziemlewicz, Tim; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Potretzke, Theodora A.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Nagle, Scott K.; Reeder, Scott B.

    2017-01-01

    To compare gadoxetic acid alone and combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced liver MRI for detection of metastases and differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas. Ninety-one patients underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI before and after additional injection of gadofosveset. First, two readers retrospectively identified metastases on gadoxetic acid alone enhanced delayed hepatobiliary phase T1-weighted images together with all other MR images (dynamic images, T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images). Second, readers assessed additional T1-weighted images obtained after administration of gadofosveset trisodium. For both interpretations, readers rated lesion conspicuity and confidence in differentiating metastases from haemangiomas. Results were compared using alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (AFROC) and conventional ROC methods. Histology and follow-up served as reference standard. There were 145 metastases and 16 haemangiomas. Both readers detected more metastases using combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 130; reader 2 = 124) compared to gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 104; reader 2 = 103). Sensitivity of combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 90 %; reader 2 = 86 %) was higher than that of gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 72 %; reader 2 = 71 %, both P < 0.01). AFROC-AUC was higher for the combined technique (0.92 vs. 0.86, P < 0.001). Sensitivity for correct differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas was higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 98 %; reader 2 = 99 % vs. reader 1 = 86 %; reader 2 = 91 %, both P < 0.01). ROC-AUC was significantly higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 1.00; reader 2 = 1.00 vs. reader 1 = 0.87; reader 2 = 0.92, both P < 0.01). Combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset-enhanced MRI improves detection and characterization of liver metastases compared to gadoxetic acid alone. (orig.)

  5. Combined gadoxetic acid and gadofosveset enhanced liver MRI for detection and characterization of liver metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannas, Peter [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Radiology, University Hospital, Hamburg (Germany); Bookwalter, Candice A.; Ziemlewicz, Tim; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Potretzke, Theodora A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); Motosugi, Utaroh [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Yamanashi, Department of Radiology, Yamanashi (Japan); Nagle, Scott K. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Pediatrics, Madison, WI (United States); Reeder, Scott B. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medical Physics, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Emergency Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To compare gadoxetic acid alone and combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset trisodium-enhanced liver MRI for detection of metastases and differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas. Ninety-one patients underwent gadoxetic acid-enhanced liver MRI before and after additional injection of gadofosveset. First, two readers retrospectively identified metastases on gadoxetic acid alone enhanced delayed hepatobiliary phase T1-weighted images together with all other MR images (dynamic images, T2-weighted images, diffusion-weighted images). Second, readers assessed additional T1-weighted images obtained after administration of gadofosveset trisodium. For both interpretations, readers rated lesion conspicuity and confidence in differentiating metastases from haemangiomas. Results were compared using alternative free-response receiver-operating characteristic (AFROC) and conventional ROC methods. Histology and follow-up served as reference standard. There were 145 metastases and 16 haemangiomas. Both readers detected more metastases using combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 130; reader 2 = 124) compared to gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 104; reader 2 = 103). Sensitivity of combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset (reader 1 = 90 %; reader 2 = 86 %) was higher than that of gadoxetic acid alone (reader 1 = 72 %; reader 2 = 71 %, both P < 0.01). AFROC-AUC was higher for the combined technique (0.92 vs. 0.86, P < 0.001). Sensitivity for correct differentiation of metastases from haemangiomas was higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 98 %; reader 2 = 99 % vs. reader 1 = 86 %; reader 2 = 91 %, both P < 0.01). ROC-AUC was significantly higher for the combined technique (reader 1 = 1.00; reader 2 = 1.00 vs. reader 1 = 0.87; reader 2 = 0.92, both P < 0.01). Combined gadoxetic acid/gadofosveset-enhanced MRI improves detection and characterization of liver metastases compared to gadoxetic acid alone. (orig.)

  6. Functional-anatomic study of episodic retrieval using fMRI. I. Retrieval effort versus retrieval success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, R L; Koutstaal, W; Schacter, D L; Wagner, A D; Rosen, B R

    1998-04-01

    A number of recent functional imaging studies have identified brain areas activated during tasks involving episodic memory retrieval. The identification of such areas provides a foundation for targeted hypotheses regarding the more specific contributions that these areas make to episodic retrieval. As a beginning effort toward such an endeavor, whole-brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine 14 subjects during episodic word recognition in a block-designed fMRI experiment. Study conditions were manipulated by presenting either shallow or deep encoding tasks. This manipulation yielded two recognition conditions that differed with regard to retrieval effort and retrieval success: shallow encoding yielded low levels of recognition success with high levels of retrieval effort, and deep encoding yielded high levels of recognition success with low levels of effort. Many brain areas were activated in common by these two recognition conditions compared to a low-level fixation condition, including left and right prefrontal regions often detected during PET episodic retrieval paradigms (e.g., R. L. Buckner et al., 1996, J. Neurosci. 16, 6219-6235) thereby generalizing these findings to fMRI. Characterization of the activated regions in relation to the separate recognition conditions showed (1) bilateral anterior insular regions and a left dorsal prefrontal region were more active after shallow encoding, when retrieval demanded greatest effort, and (2) right anterior prefrontal cortex, which has been implicated in episodic retrieval, was most active during successful retrieval after deep encoding. We discuss these findings in relation to component processes involved in episodic retrieval and in the context of a companion study using event-related fMRI.

  7. Does preoperative breast MRI significantly impact on initial surgical procedure and re-operation rates in patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, K.; Sakellariou, S.; Dawson, N.; Litherland, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes the management of patients with screen-detected invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). Materials and methods: A retrospective, controlled, single-centre analysis of 138 cases of screen-detected ILC was performed. All patients were assessed by a single multidisciplinary team as to whether preoperative MRI altered the initial management decision or reduced re-operation rates. Results: Forty-three percent of patients had preoperative MRI. MRI guided surgical management in 40.7% patients. Primary mastectomy rates were not significantly different between the MRI and non-MRI groups (32% and 30% respectively, p=0.71). The MRI group had a lower secondary surgery rate (6.8% versus 15.2%); however, the results did not reach statistical significance, and there were no unnecessary mastectomies. Conclusion: MRI can be used appropriately to guide primary surgery in screen-detected ILC cases and affects the initial management decision in 40.7% of patients. It does not significantly affect the overall mastectomy rate or re-operation rates, but reduces the likelihood of the latter. As a result of this review, the authors' local policy for the use of MRI in screen-detected ILC patients has been modified. For patients undergoing mastectomy for ILC, MRI is no longer performed routinely to search for contralateral malignancy as this has no proven added benefit. - Highlights: • Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows more accurate tumour assessment and detects additional foci of disease in invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC). • Over the study's 3 year time frame, MRI guided surgical management of 40.7% screen-detected ILC patients scanned. • No statistically significant difference in mastectomy rates between MRI and non MRI groups. • Observed lower re-operation rate (6.8%-v-15.2%) in MRI group not statistically significant. • No MRI benefit for contralateral disease detection in ILC patients for

  8. Comparison of quantitative regional ventilation-weighted fourier decomposition MRI with dynamic fluorinated gas washout MRI and lung function testing in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaireit, Till F; Gutberlet, Marcel; Voskrebenzev, Andreas; Freise, Julia; Welte, Tobias; Hohlfeld, Jens M; Wacker, Frank; Vogel-Claussen, Jens

    2018-06-01

    Ventilation-weighted Fourier decomposition-MRI (FD-MRI) has matured as a reliable technique for quantitative measures of regional lung ventilation in recent years, but has yet not been validated in COPD patients. To compare regional fractional lung ventilation obtained by ventilation-weighted FD-MRI with dynamic fluorinated gas washout MRI ( 19 F-MRI) and lung function test parameters. Prospective study. Twenty-seven patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, median age 61 [54-67] years) were included. For FD-MRI and for 19 F-MRI a spoiled gradient echo sequence was used at 1.5T. FD-MRI coronal slices were acquired in free breathing. Dynamic 19 F-MRI was performed after inhalation of 25-30 L of a mixture of 79% fluorinated gas (C 3 F 8 ) and 21% oxygen via a closed face mask tubing using a dedicated coil tuned to 59.9 MHz. 19 F washout times in numbers of breaths ( 19 F-n breaths ) as well as fractional ventilation maps for both methods (FD-FV, 19 F-FV) were calculated. Slices were matched using a landmark driven algorithm, and only corresponding slices with an overlap of >90% were coregistered for evaluation. The obtained parameters were correlated with each other using Spearman's correlation coefficient (r). FD-FV strongly correlated with 19 F-n breaths on a global (r = -0.72, P Fourier decomposition-MRI is a promising noninvasive, radiation-free tool for quantification of regional ventilation in COPD patients. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 2 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:1534-1541. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  9. Joint Modelling of Structural and Functional Brain Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Winther; Herlau, Tue; Mørup, Morten

    -parametric Bayesian network model which allows for joint modelling and integration of multiple networks. We demonstrate the model’s ability to detect vertices that share structure across networks jointly in functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion MRI (dMRI) data. Using two fMRI and dMRI scans per subject, we establish...

  10. Contribution to the detection of changes in multi-modal 3D MRI sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bosc, Marcel

    2003-01-01

    This research thesis reports the study of automatic techniques for the detection of changes in image sequences of brain magnetic resonance imagery (MRI), and more particularly the study of localised intensity changes occurring during pathological evolutions such as evolutions of lesions into multiple sclerosis. Thus, this work focused on the development of image processing tools allowing to decide whether changes are statistically significant or not. The author developed automatic techniques of identification and correction of the main artefacts (position, deformations, intensity variation, and so on), and proposes an original technique for cortex segmentation which introduced anatomic information for an improved automatic detection. The developed change detection system has been assessed within the frame of the study of the evolution of lesions of multiple sclerosis. Performance have been determined on a large number of multi-modal images, and the automatic system has shown better performance than a human expert [fr

  11. Detecting Activation in fMRI Data: An Approach Based on Sparse Representation of BOLD Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca Guillen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a simple yet effective approach for detecting activated voxels in fMRI data by exploiting the inherent sparsity property of the BOLD signal in temporal and spatial domains. In the time domain, the approach combines the General Linear Model (GLM with a Least Absolute Deviation (LAD based regression method regularized by the pseudonorm l0 to promote sparsity in the parameter vector of the model. In the spatial domain, detection of activated regions is based on thresholding the spatial map of estimated parameters associated with a particular stimulus. The threshold is calculated by exploiting the sparseness of the BOLD signal in the spatial domain assuming a Laplacian distribution model. The proposed approach is validated using synthetic and real fMRI data. For synthetic data, results show that the proposed approach is able to detect most activated voxels without any false activation. For real data, the method is evaluated through comparison with the SPM software. Results indicate that this approach can effectively find activated regions that are similar to those found by SPM, but using a much simpler approach. This study may lead to the development of robust spatial approaches to further simplifying the complexity of classical schemes.

  12. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallenberg, E M; Dromain, C; Diekmann, F; Engelken, F; Krohn, M; Singh, J M; Ingold-Heppner, B; Winzer, K J; Bick, U; Renz, D M

    2014-01-01

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. • Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) is slowly being introduced into clinical practice. • Access to breast MRI is limited by availability and lack of reimbursement. • Initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI than conventional mammography. • CESM showed a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. • Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography offers promise, seemingly providing information comparable to MRI.

  13. Motor function deficits in schizophrenia: an fMRI and VBM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Namita; Khushu, Subash [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences (INMAS), NMR Research Center, Delhi (India); Goyal, Satnam; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N. [RML Hospital, PGIMER, New Delhi (India)

    2014-05-15

    To investigate whether the motor functional alterations in schizophrenia (SZ) are also associated with structural changes in the related brain areas using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 right-handed SZ patients and 14 right-handed healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during right index finger-tapping task in the same session. fMRI results showed reduced functional activation in the motor areas (contralateral precentral and postcentral gyrus) and ipsilateral cerebellum in SZ subjects as compared to healthy controls (n = 14). VBM analysis also revealed reduced grey matter in motor areas and white matter reduction in cerebellum of SZ subjects as compared to controls. The present study provides an evidence for a possible association between structural alterations in the motor cortex and disturbed functional activation in the motor areas in persons affected with SZ during a simple finger-tapping task. (orig.)

  14. Motor function deficits in schizophrenia: an fMRI and VBM study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sadhana; Modi, Shilpi; Kumar, Pawan; Singh, Namita; Khushu, Subash; Goyal, Satnam; Bhatia, Triptish; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether the motor functional alterations in schizophrenia (SZ) are also associated with structural changes in the related brain areas using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and voxel-based morphometry (VBM). A sample of 14 right-handed SZ patients and 14 right-handed healthy control subjects matched for age, sex, and education were examined with structural high-resolution T1-weighted MRI; fMRI images were obtained during right index finger-tapping task in the same session. fMRI results showed reduced functional activation in the motor areas (contralateral precentral and postcentral gyrus) and ipsilateral cerebellum in SZ subjects as compared to healthy controls (n = 14). VBM analysis also revealed reduced grey matter in motor areas and white matter reduction in cerebellum of SZ subjects as compared to controls. The present study provides an evidence for a possible association between structural alterations in the motor cortex and disturbed functional activation in the motor areas in persons affected with SZ during a simple finger-tapping task. (orig.)

  15. Predicting Treatment Outcome in PTSD : A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study on Trauma-Unrelated Emotional Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, Sanne J H; Kennis, Mitzy; Vink, Matthijs; Geuze, Elbert

    2016-01-01

    In about 30-50% of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), symptoms persist after treatment. Although neurobiological research has advanced our understanding of PTSD, little is known about the neurobiology underlying persistence of PTSD. Two functional MRI scans were collected from 72

  16. Secretin-stimulated MRI characterization of pancreatic morphology and function in patients with chronic pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Adnan; Olesen, Søren Schou; Haldorsen, Ingfrid Salvesen; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frøkjær, Jens Brøndum

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by abnormal pancreatic morphology and impaired endocrine and exocrine function. However, little is known about the relationship between pancreatic morphology and function, and also the association with the etiology and clinical manifestations of CP. The aim was to explore pancreatic morphology and function with advanced MRI in patients with CP and healthy controls (HC) METHODS: Eighty-two patients with CP and 22 HC were enrolled in the study. Morphological imaging parameters included pancreatic main duct diameter, gland volume, fat signal fraction and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values. Functional secretin-stimulated MRI (s-MRI) parameters included pancreatic secretion (bowel fluid volume) and changes in pancreatic ADC value before and after secretin stimulation. Patients were classified according to the modified Cambridge and M-ANNHEIM classification system and fecal elastase was collected. All imaging parameters differentiated CP patients from HC; however, correlations between morphological and functional parameters in CP were weak. Patients with alcoholic and non-alcoholic etiology had comparable s-MRI findings. Fecal elastase was positively correlated to pancreatic gland volume (r = 0.68, P = 0.0016) and negatively correlated to Cambridge classification (r = -0.35, P pancreatic gland volume was significantly decreased in the severe stages of CP (P = 0.001). S-MRI provides detailed information about pancreatic morphology and function and represents a promising non-invasive imaging method to characterize pancreatic pathophysiology and may enable monitoring of disease progression in patients with CP. Copyright © 2017 IAP and EPC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Predictive values of BI-RADS® magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection of breast ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badan, Gustavo Machado; Piato, Sebastião; Roveda, Décio; Faria Castro Fleury, Eduardo de

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate BI-RADS indicators in the detection of DCIS by MRI. Materials and methods: Prospective observational study that started in 2014 and lasted 24 months. A total of 110 consecutive patients were evaluated, who presented with suspicious or highly suspicious microcalcifications on screening mammography (BI-RADS categories 4 and 5) and underwent stereotactic-guided breast biopsy, having had an MRI scan performed prior to biopsy. Results: Altogether, 38 cases were characterized as positive for malignancy, of which 25 were DCIS and 13 were invasive ductal carcinoma cases. MRI had a sensitivity of 96%; specificity of 75.67%; positive predictive value (PPV) for DCIS detection of 57.14%; negative predictive value (NPV) in the detection of DCIS of 98.24%; and an accuracy of 80.80%. Conclusion: BI-RADS as a tool for the detection of DCIS by MRI is a powerful instrument whose sensitivity was higher when compared to that observed for mammography in the literature. Likewise, the PPV obtained by MRI was higher than that observed in the present study for mammography, and the high NPV obtained on MRI scans can provide early evidence to discourage breast biopsy in selected cases.

  18. Parameterized hemodynamic response function data of healthy individuals obtained from resting-state functional MRI in a 7T MRI scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Rangaprakash

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, being an indirect measure of brain activity, is mathematically defined as a convolution of the unmeasured latent neural signal and the hemodynamic response function (HRF. The HRF is known to vary across the brain and across individuals, and it is modulated by neural as well as non-neural factors. Three parameters characterize the shape of the HRF, which is obtained by performing deconvolution on resting-state fMRI data: response height, time-to-peak and full-width at half-max. The data provided here, obtained from 47 healthy adults, contains these three HRF parameters at every voxel in the brain, as well as HRF parameters from the default-mode network (DMN. In addition, we have provided functional connectivity (FC data from the same DMN regions, obtained for two cases: data with deconvolution (HRF variability minimized and data with no deconvolution (HRF variability corrupted. This would enable researchers to compare regional changes in HRF with corresponding FC differences, to assess the impact of HRF variability on FC. Importantly, the data was obtained in a 7T MRI scanner. While most fMRI studies are conducted at lower field strengths, like 3T, ours is the first study to report HRF data obtained at 7T. FMRI data at ultra-high fields contains larger contributions from small vessels, consequently HRF variability is lower for small vessels at higher field strengths. This implies that findings made from this data would be more conservative than from data acquired at lower fields, such as 3T. Results obtained with this data and further interpretations are available in our recent research study (Rangaprakash et al., in press [1]. This is a valuable dataset for studying HRF variability in conjunction with FC, and for developing the HRF profile in healthy individuals, which would have direct implications for fMRI data analysis, especially resting-state connectivity modeling. This is the first public HRF

  19. Comparison of MRI and PET-CT in detecting the loco-regional recurrence of soft tissue sarcomas during surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sun-Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Department of Radiology, Anyang-si, Gyeonggi-do (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hye Won [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chae, Sun Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Seok [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, 88, Olympic-ro 43-gil, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the diagnostic performance of MRI and PET-CT for the detection of loco-regional recurrences after soft tissue sarcoma (STS) excision. From Dec 2003 to Aug 2014, 394 patients with STSs, who were included in the electronic patient registry for initial or repeated surgery at our hospital, were retrospectively reviewed. We identified 152 patients who underwent regular postoperative follow-ups with both MRI and PET-CT, obtained within a 3 month period of each other. We analyzed differences in the performance of MRI and PET-CT for the diagnosis of loco-regional recurrences using McNemar's test. The receiver-operating characteristic curves and calculations of the area under the curve were used. Twenty patients were found to have a loco-regional recurrence after tumor excision. For MRI and PET-CT, the sensitivities were 90.0 and 95.0 %, and the specificities 97.7 and 95.5 %, respectively, with positive predictive values of 85.7 and 76.0 % and negative predictive values of 98.5 and 99.2 %, respectively. No significant difference was detected between the sensitivities of MRI and PET-CT (p = 0.125). The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve for PET-CT (0.952) was not significantly greater than that for MRI (0.939; p = 0.6). MRI of the area of interest is recommended for evaluation of tumor recurrence after surgical excision of STS. PET-CT was shown to be effective for detection of STS recurrence, and comparable to MRI. However, if PET-CT or MRI findings are inconclusive, the other modality may be helpful in differentiating tumor recurrence from post-therapeutic tissue change. (orig.)

  20. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G. [University Hospital Basel, Institute of Radiology, Department of Neuroradiology, Basel (Switzerland); Luetschg, Juerg [University Children' s Hospital (UKBB), Basel (Switzerland)

    2008-05-15

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  1. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G.; Luetschg, Juerg

    2008-01-01

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network. (orig.)

  2. Functional MRI, DTI and neurophysiology in horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Wetzel, Stephan G; Lütschg, Jürg

    2008-05-01

    Horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS) is an autosomal recessive disease due to a mutation in the ROBO3 gene. This rare disease is of particular interest because the absence, or at least reduction, of crossing of the ascending lemniscal and descending corticospinal tracts in the medulla predicts abnormal ipsilateral sensory and motor systems. We evaluated the use of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for the first time in this disease and compared it to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography and neurophysiological findings in the same patient with genetically confirmed ROBO3 mutation. As expected, motor fMRI, somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP) and motor evoked potentials (MEP) were dominantly ipsilateral to the stimulation side. DTI tractography revealed ipsilateral ascending and descending connectivity in the brainstem yet normal interhemispheric connections in the corpus callosum. Auditory fMRI revealed bilateral auditory activation to monaural left-sided auditory stimulation. No significant cortical activation was observed after monaural right-sided stimulation, a hearing defect having been excluded. Prosaccades fMRI showed no activations in the eye-movement network. Motor fMRI confirmed the established findings of DTI and neurophysiology in the same patient. In suspected HGPPS, any technique appears appropriate for further investigation. Auditory fMRI suggests that a monaural auditory system with bilateral auditory activations might be a physiological advantage as compared to a binaural yet only unilateral auditory system, in analogy to anisometropic amblyopia. Moving-head fMRI studies in the future might show whether the compensatory head movements instead of normal eye movements activate the eye-movement network.

  3. Assessment of metastatic colorectal cancer with hybrid imaging: comparison of reading performance using different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT in a short case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brendle, C.; Schwenzer, N.F.; Rempp, H.; Schmidt, H.; Pfannenberg, C.; Nikolaou, K.; Schraml, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); La Fougere, C. [Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-01-15

    The purpose was to investigate the diagnostic performance of different combinations of anatomical and functional imaging techniques in PET/MRI and PET/CT for the evaluation of metastatic colorectal cancer lesions. Image data of 15 colorectal cancer patients (FDG-PET/CT and subsequent FDG-PET/MRI) were retrospectively evaluated by two readers in five reading sessions: MRI (morphology) alone, MRI/diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI), MRI/PET, MRI/DWI/PET; and PET/CT. Diagnostic performance of lesion detection with each combination was assessed in general and organ-based. The reference standard was given by histology and/or follow-up imaging. Separate analysis of mucinous tumours was performed. One hundred and eighty lesions (110 malignant) were evaluated (intestine n = 6, liver n = 37, lymph nodes n = 55, lung n = 4, and peritoneal n = 74). The overall lesion-based diagnostic accuracy was 0.46 for MRI, 0.47 for MRI/DWI, 0.57 for MRI/PET, 0.69 for MRI/DWI/PET and 0.66 for PET/CT. In the organ-based assessment, MRI/DWI/PET showed the highest accuracy for liver metastases (0.74), a comparable accuracy to PET/CT in peritoneal lesions (0.55), and in lymph node metastases (0.84). The accuracy in mucinous tumour lesions was limited in all modalities (MRI/DWI/PET = 0.52). PET/MRI including DWI is comparable to PET/CT in the evaluation of colorectal cancer metastases, with a markedly higher accuracy when using combined imaging data than the modalities separately. Further improvement is needed in the imaging of peritoneal carcinomatosis and mucinous tumours. (orig.)

  4. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Clinic of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Dromain, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Department of Radiology, Villejuif cedex (France); Diekmann, F. [St. Joseph-Stift Bremen, Department of Medical Imaging, Bremen (Germany); Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ingold-Heppner, B. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Institute of Pathology, Berlin (Germany); Winzer, K.J. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Breast Center, Department of Gynecology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  5. Contrast-enhanced spectral mammography versus MRI: Initial results in the detection of breast cancer and assessment of tumour size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallenberg, E.M.; Renz, D.M.; Dromain, C.; Diekmann, F.; Engelken, F.; Krohn, M.; Singh, J.M.; Bick, U.; Ingold-Heppner, B.; Winzer, K.J.

    2014-01-01

    To compare mammography (MG), contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the detection and size estimation of histologically proven breast cancers using postoperative histology as the gold standard. After ethical approval, 80 women with newly diagnosed breast cancer underwent MG, CESM, and MRI examinations. CESM was reviewed by an independent experienced radiologist, and the maximum dimension of suspicious lesions was measured. For MG and MRI, routine clinical reports of breast specialists, with judgment based on the BI-RADS lexicon, were used. Results of each imaging technique were correlated to define the index cancer. Fifty-nine cases could be compared to postoperative histology for size estimation. Breast cancer was visible in 66/80 MG, 80/80 CESM, and 77/79 MRI examinations. Average lesion largest dimension was 27.31 mm (SD 22.18) in MG, 31.62 mm (SD 24.41) in CESM, and 27.72 mm (SD 21.51) in MRI versus 32.51 mm (SD 29.03) in postoperative histology. No significant difference was found between lesion size measurement on MRI and CESM compared with histopathology. Our initial results show a better sensitivity of CESM and MRI in breast cancer detection than MG and a good correlation with postoperative histology in size assessment. (orig.)

  6. Pre-surgical evaluation of the cerebral tumor in the left language related areas by functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Zhitong; Ma Lin; Weng Xuchu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the application of combination of BOLD-fMRI and diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) in pre-operative evaluation of cerebral tumors located at the left language related areas. Methods: A non-vocal button pressing semantic judging paradigm was developed and validated in 10 right-handed volunteers at 3 T. After validation, this protocol combined with DTI were applied to 15 patients with left cerebral tumor prior to surgical resection, and 3 of them had aphasia. fMRI data analysis was on subject-specific basis by one-sampled t-test. The distance from the tumor to Broca area and pre-central 'hand-knot' area were measured separately. Functional language laterality index (LI) was calculated by taking out Broca area and Wernicke area. Three dimensional architecture of frontal lobe white matter fibers, especially arcuate fasciculus, were visualized using diffusion tensor tractography on Volume-one software. The images demonstrating relationship among tumor, language activation areas and white matter fibers were reviewed by neurosurgeons as part of pre-operative planning. One year after the operation, patients were followed up with MRI and language function test. Results: The non-vocal semantic judging paradigm successfully detect Broca area, Wernicke area and pre-central 'hand-knot' area. In 12 of 15 patients, the relationship of Broca area and pre-central motor area to the left brain tumor in language related areas was identified, which make the pre-operative neurosurgical plan applicable to minimize the disruption of language and motor. 8 patients had the left language dominant hemisphere, 3 patients with the right language dominant hemisphere and 1 patient with bilateral dominance. The other 3 patients' fMRI data were corrupted by patients' motion. Diffusion tensor images were corrupted by motion in 1 patient but demonstrated the impact of tumor on left accouter fasciculus in 14 patients. Diffusion tensor tractography showed disruption of left

  7. Introducing Alternative-Based Thresholding for Defining Functional Regions of Interest in fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper Degryse

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In fMRI research, one often aims to examine activation in specific functional regions of interest (fROIs. Current statistical methods tend to localize fROIs inconsistently, focusing on avoiding detection of false activation. Not missing true activation is however equally important in this context. In this study, we explored the potential of an alternative-based thresholding (ABT procedure, where evidence against the null hypothesis of no effect and evidence against a prespecified alternative hypothesis is measured to control both false positives and false negatives directly. The procedure was validated in the context of localizer tasks on simulated brain images and using a real data set of 100 runs per subject. Voxels categorized as active with ABT can be confidently included in the definition of the fROI, while inactive voxels can be confidently excluded. Additionally, the ABT method complements classic null hypothesis significance testing with valuable information by making a distinction between voxels that show evidence against both the null and alternative and voxels for which the alternative hypothesis cannot be rejected despite lack of evidence against the null.

  8. Atlas of regional anatomy of the brain using MRI. With functional correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamraz, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    The volume provides a unique review of the essential topographical anatomy of the brain from an MRI perspective, correlating high-quality anatomical plates with the corresponding high-resolution MRI images. The book includes a historical review of brain mapping and an analysis of the essential reference planes used for the study of the human brain. Subsequent chapters provide a detailed review of the sulcal and the gyral anatomy of the human cortex, guiding the reader through an interpretation of the individual brain atlas provided by high-resolution MRI. The relationship between brain structure and function is approached in a topographical fashion with analysis of the necessary imaging methodology and displayed anatomy. The central, perisylvian, mesial temporal and occipital areas receive special attention. Imaging of the core brain structures is included. An extensive coronal atlas concludes the book. (orig.)

  9. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S. [Dept. of Neurology D4, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N. [Dept. of Radiology, Osaka Univ. Graduate School of Medicine, Suita City, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  10. A functional MRI study of somatotopic representation of somatosensory stimulation in the cerebellum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, M.; Abe, K.; Yanagihara, T.; Sakoda, S.; Tanaka, H.; Hirabuki, N.; Nakamura, H.; Fujita, N.

    2003-01-01

    Somatotopic representation in the cerebral cortex of somatosensory stimulation has been widely reported, but that in the cerebellum has not. We investigated the latter in the human cerebellum by functional MRI (fMRI). Using a 1.5 tesla imager, we obtained multislice blood oxygen level-dependent fMRI with single-shot gradient-echo echoplanar imaging in seven right-handed volunteers during electrical stimulation of the left index finger and big toe. In the anterior and posterior cerebellum, activated pixels for the index finger were separate from those for the toe. This suggests that somatosensory stimulation of different parts of the body may involve distinct areas of in the cerebellum as well as the cerebral cortex. (orig.)

  11. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of motor deficits in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wenz, F.; Floemer, F.; Kaick, G. van

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences in the cerebral activation pattern in ten schizophrenic patients and ten healthy volunteers using functional MRI. fMRI was performed using a modified FLASH sequence (TR/TE/α=100/60/40 ) and a conventional 1.5 T MR scanner. Colorcoded statistical parametric maps based on Student's t-test were calculated. Activation strength was quantified using a 5x6 grid overlay. The volunteers showed a higher activation strength during left hand movement compared to right hand movement. This lateralization effect was reversed in patients who showed overall reduced activation strength. Disturbed interhemispheric balance in schizophrenic patients during motor task performance can be demonstrated using fMRI. (orig.) [de

  12. Functional and molecular imaging with MRI: potential applications in paediatric radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthurs, Owen J.; Gallagher, Ferdia A.

    2011-01-01

    MRI is a very versatile tool for noninvasive imaging and it is particularly attractive as an imaging technique in paediatric patients given the absence of ionizing radiation. Recent advances in the field of MRI have enabled tissue function to be probed noninvasively, and increasingly MRI is being used to assess cellular and molecular processes. For example, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI has been used to assess tissue vascularity, diffusion-weighted imaging can quantify molecular movements of water in tissue compartments and MR spectroscopy provides a quantitative assessment of metabolite levels. A number of targeted contrast agents have been developed that bind specifically to receptors on the vascular endothelium or cell surface and there are several MR methods for labelling cells and tracking cellular movements. Hyperpolarization techniques have the capability of massively increasing the sensitivity of MRI and these have been used to image tissue pH, successful response to drug treatment as well as imaging the microstructure of the lungs. Although there are many challenges to be overcome before these techniques can be translated into routine paediatric imaging, they could potentially be used to aid diagnosis, predict disease outcome, target biopsies and determine treatment response noninvasively. (orig.)

  13. Usefulness and limitation of functional MRI with echo planar imaging using clinical MR apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusunoki, Katsusuke; Zenke, Kiichiro; Saito, Masahiro; Sadamoto, Kazuhiko; Ohue, Shiro; Sakaki, Saburo; Kumon, Yoshiaki; Kabasawa, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Kiyoshi

    1998-01-01

    We studied blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) with EPI sequence in 21 normal volunteers and 8 presurgical clinical patients using a 1.5 T clinical MRI apparatus. To optimize the imaging parameters, we compared the fMRI images obtained by GFE-EPI and by SE-EPI in normal volunteers while each squeezed a sponge ball. We identified the motor cortex in 85.7% of normal volunteers by GFE-EPI in contrast to only 28.6% by SE-EPI. In addition, our clinical MR apparatus, using optimized parameters, maximally provides 15 slices per 5 seconds. In patients with brain tumor close to the sensorimotor cortex, we attempted to identify the motor cortex preoperatively by this procedure and found a significant increase of signal intensity in the motor cortex in 5 of 8 patients. In conclusion, fMRI using EPI may be useful for identifying the motor cortex preoperatively. However, further development of the apparatus is needed to obtain better temporal and spatial resolution for clinical applications. (author)

  14. Functional brain activation differences in stuttering identified with a rapid fMRI sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Shelly Jo; Choo, Ai Leen; Sharma, Harish; Ambrose, Nicoline G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether brain activity related to the presence of stuttering can be identified with rapid functional MRI (fMRI) sequences that involved overt and covert speech processing tasks. The long-term goal is to develop sensitive fMRI approaches with developmentally appropriate tasks to identify deviant speech motor and auditory brain activity in children who stutter closer to the age at which recovery from stuttering is documented. Rapid sequences may be preferred for individuals or populations who do not tolerate long scanning sessions. In this report, we document the application of a picture naming and phoneme monitoring task in three minute fMRI sequences with adults who stutter (AWS). If relevant brain differences are found in AWS with these approaches that conform to previous reports, then these approaches can be extended to younger populations. Pairwise contrasts of brain BOLD activity between AWS and normally fluent adults indicated the AWS showed higher BOLD activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), right temporal lobe and sensorimotor cortices during picture naming and and higher activity in the right IFG during phoneme monitoring. The right lateralized pattern of BOLD activity together with higher activity in sensorimotor cortices is consistent with previous reports, which indicates rapid fMRI sequences can be considered for investigating stuttering in younger participants. PMID:22133409

  15. Development of visual cortical function in infant macaques: A BOLD fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J Van Grootel

    Full Text Available Functional brain development is not well understood. In the visual system, neurophysiological studies in nonhuman primates show quite mature neuronal properties near birth although visual function is itself quite immature and continues to develop over many months or years after birth. Our goal was to assess the relative development of two main visual processing streams, dorsal and ventral, using BOLD fMRI in an attempt to understand the global mechanisms that support the maturation of visual behavior. Seven infant macaque monkeys (Macaca mulatta were repeatedly scanned, while anesthetized, over an age range of 102 to 1431 days. Large rotating checkerboard stimuli induced BOLD activation in visual cortices at early ages. Additionally we used static and dynamic Glass pattern stimuli to probe BOLD responses in primary visual cortex and two extrastriate areas: V4 and MT-V5. The resulting activations were analyzed with standard GLM and multivoxel pattern analysis (MVPA approaches. We analyzed three contrasts: Glass pattern present/absent, static/dynamic Glass pattern presentation, and structured/random Glass pattern form. For both GLM and MVPA approaches, robust coherent BOLD activation appeared relatively late in comparison to the maturation of known neuronal properties and the development of behavioral sensitivity to Glass patterns. Robust differential activity to Glass pattern present/absent and dynamic/static stimulus presentation appeared first in V1, followed by V4 and MT-V5 at older ages; there was no reliable distinction between the two extrastriate areas. A similar pattern of results was obtained with the two analysis methods, although MVPA analysis showed reliable differential responses emerging at later ages than GLM. Although BOLD responses to large visual stimuli are detectable, our results with more refined stimuli indicate that global BOLD activity changes as behavioral performance matures. This reflects an hierarchical development of

  16. Preoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartwigsen, G.; Siebner, Hartwig R.; Stippich, C.

    2010-01-01

    Neurosurgical resection of brain lesions aims to maximize excision while minimizing the risk of permanent injury to the surrounding intact brain tissue and resulting neurological deficits. While direct electrical cortical stimulation at the time of surgery allows the precise identification...... of essential cortex, it cannot provide information preoperatively for surgical planning.Brain imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), magnetoencephalography (MEG) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) are increasingly being used to localize functionally critical cortical......, if the stimulated cortex makes a critical contribution to the brain functions subserving the task. While the relationship between task and functional activation as revealed by fMRI is correlative in nature, the neurodisruptive effect of TMS reflects a causal effect on brain activity.The use of preoperative f...

  17. Functional MRI in pre-surgical planning: Case study and cautionary notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce S Spottiswoode

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Since its inception almost 20 years ago, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI has greatly advanced our knowledge of human brain function. Although the clinical applications of fMRI are still limited, there have recently been encouraging advances for its use in pre-operative functional cortical mapping to identify potentially eloquent areas prior to neurosurgery. Objectives. We explore the potential use of this emerging technique by presenting a neurosurgical case study, as performed at the Cape Universities Brain Imaging Centre (CUBIC, Tygerberg, Cape Town. We conclude with a brief summary of the potential pitfalls of this technique, as well as cautionary guidelines based on our experience. Methods and results. A 22-year-old male patient from Tygerberg Hospital underwent the successful resection of an anaplastic astrocytoma after fMRI presurgical planning at our facility. The subject was able to leave the ward unassisted. Conclusion. If consideration is given to the many limitations of this emerging technique, fMRI can be useful in aiding the neurosurgeon in pre-operative planning of his surgical approach.

  18. Whole brain functional connectivity in clinically isolated syndrome without conventional brain MRI lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yaou; Dai, Zhengjia; Duan, Yunyun; Huang, Jing; Ren, Zhuoqiong; Li, Kuncheng; Liu, Zheng; Dong, Huiqing; Shu, Ni; He, Yong; Vrenken, Hugo; Wattjes, Mike P.; Barkhof, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    To investigate brain functional connectivity (FC) alterations in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) presenting without conventional brain MRI lesions, and to identify the FC differences between the CIS patients who converted to multiple sclerosis (MS) and those not converted during a 5-year follow-up. We recruited 20 CIS patients without conventional brain lesions, 28 patients with MS and 28 healthy controls (HC). Normalized voxel-based functional connectivity strength (nFCS) was determined using resting-state fMRI (R-fMRI) and compared among groups. Furthermore, 5-years clinical follow-up of the CIS patients was performed to examine the differences in nFCS between converters and non-converters. Compared to HC, CIS patients showed significantly decreased nFCS in the visual areas and increased nFCS in several brain regions predominately in the temporal lobes. MS patients revealed more widespread higher nFCS especially in deep grey matter (DGM), compared to CIS and HC. In the four CIS patients converting to MS, significantly higher nFCS was found in right anterior cingulate gyrus (ACC) and fusiform gyrus (FG), compared to non-converted patients. We demonstrated both functional impairment and compensation in CIS by R-fMRI. nFCS alteration in ACC and FG seems to occur in CIS patients at risk of developing MS. (orig.)

  19. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Kumaran, S Senthil; Chandra, Sarat P; Wadhawan, Ashima Nehra; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery). In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and superior temporal gyrus (STG), during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease

  20. BOLDSync: a MATLAB-based toolbox for synchronized stimulus presentation in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Jitesh; Saharan, Sumiti; Mandal, Pravat K

    2014-02-15

    Precise and synchronized presentation of paradigm stimuli in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is central to obtaining accurate information about brain regions involved in a specific task. In this manuscript, we present a new MATLAB-based toolbox, BOLDSync, for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI. BOLDSync provides a user friendly platform for design and presentation of visual, audio, as well as multimodal audio-visual (AV) stimuli in functional imaging experiments. We present simulation experiments that demonstrate the millisecond synchronization accuracy of BOLDSync, and also illustrate the functionalities of BOLDSync through application to an AV fMRI study. BOLDSync gains an advantage over other available proprietary and open-source toolboxes by offering a user friendly and accessible interface that affords both precision in stimulus presentation and versatility across various types of stimulus designs and system setups. BOLDSync is a reliable, efficient, and versatile solution for synchronized stimulus presentation in fMRI study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. Purpose: fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. Materials and Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery. Results: In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, middle frontal gyrus (MFG, and superior temporal gyrus (STG, during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Conclusion: Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease.

  2. Time-delayed contrast-enhanced MRI improves detection of brain metastases and apparent treatment volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushnirsky, Marina; Nguyen, Vinh; Katz, Joel S; Steinklein, Jared; Rosen, Lisa; Warshall, Craig; Schulder, Michael; Knisely, Jonathan P S

    2016-02-01

    Contrast-enhanced MRI is the preeminent diagnostic test for brain metastasis (BM). Detection of BMs for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) planning may improve with a time delay following administration of a high-relaxivity agent for 1.5-T and 3-T imaging systems. Metastasis detection with time-delayed MRI was evaluated in this study. Fifty-three volumetric MRI studies from 38 patients undergoing SRS for BMs were evaluated. All studies used 0.1-mmol/kg gadobenate dimeglumine (MultiHance; Bracco Diagnostics) immediately after injection, followed by 2 more axial T1-weighted sequences after 5-minute intervals (final image acquisition commenced 15 minutes after contrast injection). Two studies were motion limited and excluded. Two hundred eighty-seven BMs were identified. The studies were randomized and examined separately by 3 radiologists, who were blinded to the temporal sequence. Each radiologist recorded the number of BMs detected per scan. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test compared BM numbers between scans. One radiologist determined the scan on which BMs were best defined. All confirmed, visible tumors were contoured using iPlan RT treatment planning software on each of the 3 MRI data sets. A linear mixed model was used to analyze volume changes. The interclass correlations for Scans 1, 2, and 3 were 0.7392, 0.7951, and 0.7290, respectively, demonstrating excellent interrater reliability. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the second scan as compared with the first in 35.3% of subjects (95% CI 22.4%-49.9%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 1 and 2 ranged from 1 to 10. At least 1 new lesion was detected in the third scan as compared with the second in 21.6% of subjects (95% CI 11.3%-35.3%). The increase in BM numbers between Scans 2 and 3 ranged from 1 to 9. Between Scans 1 and 3, additional tumors were seen on 43.1% of scans (increase ranged from 1 to 14). The median increase in tumor number for all comparisons was 1. There was a significant increase in number

  3. Intraoperative detection of glioma invasion beyond MRI enhancement with Raman spectroscopy in humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jermyn, Michael; Mok, Kelvin; Mercier, Jeanne; Desroches, Joannie; Pichette, Julien; Saint-Arnaud, Karl; Guiot, Marie-Christine; Petrecca, Kevin; Leblond, Frédéric

    2015-03-01

    Cancer tissue is frequently impossible to distinguish from normal brain during surgery. Gliomas are a class of brain cancer which invade into the normal brain. If left unresected, these invasive cancer cells are the source of glioma recurrence. Moreover, these invasion areas do not show up on standard-of-care pre-operative Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). This inability to fully visualize invasive brain cancers results in subtotal surgical resections, negatively impacting patient survival. To address this issue, we have demonstrated the efficacy of single-point in vivo Raman spectroscopy using a contact hand-held fiber optic probe for rapid detection of cancer invasion in 8 patients with low and high grade gliomas. Using a supervised machine learning algorithm to analyze the Raman spectra obtained in vivo, we were able to distinguish normal brain from the presence of cancer cells with sensitivity and specificity greater than 90%. Moreover, by correlating these results with pre-operative MRI we demonstrate the ability to detect low density cancer invasion up to 1.5cm beyond the cancer extent visible using MRI. This represents the potential for significant improvements in progression-free and overall patient survival, by identifying previously undetectable residual cancer cell populations and preventing the resection of normal brain tissue. While the importance of maximizing the volume of tumor resection is important for all grades of gliomas, the impact for low grade gliomas can be dramatic because surgery can even be curative. This convenient technology can rapidly classify cancer invasion in real-time, making it ideal for intraoperative use in brain tumor resection.

  4. Unsupervised classification of major depression using functional connectivity MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-Li; Shen, Hui; Liu, Li; Hu, Dewen

    2014-04-01

    The current diagnosis of psychiatric disorders including major depressive disorder based largely on self-reported symptoms and clinical signs may be prone to patients' behaviors and psychiatrists' bias. This study aims at developing an unsupervised machine learning approach for the accurate identification of major depression based on single resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans in the absence of clinical information. Twenty-four medication-naive patients with major depression and 29 demographically similar healthy individuals underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. We first clustered the voxels within the perigenual cingulate cortex into two subregions, a subgenual region and a pregenual region, according to their distinct resting-state functional connectivity patterns and showed that a maximum margin clustering-based unsupervised machine learning approach extracted sufficient information from the subgenual cingulate functional connectivity map to differentiate depressed patients from healthy controls with a group-level clustering consistency of 92.5% and an individual-level classification consistency of 92.5%. It was also revealed that the subgenual cingulate functional connectivity network with the highest discriminative power primarily included the ventrolateral and ventromedial prefrontal cortex, superior temporal gyri and limbic areas, indicating that these connections may play critical roles in the pathophysiology of major depression. The current study suggests that subgenual cingulate functional connectivity network signatures may provide promising objective biomarkers for the diagnosis of major depression and that maximum margin clustering-based unsupervised machine learning approaches may have the potential to inform clinical practice and aid in research on psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Quantitative estimation of brain atrophy and function with PET and MRI two-dimensional projection images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Reiko; Uemura, Koji; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Toyama, Hinako; Ishii, Kenji; Senda, Michio

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to estimate the extent of atrophy and the decline in brain function objectively and quantitatively. Two-dimensional (2D) projection images of three-dimensional (3D) transaxial images of positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were made by means of the Mollweide method which keeps the area of the brain surface. A correlation image was generated between 2D projection images of MRI and cerebral blood flow (CBF) or 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET images and the sulcus was extracted from the correlation image clustered by K-means method. Furthermore, the extent of atrophy was evaluated from the extracted sulcus on 2D-projection MRI and the cerebral cortical function such as blood flow or glucose metabolic rate was assessed in the cortex excluding sulcus on 2D-projection PET image, and then the relationship between the cerebral atrophy and function was evaluated. This method was applied to the two groups, the young and the aged normal subjects, and the relationship between the age and the rate of atrophy or the cerebral blood flow was investigated. This method was also applied to FDG-PET and MRI studies in the normal controls and in patients with corticobasal degeneration. The mean rate of atrophy in the aged group was found to be higher than that in the young. The mean value and the variance of the cerebral blood flow for the young are greater than those of the aged. The sulci were similarly extracted using either CBF or FDG PET images. The purposed method using 2-D projection images of MRI and PET is clinically useful for quantitative assessment of atrophic change and functional disorder of cerebral cortex. (author)

  6. Functional MRI studies in human Ecstasy and cannabis users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, G.

    2006-01-01

    Cannabis and ecstasy are among the most widely used illicit drugs in the world. However, there are substantial concerns about their neurotoxic potential for brain and brain function. Despite previous research, some crucial questions regarding the causality, course and clinical relevance have

  7. Functional MRI of food-induced brain responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, P.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ultimate goal of this research was to find central biomarkers of satiety, i.e., physiological measures in the brain that relate to subjectively rated appetite, actual food intake, or both. This thesis describes the changes in brain activity in response to food stimuli as measured by functional

  8. Early detection of osteoarthritis in rabbits using MRI with a double-contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Okihiro; Ikoma, Kazuya; Kido, Masamitsu; Kabuto, Yukichi; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Matsuda, Ken-Ichi; Tanaka, Masaki; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2018-03-13

    of the knees in a rabbit OA model and a control model using a new double-contrast agent. MRI with this agent enabled OA detection earlier than using conventional MRI.

  9. Synthesis of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as liver targeting MRI contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yazdani, Farshad; Fattahi, Bahare; Azizi, Najmodin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was the preparation of functionalized magnetite nanoparticles to use as a liver targeting contrast agent in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For this purpose, Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles were synthesized via the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles were coated with silica via the Stober method and finally the coated nanoparticles were functionalized with mebrofenin. Formation of crystalline magnetite particles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDX) of the final product showed that silica had been effectively bonded onto the surface of the magnetite nanoparticles and the coated nanoparticles functionalized with mebrofenin. The magnetic resonance imaging of the functional nanoparticles showed that the Fe_3O_4–SiO_2-mebrofenin composite is an effective MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by simple and economical method. • Preperation of functional MNPs as a MRI contrast agent for liver targeting. • Gaining a good r_2 relaxivity of the coated functional nanoparticles.

  10. ICN_Atlas: Automated description and quantification of functional MRI activation patterns in the framework of intrinsic connectivity networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozák, Lajos R; van Graan, Louis André; Chaudhary, Umair J; Szabó, Ádám György; Lemieux, Louis

    2017-12-01

    Generally, the interpretation of functional MRI (fMRI) activation maps continues to rely on assessing their relationship to anatomical structures, mostly in a qualitative and often subjective way. Recently, the existence of persistent and stable brain networks of functional nature has been revealed; in particular these so-called intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) appear to link patterns of resting state and task-related state connectivity. These networks provide an opportunity of functionally-derived description and interpretation of fMRI maps, that may be especially important in cases where the maps are predominantly task-unrelated, such as studies of spontaneous brain activity e.g. in the case of seizure-related fMRI maps in epilepsy patients or sleep states. Here we present a new toolbox (ICN_Atlas) aimed at facilitating the interpretation of fMRI data in the context of ICN. More specifically, the new methodology was designed to describe fMRI maps in function-oriented, objective and quantitative way using a set of 15 metrics conceived to quantify the degree of 'engagement' of ICNs for any given fMRI-derived statistical map of interest. We demonstrate that the proposed framework provides a highly reliable quantification of fMRI activation maps using a publicly available longitudinal (test-retest) resting-state fMRI dataset. The utility of the ICN_Atlas is also illustrated on a parametric task-modulation fMRI dataset, and on a dataset of a patient who had repeated seizures during resting-state fMRI, confirmed on simultaneously recorded EEG. The proposed ICN_Atlas toolbox is freely available for download at http://icnatlas.com and at http://www.nitrc.org for researchers to use in their fMRI investigations. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Improved detection of localized prostate cancer using co-registered MRI and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, Ivan, E-mail: ivjamb@utu.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); 2nd Department of Radiology, Comenius University and St. Elisabeth Oncology Institute, Bratislava (Slovakia); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Borra, Ronald, E-mail: ronald.borra@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Kemppainen, Jukka, E-mail: Jukka.Kemppainen@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Department of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Lepomaeki, Virva, E-mail: Virva.Lepomaki@tyks.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Parkkola, Riitta, E-mail: Riitta.Parkkola@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Dean, Kirsti, E-mail: Kirsti.Dean@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Alanen, Kalle, E-mail: Kalle.Alanen@tyks.fi [Department of Pathology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Arponen, Eveliina, E-mail: Eveliina.Arponen@utu.fi [Turku PET Centre, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Nurmi, Martti, E-mail: Martti.Nurmi@tyks.fi [Department of Surgery, Division of Urology, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); Aronen, Hannu J., E-mail: Hannu.Aronen@tyks.fi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Turku, Turku (Finland); Medical Imaging Centre of Southwest Finland, Turku University Hospital, Turku (Finland); and others

    2012-11-15

    Objectives: We aimed to study the ability of contrast enhanced MRI at 1.5 T and {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT, both individually and using fused data, to detect localized prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six men with untreated prostate cancer and negative for metastatic disease on pelvic CT and bone scan were prospectively enrolled. A pelvic {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT scan was performed in all patients, and a contrast enhanced MRI scan in 33 patients (6 examinations using both endorectal coil and surface coils, and 27 examinations using surface coils only). After the imaging studies 10 patients underwent prostatectomy and 26 were treated by image guided external beam radiation treatment. Image fusion of co-registered PET and MRI data was performed based on anatomical landmarks visible on CT and MRI using an advanced in-house developed software package. PET/CT, MRI and fused PET/MRI data were evaluated visually and compared with biopsy findings on a lobar level, while a sextant approach was used for patients undergoing prostatectomy. Results: When using biopsy samples as method of reference, the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for visual detection of prostate cancer on a lobar level by contrast enhanced MRI was 85%, 37%, 73% and that of {sup 11}C-acetate PET/CT 88%, 41%, 74%, respectively. Fusion of PET with MRI data increased sensitivity, specificity and accuracy to 90%, 72% and 85%, respectively. Conclusions: Fusion of sequentially obtained PET/CT and MRI data for the localization of prostate cancer is feasible and superior to the performance of each individual modality alone.

  12. Functional brain imaging in irritable bowel syndrome with rectal balloon-distention by using fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yao-Zong; Tao, Ran-Jun; Xu, Bin; Sun, Jing; Chen, Ke-Min; Miao, Fei; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Xu, Jia-Yu

    2003-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is characterized by abdominal pain and changes in stool habits. Visceral hypersensitivity is a key factor in the pathophysiology of IBS. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of rectal balloon-distention stimulus by blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (BOLD-fMRI) in visceral pain center and to compare the distribution, extent, and intensity of activated areas between IBS patients and normal controls. Twenty-six patients with IBS and eleven normal controls were tested for rectal sensation, and the subjective pain intensity at 90 ml and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention was reported by using Visual Analogue Scale. Then, BOLD-fMRI was performed at 30 ml, 60 ml, 90 ml, and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention in all subjects. Rectal distention stimulation increased the activity of anterior cingulate cortex (35/37), insular cortex (37/37), prefrontal cortex (37/37), and thalamus (35/37) in most cases. At 120 ml of rectal balloon-distention, the activation area and percentage change in MR signal intensity of the regions of interest (ROI) at IC, PFC, and THAL were significantly greater in patients with IBS than that in controls. Score of pain sensation at 90 ml and 120 ml rectal balloon-distention was significantly higher in patients with IBS than that in controls. Using fMRI, some patients with IBS can be detected having visceral hypersensitivity in response to painful rectal balloon-distention. fMRI is an objective brain imaging technique to measure the change in regional cerebral activation more precisely. In this study, IC and PFC of the IBS patients were the major loci of the CNS processing of visceral perception.

  13. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alamo, Leonor, E-mail: leonor.alamo@chuv.ch [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bongartz, Georg [Universitätsspital Basel (Switzerland); Terraz, Sylvain [Hôpitaux Universitaires Genève (Switzerland); Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2013-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r{sup 2} = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r{sup 2} = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience.

  14. Detection of suspected placental invasion by MRI: Do the results depend on observer’ experience?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamo, Leonor; Anaye, Anass; Rey, Jannick; Denys, Alban; Bongartz, Georg; Terraz, Sylvain; Artemisia, Simona; Meuli, Reto; Schmidt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the diagnostic value of previously described MR features used for detecting suspected placental invasion according to observers’ experience. Materials and methods: Our population included 25 pregnant women (mean age 35.16) investigated by prenatal MRI (1.5 T, T1- and T2-weighted MR-sequences without i.v. contrast), among them 12 with histopathologically proven placental invasion and 13 women (52%) without placental invasion used as control group. Two senior and two junior radiologists blindly and independently reviewed MR-examinations in view of 6 previously defined MR-features indicating presence and degree of placental invasion (placenta increta, accreta or percreta). For each reader the sensibility, specificity, and receiver operating curve (ROC) were calculated. Interobserver agreements between senior and junior readers were determined. Stepwise logistic regression was performed including the 6 MR-features predictive of placental invasion. Results: Demographics between both groups were statistically equivalent. Overall sensitivity and specificity for placental invasion was 90.9% and 75.0% for seniors and 81.8% and 61.8% for juniors, respectively. The best single MR-feature indicating placental invasion was T2-hypointense placental bands (r 2 = 0.28), followed by focally interrupted myometrial border, infiltration of pelvic organs and tenting of the bladder (r 2 = 0.36). Interobserver agreement for detecting placental invasion was 0.64 for seniors and 0.41 for juniors, thus substantial and moderate, respectively. Seniors detected placental invasion and depth of infiltration with significantly higher diagnostic certitude than juniors (p = 0.0002 and p = 0.0282, respectively). Conclusion: MRI can be a reliable and reproducible tool for the detection of suspected placental invasion, but the diagnostic value significantly depends on observers’ experience

  15. Assessment of pulmonary structure-function relationships in young children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis by multivolume proton-MRI and CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennati, Francesca; Roach, David J; Clancy, John P; Brody, Alan S; Fleck, Robert J; Aliverti, Andrea; Woods, Jason C

    2018-02-19

    Lung disease is the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and there is a shortage of sensitive biomarkers able to regionally monitor disease progression and to assess early responses to therapy. To determine the feasibility of noncontrast-enhanced multivolume MRI, which assesses intensity changes between expiratory and inspiratory breath-hold images, to detect and quantify regional ventilation abnormalities in CF lung disease, with a focus on the structure-function relationship. Retrospective. Twenty-nine subjects, including healthy young children (n = 9, 7-37 months), healthy adolescents (n = 4, 14-22 years), young children with CF lung disease (n = 10, 7-47 months), and adolescents with CF lung disease (n = 6, 8-18 years) were studied. 3D spoiled gradient-recalled sequence at 1.5T. Subjects were scanned during breath-hold at functional residual capacity (FRC) and total lung capacity (TLC) through noncontrast-enhanced MRI and CT. Expiratory-inspiratory differences in MR signal-intensity (Δ 1 H-MRI) and CT-density (ΔHU) were computed to estimate regional ventilation. MR and CT images were also evaluated using a CF-specific scoring system. Quadratic regression, Spearman's correlation, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Δ 1 H-MRI maps were sensitive to ventilation heterogeneity related to gravity dependence in healthy lung and to ventilation impairment in CF lung disease. A high correlation was found between MRI and CT ventilation maps (R 2  = 0.79, P < 0.001). Globally, Δ 1 H-MRI and ΔHU decrease with increasing morphological score (respectively, R 2  = 0.56, P < 0.001 and R 2  = 0.31, P < 0.001). Locally, Δ 1 H-MRI was higher in healthy regions (median 15%) compared to regions with bronchiectasis, air trapping, consolidation, and to segments fed by airways with bronchial wall thickening (P < 0.001). Multivolume noncontrast-enhanced MRI, as a nonionizing imaging

  16. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Wang

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain’s spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain’s intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  17. Graph-based network analysis of resting-state functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhui; Zuo, Xinian; He, Yong

    2010-01-01

    In the past decade, resting-state functional MRI (R-fMRI) measures of brain activity have attracted considerable attention. Based on changes in the blood oxygen level-dependent signal, R-fMRI offers a novel way to assess the brain's spontaneous or intrinsic (i.e., task-free) activity with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. The properties of both the intra- and inter-regional connectivity of resting-state brain activity have been well documented, promoting our understanding of the brain as a complex network. Specifically, the topological organization of brain networks has been recently studied with graph theory. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in graph-based brain network analyses of R-fMRI signals, both in typical and atypical populations. Application of these approaches to R-fMRI data has demonstrated non-trivial topological properties of functional networks in the human brain. Among these is the knowledge that the brain's intrinsic activity is organized as a small-world, highly efficient network, with significant modularity and highly connected hub regions. These network properties have also been found to change throughout normal development, aging, and in various pathological conditions. The literature reviewed here suggests that graph-based network analyses are capable of uncovering system-level changes associated with different processes in the resting brain, which could provide novel insights into the understanding of the underlying physiological mechanisms of brain function. We also highlight several potential research topics in the future.

  18. Community structure in networks of functional connectivity: resolving functional organization in the rat brain with pharmacological MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Adam J; Gozzi, Alessandro; Bifone, Angelo

    2009-08-01

    In the study of functional connectivity, fMRI data can be represented mathematically as a network of nodes and links, where image voxels represent the nodes and the connections between them reflect a degree of correlation or similarity in their response. Here we show that, within this framework, functional imaging data can be partitioned into 'communities' of tightly interconnected voxels corresponding to maximum modularity within the overall network. We evaluated this approach systematically in application to networks constructed from pharmacological MRI (phMRI) of the rat brain in response to acute challenge with three different compounds with distinct mechanisms of action (d-amphetamine, fluoxetine, and nicotine) as well as vehicle (physiological saline). This approach resulted in bilaterally symmetric sub-networks corresponding to meaningful anatomical and functional connectivity pathways consistent with the purported mechanism of action of each drug. Interestingly, common features across all three networks revealed two groups of tightly coupled brain structures that responded as functional units independent of the specific neurotransmitter systems stimulated by the drug challenge, including a network involving the prefrontal cortex and sub-cortical regions extending from the striatum to the amygdala. This finding suggests that each of these networks includes general underlying features of the functional organization of the rat brain.

  19. Value of FDG-PET vs MRI/CT in detection and staging of early uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kluge, P.; Kratzsch, A.; Horn, L.; Schmidt, F.; Einkel, J.; Sabri, O.

    2003-01-01

    This prospective study was performed to define the efficiency of FDG-PET in detecting primaries and in preoperatively assessing lymph node metastases of cervical cancer. Forty one patients with cervical cancer were investigated with PET (370 MBq F-18-FDG, Siemens ECAT EXACT HR+, visual evaluation) and MRI prior radical hysterectomy with pelvic, and additionally 12 cases paraortal, lymphadenectomies. Histopathological evaluation verified in all cases the evidence of cervical cancer except in one case, where the tumor was completely removed by conisation procedure. Sensitivity of PET and MRI were 95% and 85%, respectively. In 16/82 pelvic lymph node sites metastases were histologically detected (7 x micrometastases). Sensitivity, specificity, positive positive and negative predictive value were 50%, 85%, 44% and 88% for PET and 31%, 90%, 40% and 86% for MRI. Out of the 12 cases with dissection of paraortal lymph nodes, metastases were found histologically in 3 cases. PET detected 2/3 truly with no false positive result while CT detected 0/3 cases with no false positive findings. It is concluded that PET can detect cervical cancer with high accuracy. The accuracy of PET and MRI was similar for detection of pelvic metastases. Both methods have limited sensitivity due to the high incidence of micrometastases. PET was more accurate than CT in detection of paraortal metastases

  20. Preliminary study on the mechanism of reading recovery in a pure alexia by using functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Lin; Li Dejun; Weng Xuchu; Tang Yiyuan; Zhang Wutian; Sun Weijian; Feng Shiwen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To observe the changes of the brain function during reading recovery by using functional MRI (fMRI), and to provide the experimental data in elucidating the mechanism on the recovery of reading and language function. Methods: fMRI was performed in a native Chinese patient with pure alexia on the 45 th and 130 th day after the onset, respectively. Three kinds of Chinese characters were presented during the scan and the patient was asked to make the judgement weather he could recognize the characters or not. The brain activation maps were acquired after postprocessing, and the activated location and volume were compared between the first and second experiments. Results: In both experiments, Broca area, Wernicke area, and the right extrastriate were significantly activated, while the left extrastriate around the lesion was markedly activated only in the second experiment, and the volume of activation in the right extrastriate in the second experiment was about 3 times as large as that in the first experiment. Conclusion: The left extrastriate cortex is one of the key areas responsible for reading function in the brain. The recovery of reading function can be compensated in contralateral corresponding cortical area, or it can be the result of reorganization in ipsilateral peri-lesion cortex. Both mechanisms may simultaneously play important roles in reading recovery

  1. Differentiating between bipolar and unipolar depression in functional and structural MRI studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kyu-Man; De Berardis, Domenico; Fornaro, Michele; Kim, Yong-Ku

    2018-03-28

    Distinguishing depression in bipolar disorder (BD) from unipolar depression (UD) solely based on clinical clues is difficult, which has led to the exploration of promising neural markers in neuroimaging measures for discriminating between BD depression and UD. In this article, we review structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies that directly compare UD and BD depression based on neuroimaging modalities including functional MRI studies on regional brain activation or functional connectivity, structural MRI on gray or white matter morphology, and pattern classification analyses using a machine learning approach. Numerous studies have reported distinct functional and structural alterations in emotion- or reward-processing neural circuits between BD depression and UD. Different activation patterns in neural networks including the amygdala, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), prefrontal cortex (PFC), and striatum during emotion-, reward-, or cognition-related tasks have been reported between BD and UD. A stronger functional connectivity pattern in BD was pronounced in default mode and in frontoparietal networks and brain regions including the PFC, ACC, parietal and temporal regions, and thalamus compared to UD. Gray matter volume differences in the ACC, hippocampus, amygdala, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) have been reported between BD and UD, along with a thinner DLPFC in BD compared to UD. BD showed reduced integrity in the anterior part of the corpus callosum and posterior cingulum compared to UD. Several studies performed pattern classification analysis using structural and functional MRI data to distinguish between UD and BD depression using a supervised machine learning approach, which yielded a moderate level of accuracy in classification. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Subjective cognitive impairment: functional MRI during a divided attention task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, J; Dannhauser, T; Cutinha, D J; Shergill, S S; Walker, Z

    2011-10-01

    Individuals with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) have persistent memory complaints but normal neurocognitive performance. For some, this may represent a pre-mild cognitive impairment (MCI) stage of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Given that attentional deficits and associated brain activation changes are present early in the course of AD, we aimed to determine whether SCI is associated with brain activation changes during attentional processing. Eleven SCI subjects and 10 controls completed a divided attention task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. SCI and control groups did not differ in sociodemographic, neurocognitive or behavioural measures. When group activation during the divided attention task was compared, the SCI group demonstrated increased activation in left medial temporal lobe, bilateral thalamus, posterior cingulate and caudate. This pattern of increased activation is similar to the pattern of decreased activation reported during divided attention in AD and may indicate compensatory changes. These findings suggest the presence of early functional changes in SCI; longitudinal studies will help to further elucidate the relationship between SCI and AD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Atypical hemispheric dominance for attention: functional MRI topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöel, Agnes; Jansen, Andreas; Deppe, Michael; Kanowski, Martin; Konrad, Carsten; Sommer, Jens; Knecht, Stefan

    2005-09-01

    The right hemisphere is predominantly involved in tasks associated with spatial attention. However, left hemispheric dominance for spatial attention can be found in healthy individuals, and both spatial attention and language can be lateralized to the same hemisphere. Little is known about the underlying regional distribution of neural activation in these 'atypical' individuals. Previously a large number of healthy subjects were screened for hemispheric dominance of visuospatial attention and language, using functional Doppler ultrasonography. From this group, subjects were chosen who were 'atypical' for hemispheric dominance of visuospatial attention and language, and their pattern of brain activation was studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging during a task probing spatial attention. Right-handed subjects with the 'typical' pattern of brain organization served as control subjects. It was found that subjects with an inverted lateralization of language and spatial attention (language right, attention left) recruited left-hemispheric areas in the attention task, homotopic to those recruited by control subjects in the right hemisphere. Subjects with lateralization of both language and attention to the right hemisphere activated an attentional network in the right hemisphere that was comparable to control subjects. The present findings suggest that not the hemispheric side, but the intrahemispheric pattern of activation is the distinct feature for the neural processes underlying language and attention.

  4. Orofacial complex regional pain syndrome: pathophysiologic mechanisms and functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Kyung Mi; Kim, Hyug-Gi; Kang, Soo-Kyung; Auh, Q-Schick; Hong, Jyung-Pyo; Chun, Yang-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is one of the most challenging chronic pain conditions and is characterized by burning pain, allodynia, hyperalgesia, autonomic changes, trophic changes, edema, and functional loss involving mainly the extremities. Until recently, very few reports have been published concerning CRPS involving the orofacial area. We report on a 50-year-old female patient who presented with unbearable pain in all of her teeth and hypersensitivity of the facial skin. She also reported intractable pain in both extremities accompanied by temperature changes and orofacial pain that increased when the other pains were aggravated. In the case of CRPS with trigeminal neuropathic pain, protocols for proper diagnosis and prompt treatment have yet to be established in academia or in the clinical field. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging for a thorough analysis of the cortical representation of the affected orofacial area immediately before and immediately after isolated light stimulus of the affected hand and foot and concluded that CRPS can be correlated with trigeminal neuropathy in the orofacial area. Furthermore, the patient was treated with carbamazepine administration and stellate ganglion block, which can result in a rapid improvement of pain in the trigeminal region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reciprocal Benefits of Mass-Univariate and Multivariate Modeling in Brain Mapping: Applications to Event-Related Functional MRI, H215O-, and FDG-PET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Moeller

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In brain mapping studies of sensory, cognitive, and motor operations, specific waveforms of dynamic neural activity are predicted based on theoretical models of human information processing. For example in event-related functional MRI (fMRI, the general linear model (GLM is employed in mass-univariate analyses to identify the regions whose dynamic activity closely matches the expected waveforms. By comparison multivariate analyses based on PCA or ICA provide greater flexibility in detecting spatiotemporal properties of experimental data that may strongly support alternative neuroscientific explanations. We investigated conjoint multivariate and mass-univariate analyses that combine the capabilities to (1 verify activation of neural machinery we already understand and (2 discover reliable signatures of new neural machinery. We examined combinations of GLM and PCA that recover latent neural signals (waveforms and footprints with greater accuracy than either method alone. Comparative results are illustrated with analyses of real fMRI data, adding to Monte Carlo simulation support.

  6. Arcuate fasciculus laterality by diffusion tensor imaging correlates with language laterality by functional MRI in preadolescent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreedharan, Ruma Madhu; Menon, Amitha C; James, Jija S; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Thomas, Sanjeev V

    2015-03-01

    Language lateralization is unique to humans. Functional MRI (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) enable the study of language areas and white matter fibers involved in language, respectively. The objective of this study was to correlate arcuate fasciculus (AF) laterality by diffusion tensor imaging with that by fMRI in preadolescent children which has not yet been reported. Ten children between 8 and 12 years were subjected to fMRI and DTI imaging using Siemens 1.5 T MRI. Two language fMRI paradigms--visual verb generation and word pair task--were used. Analysis was done using SPM8 software. In DTI, the fiber volume of the arcuate fasciculus (AFV) and fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured. The fMRI Laterality Index (fMRI-LI) and DTI Laterality Index (DTI-LI) were calculated and their correlation assessed using the Pearson Correlation Index. Of ten children, mean age 10.6 years, eight showed left lateralization while bilateral language lateralization was seen in two. AFV by DTI was more on the left side in seven of the eight children who had left lateralization by fMRI. DTI could not trace the AF in one child. Of the two with bilateral language lateralization on fMRI, one showed larger AFV on the right side while the other did not show any asymmetry. There was a significant correlation (p laterality in children with a high degree of correlation between the two imaging modalities.

  7. ''Textural analysis of multiparametric MRI detects transition zone prostate cancer''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, Harbir S.; Johnston, Edward W.; Taylor, Stuart A.; Halligan, Steve [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Benigno, Salvatore; Dikaios, Nikos [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Ganeshan, Balaji [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Allen, Clare; Kirkham, Alex [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Groves, Ashley M. [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College London, University College Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Ahmed, Hashim U.; Emberton, Mark [University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); University College London, Research Department of Urology, London (United Kingdom); Punwani, Shonit [Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London, London (United Kingdom); University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Centre for Medical Imaging, University College London and University College London Hospitals NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate multiparametric-MRI (mpMRI) derived histogram textural-analysis parameters for detection of transition zone (TZ) prostatic tumour. Sixty-seven consecutive men with suspected prostate cancer underwent 1.5T mpMRI prior to template-mapping-biopsy (TPM). Twenty-six men had 'significant' TZ tumour. Two radiologists in consensus matched TPM to the single axial slice best depicting tumour, or largest TZ diameter for those with benign histology, to define single-slice whole TZ-regions-of-interest (ROIs). Textural-parameter differences between single-slice whole TZ-ROI containing significant tumour versus benign/insignificant tumour were analysed using Mann Whitney U test. Diagnostic accuracy was assessed by receiver operating characteristic area under curve (ROC-AUC) analysis cross-validated with leave-one-out (LOO) analysis. ADC kurtosis was significantly lower (p < 0.001) in TZ containing significant tumour with ROC-AUC 0.80 (LOO-AUC 0.78); the difference became non-significant following exclusion of significant tumour from single-slice whole TZ-ROI (p = 0.23). T1-entropy was significantly lower (p = 0.004) in TZ containing significant tumour with ROC-AUC 0.70 (LOO-AUC 0.66) and was unaffected by excluding significant tumour from TZ-ROI (p = 0.004). Combining these parameters yielded ROC-AUC 0.86 (LOO-AUC 0.83). Textural features of the whole prostate TZ can discriminate significant prostatic cancer through reduced kurtosis of the ADC-histogram where significant tumour is included in TZ-ROI and reduced T1 entropy independent of tumour inclusion. (orig.)

  8. Breast Cancer Redox Heterogeneity Detectable with Chemical Exchange Satruation Transfer (CEST) MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kejia; Xu, He N.; Singh, Anup; Moon, Lily; Haris, Mohammad; Reddy, Ravinder; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tissue redox state is an important mediator of various biological processes in health and diseases such as cancer. Previously, we discovered that the mitochondrial redox state of ex vivo tissues detected by redox scanning (an optical imaging method) revealed interesting tumor redox state heterogeneity that could differentiate tumor aggressiveness. Because the noninvasive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can probe the proton transfer and generate contrasts from endogenous metabolites, we aim to investigate if the in vivo CEST contrast is sensitive to proton transfer of the redox reactions so as to reveal the tissue redox states in breast cancer animal models. Procedures CEST MRI has been employed to characterize tumor metabolic heterogeneity and correlated with the redox states measured by the redox scanning in two human breast cancer mouse xenograft models, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The possible biological mechanism on the correlation between the two imaging modalities was further investigated by phantom studies where the reductants and the oxidants of the representative redox reactions were measured. Results The CEST contrast is found linearly correlated with NADH concentration and the NADH redox ratio with high statistical significance, where NADH is the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The phantom studies showed that the reductants of the redox reactions have more CEST contrast than the corresponding oxidants, indicating that higher CEST effect corresponds to the more reduced redox state. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that CEST MRI, once calibrated, might provide a novel noninvasive imaging surrogate for the tissue redox state and a possible diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer in the clinic. PMID:24811957

  9. Hamstring Injuries in Professional Soccer Players: Extent of MRI-Detected Edema and the Time to Return to Play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Michel D; Godoy, Ivan R B; Abdalla, Rene J; de Aquino, Jose Sanchez; Ingham, Sheila J McNeill; Skaf, Abdalla Y

    Discrepancies exist in the literature regarding the association of the extent of injuries assessed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with recovery times. MRI-detected edema in grade 1 hamstring injuries does not affect the return to play (RTP). Retrospective cohort study. Level 4. Grade 1 hamstring injuries from 22 professional soccer players were retrospectively reviewed. The extent of edema-like changes on fluid-sensitive sequences from 1.5-T MRI were evaluated using craniocaudal length, percentage of cross-sectional area, and volume. The time needed to RTP was the outcome. Negative binomial regression analysis tested the measurements of MRI-detected edema-like changes as prognostic factors. The mean craniocaudal length was 7.6 cm (SD, 4.9 cm; range, 0.9-19.1 cm), the mean percentage of cross-sectional area was 23.6% (SD, 20%; range, 4.4%-89.6%), and the mean volume was 33.1 cm 3 (SD, 42.6 cm 3 ; range, 1.1-161.3 cm 3 ). The mean time needed to RTP was 13.6 days (SD, 8.9 days; range, 3-32 days). None of the parameters of extent was associated with RTP. The extent of MRI edema in hamstring injuries does not have prognostic value. Measuring the extent of edema in hamstring injuries using MRI does not add prognostic value in clinical practice.

  10. Investigation of a calcium-responsive contrast agent in cellular model systems: feasibility for use as a smart molecular probe in functional MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelovski, Goran; Gottschalk, Sven; Milošević, Milena; Engelmann, Jörn; Hagberg, Gisela E; Kadjane, Pascal; Andjus, Pavle; Logothetis, Nikos K

    2014-05-21

    Responsive or smart contrast agents (SCAs) represent a promising direction for development of novel functional MRI (fMRI) methods for the eventual noninvasive assessment of brain function. In particular, SCAs that respond to Ca(2+) may allow tracking neuronal activity independent of brain vasculature, thus avoiding the characteristic limitations of current fMRI techniques. Here we report an in vitro proof-of-principle study with a Ca(2+)-sensitive, Gd(3+)-based SCA in an attempt to validate its potential use as a functional in vivo marker. First, we quantified its relaxometric response in a complex 3D cell culture model. Subsequently, we examined potential changes in the functionality of primary glial cells following administration of this SCA. Monitoring intracellular Ca(2+) showed that, despite a reduction in the Ca(2+) level, transport of Ca(2+) through the plasma membrane remained unaffected, while stimulation with ATP induced Ca(2+)-transients suggested normal cellular signaling in the presence of low millimolar SCA concentrations. SCAs merely lowered the intracellular Ca(2+) level. Finally, we estimated the longitudinal relaxation times (T1) for an idealized in vivo fMRI experiment with SCA, for extracellular Ca(2+) concentration level changes expected during intense neuronal activity which takes place upon repetitive stimulation. The values we obtained indicate changes in T1 of around 1-6%, sufficient to be robustly detectable using modern MRI methods in high field scanners. Our results encourage further attempts to develop even more potent SCAs and appropriate fMRI protocols. This would result in novel methods that allow monitoring of essential physiological processes at the cellular and molecular level.

  11. Assessment of the right ventricular function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yan; Du Xiangying; Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with changes of the structure and the function of the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, the assessment of right ventricular function and myocardial mass (MM) is clinically important for the evaluation of the severity of COPD, which may provide an objective basis for therapeutic strategy. Purpose: To assess the right ventricular function and RV MM in patients with mild to severe COPD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: We prospectively studied 49 COPD patients determined by the pulmonary function test (PFT). Using the Global Initiative for COPD classification, the COPD patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of the disease: group I = mild (n = 18); group II = moderate (n = 16); and group III = severe (n = 15). The patient groups were compared to a control group consisting of 30 age-matched, healthy, non-smoking subjects. The RV function and RV MM were obtained by 1.5T cardiac MRI in all of the four groups. The results were compared among the four groups using the ANOVA. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate the relationship between the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and MM with the PFT results in COPD patients. Results: The RVEF was significantly lower in group III than in the other groups (P < 0.01). The RV MM differed significantly among all groups (P < 0.01) and gradually increased with the severity of COPD (P < 0.01). The correlation was significant between the MRI results and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = 0.860 for RVEF, r = -0.838 for RV MM) in COPD patients. Conclusion: The RVEF and RV MM measured by MRI correlate significantly with the severity of disease as determined by PFT in patients with COPD

  12. Assessment of the right ventricular function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease using MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Yan; Du Xiangying; Qin Wen; Li Kuncheng (Dept. of Radiology, Xuanwu Hospital of Capital Medical Univ., Beijing (China)), email: kuncheng.li@gmail.com

    2011-09-15

    Background: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is often associated with changes of the structure and the function of the right ventricle (RV). Therefore, the assessment of right ventricular function and myocardial mass (MM) is clinically important for the evaluation of the severity of COPD, which may provide an objective basis for therapeutic strategy. Purpose: To assess the right ventricular function and RV MM in patients with mild to severe COPD using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Material and Methods: We prospectively studied 49 COPD patients determined by the pulmonary function test (PFT). Using the Global Initiative for COPD classification, the COPD patients were divided into three groups according to the severity of the disease: group I = mild (n = 18); group II = moderate (n = 16); and group III = severe (n = 15). The patient groups were compared to a control group consisting of 30 age-matched, healthy, non-smoking subjects. The RV function and RV MM were obtained by 1.5T cardiac MRI in all of the four groups. The results were compared among the four groups using the ANOVA. Pearson's correlation was used to evaluate the relationship between the right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and MM with the PFT results in COPD patients. Results: The RVEF was significantly lower in group III than in the other groups (P < 0.01). The RV MM differed significantly among all groups (P < 0.01) and gradually increased with the severity of COPD (P < 0.01). The correlation was significant between the MRI results and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (r = 0.860 for RVEF, r = -0.838 for RV MM) in COPD patients. Conclusion: The RVEF and RV MM measured by MRI correlate significantly with the severity of disease as determined by PFT in patients with COPD

  13. Multivariate Functional Data Visualization and Outlier Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Wenlin; Genton, Marc G.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes a new graphical tool, the mag