WorldWideScience

Sample records for functional group chemistry

  1. Functional Group Chemistry (by James R. Hanson)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karty, Joel M.

    2002-06-01

    Given its density and brevity and the apparent requirement of previous organic chemistry knowledge, Functional Group Chemistry is inappropriate as a stand-alone text for first-year organic students. It is also difficult to imagine using it as a supplement to a traditional textbook, since the textbook would presumably provide the same material in greater depth and with better clarity. The end-of-chapter problems in Functional Group Chemistry, however, would provide excellent exam and supplemental homework questions, and would be appropriate given the greater emphasis on reaction mechanisms in the traditional textbook. Perhaps the best use for Functional Group Chemistry, then, is for students returning after having had a year of organic chemistry, either for a quick reference, or for an in-depth review in studying for a standardized exam.

  2. Chemkarta: A Card Game for Teaching Functional Groups in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudtson, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Students in undergraduate organic chemistry courses are frequently overwhelmed by the volume and complexity of information they are expected to learn. To aid in students' learning of organic functional groups, a novel card game "ChemKarta" is reported that can serve as a useful alternative to flashcards. This pedagogy is a simple…

  3. Group theory and chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Bishop, David M

    1993-01-01

    Group theoretical principles are an integral part of modern chemistry. Not only do they help account for a wide variety of chemical phenomena, they simplify quantum chemical calculations. Indeed, knowledge of their application to chemical problems is essential for students of chemistry. This complete, self-contained study, written for advanced undergraduate-level and graduate-level chemistry students, clearly and concisely introduces the subject of group theory and demonstrates its application to chemical problems.To assist chemistry students with the mathematics involved, Professor Bishop ha

  4. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  5. Controls of functional group chemistry on calcium carbonate nucleation: Insights into systematics of biomolecular innovations for skeletal mineralization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dove, P. M.; Hamm, L. M.; Giuffre, A. J.

    2012-12-01

    Living organisms produce skeletal structures within a complex matrix of organic macromolecules that guide the nucleation and growth of crystalline structures into the organic-inorganic composites we know as biominerals. This type of biomolecule-directed mineralization is an ancient process as evidenced by structures in the fossil record that date to the Ediacaran (ca. 549 Ma). Our understanding of template-directed biomineralization, however, is largely based upon assumptions from studies that: 1) qualitatively demonstrate some chemical functionalities influence the nucleating mineral phase and morphology; 2) propose proteins are the primary driver to template-directed mineralization and 3) propose the ubiquitous polysaccharides are inert components. Thus, a mechanistic basis for how the underlying chemistry of macromolecules controls nucleation kinetics and thermodynamics in template-directed nucleation is not well established. Moreover, there is not yet a good appreciation for how patterns of skeletal mineralization evolved with biochemical innovations in response to environmental changes over geologic timescales. In small steps toward understanding biochemical controls on biomineralization, we test the hypothesis that the kinetics and thermodynamics of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) formation is regulated by a systematic relationship to the functional group chemistry of macromolecules. A long-term goal is to establish the energetic basis for biochemical motifs that are seen (and not seen) at sites of calcification across the phylogenetic tree. Two types of studies were conducted. The first measured nucleation rates on model biomolecular substrates with termini that are found in proteins associated with sites of calcification (-COOH, -PO4, and -SH) and two alkanethiol chain lengths (16-C and 11-C) at a variety of chemical driving forces. The measurements show functional group chemistry and molecule conformation regulate rates by a predictable relation to interfacial

  6. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  7. An Epistemological Inquiry into Organic Chemistry Education: Exploration of Undergraduate Students' Conceptual Understanding of Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to determine the levels of conceptual understanding of undergraduate students regarding organic compounds within different functional groups. A total of 60 students who were enrolled in the Department of Secondary Science and Mathematics Education of a Faculty of Education at a state university in Turkey and who had followed an…

  8. Organic chemistry. Functionalization of C(sp3)-H bonds using a transient directing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang-Lin; Hong, Kai; Li, Tuan-Jie; Park, Hojoon; Yu, Jin-Quan

    2016-01-15

    Proximity-driven metalation has been extensively exploited to achieve reactivity and selectivity in carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond activation. Despite the substantial improvement in developing more efficient and practical directing groups, their stoichiometric installation and removal limit efficiency and, often, applicability as well. Here we report the development of an amino acid reagent that reversibly reacts with aldehydes and ketones in situ via imine formation to serve as a transient directing group for activation of inert C-H bonds. Arylation of a wide range of aldehydes and ketones at the β or γ positions proceeds in the presence of a palladium catalyst and a catalytic amount of amino acid. The feasibility of achieving enantioselective C-H activation reactions using a chiral amino acid as the transient directing group is also demonstrated.

  9. Structural Chemistry of Functional Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ This innovative research group on structural chemistry of functional materials was approved by NSFC in 2005.Headed by Prof.HONG Maochun, the team consists of several young research scientists from the CAS Fujian Institute of Research on the Structures of Matter, including Profs CAO Rong, LU Canzhong, GUO Guocong, CHEN Zhongning, MAO Jianggao Mao and CHEN Ling.

  10. DNA functionalization by dynamic chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Kanlidere

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC is an attractive method to efficiently generate libraries of molecules from simpler building blocks by reversible reactions under thermodynamic control. Here we focus on the chemical modification of DNA oligonucleotides with acyclic diol linkers and demonstrate their potential for the deoxyribonucleic acid functionalization and generation of libraries of reversibly interconverting building blocks. The syntheses of phosphoramidite building blocks derived from D-threoninol are presented in two variants with protected amino or thiol groups. The threoninol building blocks were successfully incorporated via automated solid-phase synthesis into 13mer oligonucleotides. The amino group containing phosphoramidite was used together with complementary single-strand DNA templates that influenced the Watson–Crick base-pairing equilibrium in the mixture with a set of aldehyde modified nucleobases. A significant fraction of all possible base-pair mismatches was obtained, whereas, the highest selectivity (over 80% was found for the guanine aldehyde templated by the complementary cytosine containing DNA. The elevated occurrence of mismatches can be explained by increased backbone plasticity derived from the linear threoninol building block as a cyclic deoxyribose analogue.

  11. Click Chemistry in Functional Aliphatic Polycarbonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yu; Zhang, Xiaojin; Xia, Fan

    2017-10-01

    Click chemistry, one of the most important methods in conjugation, plays an extremely significant role in the synthesis of functional aliphatic polycarbonates, which are a group of biodegradable polymers containing carbonate bonds in their main chains. To date, more than 75 articles have been reported on the topic of click chemistry in functional aliphatic polycarbonates. However, these efforts have not yet been highlighted. Six categories of click reactions (alkyne-azide reaction, thiol-ene reaction, Michael addition, epoxy-amine/thiol reaction, Diels-Alder reaction, and imine formation) that have been afforded for further post-polymerization modification of polycarbonates are reviewed. Through this review, a comprehensive understanding of functional aliphatic polycarbonates aims to afford insight on the design of polycarbonates for further post-polymerization modification via click chemistry and the expectation of the practical application. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. In-situ Evaluation of Soil Organic Molecules: Functional Group Chemistry Aggregate Structures, Metal & Surface Complexation Using Soft X-Ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, Satish, C

    2008-11-30

    Organic molecules are common in all Earth surface environments, and their composition and chemistry play an important role in a variety of biogeochemical reactions, such as mineral weathering, nutrient cycling and the solubility and transport of contaminants. However, most of what we know about the chemistry of these molecules comes from spectroscopy and microscopy studies of organic molecules extracted from different natural systems using either inorganic or organic solvents. Although all these methods gave us clues about the composition of these molecules, their composition and structure change with the extraction and the type of ex-situ analysis, their true behavior is less well understood. The goal of this project is to develop synchrotron instrumentation for studying natural organics, and to apply these recently developed synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy and microscopy techniques for understanding the: (1) functional group composition of naturally occurring organic molecules; (2) macromolecular structures of organic molecules; and (3) the nature of interactions of organic molecules with mineral surfaces in different environmental conditions.

  13. Protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry: influence on stereoselectivity of glycosylations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jian; Ye, Xin-Shan

    2010-10-20

    Saccharides are polyhydroxy compounds, and their synthesis requires complex protecting group manipulations. Protecting groups are usually used to temporarily mask a functional group which may interfere with a certain reaction, but protecting groups in carbohydrate chemistry do more than protecting groups usually do. Particularly, protecting groups can participate in reactions directly or indirectly, thus affecting the stereochemical outcomes, which is important for synthesis of oligosaccharides. Herein we present an overview of recent advances in protecting groups influencing stereoselectivity in glycosylation reactions, including participating protecting groups, and conformation-constraining protecting groups in general.

  14. The density matrix renormalization group for ab initio quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Wouters, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    During the past 15 years, the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) has become increasingly important for ab initio quantum chemistry. Its underlying wavefunction ansatz, the matrix product state (MPS), is a low-rank decomposition of the full configuration interaction tensor. The virtual dimension of the MPS, the rank of the decomposition, controls the size of the corner of the many-body Hilbert space that can be reached with the ansatz. This parameter can be systematically increased until numerical convergence is reached. The MPS ansatz naturally captures exponentially decaying correlation functions. Therefore DMRG works extremely well for noncritical one-dimensional systems. The active orbital spaces in quantum chemistry are however often far from one-dimensional, and relatively large virtual dimensions are required to use DMRG for ab initio quantum chemistry (QC-DMRG). The QC-DMRG algorithm, its computational cost, and its properties are discussed. Two important aspects to reduce the computational co...

  15. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  16. Relating Functional Groups to the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struyf, Jef

    2009-01-01

    An introduction to organic chemistry functional groups and their ionic variants is presented. Functional groups are ordered by the position of their specific (hetero) atom in the periodic table. Lewis structures are compared with their corresponding condensed formulas. (Contains 5 tables.)

  17. Density Functionals with Broad Applicability in Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2008-02-01

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Although density functional theory is widely used in the computational chemistry community, the most popular density functional, B3LYP, has some serious shortcomings: (i) it is better for main-group chemistry than for transition metals; (ii) it systematically underestimates reaction barrier heights; (iii) it is inaccurate for interactions dominated by mediumrange correlation energy, such as van der Waals attraction, aromatic-aromatic stacking, and alkane isomerization energies. We have developed a variety of databases for testing and designing new density functionals. We used these data to design new density functionals, called M06-class (and, earlier, M05-class) functionals, for which we enforced some fundamental exact constraints such as the uniform-electron-gas limit and the absence of self-correlation energy. Our M06-class functionals depend on spin-up and spin-down electron densities (i.e., spin densities), spin density gradients, spin kinetic energy densities, and, for nonlocal (also called hybrid) functionals, Hartree-Fock exchange. We have developed four new functionals that overcome the above-mentioned difficulties: (a) M06, a hybrid meta functional, is a functional with good accuracy “across-theboard” for transition metals, main group thermochemistry, medium-range correlation energy, and barrier heights; (b) M06- 2X, another hybrid meta functional, is not good for transition metals but has excellent performance for main group chemistry, predicts accurate valence and Rydberg electronic excitation energies, and is an excellent functional for aromatic-aromatic stacking interactions; (c) M06-L is not as accurate as M06 for barrier heights but is the most accurate

  18. Density functional theory in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuneda, Takao

    2014-01-01

    This book examines density functional theory based on the foundation of quantum chemistry. Unconventional in approach, it reviews basic concepts, then describes the physical meanings of state-of-the-art exchange-correlation functionals and their corrections.

  19. Applications of N-heterocyclic imines in main group chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Tatsumi; Franz, Daniel; Inoue, Shigeyoshi

    2016-11-07

    The imidazolin-2-imino group is an N-heterocyclic imino functionality that derives from the class of compounds known as guanidines. The exocyclic nitrogen atom preferably bonds to electrophiles and its electron-donating character is markedly enhanced by efficient delocalization of cationic charge density into the five-membered imidazoline ring. Thus, this imino group is an excellent choice for thermodynamic stabilization of electron-deficient species. Due to the variety of available imidazoline-based precursors to this ligand, its steric demand can be tailored to meet the requirements for kinetic stabilization of otherwise highly reactive species. Consequently, it does not come as a surprise that the imidazolin-2-iminato ligand has found widespread applications in transition-metal chemistry to furnish pincer complexes or "pogo stick" type compounds. In comparison, the field of main-group metal compounds of this ligand is still in its infancy; however, it has received growing attention in recent years. A considerable number of electron-poor main-group element species have been described today which are stabilized by N-heterocyclic iminato ligands. These include low-valent metal cations and species that are marked by formerly unknown bonding modes. In this article we provide an overview on the present chemistry of main-group element compounds of the imidazolin-2-iminato ligand, as well as selected examples for the related imidazolidin- and benzimidazolin-2-imino system.

  20. The use of heterogeneous chemistry for the characterization of functional groups at the gas/particle interface of soot and TiO2 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyan, A; Sauvain, J-J; Rossi, M J

    2009-08-07

    Six gases [N(CH(3))(3), NH(2)OH, CF(3)COOH, HCl, NO(2) and O(3)] were selected to probe the surface of seven different types of combustion aerosol samples (amorphous carbon, flame soot) and three types of TiO(2) nanoparticles using heterogeneous, i.e. gas-surface reactions. The gas uptake to saturation of the probes was measured under molecular flow conditions in a Knudsen flow reactor and expressed as a density of surface functional groups on a particular aerosol, namely acidic (carboxylic) and basic (conjugated oxides such as pyrone, N-heterocycle and amine) sites, carbonyl (R(1)-C(O)-R(2)) and oxidizable (olefinic, -OH) groups. The limit of detection was generally well below 1% of a formal monolayer of adsorbed probe gas. With few exceptions most investigated aerosol samples interacted with all probe gases to various extents which points to the coexistence of different functional groups on the same aerosol surface such as acidic and basic groups. Generally, the carbonaceous particles displayed significant differences in surface group density: Printex 60 amorphous carbon had the lowest density of surface functional groups throughout, whereas Diesel soot recovered from a Diesel particulate filter had the largest. The presence of basic oxides on carbonaceous aerosol particles was inferred from the ratio of uptakes of CF(3)COOH and HCl owing to the larger stability of the acetate compared to the chloride counterion in the resulting pyrylium salt. Both soots generated from a rich and a lean hexane diffusion flame had a large density of oxidizable groups similar to amorphous carbon FS 101. TiO(2) 15 had the lowest density of functional groups studied for all probe gases among the three TiO(2) nanoparticles despite the smallest size of its primary particles. The technique used enabled the measurement of the uptake probability of the probe gases on the various supported aerosol samples. The initial uptake probability, gamma(0), of the probe gas onto the supported

  1. Symmetry and group theory in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetry, this book covers both point-group and space-group symmetries.Provides a comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetryCovers both point-group and space-group symmetriesIncludes tutorial solutions

  2. Handbook of heterocyclic chemistry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Katritzky, Alan R

    2010-01-01

    ... Heterocyclic Chemistry I (1984) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry II (1996) Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry III (2008) Comprehensive Organic Functional Group Transformations I (1995) Compreh...

  3. Incorporating More Individual Accountability in Group Activities in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Charles T., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    A modified model of cooperative learning known as the GIG model (for group-individual-group) designed and implemented in a large enrollment freshman chemistry course. The goal of the model is to establish a cooperative environment while emphasizing greater individual accountability using both group and individual assignments. The assignments were…

  4. Cluster functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuther, Johannes; Thomale, Ronny

    2014-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) has become a diverse and powerful tool to derive effective low-energy scattering vertices of interacting many-body systems. Starting from a free expansion point of the action, the flow of the RG parameter Λ allows us to trace the evolution of the effective one- and two-particle vertices towards low energies by taking into account the vertex corrections between all parquet channels in an unbiased fashion. In this work, we generalize the expansion point at which the diagrammatic resummation procedure is initiated from a free UV limit to a cluster product state. We formulate a cluster FRG scheme where the noninteracting building blocks (i.e., decoupled spin clusters) are treated exactly, and the intercluster couplings are addressed via RG. As a benchmark study, we apply our cluster FRG scheme to the spin-1/2 bilayer Heisenberg model (BHM) on a square lattice where the neighboring sites in the two layers form the individual two-site clusters. Comparing with existing numerical evidence for the BHM, we obtain reasonable findings for the spin susceptibility, the spin-triplet excitation energy, and quasiparticle weight even in coupling regimes close to antiferromagnetic order. The concept of cluster FRG promises applications to a large class of interacting electron systems.

  5. Content-Related Interactions and Methods of Reasoning within Self-Initiated Organic Chemistry Study Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Karen Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    Students often use study groups to prepare for class or exams; yet to date, we know very little about how these groups actually function. This study looked at the ways in which undergraduate organic chemistry students prepared for exams through self-initiated study groups. We sought to characterize the methods of social regulation, levels of…

  6. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Haitao [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  7. Intensive chemistry seminar, group ability composition, and students' achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhreddine, Fatima Hassan

    Intensive Chemistry Seminar (ICS) is an optional, supplemental, honors-level program for chemistry and biochemistry majors. The program emphasizes academic excellence in a challenging yet supportive chemistry rich learning environment that brings together a community of freshmen sharing the same interests. At the heart of ICS are intensive discussion sessions where students work in small groups on worksheets of carefully chosen problems that are direct application of the concepts covered in the main general chemistry course. Central to the success of such learning environment are interactions among students. A key element affecting the depth of such interactions is the relative ability levels of group members. The main focus of this study is to investigate the relationship between. group ability composition and chemistry knowledge acquisition within the ICS sessions. However, the study also compares the achievement of the ICS students with achievement of the non-ICS students. Our data analyses show that chemistry knowledge acquisition within the ICS sessions was significantly enhanced when group members' selection occurred from a Zone of Proximal Development perspective. Our analyses show that students' attitude toward the ICS is overwhelmingly positive and that the benefits of the program extend beyond academic achievement. In practice, our significant results have important applications in college level, cooperative learning practices with objectives similar to those of ICS. Our results show that Vygotsky's ZPD theory seems to be very appropriate for the design and application of cooperative learning environments. Finally, the significant beneficial outcomes of the ICS program should strongly support its integration into the general chemistry I and II majors' sections curriculums.

  8. The Chemistry of the Local Group

    CERN Document Server

    Gibson, B K

    2007-01-01

    Simulations of the chemical enrichment histories of ten Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies are presented, employing empirically-derived star formation histories (SFHs), a rich network of isotopic and elemental nucleosynthetic yields, and a range of prescriptions for supernova (SN)-driven outflows. Our main conclusions are that (i) neutron-capture element patterns (particularly that of Ba/Y) suggest a strong contribution from low- and intermediate-mass stars, (ii) neutron star mergers may play a relatively larger role in the nucleosynthesis of dwarfs, (iii) SN feedback alone can explain the observed gas fraction in dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), but dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) require almost all their gas to be removed via ram pressure and/or tidal stripping, (iv) the predicted heavy Mg isotope enhancements in the interstellar medium of dwarfs may provide an alternate solution to claims of a varying fine structure (v) the gas lost from dwarfs have O,Si/C abundances in broad agreement with intergalactic medium abundances...

  9. Flow chemistry meets advanced functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Rebecca M; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-22

    Flow chemistry and continuous processing techniques are beginning to have a profound impact on the production of functional materials ranging from quantum dots, nanoparticles and metal organic frameworks to polymers and dyes. These techniques provide robust procedures which not only enable accurate control of the product material's properties but they are also ideally suited to conducting experiments on scale. The modular nature of flow and continuous processing equipment rapidly facilitates reaction optimisation and variation in function of the products. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Conductive Polymer Functionalization by Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren; Hansen, Thomas Steen

    2008-01-01

    Click chemistry is used to obtain new conductive polymer films based on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) from a new azide functional monomer. Postpolymerization, 1,3-dipolar cycloadditions in DMF, using a catalyst system of CUS04 and sodium ascorbate, and different alkynes are performed...... to functionalize films of PEDOT-N3 and copolymers prepared from EDOT-N3 and 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene (EDOT). This approach enables new functionalities on PEDOT that could otherwise not withstand the polymerization conditions. Reactions on the thin polymer films have been optimized using an alkynated fluorophore......, with reaction times of '"'-'20 h. The applicability of the method is illustrated by coupling of two other alkynes: a short chain fluorocarbon and a MPEG 5000 to the conductive polymer; this alters the advancing water contact angle of the surface by +20° and -20°/-25°, respectively. The targeted chemical surface...

  11. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-01-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse…

  12. Functionalization of Mechanochemically Passivated Germanium Nanoparticles via "Click" Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purkait, Tapas Kumar

    Germanium nanoparticles (Ge NPs) may be fascinating for their electronic and optoelectronic properties, as the band gap of Ge NPs can be tuned from the infrared into the visible range of solar spectru. Further functionalization of those nanoparticles may potentially lead to numerous applications ranging from surface attachment, bioimaging, drug delivery and nanoparticles based devices. Blue luminescent germanium nanoparticles were synthesized from a novel top-down mechanochemical process using high energy ball milling (HEBM) of bulk germanium. Various reactive organic molecules (such as, alkynes, nitriles, azides) were used in this process to react with fresh surface and passivate the surface through Ge-C or Ge-N bond. Various purification process, such as gel permeation chromatography (GPC), Soxhlet dailysis etc. were introduced to purify nanoparticles from molecular impurities. A size separation technique was developed using GPC. The size separated Ge NPs were characterize by TEM, small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), UV-vis absorption and photoluminescence (PL) emission spectroscopy to investigate their size selective properties. Germanium nanoparticles with alkyne termini group were prepared by HEBM of germanium with a mixture of n-alkynes and alpha, o-diynes. Additional functionalization of those nanoparticles was achieved by copper(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" reaction. A variety of organic and organometallic azides including biologically important glucals have been reacted in this manner resulting in nanopartilces adorned with ferrocenyl, trimethylsilyl, and glucal groups. Additional functionalization of those nanoparticles was achieved by reactions with various azides via a Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne "click" reaction. Various azides, including PEG derivatives and cylcodextrin moiety, were grafted to the initially formed surface. Globular nanoparticle arrays were formed through interparticle linking via "click" chemistry or "host-guest" chemistry

  13. Spatially Selective Functionalization of Conducting Polymers by "Electroclick" Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Steen; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Conducting polymer microelectrodes can electrochemically generate the catalyst required for their own functionalization by "click chemistry" with high spatial resolution. Interdigitated microelectrodes prepared from an azide-containing conducting polymer are selectively functionalized in sequence...

  14. Weapons in disguise--activating mechanisms and protecting group chemistry in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Jason C; Luesch, Hendrik

    2010-11-22

    Bioactive natural products often possess uniquely functionalized structures with unusual modes of action; however, the natural product itself is not always the active species. We discuss molecules that draw on protecting group chemistry or else require activation to unmask reactive centers, illustrating that nature is not only a source of complex structures but also a guide for elegant chemical transformations which provides ingenious chemical solutions for drug delivery.

  15. Protective group strategies in carbohydrate and peptide chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali, Asghar

    2010-01-01

    Protecting groups play a key role in the synthesis of complex natural products.This holds especially true for the synthesis of oligosaccharides, of which the monomeric carbohydrate building blocks usually contain up to five different hydroxyl functions. The discrimination of these hydroxyl functions

  16. Post-functionalization of polymers via orthogonal ligation chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldmann, Anja S; Glassner, Mathias; Inglis, Andrew J; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2013-05-27

    The establishment of advanced living/controlled polymerization protocols allows for engineering synthetic polymers in a precise fashion. Combining advanced living/controlled polymerization techniques with highly efficient coupling chemistries facilitates quantitative, modular, and orthogonal functionalization of synthetic polymer strands at their chain termini as well as side-chain functionalization. The review highlights the current status of selected post-functionalization techniques of polymers via orthogonal ligation chemistries, major characteristics of the specific transformation chemistry, as well as the characterization of the products.

  17. Functionalization of carbon nanofibers with elastomeric block copolymer using carbodiimide chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapkar, Javed A.; Iyer, Ganesh; Coleman, Maria R.

    2009-02-01

    Surface functionalization of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) with aminopropyl terminated polydimethylsiloxane [(PDMS-NH 2)] and other organic diamines was achieved using carbodiimide chemistry. The carbodiimide chemistry provides faster reaction rate so that the reaction occurs at lower temperature compared to amidation and acylation-amidation chemistry. CNF functionalized with PDMS-NH 2 fibers were further functionalized with oligomer of polyimide (6FDA-BisP) using imidization reaction. The formation of block copolymer on the surface of CNF is proposed as an effective method to engineer the interphase between the fiber and the polymer, which is essential to modulate and enhance the properties of the nanocomposite. The efficiency of the carbodiimide chemistry to functionalize amine terminated groups on CNF and the functionalization of block copolymer was characterized using thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  18. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    topographically modified surface (R2=0.82). Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels significantly reduced attachment and attachment strength of Navicula and C. marina. These hydrogels also reduced attachment of zoospores of Ulva compared to PDMSe. Attachment of Ulva to microtopographies in PDMSe and PEGDMA-co-HEMA negatively correlated with ERIII*Re (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.99, respectively). Incorporating a surface energy term into this equation created a correlation between the attachment densities of cells from two evolutionarily diverse groups on substrates of two surface chemistries with an equation that describes the various microtopographies and surface chemistries in terms of surface energy (R2 = 0.80). The current Attachment Model can now be used to design engineered antifouling surface microtopographies and chemistries that inhibit the attachment of organisms from three evoluntionarily diverse groups. Hydrogels based on PEGDMA were also chosen as a substratum material for mammalian cell culture. Capturing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and inducing differentiation into the endothelial cell (EC) phenotype is the ideal way to re-endothelialize a small-diameter vascular graft. Substratum elasticity has been reported to direct stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels provided good compliance, high fidelity of topographic features and sites for surface modification with biomolecules. Fibronectin grafting and topography both increased EC attachment. This combination of adjustable elasticity, surface chemistry and topography has the potential to promote the capture and differentiation of EPCs into a confluent EC monolayer. Engineered microtopographies replicated in PDMSe directed elongation and alignment of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) compared to smooth surfaces. Engineered cellular micro-environments were created with specific surface energies defined by chemistry

  19. Influence of functional groups on charge transport in molecular junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mowbray, Duncan; Jones, Glenn; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2008-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT), we analyze the influence of five classes of functional groups, as exemplified by NO2, OCH3, CH3, CCl3, and I, on the transport properties of a 1,4-benzenedithiolate (BDT) and 1,4-benzenediamine (BDA) molecular junction with gold electrodes. Our analysis...... demonstrates how ideas from functional group chemistry may be used to engineer a molecule's transport properties, as was shown experimentally and using a semiempirical model for BDA [Nano Lett. 7, 502 (2007)]. In particular, we show that the qualitative change in conductance due to a given functional group can...

  20. Bioinorganic Chemistry Modeled with the TPSSh Density Functional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the TPSSh density functional has been benchmarked against a test set of experimental structures and bond energies for 80 transition-metal-containing diatomics. It is found that the TPSSh functional gives structures of the same quality as other commonly used hybrid and nonhybrid func...... promising density functional for use and further development within the field of bioinorganic chemistry....

  1. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes and other nanocarbons by azide chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Han; Chao Gao

    2010-01-01

    Following the conventional carbon allotropes of diamond and graphite, fullerene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene as 0D, 1D and 2D graphitic macromolecules have been discovered recently in succession, declaring the unlimited potential of carbon-based nanomaterials and nanotechnology. Although CNTs exhibit significant potential applications in advanced materials and other fields due to their extraordinary mechanical strength and electrical/thermal conductivity properties, their low solubility, poor wettability and bad dispersibility in common solvents and solid matrices have limited their processing and applications. Thus, the attempt to achieve wettable/processable CNTs by functionalization has attracted increasing attention in both scientific and industrial communities. In recent years, azide chemistry has been demonstrated as a powerful means to covalently modify CNTs. It consists of two major approaches: click chemistry and nitrene chemistry, which both involve the usage of various azide compounds. The former one is based on highly reactive and stereospecifical Cu(I) catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction; the latter one is based on the electrophilic attack to unsaturated bonds of CNTs with nitrenes as reactive intermediates formed from thermolysis or photolysis of azides. In this mini-review paper, the azide chemistry to functionalize CNTs is highlighted and the corresponding functionalization routes to build CNT-based complex structures are also discussed. Besides, covalent functionalizations of other graphitic nanomaterials such as fullerence and graphene, via azide chemistry, are commented briefly.

  2. The interaction-strength interpolation method for main-group chemistry: benchmarking, limitations, and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Fabiano, E; Seidl, M; Della Sala, F

    2016-01-01

    We have tested the original interaction-strength-interpolation (ISI) exchange-correlation functional for main group chemistry. The ISI functional is based on an interpolation between the weak and strong coupling limits and includes exact-exchange as well as the G\\"orling-Levy second-order energy. We have analyzed in detail the basis-set dependence of the ISI functional, its dependence on the ground-state orbitals, and the influence of the size-consistency problem. We show and explain some of the expected limitations of the ISI functional (i.e. for atomization energies), but also unexpected results, such as the good performance for the interaction energy of dispersion-bonded complexes when the ISI correlation is used as a correction to Hartree-Fock.

  3. Silane meets click chemistry: towards the functionalization of wet bacterial cellulose sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hettegger, Hubert; Sumerskii, Ivan; Sortino, Salvatore; Potthast, Antje; Rosenau, Thomas

    2015-02-01

    The modification of cellulosic materials is of great interest in materials research. Wet bacterial cellulose sheets were modified by an alkoxysilane under mild conditions to make them accessible to click chemistry derivatization. For this purpose (3-azidopropyl)triethoxysilane was grafted covalently onto the cellulosic surface. The silanized bacterial cellulose sheets were characterized comprehensively by attenuated total reflectance FTIR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, SEM with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. To demonstrate subsequent click chemistry functionalization, a new fluorophore based on fluorescein was synthesized and clicked to the silane-modified bacterial cellulose. The new method renders bacterial cellulose and other never-dried cellulosic materials susceptible to direct and facile functionalization in an aqueous medium without the need to work in water-free organic phases or to employ extensive protecting group chemistry and functional group interconversion.

  4. Micropatterning of Functional Conductive Polymers with Multiple Surface Chemistries in Register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Johan Ulrik; Acikgöz, Canet; Daugaard, Anders Egede;

    2012-01-01

    A versatile procedure is presented for fast and efficient micropatterning of multiple types of covalently bound surface chemistry in perfect register on and between conductive polymer microcircuits. The micropatterning principle is applied to several types of native and functionalized PEDOT (poly(3......,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)) thin films. The method is based on contacting PEDOT-type thin films with a micropatterned agarose stamp containing an oxidant (aqueous hypochlorite) and applying a nonionic detergent. Where contacted, PEDOT not only loses its conductance but is entirely removed, thereby locally revealing...... the underlying substrate. Surface analysis showed that the substrate surface chemistry was fully exposed and not affected by the treatment. Click chemistry could thus be applied to selectively modify re-exposed alkyne and azide functional groups of functionalized polystyrene substrates. The versatility...

  5. Chemistry by Way of Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Ricca, Alessandra; Partridge, Harry; Langohff, Stephen R.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate that density functional theory (DFT) methods make an important contribution to understanding chemical systems and are an important additional method for the computational chemist. We report calibration calculations obtained with different functionals for the 55 G2 molecules to justify our selection of the B3LYP functional. We show that accurate geometries and vibrational frequencies obtained at the B3LYP level can be combined with traditional methods to simplify the calculation of accurate heats of formation. We illustrate the application of the B3LYP approach to a variety of chemical problems from the vibrational frequencies of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to transition metal systems. We show that the B3LYP method typically performs better than the MP2 method at a significantly lower computational cost. Thus the B3LYP method allows us to extend our studies to much larger systems while maintaining a high degree of accuracy. We show that for transition metal systems, the B3LYP bond energies are typically of sufficient accuracy that they can be used to explain experimental trends and even differentiate between different experimental values. We show that for boron clusters the B3LYP energetics are not as good as for many of the other systems presented, but even in this case the B3LYP approach is able to help understand the experimental trends.

  6. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  7. Quantitative Evaluation of Bioorthogonal Chemistries for Surface Functionalization of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldborg, Lise Nørkjær; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2012-01-01

    We present here a highly efficient and chemoselective liposome functionalization method based on oxime bond formation between a hydroxylamine and an aldehyde-modified lipid component. We have conducted a systematic and quantitative comparison of this new approach with other state-of-the-art...... affinity between the peptide and the liposome surface. These studies demonstrate the importance of hoosing the correct chemistry in order to obtain a quantitative surface functionalization of liposomes....

  8. NanoChemistry Group at DTU uses NanoSight's NTA System for Nanoparticle Characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    (Nanowerk News) NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs.......(Nanowerk News) NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs....

  9. The functions of ritual in social groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson-Jones, Rachel E; Legare, Cristine H

    2016-01-01

    Ritual cognition builds upon social learning biases that may have become specialized for affiliation within social groups. The adaptive problems of group living required a means of identifying group members, ensuring commitment to the group, facilitating cooperation, and maintaining group cohesion. We discuss how ritual serves these social functions.

  10. Let's Face(book) It: Analyzing Interactions in Social Network Groups for Chemistry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rap, Shelley; Blonder, Ron

    2016-02-01

    We examined how social network (SN) groups contribute to the learning of chemistry. The main goal was to determine whether chemistry learning could occur in the group discourse. The emphasis was on groups of students in the 11th and 12th grades who learn chemistry in preparation for their final external examination. A total of 1118 discourse events were tallied in the different groups. We analyzed the different events that were found in chemistry learning Facebook groups (CLFGs). The analysis revealed that seven types of interactions were observed in the CLFGs: The most common interaction (47 %) dealt with organizing learning (e.g., announcements regarding homework, the location of the next class); learning interactions were observed in 22 % of the posts, and links to learning materials and social interactions constituted about 20 % each. The learning events that were ascertained underwent a deeper examination and three different types of chemistry learning interactions were identified. This examination was based on the theoretical framework of the commognitive approach to learning (Sfard in Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2008), which will be explained. The identified learning interactions that were observed in the Facebook groups illustrate the potential of SNs to serve as an additional tool for teachers to advance their students' learning of chemistry.

  11. Approaches to Pendent Groups' Functionalization of Polyimide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Pendent groups' functionalization of polyimide is an optimum approach to improve its processability and achieve functionalized polyimide materials. There are two types of modification routes for pendent groups functionalization of polyimide: monomer route and macromolecular route. In this paper, various approaches for pendent groups' functionalization of polyimide are introduced. At the same time, a new method to achieve functional polyimide materials without decreasing its thermal stability and mechanical properties is mentioned.

  12. Liposome functionalization with copper-free "click chemistry".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oude Blenke, Erik; Klaasse, Gruson; Merten, Hannes; Plückthun, Andreas; Mastrobattista, Enrico; Martin, Nathaniel I

    2015-03-28

    The modification of liposomal surfaces is of interest for many different applications and a variety of chemistries are available that makes this possible. A major disadvantage of commonly used coupling chemistries (e.g. maleimide-thiol coupling) is the limited control over the site of conjugation in cases where multiple reactive functionalities are present, leading to heterogeneous products and in some cases dysfunctional conjugates. Bioorthogonal coupling approaches such as the well-established copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" reaction are attractive alternatives as the reaction kinetics are favorable and azide-containing reagents are widely available. In the work described here, we prepared lipids containing a reactive cyclooctyne group and, after incorporation into liposomes, demonstrated successful conjugation of both a small molecule dye (5'-TAMRA-azide) as well as a larger azide-containing model protein based upon a designed ankyrin repeat protein (azido-DARPin). By applying the strain-promoted azido-alkyne cycloaddition (SPAAC) the use of Cu(I) as a catalyst is avoided, an important advantage considering the known deleterious effects associated with copper in cell and protein studies. We demonstrate complete control over the number of ligands coupled per liposome when using a small molecule azide with conjugation occurring at a reasonable reaction rate. By comparison, the conjugation of a larger azide-modified protein occurs more slowly, however the number of protein ligands coupled was found to be sufficient for liposome targeting to cells. Importantly, these results provide a strong proof of concept for the site-specific conjugation of protein ligands to liposomal surfaces via SPAAC. Unlike conventional approaches, this strategy provides for the homogeneous coupling of proteins bearing a single site-specific azide modification and eliminates the chance of forming dysfunctional ligands on the liposome. Furthermore, the absence of

  13. Density functional theory across chemistry, physics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mourik, Tanja; Bühl, Michael; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2014-03-13

    The past decades have seen density functional theory (DFT) evolve from a rising star in computational quantum chemistry to one of its major players. This Theme Issue, which comes half a century after the publication of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems that laid the foundations of modern DFT, reviews progress and challenges in present-day DFT research. Rather than trying to be comprehensive, this Theme Issue attempts to give a flavour of selected aspects of DFT.

  14. Conceptual change strategies and cooperative group work in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Patricia A.; Sanford, Julie P.

    This study conducted at a suburban community college tested a method of conceptual change in which treatment students worked in small cooperative groups on tasks aimed at eliciting their misconceptions so that they could then be discussed in contrast to the scientific conceptions that had been taught in direct instruction. Categorizations of student understanding of the target concepts of the laws of conservation of matter and energy and aspects of the particulate nature of gases, liquids, and solids were ascertained by pre- and posttesting. Audiotapes of student verbal interaction in the small groups provided quantitative and qualitative data concerning student engagement in behaviors suggestive of the conditions posited to be part of the conceptual change process (Posner, Strike, Hewson & Gertzog, 1982). Chi-square analysis of posttests indicated that students in treatment groups had significantly lower (p < 0.05) proportion of misconceptions than control students on four of the five target concepts. Students who exhibited no change in concept state had a higher frequency of verbal behaviors suggestive of impeding conceptual change when compared to students who did change. Three factors emerged from qualitative analysis of group interaction that appeared to influence learning: (a) many students had flawed understanding of concepts that supported the target concepts; (b) student views towards learning science affected their engagement in assigned tasks, (c) good and poor group leaders had a strong influence on group success.

  15. Quasi-convex Functions in Carnot Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mingbao SUN; Xiaoping YANG

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the authors introduce the concept of h-quasiconvex functions on Carnot groups G. It is shown that the notions of h-quasiconvex functions and h-convex sets are equivalent and the L∞ estimates of first derivatives of h-quasiconvex functions are given. For a Carnot group G of step two, it is proved that h-quasiconvex functions are locally bounded from above. Furthermore, the authors obtain that h-convex functions are locally Lipschitz continuous and that an h-convex function is twice differentiable almost everywhere.

  16. The tert-butyl group in chemistry and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisel, Philippe; Al-Momani, Loay; Müller, Michael

    2008-08-07

    The unique reactivity pattern elicited by the crowded tert-butyl group is highlighted by summarising characteristic applications. Starting from the use of this simple hydrocarbon moiety in chemical transformations, via its relevance in Nature and its implication in biosynthetic and biodegradation pathways, the way through to its possible application in biocatalytic processes is described.

  17. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  18. A Wiki-Based Group Project in an Inorganic Chemistry Foundation Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristian, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    A semester-long group project that utilizes wiki sites to enhance collaboration was developed for a foundation course in inorganic chemistry. Through structured assignments, student groups use metal-based or metal-combating therapeutic agents as a model for applying and understanding course concepts; they also gain proficiency with scientific- and…

  19. Conceptual DFT: chemistry from the linear response function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geerlings, Paul; Fias, Stijn; Boisdenghien, Zino; De Proft, Frank

    2014-07-21

    Within the context of reactivity descriptors known in conceptual DFT, the linear response function (χ(r,r')) remained nearly unexploited. Although well known, in its time dependent form, in the solid state physics and time-dependent DFT communities the study of the "chemistry" present in the kernel was, until recently, relatively unexplored. The evaluation of the linear response function as such and its study in the time independent form are highlighted in the present review. On the fundamental side, the focus is on the approaches of increasing complexity to compute and represent χ(r,r'), its visualisation going from plots of the unintegrated χ(r,r') to an atom condensed matrix. The study on atoms reveals its physical significance, retrieving atomic shell structure, while the results on molecules illustrate that a variety of chemical concepts are retrieved: inductive and mesomeric effects, electron delocalisation, aromaticity and anti-aromaticity, σ and π aromaticity,…. The applications show that the chemistry of aliphatic (saturated and unsaturated) chains, saturated and aromatic/anti-aromatic rings, organic, inorganic or metallic in nature, can be retrieved via the linear response function, including the variation of the electronic structure of the reagents along a reaction path. The connection of the linear response function with the concept of nearsightedness and the alchemical derivatives is also highlighted.

  20. Silsesquioxane nanoparticles with reactive internal functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozek, Eric M. ..; Washton, Nancy M.; Mueller, Karl T.; Zharov, Ilya

    2017-02-01

    A series of silsesquioxane nanoparticles containing reactive internal organic functionalities throughout the entire particle body have been synthesized using a surfactant-free method with organosilanes as the sole precursors and a base catalyst. The organic functional groups incorporated are vinyl, allyl, mercapto, cyanoethyl, and cyanopropyl groups. The sizes and morphologies of the particles were characterized using SEM and nitrogen adsorption, while the compositions were confirmed using TGA, FT-IR, solid state NMR, and elemental analysis. The accessibility and reactivity of the functional groups inside the particles were demonstrated by performing bromination and reduction reactions in the interior of the particles.

  1. Versatile post-functionalization of the external shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus by using click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommersom, C.A.; Matt, B.D.; van der Ham, A.M.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Katsonis, Nathalie Hélène

    2014-01-01

    We present the modification of the outer protein shell of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) with linear and strained alkyne groups. These functionalized protein capsids constitute valuable platforms for post-functionalization via click chemistry. After modification, the integrity of the capsid an

  2. Novel cross-linkers for PDMS networks for controlled and well distributed grafting of functionalities by click chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahrt, Frederikke; Dimitrov, Ivaylo; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2013-01-01

    An azide-containing, trifunctional vinyl cross-linker for silicone networks has been synthesized. The cross-linker has through Cu(i) catalyzed 1,3-cycloaddition been reacted with six different alkyne-containing chemical groups which each possess a particular functionality. The functional cross-li...... The Royal Society of Chemistry....

  3. Student Perceptions of Group-Based Competitive Exercises in the Chemistry Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Kevin C.; Mody, Tina; Breen, Maureen P.

    2008-01-01

    A non-traditional teaching method that can operate as a vehicle for engaging students is group-based competitive exercises. These exercises combine cooperative learning with a competitive environment and may be employed to promote subject- and problem-based learning. Survey responses of college-level organic chemistry and biochemistry students…

  4. "Chemistry Is in the News": Assessing Intra-Group Peer Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Kathleen M.; Glaser, Rainer E.

    2010-01-01

    Interdisciplinarity is rapidly becoming a norm within both the professional and academic worlds, and the ability to collaborate is becoming an essential skill for all graduates. "Chemistry Is in the News" ("CIITN") is a curriculum that aims to teach students this skill by engaging student collaborative groups in a project that…

  5. Promoting Student Learning through Group Problem Solving in General Chemistry Recitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Madhu; Schaefer, Fred; Morlino, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    We describe the implementation and effects of group problem solving in recitation sections associated with the general chemistry course at a small private science university. Recitation sections of approximately 45 students are used to supplement large (approximately 180 students) lecture sections. The primary goal of recitation is working in…

  6. Promoting Student Learning through Group Problem Solving in General Chemistry Recitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalingam, Madhu; Schaefer, Fred; Morlino, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    We describe the implementation and effects of group problem solving in recitation sections associated with the general chemistry course at a small private science university. Recitation sections of approximately 45 students are used to supplement large (approximately 180 students) lecture sections. The primary goal of recitation is working in…

  7. Saudi arabian students' chemistry achievement and science attitudes stemming from lecture-demonstration and small group teaching methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harty, Harold; Al-Faleh, Nasser

    The study was designed to determine differences between two chemistry teaching methods on students' chemistry achievement and attitudes toward science. The two methods were the large lecture-demonstration and small-group laboratory approaches to teaching chemistry. The subjects were 74 eleventh-grade Saudi Arabian students randomly assigned to the two treatment groups. The findings revealed that the small-group laboratory students exhibited significantly greater chemistry achievement than students in the lecture-demonstration group on both immediate and delayed posttests. The results also indicated that students taught by the lab approach possessed more desirable attitudes toward science.

  8. Harmonic functions on groups and Fourier algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Chu, Cho-Ho

    2002-01-01

    This research monograph introduces some new aspects to the theory of harmonic functions and related topics. The authors study the analytic algebraic structures of the space of bounded harmonic functions on locally compact groups and its non-commutative analogue, the space of harmonic functionals on Fourier algebras. Both spaces are shown to be the range of a contractive projection on a von Neumann algebra and therefore admit Jordan algebraic structures. This provides a natural setting to apply recent results from non-associative analysis, semigroups and Fourier algebras. Topics discussed include Poisson representations, Poisson spaces, quotients of Fourier algebras and the Murray-von Neumann classification of harmonic functionals.

  9. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-03-14

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors.

  10. Aryl Diazonium Chemistry for the Surface Functionalization of Glassy Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wei; van den Hurk, Remko; Cao, Yong; Du, Rongbing; Sun, Xuejun; Wang, Yiyu; McDermott, Mark T.; Evoy, Stephane

    2016-01-01

    Nanostring resonator and fiber-optics-based biosensors are of interest as they offer high sensitivity, real-time measurements and the ability to integrate with electronics. However, these devices are somewhat impaired by issues related to surface modification. Both nanostring resonators and photonic sensors employ glassy materials, which are incompatible with electrochemistry. A surface chemistry approach providing strong and stable adhesion to glassy surfaces is thus required. In this work, a diazonium salt induced aryl film grafting process is employed to modify a novel SiCN glassy material. Sandwich rabbit IgG binding assays are performed on the diazonium treated SiCN surfaces. Fluorescently labelled anti-rabbit IgG and anti-rabbit IgG conjugated gold nanoparticles were used as markers to demonstrate the absorption of anti-rabbit IgG and therefore verify the successful grafting of the aryl film. The results of the experiments support the effectiveness of diazonium chemistry for the surface functionalization of SiCN surfaces. This method is applicable to other types of glassy materials and potentially can be expanded to various nanomechanical and optical biosensors. PMID:26985910

  11. Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-02

    further enable enzyme encapsulation to improve the efficiency of light-driven hydrogen fuel production. 5. Changes in key personnel, if applicable : -None ...Controlling Functional Group Architecture in Artificial Cells 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W9132T-14-2-0002 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...cycloadditions to modify reactive groups within the phospholipid membrane structure and how the nature of the reactive elements, the copper catalyst

  12. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  13. Final Report: Main Group Element Chemistry in Service of Hydrogen Storage and Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David A. Dixon; Anthony J. Arduengo, III

    2010-09-30

    goal was met in terms of reducing the number of costly experiments and helping to focus the experimental effort on the potentially optimal targets. We have used computational chemistry approaches to predict the thermodynamic properties of a wide range of compounds containing boron, nitrogen, hydrogen, and other elements as appropriate including carbon. These calculations were done in most cases with high level molecular orbital theory methods that have small error bars on the order of ± 1 to 2 kcal/mol. The results were used to benchmark more approximate methods such as density functional theory for larger systems and for database development. We predicted reliable thermodynamics for thousands of compounds for release and regeneration schemes to aid/guide materials design and process design and simulation. These are the first reliable computed values for these compounds and for many represent the only available values. Overall, the computational results have provided us with new insights into the chemistry of main group and organic-base chemical hydrogen systems from the release of hydrogen to the regeneration of spent fuel. A number of experimental accomplishments were also made in this project. The experimental work on hydrogen storage materials centered on activated polarized σ- or π-bonded frameworks that hold the potential for ready dihydrogen activation, uptake, and eventually release. To this end, a large number of non-traditional valence systems including carbenes, cyanocarbons, and C-B and and B-N systems were synthesized and examined. During the course of these studies an important lead arose from the novel valency of a class of stable organic singlet bi-radical systems. A synthetic strategy to an “endless” hydrogen storage polymer has been developed based on our cyanocarbon chemistry. A key issue with the synthetic efforts was being able to link the kinetics of release with the size of the substituents as it was difficult to develop a low molecular

  14. Aspects of the Functional Renormalisation Group

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlowski, J M

    2005-01-01

    We discuss structural aspects of the functional renormalisation group. Flows for a general class of correlation functions are derived, and it is shown how symmetry relations of the underlying theory are lifted to the regularised theory. A simple equation for the flow of these relations is provided. The setting includes general flows in the presence of composite operators and their relation to standard flows, an important example being NPI quantities. We discuss optimisation and derive a functional optimisation criterion. Applications deal with the interrelation between functional flows and the quantum equations of motion, general Dyson-Schwinger equations. We discuss the combined use of these functional equations as well as outlining the construction of practical renormalisation schemes, also valid in the presence of composite operators. Furthermore, the formalism is used to derive various representations of modified symmetry relations in gauge theories, as well as to discuss gauge-invariant flows. We close w...

  15. The Circular Velocity Function of Group Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Abramson, Louis E; Benson, Andrew J; Kollmeier, Juna A; Mulchaey, John S

    2013-01-01

    A robust prediction of LCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. However, the correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened relative to LCDM expectations at circular velocities v_c < 200 km/s. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role of environment in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v_c estimators, we find no transition from field- to LCDM-shaped CVF above v_c = 50 km/s as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 < log(M_halo/M_sun) < 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs that are marginally suppressed at low-v_c compared to tha...

  16. Properties of graphene inks stabilized by different functional groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Di; Li Hongwei; Bower, Chris; Andrew, Piers; Ryhaenen, Tapani [Nokia Research Centre, Broers Building, 21 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Han Dongxue; Zhang Qixian; Niu Li; Yang Huafeng, E-mail: di.wei@nokia.com, E-mail: lniu@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electroanalytical Chemistry, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun City 130022, Jilin Province (China)

    2011-06-17

    Different graphene inks have been synthesized by chemical methods. These uniform dispersions were stabilized by various functional groups such as room temperature ionic liquid, polyaniline, polyelectrolyte (poly[2,5-bis(3-sulfonatopropoxy)-1,4-ethynylphenylene-alt-1, 4-ethynylphenylene] sodium salt) and poly(styrenesulfonate) (PSS). The dispersions can be easily cast into high-quality, free-standing films but with very different physiochemical properties such as surface tension and adhesion. SEM and AFM methods have been applied to have a detailed study of the properties of the inks. It is found that graphenes modified by p-type polyaniline show the highest surface tension. Diverse surface adhesive properties to the substrate are also found with various functional groups. The different viscoelasticities of graphene inks were related to the microscopic structure of their coating layer and subsequently related to the configuration, chemistry and molecular dimensions of the modifying molecules to establish the property-structure relationship. Modifications of graphene inks made from chemical reduction cannot only enable cost-effective processing for printable electronics but also extend the applications into, for example, self-assembly of graphene via bottom-up nano-architecture and surface energy engineering of the graphenes. To fabricate useful devices, understanding the surface properties of graphene inks is very important. It is the first paper of this kind to study the surface tension and adhesion of graphene influenced by different functional groups.

  17. Spherical functions on affine Lie groups

    CERN Document Server

    Etingof, P; Kirillov, A A; Pavel Etingof; Igor Frenkel; Alexander Kirillov Jr

    1994-01-01

    We show that the space of holomorphic functions of a fixed degree on an affine Lie group which take values in a finite-dimensional representation of this group and are equivariant with respect to (twisted) conjugacy coin- cides with the space of conformal blocks of the Wess-Zumino-Witten conformal field theory on an elliptic curve with punctures, or, equivalently,with the space of states of the Chern-Simons topological field theory in genus 1. This provides a group-theoretic realization of the Segal modular functor for elliptic curves. We also show that the the radial part of the second order Laplace operator on an affine Lie group acting in the space of equivariant functions coincides with the operator defining the Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov connection on conformal blocks on elliptic curves, and its eigenfunctions coincide with the correlation functions of conformal blocks. At the critical value of the degree (minus the dual Coxeter number of the underlying simple Lie algebra) there exist higher order Laplace op...

  18. The circular velocity function of group galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, Louis E. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics and Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, The University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Williams, Rik J.; Benson, Andrew J.; Kollmeier, Juna A.; Mulchaey, John S., E-mail: labramson@uchicago.edu [The Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2014-09-20

    A robust prediction of ΛCDM cosmology is the halo circular velocity function (CVF), a dynamical cousin of the halo mass function. The correspondence between theoretical and observed CVFs is uncertain, however: cluster galaxies are reported to exhibit a power-law CVF consistent with N-body simulations, but that of the field is distinctly Schechter-like, flattened compared to ΛCDM expectations at circular velocities v {sub c} ≲ 200 km s{sup –1}. Groups offer a powerful probe of the role environment plays in this discrepancy as they bridge the field and clusters. Here, we construct the CVF for a large, mass- and multiplicity-complete sample of group galaxies from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. Using independent photometric v {sub c} estimators, we find no transition from field to ΛCDM-shaped CVF above v {sub c} = 50 km s{sup –1} as a function of group halo mass. All groups with 12.4 ≲ log M {sub halo}/M {sub ☉} ≲ 15.1 (Local Group analogs to rich clusters) display similar Schechter-like CVFs marginally suppressed at low v {sub c} compared to that of the field. Conversely, some agreement with N-body results emerges for samples saturated with late-type galaxies, with isolated late-types displaying a CVF similar in shape to ΛCDM predictions. We conclude that the flattening of the low-v {sub c} slope in groups is due to their depressed late-type fractions—environment affecting the CVF only to the extent that it correlates with this quantity—and that previous cluster analyses may suffer from interloper contamination. These results serve as useful benchmarks for cosmological simulations of galaxy formation.

  19. Functional renormalization group approach to neutron matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Drews

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The chiral nucleon-meson model, previously applied to systems with equal number of neutrons and protons, is extended to asymmetric nuclear matter. Fluctuations are included in the framework of the functional renormalization group. The equation of state for pure neutron matter is studied and compared to recent advanced many-body calculations. The chiral condensate in neutron matter is computed as a function of baryon density. It is found that, once fluctuations are incorporated, the chiral restoration transition for pure neutron matter is shifted to high densities, much beyond three times the density of normal nuclear matter.

  20. Ising exponents from the functional renormalisation group

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F

    2010-01-01

    We study the 3d Ising universality class using the functional renormalisation group. With the help of background fields and a derivative expansion up to fourth order we compute the leading index, the subleading symmetric and anti-symmetric corrections to scaling, the anomalous dimension, the scaling solution, and the eigenperturbations at criticality. We also study the cross-correlations of scaling exponents, and their dependence on dimensionality. We find a very good numerical convergence of the derivative expansion, also in comparison with earlier findings. Evaluating the data from all functional renormalisation group studies to date, we estimate the systematic error which is found to be small and in good agreement with findings from Monte Carlo simulations, \\epsilon-expansion techniques, and resummed perturbation theory.

  1. Lectures on the functional renormalization group method

    CERN Document Server

    Polonyi, J

    2001-01-01

    These introductory notes are about functional renormalization group equations and some of their applications. It is emphasised that the applicability of this method extends well beyond critical systems, it actually provides us a general purpose algorithm to solve strongly coupled quantum field theories. The renormalization group equation of F. Wegner and A. Houghton is shown to resum the loop-expansion. Another version, due to J. Polchinski, is obtained by the method of collective coordinates and can be used for the resummation of the perturbation series. The genuinely non-perturbative evolution equation is obtained in a manner reminiscent of the Schwinger-Dyson equations. Two variants of this scheme are presented where the scale which determines the order of the successive elimination of the modes is extracted from external and internal spaces. The renormalization of composite operators is discussed briefly as an alternative way to arrive at the renormalization group equation. The scaling laws and fixed poin...

  2. Antibiotic inhibition of group I ribozyme function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ahsen, U; Davies, J; Schroeder, R

    1991-09-26

    The discovery of catalytically active RNA has provided the basis for the evolutionary concept of an RNA world. It has been proposed that during evolution the functions of ancient catalytic RNA were modulated by low molecular weight effectors, related to antibiotics, present in the primordial soup. Antibiotics and RNA may have coevolved in the formation of the modern ribosome. Here we report that a set of aminoglycoside antibiotics, which are known to interact with the decoding region of the 16S ribosomal RNA of Escherichia coli, inhibit the second step of splicing of the T4 phage-derived td intron. Thus catalytic RNA seems to interact not only with a mononucleotide and an amino acid, but also with another class of biomolecules, the sugars. Splicing of other group I introns but not group II introns was inhibited. The similarity in affinity and specificity of these antibiotics for group I introns and rRNAs may result from recognition of evolutionarily conserved structures.

  3. Liposome functionalization with copper-free "click chemistry"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Blenke, Erik; Klaasse, Gruson; Merten, Hannes; Plückthun, Andreas; Mastrobattista, Enrico|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/228061105; Martin, Nathaniel I.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314123083

    2015-01-01

    The modification of liposomal surfaces is of interest for many different applications and a variety of chemistries are available that makes this possible. A major disadvantage of commonly used coupling chemistries (e.g. maleimide-thiol coupling) is the limited control over the site of conjugation in

  4. Organized thiol functional groups in mesoporous core shell colloids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchena, Martin H. [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Granada, Mara [Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro-Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Bordoni, Andrea V. [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Joselevich, Maria [Asociacion Civil Expedicion Ciencia, Cabrera 4948, C1414BGP Buenos Aires (Argentina); Troiani, Horacio [Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, 8400 San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Instituto Balseiro-Centro Atomico Bariloche-CNEA, San Carlos de Bariloche 8400 (Argentina); Williams, Federico J. [DQIAQyF-INQUIMAE FCEN, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon II, C1428EHA Buenos Aires (Argentina); Wolosiuk, Alejandro, E-mail: wolosiuk@cnea.gov.ar [Gerencia Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Avda. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2012-03-15

    The co-condensation in situ of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) and mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as a template results in the synthesis of multilayered mesoporous structured SiO{sub 2} colloids with 'onion-like' chemical environments. Thiol groups were anchored to an inner selected SiO{sub 2} porous layer in a bilayered core shell particle producing different chemical regions inside the colloidal layered structure. X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) shows a preferential anchoring of the -SH groups in the double layer shell system, while porosimetry and simple chemical modifications confirm that pores are accessible. We can envision the synthesis of interesting colloidal objects with defined chemical environments with highly controlled properties. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous core shell SiO{sub 2} colloids with organized thiol groups. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Double shell mesoporous silica colloids templated with CTAB. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sequential deposition of mesoporous SiO{sub 2} layers with different chemistries. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer XPS shows the selective functionalization of mesoporous layers with thiol groups.

  5. Analytic continuation of functional renormalization group equations

    CERN Document Server

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Functional renormalization group equations are analytically continued from imaginary Matsubara frequencies to the real frequency axis. On the example of a scalar field with O(N) symmetry we discuss the analytic structure of the flowing action and show how it is possible to derive and solve flow equations for real-time properties such as propagator residues and particle decay widths. The formalism conserves space-time symmetries such as Lorentz or Galilei invariance and allows for improved, self-consistent approximations in terms of derivative expansions in Minkowski space.

  6. Functional Microbial Diversity Explains Groundwater Chemistry in a Pristine Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial communities inhabiting anoxic aquifers catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface, yet little is known about how their community structure correlates with groundwater chemistry. In this study, we described the composition of microbial communities in th...

  7. Functional Microbial Diversity Explains Groundwater Chemistry in a Pristine Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial communities inhabiting anoxic aquifers catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions in the subsurface, yet little is known about how their community structure correlates with groundwater chemistry. In this study, we described the composition of microbial communities in th...

  8. Vygotskian-based grouping: Utilizing the zone of proximal development in a chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggle, Justin David

    A large portion of any science major's curriculum utilizes laboratories. Many of these laboratories now incorporate cooperative learning as a result of studies attesting to its beneficial effects. However, little attention has been given to the composition of those groups, specifically at post-secondary education institutes. We have therefore investigated the effectiveness of a grouping technique based on the theories of L. S. Vygotsky and his construct of the zone of proximal development (ZPD) in the context of an undergraduate general chemistry laboratory course at The University of Texas at Austin. All students were responsible for the completion of a short, 11 question, pre-quiz. Depending on their respective classes, students were grouped either according to the ZPD-scheme, based on pre-quiz scores, or randomly, regardless of pre-quiz score. Achievement of the students in each of the two groups was compared in order to determine grouping effectiveness. This study was carried out for 3 semesters (spring 2003, spring 2004, and fall 2004) under two different instructors. Overall, results indicate that grouping according to the ZPD-scheme revealed higher student achievement versus random grouping. Moreover, students scoring low and average on pre-quizzes benefited far more from this grouping method than higher scoring students. The protocol for implementing this grouping scheme is straightforward and is discussed in detail.

  9. Analysing Symbolic Expressions in Secondary School Chemistry: Their Functions and Implications for Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Taber, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Symbolic expressions are essential resources for producing knowledge, yet they are a source of learning difficulties in chemistry education. This study aims to employ social semiotics to analyse the symbolic representation of chemistry from two complementary perspectives, referred to here as contextual (i.e., historical) and functional. First, the…

  10. Electrochemical functionalization of carbon surfaces by aromatic azide or alkyne molecules: a versatile platform for click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrard, David; Lambert, François; Policar, Clotilde; Balland, Véronique; Limoges, Benoît

    2008-01-01

    The electrochemical reduction of phenylazide or phenylacetylene diazonium salts leads to the grafting of azido or ethynyl groups onto the surface of carbon electrodes. In the presence of copper(I) catalyst, these azide- or alkyne-modified surfaces react efficiently and rapidly with compounds bearing an acetylene or azide function, thus forming a covalent 1,2,3-triazole linkage by means of click chemistry. This was illustrated with the surface coupling of ferrocenes functionalized with an ethynyl or azido group and the biomolecule biotin terminated by an acetylene group.

  11. Spectral functions and transport coefficients from the functional renormalization group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tripolt, Ralf-Arno

    2015-06-03

    In this thesis we present a new method to obtain real-time quantities like spectral functions and transport coefficients at finite temperature and density using the Functional Renormalization Group approach. Our non-perturbative method is thermodynamically consistent, symmetry preserving and based on an analytic continuation from imaginary to real time on the level of the flow equations. We demonstrate the applicability of this method by calculating mesonic spectral functions as well as the shear viscosity for the quark-meson model. In particular, results are presented for the pion and sigma spectral function at finite temperature and chemical potential, with a focus on the regime near the critical endpoint in the phase diagram of the quark-meson model. Moreover, the different time-like and space-like processes, which give rise to a complex structure of the spectral functions, are discussed. Finally, based on the momentum dependence of the spectral functions, we calculate the shear viscosity and the shear viscosity to entropy density ratio using the corresponding Green-Kubo formula.

  12. Exploitation of desilylation chemistry in tailor-made functionalization on diverse surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongchun; Chen, Songjie; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Rudnev, Alexander; Huang, Cancan; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Baghernejad, Masoud; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-03-01

    Interface engineering to attain a uniform and compact self-assembled monolayer at atomically flat surfaces plays a crucial role in the bottom-up fabrication of organic molecular devices. Here we report a promising and operationally simple approach for modification/functionalization not only at ultraflat single-crystal metal surfaces, M(111) (M=Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) but also at the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, upon efficient in situ cleavage of trimethylsilyl end groups of the molecules. The obtained self-assembled monolayers are ultrastable within a wide potential window. The carbon-surface bonding on various substrates is confirmed by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Application of this strategy in tuning surface wettability is also demonstrated. The most valuable finding is that a combination of the desilylation with the click chemistry represents an efficient method for covalent and tailor-made functionalization of diverse surfaces.

  13. Exploitation of desilylation chemistry in tailor-made functionalization on diverse surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yongchun; Chen, Songjie; Kuzume, Akiyoshi; Rudnev, Alexander; Huang, Cancan; Kaliginedi, Veerabhadrarao; Baghernejad, Masoud; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas; Decurtins, Silvio; Liu, Shi-Xia

    2015-03-11

    Interface engineering to attain a uniform and compact self-assembled monolayer at atomically flat surfaces plays a crucial role in the bottom-up fabrication of organic molecular devices. Here we report a promising and operationally simple approach for modification/functionalization not only at ultraflat single-crystal metal surfaces, M(111) (M=Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Ir) but also at the highly oriented pyrolytic graphite surface, upon efficient in situ cleavage of trimethylsilyl end groups of the molecules. The obtained self-assembled monolayers are ultrastable within a wide potential window. The carbon-surface bonding on various substrates is confirmed by shell-isolated nanoparticle-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Application of this strategy in tuning surface wettability is also demonstrated. The most valuable finding is that a combination of the desilylation with the click chemistry represents an efficient method for covalent and tailor-made functionalization of diverse surfaces.

  14. Multireference quantum chemistry through a joint density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai, Takeshi; Kurashige, Yuki; Neuscamman, Eric; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2010-01-01

    We describe the joint application of the density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory to multireference quantum chemistry. The density matrix renormalization group provides the ability to describe static correlation in large active spaces, while the canonical transformation theory provides a high-order description of the dynamic correlation effects. We demonstrate the joint theory in two benchmark systems designed to test the dynamic and static correlation capabilities of the methods, namely, (i) total correlation energies in long polyenes and (ii) the isomerization curve of the [Cu2O2]2+ core. The largest complete active spaces and atomic orbital basis sets treated by the joint DMRG-CT theory in these systems correspond to a (24e,24o) active space and 268 atomic orbitals in the polyenes and a (28e,32o) active space and 278 atomic orbitals in [Cu2O2]2+.

  15. Cu(II) coordination chemistry of patellamide derivatives: possible biological functions of cyclic pseudopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comba, Peter; Dovalil, Nina; Gahan, Lawrence R; Haberhauer, Gebhard; Hanson, Graeme R; Noble, Christopher J; Seibold, Björn; Vadivelu, Prabha

    2012-02-27

    Two synthetic derivatives of the naturally occurring cyclic pseudooctapeptides patellamide  A-F and ascidiacyclamide, that is, H(4)pat(2), H(4)pat(3), as well as their Cu(II) complexes are described. These cyclic peptide derivatives differ from the naturally occurring macrocycles by the variation of the incorporated heterocyclic donor groups and the configuration of the amino acids connecting the heterocycles. The exchange of the oxazoline and thiazole groups by dimethylimidazoles or methyloxazoles leads to more rigid macrocycles, and the changes in the configuration of the side chains leads to significant differences in the folding of the cyclic peptides. These variations allow a detailed study of the various possible structural changes on the chemistry of the Cu(II) complexes formed. The coordination of Cu(II) with these macrocyclic species was monitored by high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), spectrophotometric (UV/Vis) and circular dichroic (CD) titrations, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and molecular mechanics (MM) simulations have been used to model the structures of the Cu(II) complexes and provide a detailed understanding of their geometric preferences and conformational flexibility. This is related to the Cu(II) coordination chemistry and the reactivity of the dinuclear Cu(II) complexes towards CO(2) fixation. The variation observed between the natural and various synthetic peptide systems enables conclusions about structure-reactivity correlations, and our results also provide information on why nature might have chosen oxazolines and thiazoles as incorporated heterocycles.

  16. Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norskov, Jens

    2011-05-19

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

  17. Density functional theory in surface chemistry and catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Abild-Pedersen, Frank; Studt, Felix

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition-metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. The current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling theory and experiment and future...

  18. Functional renormalization group methods in quantum chromodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, J.

    2006-12-18

    We apply functional Renormalization Group methods to Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD). First we calculate the mass shift for the pion in a finite volume in the framework of the quark-meson model. In particular, we investigate the importance of quark effects. As in lattice gauge theory, we find that the choice of quark boundary conditions has a noticeable effect on the pion mass shift in small volumes. A comparison of our results to chiral perturbation theory and lattice QCD suggests that lattice QCD has not yet reached volume sizes for which chiral perturbation theory can be applied to extrapolate lattice results for low-energy observables. Phase transitions in QCD at finite temperature and density are currently very actively researched. We study the chiral phase transition at finite temperature with two approaches. First, we compute the phase transition temperature in infinite and in finite volume with the quark-meson model. Though qualitatively correct, our results suggest that the model does not describe the dynamics of QCD near the finite-temperature phase boundary accurately. Second, we study the approach to chiral symmetry breaking in terms of quarks and gluons. We compute the running QCD coupling for all temperatures and scales. We use this result to determine quantitatively the phase boundary in the plane of temperature and number of quark flavors and find good agreement with lattice results. (orig.)

  19. Gateway to Success for At-Risk Students in a Large-Group Introductory Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Diana; Verdel, Ellen

    2001-02-01

    Thirty-six entering freshmen of a designated "at-risk" population were divided between two classes of introductory chemistry for nonscience majors. Seventeen students were placed in a typical large-group lecture (n = 210) class, and the remaining 19 were placed in a special class with enrollment restricted to the selected, at-risk students. To assure equity and control for consistency, both lecture classes met at the same time. The two female instructors gave the same lectures to each class. At-risk students from both sections were required to attend supplemental instruction sections led by the same teaching assistant, and the same instructor graded all assignments. Students of both classes were encouraged to form informal collaborative groups to complete 10 in-class problem sets, which were graded on an individual basis. The at-risk students from the large-group lecture (average = 75.5) outperformed students enrolled in the special class (average = 70.6). All targeted students were successful in the large-group lecture class; however, three at-risk students in the smaller class were unsuccessful. Scaffolding from a more diverse population in the larger group may be one reason for this unexpected outcome. In the larger lecture class, students rated the collaborative assignments as being most beneficial to their success.

  20. Quest for a universal density functional: the accuracy of density functionals across a broad spectrum of databases in chemistry and physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverati, Roberto; Truhlar, Donald G

    2014-03-13

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory is in principle an exact formulation of quantum mechanical electronic structure theory, but in practice we have to rely on approximate exchange-correlation (xc) functionals. The objective of our work has been to design an xc functional with broad accuracy across as wide an expanse of chemistry and physics as possible, leading--as a long-range goal--to a functional with good accuracy for all problems, i.e. a universal functional. To guide our path towards that goal and to measure our progress, we have developed-building on earlier work of our group-a set of databases of reference data for a variety of energetic and structural properties in chemistry and physics. These databases include energies of molecular processes, such as atomization, complexation, proton addition and ionization; they also include molecular geometries and solid-state lattice constants, chemical reaction barrier heights, and cohesive energies and band gaps of solids. For this paper, we gather many of these databases into four comprehensive databases, two with 384 energetic data for chemistry and solid-state physics and another two with 68 structural data for chemistry and solid-state physics, and we test two wave function methods and 77 density functionals (12 Minnesota meta functionals and 65 others) in a consistent way across this same broad set of data. We especially highlight the Minnesota density functionals, but the results have broader implications in that one may see the successes and failures of many kinds of density functionals when they are all applied to the same data. Therefore, the results provide a status report on the quest for a universal functional.

  1. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  2. Functionalization of PEDOT by Click Chemistry and ATRP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    Poly(3,4‐ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) is a conductive polymer which has received increasing attention and many developments have been investigated. PEDOT has been applied in many different areas such as biosensors or polymer solar cells. This work presents a modification of PEDOT films through...... Click Chemistry with alkynes followed by activator regenerated by electron transfer (ARGET) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) to develop PEDOT films with anti‐fouling properties through application of a model system based on a crosslinked surface of polystyrene PS‐N3....

  3. Physical Chemistry of Molecular

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Established in 2009, the group consists of six researchers and more than 70 research assistants and graduate students from the CAS Key Laboratory of Molecular Nanostructures and Nanotechnologies at the CAS Institute of Chemistry.Its research focuses on the physical chemistry involved in molecular assembly, molecular nanostructures, functional nanomaterials and conceptual nano-devices.

  4. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, D; Yallop, M L; Memmott, J

    2015-06-10

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web.

  5. Chemistry and Evolution of Fergusonite—Group Minerals,Bayan Obo,Inner Mongolia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贡伟亮

    1991-01-01

    A new classification scheme of the fergusnoite-group minerals is suggested on the basis of mineral chem.-istry and high temperature XRD.A number of new varieties such as M-thorian fergusonite-(Ce),M-neodymian fergusonite-(Ce),T-titanian fergusonite-(Nd) and T-yttrian fergusonite-(Nd) have been rec-ognized in the light of detailed chemical studies,particularly with reference to REE,SRE and solid solution relationship.The results indicate strong REE and SRE differentiation and evolution in the fergusonite group,which can be interpretated by differences in the stability of various REE complexes in response to vari-ations in physicochemical conditions during the multi-stage mineralization process in the Bayan Bbo ore de-posit.The crystallization of the minerals is closely related to hydrolysis of REE and Nb complexes,REE(OH)3 ·Nb(OH)5 coprecipitation,dehydration,polymerization and nucleation.The significance of SRE(Eu) in the western part of the deposit is emphasized.

  6. Chemistry and Functionality of Bioactive Compounds Present in Persimmon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shazia Yaqub

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive research has related the consumption of persimmon with the reduced risk of various diseases and particularly highlighted the presence of bioactive phenolic compounds for their therapeutic properties. Major phenolic compounds present in persimmon are ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, and gallic acid. β-Cryptoxanthin, lycopene, β-carotene, zeaxanthin, and lutein are important carotenoids having antioxidant potential. They are important to prevent oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, safeguard beta cells of the pancreas, and reduce cardiovascular diseases, cancer, diabetes mellitus, and damage caused by chronic alcohol consumption. In this paper, the chemistry and health benefits of bioactive compounds present in persimmon are reviewed to encourage impending applications and to facilitate further research activities.

  7. Localized Template-Driven Functionalization of Nanoparticles by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowak, Piotr; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Salehian, Fatemeh; Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Han, Yang; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a method for the localized functionalization of gold nanoparticles using imine-based dynamic combinatorial chemistry. By using DNA templates, amines were grafted on the aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles only if and where the nanoparticles interacted with the template molecules.

  8. Localized Template-Driven Functionalization of Nanoparticles by Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nowak, Piotr; Saggiomo, Vittorio; Salehian, Fatemeh; Colomb-Delsuc, Mathieu; Han, Yang; Otto, Sijbren

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a method for the localized functionalization of gold nanoparticles using imine-based dynamic combinatorial chemistry. By using DNA templates, amines were grafted on the aldehyde-functionalized nanoparticles only if and where the nanoparticles interacted with the template molecules.

  9. How to Improve Students' Comprehension Concerning the Major Terms of Functional Groups?--In the Experiment of OrCheTaboo Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkuzu, Nalan; Uyulgan, Melis Arzu

    2016-01-01

    In this research, for an effective learning of concepts in the scope of functional groups in organic chemistry, it has been developed as "Organic Chemistry Taboo (OrCheTaboo)" which is an educational activity by the researchers. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of the game OrCheTaboo on learning of concepts related to…

  10. Polyisobutylene chain end transformations: Block copolymer synthesis and click chemistry functionalizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magenau, Andrew Jackson David

    cycloaddition reaction. 1-(o-Azidoalkyl)pyrrolyl-terminated PIB was successfully synthesized both by substitution of the terminal halide of 1-(o-haloalkyl)pyrrolyl-terminated PIB with sodium azide and by in situ quenching of quasiliving PIB with a 1-(o-azidoalkyl)pyrrole. GPC indicated the absence of coupled PIB under optimized conditions, confirming exclusive mono-substitution on each pyrrole ring. In a fourth study, radical thiol-ene hydrothiolation "Click" chemistry was explored and adapted to easily and rapidly modify exo -olefin PIB with an array of thiol compounds bearing useful functionalities, including primary halogen, primary amine, primary hydroxyl, and carboxylic acid. The thiol-ene "click" procedure was shown to be applicable to both mono and difunctional exo-olefin polyisobutylene. Telechelic mono- and difunctional exo-olefin PIBs were synthesized via quasiliving cationic polymerization followed by quenching with the hindered amine, 1,2,2,6,6-pentamethylpiperidine. Lower reaction temperatures were found to increase exo-olefin conversion to near quantitative amounts. In the fifth study, thiol-terminated polyisobutylene (PIB-SH) was synthesized by reaction of thiourea with alpha,o-bromine-terminated PIB in a three step one-pot procedure. First the alkylisothiouronium salt was produced using a 1:1 (v:v) DMF:heptane cosolvent mixture at 90°C. Hydrolysis of the salt by aqueous base produced thiolate chain ends, which were then acidified to form the desired thiol functional group. An extension of this reaction was performed by a sequential thiol-ene/thiol-yne procedure to produce tetra-hydroxy functionalized PIB. 1H NMR was used to confirm formation of both alkyne and tetrahydroxyl functional species. Further utility of PIB-SH was demonstrated by base catalyzed thiol-isocyanate reactions. A model reaction was conducted with phenyl isocyanate in THF using triethylamine as the catalyst. Last, conversion of PIB-SH directly into a RAFT macro-CTA was accomplished, as shown

  11. Fermionic functional integrals and the renormalization group

    CERN Document Server

    Feldman, Joel; Trubowitz, Eugene

    2002-01-01

    This book, written by well-known experts in the field, offers a concise summary of one of the latest and most significant developments in the theoretical analysis of quantum field theory. The renormalization group is the name given to a technique for analyzing the qualitative behavior of a class of physical systems by iterating a map on the vector space of interactions for the class. In a typical nonrigorous application of this technique, one assumes, based on one's physical intuition, that only a certain finite dimensional subspace (usually of dimension three or less) is important. The material in this book concerns a technique for justifying this approximation in a broad class of fermionic models used in condensed matter and high energy physics. This volume is based on the Aisenstadt Lectures given by Joel Feldman at the Centre de Recherches Mathematiques (Montreal, Canada). It is suitable for graduate students and research mathematicians interested in mathematical physics. Included are many problems and so...

  12. STM investigation of carbon nanotubes completely covered with functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koos, Antal A.; Horvath, Zsolt Endre; Osvath, Zoltan; Tapaszto, Levente; Niesz, Krisztián; Konya, Zoltan; Kiricsi, Imre; Grobert, Nicole; Ruehle, Manfred; Biro, Laszlo P.

    2003-04-01

    The functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is important both for composite - to improve load transfer between CNTs and matrix - and nanoelectronic applications - to interlink individual nanotubes in a network. Oposite to earlier results, complete coverage of CNT surface with functional groups was achieved. The distribution of functional groups on the nanotube surface was investigated using STM and TEM. The influence of functional groups on the electron density of states of the nanotubes was studied with scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS).

  13. On the Stability of Jensen's Functional Equation on Groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Valeriĭ A Faĭziev; Prasanna K Sahoo

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we establish the stability of Jensen’s functional equation on some classes of groups. We prove that Jensen equation is stable on noncommutative groups such as metabelian groups and (2,), where is an arbitrary commutative field with characteristic different from two. We also prove that any group can be embedded into some group such that the Jensen functional equation is stable on .

  14. Chemistry of carbon nanomaterials: Uses of lithium nanotube salts in organic syntheses and functionalization of graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Jayanta

    transfer (SET) mechanism to functionalize carbon nanotubes with different alkyl/aryl groups. Using the reductive alkylation approach, we can also functionalize graphites by alkyl/carboxylic acid groups, making graphite soluble in organic solvents and water. Tailoring of graphite layers is also accomplished by using different metals in liquid ammonia. Finally, SWNT-epoxides/graphite epoxides are synthesized using m-CPBA. Quantification of the epoxide substituents on the nanotube/graphite surface is evaluated through the catalytic de-epoxidation reaction using MeReO 3/PPh3 as heterogeneous catalyst. In summary, the proposed covalent functionalization methods yield derivatized nanomaterials that can provide a solid platform for a number of exciting applications, ranging from material science to biomedical devices. Furthermore, the results presented in this thesis provide insight into the molecular chemistry at nano-resolution.

  15. Three applications of functional analysis with group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharwächter, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Case illustrations from group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy are presented to demonstrate three applications of functional analysis and the resulting cognitive behavioral interventions. The principles of group dynamic cognitive behavioral group therapy are explained. A functional analysis is applied first to the problem behavior of an individual group member. A clinical case illustrates how the group members help to change this individual group member's behavior from a learning theory perspective. Next, the circular interactional problem behavior between two group members is reduced to the individual functional analysis of each of the two member's problem behaviors. It is then illustrated how the two group member's problem behaviors, as well as feedback from others, contribute toward helping to change each others behavior. The paper concludes that functional analysis and ensuing behavioral interventions can be also applied to group as a whole behavior.

  16. Automatic structures and growth functions for finitely generated abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Kamei, Satoshi

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the formal power series whose n-th coefficient is the number of copies of a given finite graph in the ball of radius n centred at the identity element in the Cayley graph of a finitely generated group and call it the growth function. Epstein, Iano-Fletcher and Uri Zwick proved that the growth function is a rational function if the group has a geodesic automatic structure. We compute the growth function in the case where the group is abelian and see that the denominator of the rational function is determined from the rank of the group.

  17. ICRPG WORKING GROUP ON ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY ROUND ROBIN NO. 22 -- EUDIOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF POWDERED ALUMINUM,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Analytical Chemistry voted to conduct a round robin to estimate the interlaboratory reproducibility. The round robin was designed to facilitate statistical analysis of the data. Three samples representing different purity levels as

  18. Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.): composition, chemistry, nutritional, and functional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abugoch James, Lilian E

    2009-01-01

    Quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.), which is considered a pseudocereal or pseudograin, has been recognized as a complete food due to its protein quality. It has remarkable nutritional properties; not only from its protein content (15%) but also from its great amino acid balance. It is an important source of minerals and vitamins, and has also been found to contain compounds like polyphenols, phytosterols, and flavonoids with possible nutraceutical benefits. It has some functional (technological) properties like solubility, water-holding capacity (WHC), gelation, emulsifying, and foaming that allow diversified uses. Besides, it has been considered an oil crop, with an interesting proportion of omega-6 and a notable vitamin E content. Quinoa starch has physicochemical properties (such as viscosity, freeze stability) which give it functional properties with novel uses. Quinoa has a high nutritional value and has recently been used as a novel functional food because of all these properties; it is a promising alternative cultivar.

  19. MADNESS applied to density functional theory in chemistry and nuclear physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fann, G I [Computational Mathematics Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Harrison, R J [Computational Chemical Sciences Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 and Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee at Knoxville (United States); Beylkin, G [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Colorado at Boulder, 526 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0526 (United States); Jia, J [Computational Mathematics Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Hartman-Baker, R [Computational Mathematics Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Shelton, W A [Computational Chemical Sciences Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sugiki, S [Computational Chemical Sciences Group, Computer Science and Mathematics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States)

    2007-07-15

    We describe some recent mathematical results in constructing computational methods that lead to the development of fast and accurate multiresolution numerical methods for solving quantum chemistry and nuclear physics problems based on Density Functional Theory (DFT). Using low separation rank representations of functions and operators in conjunction with representations in multiwavelet bases, we developed a multiscale solution method for integral and differential equations and integral transforms. The Poisson equation, the Schrodinger equation, and the projector on the divergence free functions provide important examples with a wide range of applications in computational chemistry, nuclear physics, computational electromagnetic and fluid dynamics. We have implemented this approach along with adaptive representations of operators and functions in the multiwavelet basis and low separation rank (LSR) approximation of operators and functions. These methods have been realized and implemented in a software package called Multiresolution Adaptive Numerical Evaluation for Scientific Simulation (MADNESS)

  20. Green polymer chemistry: enzyme catalysis for polymer functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sanghamitra; Puskas, Judit E

    2015-05-21

    Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions.

  1. Green Polymer Chemistry: Enzyme Catalysis for Polymer Functionalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Sen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme catalyzed reactions are green alternative approaches to functionalize polymers compared to conventional methods. This technique is especially advantageous due to the high selectivity, high efficiency, milder reaction conditions, and recyclability of enzymes. Selected reactions can be conducted under solventless conditions without the application of metal catalysts. Hence this process is becoming more recognized in the arena of biomedical applications, as the toxicity created by solvents and metal catalyst residues can be completely avoided. In this review we will discuss fundamental aspects of chemical reactions biocatalyzed by Candida antarctica lipase B, and their application to create new functionalized polymers, including the regio- and chemoselectivity of the reactions.

  2. Functional monolayers on oxide-free silicon surfaces via thiol-ene click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caipa Campos, M.A.; Paulusse, J.M.J.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    Thiol–ene click chemistry was used for the attachment of a variety of functional molecules onto oxide-free Si(111) surfaces using very mild conditions; the efficient nature of this coupling strategy allowed for successful light-induced micropatterning and thus provides a novel route towards biofunct

  3. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  4. Functional monolayers on oxide-free silicon surfaces via thiol–ene click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caipa Campos, Mabel A.; Paulusse, Jos Marie Johannes; Zuilhof, Han

    2010-01-01

    Thiol–ene click chemistry was used for the attachment of a variety of functional molecules onto oxide-free Si(111) surfaces using very mild conditions; the efficient nature of this coupling strategy allowed for successful light-induced micropatterning and thus provides a novel route towards biofunct

  5. Functional monolayers on oxide-free silicon surfaces via thiol–ene click chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caipa Campos, Mabel A.; Paulusse, Jos M.J.; Zuilhof, Han

    2010-01-01

    Thiol–ene click chemistry was used for the attachment of a variety of functional molecules onto oxide-free Si(111) surfaces using very mild conditions; the efficient nature of this coupling strategy allowed for successful light-induced micropatterning and thus provides a novel route towards biofunct

  6. From molecular chemistry to hybrid nanomaterials. Design and functionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi, Ahmad; Reye, Catherine; Corriu, Robert

    2011-02-01

    This tutorial review reports upon the organisation and functionalization of two families of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. We attempted to show in both cases the best ways permitting the organisation of materials in terms of properties at the nanometric scale. The first family concerns mesoporous hybrid organic-inorganic materials prepared in the presence of a structure-directing agent. We describe the functionalization of the channel pores of ordered mesoporous silica, that of the silica framework, as well as the functionalization of both of them simultaneously. This family is currently one of the best supports for exploring polyfunctional materials, which can provide a route to interactive materials. The second family concerns lamellar hybrid organic-inorganic materials which is a new class of nanostructured materials. These materials were first obtained by self-assembly, as a result of van der Waals interactions of bridged organosilica precursors containing long alkylene chains during the sol-gel process, without any structure directing agent. This methodology has been extended to functional materials. It is also shown that such materials can be obtained from monosilylated precursors.

  7. Influence of surface chemistry on the structural organization of monomolecular protein layers adsorbed to functionalized aqueous interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lösche, M.; Piepenstock, M.; Diederich, A.;

    1993-01-01

    The molecular organization of streptavidin (SA) bound to aqueous surface monolayers of biotin-functionalized lipids and binary lipid mixtures has been investigated with neutron reflectivity and electron and fluorescence microscopy. The substitution of deuterons (2H) for protons (1H), both...... dependence of the structural properties of such self-assembled SA monolayers on the surface chemistry was observed: the lateral protein density depends on the length of the spacer connecting the biotin moiety and its hydrophobic anchor. The hydration of the lipid head groups in the protein-bound state...

  8. The NanoChemistry group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) uses NanoSight’s NTA system for nanoparticle characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs.......NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs....

  9. Group delay functions and its applications in speech technology

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hema A Murthy; B Yegnanarayana

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, the information in speech signals is represented in terms of features derived from short-time Fourier analysis. In this analysis the features extracted from the magnitude of the Fourier transform (FT) are considered, ignoring the phase component. Although the significance of the FT phase was highlighted in several studies over the recent three decades, the features of the FT phase were not exploited fully due to difficulty in computing the phase and also in processing the phase function. The information in the short-time FT phase function can be extracted by processing the derivative of the FT phase, i.e., the group delay function. In this paper, the properties of the group delay functions are reviewed, highlighting the importance of the FT phase for representing information in the speech signal. Methods to process the group delay function are discussed to capture the characteristics of the vocal-tract system in the form of formants or through a modified group delay function. Applications of group delay functions for speech processing are discussed in some detail. They include segmentation of speech into syllable boundaries, exploiting the additive and high resolution properties of the group delay functions. The effectiveness of segmentation of speech, and the features derived from the modified group delay are demonstrated in applications such as language identification, speech recognition and speaker recognition. The paper thus demonstrates the need to exploit the potential of the group delay functions for development of speech systems.

  10. Cyclodextrin-Triazole Derivative Functionalized on Ag-SiO{sub 2} Core-Shell Nanoparticles via Click Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Gun Bae; Singu, Bal Sydulu; Hong, Sang Eun; Yoon, Kuk Ro [Hannam Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    Click chemistry has provided a versatile strategy for functionalization in solution chemistry under mild reaction conditions with a high degree of functional group compatibility. Initially, silver (Ag) nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction method, followed by the synthesis of silver–silica (Ag–SiO{sub 2}) core–shell nanoparticles by the Stöber method. The Ag–SiO2 core shell nanoparticles were functionalized with the alkyne derivative. The cycloaddition reaction between the azide-functionalized cyclodextrin and the alkyne-functionalized Ag–SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles was carried out via the copper-catalyzed click reaction, leading to the formation of the cyclodextrin-triazole derivative on the Ag–SiO{sub 2} core–shell nanoparticles. The presence of the resulting cyclodextrin-triazole derivative on the silver–silica core–shell nanoparticles was confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  11. Affinity Induced Surface Functionalization of Liposomes Using Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Eliasen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    be used for functionalization of other nanoparticles or solid surfaces. The method exploits a synergistic effect of having both affinity and covalent anchoring tags on the surface of the liposome. This was achieved by synthesizing a peptide linker system that uses Cu-free strain-promoted click chemistry.......2%. The reaction kinetics and overall yield were quantified by HPLC. The results presented here open new possibilities for constructing complex nanostructures and functionalized surfaces....

  12. Morpho-chemistry and functionality of diseased biological tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Marta; Cicchi, Riccardo; Pavone, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    Heart and cardiovascular diseases are one of the most common in the world, in particular - arthrosclerosis. The aim of the research is to distinguish pathological and healthy tissue regions in biological samples, in this case - to distinguish collagen and lipid rich regions within the arterial wall. In the work a specific combination of such methods are used: FLIM and SHG in order to evaluate the biological tissue morphology and functionality, so that this research could give a contribution for creating a new biological tissue imaging standard in the closest future. During the study the most appropriate parameter for fluorescence lifetime decay was chosen in order to evaluate lifetime decay parameters and the isotropy of the arterial wall and deposition, using statistical methods FFT and GLCM. The research gives a contribution or the future investigations for evaluating lipid properties when it can de-attach from the arterial wall and cause clotting in the blood vessel or even a stroke.

  13. Click Chemistry Mediated Functionalization of Vertical Nanowires for Biological Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vutti, Surendra; Schoffelen, Sanne; Bolinsson, Jessica; Buch-Månson, Nina; Bovet, Nicolas; Nygård, Jesper; Martinez, Karen L; Meldal, Morten

    2016-01-11

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) are gaining significant importance in various biological applications, such as biosensing and drug delivery. Efficient and controlled immobilization of biomolecules on the NW surface is crucial for many of these applications. Here, we present for the first time the use of the Cu(I) -catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition and its strain-promoted variant for the covalent functionalization of vertical NWs with peptides and proteins. The potential of the approach was demonstrated in two complementary applications of measuring enzyme activity and protein binding, which is of general interest for biological studies. The attachment of a peptide substrate provided NW arrays for the detection of protease activity. In addition, green fluorescent protein was immobilized in a site-specific manner and recognized by antibody binding to demonstrate the proof-of-concept for the use of covalently modified NWs for diagnostic purposes using minute amounts of material.

  14. 2D-RNA-coupling numbers: a new computational chemistry approach to link secondary structure topology with biological function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Díaz, Humberto; Agüero-Chapin, Guillermín; Varona, Javier; Molina, Reinaldo; Delogu, Giovanna; Santana, Lourdes; Uriarte, Eugenio; Podda, Gianni

    2007-04-30

    Methods for prediction of proteins, DNA, or RNA function and mapping it onto sequence often rely on bioinformatics alignment approach instead of chemical structure. Consequently, it is interesting to develop computational chemistry approaches based on molecular descriptors. In this sense, many researchers used sequence-coupling numbers and our group extended them to 2D proteins representations. However, no coupling numbers have been reported for 2D-RNA topology graphs, which are highly branched and contain useful information. Here, we use a computational chemistry scheme: (a) transforming sequences into RNA secondary structures, (b) defining and calculating new 2D-RNA-coupling numbers, (c) seek a structure-function model, and (d) map biological function onto the folded RNA. We studied as example 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) oxidases known as ACO, which control fruit ripening having importance for biotechnology industry. First, we calculated tau(k)(2D-RNA) values to a set of 90-folded RNAs, including 28 transcripts of ACO and control sequences. Afterwards, we compared the classification performance of 10 different classifiers implemented in the software WEKA. In particular, the logistic equation ACO = 23.8 . tau(1)(2D-RNA) + 41.4 predicts ACOs with 98.9%, 98.0%, and 97.8% of accuracy in training, leave-one-out and 10-fold cross-validation, respectively. Afterwards, with this equation we predict ACO function to a sequence isolated in this work from Coffea arabica (GenBank accession DQ218452). The tau(1)(2D-RNA) also favorably compare with other descriptors. This equation allows us to map the codification of ACO activity on different mRNA topology features. The present computational-chemistry approach is general and could be extended to connect RNA secondary structure topology to other functions.

  15. Principles in redox signaling: from chemistry to functional significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindoli, Alberto; Rigobello, Maria Pia

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species are currently considered not only harmful byproducts of aerobic respiration but also critical mediators of redox signaling. The molecules and the chemical principles sustaining the network of cellular redox regulated processes are described. Special emphasis is placed on hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), now considered as acting as a second messenger, and on sulfhydryl groups, which are the direct targets of the oxidant signal. Cysteine residues of some proteins, therefore, act as sensors of redox conditions and are oxidized in a reversible reaction. In particular, the formation of sulfenic acid and disulfide, the initial steps of thiol oxidation, are described in detail. The many cell pathways involved in reactive oxygen species formation are reported. Central to redox signaling processes are the glutathione and thioredoxin systems controlling H(2)O(2) levels and, hence, the thiol/disulfide balance. Lastly, some of the most important redox-regulated processes involving specific enzymes and organelles are described. The redox signaling area of research is rapidly expanding, and future work will examine new pathways and clarify their importance in cellular pathophysiology.

  16. Zeta Functions Of Discrete Groups Acting On Trees

    OpenAIRE

    Clair, Bryan; Mokhtari-Sharghi, Shahriar

    1999-01-01

    This paper generalizes Bass' work on zeta functions for uniform tree lattices. Using the theory of von Neumann algebras, machinery is developed to define the zeta function of a discrete group of automorphisms of a bounded degree tree. The main theorems relate the zeta function to determinants of operators defined on edges or vertices of the tree. A zeta function associated to a non-uniform tree lattice with appropriate Hilbert representation is defined. Zeta functions are defined for infinite...

  17. Expanding the coordination chemistry of donor-stabilized group-14 metalenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Javier A; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Polo, Diego

    2013-02-07

    The transformation of an amidinate germylene, equipped with just one accessible lone pair of electrons on the Ge atom, into a bidentate 4-electron donor κ(2)Ge,N-ligand, has been achieved for the first time, opening new doors to the non-carbene-like coordination chemistry of heavier carbene analogues.

  18. Glioma cell line proliferation controlled by different chemical functional groups in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su-Ju XU; Fu-Zhai CUI; Xiao-Long YU; Xiang-Dong KONG

    2013-01-01

    Glioma cell line C6 cultured on silicon surfaces modified by different chemical functional groups, including mercapto (-SH), carboxyl (-COOH), amino (-NH2), hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) groups, was studied here to investigate the influence of surface chemistry on the cell proliferation, adhesion and apoptosis. AFM confirmed the similar characteristic of different functional groups occupation. The adhering C6 exhibited morphological changes in response to different chemical functional groups. The C6 adhered to -COOH, -NH2, -OH and -CH3 surfaces and flattened morphology, while those on -SH surface exhibited the smallest contact area with mostly rounded morphology, which led to the death of cancer cells. The results of MTT assay showed that the -COOH and -NH2 groups promoted ceil proliferation, while the -SH significantly inhibited the proliferation. Compared with other chemical functional groups, the -SH group exhibited its unique effect on the fate of cancer cells, which might provide means for the design of biomaterials to prevent and treat glioma.

  19. Collaboration of chemistry instructional games and group investigation (Gi) model to improve learning outcome in high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspita, Ita; Sugiyarto, Kristian H.; Ikhsan, Jaslin

    2017-05-01

    The aims of this research are to: (1) develop chemistry instructional games on reaction rate matter; and (2) reveal the collaboration of chemistry instructional games and group investigation model to improvement learning outcome in high school student. This study is research and development (R&D). The procedure of developing product was adapted from Borg & Gall that modified into three principal steps: product planning, product developing, and product evaluating. The product planning step consist of field study, literature study, and manufacturing product. Product developing was developed product using Adobe Flash Professional CS 6 program. The last, product evaluating was performed by year XI of high school students, uses experimental methods nonequivalent control-group design by control class and experiment class. The results of this research show that: (1) a software of chemistry instructional games successfully developed using Adobe Flash Professional CS 6 and can be run on Android device; and (2) the test results of students showed that the collaboration of instructional games and group investigation model able to improvement learning outcome of hight school student.

  20. Replicating Small Group Research Using the Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cragan, John F.; Wright, David W.

    A replication study tested functional theory utilizing untrained full-fledged groups. One hundred forty undergraduate students who were enrolled in a small group communication course at a large midwestern university participated in small group discussions analyzing a plagiarism case used in an original study by R. Y. Hirokawa. Results indicated…

  1. Functional renormalization group approach to the Kraichnan model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, Carlo

    2015-09-01

    We study the anomalous scaling of the structure functions of a scalar field advected by a random Gaussian velocity field, the Kraichnan model, by means of functional renormalization group techniques. We analyze the symmetries of the model and derive the leading correction to the structure functions considering the renormalization of composite operators and applying the operator product expansion.

  2. The effect of C-OH functionality on the surface chemistry of biomass-derived molecules: ethanol chemistry on Rh(100).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, B; Olus Ozbek, M; Niemantsverdriet, J W Hans; Weststrate, C J Kees-Jan

    2016-11-21

    The adsorption and decomposition of ethanol on Rh(100) was studied as a model reaction to understand the role of C-OH functionalities in the surface chemistry of biomass-derived molecules. A combination of experimental surface science and computational techniques was used: (i) temperature programmed reaction spectroscopy (TPRS), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), work function measurements (Kelvin Probe - KP), and density functional theory (DFT). Ethanol produces ethoxy (CH3CH2O) species via O-H bond breaking upon adsorption at 100 K. Ethoxy decomposition proceeds differently depending on the surface coverage. At low coverage, the decomposition of ethoxy species occurs viaβ-C-H cleavage, which leads to an oxometallacycle (OMC) intermediate. Decomposition of the OMC scissions (at 180-320 K) ultimately produces CO, H2 and surface carbon. At high coverage, along with the pathway observed in the low coverage case, a second pathway occurs around 140-200 K, which produces an acetaldehyde intermediate viaα-C-H cleavage. Further decomposition of acetaldehyde produces CH4, CO, H2 and surface carbon. However, even at high coverage this is a minor pathway, and methane selectivity is 10% at saturation coverage. The results suggests that biomass-derived oxygenates, which contain an alkyl group, react on the Rh(100) surface to produce synthesis gas (CO and H2), surface carbon and small hydrocarbons due to the high dehydrogenation and C-C bond scission activity of Rh(100).

  3. Surface chemistry of the atomic layer deposition of metals and group III oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, David Nathan

    Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) is a thin-film growth technique offering precise control of film thickness and the ability to coat high-aspect-ratio features such as trenches and nanopowders. Unlike other film growth techniques, ALD does not require harsh processing conditions and is not limited by line-of-sight deposition. Emerging applications for ALD materials include semiconductor devices, gas sensors, and water-diffusion barriers. The chemistry behind ALD involves understanding how the precursors interact with surfaces to deposit the desired material. All ALD precursors need to be stable on the substrate to ensure self-limiting behavior yet reactive enough to be easily removed with the second reagent. Recent precursor development has provided many volatile organometallic compounds for most of the periodic table. As the number of precursors increases, proper precursor choice becomes crucial. This is because the film properties, growth rates, and growth temperature vary widely between the precursors. Many of the above traits can be predicted with knowledge of the precursor reaction mechanisms. This thesis aims to link surface reaction mechanisms to observed growth and nucleation trends in metal and oxide ALD systems. The first portion of this thesis explores the mechanisms of two ALD oxide systems. First, I examine the mechanism of ALD alumina with ozone. Ozone is used as an oxidant in the semiconductor industry because the deposited Al 2O3 films possess better insulating properties and ozone is easier to purge from a vacuum system. FT-IR analysis reveals a complicated array of surface intermediates such as formate, carbonate, and methoxy groups that form during Al2O3 growth with ozone. Next, a new method to deposit thin films of Ga2O3 is introduced. Gallium oxide is a transparent conducting oxide that needs expensive solid precursors to be deposited by ALD. I show that trimethylgallium is a good high-temperature ALD precursor that deposits films of Ga2O 3 with

  4. The quest for a universal density functional: The accuracy of density functionals across a broad spectrum of databases in chemistry and physics

    CERN Document Server

    Peverati, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory is in principle an exact formulation of quantum mechanical electronic structure theory, but in practice we have to rely on approximate exchange-correlation (xc) functionals. The objective of our work has been to design an xc functional with broad accuracy across as wide an expanse of chemistry and physics as possible, leading-as a long-range goal-to a functional with good accuracy for all problems, i.e., a universal functional. To guide our path toward that goal and to measure our progress, we have developed-building on earlier work in our group-a set of databases of reference data for a variety of energetic and structural properties in chemistry and physics. These databases include energies of molecular processes such as atomization, complexation, proton addition, and ionization; they also include molecular geometries and solid-state lattice constants, chemical reaction barrier heights, and cohesive energies and band gaps of solids. For the present paper we gather many of ...

  5. Click chemistry approach to functionalize two-dimensional macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Kou; Hongkun He; Chao Gao

    2010-01-01

    A facile “click chemistry” approach to functionalize 2D macromolecules of graphene oxide nanosheets with poly (ethylene glycol) of different molecular weights, polystyrene, palmitic acid and various amino acids was presented. FTIR, TGA, Raman spectroscopy, XPS, XRD, TEM, AFM and SEM were utilized to characterize the products. High degree of functionalization was achieved on the flat surfaces of graphene oxide, affording polymer-grafted 2D brushes and amino acids-immobilized nanosheets, which show improved solubility in organic solvents. The click chemistry strategy reported herein provides a facile and general method for functionalization of graphene oxide with macromolecules and desired biomolecules.

  6. Linking variability in brain chemistry and circuit function through multimodal human neuroimaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fisher, Patrick M; Hariri, A R

    2012-01-01

    to assay in vivo regional brain chemistry and function, respectively. Typically, these neuroimaging modalities are implemented independently despite the capacity for integrated data sets to offer unique insight into molecular mechanisms associated with brain function. Through examples from the serotonin...... and dopamine system and its effects on threat- and reward-related brain function, we review evidence for how such a multimodal neuroimaging strategy can be successfully implemented. Furthermore, we discuss how multimodal PET-fMRI can be integrated with techniques such as imaging genetics, pharmacological...

  7. FGO: A novel ontology for identification of ligand functional group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2007-01-01

    Small molecules play crucial role in the modulation of biological functions by interacting with specific macromolecules. Hence small molecule interactions are captured by a variety of experimental methods to estimate and propose correlations between molecular structures to their biological activities. The tremendous expanse in publicly available small molecules is also driving new efforts to better understand interactions involving small molecules particularly in area of drug docking and pharmacogenomics. We have studied and designed a functional group identification system with the associated ontology for it. The functional group identification system can detect the functional group components from given ligand structure with specific coordinate information. Functional group ontology (FGO) proposed by us is a structured classification of chemical functional group which acts as an important source of prior knowledge that may be automatically integrated to support identification, categorization and predictive data analysis tasks. We have used a new annotation method which can be used to construct the original structure from given ontological expression using exact coordinate information. Here, we also discuss about ontology-driven similarity measure of functional groups and uses of such novel ontology for pharmacophore searching and de-novo ligand designing. PMID:18288335

  8. 100% thiol-functionalized ethylene PMOs prepared by "thiol acid-ene" chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel, Dolores; van den Berg, Otto; Romero-Salguero, Francisco J; Du Prez, Filip; Van der Voort, Pascal

    2013-03-21

    A novel thiol functionalized bis-silane PMO precursor was synthesized by highly efficient thiol acid-ene chemistry between the double bonds of 1,2-(E)-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene and thioacetic acid. After aminolysis the self-assembly process of the formed SH-precursor with Pluronic P123 under acidic conditions yields the first 100% thiol-PMO material with good structural ordering.

  9. Carboxyl group (-CO2 H) functionalized coordination polymer nanoparticles as efficient platforms for drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novio, Fernando; Lorenzo, Julia; Nador, Fabiana; Wnuk, Karolina; Ruiz-Molina, Daniel

    2014-11-17

    Functionalization of nanoparticles can significantly influence their properties and potential applications. Although researchers can now functionalize metal, metal oxide, and organic polymer nanoparticles with a high degree of precision, controlled surface functionalization of nanoscale coordination polymer particles (CPPs) has remained a significant challenge. The lack of methodology is perhaps one of the greatest roadblocks to the advancement of CPPs into high added-value drug delivery applications. Here, we report having achieved this goal through a stepwise formation and functionalization protocol. We fabricated robust nanoparticles with enhanced thermal and colloidal stabilities by incorporation of carboxyl groups and these surface carboxyl groups could be subsequently functionalized through well-known peptide coupling reactions. The set of chemistries that we employed as proof-of-concept enabled a plethora of new functional improvements for the application of CPPs as drug delivery carriers, including enhanced colloidal stabilities and the incorporation of additional functional groups such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) or fluorescent dyes that enabled tracking of their cellular uptake. Finally, we ascertained the cytotoxicity of the new CPP nanoparticles loaded with camptothecin to human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7). Efflux measurements show that the encapsulation of camptothecin enhances the potency of the drug 6.5-fold and increases the drug retention within the cell.

  10. Functional group and substructure searching as a tool in metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Kotera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A direct link between the names and structures of compounds and the functional groups contained within them is important, not only because biochemists frequently rely on literature that uses a free-text format to describe functional groups, but also because metabolic models depend upon the connections between enzymes and substrates being known and appropriately stored in databases. METHODOLOGY: We have developed a database named "Biochemical Substructure Search Catalogue" (BiSSCat, which contains 489 functional groups, >200,000 compounds and >1,000,000 different computationally constructed substructures, to allow identification of chemical compounds of biological interest. CONCLUSIONS: This database and its associated web-based search program (http://bisscat.org/ can be used to find compounds containing selected combinations of substructures and functional groups. It can be used to determine possible additional substrates for known enzymes and for putative enzymes found in genome projects. Its applications to enzyme inhibitor design are also discussed.

  11. Inorganic SnIP-type double helices in main group chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Maximilian; Weihrich, Richard; Nilges, Tom

    2017-03-01

    Inspired by the synthesis of the first atomic-scale double helix semiconductor SnIP this study deals with the question if more atomistic, inorganic double helix compounds are accessible. With the aid of quantum chemical calculations we have identified 31 candidates by a homoatomic substitution in MXPn, varying the group 4 M-element from Si to Pb, the group 7 X-element from F to I and replacing the pnictide (Pn) phosphorus by arsenic. The double-helical structure of SnIP has been used as the starting model for all candidates and the electronic structure and vibrational spectra were determined within the Framework of Density Functional Theory (DFT). Varying the outer MX or the inner Pn helix led to the conclusion that iodide and bromide containing MXPn compounds show similar structures to SnIP. Here, the calculations indicate interesting effects for electronic band gap tuning. For the highly polarized fluorides a segregation of the helices to more complex MX substructures is predicted.

  12. Are erectile functions affected by AB0 blood group?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal Benli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between erectile dysfunction (ED, thought to be a vascular disease, and AB0 blood group. Material and Method: The study included 350 people abiding by the study criteria who applied to our clinic from April 2012-April 2015. The patients were divided into two groups including those with ED (Group 1 and those without (Group 2. Age, blood group, IIEF-5 score and presence of additional diseases were recorded. Erectile functions were analyzed according to blood group. Results: There was no difference between the mean age of 111 patients with ED and that of 239 patients without ED included in the study (p = 0.284. There was no difference between patients in the two groups in terms of smoking, alcohol use, hypertension and diabetes (p > 0.05. Among patients in the ED group, the mean IIEF-5 score according to blood group was 19.8 ± 5.04 in the 0 blood group, 16.5 ± 5.2 in the A blood group, 17.2 ± 5.3 in the B blood group and 13.3 ± 3.02 in the AB blood group. The IIEF-5 scores of individuals in the 0 blood group were significantly high compared to individuals in other blood groups (p = 0.004. Logistic regression analysis found that compared to the 0 blood group, the erectile dysfunction risk was 3.9 times greater for the A blood group, 3.5 times greater for the B blood group and 4.7 times greater for the AB blood group (p = 0.001 (Table 3. Conclusion: The risk of erectile dysfunction was significantly increased for individuals in the A, B and AB blood groups compared to individuals in the 0 blood group.

  13. Functional Grouping in Residential Homes for People with Intellectual Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Jim; Beadle-Brown, Julie; Macdonald, Susan; Ashman, Bev

    2003-01-01

    The effects of functional grouping of 303 people with intellectual disabilities on care practices in English group homes were investigated. Residents who were non-ambulant were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and residents with severe challenging behavior were rated as receiving care with less interpersonal warmth and…

  14. Protein functional-group 3D motif and its applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Representing and recognizing protein active sites sequence motif (1D motif) and structural motif (3D motif) is an important topic for predicting and designing protein function. Prevalent methods for extracting and searching 3D motif always consider residue as the minimal unit, which have limited sensitivity. Here we present a new spatial representation of protein active sites, called "functional-group 3D motif ", based on the fact that the functional groups inside a residue contribute mostly to its function. Relevant algorithm and computer program are developed, which could be widely used in the function prediction and the study of structural-function relationship of proteins. As a test, we defined a functional-group 3D motif of the catalytic triad and oxyanion hole with the structure of porcine trypsin (PDB code: 1mct) as the template. With our motif-searching program, we successfully found similar sub-structures in trypsins, subtilisins and a/b hydrolases, which show distinct folds but share similar catalytic mechanism. Moreover, this motif can be used to elucidate the structural basis of other proteins with variant catalytic triads by comparing it to those proteins. Finally, we scanned this motif against a non-redundant protein structure database to find its matches, and the results demonstrated the potential application of functional group 3D motif in function prediction. Above all, compared with the other 3D-motif representations on residues, the functional group 3D motif achieves better representation of protein active region, which is more sensitive for protein function prediction.

  15. On the construction of double group molecular symmetry functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visscher, L

    1996-01-01

    A new procedure for constructing double group symmetry functions is presented. Using this method integrals over Hermitian operators can become real quantities, even though the integrand and the functions themselves are complex. This is especially of interest to 4-component relativistic methods that

  16. Some Properties of Quasiconvex Functions on the Heisenberg Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-bao Sun; Xiao-ping Yang

    2005-01-01

    For the Heisenberg group, we introduce the concept of h-quasiconvex functions. We prove that the notions of h-quasiconvex functions and h-convex set are equivalent and that h-quasiconvex functions are locally bounded from above, and furthermore derive that h-convex functions are locally bounded, therefore it is locally Lipschitz continuous by using recent results by Danielli-Garofalo-Nhieu. Finally we give estimates of the L∞norm of the first derivatives of h-quasiconvex functions.

  17. Background field functional renormalization group for absorbing state phase transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchhold, Michael; Diehl, Sebastian

    2016-07-01

    We present a functional renormalization group approach for the active to inactive phase transition in directed percolation-type systems, in which the transition is approached from the active, finite density phase. By expanding the effective potential for the density field around its minimum, we obtain a background field action functional, which serves as a starting point for the functional renormalization group approach. Due to the presence of the background field, the corresponding nonperturbative flow equations yield remarkably good estimates for the critical exponents of the directed percolation universality class, even in low dimensions.

  18. Molecular materials and devices: developing new functional systems based on the coordination chemistry approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toma Henrique E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available At the onset of the nanotechnology age, molecular designing of materials and single molecule studies are opening wide possibilities of using molecular systems in electronic and photonic devices, as well as in technological applications based on molecular switching or molecular recognition. In this sense, inorganic chemists are privileged by the possibility of using the basic strategies of coordination chemistry to build up functional supramolecular materials, conveying the remarkable chemical properties of the metal centers and the characteristics of the ancillary ligands. Coordination chemistry also provides effective self-assembly strategies based on specific metal-ligand affinity and stereochemistry. Several molecular based materials, derived from inorganic and metal-organic compounds are focused on this article, with emphasis on new supramolecular porphyrins and porphyrazines, metal-clusters and metal-polyimine complexes. Such systems are also discussed in terms of their applications in catalysis, sensors and molecular devices.

  19. Optical behaviour of functional groups of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanam, Pavan K.; Sankaran, K.

    2016-10-01

    Optical properties of graphene oxide (GO) dispersed in aqueous medium with aging and pH variations were investigated along with concurrent changes of oxygen functional groups of GO. Freshly prepared GO exhibit strong excitation wavelength dependent luminescence, which gets gradually nullified with aging due to the drastic reduction in fraction of polar hydroxyl groups. Fourier transform infrared studies indicated that functional groups of GO undergo spontaneous modification with aging in aqueous medium, resulting in suppression of epoxide groups and enriched adsorption of water molecules. When the pH of GO dispersed in aqueous medium was varied, unique transformations of functional groups take place causing major disruption to the sp2 hybridised carbon domains of GO. Concurrent changes in luminescence of GO infer that the broad emission from freshly prepared GO has large contribution from disorder induced localised states due to hydroxyl, epoxide, carboxyl groups and changes in relative fractions of these groups with aging and pH variations of GO dispersions strongly influence the intensity as well as emission wavelength region of GO. Especially emission features of GO are strongly influenced by the presence, fraction and transformations of epoxide and hydroxyl groups of GO.

  20. The Program of External Quality Evaluation in Clinical Chemistry. An overview and evaluation after 11 years of functioning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martins, M C; Rodrigues, M O; Gomes, M A; Fonseca, A; Freitas, M M; Miguel, J P; Gomes, E M

    1994-01-01

    After an eleven-year period, the goals and way of functioning are remembered the External Quality Assessment Scheme in Clinical Chemistry, under the responsibility of the National Institute of Health...

  1. Solution-phase-peptide synthesis via the group-assisted purification (GAP) chemistry without using chromatography and recrystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianbin; An, Guanghui; Lin, Siqi; Xie, Jianbo; Zhou, Wei; Sun, Hao; Pan, Yi; Li, Guigen

    2014-02-01

    The solution phase synthesis of N-protected amino acids and peptides has been achieved through the Group-Assisted Purification (GAP) chemistry by avoiding disadvantages of other methods in regard to the difficult scale-up, expenses of solid and soluble polymers, etc. The GAP synthesis can reduce the use of solvents, silica gels, energy and manpower. In addition, the GAP auxiliary can be conveniently recovered for re-use and is environmentally friendly and benign, and substantially reduces waste production in academic labs and industry.

  2. Light and heavy dansyl reporter groups in food chemistry: amino acid assay in beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, Fabio; Benabdelkamel, Hicham; Di Donna, Leonardo; Athanassopoulos, Constantinos M; Napoli, Anna; Sindona, Giovanni

    2012-07-01

    5-Dimethylamino-1-sulfonyl naphthalene (DNS, commonly referred as dansyl) is a functionality, bearing well-established properties in directing the fragmentation, by mass spectrometry (MS), of the corresponding ionized sulfonylated derivatives. This property is shared also by its labeled analogs. The use of d(0)/d(6) DNS derivatives is now exploited in the application of the well-established isotope dilution mass spectrometric approach in the assay of complex mixtures. A new method for the quantitation of amino acids (AAs) in beverages is therefore presented, which relies on liquid chromatographic separation of their N-dansylated derivatives followed by comparative electrospray tandem MS/MS of the d(0)/d(6) isobaric mixtures. Labeled and unlabeled DNS derivatives of the selected AAs are readily available by microwave-assisted synthetic protocols. The novelty of the method is represented by the use of heavy and light DNS-isotopologue providing suitable reporter groups. Multiple-reaction monitoring has been applied in the assay of AAs in wine, pineapple juice and bergamot juice with good-to-excellent results as proved by both relative standard deviation, lower than 15%, and by the accuracy values in the range 90-110%.

  3. The NanoChemistry group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) uses NanoSight’s NTA system for nanoparticle characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs....

  4. The NanoChemistry group at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) uses NanoSight’s NTA system for nanoparticle characterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Salisbury, UK, 7th December 2011: NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs.......Salisbury, UK, 7th December 2011: NanoSight, leading manufacturers of unique nanoparticle characterization technology, describes how the Nano Chemistry group at DTU Copenhagen is utilizing nanoparticle tracking analysis, NTA, in its research and teaching programs....

  5. Surface functional groups and redox property of modified activated carbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xianglan; Deng Shengfu; Liu Qiong; Zhang Yan; Cheng Lei

    2011-01-01

    A series of activated carbons (ACs) were prepared using HNO3, H2O2 and steam as activation agents with the aim to introduce functional groups to carbon surface in the ACs preparation process. The effects of concentration of activation agent, activation time on the surface functional groups and redox property of ACs were characterized by Temperature Program Desorption (TPD) and Cyclic Voitammetry (CV). Results showed that lactone groups of ACs activated by HNO3 increase with activation time, and the carboxyl groups increase with the concentration of HNO3. Carbonyl/quinine groups of ACs activated by H2O2 increase with the activation time and the concentration of H2O2, although the acidic groups decrease with the concentration of H2O2. The redox property reflected by CV at 0 and 0.5 V is different with any kinds of oxygen functional groups characterized by TPD, but it is consistent with the SO2 catalytic oxidization/oxidation properties indicated by TPR.

  6. Fundamental and functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures with examples in physics, cell biology, and chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalay, Ziya

    2011-08-01

    How small can a macroscopic object be made without losing its intended function? Obviously, the smallest possible size is determined by the size of an atom, but it is not so obvious how many atoms are required to assemble an object so small, and yet that performs the same function as its macroscopic counterpart. In this review, we are concerned with objects of intermediate nature, lying between the microscopic and the macroscopic world. In physics and chemistry literature, this regime in-between is often called mesoscopic, and is known to bear interesting and counterintuitive features. After a brief introduction to the concept of mesoscopic systems from the perspective of physics, we discuss the functional aspects of mesoscopic architectures in cell biology, and supramolecular chemistry through many examples from the literature. We argue that the biochemistry of the cell is largely regulated by mesoscopic functional architectures; however, the significance of mesoscopic phenomena seems to be quite underappreciated in biological sciences. With this motivation, one of our main purposes here is to emphasize the critical role that mesoscopic structures play in cell biology and biochemistry.

  7. Multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory: barrier heights and main group and transition metal energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Rebecca K; Li Manni, Giovanni; Sonnenberger, Andrew L; Truhlar, Donald G; Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-01-13

    Kohn-Sham density functional theory, resting on the representation of the electronic density and kinetic energy by a single Slater determinant, has revolutionized chemistry, but for open-shell systems, the Kohn-Sham Slater determinant has the wrong symmetry properties as compared to an accurate wave function. We have recently proposed a theory, called multiconfiguration pair-density functional theory (MC-PDFT), in which the electronic kinetic energy and classical Coulomb energy are calculated from a multiconfiguration wave function with the correct symmetry properties, and the rest of the energy is calculated from a density functional, called the on-top density functional, that depends on the density and the on-top pair density calculated from this wave function. We also proposed a simple way to approximate the on-top density functional by translation of Kohn-Sham exchange-correlation functionals. The method is much less expensive than other post-SCF methods for calculating the dynamical correlation energy starting with a multiconfiguration self-consistent-field wave function as the reference wave function, and initial tests of the theory were quite encouraging. Here, we provide a broader test of the theory by applying it to bond energies of main-group molecules and transition metal complexes, barrier heights and reaction energies for diverse chemical reactions, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy. Averaged over 56 data points, the mean unsigned error is 3.2 kcal/mol for MC-PDFT, as compared to 6.9 kcal/mol for Kohn-Sham theory with a comparable density functional. MC-PDFT is more accurate on average than complete active space second-order perturbation theory (CASPT2) for main-group small-molecule bond energies, alkyl bond dissociation energies, transition-metal-ligand bond energies, proton affinities, and the water dimerization energy.

  8. 25th anniversary article: progress in chemistry and applications of functional indigos for organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Głowacki, Eric Daniel; Voss, Gundula; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-17

    Indigo and its derivatives are dyes and pigments with a long and distinguished history in organic chemistry. Recently, applications of this 'old' structure as a functional organic building block for organic electronics applications have renewed interest in these molecules and their remarkable chemical and physical properties. Natural-origin indigos have been processed in fully bio-compatible field effect transistors, operating with ambipolar mobilities up to 0.5 cm(2) /Vs and air-stability. The synthetic derivative isoindigo has emerged as one of the most successful building-blocks for semiconducting polymers for plastic solar cells with efficiencies > 5%. Another isomer of indigo, epindolidione, has also been shown to be one of the best reported organic transistor materials in terms of mobility (∼2 cm(2) /Vs) and stability. This progress report aims to review very recent applications of indigoids in organic electronics, but especially to logically bridge together the hereto independent research directions on indigo, isoindigo, and other materials inspired by historical dye chemistry: a field which was the root of the development of modern chemistry in the first place. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. From infinite to two dimensions through the functional renormalization group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranto, C; Andergassen, S; Bauer, J; Held, K; Katanin, A; Metzner, W; Rohringer, G; Toschi, A

    2014-05-16

    We present a novel scheme for an unbiased, nonperturbative treatment of strongly correlated fermions. The proposed approach combines two of the most successful many-body methods, the dynamical mean field theory and the functional renormalization group. Physically, this allows for a systematic inclusion of nonlocal correlations via the functional renormalization group flow equations, after the local correlations are taken into account nonperturbatively by the dynamical mean field theory. To demonstrate the feasibility of the approach, we present numerical results for the two-dimensional Hubbard model at half filling.

  10. Direct and indirect effects of invasive plants on soil chemistry and ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenhamer, Jeffrey D; Callaway, Ragan M

    2010-01-01

    Invasive plants have a multitude of impacts on plant communities through their direct and indirect effects on soil chemistry and ecosystem function. For example, plants modify the soil environment through root exudates that affect soil structure, and mobilize and/or chelate nutrients. The long-term impact of litter and root exudates can modify soil nutrient pools, and there is evidence that invasive plant species may alter nutrient cycles differently from native species. The effects of plants on ecosystem biogeochemistry may be caused by differences in leaf tissue nutrient stoichiometry or secondary metabolites, although evidence for the importance of allelochemicals in driving these processes is lacking. Some invasive species may gain a competitive advantage through the release of compounds or combinations of compounds that are unique to the invaded community—the “novel weapons hypothesis.” Invasive plants also can exert profound impact on plant communities indirectly through the herbicides used to control them. Glyphosate, the most widely used herbicide in the world, often is used to help control invasive weeds, and generally is considered to have minimal environmental impacts. Most studies show little to no effect of glyphosate and other herbicides on soil microbial communities. However, herbicide applications can reduce or promote rhizobium nodulation and mycorrhiza formation. Herbicide drift can affect the growth of non-target plants, and glyphosate and other herbicides can impact significantly the secondary chemistry of plants at sublethal doses. In summary, the literature indicates that invasive species can alter the biogeochemistry of ecosystems, that secondary metabolites released by invasive species may play important roles in soil chemistry as well as plant-plant and plant-microbe interactions, and that the herbicides used to control invasive species can impact plant chemistry and ecosystems in ways that have yet to be fully explored.

  11. Self-assembled molecular platforms for bacteria/material biointerface studies: importance to control functional group accessibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmler, Judith; Ponche, Arnaud; Anselme, Karine; Ploux, Lydie

    2013-11-13

    Highly controlled mixed molecular layers are crucial to study the role of material surface chemistry in biointerfaces, such as bacteria and subsequent biofilms interacting with biomaterials. Silanes with non-nucleophilic functional groups are promising to form self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) due to their low sensitivity to side-reactions. Nevertheless, the real control of surface chemistry, layer structure, and organization has not been determined. Here, we report a comprehensive synthesis and analysis of undecyltrichlorosilane- and 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane-based mixed SAMs on silicon substrates. The impact of the experimental conditions on the control of surface chemistry, layer structure, and organization was investigated by combining survey and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, wettability measurements, and ellipsometry. The most appropriate conditions were first determined for elaborating highly reproducible, but easily made, pure 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane SAMs. We have demonstrated that the control is maintained on more complex surfaces, i.e., surfaces revealing various chemical densities, which were obtained with different ratios of undecyltrichlorosilane and 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane. The control is also maintained after bromine to amine group conversion via SN2 bromine-to-azide reactions. The appropriateness of such highly controlled amino- and methyl-group revealing platforms (NH2-X%/CH3) for biointerface studies was shown by the higher reproducibility of bacterial adhesion on NH2-100%/CH3 SAMs compared to bacterial adhesion on molecular layers of overall similar surface chemistry but less control at the molecular scale.

  12. Ideal Class Groups and Subgroups of Real Quadratic Function Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In this paper, we study the real quadratic function fields K=k(D), given a necessary and sufficient condition for the ideal class group H(K) of any real quadratic function field K to have a cyclic subgroup of order n, and obtained eight series of such fields. The ideal class numbers h(OK) of K in the series all have a factor n.

  13. PROBLEMS OF TEAM FUNCTIONING AS SPECIAL TYPE OF SOCIAL GROUP

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. VASILYEV

    2016-01-01

    In the article the analysis of different concepts of "team" from the point of view of sociology, which today can be divided into two large groups. The first affects his symptoms and descriptions, and the second structure of the definition. Summarizing them all, the author highlighted that currently the "team" can only be called an effectively functioning social group. Despite the fact that "command" is a kind of small social group, described the differences between these concepts. The article...

  14. Dominance Weighted Social Choice Functions for Group Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia ROSSI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In travel domains, decision support systems provide support to tourists in the planning of their vacation. In particular, when the number of possible Points of Interest (POI to visit is large, the system should help tourists providing recommendations on the POI that could be more interesting for them. Since traveling is, usually, an activity that involves small groups of people, the system should take simultaneously into account the preferences of each group's member. At the same time, it also should model possible intra-group relationships, which can have an impact in the group decision-making process. In this paper, we model this problem as a multi-agent aggregation of preferences by using weighted social choice functions, whereas such weights are automatically evaluated by analyzing the interactions of the group's members on Online Social Networks.

  15. Elemental and compound semiconductor surface chemistry: Intelligent interfacial design facilitated through novel functionalization and deposition strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Lon Alan, Jr.

    The fundamental understanding of silicon surface chemistry is an essential tool for silicon's continued dominance of the semiconductor industry in the years to come. By tapping into the vast library of organic functionalities, the synthesis of organic monolayers may be utilized to prepare interfaces, tailored to a myriad of applications ranging from silicon VLSI device optimization and MEMS to physiological implants and chemical sensors. Efforts in our lab to form stable organic monolayers on porous silicon through direct silicon-carbon linkages have resulted in several efficient functionalization methods. In the first chapter of this thesis a comprehensive review of these methods, and many others is presented. The following chapter and the appendix serve to demonstrate both potential applications and studies aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the chemistry behind the organic functionalization of silicon surfaces. The remainder of this thesis attempts to demonstrate new methods of metal deposition onto both elemental and compound semiconductor surfaces. Currently, there is considerable interest in producing patterned metallic structures with reduced dimensions for use in technologies such as ULSI device fabrication, MEMS, and arrayed nanosensors, without sacrificing throughput or cost effectiveness. Research in our laboratory has focused on the preparation of precious metal thin films on semiconductor substrates via electroless deposition. Continuous metallic films form spontaneously under ambient conditions, in the absence of a fluoride source or an externally applied current. In order to apply this metallization method toward the development of useful technologies, patterning utilizing photolithography, microcontact printing, and scanning probe nanolithography has been demonstrated.

  16. Control of oxo-group functionalization and reduction of the uranyl ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L; Pécharman, Anne-Frédérique; Lord, Rianne M; Jones, Guy M; Hollis, Emmalina; Nichol, Gary S; Maron, Laurent; Fang, Jian; Davin, Thomas; Love, Jason B

    2015-04-01

    Uranyl complexes of a large, compartmental N8-macrocycle adopt a rigid, "Pacman" geometry that stabilizes the U(V) oxidation state and promotes chemistry at a single uranyl oxo-group. We present here new and straightforward routes to singly reduced and oxo-silylated uranyl Pacman complexes and propose mechanisms that account for the product formation, and the byproduct distributions that are formed using alternative reagents. Uranyl(VI) Pacman complexes in which one oxo-group is functionalized by a single metal cation are activated toward single-electron reduction. As such, the addition of a second equivalent of a Lewis acidic metal complex such as MgN″2 (N″ = N(SiMe3)2) forms a uranyl(V) complex in which both oxo-groups are Mg functionalized as a result of Mg-N bond homolysis. In contrast, reactions with the less Lewis acidic complex [Zn(N″)Cl] favor the formation of weaker U-O-Zn dative interactions, leading to reductive silylation of the uranyl oxo-group in preference to metalation. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational analysis of these reactions and of oxo-metalated products isolated by other routes have allowed us to propose mechanisms that account for pathways to metalation or silylation of the exo-oxo-group.

  17. Efficient functionalization of oxide-free silicon(111) surfaces: thiol-yne versus thiol-ene click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhairamadgi, Nagendra S; Gangarapu, Satesh; Caipa Campos, Mabel A; Paulusse, Jos M J; van Rijn, Cees J M; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-04-09

    Thiol-yne click (TYC) chemistry was utilized as a copper-free click reaction for the modification of alkyne-terminated monolayers on oxide-free Si(111) surfaces, and the results were compared with the analogous thiol-ene click (TEC) chemistry. A wide range of thiols such as 9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbonyl cysteine, thio-β-d-glucose tetraacetate, thioacetic acid, thioglycerol, thioglycolic acid, and 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecanethiol was immobilized using TYC under photochemical conditions, and all modified surfaces were characterized by static water contact angle measurements, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (including a simulation thereof by density functional calculations), and infrared absorption reflection spectroscopy. Surface-bound TYC proceeds with an efficiency of up to 1.5 thiols per alkyne group. This high surface coverage proceeds without oxidizing the Si surface. TYC yielded consistently higher surface coverages than TEC, due to double addition of thiols to alkyne-terminated monolayers. This also allows for the sequential and highly efficient attachment of two different thiols onto an alkyne-terminated monolayer.

  18. Testing for difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup; Chen, Andrew C. N.; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2004-01-01

    We describe a meta-analytic method that tests for the difference between two groups of functional neuroimaging experiments. We use kernel density estimation in three-dimensional brain space to convert points representing focal brain activations into a voxel-based representation. We find the maximum...

  19. Assessment of the TCA functional in computational chemistry and solid-state physics

    CERN Document Server

    Fabiano, E; Terentjevs, A; Della Sala, F; Cortona, P

    2015-01-01

    We assess the Tognetti-Cortona-Adamo (TCA) generalized gradient approximation correlation functional [J. Chem. Phys. 128:034101 (2008)] for a variety of electronic systems. We find that, even if the TCA functional is not exact for the uniform electron gas, it is very accurate for the jellium surface correlation energies and it gives a realistic description of the quantum oscillations and surface effects of various jellium clusters, that are important model systems in computational chemistry and solid-state physics. When the TCA correlation is combined with the non-empirical PBEint, Wu-Cohen, and PBEsol$_b$ exchange functionals, the resulting exchange-correlation approximations provide good performances for a broad palette of systems and properties, being reasonably accurate for thermochemistry and geometry of molecules, transition metal complexes, non-covalent interactions,equilibrium lattice constants, bulk moduli, and cohesive energies of solids.

  20. Formation of functional groups on graphite during oxygen plasma treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvelbar, Uros [Plasma Laboratory, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia)]. E-mail: uros.cvelbar@guest.arnes.si; Markoli, Bostjan [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 12, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Poberaj, Igor [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Zalar, Anton [Plasma Laboratory, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Kosec, Ladislav [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 12, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia); Spaic, Savo [Faculty of Natural Sciences and Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Askerceva 12, Ljubljana SI-1000 (Slovenia)

    2006-12-15

    Improved sample wettability was obtained by oxygen plasma functionalization of pyrolytic graphite. The samples were exposed to highly dissociated oxygen plasma with the density of 1 x 10{sup 16} m{sup -3}, the electron temperature of about 5.5 eV and the density of neutral oxygen atoms of 8 x 10{sup 21} m{sup -3} for 20 s. The surface wettability was measured by a contact angle of water drop. The contact angle dropped from original 112{sup o} down to about 1{sup o}. The functional groups were detected by XPS analyses. The survey spectrum showed a substantial increase of oxygen concentration on the surface, while high-resolution analyses showed additional oxygen was bonded onto the graphite surface in the form of C-O polar functional group responsible for the increase of the surface energy.

  1. Direct quantification of negatively charged functional groups on membrane surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Tiraferri, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Surface charge plays an important role in membrane-based separations of particulates, macromolecules, and dissolved ionic species. In this study, we present two experimental methods to determine the concentration of negatively charged functional groups at the surface of dense polymeric membranes. Both techniques consist of associating the membrane surface moieties with chemical probes, followed by quantification of the bound probes. Uranyl acetate and toluidine blue O dye, which interact with the membrane functional groups via complexation and electrostatic interaction, respectively, were used as probes. The amount of associated probes was quantified using liquid scintillation counting for uranium atoms and visible light spectroscopy for the toluidine blue dye. The techniques were validated using self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols with known amounts of charged moieties. The surface density of negatively charged functional groups of hand-cast thin-film composite polyamide membranes, as well as commercial cellulose triacetate and polyamide membranes, was quantified under various conditions. Using both techniques, we measured a negatively charged functional group density of 20-30nm -2 for the hand-cast thin-film composite membranes. The ionization behavior of the membrane functional groups, determined from measurements with toluidine blue at varying pH, was consistent with published data for thin-film composite polyamide membranes. Similarly, the measured charge densities on commercial membranes were in general agreement with previous investigations. The relative simplicity of the two methods makes them a useful tool for quantifying the surface charge concentration of a variety of surfaces, including separation membranes. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Engineering single-molecule, nanoscale, and microscale bio-functional materials via click chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele, Michael Angelo-Anthony

    To expand the design envelope and supplement the materials library available to biomaterials scientists, the copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuCAAC) was explored as a route to design, synthesize and characterize bio-functional small-molecules, nanoparticles, and microfibers. In each engineered system, the use of click chemistry provided facile, bio-orthogonal control for materials synthesis; moreover, the results provided a methodology and more complete, fundamental understanding of the use of click chemistry as a tool for the synergy of biotechnology, polymer and materials science. Fluorophores with well-defined photophysical characteristics (ranging from UV to NIR fluorescence) were used as building blocks for small-molecule, fluorescent biosensors. Fluorophores were paired to exhibit fluorescence resonant energy transfer (FRET) and used to probe the metabolic activity of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase (CARDO). The FRET pair exhibited a significant variation in PL response with exposure to the lysate of Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10, an organism which can degrade variants of both the donor and acceptor fluorophores. Nanoparticle systems were modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry affinity tags for CARDO and were subsequently utilized for affinity based bioseparation of CARDO from crude cell lysate. The enzymes were baited with an azide-modified carbazolyl-moiety attached to a poly(propargyl acrylate) nanoparticle. Magnetic nanocluster systems were also modified via CuCAAC chemistry to carry fluorescent imaging tags. The iron-oxide nanoclusters were coated with poly(acrylic acid-co-propargyl acrylate) to provide a clickable surface. Ultimately, alternate Cu-free click chemistries were utilized to produce biohybrid microfibers. The biohybrid microfibers were synthesized under benign photopolymerization conditions inside a microchannel, allowing the encapsulation of viable bacteria. By adjusting pre-polymer solutions and laminar flow rates within the

  3. Linking functional group richness and ecosystem functions of dung beetles: an experimental quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milotić, Tanja; Quidé, Stijn; Van Loo, Thomas; Hoffmann, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    Dung beetles form an insect group that fulfils important functions in terrestrial ecosystems throughout the world. These include nutrient cycling through dung removal, soil bioturbation, plant growth, secondary seed dispersal and parasite control. We conducted field experiments at two sites in the northern hemisphere temperate region in which dung removal and secondary seed dispersal were assessed. Dung beetles were classified in three functional groups, depending on their size and dung manipulation method: dwellers, large and small tunnelers. Other soil inhabiting fauna were included as a fourth functional group. Dung removal and seed dispersal by each individual functional group and combinations thereof were estimated in exclusion experiments using different dung types. Dwellers were the most diverse and abundant group, but tunnelers were dominant in terms of biomass. All dung beetle functional groups had a clear preference for fresh dung. The ecosystem services in dung removal and secondary seed dispersal provided by dung beetles were significant and differed between functional groups. Although in absolute numbers more dwellers were found, large tunnelers were disproportionally important for dung burial and seed removal. In the absence of dung beetles, other soil inhabiting fauna, such as earthworms, partly took over the dung decomposing role of dung beetles while most dung was processed when all native functional groups were present. Our results, therefore, emphasize the need to conserve functionally complete dung ecosystems to maintain full ecosystem functioning.

  4. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-07

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  5. Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

    2012-10-01

    Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ~1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10(-11)) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10(-4)), excitability (P=9.0 × 10(-4)) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10(-3)). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia.

  6. 2-Pyridinyl Thermolabile Groups as General Protectants for Hydroxyl, Phosphate, and Carboxyl Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinska, Jolanta; Witkowska, Agnieszka; Kaczyński, Tomasz P; Krygier, Dominika; Ratajczak, Tomasz; Chmielewski, Marcin K

    2017-03-02

    Application of 2-pyridinyl thermolabile protecting groups (2-PyTPGs) for protection of hydroxyl, phosphate, and carboxyl functions is presented in this unit. Their characteristic feature is a unique removal process following the intramolecular cyclization mechanism and induced only by temperature rise. Deprotection rate of 2-PyTPGs is dependent on certain parameters, such as solvent (aqueous or non-aqueous medium), pH values, and electron distribution in a pyridine ring. The presented approach pertains not only to protecting groups but also to an advanced system of controlling certain properties of 2-pyridinyl derivatives. We improved the "chemical switch" method, allowing us to regulate the protecting group stability by inversing the electron distribution in 2-PyTPG. Together with pH values manipulation, this allows us to regulate the protecting group stability. Moreover, phosphite cyclization to oxazaphospholidine provides a very stable but easily reversible tool for phosphate protection/modifications. For all TPGs we confirmed their utility in a system of protecting groups. This concept can contribute to designing the general protecting group that could be useful in bioorganic chemistry. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. Effects of resource chemistry on the composition and function of hyporheic stream biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward eHall

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stream ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwaters to the sea. Interstitial sediments in the hyporheic zone are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their high levels of microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics of these systems remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown interstitial biofilms. Specifically, we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of beta-proteobacter origin. We use this model system to link microbial form, (community composition and proteome, with function, (enzyme activity, in an attempt to develop a better understanding of the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems.

  8. Effects of resource chemistry on the composition and function of stream hyporheic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, E.K.; Besemer, K.; Kohl, L.; Preiler, C.; Reidel, K.; Schneider, T.; Wanek, W.; Battin, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    Fluvial ecosystems process large quantities of dissolved organic matter as it moves from the headwater streams to the sea. In particular, hyporheic sediments are centers of high biogeochemical reactivity due to their elevated residence time and high microbial biomass and activity. However, the interaction between organic matter and microbial dynamics in the hyporheic zone remains poorly understood. We evaluated how variance in resource chemistry affected the microbial community and its associated activity in experimentally grown hyporheic biofilms. To do this we fed beech leaf leachates that differed in chemical composition to a series of bioreactors filled with sediment from a sub-alpine stream. Differences in resource chemistry resulted in differences in diversity and phylogenetic origin of microbial proteins, enzyme activity, and microbial biomass stoichiometry. Specifically, increased lignin, phenolics, and manganese in a single leachate resulted in increased phenoloxidase and peroxidase activity, elevated microbial biomass carbon:nitrogen ratio, and a greater proportion of proteins of Betaproteobacteria origin. We used this model system to attempt to link microbial form (community composition and metaproteome) with function (enzyme activity) in order to better understand the mechanisms that link resource heterogeneity to ecosystem function in stream ecosystems.

  9. A General Chemistry and Precalculus First-Year Interest Group (FIG): Effect on Retention, Skills, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Laura E.; Workman, Harry J.; Haruta, Mako E.

    2005-01-01

    The backdrop of the calculus reform movement created a fertile movement for the creation of overlap between general chemistry and precalculus as many of the goals emphasized key concepts from the chemistry lab. By using the graphing calculator in both precalculus and chemistry laboratory enhanced the students' comfort and competence with the…

  10. A General Chemistry and Precalculus First-Year Interest Group (FIG): Effect on Retention, Skills, and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Laura E.; Workman, Harry J.; Haruta, Mako E.

    2005-01-01

    The backdrop of the calculus reform movement created a fertile movement for the creation of overlap between general chemistry and precalculus as many of the goals emphasized key concepts from the chemistry lab. By using the graphing calculator in both precalculus and chemistry laboratory enhanced the students' comfort and competence with the…

  11. Unexpected metal ion-assisted transformations leading to unexplored bridging ligands in Ni(II) coordination chemistry: the case of PO3F(2-) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermitzaki, Despina; Raptopoulou, Catherine P; Psycharis, Vassilis; Escuer, Albert; Perlepes, Spyros P; Stamatatos, Theocharis C

    2014-10-21

    The initial 'accidental', metal ion-assisted hydrolysis of PF6(-) to PO3F(2-) has been evolved in a systematic investigation of the bridging affinity of the latter group in Ni(II)/oximate chemistry; mono-, di- and trinuclear complexes have been prepared and confirmed both the rich reactivity of PO3F(2-) and its potential for further use as bridging ligand in high-nuclearity 3d-metal cluster chemistry.

  12. Evolution of Functional Groups during Pyrolysis Oil Upgrading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovikj, Filip [Department; Tran, Chi-Cong [Department; Kaliaguine, Serge [Department; Olarte, Mariefel V. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354, United States; Garcia-Perez, Manuel [Department

    2017-07-14

    In this paper, we examine the evolution of functional groups (carbonyl, carboxyl, phenol, and hydroxyl) during stabilization at 100–200 °C of two typical wood derived pyrolysis oils from BTG and Amaron in a batch reactor over Ru/C catalyst for 4h. An aqueous and an oily phase were obtained. The content of functional groups in both phases were analyzed by GC/MS, 31P-NMR, 1H-NMR, elemental analysis, KF titration, carbonyl groups by Faix, Folin – Ciocalteu method and UV-Fluorescence. The consumption of hydrogen was between 0.007 and 0.016 g/g oil, and 0.001-0.020 g of CH4/g of oil, 0.005-0.016 g of CO2/g oil and 0.03-0.10 g H2O/g oil were formed. The content of carbonyl, hydroxyl, and carboxyl groups in the volatile GC-MS detectable fraction decreased (80, 65, and ~70% respectively), while their behavior in the total oil and hence in the non-volatile fraction was more complex. The carbonyl groups initially decreased having minimum at ~125-150°C and then increased, while the hydroxyl groups had reversed trend. This might be explained by initial hydrogenation of the carbonyl groups to form hydroxyls, followed by continued dehydration reactions at higher temperatures that may increase their content. The 31P-NMR was on the limit of its sensitivity for the carboxylic groups to precisely detect changes in the non-volatile fraction, however the more precise titration method showed that the concentration of carboxylic groups in the non-volatile fraction remains constant with increased stabilization temperature. The UV-Fluorescence results show that repolymerization increases with temperature. ATR-FTIR method coupled with deconvolution of the region between 1490 and 1850 cm-1 showed to be a good tool for following the changes in carbonyl groups and phenols of the stabilized pyrolysis oils. The deconvolution of the IR bands around 1050 and 1260 cm-1 correlated very well with the changes in the 31P-NMR silent O groups (likely ethers). Most of the H2O formation could be

  13. Functionalization of metal-organic frameworks through the postsynthetic transformation of olefin side groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindelang, Konrad; Kronast, Alexander; Vagin, Sergei I; Rieger, Bernhard

    2013-06-17

    For the first time, the adaptability of the C=C double bond as a versatile precursor for the postsynthetic modification (PSM) of microporous materials was extensively investigated and evaluated. Therefore, an olefin-tagged 4,4'-bipyridine linker was synthesized and successfully introduced as pillar linker within a 9,10-triptycenedicarboxylate (TDC) zinc paddle-wheel metal-organic framework (MOF) through microwave-assisted synthesis. Different reactions, predominately used in organic chemistry, were tested, leading to the development of new postsynthetic reactions for the functionalization of solid materials. The postsynthetic oxidation of the olefin side groups applying osmium tetroxide (OsO₄) as a catalyst led to the formation of a microporous material with free vicinal diol functionalities. The epoxidation with dimethyldioxirane (DMDO) enabled the synthesis of epoxy-functionalized MOFs. In addition to that, reaction procedures for a postsynthetic hydroboration with borane dimethyl sulfide as well as a photoinduced thiol-ene click reaction with ethyl mercaptan were developed. For all of these PSMs, yields of more than 90% were obtained, entirely maintaining the crystallinity of the MOFs. Since the direct introduction of the corresponding groups by means of pre-synthetic approaches is hardly possible, these new PSMs are useful tools for the functionalization of porous solids towards applications such as selective adsorption, separation, and catalysis.

  14. Groups as units of functional analysis, individuals as proximate mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, David Sloan

    2014-06-01

    Whenever selection operates at a given level of a multitier hierarchy, units at that level should become the object of functional analysis, and units at lower levels should be studied as proximate mechanisms. This intuition already exists for the study of genes in individuals, when individuals are the unit of selection. It is only beginning to be applied for the study of individuals in groups, when groups are the unit of selection. Smaldino's target article is an important step in this direction with an emphasis on human cultural evolution, but the same algorithm applies to all multilevel evolutionary processes.

  15. Recent progress in orbital-free density functional theory (recent advances in computational chemistry)

    CERN Document Server

    Wesolowski, Tomasz A

    2013-01-01

    This is a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art computational methods based on orbital-free formulation of density functional theory completed by the most recent developments concerning the exact properties, approximations, and interpretations of the relevant quantities in density functional theory. The book is a compilation of contributions stemming from a series of workshops which had been taking place since 2002. It not only chronicles many of the latest developments but also summarises some of the more significant ones. The chapters are mainly reviews of sub-domains but also include original research. Readership: Graduate students, academics and researchers in computational chemistry. Atomic & molecular physicists, theoretical physicists, theoretical chemists, physical chemists and chemical physicists.

  16. Copper-free click-chemistry platform to functionalize cisplatin prodrugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, Rakesh K; McNitt, Christopher D; Popik, Vladimir V; Dhar, Shanta

    2014-06-02

    The ability to rationally design and construct a platform technology to develop new platinum(IV) [Pt(IV)] prodrugs with functionalities for installation of targeting moieties, delivery systems, fluorescent reporters from a single precursor with the ability to release biologically active cisplatin by using well-defined chemistry is critical for discovering new platinum-based therapeutics. With limited numbers of possibilities considering the sensitivity of Pt(IV) centers, we used a strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition approach to provide a platform, in which new functionalities can easily be installed on cisplatin prodrugs from a single Pt(IV) precursor. The ability of this platform to be incorporated in nanodelivery vehicle and conjugation to fluorescent reporters were also investigated.

  17. Computing the effective action with the functional renormalization group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Codello, Alessandro [CP3-Origins and the Danish IAS University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Percacci, Roberto [SISSA, Trieste (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Rachwal, Leslaw [Fudan University, Department of Physics, Center for Field Theory and Particle Physics, Shanghai (China); Tonero, Alberto [ICTP-SAIFR and IFT, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2016-04-15

    The ''exact'' or ''functional'' renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ{sub k}. The ordinary effective action Γ{sub 0} can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k = Λ down to k = 0. We give several examples of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We reproduce the four-point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral Lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization of QED and of Yang-Mills theory. We also compute the two-point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity. (orig.)

  18. Oxygen functional groups in graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shizhen; Li, Degang; Sun, Hongqi; Ang, Ha Ming; Tadé, Moses O; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-04-15

    Metal-free semiconductors offer a new opportunity for environmental photocatalysis toward a potential breakthrough in high photo efficiency with complete prevention of metal leaching. In this study, graphitic carbon nitride (GCN) modified by oxygen functional groups was synthesized by a hydrothermal treatment of pristine GCN at different temperatures with H2O2. Insights into the emerging characteristics of the modified GCN in photocatalysis were obtained by determining the optical properties, band structure, electrochemical activity and pollutant degradation efficiency. It was found that the introduction of GCN with oxygen functional groups can enhance light absorption and accelerate electron transfer so as to improve the photocatalytic reaction efficiency. The photoinduced reactive radicals and the associated photodegradation were investigated by in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The reactive radicals, O2(-) and OH, were responsible for organic degradation.

  19. Microscopic work function anisotropy and surface chemistry of 316L stainless steel using photoelectron emission microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, N., E-mail: nick.barrett@cea.fr [CEA, IRAMIS, SPEC, LENSIS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renault, O. [CEA, LETI, Minatec Campus, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Lemaître, H. [Université de Cergy-Pontoise, Rue d’Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95 031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Surface Dynamics Laboratory, Institut for Fysik og Astronomi Aarhus Universitet, Ny Munkegade 120, 8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Bonnaillie, P. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMP, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Barcelo, F. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DMN, SRMA, LA2M, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Miserque, F. [CEA, DEN, DANS, DPC, SCCME, LECA, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Wang, M.; Corbel, C. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradis, Ecole Polytechnique, route de Saclay, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • PEEM and EBSD study of spatial variations in local work function of 316L steel. • Correlation between work function and crystal grain orientation at the surface of 316L steel. • Spatially resolved chemistry of residual oxide layer. - Abstract: We have studied the variation in the work function of the surface of sputtered cleaned 316L stainless steel with only a very thin residual oxide surface layer as a function of grain orientation using X-ray photoelectron emission microscopy (XPEEM) and Electron Backscattering Diffraction. The grains are mainly oriented [1 1 1] and [1 0 1]. Four distinct work function values spanning a 150 meV energy window are measured. Grains oriented [1 1 1] have a higher work function than those oriented [1 0 1]. From core level XPEEM we deduce that all grain surfaces are Cr enriched and Ni depleted whereas the Cr/Fe ratio is similar for all grains. The [1 1 1] oriented grains show evidence for a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide and a higher concentration of defective oxygen sites.

  20. Model parameters for representative wetland plant functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Amber S.; Kiniry, James R.; Mushet, David M.; Smith, Loren M.; McMurry, Scott T.; Attebury, Kelly; Lang, Megan; McCarty, Gregory W.; Shaffer, Jill A.; Effland, William R.; Johnson, Mari-Vaughn V.

    2017-01-01

    Wetlands provide a wide variety of ecosystem services including water quality remediation, biodiversity refugia, groundwater recharge, and floodwater storage. Realistic estimation of ecosystem service benefits associated with wetlands requires reasonable simulation of the hydrology of each site and realistic simulation of the upland and wetland plant growth cycles. Objectives of this study were to quantify leaf area index (LAI), light extinction coefficient (k), and plant nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) concentrations in natural stands of representative plant species for some major plant functional groups in the United States. Functional groups in this study were based on these parameters and plant growth types to enable process-based modeling. We collected data at four locations representing some of the main wetland regions of the United States. At each site, we collected on-the-ground measurements of fraction of light intercepted, LAI, and dry matter within the 2013–2015 growing seasons. Maximum LAI and k variables showed noticeable variations among sites and years, while overall averages and functional group averages give useful estimates for multisite simulation modeling. Variation within each species gives an indication of what can be expected in such natural ecosystems. For P and K, the concentrations from highest to lowest were spikerush (Eleocharis macrostachya), reed canary grass (Phalaris arundinacea), smartweed (Polygonum spp.), cattail (Typha spp.), and hardstem bulrush (Schoenoplectus acutus). Spikerush had the highest N concentration, followed by smartweed, bulrush, reed canary grass, and then cattail. These parameters will be useful for the actual wetland species measured and for the wetland plant functional groups they represent. These parameters and the associated process-based models offer promise as valuable tools for evaluating environmental benefits of wetlands and for evaluating impacts of various agronomic practices in

  1. Renormalization Scheme Dependence and the Renormalization Group Beta Function

    OpenAIRE

    Chishtie, F. A.; McKeon, D. G. C.

    2016-01-01

    The renormalization that relates a coupling "a" associated with a distinct renormalization group beta function in a given theory is considered. Dimensional regularization and mass independent renormalization schemes are used in this discussion. It is shown how the renormalization $a^*=a+x_2a^2$ is related to a change in the mass scale $\\mu$ that is induced by renormalization. It is argued that the infrared fixed point is to be a determined in a renormalization scheme in which the series expan...

  2. The Observational Mass Function of Loose Galaxy Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Girardi, M

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the three catalogs of nearby loose groups identified by Garcia (1993). She used a percolation and a hierarchical method, and proposed a third group catalog defined as a combination of the two. Each catalog contains almost 500 groups. In agreement with previous works on earlier catalogs, we find that groups can be described as collapsing systems. Their sampled size is much larger than their expected virialized region. We compute the virial masses and correct them by taking into account the young dynamical status. We estimate group masses, M, for two cosmological models, a flat one with Omega_0=1 and an open one with Omega_0=0.2. For each of the three catalogs we calculate the mass function, MF. The number density of groups with M>9x10^{12}\\msun, which is the adopted limit of sample completeness, ranges within 1.3-1.9x10^{-3}h^3/Mpc^3 for Omega_0=1, and it is about a factor of 15% lower for Omega_0=0.2. The MFs of the hierarchical and combined catalogs have essentially the same shape, while the MF of...

  3. Thermophoretic migration of vesicles depends on mean temperature and head group chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Emma L.; Kotar, Jurij; Parolini, Lucia; di Michele, Lorenzo; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-05-01

    A number of colloidal systems, including polymers, proteins, micelles and hard spheres, have been studied in thermal gradients to observe and characterize their driven motion. Here we show experimentally the thermophoretic behaviour of unilamellar lipid vesicles, finding that mobility depends on the mean local temperature of the suspension and on the structure of the exposed polar lipid head groups. By tuning the temperature, vesicles can be directed towards hot or cold, forming a highly concentrated region. Binary mixtures of vesicles composed of different lipids can be segregated using thermophoresis, according to their head group. Our results demonstrate that thermophoresis enables robust and chemically specific directed motion of liposomes, which can be exploited in driven processes.

  4. Water Chemistry Laboratory Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, David; And Others

    This manual of laboratory experiments in water chemistry serves a dual function of illustrating fundamental chemical principles of dilute aqueous systems and of providing the student with some familiarity with the chemical measurements commonly used in water and wastewater analysis. Experiments are grouped in categories on the basis of similar…

  5. Keldysh functional renormalization group for electronic properties of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fräßdorf, Christian; Mosig, Johannes E. M.

    2017-03-01

    We construct a nonperturbative nonequilibrium theory for graphene electrons interacting via the instantaneous Coulomb interaction by combining the functional renormalization group method with the nonequilibrium Keldysh formalism. The Coulomb interaction is partially bosonized in the forward scattering channel resulting in a coupled Fermi-Bose theory. Quantum kinetic equations for the Dirac fermions and the Hubbard-Stratonovich boson are derived in Keldysh basis, together with the exact flow equation for the effective action and the hierarchy of one-particle irreducible vertex functions, taking into account a possible nonzero expectation value of the bosonic field. Eventually, the system of equations is solved approximately under thermal equilibrium conditions at finite temperature, providing results for the renormalized Fermi velocity and the static dielectric function, which extends the zero-temperature results of Bauer et al., Phys. Rev. B 92, 121409 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.121409.

  6. Thiol-ene click chemistry: computational and kinetic analysis of the influence of alkene functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrop, Brian H; Coffey, Roderick N

    2012-08-22

    The influence of alkene functionality on the energetics and kinetics of radical initiated thiol-ene click chemistry has been studied computationally at the CBS-QB3 level. Relative energetics (ΔH°, ΔH(++), ΔG°, ΔG(++)) have been determined for all stationary points along the step-growth mechanism of thiol-ene reactions between methyl mercaptan and a series of 12 alkenes: propene, methyl vinyl ether, methyl allyl ether, norbornene, acrylonitrile, methyl acrylate, butadiene, methyl(vinyl)silanediamine, methyl crotonate, dimethyl fumarate, styrene, and maleimide. Electronic structure calculations reveal the underlying factors that control activation barriers for propagation and chain-transfer processes of the step-growth mechanism. Results are further extended to predict rate constants for forward and reverse propagation and chain-transfer steps (k(P), k(-P), k(CT), k(-CT)) and used to model overall reaction kinetics. A relationship between alkene structure and reactivity in thiol-ene reactions is derived from the results of kinetic modeling and can be directly related to the relative energetics of stationary points obtained from electronic structure calculations. The results predict the order of reactivity of alkenes and have broad implications for the use and applications of thiol-ene click chemistry.

  7. The 3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl group: synthesis and applications to peptide chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentier, Cédric; Fukumoto, Kentarou; Taguchi, Akihiro; Hayashi, Yoshio

    2017-07-01

    The 3-nitro-2-pyridinesulfenyl chloride, commonly abbreviated as Npys-Cl, was among the first stable heterocyclic sulfenyl halides to be isolated. After its discovery, the Npys group was widely used as a protecting group for the amines, alcohols and thiols. Herein, we have reviewed some of the aspects of the Npys-Cl moiety, and its most promising recent uses are summarized, from the stability of the Npys protection of amines, hydroxyls and thiols and removal conditions for potential applications in peptide synthesis, to one of its most successful applications for the formation of mixed disulfides. Indeed, Npys protects thiols and acts as an activator for disulfide bond formation, thereby facilitating thiol/disulfide exchange to the corresponding disulfides. The selectivity and mild reaction conditions opened up a wide range of applications in chemical biology as well. Finally, some of the most recent developments regarding the synthesis and applications of solid-phase Npys derivatives are discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Main group adducts of carbon dioxide and related chemistry (LDRD 149938).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, Brian M. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.; Dickie, Diane A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-01

    This late-start LDRD was broadly focused on the synthetic attempts to prepare novel ligands as complexing agents for main group metals for the sequestration of CO{sub 2}. In prior work we have shown that certain main group (p block elements) metals such as tin and zinc, when ligated to phosphinoamido- ligands, can bind CO{sub 2} in a novel fashion. Rather than simple insertion into the metal-nitrogen bonds to form carbamates, we have seen the highly unusual complexation of CO{sub 2} in a mode that is more similar to a chemical 'adduct' rather than complexation schemes that have been observed previously. The overarching goal in this work is to prepare more of these complexes that can (a) sequester (or bind) CO{sub 2} easily in this adduct form, and (b) be stable to chemical or electrochemical reduction designed to convert the CO{sub 2} to useful fuels or fuel precursors. The currently used phosphinoamido- ligands appear at this point to be less-stable than desired under electrochemical reduction conditions. This instability is believed due to the more delicate, reactive nature of the ligand framework system. In order to successfully capture and convert CO{sub 2} to useful organics, this instability must be addressed and solved. Work described in the late-start LDRD was designed to screen a variety of ligand/metal complexes that a priori are believed to be more stable to polar solvents and possible mild hydrolytic conditions than are the phosphinoamido-ligands. Results from ligand syntheses and metal complexation studies are reported.

  9. Functional group diversity of bee pollinators increases crop yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Patrick; Tscharntke, Teja; Tylianakis, Jason M; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf

    2008-10-01

    Niche complementarity is a commonly invoked mechanism underlying the positive relationship between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning, but little empirical evidence exists for complementarity among pollinator species. This study related differences in three functional traits of pollinating bees (flower height preference, daily time of flower visitation and within-flower behaviour) to the seed set of the obligate cross-pollinated pumpkin Cucurbita moschata Duch. ex Poir. across a land-use intensity gradient from tropical rainforest and agroforests to grassland in Indonesia. Bee richness and abundance changed with habitat variables and we used this natural variation to test whether complementary resource use by the diverse pollinator community enhanced final yield. We found that pollinator diversity, but not abundance, was positively related to seed set of pumpkins. Bees showed species-specific spatial and temporal variation in flower visitation traits and within-flower behaviour, allowing for classification into functional guilds. Diversity of functional groups explained even more of the variance in seed set (r2=45%) than did species richness (r2=32%) highlighting the role of functional complementarity. Even though we do not provide experimental, but rather correlative evidence, we can link spatial and temporal complementarity in highly diverse pollinator communities to pollination success in the field, leading to enhanced crop yield without any managed honeybees.

  10. Characterization of Sea Lettuce Surface Functional Groups by Potentiometric Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebling, A. M.; Schijf, J.

    2008-12-01

    In pursuit of our ultimate goal to better understand the prodigious capacity of the marine macroalga Ulva lactuca (sea lettuce) for adsorbing a broad range of dissolved trace metals from seawater, we performed an initial characterization of its surface functional groups. Specifically, the number of distinct functional groups as well as their individual bulk concentrations and acid dissociation constants (pKas) were determined by potentiometric titrations in NaCl solutions of various ionic strengths (I = 0.01-5.0 M), under inert nitrogen atmosphere at 25°C. Depending on the ionic strength, Ulva samples were manually titrated down to pH 2 or 3 with 1 N HCl and then up to pH 10 with 1 N NaOH in steps of 0.1-0.2 units, continuously monitoring pH with a glass combination electrode. Titrations of a dehydrated Ulva standard reference material (BCR-279) were compared with fresh Ulva tissue cultured in our laboratory. A titration in filtered natural seawater was also compared with one in an NaCl solution of equal ionic strength. Equilibrium constants for the ionization of water in NaCl solutions as a function of ionic strength were obtained from the literature. Fits to the titration data ([H]T vs. pH) were performed with the FITEQL4.0 computer code using non-electrostatic 3-, 4-, and 5-site models, either by fixing ionic strength at its experimental value or by allowing it to be extrapolated to zero, while considering all functional group pKas and bulk concentrations as adjustable parameters. Since pKas and bulk concentrations were found to be strongly correlated, the latter were also fixed in some cases to further constrain the pKas. Whereas these calculations are currently ongoing, preliminary results point to three, possibly four, functional groups with pKas of about 4.1, 6.3, and 9.5 at I = 0. Bulk concentrations of the three groups are very similar, about 5-6×10-4 mol/g based on dry weight, which suggests that all are homogeneously distributed over the surface and

  11. Functional Renormalisation Group analysis of Tensorial Group Field Theories on $\\mathbb{R}^d$

    CERN Document Server

    Geloun, Joseph Ben; Oriti, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Rank-d Tensorial Group Field Theories are quantum field theories defined on a group manifold $G^{\\times d}$, which represent a non-local generalization of standard QFT, and a candidate formalism for quantum gravity, since, when endowed with appropriate data, they can be interpreted as defining a field theoretic description of the fundamental building blocks of quantum spacetime. Their renormalisation analysis is crucial both for establishing their consistency as quantum field theories, and for studying the emergence of continuum spacetime and geometry from them. In this paper, we study the renormalisation group flow of two simple classes of TGFTs, defined for the group $G=\\mathbb{R}$ for arbitrary rank, both without and with gauge invariance conditions, by means of functional renormalisation group techniques. The issue of IR divergences is tackled by the definition of a proper thermodynamic limit for TGFTs. We map the phase diagram of such models, in a simple truncation, and identify both UV and IR fixed poin...

  12. Combustion chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  13. [Functional feeding groups of macroinvertebrates in Gaira river, Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Barrios, Javier; Ospina-Tórres, Rodulfo; Turizo-Correa, Rodrigo

    2011-12-01

    Tropical rivers are frequently described on their biodiversity but few studies have considered the ecological value of this richness in their food webs. We determined the trophic structure of aquatic macroinvertebrate communities (expressed in the richness and abundance of taxa and biomass proportions of different functional feeding groups) at the level of the river, stretch and microhabitats (functional units - UFs). We evaluated the spatial and temporal variation of these descriptors during wet and dry events, and selected three sites associated with different altitudinal belts. We reported 109 taxa, with 11167 individuals who contributed 107.11g of biomass. Density of macroinvertebrates was favored with increasing height, and biomass showed the opposite pattern (K-W = 10.1, d.f. = 1, p shredders (Macrobrachium, 73%), present only in the lower reaches, followed by shredder Leptonema with 15%, located mostly in the upper reaches and predatory stoneflies of the genus Anacroneuria to 6.56%, which dominated in the middle stretch of stream. Excluding Macrobrachium from the analysis, there was dominance of Anacroneuria in the lower reaches. Between rainfall and drought events, biomass of functional feeding groups was higher in rain (W = 10.1, d.f. = 1, p < 0.05), favoring the growth of decapods, but the abundance was much higher during drought events.

  14. Characterization of Iron-Imido Species Relevant for N-Group Transfer Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovan, Diana A; Betley, Theodore A

    2016-02-17

    A sterically accessible tert-butyl-substituted dipyrrinato di-iron(II) complex [((tBu)L)FeCl]2 possessing two bridging chloride atoms was synthesized from the previously reported solvento adduct. Upon treatment with aryl azides, the formation of high-spin Fe(III) species was confirmed by (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. Crystallographic characterization revealed two possible oxidation products: (1) a terminal iron iminyl from aryl azides bearing ortho isopropyl substituents, ((tBu)L)FeCl((•)NC6H3-2,6-(i)Pr2); or (2) a bridging di-iron imido arising from reaction with 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)aryl azide, [((tBu)L)FeCl]2(μ-NC6H3-3,5-(CF3)2). Similar to the previously reported ((Ar)L)FeCl((•)NC6H4-4-(t)Bu), the monomeric iron imido is best described as a high-spin Fe(III) antiferromagnetically coupled to an iminyl radical, affording an S = 2 spin state as confirmed by SQUID magnetometry. The di-iron imido possesses an S = 0 ground state, arising from two high-spin Fe(III) centers weakly antiferromagnetically coupled through the bridging imido ligand. The terminal iron iminyl complex undergoes facile decomposition via intra- or intermolecular hydrogen-atom abstraction (HAA) from an imido aryl ortho isopropyl group, or from 1,4-cyclohexadiene, respectively. The bridging di-iron imido is a competent N-group transfer reagent to cyclic internal olefins as well as styrene. Although solid-state magnetometry indicates an antiferromagnetic interaction between the two iron centers (J = -108.7 cm(-1)) in [((tBu)L)FeCl]2(μ-NC6H3-3,5-(CF3)2), we demonstrate that in solution the bridging imido can facilitate HAA as well as dissociate into a terminal iminyl species, which then can promote HAA. In situ monitoring reveals the di-iron bridging imido is a catalytically competent intermediate, one of several iron complexes observed in the amination of C-H bond substrates or styrene aziridination.

  15. Function of Nanocatalyst in Chemistry of Organic Compounds Revolution: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanagarajan Hemalatha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterocyclic motif is an important scaffold which has both industrial and pharmaceutical applications. These motifs can be prepared using wide variety of reaction conditions such as the use of expensive catalyst, toxic solvent, harsh reaction condition like the use of base, high temperature, and multistep reaction. Although various methods are involved, the chemistry arena is now shifted towards the greener way of synthesis. Nanocatalyst constitutes an important role in the green synthesis. This is because the activity of the catalyst resides in the exposed portion of the particles. By decreasing the size of the catalyst, advantages such as more surface area would be exposed to the reactant, only negligible amount would be required to give the significant result and selectivity could be achieved, thereby, eliminating the undesired products. The current review enlists the various types of nanocatalyst involved in the heterocyclic ring formation and also some other important functionalization over the ring.

  16. A spin-adapted Density Matrix Renormalization Group algorithm for quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    We extend the spin-adapted density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm of McCulloch and Gulacsi [Europhys. Lett.57, 852 (2002)] to quantum chemical Hamiltonians. This involves two key modifications to the non-spin-adapted DMRG algorithm: the use of a quasi-density matrix to ensure that the renormalised DMRG states are eigenvalues of $S^2$ , and the use of the Wigner-Eckart theorem to greatly reduce the overall storage and computational cost. We argue that the advantages of the spin-adapted DMRG algorithm are greatest for low spin states. Consequently, we also implement the singlet-embedding strategy of Nishino et al [Phys. Rev. E61, 3199 (2000)] which allows us to target high spin states as a component of a mixed system which is overall held in a singlet state. We evaluate our algorithm on benchmark calculations on the Fe$_2$S$_2$ and Cr$_2$ transition metal systems. By calculating the full spin ladder of Fe$_2$S$_2$ , we show that the spin-adapted DMRG algorithm can target very closely spaced spin ...

  17. Surface functionalization of two-dimensional metal chalcogenides by Lewis acid-base chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Sidong; Wang, Xifan; Li, Bo; Kang, Jiahao; He, Yongmin; George, Antony; Ge, Liehui; Gong, Yongji; Dong, Pei; Jin, Zehua; Brunetto, Gustavo; Chen, Weibing; Lin, Zuan-Tao; Baines, Robert; Galvão, Douglas S.; Lou, Jun; Barrera, Enrique; Banerjee, Kaustav; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel

    2016-05-01

    Precise control of the electronic surface states of two-dimensional (2D) materials could improve their versatility and widen their applicability in electronics and sensing. To this end, chemical surface functionalization has been used to adjust the electronic properties of 2D materials. So far, however, chemical functionalization has relied on lattice defects and physisorption methods that inevitably modify the topological characteristics of the atomic layers. Here we make use of the lone pair electrons found in most of 2D metal chalcogenides and report a functionalization method via a Lewis acid-base reaction that does not alter the host structure. Atomic layers of n-type InSe react with Ti4+ to form planar p-type [Ti4+n(InSe)] coordination complexes. Using this strategy, we fabricate planar p-n junctions on 2D InSe with improved rectification and photovoltaic properties, without requiring heterostructure growth procedures or device fabrication processes. We also show that this functionalization approach works with other Lewis acids (such as B3+, Al3+ and Sn4+) and can be applied to other 2D materials (for example MoS2, MoSe2). Finally, we show that it is possible to use Lewis acid-base chemistry as a bridge to connect molecules to 2D atomic layers and fabricate a proof-of-principle dye-sensitized photosensing device.

  18. Computing the effective action with the functional renormalization group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Percacci, Roberto; Rachwał, Lesław

    2016-01-01

    The “exact” or “functional” renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ k. The ordinary effective action Γ 0 can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k= Λ down to k= 0. We give several examples of such...... of QED and of Yang–Mills theory. We also compute the two-point functions for scalars and gravitons in the effective field theory of scalar fields minimally coupled to gravity.......The “exact” or “functional” renormalization group equation describes the renormalization group flow of the effective average action Γ k. The ordinary effective action Γ 0 can be obtained by integrating the flow equation from an ultraviolet scale k= Λ down to k= 0. We give several examples...... of such calculations at one-loop, both in renormalizable and in effective field theories. We reproduce the four-point scattering amplitude in the case of a real scalar field theory with quartic potential and in the case of the pion chiral Lagrangian. In the case of gauge theories, we reproduce the vacuum polarization...

  19. Increase in functional groups for POSS by introducing branched phenylglycidylether

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    付强; 胡立江; 孙德智

    2004-01-01

    In the selected experimental conditions, firstly, the branched products with functional groups, N-(2-hydroxylpropylphenylether) (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane (APES-PGE, containing one hydroxyl group) and N- [ di (2-hydroxylpropylphenylether) ] (3-aminopropyl) triethoxysilane ( APES-PGE2, containing two hydroxyl groups), were synthesized by reacting 1 mole of (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APES) with 2 mole of phenylglycidylether (PGE). Then the hydrolytic condensation of APES-PGE and APES-PGE2 was performed by dissolving 1 g of the corresponding silane in 1.5 ml tetrahydrofuran (THF), adding water and eventually a catalyst ( molar ratios: [ H2O ]/Si = 3, [ NaOH ]/Si = 0.05 ), and heating at 50 ℃ for 24 h, allowing continuous evaporation of volatiles. The final products with branches containing hydroxyl groups were polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS). The products from two reactions were characterized by standard spectroscopic techniques,gel partition chromatography (GPC), Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and matrix-assisted ultraviolet laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UV-MALDI-TOF MS). Additionally, a narrow mass distribution of multifunctionalized POSS was shown by UV-MALDI-TOF MS and assignments of the MS peaks.

  20. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    CERN Document Server

    Drews, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The questio...

  1. PROBLEMS OF TEAM FUNCTIONING AS SPECIAL TYPE OF SOCIAL GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. VASILYEV

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article the analysis of different concepts of "team" from the point of view of sociology, which today can be divided into two large groups. The first affects his symptoms and descriptions, and the second structure of the definition. Summarizing them all, the author highlighted that currently the "team" can only be called an effectively functioning social group. Despite the fact that "command" is a kind of small social group, described the differences between these concepts. The article examines the question about correlation of concepts "team" and "team". A comparison of their characteristics reveals that they are extremely close to each other. Identified problems in the functioning of the team as a special type of social group. The features of leadership in the team, in particular, the possibility and feasibility of a divided leadership. Divided leadership implies that at different stages of achieving the team purpose leadership position is given to those team members who are most competent in solving a particular task, but the final decisions are made by joint efforts of the group. The presence of a clearly defined leader in the team is imperative. On the other hand, many teams are able to function effectively using only one type of influence ‒ vertical, when a mutual influence on each other have a leader and his associate, boss and employee. The presence of horizontal influence that occurs in the process of interaction between team members (excluding leader among themselves, it is necessary to perform tasks that require synchronous operation of several (or all team members. In the end, formulated the following conclusion: the presence of vertical interactions is a necessary condition for the existence of the team.

  2. Local Group velocity versus gravity the coherence function

    CERN Document Server

    Chodorowski, M; Chodorowski, Michal; Ciecielag, Pawel

    2002-01-01

    In maximum-likelihood analyses of the Local Group (LG) acceleration, the object describing nonlinear effects is the coherence function (CF), i.e. the cross-correlation coefficient of the Fourier modes of the velocity and gravity fields. We study the CF both analytically, using perturbation theory, and numerically, using a hydrodynamic code. The dependence of the function on Omega_m and the shape of the power spectrum is very weak. The only cosmological parameter that the CF is strongly sensitive to is the normalization sigma_8 of the underlying density field. Perturbative approximation for the function turns out to be accurate as long as sigma_8 is smaller than about 0.3. For higher normalizations we provide an analytical fit for the CF as a function of sigma_8 and the wavevector. The characteristic decoherence scale which our formula predicts is an order of magnitude smaller than that determined by Strauss et al. This implies that present likelihood constraints on cosmological parameters from analyses of the...

  3. Cluster Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    @@ Cansisting of eight scientists from the State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces and Xiamen University, this creative research group is devoted to the research of cluster chemistry and creation of nanomaterials.After three-year hard work, the group scored a series of encouraging progresses in synthesis of clusters with special structures, including novel fullerenes, fullerene-like metal cluster compounds as well as other related nanomaterials, and their properties study.

  4. Synthesis of Nine-atom Deltahedral Zintl Ions of Germanium and their Functionalization with Organic Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillett-Kunnath, Miriam M.; Sevov, Slavi C.

    2012-01-01

    Although the first studies of Zintl ions date between the late 1890's and early 1930's they were not structurally characterized until many years later.1,2 Their redox chemistry is even younger, just about ten years old, but despite this short history these deltahedral clusters ions E9n- (E = Si, Ge, Sn, Pb; n = 2, 3, 4) have already shown interesting and diverse reactivity and have been at the forefront of rapidly developing and exciting new chemistry.3-6 Notable milestones are the oxidative coupling of Ge94- clusters to oligomers and infinite chains,7-19 their metallation,14-16,20-25 capping by transition-metal organometallic fragments,26-34 insertion of a transition-metal atom at the center of the cluster which is sometimes combined with capping and oligomerization,35-47 addition of main-group organometallic fragments as exo-bonded substituents,48-50 and functionalization with various organic residues by reactions with organic halides and alkynes.51-58 This latter development of attaching organic fragments directly to the clusters has opened up a new field, namely organo-Zintl chemistry, that is potentially fertile for further synthetic explorations, and it is the step-by-step procedure for the synthesis of germanium-divinyl clusters described herein. The initial steps outline the synthesis of an intermetallic precursor of K4Ge9 from which the Ge94- clusters are extracted later in solution. This involves fused-silica glass blowing, arc-welding of niobium containers, and handling of highly air-sensitive materials in a glove box. The air-sensitive K4Ge9 is then dissolved in ethylenediamine in the box and then alkenylated by a reaction with Me3SiC≡CSiMe3. The reaction is followed by electrospray mass spectrometry while the resulting solution is used for obtaining single crystals containing the functionalized clusters [H2C=CH-Ge9-CH=CH2]2-. For this purpose the solution is centrifuged, filtered, and carefully layered with a toluene solution of 18-crown-6. Left

  5. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  6. Evaluation of group electronegativities and hardness (softness) of group 14 elements and containing functional groups through density functional theory and correlation with NMR spectra data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivas-Reyes, R.; Aria, A. [Universidad de Cartagena, Cartagena (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias Naturales y Exactas. Grupo de Quimica Cuantica y Computacional]. E-mail: rvivasr@unicartagena.edu.co

    2008-07-01

    Quantum Chemical calculations for group 14 elements of Periodic Table (C, Si, Ge, Sn, Pb) and their functional groups have been carried out using Density Functional Theory (DFT) based reactivity descriptors such as group electronegativities, hardness and softness. DFT calculations were performed for a large series of tetra coordinated Sn compounds of the CH{sub 3}SnRR'X type, where X is a halogen and R and R' are alkyl, halogenated alkyl, alkoxy, or alkyl thio groups. The results were interpreted in terms of calculated electronegativity and hardness of the SnRR'X groups, applying a methodology previously developed by Geerlings and coworkers (J. Phys. Chem. 1993, 97, 1826). These calculations allowed to see the regularities concerning the influence of the nature of organic groups RR' and inorganic group X on electronegativities and hardness of the SnRR'X groups; in this case, it was found a very good correlation between the electronegativity of the fragment and experimental {sup 119}Sn chemical shifts, a property that sensitively reflects the change in the valence electronic structure of molecules. This work was complemented with the study of some compounds of the EX and ER types, where E= C, Si, Ge, Sn and R= CH{sub 3}, H, which was performed to study the influence that the central atom has on the electronegativity and hardness of molecules, or whether these properties are mainly affected for the type of ligand bound to the central atom. All these calculations were performed using the B3PW91 functional together with the 6-3 1 1 + + G basis set level for H, C, Si, Ge, F, Cl and Br atoms and the 3-21G for Sn and I atoms. (author)

  7. Control of Block Copolymer Morphology through End-functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Gyuha; Park, Moon Jeong

    2014-03-01

    Recently, poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO)-containing polymer electrolytes have attracted significant attention to be applied for lithium batteries. As the realization of high mechanical strength from the polymer electrolyte becomes of critical importance in high-energy lithium batteries, much effort has been devoted to developing PEO-based block copolymers comprising mechanically robust polymer chains. Interest in this topic has been further stimulated by multiple observations of significant electrolytic conductivity enhancement imparted by microphase separation of block copolymers. In the present study, we report an intriguing methodology for modulating the morphology of poly(styrene-ethylene oxide) (PS-PEO) block copolymers with a single ionic group tethered at the chain end of PEO. Unique intra- and inter-chain interactions deduced from the end functional group afforded enriched nanostructures, i.e. disorder, lamellae, hexagonal cylinder, and gyroid, with significant differences in conductivities depending on lithium salt concentration. In particular, a gyorid morphology with a twofold-enhanced lithium ion transport efficiency was found for the end-functionalized PS-PEO block copolymer, attributed to the structural advantages of the gyroid having co-continuous ionic channels.

  8. Functional Interfaces Constructed by Controlled/Living Radical Polymerization for Analytical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huai-Song; Song, Min; Hang, Tai-Jun

    2016-02-10

    The high-value applications of functional polymers in analytical science generally require well-defined interfaces, including precisely synthesized molecular architectures and compositions. Controlled/living radical polymerization (CRP) has been developed as a versatile and powerful tool for the preparation of polymers with narrow molecular weight distributions and predetermined molecular weights. Among the CRP system, atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) are well-used to develop new materials for analytical science, such as surface-modified core-shell particles, monoliths, MIP micro- or nanospheres, fluorescent nanoparticles, and multifunctional materials. In this review, we summarize the emerging functional interfaces constructed by RAFT and ATRP for applications in analytical science. Various polymers with precisely controlled architectures including homopolymers, block copolymers, molecular imprinted copolymers, and grafted copolymers were synthesized by CRP methods for molecular separation, retention, or sensing. We expect that the CRP methods will become the most popular technique for preparing functional polymers that can be broadly applied in analytical chemistry.

  9. Dynamics of Microbial Functional Groups in Rhizosphere of Spring Barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlad Stoian

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant rhizosphere is the portion of soil which is in direct contact with the plant roots. From the microbiological point of view, this area is characterized by strong dynamic of functional groups with high specificity towards the substrate available. Spring barley is a crop with high requirements to the composition of the microflora in the rhizosphere, disturbances produced by agronomic inputs affecting the stability of rhizospheric contact interfaces and ultimately the plant growth. Analysis of changes within the microbial community was carried out with the purpose of defining the disruptive impact of mineral inputs and potential of zeolite to reduce these disruptions. Microbial functional groups were analyzed on the basis of the CO2 export under the specific conditions of soil inoculation on specific substrates over a time period of incubation. Microresp detection plates allow evaluation of a large number of samples under identical conditions of inoculation and the establishment of dynamics of the entire microbial community. The dynamics of the entire microbial communities (basal respiration is stimulated to increase in case of unilateral application of zeolite and zeolite as a buffer for urea fertilization. General growth trend of microbial communities follows proportional the associated application of zeolite with urea, the most powerful non-symbiotic nitrogen fixation processes being stimulated by this combination of fertilizers. Simultaneously, an increase in the dynamics of denitrifiers was observed, also the decomposition of lignin and cellulose and biological crust formation due to the proliferation of cyanobacteria. Rhizosphere of barley plants is characterized by the presence of actinomycetes as dominant in functional microbial community of all experimental variants analyzed with a high capacity for biological degradation and raised mineralization of organic matter.

  10. Incorporating Modeling and Simulations in Undergraduate Biophysical Chemistry Course to Promote Understanding of Structure-Dynamics-Function Relationships in Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hati, Sanchita; Bhattacharyya, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    A project-based biophysical chemistry laboratory course, which is offered to the biochemistry and molecular biology majors in their senior year, is described. In this course, the classroom study of the structure-function of biomolecules is integrated with the discovery-guided laboratory study of these molecules using computer modeling and…

  11. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the environmental effect of the atom under consideration. We have developed a novel knowledge-based statistical energy function for protein-ligand complexes which takes atomic environment in to account hence functional group as a singular entity. The proposed knowledge based scoring function is fast, simple to construct, easy to use and moreover it tackle the existing problem of handling molecular orientation in active site pocket. We have designed and used Functional group based Ligand retrieval (FBLR) system which can identify and detect the orientation of functional groups in ligand. This decoy searching was used to build the above KBSF to quantify the activity and affinity of high resolution protein-ligand complexes. We have proposed the probable use of these decoys in molecular build-up as a de-novo drug designing approach. We have also discussed the possible use of the said KSBF in pharmacophore fragment detection and pseudo center based fragment alignment procedure. PMID:19255647

  12. Substrate chemistry influences the morphology and biological function of adsorbed extracellular matrix assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherratt, Michael J; Bax, Daniel V; Chaudhry, Shazia S; Hodson, Nigel; Lu, Jian R; Saravanapavan, Priya; Kielty, Cay M

    2005-12-01

    In addition to mediating cell signalling events, native extracellular matrix (ECM) assemblies interact with other ECM components, act as reservoirs for soluble signalling molecules and perform structural roles. The potential of native ECM assemblies in the manufacture of biomimetic materials has not been fully exploited due, in part, to the effects of substrate interactions on their morphology. We have previously demonstrated that the ECM components, fibrillin and type VI collagen microfibrils, exhibit substrate dependent morphologies on chemically and topographically variable heterogeneous surfaces. Using both cleaning and coating approaches on silicon wafers and glass coverslips we have produced chemically homogeneous, topographically similar substrates which cover a large amphiphilic range. Extremes of substrate amphiphilicity induced morphological changes in periodicity, curvature and lateral spreading which may mask binding sites or disrupt domain structure. Biological functionality, as assayed by the ability to support cell spreading, was significantly reduced for fibrillin microfibrils adsorbed on highly hydrophilic substrates (contact angle 20.7 degrees) compared with less hydrophilic (contact angle 38.3 degrees) and hydrophobic (contact angle 92.8 degrees) substrates. With an appropriate choice of surface chemistry, multifunctional ECM assemblies retain their native morphology and biological functionality.

  13. Sulfonic Groups Originated Dual-Functional Interlayer for High Performance Lithium-Sulfur Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Gu, Sui; Guo, Jing; Rui, Kun; Chen, Chunhua; Zhang, Sanpei; Jin, Jun; Yang, Jianhua; Wen, Zhaoyin

    2017-05-03

    The lithium-sulfur battery is one of the most prospective chemistries in secondary energy storage field due to its high energy density and high theoretical capacity. However, the dissolution of polysulfides in liquid electrolytes causes the shuttle effect, and the rapid decay of lithium sulfur battery has greatly hindered its practical application. Herein, combination of sulfonated reduced graphene oxide (SRGO) interlayer on the separator is adopted to suppress the shuttle effect. We speculate that this SRGO layer plays two roles: physically blocking the migration of polysulfide as ion selective layer and anchoring lithium polysulfide by the electronegative sulfonic group. Lewis acid-base theory and density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate that sulfonic groups have a strong tendency to interact with lithium ions in the lithium polysulfide. Hence, the synergic effect involved by the sulfonic group contributes to the enhancement of the battery performance. Furthermore, the uniformly distributed sulfonic groups working as active sites which could induce the uniform distribution of sulfur, alleviating the excessive growth of sulfur and enhancing the utilization of active sulfur. With this interlayer, the prototype battery exhibits a high reversible discharge capacity of more than 1300 mAh g(-1) and good capacity retention of 802 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at 0.5 C rate. After 60 cycles at different rates from 0.2 to 4 C, the cell with this functional separator still recovered a high specific capacity of 1100 mAh g(-1) at 0.2 C. The results demonstrate a promising interlayer design toward high performance lithium-sulfur battery with longer cycling life, high specific capacity, and rate capability.

  14. Plant functional group composition modifies the effects of precipitation change on grassland ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Ellen L; Manning, Pete; Allen, David G P; Hurst, Alex; Everwand, Georg; Rimmler, Martin; Power, Sally A

    2013-01-01

    Temperate grassland ecosystems face a future of precipitation change, which can alter community composition and ecosystem functions through reduced soil moisture and waterlogging. There is evidence that functionally diverse plant communities contain a wider range of water use and resource capture strategies, resulting in greater resistance of ecosystem function to precipitation change. To investigate this interaction between composition and precipitation change we performed a field experiment for three years in successional grassland in southern England. This consisted of two treatments. The first, precipitation change, simulated end of century predictions, and consisted of a summer drought phase alongside winter rainfall addition. The second, functional group identity, divided the plant community into three groups based on their functional traits- broadly described as perennials, caespitose grasses and annuals- and removed these groups in a factorial design. Ecosystem functions related to C, N and water cycling were measured regularly. Effects of functional groupidentity were apparent, with the dominant trend being that process rates were higher under control conditions where a range of perennial species were present. E.g. litter decomposition rates were significantly higher in plots containing several perennial species, the group with the highest average leaf N content. Process rates were also very strongly affected by the precipitation change treatmentwhen perennial plant species were dominant, but not where the community contained a high abundance of annual species and caespitose grasses. This contrasting response could be attributable to differing rooting patterns (shallower structures under annual plants, and deeper roots under perennials) and faster nutrient uptake in annuals compared to perennials. Our results indicate that precipitation change will have a smaller effect on key process rates in grasslandscontaining a range of perennial and annual species

  15. Plant functional group composition modifies the effects of precipitation change on grassland ecosystem function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen L Fry

    Full Text Available Temperate grassland ecosystems face a future of precipitation change, which can alter community composition and ecosystem functions through reduced soil moisture and waterlogging. There is evidence that functionally diverse plant communities contain a wider range of water use and resource capture strategies, resulting in greater resistance of ecosystem function to precipitation change. To investigate this interaction between composition and precipitation change we performed a field experiment for three years in successional grassland in southern England. This consisted of two treatments. The first, precipitation change, simulated end of century predictions, and consisted of a summer drought phase alongside winter rainfall addition. The second, functional group identity, divided the plant community into three groups based on their functional traits- broadly described as perennials, caespitose grasses and annuals- and removed these groups in a factorial design. Ecosystem functions related to C, N and water cycling were measured regularly. Effects of functional groupidentity were apparent, with the dominant trend being that process rates were higher under control conditions where a range of perennial species were present. E.g. litter decomposition rates were significantly higher in plots containing several perennial species, the group with the highest average leaf N content. Process rates were also very strongly affected by the precipitation change treatmentwhen perennial plant species were dominant, but not where the community contained a high abundance of annual species and caespitose grasses. This contrasting response could be attributable to differing rooting patterns (shallower structures under annual plants, and deeper roots under perennials and faster nutrient uptake in annuals compared to perennials. Our results indicate that precipitation change will have a smaller effect on key process rates in grasslandscontaining a range of perennial

  16. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  17. Functional renormalization group studies of nuclear and neutron matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drews, Matthias; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-03-01

    Functional renormalization group (FRG) methods applied to calculations of isospin-symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter as well as neutron matter are reviewed. The approach is based on a chiral Lagrangian expressed in terms of nucleon and meson degrees of freedom as appropriate for the hadronic phase of QCD with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry. Fluctuations beyond mean-field approximation are treated solving Wetterich's FRG flow equations. Nuclear thermodynamics and the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition are investigated in detail, both in symmetric matter and as a function of the proton fraction in asymmetric matter. The equations of state at zero temperature of symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter are found to be in good agreement with advanced ab-initio many-body computations. Contacts with perturbative many-body approaches (in-medium chiral perturbation theory) are discussed. As an interesting test case, the density dependence of the pion mass in the medium is investigated. The question of chiral symmetry restoration in nuclear and neutron matter is addressed. A stabilization of the phase with spontaneously broken chiral symmetry is found to persist up to high baryon densities once fluctuations beyond mean-field are included. Neutron star matter including beta equilibrium is discussed under the aspect of the constraints imposed by the existence of two-solar-mass neutron stars.

  18. Functional renormalisation group equations for supersymmetric field theories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Synatschke-Czerwonka, Franziska

    2011-01-11

    This work is organised as follows: In chapter 2 the basic facts of quantum field theory are collected and the functional renormalisation group equations are derived. Chapter 3 gives a short introduction to the main concepts of supersymmetry that are used in the subsequent chapters. In chapter 4 the functional RG is employed for a study of supersymmetric quantum mechanics, a supersymmetric model which are studied intensively in the literature. A lot of results have previously been obtained with different methods and we compare these to the ones from the FRG. We investigate the N=1 Wess-Zumino model in two dimensions in chapter 5. This model shows spontaneous supersymmetry breaking and an interesting fixed-point structure. Chapter 6 deals with the three dimensional N=1 Wess-Zumino model. Here we discuss the zero temperature case as well as the behaviour at finite temperature. Moreover, this model shows spontaneous supersymmetry breaking, too. In chapter 7 the two-dimensional N=(2,2) Wess-Zumino model is investigated. For the superpotential a non-renormalisation theorem holds and thus guarantees that the model is finite. This allows for a direct comparison with results from lattice simulations. (orig.)

  19. Observations of Adolescent Peer Group Interactions as a Function of Within- and Between-Group Centrality Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Wendy E.; Dumas, Tara M.; Mahdy, Jasmine C.; Wolfe, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Observations of adolescent (n = 258; M age = 15.45) peer group triads (n = 86) were analyzed to identify conversation and interaction styles as a function of within-group and between-group centrality status. Group members' discussions about hypothetical dilemmas were coded for agreements, disagreements, commands, and opinions. Interactions during…

  20. Changes in bird functional diversity across multiple land uses: interpretations of functional redundancy depend on functional group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Gary W; Carter, Andrew; Smallbone, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of the impact of land-use change on functional diversity link changes in ecological community structure driven by land modification with the consequences for ecosystem function. Yet, most studies have been small-scale, experimental analyses and primarily focussed on plants. There is a lack of research on fauna communities and at large-scales across multiple land uses. We assessed changes in the functional diversity of bird communities across 24 land uses aligned along an intensification gradient. We tested the hypothesis that functional diversity is higher in less intensively used landscapes, documented changes in diversity using four diversity metrics, and examined how functional diversity varied with species richness to identify levels of functional redundancy. Functional diversity, measured using a dendogram-based metric, increased from high to low intensity land uses, but observed values did not differ significantly from randomly-generated expected values. Values for functional evenness and functional divergence did not vary consistently with land-use intensification, although higher than expected values were mostly recorded in high intensity land uses. A total of 16 land uses had lower than expected values for functional dispersion and these were mostly low intensity native vegetation sites. Relations between functional diversity and bird species richness yielded strikingly different patterns for the entire bird community vs. particular functional groups. For all birds and insectivores, functional evenness, divergence and dispersion showed a linear decline with increasing species richness suggesting substantial functional redundancy across communities. However, for nectarivores, frugivores and carnivores, there was a significant hump-shaped or non-significant positive linear relationship between these functional measures and species richness indicating less redundancy. Hump-shaped relationships signify that the most functionally diverse

  1. Functional movement screen scores in a group of running athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudon, Janice K; Parkerson-Mitchell, Amy J; Hildebrand, Laurie D; Teague, Connie

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the mean values of the functional movement screen (FMS) in a group of long-distance runners. The secondary aims were to investigate whether the FMS performance differed between sexes and between young and older runners. Forty-three runners, 16 women (mean age = 33.5 years, height = 165.2 cm, weight = 56.3 kg, and body mass index [BMI] = 20.6) and 27 men (mean age = 39.3 years, height = 177.6 cm, weight = 75.8 kg, and BMI = 24.2) performed the FMS. All the runners were injury-free and ran >30 km·wk. Independent t-tests were performed on the composite scores to examine the differences between men and women and also between young (40 years). Contingency tables (2 × 2) were developed for each of the 7 screening tests to further look at the differences in groups for each single test. The χ values were calculated to determine significant differences. Statistical significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. There was no significant difference in the composite score between women and men. There were significant differences between the sexes in the push-up and straight leg test scores, with the women scoring better on each test. A significant difference was found in the composite scores between younger and older runners (p score differences were found for the squat, hurdle step, and in-line lunge tests with the younger runners scoring better. This study provided mean values for the FMS in a cohort of long-distance runners. These values can be used as a reference for comparing FMST scores in other runners who are screened with this tool.

  2. Meson spectral functions at finite temperature and isospin density with the functional renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziyue; Zhuang, Pengfei

    2017-07-01

    The pion superfluid and the corresponding Goldstone and soft modes are investigated in a two-flavor quark-meson model with a functional renormalization group. By solving the flow equations for the effective potential and the meson two-point functions at finite temperature and isospin density, the critical temperature for the superfluid increases sizeably in comparison with solving the flow equation for the potential only. The spectral function for the soft mode shows clearly a transition from meson gas to quark gas with increasing temperature and a crossover from Bose-Einstein condensation to Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer pairing of quarks with increasing isospin density.

  3. Nucleic acid chemistry in the organic phase: from functionalized oligonucleotides to DNA side chain polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kai; Zheng, Lifei; Liu, Qing; de Vries, Jan Willem; Gerasimov, Jennifer Y; Herrmann, Andreas

    2014-10-08

    DNA-incorporating hydrophobic moieties can be synthesized by either solid-phase or solution-phase coupling. On a solid support the DNA is protected, and hydrophobic units are usually attached employing phosphoramidite chemistry involving a DNA synthesizer. On the other hand, solution coupling in aqueous medium results in low yields due to the solvent incompatibility of DNA and hydrophobic compounds. Hence, the development of a general coupling method for producing amphiphilic DNA conjugates with high yield in solution remains a major challenge. Here, we report an organic-phase coupling strategy for nucleic acid modification and polymerization by introducing a hydrophobic DNA-surfactant complex as a reactive scaffold. A remarkable range of amphiphile-DNA structures (DNA-pyrene, DNA-triphenylphosphine, DNA-hydrocarbon, and DNA block copolymers) and a series of new brush-type DNA side-chain homopolymers with high DNA grafting density are produced efficiently. We believe that this method is an important breakthrough in developing a generalized approach to synthesizing functional DNA molecules for self-assembly and related technological applications.

  4. High-performance functional Renormalization Group calculations for interacting fermions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichtenstein, J.; Sánchez de la Peña, D.; Rohe, D.; Di Napoli, E.; Honerkamp, C.; Maier, S. A.

    2017-04-01

    We derive a novel computational scheme for functional Renormalization Group (fRG) calculations for interacting fermions on 2D lattices. The scheme is based on the exchange parametrization fRG for the two-fermion interaction, with additional insertions of truncated partitions of unity. These insertions decouple the fermionic propagators from the exchange propagators and lead to a separation of the underlying equations. We demonstrate that this separation is numerically advantageous and may pave the way for refined, large-scale computational investigations even in the case of complex multiband systems. Furthermore, on the basis of speedup data gained from our implementation, it is shown that this new variant facilitates efficient calculations on a large number of multi-core CPUs. We apply the scheme to the t ,t‧ Hubbard model on a square lattice to analyze the convergence of the results with the bond length of the truncation of the partition of unity. In most parameter areas, a fast convergence can be observed. Finally, we compare to previous results in order to relate our approach to other fRG studies.

  5. Functional trait responses to grazing are mediated by soil moisture and plant functional group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shuxia; Li, Wenhuai; Lan, Zhichun; Ren, Haiyan; Wang, Kaibo

    2015-12-11

    Abundant evidence has shown that grazing alters plant functional traits, community structure and ecosystem functioning of grasslands. Few studies, however, have tested how plant responses to grazing are mediated by resource availability and plant functional group identity. We examined the effects of grazing on functional traits across a broad range of species along a soil moisture gradient in Inner Mongolia grassland. Our results showed that trait syndromes of plant size (individual biomass) and shoot growth (leaf N content and leaf density) distinguished plant species responses to grazing. The effects of grazing on functional traits were mediated by soil moisture and dependent on functional group identity. For most species, grazing decreased plant height but increased leaf N and specific leaf area (SLA) along the moisture gradient. Grazing enhanced the community-weighted attributes (leaf NCWM and SLACWM), which were triggered mainly by the positive trait responses of annuals and biennials and perennial grasses, and increased relative abundance of perennial forbs. Our results suggest that grazing-induced species turnover and increased intraspecific trait variability are two drivers for the observed changes in community weighted attributes. The dominant perennial bunchgrasses exhibited mixed tolerance-resistance strategies to grazing and mixed acquisitive-conservative strategies in resource utilization.

  6. Chemistry of complexing molecules and environment. Report of the working group of the Cea ''mission environment''; Chimie des complexants en environnements. Rapport du groupe de travail de la mission environnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, J.C

    1998-07-01

    The Working group 'Chemistry of Complexing Molecules and Environment' of the Mission Environment (AG/ENV) identified themes for an original positioning of CEA on important issues of environmental research if a sufficiently strong demand appears. The research of CEA on the environment should be complementary to actions undertaken by other partners (official institutions, research organizations and industrial firms). The themes suggested are: the synthesis of new chelating molecules and new materials having specific properties, with the support of theoretical chemistry and modeling, analytical physical chemistry and speciation of species in relation to their eco-toxicity and their biogeochemical mobility in the natural environment. These themes, illustrated by examples of actions in progress at CEA or likely to be launched quickly, draw largely from recognized competences of the teams, generally developed for finalized nuclear applications: experimental, theoretical and instrumental competences. (author)

  7. A conceptual basis to encode and detect organic functional groups in XML.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, Punnaivanam; Krief, Alain; Vijayasarathi, Durairaj

    2013-06-01

    A conceptual basis to define and detect organic functional groups is developed. The basic model of a functional group is termed as a primary functional group and is characterized by a group center composed of one or more group center atoms bonded to terminal atoms and skeletal carbon atoms. The generic group center patterns are identified from the structures of known functional groups. Accordingly, a chemical ontology 'Font' is developed to organize the existing functional groups as well as the new ones to be defined by the chemists. The basic model is extended to accommodate various combinations of primary functional groups as functional group assemblies. A concept of skeletal group is proposed to define the characteristic groups composed of only carbon atoms to be regarded as equivalent to functional groups. The combination of primary functional groups with skeletal groups is categorized as skeletal group assembly. In order to make the model suitable for reaction modeling purpose, a Graphical User Interface (GUI) is developed to define the functional groups and to encode in XML format appropriate to detect them in chemical structures. The system is capable of detecting multiple instances of primary functional groups as well as the overlapping poly-functional groups as the respective assemblies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Doing the Research that Informs Practice: A Retrospective View of One Group's Attempt to Study The Teaching and Learning of Organic Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, George M; Ferguson, Rob; Çalimsiz, Selçuk

    2017-07-04

    The idea that the focus of educational research should be on results that can inform the practice of teaching has been an implicit assumption for so many years that one would be hard-pressed to trace it back to an individual source. At one time, the people doing such research in STEM disciplines were faculty in schools or colleges of education who focused on K-12 classrooms and looked for ideas, concepts, and principles that would be valid across a range of STEM disciplines. Eventually, this research was done on college- or university-level students, as well, and there was a shift toward what has been called discipline-based educational research (DBER) that looks at the problems associated with the teaching and learning of a given discipline, such as chemistry. This paper will discuss the results of research on problem-solving in chemistry that has been done in our research group, with particular emphasis on the challenges of teaching and learning organic chemistry. The goal of this paper is to show what can happen when one listens carefully to students and begins to appreciate the difference between what we think we have taught and what the students learned. The examples we will use have the potential for convincing those of us who teach chemistry to rethink what we do in our classes to find better ways of helping our students understand the material we are trying to teach. Although this paper will focus on results from the second-year organic chemistry course, similar results have been observed in both inorganic and physical chemistry, as well as biochemistry courses. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The Observational Mass Function of Loose Galaxy Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Girardi, M.; Giuricin, G.; ;

    2000-01-01

    We analyze the three catalogs of nearby loose groups identified by Garcia (1993). She used a percolation and a hierarchical method, and proposed a third group catalog defined as a combination of the two. Each catalog contains almost 500 groups. In agreement with previous works on earlier catalogs, we find that groups can be described as collapsing systems. Their sampled size is much larger than their expected virialized region. We compute the virial masses and correct them by taking into acco...

  10. Perceptions of learning as a function of seminar group factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.; de Grave, Willem S.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Scherpbier, Albert J. J. A.; van Beukelen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Small-group learning is advocated for enhancing higher-order thinking and the development of skills and attitudes. Teacher performance, group interaction and the quality of assignments have been shown to affect small-group learning in hybrid and problem-based curricula. This study aimed to examine

  11. Plant species and functional group combinations affect green roof ecosystem functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Lundholm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Green roofs perform ecosystem services such as summer roof temperature reduction and stormwater capture that directly contribute to lower building energy use and potential economic savings. These services are in turn related to ecosystem functions performed by the vegetation layer such as radiation reflection and transpiration, but little work has examined the role of plant species composition and diversity in improving these functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a replicated modular extensive (shallow growing- medium green roof system planted with monocultures or mixtures containing one, three or five life-forms, to quantify two ecosystem services: summer roof cooling and water capture. We also measured the related ecosystem properties/processes of albedo, evapotranspiration, and the mean and temporal variability of aboveground biomass over four months. Mixtures containing three or five life-form groups, simultaneously optimized several green roof ecosystem functions, outperforming monocultures and single life-form groups, but there was much variation in performance depending on which life-forms were present in the three life-form mixtures. Some mixtures outperformed the best monocultures for water capture, evapotranspiration, and an index combining both water capture and temperature reductions. Combinations of tall forbs, grasses and succulents simultaneously optimized a range of ecosystem performance measures, thus the main benefit of including all three groups was not to maximize any single process but to perform a variety of functions well. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Ecosystem services from green roofs can be improved by planting certain life-form groups in combination, directly contributing to climate change mitigation and adaptation strategies. The strong performance by certain mixtures of life-forms, especially tall forbs, grasses and succulents, warrants further investigation into niche complementarity or

  12. GROUP DYNAMICS AND TEAM FUNCTIONING IN ORGANIZATIONAL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca ZOLTAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In all kind of organization many activities are done by groups and teams. But how are they formed? What factors influence their existence and development? How members of groups and teams are selected? Which are the consequences in organizational context? In order to answer these questions, in the present paper we describe and analyze the main approaches regarding the formation of work groups and work teams (sociometric approach and group dynamics approach, the main factors that affects group dynamics and the FIRO model for evaluation the team members’ needs.

  13. Students' Perceptions of Classroom Group Work as a Function of Group Member Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Scott A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this assessment was to examine whether differences exist between students who self-select their classroom work group members and students who are randomly assigned to their classroom work groups in terms of their use of organizational citizenship behaviors with their work group members; their commitment to, trust in, and relational…

  14. A versatile pathway to end-functionalized cellulose ethers for click chemistry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitakahara, Hiroshi; Suhara, Ryo; Yamagami, Mao; Kawano, Haruko; Okanishi, Ryoko; Asahi, Tomoyuki; Takano, Toshiyuki

    2016-10-20

    This paper describes a versatile pathway to heterobifunctional/telechelic cellulose ethers, such as tri-O-methyl cellulosyl azide and propargyl tri-O-methyl celluloside, having one free C-4 hydroxyl group attached to the glucosyl residue at the non-reducing end for the use in Huisgen 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and copper(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The one-step end-functionalization of cellulose ethers for molecular rod synthesis involves the introduction of two reactive groups at both ends of the cellulose molecule, and can afford linear triblock copolymers via CuAAC and further reactions. We were able to tailor the degree of polymerization of end-functionalized cellulose ethers with controlled amounts of a Lewis acid, namely SnCl4. Chemical structures of the above cellulose ethers and the reaction conditions for controlling molecular length are discussed.

  15. Green polymer chemistry: The role of Candida antarctica lipase B in polymer functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano Gil, Yenni Marcela

    The synthesis of functional polymers with well-defined structure, end-group fidelity and physico-chemical properties useful for biomedical applications has proven challenging. Chemo-enzymatic methods are an alternative strategy to increase the diversity of functional groups in polymeric materials. Specifically, enzyme-catalyzed polymer functionalization carried out under solventless conditions is a great advancement in the design of green processes for biomedical applications, where the toxicity of solvents and catalyst residues need to be considered. Enzymes offer several distinct advantages, including high efficiency, catalyst recyclability, and mild reaction conditions. This reseach aimed to precisely functionalized polymers using two methods: enzyme-catalyzed functionalization via polymerization and chemo-enzymatic functionalization of pre-made polymers for drug delivery. In the first method, well-defined poly(caprolactone)s were generated using alkyne-based initiating systems catalyzed by CALB. Propargyl alcohol and 4-dibenzocyclooctynol (DIBO) were shown to efficiently initiate the ring opening polymerization of epsilon-caprolactone under metal free conditions and yielded polymers with Mn ~4 to 24 KDa and relatively narrow molecular mass distribution. In the second methodology, we present quantitative enzyme-catalyzed transesterification of vinyl esters and ethyl esters with poly(ethylene glycol)s (PEG)s that will serve as building blocks for dendrimer synthesis, followed by introducing a new process for the exclusive gamma-conjugation of folic acid. Specifically, fluorescein-acrylate was enzymatically conjugated with PEG. Additionally, halo-ester functionalized PEGs were successfully prepared by the transesterification of alkyl halo-esters with PEGs. 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy, SEC and MALDI-ToF mass spectrometry confirmed the structure and purity of the products.

  16. The Quantitative Resolution of a Mixture of Group II Metal Ions by Thermometric Titration with EDTA. An Analytical Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Robert L.; Popham, Ronald E.

    1983-01-01

    Presents an experiment in thermometric titration used in an analytic chemistry-chemical instrumentation course, consisting of two titrations, one a mixture of calcium and magnesium, the other of calcium, magnesium, and barium ions. Provides equipment and solutions list/specifications, graphs, and discussion of results. (JM)

  17. A Simple Assignment that Enhances Students' Ability to Solve Organic Chemistry Synthesis Problems and Understand Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Jennifer; Holman, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    Organic chemistry students typically struggle with the retrosynthetic approach to solving synthesis problems because most textbooks present the chemistry grouped by "reactions of the functional group". In contrast, the retrosynthetic approach requires the student to envision "reactions that yield the functional group". A second challenge is the…

  18. Functional renormalization group study of fluctuation effects in fermionic superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eberlein, Andreas

    2013-03-22

    This thesis is concerned with ground state properties of two-dimensional fermionic superfluids. In such systems, fluctuation effects are particularly strong and lead for example to a renormalization of the order parameter and to infrared singularities. In the first part of this thesis, the fermionic two-particle vertex is analysed and the fermionic renormalization group is used to derive flow equations for a decomposition of the vertex in charge, magnetic and pairing channels. In the second part, the channel-decomposition scheme is applied to various model systems. In the superfluid state, the fermionic two-particle vertex develops rich and singular dependences on momentum and frequency. After simplifying its structure by exploiting symmetries, a parametrization of the vertex in terms of boson-exchange interactions in the particle-hole and particle-particle channels is formulated, which provides an efficient description of the singular momentum and frequency dependences. Based on this decomposition of the vertex, flow equations for the effective interactions are derived on one- and two-loop level, extending existing channel-decomposition schemes to (i) the description of symmetry breaking in the Cooper channel and (ii) the inclusion of those two-loop renormalization contributions to the vertex that are neglected in the Katanin scheme. In the second part, the superfluid ground state of various model systems is studied using the channel-decomposition scheme for the vertex and the flow equations. A reduced model with interactions in the pairing and forward scattering channels is solved exactly, yielding insights into the singularity structure of the vertex. For the attractive Hubbard model at weak coupling, the momentum and frequency dependence of the two-particle vertex and the frequency dependence of the self-energy are determined on one- and two-loop level. Results for the suppression of the superfluid gap by fluctuations are in good agreement with the literature

  19. Selenol protecting groups in organic chemistry: special emphasis on selenocysteine Se-protection in solid phase peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemer, Stevenson

    2011-04-18

    The appearance of selenium in organic synthesis is relatively rare, and thus examples in the literature pertaining to the masking of its considerable reactivity are similarly uncommon. Greene's Protecting Groups in Organic Synthesis, the standard reference for the state of the art in this arena, offers no entries for selenium protective methodology, in stark comparison to its mention of the great variety of protecting groups germane to its chalcogen cousin sulfur. This scarcity of Se-protection methods makes it no less interesting and pertinent toward the construction of selenium-containing organic systems which do indeed require the iterative blocking and de-blocking of selenol functionalities. A selenium-containing system which is especially relevant is selenocysteine, as its use in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis requires extensive protection of its selenol side chain. This review will attempt to summarize the current state of understanding with regard to selenium protection protocol in organic synthesis. Moreover, it will provide a special emphasis on selenocysteine side chain protection, comprising both the breadth of functionality used for this purpose as well as methods of deprotection.

  20. Selenol Protecting Groups in Organic Chemistry: Special Emphasis on Selenocysteine Se-Protection in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Flemer Jr.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of selenium in organic synthesis is relatively rare, and thus examples in the literature pertaining to the masking of its considerable reactivity are similarly uncommon. Greene's Protecting Groups in Organic Synthesis, the standard reference for the state of the art in this arena, offers no entries for selenium protective methodology, in stark comparison to its mention of the great variety of protecting groups germane to its chalcogen cousin sulfur. This scarcity of Se-protection methods makes it no less interesting and pertinent toward the construction of selenium-containing organic systems which do indeed require the iterative blocking and de-blocking of selenol functionalities. A selenium-containing system which is especially relevant is selenocysteine, as its use in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis requires extensive protection of its selenol side chain. This review will attempt to summarize the current state of understanding with regard to selenium protection protocol in organic synthesis. Moreover, it will provide a special emphasis on selenocysteine side chain protection, comprising both the breadth of functionality used for this purpose as well as methods of deprotection.

  1. Organometallic frustrated Lewis pair chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erker, Gerhard

    2011-08-07

    Frustrated Lewis pairs are playing an increasingly important role in organometallic chemistry. Examples are presented and discussed where organometallic systems themselves serve as the Lewis base or Lewis acid components in frustrated Lewis pair chemistry, mostly through their attached functional groups. Activation of dihydrogen takes place easily in many of these systems. This may lead to the generation of novel catalyst systems but also in many cases to the occurrence of specific reactions at the periphery of the organometallic frameworks. Increasingly, FLP reactions are used to carry out functional group conversions in organometallic systems under mild reaction conditions. The limits of typical FLP reactivity are explored with selected organometallic examples, a discussion that points toward new developments, such as the discovery of facile new 1,1-carboboration reactions. Learning more and more about the broad spectrum of frustrated Lewis pair chemistry helps us to find novel reactions and applications.

  2. Invited award contribution for ACS Award in Inorganic Chemistry. Geometric and electronic structure contributions to function in bioinorganic chemistry: active sites in non-heme iron enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, E I

    2001-07-16

    Spectroscopy has played a major role in the definition of structure/function correlations in bioinorganic chemistry. The importance of spectroscopy combined with electronic structure calculations is clearly demonstrated by the non-heme iron enzymes. Many members of this large class of enzymes activate dioxygen using a ferrous active site that has generally been difficult to study with most spectroscopic methods. A new spectroscopic methodology has been developed utilizing variable temperature, variable field magnetic circular dichroism, which enables one to obtain detailed insight into the geometric and electronic structure of the non-heme ferrous active site and probe its reaction mechanism on a molecular level. This spectroscopic methodology is presented and applied to a number of key mononuclear non-heme iron enzymes leading to a general mechanistic strategy for O2 activation. These studies are then extended to consider the new features present in the binuclear non-heme iron enzymes and applied to understand (1) the mechanism of the two electron/coupled proton transfer to dioxygen binding to a single iron center in hemerythrin and (2) structure/function correlations over the oxygen-activating enzymes stearoyl-ACP Delta9-desaturase, ribonucleotide reductase, and methane monooxygenase. Electronic structure/reactivity correlations for O2 activation by non-heme relative to heme iron enzymes will also be developed.

  3. Organometallic chemistry: A new metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Elisabeth T.; Jacobsen, Eric N.

    2016-08-01

    Carbonyls and alkenes, two of the most common functional groups in organic chemistry, generally do not react with one another. Now, a simple Lewis acid has been shown to catalyse metathesis between alkenes and ketones in a new carbonyl olefination reaction.

  4. Organic Chemistry in Two Dimensions: Surface-Functionalized Polymers and Self-Assembled Monolayer Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    adhesion. inhibition of corrosion , and control of friction, and they may prove important in the production of sensors and microelectronic devices. The...Materials Science 650 Harry Road K91B801 and Engineering San Jose, CA 95120 Cornell University Ithaca, Nem York 14853-1501 Or. William B. Moniz Chemistry Division Naval Research Laboratory Washington, D.C. 20375-5000

  5. Performance of European chemistry transport models as function of horizontal resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.; Cuvelier, C.; Hendriks, C.; Bessagnet, B.; Baldasano, J.M.; Colette, A.; Thunis, P.; Karam, D.; Fagerli, H.; Graff, A.; Kranenburg, R.; Nyiri, A.; Pay, M.T.; Rouïl, L.; Schulz, M.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.; Terrenoire, E.; Wind, P.

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution causes adverse effects on human health as well as ecosystems and crop yield and also has an impact on climate change trough short-lived climate forcers. To design mitigation strategies for air pollution, 3D Chemistry Transport Models (CTMs) have been developed to support the decision p

  6. Para-Functionalized NCN-Pincer Palladium and Platinum Complexes as Building Blocks in Organometallic Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, Martijn Quico

    2002-01-01

    A rapidly evolving field in chemistry is the application of organometallic and coordination complexes as building blocks or active components for the construction of new materials exhibiting specific catalytic, redox, optical or sensor activities. A central theme in the construction of these inorgan

  7. Para-Functionalized NCN-Pincer Palladium and Platinum Complexes as Building Blocks in Organometallic Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slagt, Martijn Quico

    2002-01-01

    A rapidly evolving field in chemistry is the application of organometallic and coordination complexes as building blocks or active components for the construction of new materials exhibiting specific catalytic, redox, optical or sensor activities. A central theme in the construction of these inorgan

  8. Well-defined functional mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids prepared by an ICAR ATRP technique integrated with bio-inspired polydopamine chemistry for lithium isotope separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuekun; Liu, Xuegang; Ye, Gang; Song, Yang; Liu, Fei; Huo, Xiaomei; Chen, Jing

    2017-05-09

    Mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids with well-preserved mesoporosity were prepared by integrating the initiators for continuous activator regeneration (ICAR) atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique with the bio-inspired polydopamine (PDA) chemistry. By manipulating the auto-oxidative polymerization of dopamine, uniform PDA layers were deposited on the surfaces and pore walls of ordered mesoporous silicas (OMSs), thereby promoting the immobilization of ATRP initiators. Poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) brushes were then grown from the OMSs by using the ICAR ATRP technique. The evolution of the mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids during synthesis, in terms of morphology, structure, surface and porous properties, was detailed. And, parameters influencing the controlled growth of polymer chains in the ICAR ATRP system were studied. Taking advantage of the abundant epoxy groups in the PGMA platform, post-functionalization of the mesoporous silica/polymer hybrids by the covalent attachment of macrocyclic ligands for the adsorptive separation of lithium isotopes was realized. Adsorption behavior of the functionalized hybrids toward lithium ions was fully investigated, highlighting the good selectivity, and effects of temperature, solvent and counter ions. The ability for lithium isotope separation was evaluated. A higher separation factor could be obtained in systems with softer counter anions and lower polarity solvents. More importantly, due to the versatility of the ICAR ATRP technique, combined with the non-surface specific PDA chemistry, the methodology established in this work would provide new opportunities for the preparation of advanced organic-inorganic porous hybrids for broadened applications.

  9. Solubility studies of inorganic–organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Li

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.

  10. The preparation of new functionalized [2.2]paracyclophane derivatives with N-containing functional groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henning Hopf

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The two isomeric bis(isocyanates 4,12- and 4,16-di-isocyanato[2.2]paracyclophane, 16 and 28, have been prepared from their corresponding diacids by simple routes. The two isomers are versatile intermediates for the preparation of various cyclophanes bearing substituents with nitrogen-containing functional groups, e.g., the pseudo-ortho diamine 8, the bis secondary amine 23, and the crownophanes 18 and 19. Several of these new cyclophane derivatives (18, 19, 22, 26, 28 have been characterized by X-ray structural analysis.

  11. XPS of nitrogen-containing functional groups on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.J.J.; Bekkum, van H.

    1995-01-01

    XPS is used to study the binding energy of the Cls, Nls and Ols photoelectrons of surface groups on several nitrogen-containing activated carbons. Specific binding energies are assigned to amide (399.9 eV). lactam and imidc (399.7 eV). pyridine (398.7 eV), pyrrole (400.7 eV), alkylamine. secondary a

  12. Adsorbent Selection by Functional Group Interaction Screening for Peptide Recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijntje, Renze; Bosch, Hans; Haan, de Andre B.; Bussman, Paul

    2005-01-01

    In order to selectively adsorb small peptides from complex aqueous feeds, selective adsorbents are required. The goal is to first find adsorbents with capacity for triglycine, as triglycine contains all groups common to small peptides. Selectivity studies will follow. Adsorbent selection was based o

  13. Molecular electronegativity in density functional theory (II) --Direct calculation of group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨忠志; 沈尔忠

    1996-01-01

    On the basis of a more precise expression of the atomic effective electronegativity deduced from the density functional theory and electronegativity equalization principle, a new scheme for calculating the group electronegativity and the atomic charges in a group is proposed and programed, and various parameters of electronegativity and hardness are given for some common atoms. Through calculation, analysis and comparison of more than one hundred groups, it is shown that the results from this scheme are reasonable and may be extended.

  14. Effects of Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Supercapacitor Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-07-03

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the interface between graphene and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIM OTf) were carried out to gain molecular-level insights into the performance of graphene-based supercapacitors and, in particular, determine the effects of the presence of oxygen-containing defects at the graphene surface on their integral capacitance. The MD simulations predict that increasing the surface coverage of hydroxyl groups negatively affects the integral capacitance, whereas the effect of the presence of epoxy groups is much less significant. The calculated variations in capacitance are found to be directly correlated to the interfacial structure. Indeed, hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups and SO3 anion moieties prevents BMIM+ and OTf- molecules from interacting favorably in the dense interfacial layer and restrains the orientation and mobility of OTf- ions, thereby reducing the permittivity of the ionic liquid at the interface. The results of the molecular simulations can facilitate the rational design of electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  15. Quantum groups and functional relations for lower rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirov, Kh. S.; Razumov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A detailed construction of the universal integrability objects related to the integrable systems associated with the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl2)) is given. The full proof of the functional relations in the form independent of the representation of the quantum loop algebra on the quantum space is presented. The case of the general gradation and general twisting is treated. The specialization of the universal functional relations to the case when the quantum space is the state space of a discrete spin chain is described. This is a digression of the corresponding consideration for the case of the quantum loop algebra Uq(L(sl3)) with an extension to the higher spin case.

  16. FGO: A novel ontology for identification of ligand functional group

    OpenAIRE

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2007-01-01

    Small molecules play crucial role in the modulation of biological functions by interacting with specific macromolecules. Hence small molecule interactions are captured by a variety of experimental methods to estimate and propose correlations between molecular structures to their biological activities. The tremendous expanse in publicly available small molecules is also driving new efforts to better understand interactions involving small molecules particularly in area of drug docking and phar...

  17. How Science/Technology/Society relations are approached in the contents of organic functions in high school chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmem Lúcia Costa Amaral

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aimed to verify how the relation between Science/Technology/Society (STS is present in Chemistry textbooks recommended by the Brazilian Ministry of Education. The interest in textbooks is due to the fact that they constitute important resources used by teachers to prepare their classes. Thus, researches in this area are necessary to indicate how the authors could improve the quality of their books. We believe that one way to do this is the introduction of the STS relation, which took place because of the necessity in establishing new ways of teaching, specially the teaching of science. One of the goals of STS education is to create conditions to develop abilities and competences that qualify the students for discussions concerning scientific and technologic questions of everyday life. The analysis of testbooks used the descriptors and indicators developed by Fracalanza and Megid-Neto (2006 as reference. In order to carry out the study, we chose the area of Organic Chemistry, more specifically contents referring to organic functions, with great use in society. In general, the results showed that STS relations are not totally observed in the investigated contents, contributing to the development of Chemistry classes through activities apart from the students social context.

  18. Mixed valency and site-preference chemistry for cerium and its compounds: A predictive density-functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Aftab [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory

    2014-06-01

    Cerium and its technologically relevant compounds are examples of anomalous mixed valency, originating from two competing oxidation states—itinerant Ce4+ and localized Ce3+. Under applied stress, anomalous transitions are observed but not well understood. Here we treat mixed valency as an “alloy” problem involving two valences with competing and numerous site-occupancy configurations. We use density-functional theory with Hubbard U (i.e., DFT+U) to evaluate the effective valence and predict properties, including controlling the valence by pseudoternary alloying. For Ce and its compounds, such as (Ce,La)2(Fe,Co)14B permanent magnets, we find a stable mixed-valent α state near the spectroscopic value of νs=3.53. Ce valency in compounds depends on its steric volume and local chemistry. For La doping, Ce valency shifts towards γ-like Ce3+, as expected from steric volume; for Co doping, valency depends on local Ce-site chemistry and steric volume. Our approach captures the key origins of anomalous valency and site-preference chemistry in complex compounds.

  19. Radar and Sonar Ambiguity Functions and Group Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Rice, On contractions of semisimple Lie groups, Trans. Amer. Math. Soc., 289 (1985), 185-202. [16] J. B. Fraleigh , A First course in Abstract Algebra...will be 6 identical to the transmitted waveform, delayed of course , if the object were not moving. Finally we assume the object to be travelling at a...e,(t) = V/is(at + b) (2.5) 8 where b is related io the delay of the first transmitted photon and 1+0 (2.6) 1-0 where J - £. Note that now the time

  20. Function group approach to unconstrained Hamiltonian Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Salmela, A

    2004-01-01

    Starting from the temporal gauge Hamiltonian for classical pure Yang-Mills theory with the gauge group SU(2) a canonical transformation is initiated by parametrising the Gauss law generators with three new canonical variables. The construction of the remaining variables of the new set proceeds through a number of intermediate variables in several steps, which are suggested by the Poisson bracket relations and the gauge transformation properties of these variables. The unconstrained Hamiltonian is obtained from the original one by expressing it in the new variables and then setting the Gauss law generators to zero. This Hamiltonian turns out to be local and it decomposes into a finite Laurent series in powers of the coupling constant.

  1. Application technology on human general function as a group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numano, Masayoshi; Matsuoka, Takeshi; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Fukuto, Junji; Mitomo, Nobuo; Miyazaki; Keiko; Matsukura, Hiroshi; Niwa, Yasuyuki; Ando, Hirotomo [Ship Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-01

    An operation assistant system for two operators as an object of plant model simulated on PWR was made experimentally, effectiveness on applying 3D-VR spatial indication and repulsive feedback input apparatus to plant operation assistance was investigated. By adopting a transmission type HMD, combination use with the conventional type operation monitoring system was made possible, and then it could be thought to become possible that human error was found by oneself by adding intuitive indication and feedback to judgement and operation used by a system assisting with logic understanding. And, by sharing these informations in a group, it was also found that correction of not only selfish but also other operator's error was made possible. (G.K.)

  2. Duffy blood group antigens: structure, serological properties and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Łukasik

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Duffy (Fy blood group antigens are located on seven-transmembrane glycoprotein expressed on erythrocytes and endothelial cells, which acts as atypical chemokine receptor (ACKR1 and malarial receptor. The biological role of the Duffy glycoprotein has not been explained yet. It is suggested that Duffy protein modulate the intensity of the inflammatory response. The Duffy blood group system consists of two major antigens, Fya and Fyb, encoded by two codominant alleles designated FY*A and FY*B which differ by a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP at position 125G>A of the FY gene that results in Gly42Asp amino acid change in the Fya and Fyb antigens, respectively. The presence of antigen Fya and/or Fyb on the erythrocytes determine three Duffy-positive phenotypes: Fy(a+b-, Fy(a-b+ and Fy(a+b+, identified in Caucasian population. The Duffy-negative phenotype Fy(a-b-, frequent in Africans, but very rare in Caucasians, is defined by the homozygous state of FY*B-33 alleles. The FY*B-33 allele is associated with a SNP -33T>C in the promoter region of the FY gene, which suppresses erythroid expression of this gene without affecting its expression in other tissues. The FY*X allele, found in Caucasians, is correlated with weak expression of Fyb antigen. Fyx antigen differs from the native Fyb by the Arg89Cys and Ala100Thr amino acid substitutions due to SNPs: 265C>T and 298G>A in FY*B allele. The frequency of the FY alleles shows marked geographic disparities, the FY*B-33 allele is predominant in Africans, the FY*B in Caucasians, while the FY*A allele is dominant in Asians and it is the most prevalent allele globally. Tytuł główny Tak

  3. Influence of substituents and functional groups on the surface composition of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbeck, Claudia; Niedermaier, Inga; Deyko, Alexey; Lovelock, Kevin R J; Taccardi, Nicola; Wei, Wei; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter

    2014-04-01

    We have performed a systematic study addressing the surface behavior of a variety of functionalized and non-functionalized ionic liquids (ILs). From angle-resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, detailed conclusions on the surface enrichment of the functional groups and the molecular orientation of the cations and anions is derived. The systems include imidazolium-based ILs methylated at the C2 position, a phenyl-functionalized IL, an alkoxysilane-functionalized IL, halo-functionalized ILs, thioether-functionalized ILs, and amine-functionalized ILs. The results are compared with the results for corresponding non-functionalized ILs where available. Generally, enrichment of the functional group at the surface is only observed for systems that have very weak interaction between the functional group and the ionic head groups.

  4. 1,2,3-Triazole-Functionalized Polysulfone Synthesis through Microwave-Assisted Copper-Catalyzed Click Chemistry: A Highly Proton Conducting High Temperature Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rakhi; Donnadio, Anna; Giancola, Stefano; Kreisz, Aurélien; Jones, Deborah J; Cavaliere, Sara

    2016-07-06

    Microwave heating holds all the aces regarding development of effective and environmentally friendly methods to perform chemical transformations. Coupling the benefits of microwave-enhanced chemistry with highly reliable copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry paves the way for a rapid and efficient synthesis procedure to afford high performance thermoplastic materials. We describe herein fast and high yielding synthesis of 1,2,3-triazole-functionalized polysulfone through microwave-assisted CuAAC as well as explore their potential as phosphoric acid doped polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) for high temperature PEM fuel cells. Polymers with various degrees of substitution of the side-chain functionality of 1,4-substituted 1,2,3-triazole with alkyl and aryl pendant structures are prepared by sequential chloromethylation, azidation, and microwave-assisted CuAAC using a range of alkynes (1-pentyne, 1-nonyne, and phenylacetylene). The completeness of reaction at each step and the purity of the clicked polymers were confirmed by (1)H-(13)C NMR, DOSY-NMR and FTIR-ATR spectroscopies. The thermal and thermochemical properties of the modified polymers were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with mass spectroscopy (TG-MS), respectively. TG-MS analysis demonstrated that the commencement of the thermal degradation takes place with the decomposition of the triazole ring while its substituents have critical influence on the initiation temperature. Polysulfone functionalized with 4-phenyl-1,2,3-triazole demonstrates significantly higher Tg, Td, and elastic modulus than the ones bearing 4-propyl-1,2,3-triazole and 4-heptyl-1,2,3-triazole groups. After doping with phosphoric acid, the functionalized polymers with acid doping level of 5 show promising performance with high proton conductivity in anhydrous conditions (in the range of 27-35 mS/cm) and satisfactorily high elastic modulus (in the range

  5. Investigation of the redox chemistry of anthraquinone derivatives using density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, Jonathan E; Curtiss, Larry A; Assary, Rajeev S

    2014-09-25

    Application of density functional calculations to compute electrochemical properties such as redox windows, effect of substitution by electron donating and electron withdrawing groups on redox windows, and solvation free energies for ∼50 anthraquinone (AQ) derivatives are presented because of their potential as anolytes in all-organic redox flow batteries. Computations suggest that lithium ions can increase (by ∼0.4 V) the reduction potential of anthraquinone due to the lithium ion pairing by forming a Lewis base-Lewis acid complex. To design new redox active species, the substitution by electron donating groups is essential to improve the reduction window of AQ with adequate oxidative stability. For instance, a complete methylation of AQ can improve its reduction window by ∼0.4 V. The quantum chemical studies of the ∼50 AQ derivatives are used to derive a relationship that connects the computed LUMO energy and the reduction potential that can be applied as a descriptor for screening thousands of AQ derivatives. Our computations also suggest that incorporating oxy-methyl dioxolane substituents in the AQ framework can increase its interaction with nonaqueous solvent and improve its solubility. Thermochemical calculations for likely bond breaking decomposition reactions of unsubstituted AQ anions suggest that the dianions are relatively stable in the solution. These studies provide an ideal platform to perform further combined experimental and theoretical studies to understand the electrochemical reversibility and solubility of new quinone molecules as energy storage materials.

  6. The marriage of metallacycle transfer chemistry with Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling to give main group element-containing conjugated polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Gang; Kang, Le; Torres Delgado, William; Shynkaruk, Olena; Ferguson, Michael J; McDonald, Robert; Rivard, Eric

    2013-04-10

    A versatile and general synthetic route for the synthesis of conjugated main group element-based polymers, previously inaccessible by conventional means, is reported. These polymers contain five-membered chalcogenophene rings based on S, Se, and Te, and we demonstrate that optoelectronic properties can be readily tuned via controlled atom substitution chemistry. In addition, regioregular hybrid thiophene-selenophene-tellurophene and selenophene-fluorene copolymers were synthesized to provide a further illustration of the scope of the presented metallacycle transfer/cross-coupling polymerization method.

  7. Recent advances in surface chemistry strategies for the fabrication of functional iron oxide based magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcheniuk, Kostiantyn; Tarasevych, Arkadii V.; Kukhar, Valeriy P.; Boukherroub, Rabah; Szunerits, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The synthesis of superparamagnetic nanostructures, especially iron-oxide based nanoparticles (IONPs), with appropriate surface functional groups has been intensively researched for many high-technological applications, including high density data storage, biosensing and biomedicine. In medicine, IONPs are nowadays widely used as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in hyperthermia therapy, but are also exploited for drug and gene delivery, detoxification of biological fluids or immunoassays, as they are relatively non-toxic. The use of magnetic particles in vivo requires IONPs to have high magnetization values, diameters below 100 nm with overall narrow size distribution and long time stability in biological fluids. Due to the high surface energies of IONPs agglomeration over time is often encountered. It is thus of prime importance to modify their surface to prevent aggregation and to limit non-specific adsorption of biomolecules onto their surface. Such chemical modifications result in IONPs being well-dispersed and biocompatible, and allow for targeted delivery and specific interactions. The chemical nature of IONPs thus determines not only the overall size of the colloid, but also plays a significant role for in vivo and in vitro applications. This review discusses the different concepts currently used for the surface functionalization and coating of iron oxide nanoparticles. The diverse strategies for the covalent linking of drugs, proteins, enzymes, antibodies, and nucleotides will be discussed and the chemically relevant steps will be explained in detail.

  8. Metallicity Distribution Functions of Four Local Group dwarf galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Teresa L; Saha, Abhijit; Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J

    2015-01-01

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) instrument aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, 1) matching stars to isochrones in color-color diagrams, and 2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color-color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter, and produces MDFs 30-50 % narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEM) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spher...

  9. Synthesis of polystyrene microspheres and functionalization with Pd(0) nanoparticles to perform bioorthogonal organometallic chemistry in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Johansson, Emma M V; Yusop, Rahimi M; Sánchez-Martín, Rosario M; Bradley, Mark

    2012-05-31

    We have developed miniaturized heterogeneous Pd(0)-catalysts (Pd(0)-microspheres) with the ability to enter cells, stay harmlessly within the cytosol and mediate efficient bioorthogonal organometallic chemistries (e.g., allylcarbamate cleavage and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling). This approach is a major addition to the toolbox available for performing chemical reactions within cells. Here we describe a full protocol for the synthesis of the Pd(0)-microspheres from readily available starting materials (by the synthesis of size-controlled amino-functionalized polystyrene microspheres), as well as for their characterization (electron microscopy and palladium quantitation) and functional validation ('in solution' and 'in cytoplasm' conversions). From the beginning of the synthesis to functional evaluation of the catalytic device requires 5 d of work.

  10. METALLICITY DISTRIBUTION FUNCTIONS OF FOUR LOCAL GROUP DWARF GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Teresa L.; Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, P.O. Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Saha, Abhijit [NOAO, 950 Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Anthony-Twarog, Barbara J., E-mail: rosst@nmsu.edu, E-mail: holtz@nmsu.edu, E-mail: bjat@ku.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045-7582 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    We present stellar metallicities in Leo I, Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix dwarf galaxies derived from medium (F390M) and broad (F555W, F814W) band photometry using the Wide Field Camera 3 instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We measured metallicity distribution functions (MDFs) in two ways, (1) matching stars to isochrones in color–color diagrams and (2) solving for the best linear combination of synthetic populations to match the observed color–color diagram. The synthetic technique reduces the effect of photometric scatter and produces MDFs 30%–50% narrower than the MDFs produced from individually matched stars. We fit the synthetic and individual MDFs to analytical chemical evolution models (CEMs) to quantify the enrichment and the effect of gas flows within the galaxies. Additionally, we measure stellar metallicity gradients in Leo I and II. For IC 1613 and Phoenix our data do not have the radial extent to confirm a metallicity gradient for either galaxy. We find the MDF of Leo I (dwarf spheroidal) to be very peaked with a steep metal-rich cutoff and an extended metal-poor tail, while Leo II (dwarf spheroidal), Phoenix (dwarf transition), and IC 1613 (dwarf irregular) have wider, less peaked MDFs than Leo I. A simple CEM is not the best fit for any of our galaxies; therefore we also fit the “Best Accretion Model” of Lynden-Bell. For Leo II, IC 1613, and Phoenix we find similar accretion parameters for the CEM even though they all have different effective yields, masses, star formation histories, and morphologies. We suggest that the dynamical history of a galaxy is reflected in the MDF, where broad MDFs are seen in galaxies that have chemically evolved in relative isolation and narrowly peaked MDFs are seen in galaxies that have experienced more complicated dynamical interactions concurrent with their chemical evolution.

  11. Quantitative evaluation of interaction force between functional groups in protein and polymer brush surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Sho; Inoue, Yuuki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2014-03-18

    To understand interactions between polymer surfaces and different functional groups in proteins, interaction forces were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Various polymer brush surfaces were systematically prepared by surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization as well-defined model surfaces to understand protein adsorption behavior. The polymer brush layers consisted of phosphorylcholine groups (zwitterionic/hydrophilic), trimethylammonium groups (cationic/hydrophilic), sulfonate groups (anionic/hydrophilic), hydroxyl groups (nonionic/hydrophilic), and n-butyl groups (nonionic/hydrophobic) in their side chains. The interaction forces between these polymer brush surfaces and different functional groups (carboxyl groups, amino groups, and methyl groups, which are typical functional groups existing in proteins) were quantitatively evaluated by force-versus-distance curve measurements using atomic force microscopy with a functional-group-functionalized cantilever. Furthermore, the amount of adsorbed protein on the polymer brush surfaces was quantified by surface plasmon resonance using albumin with a negative net charge and lysozyme with a positive net charge under physiological conditions. The amount of proteins adsorbed on the polymer brush surfaces corresponded to the interaction forces generated between the functional groups on the cantilever and the polymer brush surfaces. The weakest interaction force and least amount of protein adsorbed were observed in the case of the polymer brush surface with phosphorylcholine groups in the side chain. On the other hand, positive and negative surfaces generated strong forces against the oppositely charged functional groups. In addition, they showed significant adsorption with albumin and lysozyme, respectively. These results indicated that the interaction force at the functional group level might be

  12. Red electroluminescence of ruthenium sensitizer functionalized by sulfonate anchoring groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahroosvand, Hashem; Abbasi, Parisa; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Janghouri, Mohammad

    2014-06-28

    We have synthesized five novel Ru(ii) phenanthroline complexes with an additional aryl sulfonate ligating substituent at the 5-position [Ru(L)(bpy)2](BF4)2 (1), [Ru(L)(bpy)(SCN)2] (2), [Ru(L)3](BF4)2 (3), [Ru(L)2(bpy)](BF4)2 (4) and [Ru(L)(BPhen)(SCN)2] (5) (where L = 6-one-[1,10]phenanthroline-5-ylamino)-3-hydroxynaphthalene 1-sulfonic, bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, BPhen = 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline), as both photosensitizers for oxide semiconductor solar cells (DSSCs) and light emitting diodes (LEDs). The absorption and emission maxima of these complexes red shifted upon extending the conjugation of the phenanthroline ligand. Ru phenanthroline complexes exhibit broad metal to ligand charge transfer-centered electroluminescence (EL) with a maximum near 580 nm. Our results indicated that a particular structure (2) can be considered as both DSSC and OLED devices. The efficiency of the LED performance can be tuned by using a range of ligands. Device (2) has a luminance of 550 cd m(-2) and maximum efficiency of 0.9 cd A(-1) at 18 V, which are the highest values among the five devices. The turn-on voltage of this device is approximately 5 V. The role of auxiliary ligands in the photophysical properties of Ru complexes was investigated by DFT calculation. We have also studied photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized nanocrystalline semiconductor solar cells based on Ru phenanthroline complexes and an iodine redox electrolyte. A solar energy to electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 0.67% was obtained for Ru complex (2) under standard AM 1.5 irradiation with a short-circuit photocurrent density (Jsc) of 2.46 mA cm(-2), an open-circuit photovoltage (Voc) of 0.6 V, and a fill factor (ff) of 40%, which are all among the highest values for ruthenium sulfonated anchoring groups reported so far. Monochromatic incident photon to current conversion efficiency was 23% at 475 nm. Photovoltaic studies clearly indicated dyes with two SCN substituents yielded a higher Jsc for the

  13. Polydopamine meets solid-state nanopores: a bioinspired integrative surface chemistry approach to tailor the functional properties of nanofluidic diodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Mitta, Gonzalo; Tuninetti, Jimena S; Knoll, Wolfgang; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia; Azzaroni, Omar

    2015-05-13

    The ability to modulate the surface chemical characteristics of solid-state nanopores is of great interest as it provides the means to control the macroscopic response of nanofluidic devices. For instance, controlling surface charge and polarity of the pore walls is one of the most important applications of surface modification that is very relevant to attain accurate control over the transport of ions through the nanofluidic architecture. In this work, we describe a new integrative chemical approach to fabricate nanofluidic diodes based on the self-polymerization of dopamine (PDOPA) on asymmetric track-etched nanopores. Our results demonstrate that PDOPA coating is not only a simple and effective method to modify the inner surface of polymer nanopores fully compatible with the fabrication of nanofluidic devices but also a versatile platform for further integration of more complex molecules through different covalent chemistries and self-assembly processes. We adjusted the chemical modification strategy to obtain various configurations of the pore surface: (i) PDOPA layer was used as primer, precursor, or even responsive functional coating; (ii) PDOPA layer was used as a platform for anchoring chemical functions via the Michael addition reaction; and (iii) PDOPA was used as a reactive layer inducing the metallization of the pore walls through the in situ reduction of metallic precursors present in solution. We believe that the transversal concept of integrative surface chemistry offered by polydopamine in combination with the remarkable physical characteristics of asymmetric nanopores constitutes a new framework to design multifunctional nanofluidic devices employing soft chemistry-based nanofunctionalization techniques.

  14. A Generalized Logistic Regression Procedure to Detect Differential Item Functioning among Multiple Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magis, David; Raiche, Gilles; Beland, Sebastien; Gerard, Paul

    2011-01-01

    We present an extension of the logistic regression procedure to identify dichotomous differential item functioning (DIF) in the presence of more than two groups of respondents. Starting from the usual framework of a single focal group, we propose a general approach to estimate the item response functions in each group and to test for the presence…

  15. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  16. Students' Understanding of Alkyl Halide Reactions in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Ramirez de Arellano, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Organic chemistry is an essential subject for many undergraduate students completing degrees in science, engineering, and pre-professional programs. However, students often struggle with the concepts and skills required to successfully solve organic chemistry exercises. Since alkyl halides are traditionally the first functional group that is…

  17. Functional groups grafted nonwoven fabrics for blood filtration-The effects of functional groups and wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Chao [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Cao Ye [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China); Sun Kang, E-mail: ksun@sjtu.edu.cn [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu Jiaxin; Wang Hong [Institute of Blood Transfusion, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Chengdu 610081 (China)

    2011-01-15

    In this work, the effects of grafted functional groups and surface wettability on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet were investigated by the method of blood filtration. The filter materials, poly(butylene terephthalate) nonwoven fabrics bearing different functional groups including hydroxyl (OH), carboxyl (COOH), sulfonic acid group (SO{sub 3}H) and zwitterionic sulfobetaine group ({sup +}N((CH{sub 3}){sub 2})(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}SO{sub 3}{sup Circled-Minus }) with controllable wettability were prepared by UV radiation grafting vinyl monomers with these functional groups. Our results emphasized that both surface functional groups and surface wettability had significant effects on the adhesion of leukocyte and platelet. In the case of filter materials with the same wettability, leukocytes adhering to filter materials decreased in the order: the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group > the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H, while platelets adhering to filter materials decreased as the following order: the surface bearing SO{sub 3}H > the surface bearing both OH and COOH > the surface bearing OH only > the surface bearing sulfobetaine group. As the wettability of filter materials increased, both leukocyte and platelet adhesion to filter materials declined, except that leukocyte adhesion to the surface bearing OH only remained unchanged.

  18. Zwitterionic polymer functionalization of polysulfone membrane with improved antifouling property and blood compatibility by combination of ATRP and click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tao; Lu, Ting; Xie, Yi; Zhao, Wei-Feng; Sun, Shu-Dong; Zhao, Chang-Sheng

    2016-08-01

    The chemical compositions are very important for designing blood-contacting membranes with good antifouling property and blood compatibility. In this study, we propose a method combining ATRP and click chemistry to introduce zwitterionic polymer of poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate) (PSBMA), negatively charged polymers of poly(sodium methacrylate) (PNaMAA) and/or poly(sodium p-styrene sulfonate) (PNaSS), to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of polysulfone (PSf) membranes. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle results confirmed the successful grafting of the functional polymers. The antifouling property and blood compatibility of the modified membranes were systematically investigated. The zwitterionic polymer (PSBMA) grafted membranes showed good resistance to protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion; the negatively charged polymer (PNaSS or PNaMAA) grafted membranes showed improved blood compatibility, especially the anticoagulant property. Moreover, the PSBMA/PNaMAA modified membrane showed both antifouling property and anticoagulant property, and exhibited a synergistic effect in inhibiting blood coagulation. The functionalization of membrane surfaces by a combination of ATRP and click chemistry is demonstrated as an effective route to improve the antifouling property and blood compatibility of membranes in blood-contact.

  19. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of functionalized CdSe quantum dots prepared by plasma sputtering and wet chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Christophe; Dahi, Abdellatif; Dalstein, Laetitia; Busson, Bertrand; Lismont, Marjorie; Colson, Pierre; Dreesen, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    We develop an innovative manufacturing process, based on radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS), to prepare neat CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on glass and silicon substrates and further chemically functionalize them. In order to validate the fabrication protocol, their optical properties are compared with those of QDs obtained from commercial solutions and deposited by wet chemistry on the substrates. Firstly, AFM measurements attest that nano-objects with a mean diameter around 13 nm are located on the substrate after RFMS treatment. Secondly, the UV-Vis absorption study of this deposited layer shows a specific optical absorption band, located at 550 nm, which is related to a discrete energy level of QDs. Thirdly, by using two-color sum-frequency generation (2C-SFG) nonlinear optical spectroscopy, we show experimentally the functionalization efficiency of the RFMS CdSe QDs layer with thiol derived molecules, which is not possible on the QDs layer prepared by wet chemistry due to the surfactant molecules from the native solution. Finally, 2C-SFG spectroscopy, performed at different visible wavelengths, highlights modifications of the vibration mode shape whatever the QDs deposition method, which is correlated to the discrete energy level of the QDs.

  20. Organic functionalization of group IV semiconductor surfaces: principles, examples, applications, and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Stacey F.

    2002-03-01

    Organic functionalization is emerging as an important area in the development of new semiconductor-based materials and devices. Direct, covalent attachment of organic layers to a semiconductor interface provides for the incorporation of many new properties, including lubrication, optical response, chemical sensing, or biocompatibility. Methods by which to incorporate organic functionality to the surfaces of semiconductors have seen immense progress in recent years, and in this article several of these approaches are reviewed. Examples are included from both dry and wet processing environments. The focus of the article is on attachment strategies that demonstrate the molecular nature of the semiconductor surface. In many cases, the surfaces mimic the reactivity of their molecular carbon or organosilane counterparts, and examples of functionalization reactions are described in which direct analogies to textbook organic and inorganic chemistry can be applied. This article addresses the expected impact of these functionalization strategies on emerging technologies in nanotechnology, sensing, and bioengineering.

  1. Extensions of time density functional theory to QED: QED-Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Angel

    n this talk we will review the recent advances within density-functional and many-body based schemes to describe spectroscopic properties of complex systems with special emphasis to modelling time and spatially resolved electron spectroscopies We will discuss the theoretical approaches developed in the group for the characterisation of matter out of equilibrium, the control material processes at the electronic level and tailor material properties, and master energy and information on the nanoscale to propose new devices with capabilities. We will focus on examples linked to the efficient conversion of light into electricity or chemical fuels (''artificial photosynthesis'') and the design on new nanostructured based optoelectronic devices based on inorganic nanotubes, among others. The goal is to provide a detailed, efficient, and at the same time accurate microscopic approach for the ab-initio description and control of the dynamics of decoherence and dissipation in quantum many-body systems. With the help of quantum optimal control (QOC) theory and the mastery over spectroscopy we could direct the movement of electrons, selectively trigger chemical reactions and processes, and create new materials

  2. 蓖麻油的单官能团反应%Single Functional Group Reactions of Castor Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海飞; 朱新宝

    2015-01-01

    Castor oil is a kind of plant oils with unique properties,its molecule contains functional groups such as hydroxyl, ester group,ethylenic bond. Among these functional groups,single group can react to form castor oil derivatives,two or three groups of them also have different reactions to get special application of castor oil derivatives. Chemical reaction is summarized and classified according to the single group reaction. This article systematically introduces the reaction of the castor oil,briefly describes a variety of purposes of different products,comprehensively recommends castor oils basis chemistry knowledge,facilitates the design of the new chemical reaction and the development of new products,improves the castor oil deep processing technology.%蓖麻油是具有独特性能的植物油类,分子中含有羟基、酯基、烯键等官能团,这些官能团可以单独进行反应得到蓖麻油衍生物,也可以其中两个或三个基团组合先后进行不同反应得到特殊用途的蓖麻油衍生物。主要对三种官能团单独进行化学反应综述归类,系统地介绍蓖麻油中各官能团所能发生的反应,简述不同反应产物的用途,较全面地介绍了蓖麻油基础化学反应知识,便于新反应和多官能团反应的设计和新产品的开发,提高蓖麻油深加工技术水平。

  3. Plant functional group composition and large-scale species richness in European agricultural landscapes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liira, J.; Schmidt, T.; Aavik, T.; Arens, P.F.P.; Augenstein, I.; Bailey, D.; Billeter, R.; Bukacek, R.; Burel, F.; Blust, de G.; Cock, de R.; Dirksen, J.; Edwards, P.J.; Hamersky, R.; Herzog, F.; Klotz, S.; Kuhn, I.; Coeur, Le D.; Miklova, P.; Roubalova, M.; Schweiger, O.; Smulders, M.J.M.; Wingerden, van W.K.R.E.; Bugter, R.J.F.; Zobel, M.

    2008-01-01

    Question: Which are the plant functional groups responding most clearly to agricultural disturbances? Which are the relative roles of habitat availability, landscape configuration and agricultural land use intensity in affecting the functional composition and diversity of vascular plants in agricult

  4. Developing the group mind through functional subgrouping: linking systems-centered training (SCT) and interpersonal neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, Susan P; Agazarian, Yvonne M

    2010-10-01

    This article introduces the systems-centered concept of the "group mind" by linking systems-centered thinking and interpersonal neurobiology, building on Siegel's definition of mind as the process of regulating the flow of energy and information. Functional subgrouping, the systems-centered group method for resolving conflicts, discriminates and integrates the flow of energy and information within and between group members, subgroups, and the group-as-a-whole, thus potentiating survival, development, and transformation. This article uses the interpersonal neurobiological framework to discuss functional subgrouping as a tool for developing the group mind: considering how functional subgrouping facilitates emotional regulation, creates a secure relational context, and potentiates neural integration.

  5. Chemistry, technology, and nutraceutical functions of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L): an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowbhagya, H B

    2013-01-01

    Cumin is a seed spice belonging to the family umbelliferae. Cumin and value added products from cumin are used in food flavoring and perfumery. Cumin contains volatile oil (3-4%), cuminaldehyde, the major active principle, which is present to an extent of 45-50%. Cumin and value added products from cumin, viz., cumin oil and oleoresin are exported. Cumin powder forms the main component of many spice mixes and curry powders. Cuminaldehyde is an important phytochemical and possesses many health benefits. Alcohol and water extract of cumin are reported to possess many nutraceutical properties like antiallergic, antioxidant, anti-platelet aggregation, and hypoglycemic. Cumin and value added products from cumin can be a good source of nutraceuticals with many biological activities. Incorporation of cumin into food products will have the benefits of a flavorant and nutraceutical at the same time. In the present review, the chemistry, processing, and biological activities of cumin and its components are discussed.

  6. Anionic Synthesis of Primary and Secondary Amine-Functionalized Polymers Using Imine Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A review of methods for the anionic synthesis of well-defined, amine-functional-ized polymers using imines as functionalizing agents is provided. The disparate results in theliterature regarding functionalizations with N-(benzylidene)trimethylsilylamine to form pri-mary amine functionalized polymers are discussed ; the efficiency of functionalization dependson the molecular weight of the polymeric organolithium(PLi). Efficient functionalizationsare observed for PLi with Kn>10 000 g/mol. The poor functionalization yields using ke-timines with enolizable hydrogens is explained. The use of N-trimethylsi-lyldiphenylcarbimide as a quantitative primary amine functionalizing reagent is described.Recent results on the anionic synthesis of secondary amine-functionalized polymers using N-(benzylidene)methylamine as the functionalization agent are presented.

  7. A CRM domain protein functions dually in group I and group II intron splicing in land plant chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yukari; Barkan, Alice

    2007-12-01

    The CRM domain is a recently recognized RNA binding domain found in three group II intron splicing factors in chloroplasts, in a bacterial protein that associates with ribosome precursors, and in a family of uncharacterized proteins in plants. To elucidate the functional repertoire of proteins with CRM domains, we studied CFM2 (for CRM Family Member 2), which harbors four CRM domains. RNA coimmunoprecipitation assays showed that CFM2 in maize (Zea mays) chloroplasts is associated with the group I intron in pre-trnL-UAA and group II introns in the ndhA and ycf3 pre-mRNAs. T-DNA insertions in the Arabidopsis thaliana ortholog condition a defective-seed phenotype (strong allele) or chlorophyll-deficient seedlings with impaired splicing of the trnL group I intron and the ndhA, ycf3-int1, and clpP-int2 group II introns (weak alleles). CFM2 and two previously described CRM proteins are bound simultaneously to the ndhA and ycf3-int1 introns and act in a nonredundant fashion to promote their splicing. With these findings, CRM domain proteins are implicated in the activities of three classes of catalytic RNA: group I introns, group II introns, and 23S rRNA.

  8. Effect of various functional groups on biodiesel synthesis from soybean oils by acidic ionic liquids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming Ming Fan; Jing Jie Zhou; Qiu Ju Han; Ping Bo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oils catalyzed by five acidic ionic liquids with three cationic functional groups was investigated.The improvement of the catalytic activities was affected by various functional groups including pyridine group,N-methylimidazole group,triethylamine group.Among them [C4SO3Hpy]HSO4 with pyridine group showed better catalytic activity with the biodiesel yield of 94.5%,and still yielded more than 90% after six successive uses.The possible mechanism was also discussed by two reaction paths in detail.

  9. Building functional groups of marine benthic macroinvertebrates on the basis of general community assembly mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandridis, Nikolaos; Bacher, Cédric; Desroy, Nicolas; Jean, Fred

    2017-03-01

    The accurate reproduction of the spatial and temporal dynamics of marine benthic biodiversity requires the development of mechanistic models, based on the processes that shape macroinvertebrate communities. The modelled entities should, accordingly, be able to adequately represent the many functional roles that are performed by benthic organisms. With this goal in mind, we applied the emergent group hypothesis (EGH), which assumes functional equivalence within and functional divergence between groups of species. The first step of the grouping involved the selection of 14 biological traits that describe the role of benthic macroinvertebrates in 7 important community assembly mechanisms. A matrix of trait values for the 240 species that occurred in the Rance estuary (Brittany, France) in 1995 formed the basis for a hierarchical classification that generated 20 functional groups, each with its own trait values. The functional groups were first evaluated based on their ability to represent observed patterns of biodiversity. The two main assumptions of the EGH were then tested, by assessing the preservation of niche attributes among the groups and the neutrality of functional differences within them. The generally positive results give us confidence in the ability of the grouping to recreate functional diversity in the Rance estuary. A first look at the emergent groups provides insights into the potential role of community assembly mechanisms in shaping biodiversity patterns. Our next steps include the derivation of general rules of interaction and their incorporation, along with the functional groups, into mechanistic models of benthic biodiversity.

  10. Facile Synthesis of Benzaldehyde-Functionalized Ionic Liquids and Their Flexible Functional Group Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Three benzaldehyde-functionalized ionic liquids were readily synthesized by quaternization of N-alkylimidazole with benzaldehyde-functionalized alkyl bromides under microwave irradiation in good yield. These aldehyde-functionalized ionic liquids could easily be oxidized in the presence of H2O2/KOH or be reduced by NaBH4 leading to the formation of the corresponding carboxyl-functionalized ionic liquids or benzylic alcohol-functionalized ionic liquids. In addition, the condensations of these functionalized ones with hydrazine hydrate and with aniline under reductive amination conditions were demonstrated.

  11. Ordered self-assembled monolayers terminated with different chemical functional groups direct neural stem cell linage behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shenglian; Liu, Xi; He, Jin; Wang, Xiumei; Wang, Ying; Cui, Fu-Zhai

    2015-12-23

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been a promising candidate for stem cell-based nerve tissue regeneration. Therefore, the design of idea biomaterials that deliver precise regulatory signals to control stem cell fate is currently a crucial issue that depends on a profound understanding of the interactions between NSCs with the surrounding micro-environment. In this work, self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold with different chemical groups, including hydroxyl (-OH), amino (-NH2), carboxyl (-COOH) and methyl (-CH3), were used as a simple model to study the effects of surface chemistry on NSC fate decisions. Contact angle measurement and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) examination implied that all types of alkanethiols self-assembled on gold into a close-packed phase structure with similar molecular densities. In this study, we evaluated NSC adhesion, migration and differentiation in response to different chemical functional groups cultured under serum-free conditions. Our studies showed that NSCs exhibited certain phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to surface chemical groups. Compared with other functional groups, the SAMs with hydroxyl end-groups provided the best micro-environment in promoting NSC migration and maintaining an undifferentiated or neuronal differentiation state.  -NH2 surfaces directed neural stem cells into astrocytic lineages, while NSCs on  -COOH and  -CH3 surfaces had a similar potency to differentiate into three nerve lineages. To further investigate the possible signaling pathway, the gene expression of integrin β1 and β4 were examined. The results indicated that a high expression of β1 integrin would probably have a tight correlation with the expression of nestin, which implied the stemness of NSCs, while β4 integrin seemed to correspond to the differentiated NSCs. The results presented here give useful information for the future design of biomaterials to regulate the preservation, proliferation and

  12. Selenol Protecting Groups in Organic Chemistry: Special Emphasis on Selenocysteine Se-Protection in Solid Phase Peptide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Stevenson Flemer Jr.

    2011-01-01

    The appearance of selenium in organic synthesis is relatively rare, and thus examples in the literature pertaining to the masking of its considerable reactivity are similarly uncommon. Greene's Protecting Groups in Organic Synthesis, the standard reference for the state of the art in this arena, offers no entries for selenium protective methodology, in stark comparison to its mention of the great variety of protecting groups germane to its chalcogen cousin sulfur. This scarcity of Se-protecti...

  13. Plant-soil feedbacks: role of plant functional group and plant traits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortois, R.; Schröder-Georgi, T.; Weigelt, A.; van der Putten, W.H.; De Deyn, G.B.

    2016-01-01

    Plant-soil feedback (PSF), plant trait and functional group concepts advanced our understanding of plant community dynamics, but how they are interlinked is poorly known. To test how plant functional groups (FGs: graminoids, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes) and plant traits relate to PSF, we grew 4

  14. Subgroups of ideal class groups of real quadratic algebraic function fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Kunpeng(王鲲鹏); ZHANG; Xianke(张贤科)

    2003-01-01

    Necessary and sufficient condition on real quadratic algebraic function fields K is given for theirideal class groups H(K) to contain cyclic subgroups of order n. And eight series of such real quadratic functionfields K are obtained whose ideal class groups contain cyclic subgroups of order n. In particular, the ideal classnumbers of these function fields are divisible by n.

  15. Synthesis of porous carbon fibers with strong anion exchange functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weihua; Hu, Jingtian; Han, Zheshen; Wang, Zixing; Zheng, Zhen; Langer, James; Economy, James

    2015-06-18

    Hybrid porous carbon fibers with strong anion-exchangeable functional groups (HACAX) were synthesized by alkylation of pyrolyzed polyacrylonitrile. HACAX exhibits generic stable positively charged functional groups. This expands the applications of porous carbon media for interacting with anions without adjusting pH, such as Cr(vi) adsorption at natural pH.

  16. Chemistry, technology, and nutraceutical functions of celery (Apium graveolens L.): an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowbhagya, H B

    2014-01-01

    Celery is a commercially important seed spice belonging to the family Umbelliferrae. Celery is used in various forms such as fresh herb, stalk, seeds, oil, and oleoresin for flavoring of foods and for medicinal purposes. Celery seed contains 2% volatile oil that finds application for flavoring of foods and also in perfumery industry. Limonene and selinene form about 60% and 20% of the oil, respectively. However, the important flavor constituents of the oil responsible for the typical aroma are 3-n-butyl-4-5-dihydrophthalide (sedanenolide), 3-n-butyl phthalide, sedanolide, and sedanonic anhydride present in very low levels (1-3%). Celery contains 15% fatty oil with the fatty acids: petroselenic (64.3%), oleic (8.1%), linoleic (18%), linolenic (0.6%), and palmitic acids. Phthalides especially sedanenaloide possess many health benefits. Celery extracts are reported to possess many nutraceutical properties, viz., antioxidant, hypolipidemic, hypoglycemic, and anti-platelet aggregation. In the present review, the chemistry, processing, and biological activities of celery and the components responsible are discussed.

  17. Fish functional groups in a tropical wetland of the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Córdova-Tapia

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The characterization of species' functional traits is a major step in the understanding and description of communities in natural habitats. The classification of species into functional groups is a useful tool to identify redundancy and uniqueness. We studied the fish community of a pristine freshwater wetland in the Sian Ka'an Biosphere Reserve by analysing two multidimensional functions: food acquisition and locomotion. We investigated changes in the functional group structure between habitats (permanent and temporary pools and seasons (dry and wet. Six functional groups with different ecological characteristics were detected, two of which had high functional redundancy and three of them were represented by single species with unique ecological functions. In permanent pools during the dry season, functional group richness and diversity were lower, while evenness was higher. During the wet season, all functional groups were detected and similar functional group structure was found between habitats. These results suggest an effect of environmental filtering during the dry season and niche complementarity during the wet season.

  18. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-12

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  19. Accurate Semilocal Density Functional for Condensed-Matter Physics and Quantum Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Jianmin; Mo, Yuxiang

    2016-08-01

    Most density functionals have been developed by imposing the known exact constraints on the exchange-correlation energy, or by a fit to a set of properties of selected systems, or by both. However, accurate modeling of the conventional exchange hole presents a great challenge, due to the delocalization of the hole. Making use of the property that the hole can be made localized under a general coordinate transformation, here we derive an exchange hole from the density matrix expansion, while the correlation part is obtained by imposing the low-density limit constraint. From the hole, a semilocal exchange-correlation functional is calculated. Our comprehensive test shows that this functional can achieve remarkable accuracy for diverse properties of molecules, solids, and solid surfaces, substantially improving upon the nonempirical functionals proposed in recent years. Accurate semilocal functionals based on their associated holes are physically appealing and practically useful for developing nonlocal functionals.

  20. Insertion of functional groups into a Nd3+ metal-organic framework via single-crystal-to-single-crystal coordinating solvent exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manos, Manolis J; Kyprianidou, Eleni J; Papaefstathiou, Giannis S; Tasiopoulos, Anastasios J

    2012-06-04

    Single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformations represent some of the most fascinating phenomena in chemistry. They are not only intriguing from a basic science point of view but also provide a means to modify or tune the properties of the materials via the postsynthetic introduction of suitable guest molecules or organic functional groups into their structures. Here, we describe UCY-2, a new flexible Nd(3+) metal-organic framework (MOF), which exhibits a unique capability to undergo a plethora of SCSC transformations with some of them being very uncommon. These structural alterations involve the replacement of coordinating solvent molecules of UCY-2 by terminally ligating solvents and organic ligands with multiple functional groups including -OH, -SH, -NH-, and -NH(2) or their combinations, chelating ligands, anions, and two different organic compounds. The SCSC coordinating solvent exchange is thus demonstrated as a powerful method for the functionalization of MOFs.

  1. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evie A Wieters

    Full Text Available We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km and local (10's m scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against

  2. Biogeographical boundaries, functional group structure and diversity of Rocky Shore communities along the Argentinean coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieters, Evie A; McQuaid, Christopher; Palomo, Gabriela; Pappalardo, Paula; Navarrete, Sergio A

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which functional structure and spatial variability of intertidal communities coincide with major biogeographical boundaries, areas where extensive compositional changes in the biota are observed over a limited geographic extension. We then investigate whether spatial variation in the biomass of functional groups, over geographic (10's km) and local (10's m) scales, could be associated to species diversity within and among these groups. Functional community structure expressed as abundance (density, cover and biomass) and composition of major functional groups was quantified through field surveys at 20 rocky intertidal shores spanning six degrees of latitude along the southwest Atlantic coast of Argentina and extending across the boundaries between the Argentinean and Magellanic Provinces. Patterns of abundance of individual functional groups were not uniformly matched with biogeographical regions. Only ephemeral algae showed an abrupt geographical discontinuity coincident with changes in biogeographic boundaries, and this was limited to the mid intertidal zone. We identified 3-4 main 'groups' of sites in terms of the total and relative abundance of the major functional groups, but these did not coincide with biogeographical boundaries, nor did they follow latitudinal arrangement. Thus, processes that determine the functional structure of these intertidal communities are insensitive to biogeographical boundaries. Over both geographical and local spatial scales, and for most functional groups and tidal levels, increases in species richness within the functional group was significantly associated to increased total biomass and reduced spatial variability of the group. These results suggest that species belonging to the same functional group are sufficiently uncorrelated over space (i.e. metres and site-to-site ) to stabilize patterns of biomass variability and, in this manner, provide a buffer, or "insurance", against spatial variability

  3. Defining planktonic protist functional groups on mechanisms for energy and nutrient acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Aditee; Flynn, Kevin J.; Tillmann, Urban

    2016-01-01

    Arranging organisms into functional groups aids ecological research by grouping organisms (irrespective of phylogenetic origin) that interact with environmental factors in similar ways. Planktonic protists traditionally have been split between photoautotrophic “phytoplankton” and phagotrophic...... for phototrophy, and (iv) non-constitutive mixotrophs (NCMs) that acquire their phototrophic capacity by ingesting specific (SNCM) or general non-specific (GNCM) prey. For the first time, we incorporate these functional groups within a foodweb structure and show, using model outputs, that there is scope...

  4. Remarks on the star product of functions on finite and compact groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aniello, P. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy); Facolta di Scienze Biotecnologiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy)], E-mail: aniello@na.infn.it; Ibort, A. [Departamento de Matematicas, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Man' ko, V.I. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Leninskii Prospect 53, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Marmo, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche dell' Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) - Sezione di Napoli, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2009-01-19

    We show that the characters {chi}(g{sub 1}g{sub 2}g{sub 3}{sup -1}) of irreducible unitary representations of finite groups and compact Lie groups provide kernels of star-product on complex valued functions f(g) of the group elements g. Examples of permutation groups of two and three elements as well as SU(2) group are considered. The k-deformed star products of the functions of finite and compact Lie groups are presented. The explicit form of the quantizers and dequantizers as well as the duality symmetry of the considered star products of the functions on the finite and compact Lie groups are discussed.

  5. Study of improved resins for advanced supersonic technology composites. Part 1: Heteroaromatic polymers containing ether groups. Part 2: Curing chemistry of aromatic polymers and composite studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takekoshi, T.; Hillig, W. B.; Mellinger, G. A.

    1975-01-01

    Fourteen ether-containing, aromatic dianhydrides have been synthesized from N-phenyl-3 or 4-nitrophthalimide and various bisphenols. The process involves nucleophilic displacement of activated nitro groups with bisphenolate ions. Ether-containing dianhydrides were indefinitely stable in the presence of atmospheric moisture. One-step, high temperature solution polymerization of the ether-containing dianhydrides with m-phenylene diamine, 4,4'-oxydianiline and 1, 3-bis(4-aminophenoxy)benzene afforded 42 polyetherimides. The polyetherimides were all soluble in m-cresol except two which were found to be crystalline. The glass transition temperatures of the polyetherimides ranged from 178 to 277 C. Soluble polybenzimidazopyrrolones containing ether groups were also prepared from the same ether-containing dianhydrides and aromatic tetraamines by one-step solution polymerization. Using low molecular weight polyetherimides, various thermoset resin systems were developed and tested as matrices for fiber-reinforced composites. The curing chemistry involving reaction of the phthalonitrile group and the o-diaminophenyl group was found to be generally applicable to crosslinking various aromatic polymers other than polyimides.

  6. Functional group based Ligand binding affinity scoring function at atomic environmental level

    OpenAIRE

    Varadwaj, Pritish Kumar; Lahiri, Tapobrata

    2009-01-01

    Use of knowledge based scoring function (KBSF) for virtual screening and molecular docking has become an established method for drug discovery. Lack of a precise and reliable free energy function that describes several interactions including water-mediated atomic interaction between amino-acid residues and ligand makes distance based statistical measure as the only alternative. Till now all the distance based scoring functions in KBSF arena use atom singularity concept, which neglects the env...

  7. Functionalization of Graphene with Nitrile Groups by Cycloaddition of Tetracyanoethylene Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojun Peng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphene has got considerable attention in both experimental and theoretical fields for its extraordinary properties. Covalent functionalization is an efficient strategy to render graphene additional properties and overcome its shortcomings such as zero band gap and nondispersibility in solvents. This study reports the synthesis and characterizations of a new kind of functionalized graphene, graphene-TCNEO, obtained by 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition. The graphene-TCNEO was systematically characterized by FTIR, Raman, XPS, SEM, TEM, and EDS mapping, and the covalent linkage between graphene and tetracyanoethylene oxide was firmly verified. Considering the great diversity of nitrile chemistry, the obtained graphene-TCNEO could be further transformed into other graphene-based derivatives with interesting properties.

  8. The role of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase in standardization and harmonization of the preanalytical phase in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornes, Michael P; Church, Stephen; van Dongen-Lases, Edmée;

    2016-01-01

    and Laboratory Medicine Working Group for Preanalytical Phase (EFLM WG-PRE) was established to lead in standardization and harmonization of preanalytical policies and practices at a European level. One of the key activities of the WG-PRE is the organization of the biennial EFLM-BD conference on the preanalytical......Patient safety is a leading challenge in healthcare and from the laboratory perspective it is now well established that preanalytical errors are the major contributor to the overall rate of diagnostic and therapeutic errors. To address this, the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry...... summarises the work that has and will be done in these areas. The goal of this initiative is to ensure the EFLM WG-PRE produces work that meets the needs of the European laboratory medicine community. Progress made in the identified areas will be updated at the next preanalytical phase conference and show...

  9. Affinity Induced Surface Functionalization of Liposomes Using Cu-Free Click Chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Jølck, Rasmus Irming; Eliasen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Functionalization of nanoparticles is a key element for improving specificity of drug delivery systems toward diseased tissue or cells. In the current study we report a highly efficient and chemoselective method for post-functionalization of liposomes with biomacromolecules, which equally well ca...

  10. Nobel Prize in Chemistry 1998 "for his development of the density-functional theory" : Walter Kohn

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    Prof. Walter Kohn presents "Electronic structure of matter : wave functions and density functionals".Since the 1920's Schroedinger wave functions have been the principal theoretical concept for understanding and computing the electronic structure of matter. More recently, Density Functional Theory (DFT), couched in terms of the electronic density distribution, n(r), has provided a new perspective and new computational possibilities, especially for systems consisting of very many (up to ~1000) atoms. In this talk some fundamental limitations of wave function methods for very-many-atom-systems will be discussed. The DFT approach will be explained together with some physical/chemical applications and a discussion of its strenghts and weaknesses. W Kohn has received the prize with J A Pople for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistr.

  11. Control of Colloid Surface Chemistry through Matrix Confinement: Facile Preparation of Stable Antibody Functionalized Silver Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skewis, Lynell R.; Reinhard, Björn M.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe a simple yet efficient gel matrix assisted preparation method which improves synthetic control over the interface between inorganic nanomaterials and biopolymers and yields stable biofunctionalized silver nanoparticles. Covalent functionalization of the noble metal surface is aided by the confinement of polyethylene glycol acetate functionalized silver nanoparticles in thin slabs of a 1% agarose gel. The gel confined nanoparticles can be transferred between reaction and washing media simply by immersing the gel slab in the solution of interest. The agarose matrix retains nanoparticles but is swiftly penetrated by the antibodies of interest. The antibodies are covalently anchored to the nanoparticles using conventional crosslinking strategies, and the resulting antibody functionalized nanoparticles are recovered from the gel through electroelution. We demonstrate the efficacy of this nanoparticle functionalization approach by labeling specific receptors on cellular surfaces with functionalized silver nanoparticles that are stable under physiological conditions. PMID:20161660

  12. Solubility studies of inorganic-organic hybrid nanoparticle photoresists with different surface functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Chakrabarty, Souvik; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Ben; Ober, Christopher; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.

    2016-01-01

    The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists.The solubility behavior of Hf and Zr based hybrid nanoparticles with different surface ligands in different concentrations of photoacid generator as potential EUV photoresists was investigated in detail. The nanoparticles regardless of core or ligand chemistry have a hydrodynamic diameter of 2-3 nm and a very narrow size distribution in organic solvents. The Hansen solubility parameters for nanoparticles functionalized with IBA and 2MBA have the highest contribution from the dispersion interaction than those with tDMA and MAA, which show more polar character. The nanoparticles functionalized with unsaturated surface ligands showed more apparent solubility changes after exposure to DUV than those with saturated ones. The solubility differences after exposure are more pronounced for films containing a higher amount of photoacid generator. The work reported here provides material selection criteria and processing strategies for the design of high performance EUV photoresists. Electronic supplementary

  13. The Effectiveness of Transactional Analysis Group-counseling on the Improvement of Couples’ Family Functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorban Ali Yahyaee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study: Family functioning is among the most important factors ensuring the mental health of family members. Disorder or disturbance in family functioning would cause many psychological problems for family members. Current study intended to examine the effectiveness of transactional analysis group counseling on the improvement of couple's family functioning. Materials & Methods: The design of the study is as semi experimental research with pretest and posttest with follow up and control group. Statistical population consists all couples referring to the psychological and counseling centers of Rasht city in 2012. Samples were selected at first by available sampling method and after completing family assessment  device, and obtaining score for enter to research, were placement using random sampling method in two experimental and control groups (N = 8 couples per group. The experimental group participated in 12 sessions of group counseling based on transactional analysis and control group received no intervention. The gathered data were analyzed using covariance analysis. Results: The results show that there are significant differences between the pre-test and post test scores of the experimental group. This difference is significant at the level of 0.05. Therefore it seems that transactional group therapy improved the dimensions of family functioning in couples. Conclusions: The results indicated that transactional analysis group counseling can improve the family functioning and use this approach to working with couples is recommended.

  14. A quantum chemistry study on the performance of porphyrin-based solar cell sensitisers; Zinc and anchor group position effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkan, Foroogh; Izadyar, Mohammad; Nakhaeipour, Ali

    2015-12-01

    In this work, ten porphyrin derivatives, including free-base zinc-metalised compounds were studied by varying the position of the carboxyl anchoring group and the alkyl substituents length on the remaining three phenyl rings with the aim of the cell efficiency investigation. Theoretical performances of the sensitisers in the dye-sensitised solar cell systems have been discussed by analysis of the optical absorption, the oxidised potential of ground and excited states, light-harvesting efficiency and electron injection efficiency. Due to lower symmetry of free-based porphyrins, they showed broader bands than zinc porphyrins. The second group sensitisers are better than the first one due to the smaller oxidation potential energy, higher open-circuit voltage and light-harvesting efficiency. The influence of long alkyl substituents on the photovoltaic parameters is not perceptible but ortho and meta positions of anchoring group modify the solar cell performance. Finally, some correlations between the quantum reactivity indices and photovoltaic parameters have obtained and discussed.

  15. Simulation study of the structure and phase behavior of ceramide bilayers and the role of lipid head group chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shan; Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Strickland, L. Anderson; McCabe, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Ceramides are known to be a key component of the stratum corneum, the outermost protective layer of the skin that controls barrier function. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the behavior of ceramide bilayers, focusing on non-hydroxy sphingosine (NS) and non-hydroxy phytosphingosine (NP) ceramides. Here, we propose a modified version of the CHARMM force field for ceramide simulation, which is directly compared to the more commonly used GROMOS-based force field o...

  16. Simulation study of the structure and phase behavior of ceramide bilayers and the role of lipid head group chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Shan; Moore, Timothy C.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; Strickland, L. Anderson; McCabe, Clare

    2013-01-01

    Ceramides are known to be a key component of the stratum corneum, the outermost protective layer of the skin that controls barrier function. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations are used to examine the behavior of ceramide bilayers, focusing on non-hydroxy sphingosine (NS) and non-hydroxy phytosphingosine (NP) ceramides. Here, we propose a modified version of the CHARMM force field for ceramide simulation, which is directly compared to the more commonly used GROMOS-based force field o...

  17. First examples of oxidizing secondary alcohols to ketones in the presence of the disulfide functional group: synthesis of novel diketone disulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X; Bandarage, U K; Wang, T; Schroeder, J D; Garvey, D S

    2001-06-01

    The disulfide functionality is present in a number of organic compounds of interest in the fields of both chemistry and biology. Because the disulfide group is known to be highly susceptible to further oxidation by a wide range of agents, performing a chemoselective oxidation without further oxidizing the disulfide moiety poses a synthetic challenge. Reported herein are the first examples of such a chemoselective oxidation in which a series of novel secondary alcohol disulfides 2a-f have been converted to the corresponding symmetrical diketones 3a-f utilizing a modified Swern oxidation.

  18. A structural and functional homolog supports a general role for frataxin in cellular iron chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Wenbin; Cowan, J A

    2010-02-07

    Bacillus subtilis YdhG lacks sequence homology, but demonstrates structural and functional similarity to the frataxin family, supporting a general cellular role for frataxin-type proteins in cellular iron homeostasis.

  19. Asymptotics for Certain Harmonic Functions and the Martin Compactification on the Quaternionic Heisenberg Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Wen LUAN; Fu Liu ZHU

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we make the asymptotic estimates of the heat kernel for the quaternionic Heisenberg group in various cases. We also use these results to deduce the asymptotic estimates of certain harmonic functions on the quaternionic Heisenberg group. Moreover a Martin compactification of the quaternionic Heisenberg group is constructed, and we prove that the Martin boundary of this group is homeomorphic to the unit ball in the quaternionic field.

  20. Self-encoding Functional Resin Applying for Combinatorial Chemistry and High Throughput Screening

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Lei; CHEN Tong-sheng

    2004-01-01

    A novel solid phase organic synthesis resin was synthesized for combinatorial high-throughput screening,which based on FTIR spectra self-encoding functional resin technology. A new deconvolution strategy termed position encoding deconvolution had illustrated and was compared with some popular combinatorial deconvolution strategies in efficiency and information content. The mimic high throughput screening of hexapeptide library successfully proved the applying of the self-encoding functional resin technology and the position encoding deconvolution strategy.

  1. Applications of the Conceptual Density Functional Theory Indices to Organic Chemistry Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, Luis R; Ríos-Gutiérrez, Mar; Pérez, Patricia

    2016-06-09

    Theoretical reactivity indices based on the conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT) have become a powerful tool for the semiquantitative study of organic reactivity. A large number of reactivity indices have been proposed in the literature. Herein, global quantities like the electronic chemical potential μ, the electrophilicity ω and the nucleophilicity N indices, and local condensed indices like the electrophilic P k + and nucleophilic P k - Parr functions, as the most relevant indices for the study of organic reactivity, are discussed.

  2. Variation of phytoplankton functional groups modulated by hydraulic controls in Hongze Lake, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Chang; Pei, Haiyan; Hu, Wenrong; Hao, Daping; Doblin, Martina A; Ren, Ying; Wei, Jielin; Feng, Yawei

    2015-11-01

    Hongze Lake is a large, shallow, polymictic, eutrophic lake in the eastern China. Phytoplankton functional groups in this lake were investigated from March 2011 to February 2013, and a comparison was made between the eastern, western, and northern regions. The lake shows strong fluctuations in water level caused by monsoon rains and regular hydraulic controls. By application of the phytoplankton functional group approach, this study aims to investigate the spatial and temporal dynamics and analyze their influencing factors. Altogether, 18 functional groups of phytoplankton were identified, encompassing 187 species. In order to seek the best variable describing the phytoplankton functional group distribution, 14 of the groups were analyzed in detail using redundancy analysis. Due to the turbid condition of the lake, the dominant functional groups were those tolerant of low light. The predominant functional groups in the annual succession were D (Cyclotella spp. and Synedra acus), T (Planctonema lauterbornii), P (Fragilaria crotonensis), X1 (Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa), C (Cyclotella meneghiniana and Cyclotella ocellata), and Y (Cryptomonas erosa). An opposite relationship between water level and the biomass of predominant groups was observed in the present study. Water level fluctuations, caused by monsoonal climate and artificial drawdown, were significant factors influencing phytoplankton succession in Hongze Lake, since they alter the hydrological conditions and influence light and nutrient availability. The clearly demonstrated factors, which significantly influence phytoplankton dynamics in Hongze Lake, will help government manage the large shallow lakes with frequent water level fluctuations.

  3. Fascinating frontiers of N/O-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene chemistry: from chemical catalysis to biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Alex; Ghosh, Prasenjit

    2010-08-21

    The in vogue N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs) have attracted attention largely for its new found popularity in chemical catalysis and also for displaying promising traits in biomedical applications. The current perspective provides an account of our efforts in exploring the utility of N/O-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbenes in these two areas. On the catalysis front, we have employed the N/O-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene based precatalysts for the C-C and C-N bond forming reactions like the Suzuki-Miyaura, Sonogashira and Hiyama cross-couplings, the base-free Michael addition, the alkene and alkyne hydroamination reactions and the ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of L-lactides that produce biodegradable polylactide polymers while on the biomedical application front, the anticancer and antimicrobial properties of these N/O-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene complexes were evaluated. Towards this objective, the N-heterocyclic carbene chemistry of a variety of transition metals like Ag, Au, Ni and Pd has been investigated.

  4. Group Theory of Wannier Functions Providing the Basis for a Deeper Understanding of Magnetism and Superconductivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekkehard Krüger

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the group theory of optimally-localized and symmetry-adapted Wannier functions in a crystal of any given space group G or magnetic group M. Provided that the calculated band structure of the considered material is given and that the symmetry of the Bloch functions at all of the points of symmetry in the Brillouin zone is known, the paper details whether or not the Bloch functions of particular energy bands can be unitarily transformed into optimally-localized Wannier functions symmetry-adapted to the space group G, to the magnetic group M or to a subgroup of G or M. In this context, the paper considers usual, as well as spin-dependent Wannier functions, the latter representing the most general definition of Wannier functions. The presented group theory is a review of the theory published by one of the authors (Ekkehard Krüger in several former papers and is independent of any physical model of magnetism or superconductivity. However, it is suggested to interpret the special symmetry of the optimally-localized Wannier functions in the framework of a nonadiabatic extension of the Heisenberg model, the nonadiabatic Heisenberg model. On the basis of the symmetry of the Wannier functions, this model of strongly-correlated localized electrons makes clear predictions of whether or not the system can possess superconducting or magnetic eigenstates.

  5. Solution chemistry of element 105. Pt. 1. Hydrolysis of group 5 cations: Nb, Ta, Ha and Pa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pershina, V.

    1998-01-01

    Relativistic molecular orbital calculations of the electronic structure of hydrated and hydrolyzed complexes have been performed for group 5 elements Nb, Ta, Ha and their pseudohomology, Pa. On their basis, relative values of the free energy changes and constants of hydrolysis reactions were defined. These results show that hydrolysis decreases in the order Nb>Ta>Ha>>Pa, which for Nb, Ta and Pa is in agreement with experiment. A decisive factor in the process turned out to be a predominant electrostatic metal-ligand interaction. (orig.)

  6. On Functional and Holographic Renormalization Group Methods in Stochastic Theory of Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ogarkov, S L

    2016-01-01

    A nonlocal quantum-field model is constructed for the system of hydrodynamic equations for incompressible viscous fluid (the stochastic Navier--Stokes (NS) equation and the continuity equation). This model is studied by the following two mutually parallel methods: the Wilson--Polchinski functional renormalization group method (FRG), which is based on the exact functional equation for the generating functional of amputated connected Green's functions (ACGF), and the Heemskerk--Polchinski holographic renormalization group method (HRG), which is based on the functional Hamilton--Jacobi (HJ) equation for the holographic boundary action. Both functional equations are equivalent to infinite hierarchies of integro-differential equations (coupled in the FRG case) for the corresponding families of Green's functions (GF). The RG-flow equations can be derived explicitly for two-particle functions. Because the HRG-flow equation is closed (contains only a two-particle GF), the explicit analytic solutions are obtained for ...

  7. Three discrete groups with homogeneous chemistry along the red giant branch in the globular cluster NGC 2808

    CERN Document Server

    Carretta, Eugenio

    2014-01-01

    We present the homogeneous reanalysis of Mg and Al abundances from high resolution UVES/FLAMES spectra for 31 red giants in the globular cluster NGC 2808. We found a well defined Mg-Al anticorrelation reaching a regime of subsolar Mg abundance ratios, with a spread of about 1.4 dex in [Al/Fe]. The main result from the improved statistics of our sample is that the distribution of stars is not continuous along the anticorrelation as they are neatly clustered into three distinct clumps each with different chemical composition. One group (P) shows the primordial composition of field stars of similar metallicity, and the other two (I and E) have increasing abundances of Al and decreasing abundances of Mg. The fraction of stars we found in the three components (P: 68%, I: 19%, E: 13%) is in excellent agreement with the number ratios computed for the three distinct main sequences in NGC 2808: for the first time there is a clear correspondence between discrete photometric sequences of dwarfs and distinct groups of gi...

  8. Substrate selective patterning on lithography defined gold on silica: Effect of end-group functionality on intermolecular layer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergkvist, Magnus; Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Strickland, Aaron D.; Batt, Carl A.

    2008-06-01

    An increasing number of applications in nanobiotechnology and other areas call for defined regions of different chemical functionality to achieve site-specific attachment while minimizing any unwanted surface interactions. In order to generate spatially defined chemical patterns on planar surfaces, standard nanofabrication methods are typically employed. However, when incorporating biological and chemical molecules into complex nanofabricated structures the micro/nanofabrication methods needed are often incompatible with the standard approaches used to achieve chemical patterning. An alternative strategy is to use substrate selective patterning (SSP) where two different organic molecules each have a specific affinity to a particular substrate material via a surface anchoring group. Here we use imaging ellipsometry, an ideally suited technique for measuring monolayer films on patterned substrates, and infrared spectroscopy to investigate SSP of alkanethiols with hydrophilic/hydrophobic moieties in combination with a methoxypolyethylenoxypropyltrichlorosilane reagent (mPEGTCS) on patterned gold on native silicon oxide substrates. One central aspect of SSP that was investigated was the cross-reactivity between the various substrate specific molecules, which can cause multilayer formation. Results showed that when the mPEGTCS reagent was used subsequently after formation of hydrophilic self-assembled alkanethiol monolayers (SAMs), there was an additional layer build-up of silane. No multilayer formation was observed for a hydrophobic alkanethiol SAM. SSP can be a practical method to effectively create localized functional chemistry on spatially defined nanofabricated devices.

  9. Applications of the Conceptual Density Functional Theory Indices to Organic Chemistry Reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. Domingo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical reactivity indices based on the conceptual Density Functional Theory (DFT have become a powerful tool for the semiquantitative study of organic reactivity. A large number of reactivity indices have been proposed in the literature. Herein, global quantities like the electronic chemical potential μ, the electrophilicity ω and the nucleophilicity N indices, and local condensed indices like the electrophilic P k + and nucleophilic P k − Parr functions, as the most relevant indices for the study of organic reactivity, are discussed.

  10. Charge transfer, chemical potentials, and the nature of functional groups: answers from quantum chemical topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendás, A Martín; Francisco, E; Blanco, M A

    2007-01-01

    We analyze the response of a quantum group within a molecule to charge transfer by using the interacting quantum atoms approach (IQA), an energy partitioning scheme within the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAM). It is shown that this response lies at the core of the concept of the functional group. The manipulation of fractional electron populations is carried out by using distribution functions for the electron number within the quantum basins. Several test systems are studied to show that similar chemical potential groups are characterized by similar energetic behavior upon interaction with other groups. The origin of the empirical additivity rules for group energies in simple hydrocarbons is also investigated. It turns out to rest on the independent saturation of both the self-energies and the interaction energies of the groups as the size of the chain increases. We also show that our results are compatible with the standard group energies of the QTAM.

  11. A Systematic Approach for Understanding Slater-Gaussian Functions in Computational Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Brianna; Hylton, Derrick J.; Ravi, Natarajan

    2013-01-01

    A systematic way to understand the intricacies of quantum mechanical computations done by a software package known as "Gaussian" is undertaken via an undergraduate research project. These computations involve the evaluation of key parameters in a fitting procedure to express a Slater-type orbital (STO) function in terms of the linear…

  12. Bridging the gap between chemistry, physiology, and evolution: Quantifying the functionality of sperm whale myoglobin mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dasmeh, Pouria; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2011-01-01

    -consumption rate resembling workload, O2 partial pressure resembling hypoxic stress, muscle cell size, and Mb concentration, resembling different organism-specific and compensatory variables. We find that O2-storage and -transport are distinct functions that rank mutants and wild type differently depending...

  13. Group-ICA model order highlights patterns of functional brain connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed eAbou Elseoud

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Resting-state networks (RSNs can be reliably and reproducibly detected using independent component analysis (ICA at both individual subject and group levels. Altering ICA dimensionality (model order estimation can have a significant impact on the spatial characteristics of the RSNs as well as their parcellation into sub-networks. Recent evidence from several neuroimaging studies suggests that the human brain has a modular hierarchical organization which resembles the hierarchy depicted by different ICA model orders. We hypothesized that functional connectivity between-group differences measured with ICA might be affected by model order selection. We investigated differences in functional connectivity using so-called dual-regression as a function of ICA model order in a group of unmedicated seasonal affective disorder (SAD patients compared to normal healthy controls. The results showed that the detected disease-related differences in functional connectivity alter as a function of ICA model order. The volume of between-group differences altered significantly as a function of ICA model order reaching maximum at model order 70 (which seems to be an optimal point that conveys the largest between-group difference then stabilized afterwards. Our results show that fine-grained RSNs enable better detection of detailed disease-related functional connectivity changes. However, high model orders show an increased risk of false positives that needs to be overcome. Our findings suggest that multilevel ICA exploration of functional connectivity enables optimization of sensitivity to brain disorders.

  14. Sudoku Puzzles for First-Year Organic Chemistry Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Alice L.; Lamoureux, G.

    2007-01-01

    Sudoku puzzle was designed to teach about amino acids and functional groups to the students of undergraduate organic chemistry students. The puzzles focus on helping the student learn the name, 3-letter code and 1-letter code of common amino acids and functional groups.

  15. Platinum Group Organometallics Based on "Pincer" Complexes: Sensors, Switches, and Catalysts In memory of Prof. Dr. Luigi M. Venanzi and his pioneering work in organometallic chemistry, particularly in PCP pincer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Martin; van Koten, Gerard

    2001-10-15

    Since the first reports in the late 1970s on transition metal complexes containing pincer-type ligands-named after the particular coordination mode of these ligands-these systems have attracted increasing interest owing to the unusual properties of the metal centers imparted by the pincer ligand. Typically, such a ligand comprises an anionic aryl ring which is ortho,ortho-disubstituted with heteroatom substituents, for example, CH(2)NR(2), CH(2)PR(2) or CH(2)SR, which generally coordinate to the metal center, and therefore support the M-C sigma bond. This commonly results in a terdentate and meridional coordination mode consisting of two metallacycles which share the M-C bond. Detailed studies of the formation and the properties of a large variety of pincers containing platinum group metal complexes have provided direct access to both a fundamental understanding of a variety of reactions in organometallic chemistry and to a range of new applications of these complexes. The discovery of alkane dehydrogenation catalysts, the mechanistic elucidation of fundamental transformations (for example, C-C bond activation), the construction of the first metallodendrimers for sustainable homogeneous catalysis, and the engineering of crystalline switches for materials processing represent only a few of the many highlights which have emanated from these numerous investigations. This review discusses the synthetic methodologies that are currently available for the preparation of platinum group metal complexes containing pincer ligands and especially emphasizes different applications that have been realized in materials science such as the development and engineering of sensors, switches, and catalysts.

  16. Group dynamic and its effect on classroom climate, achievement, and time in lab in the organic chemistry laboratory classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Rachael S.

    Despite the many studies on the benefits of cooperative learning, there is surprising little research into how the classroom as a whole changes when these cooperative groups are reassigned. In one section of CHEM 3011 in Fall 2013, students were allowed to pick their partner and kept the same partner all semester. In another section during the same semester, students were assigned a different partner for every wet lab and were allowed to pick their partners during the computer simulation labs. The students in both sections were given the "preferred" version of the Science Laboratory Environment Inventory (SLEI) at the beginning of the semester to elicit student preferences for the class environment, and the "actual" version of the SLEI and the Class Life Instrument at the end of the semester to determine what actually occurred during the semester. The students' interactions were recorded using an observational instrument developed specifically for this project. The students' responses to surveys, interactions, grades, and time in lab were analyzed for differences between the two sections. The results of this study will be discussed.

  17. Planetary nebulae: the universal mass-metallicity relation for Local Group dwarf galaxies and the chemistry of NGC 205

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, D R; Teodorescu, Ana M; Carneiro, Carolina M

    2014-01-01

    Here we study 16 planetary nebulae (PNe) in the dwarf irregular galaxy NGC 205 by using GMOS@Gemini spectra to derive their physical and chemical parameters. The chemical patterns and evolutionary tracks for 14 of our PNe suggest that there are no type I PNe among them. These PNe have an average oxygen abundance of 12+log(O/H)=8.08$\\pm$0.28, progenitor masses of 2-2.5M$_{\\odot}$ and thus were born ~1.0-1.7Gyr ago. Our results are in good agreement with previous PN studies in NGC 205. The present 12+log(O/H) is combined with our previous works and with the literature to study the PN metallicity trends of the Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies, in an effort to establish the PN luminosity- and mass-metallicity relations (LZR and MZR) for the LG dwarf irregulars (dIrrs) and dwarf spheroidals (dSphs). Previous attempts to obtain such relations failed to provide correct conclusions because were based on limited samples (Richer & McCall 1995; Gon\\c{c}calves et al. 2007). As far as we are able to compare stellar wit...

  18. Species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five agroforestry classes in Tabasco, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.C.; Peña-Álvarez, B.; Arriaga-Weiss, S.L.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2012-01-01

    We studied species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five classes of agroforestry systems: agroforests, animal agroforestry, linear agroforestry, sequential agroforestry, and crops under tree cover in Tabasco, Mexico. Sampling sites were >2 km from natural forest fragments.

  19. Species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five agroforestry classes in Tabasco, Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wal, van der J.C.; Peña-Álvarez, B.; Arriaga-Weiss, S.L.; Hernández-Daumás, S.

    2012-01-01

    We studied species, functional groups, and habitat preferences of birds in five classes of agroforestry systems: agroforests, animal agroforestry, linear agroforestry, sequential agroforestry, and crops under tree cover in Tabasco, Mexico. Sampling sites were >2 km from natural forest fragments.

  20. Functional Group Compositions of Carbonaceous Materials of Hayabusa-Returned Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuta, H.; Uesugi, M.; Naraoka, H.; Ito, M.; Kilcoyne, D.; Sandford, S. A.; Kitajima, F.; Mita, H.; Takano, Y.; Yada, T.; Karouji, Y.; Ishibashi, Y.; Okada, T.; Abe, M.

    2014-09-01

    We have analyzed the functional group compositions of the carbonaceous materials of Hayabusa-returned samples by STXM-XANES, in order to identify whether the materials are terrestrial or extraterrestrial.

  1. Ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selig, W.

    1977-11-08

    The literature on the use of ion-selective electrodes in organic elemental and functional group analysis is surveyed in some detail. The survey is complete through Chemical Abstracts, Vol. 83 (1975). 40 figures, 52 tables, 236 references.

  2. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dron

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA is being investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS. The determinations of the three functional groups' contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups and precursor ion (nitro groups scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced through photo-oxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounted for 1.7% (vehicular to 13.5% (o-xylene photo-oxidation of the organic carbon. The diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively differentiate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to distinguish the sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assesses a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional group mass

  3. The long underestimated carbonyl function of carbohydrates – an organocatalyzed shot into carbohydrate chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahrwald, R

    2015-09-21

    The aggressive and strong development of organocatalysis provides several protocols for the convenient utilization of the carbonyl function of unprotected carbohydrates in C-C-bond formation processes. These amine-catalyzed mechanisms enable multiple cascade-protocols for the synthesis of a wide range of carbohydrate-derived compound classes. Several, only slightly different protocols, have been developed for the application of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds in the stereoselective chain-elongation of unprotected carbohydrates and the synthesis of highly functionalized C-glycosides of defined configuration. In addition, C-glycosides can also be accessed by amine-catalyzed reactions with methyl ketones. By a one-pot cascade reaction of isocyanides with unprotected aldoses and amino acids access to defined configured glycopeptide mimetics is achieved. Depending on the reaction conditions different origins to control the installation of configuration during the bond-formation process were observed.

  4. Investigation into the properties of physical chemistry of methane series by density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    LuChunHai; Liao Jun Sheng; Sun Ying; WangXiaoLin

    2002-01-01

    The density functional theory method using B3' exchange and Lee-Yang-Parr's correlation function (B3LYP) with 6-31G** basis set were used to study and optimize equilibrium structure and fundamental vibrational frequencies in the equilibrium for CH4, CH3D, CH2D2, CHD3 and CD4. The relative result error from 1.1% to 6.3% were obtained between the calculation and the observation values of fundamental vibrational frequencies. After scaled, the relative result error is between 0.1% and - 2.9%. This method is used to study period properties of methane that some hydrogen atoms are replaced by tritium atoms. Following deuterium or tritium atom number rising in methane, entropy increases, but zero-point vibrational energy, heat capacity and enthalpy reduces

  5. Bulky N-Phosphino-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic Carbene Ligands: Synthesis, Ruthenium Coordination Chemistry, and Ruthenium Alkylidene Complexes for Olefin Metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Christopher C; Rominger, Frank; Limbach, Michael; Hofmann, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Ruthenium chemistry and applications in catalytic olefin metathesis based on N-phosphino-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ligands (NHCPs) are presented. Alkyl NHCP Ru coordination chemistry is described, and access to several potential synthetic precursors for ruthenium alkylidene complexes is outlined, incorporating both trimethylsilyl and phenyl alkylidenes. The Ru alkylidene complexes are evaluated as potential olefin metathesis catalysts and were shown to behave in a latent fashion. They displayed catalytic activity at elevated temperatures for both ring closing metathesis and ring opening metathesis polymerization.

  6. Changes in kenaf properties and chemistry as a function of growing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger M. Rowell; James S. Han

    1999-01-01

    Kenaf Tainung 1 cultivar was grown in Madison, WI in 1994. The ratio of core to bast fiber, total plant yield, protein, ash, fiber length, extractives, lignin, and sugar content were determined as a function of growing age. Ash, protein, extractives, L-arabinose, L-rhamnose, D-galactose, and D-mannose contents decreased while lignin, D-glucose and D-xylose content...

  7. The physical chemistry of cytoplasm and its influence on cell function: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luby-Phelps, Kate

    2013-09-01

    From the point of view of intermolecular interactions, the cytoplasmic space is more like a crowded party in a house full of furniture than a game of tag in an empty field. Understanding the physical chemical properties of cytoplasm is thus of key importance for understanding cellular function. This article attempts to provide an entrée into the current literature on this subject and offers some general guidelines for thinking about intracellular biochemistry.

  8. [Effect of obesity on pulmonary function in asthmatic children of different age groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Wen; Huang, Ying; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Xue-Li; Liang, Fan-Mei; Luo, Rong

    2017-05-01

    To study the effect of obesity on pulmonary function in newly diagnosed asthmatic children of different age groups. Two hundred and ninety-four children with newly diagnosed asthma were classified into preschool-age (obese, overweight, and normal-weight subgroups based on their body mass index (BMI). All the children underwent pulmonary function tests, including large airway function tests [forced vital capacity (FVC%) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%)] and small airway function tests [maximal expiratory flow at 25% of vital capacity (MEF25%), maximal expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity (MEF50%), and maximal expiratory flow at 75% of vital capacity (MEF75%)]. The school-age group showed lower FEV1%, MEF25%, and MEF50% than the preschool-age group (Pchildren in the school-age group had lower FEV1%, MEF25%, and MEF50% compared with their counterparts in the preschool-age group (Pchildren in the school-age group showed lower FVC% and MEF50% than those in the preschool-age group. However, all the pulmonary function parameters showed no significant differences between the obese children in the preschool-age and school-age groups. In the preschool-age group, FVC%, FEV1%, and MEF75% of the obese children were lower than those of the normal-weight children. In the school-age group, only FVC% and FEV1% showed differences between the obese and normal-weight children (Pobesity on the pulmonary function varies with age in children with asthma, and the effect is more obvious in those of preschool age.

  9. Functional groups of marine ciliated protozoa and their relationships to water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Xu, Henglong; Hu, Xiaozhong; Warren, Alan; Song, Weibo

    2013-08-01

    Ciliated protozoa (ciliates) play important ecological roles in coastal waters, especially regarding their interaction with environmental parameters. In order to increase our knowledge and understanding on the functional structure of ciliate communities and their relationships to environmental conditions in marine ecosystems, a 12-month study was carried out in a semi-enclosed bay in northern China. Samples were collected biweekly at five sampling stations with differing levels of pollution/eutrophication, giving a total of 120 samples. Thirteen functional groups of ciliates (A-M) were defined based on their specific spatio-temporal distribution and relationships to physico-chemical parameters. Six of these groups (H-M) were the primary contributors to the ciliate communities in the polluted/eutrophic areas, whereas the other seven groups (A-G) dominated the communities in less polluted areas. Six groups (A, D, G, H, I and K) dominated during the warm seasons (summer and autumn), with the other seven (B, C, E, F, J, L and M) dominating in the cold seasons (spring and winter). Of these, groups B (mainly aloricate ciliates), I (aloricate ciliates) and L (mainly loricate tintinnids) were the primary contributors to the communities. It was also shown that aloricate ciliates and tintinnids represented different roles in structuring and functioning of the communities. The results suggest that the ciliate communities may be constructed by several functional groups in response to the environmental conditions. Thus, we conclude that these functional groups might be potentially useful bioindicators for bioassessment and conservation in marine habitats.

  10. The electrokinetic characterization of gold nanoparticles, functionalized with cationic functional groups, and its' interaction with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Geraldine Genevive; Revaprasadu, Neerish; López-Viota, Julián; Singh, Moganavelli

    2014-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles have attracted strong biomedical interest for drug delivery due to their low toxic nature, surface plasmon resonance and capability of increasing the stability of the payload. However, gene transfection represents another important biological application. Considering that cellular barriers keep enclosed their secret to deliver genes using nanoparticles, an important step can be achieved by studying the functionalization of nanoparticles with DNA. In the present contribution the synthesis of nanoparticles consisting of a gold core coated with one or more layers of amino acid (l-lysine), and cationic polyelectrolytes (poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine) is reported. All nanoparticles were subjected to dynamic light scattering, electrophoretic mobility measurements, UV-vis optical spectrophotometry analysis and transmission electron microscopy imaging. In addition, the adsorption of DNA plasmid (pSGS) with linear and supercoiled configurations was studied for those gold nanoparticles under the most suitable surface modifications. Preliminary results showed that the gold nanoparticles functionalized with poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine, respectively, and bound to linear DNA configurations, present in absolute value a higher electrophoretic mobility irrespective of the pH of the media, compared to the supercoiled and nicked configuration. The findings from this study suggest that poly-ethyleneimine and poly-l-lysine functionalized gold nanoparticles are biocompatible and may be promising in the chemical design and future optimization of nanostructures for biomedical applications such as gene and drug delivery.

  11. Efficient Functionalization of Oxide-Free Silicon(111) Surfaces: Thiol-yne versus Thiol-ene Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhairamadgi, N.S.; Gangarapu, S.; Caipa Campos, M.A.; Paulusse, J.M.J.; Rijn, van C.J.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol-yne click (TYC) chemistry was utilized as a copper-free click reaction for the modification of alkyne-terminated monolayers on oxide-free Si(111) surfaces, and the results were compared with the analogous thiol–ene click (TEC) chemistry. A wide range of thiols such as 9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbon

  12. Efficient Functionalization of Oxide-Free Silicon(111) Surfaces: Thiol–yne versus Thiol–ene Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhairamadgi, N.S.; Gangarapu, S.; Caipa Campos, M.A.; Paulusse, J.M.J.; Rijn, van C.J.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol-yne click (TYC) chemistry was utilized as a copper-free click reaction for the modification of alkyne-terminated monolayers on oxide-free Si(111) surfaces, and the results were compared with the analogous thiol–ene click (TEC) chemistry. A wide range of thiols such as 9-fluorenylmethoxy-carbon

  13. Efficient Functionalization of Oxide-Free Silicon(111) Surfaces: Thiol–yne versus Thiol–ene Click Chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhairamadgi, N.S.; Gangarapu, S.; Caipa Campos, M.A.; Paulusse, Jos Marie Johannes; van Rijn, C.J.M.; Zuilhof, H.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol-yne click (TYC) chemistry was utilized as a copper-free click reaction for the modification of alkyne-terminated monolayers on oxide-free Si(111) surfaces, and the results were compared with the analogous thiol–ene click (TEC) chemistry. A wide range of thiols such as

  14. Characteristics of Interactional Management Functions in Group Oral by Japanese Learners of English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negishi, Junko

    2010-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate the characteristics of interaction dynamics in a group oral interaction carried out by Japanese learners of English. The relationship between the participants' language development and interactional management functions (IMFs) was also explored. Oral performance tests in a paired or a small group have recently…

  15. The impact of attitude functions on luxury brand consumption: An age-based group comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schade, Michael; Hegner, Sabrina; Horstmann, Florian; Brinkmann, Nora

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to understand the consumption of luxury brands in different age groups. Attitude functions (social-adjustive, value-expressive, hedonic, utilitarian) explain luxury brand consumption among three age groups. A total of 297 respondents between the age of 16 and 59 par

  16. Inequalities of Hadamard Type for r-Convex Functions in Carnot Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-bao Sun; Xiao-ping Yang

    2004-01-01

    For a Carnot group G,we establish the relationship between extended mean values and r-convex functions which is introduced in this paper,which is a class of inequalities of Hadamard type for r-convex function on G.

  17. New method of the functional renormalization group approach for Yang-Mills fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, P. M.; Shapiro, I. L.

    2014-12-01

    We propose a new formulation of the functional renormalization group (FRG) approach, based on the use of regulator functions as composite operators. In this case one can provide (in contrast with standard approach) on-shell gauge-invariance for the effective average action.

  18. Loop expansion of the average effective action in the functional renormalization group approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrov, Peter M.; Merzlikin, Boris S.

    2015-10-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in a new approach to the functional renormalization group method based on the concept of composite fields for regulator functions being their most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between the properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  19. Loop expansion of average effective action in functional renormalization group approach

    CERN Document Server

    Lavrov, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    We formulate a perturbation expansion for the effective action in new approach to the functional renormalization group (FRG) method based on concept of composite fields for regulator functions being therein most essential ingredients. We demonstrate explicitly the principal difference between properties of effective actions in these two approaches existing already on the one-loop level in a simple gauge model.

  20. Stabilization and strengthening effects of functional groups in two-dimensional titanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Z. H.; Zhang, Q. F.; Legut, D.; Si, C.; Germann, T. C.; Lookman, T.; Du, S. Y.; Francisco, J. S.; Zhang, R. F.

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted considerable interest due to their remarkable properties and potential applications for nanoelectronics, electrodes, energy storage devices, among others. However, many well-studied 2D materials lack appreciable conductivity and tunable mechanical strength, limiting their applications in flexible devices. Newly developed MXenes open up the opportunity to design novel flexible conductive electronic materials. Here, using density functional theory (DFT), we investigate systematically the effects of several functional groups on the stabilization, mechanical properties, and electronic structures of a representative MXene. It is found that oxygen possesses the largest adsorption energy as compared to other functional groups, indicating its good thermodynamic stabilization. In comparison with bare and other functionalized titanium carbides, the oxygen functionalized one exhibits the most superior ideal strength; however, the premature softening of the long-wave phonon modes might limit the intrinsic strength for T i3C2O2 . Furthermore, the introduction of functional groups can induce a strong anisotropy under tensile loading. By analyzing the deformation paths and the electronic instability under various loadings, we demonstrate that the unique strengthening by oxygen functional groups is attributed to a significant charge transfer from inner bonds to outer surface ones after functionalization. Our results shed a novel view into exploring a variety of MXenes for their potential applications in flexible electronic and energy storage devices.

  1. Plant parameters for plant functional groups of western rangelands to enable process-based simulation modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional environmental assessments with process-based models require realistic estimates of plant parameters for the primary plant functional groups in the region. “Functional group” in this context is an operational term, based on similarities in plant type and in plant parameter values. Likewise...

  2. Sub-grouping and sub-functionalization of the RIFIN multi-copy protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonnhammer Erik L

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parasitic protozoans possess many multicopy gene families which have central roles in parasite survival and virulence. The number and variability of members of these gene families often make it difficult to predict possible functions of the encoded proteins. The families of extra-cellular proteins that are exposed to a host immune response have been driven via immune selection to become antigenically variant, and thereby avoid immune recognition while maintaining protein function to establish a chronic infection. Results We have combined phylogenetic and function shift analyses to study the evolution of the RIFIN proteins, which are antigenically variant and are encoded by the largest multicopy gene family in Plasmodium falciparum. We show that this family can be subdivided into two major groups that we named A- and B-RIFIN proteins. This suggested sub-grouping is supported by a recently published study that showed that, despite the presence of the Plasmodium export (PEXEL motif in all RIFIN variants, proteins from each group have different cellular localizations during the intraerythrocytic life cycle of the parasite. In the present study we show that function shift analysis, a novel technique to predict functional divergence between sub-groups of a protein family, indicates that RIFINs have undergone neo- or sub-functionalization. Conclusion These results question the general trend of clustering large antigenically variant protein groups into homogenous families. Assigning functions to protein families requires their subdivision into meaningful groups such as we have shown for the RIFIN protein family. Using phylogenetic and function shift analysis methods, we identify new directions for the investigation of this broad and complex group of proteins.

  3. Response of rotifer functional groups to changing trophic state and crustacean community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina MANCA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Information based on taxon-based indices is species-specific while information gained from function-based research can give a comprehensive view of ecosystem processes. We applied the guild-ratio, an index based on the proportion of functional groups of rotifers (i.e. microphagous and raptorial species, on a long-term data set of Lago Maggiore. By applying seasonal trend decomposition based on smoothing techniques and non-metrical multidimensional scaling, we assessed the response of rotifer functional groups to changes in trophic state and climate. While the taxon-based indices showed smooth changes, the function-based index showed a dramatic shift from a raptorial to a microphagous dominance, with a back-shift to raptorial dominance starting in 2000. The seasonal peak of microphagous and raptorial dry weight was clearly separated in the pre-eutrophication period. When mesotrophic conditions prevailed both peaks overlapped, only to be separated again with re-oligotrophication. We attributed these alterations of rotifer functional groups to changes in competition with crustacean zooplankton and to decreased phytoplankton algal abundance and size while altered seasonality in functional groups could be related to inter-group competition for food. We hypothesise that the effects of trophic state (i.e. altered phytoplankton and climate (i.e. altered cladoceran community were transferred across trophic levels to rotifer functional groups. Our study highlights that functional groups are valid instruments for illustrating unifying principles in ecology through a better understanding of ecosystem processes and the interrelationship between trophic levels.

  4. Links between plant litter chemistry, species diversity, and below-ground ecosystem function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Courtney L; Bowman, William D

    2008-12-16

    Decomposition is a critical source of plant nutrients, and drives the largest flux of terrestrial C to the atmosphere. Decomposing soil organic matter typically contains litter from multiple plant species, yet we lack a mechanistic understanding of how species diversity influences decomposition processes. Here, we show that soil C and N cycling during decomposition are controlled by the composition and diversity of chemical compounds within plant litter mixtures, rather than by simple metrics of plant species diversity. We amended native soils with litter mixtures containing up to 4 alpine plant species, and we used 9 litter chemical traits to evaluate the chemical composition (i.e., the identity and quantity of compounds) and chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. The chemical composition of the litter mixtures was the strongest predictor of soil respiration, net N mineralization, and microbial biomass N. Soil respiration and net N mineralization rates were also significantly correlated with the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. In contrast, soil C and N cycling rates were poorly correlated with plant species richness, and there was no relationship between species richness and the chemical diversity of the litter mixtures. These results indicate that the composition and diversity of chemical compounds in litter are potentially important functional traits affecting decomposition, and simple metrics like plant species richness may fail to capture variation in these traits. Litter chemical traits therefore provide a mechanistic link between organisms, species diversity, and key components of below-ground ecosystem function.

  5. Elastic-contractile model proteins: Physical chemistry, protein function and drug design and delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urry, Dan W; Urry, Kelley D; Szaflarski, Witold; Nowicki, Michal

    2010-12-30

    This review presents the structure and physico-chemical properties of ECMPs, elastic-contractile model proteins using sparse design modifications of elastic (GVGVP)(n); it describes the capacity of ECMP to perform the energy conversions that sustain living organisms; it arrives at the hydration thermodynamics of ECMP in terms of the change in Gibbs free energy of hydrophobic association, ΔG(HA), and the apolar-polar repulsive free energy of hydration, ΔG(ap); it applies ΔG(HA), ΔG(ap), and the nature of elasticity to describe the function of basic diverse proteins, namely - the F₁-motor of ATP synthase, Complex III of mitochondria, the KscA potassium-channel, and the molecular chaperonin, GroEL/ES; it applies ΔG(HA) and ΔG(ap) to describe the function of ABC exporter proteins that confer multi-drug resistance (MDR) on micro-organisms and human carcinomas and suggests drug modifications with which to overcome MDR. Using ECMP, means are demonstrated, for quantifying drug hydrophobicity with which to combat MDR and for preparing ECMP drug delivery nanoparticles, ECMPddnp, decorated with synthetic antigen-binding fragments, Fab1 and Fab2, with which to target specific up-regulated receptors, characteristic of human carcinoma cells, for binding and localized drug release. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Application of Angular Momentum Theory to Constructing Basis Functions of Irreducible Representations of Icosahedral Group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI An-yong

    2004-01-01

    A new method based on angular momentum theory was proposed to construct the basis functions of the irreducible representations(IRs) of point groups. The transformation coefficients, i. e. , coefficients S, are the components of the eigenvectors of some Hermitian matrices, and can be made as real numbers for all pure rotation point groups. The general formula for coefficient S was deduced, and applied to constructing the basis functions of single-valued irreducible representations of icosahedral group from the spherical harmonics with angular momentum j≤7.

  7. Clickable SBA-15 to screen functional groups for adsorption of antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinsuo; Zhang, Xueying; Xu, Shutao; Liu, Jian; Tan, Feng; Li, Xinyong; Qu, Zhenping; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie

    2014-03-01

    Pharmaceutical antibiotics, as emerging contaminants, are usually composed of several functional groups that endow them with the ability to interact with adsorbents through different interactions. This makes the preparation of adsorbents tedious and time-consuming to screen appropriate functionalized materials. Herein, we describe the synthesis of clickable SBA-15 and demonstrate its feasibility as a screening material for the adsorption of antibiotics based on similar adsorption trends on materials with similar functional groups obtained by a click reaction and cocondensation/grafting methods.

  8. Actinide chemistry using singlet-paired coupled cluster and its combinations with density functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Garza, Alejandro J; Scuseria, Gustavo E

    2015-01-01

    Singlet-paired coupled cluster doubles (CCD0) is a simplification of CCD that relinquishes a fraction of dynamic correlation in order to be able to describe static correlation. Combinations of CCD0 with density functionals that recover specifically the dynamic correlation missing in the former have also been developed recently. Here, we assess the accuracy of CCD0 and CCD0+DFT (and variants of these using Brueckner orbitals) as compared to well-established quantum chemical methods for describing ground-state properties of singlet actinide molecules. The $f^0$ actinyl series (UO$_2^{2+}$, NpO$_2^{2+}$, PuO$_2^{2+}$), the isoelectronic NUN, and Thorium (ThO, ThO$^{2+}$) and Nobelium (NoO, NoO$_2$) oxides are studied.

  9. Physical Chemistry of TiO2 functionalized with oxo-manganese catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuabara, Sabas G.; Cady, Clyde W.; Schleicher, Jim M.; Baxter, Jason; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A.; Batista, Victor S.

    2006-03-01

    We describe the development and application of dye-sensitized semiconductors to heterogeneous photocatalysis. Ab initio-DFT electronic structure calculations and molecular dynamics simulations combined with quantum dynamics propagation of transient electronic excitations indicate that a surface complex consisting of a catalytic Mn oxo complex adsorbed onto a TiO2 substrate via a catechol-substituted terpyridine ligand can be activated by photoinduced subpicosecond interfacial electron transfer. Experimental realization of the Mn oxo surface complex, achieved by a novel sequential synthesis technique, is briefly described and computational results supporting the spectroscopic characterization of the nanoscale assembly are presented. Studying the photocatalytic reaction dynamics of these uniquely functionalized semiconductor materials offers the prospect of gaining unprecedented control over a wide range of contrathermodynamic reactions. Furthermore, such biomimetic materials capable of splitting water or fixating CO2 could provide viable solutions to problems ranging from current energy concerns to reducing atmospheric greenhouse gases.

  10. Understanding reaction mechanisms in organic chemistry from catastrophe theory applied to the electron localization function topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polo, Victor; Andres, Juan; Berski, Slawomir; Domingo, Luis R; Silvi, Bernard

    2008-08-07

    Thom's catastrophe theory applied to the evolution of the topology of the electron localization function (ELF) gradient field constitutes a way to rationalize the reorganization of electron pairing and a powerful tool for the unambiguous determination of the molecular mechanisms of a given chemical reaction. The identification of the turning points connecting the ELF structural stability domains along the reaction pathway allows a rigorous characterization of the sequence of electron pair rearrangements taking place during a chemical transformation, such as multiple bond forming/breaking processes, ring closure processes, creation/annihilation of lone pairs, transformations of C-C multiple bonds into single ones. The reaction mechanism of some relevant organic reactions: Diels-Alder, 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition and Cope rearrangement are reviewed to illustrate the potential of the present approach.

  11. Classifying proteins into functional groups based on all-versus-all BLAST of 10 million proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, Natali; Higdon, Roger; Broomall, William; Stanberry, Larissa; Welch, Dean; Lu, Wei; Haynes, Winston; Barga, Roger; Kolker, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    To address the monumental challenge of assigning function to millions of sequenced proteins, we completed the first of a kind all-versus-all sequence alignments using BLAST for 9.9 million proteins in the UniRef100 database. Microsoft Windows Azure produced over 3 billion filtered records in 6 days using 475 eight-core virtual machines. Protein classification into functional groups was then performed using Hive and custom jars implemented on top of Apache Hadoop utilizing the MapReduce paradigm. First, using the Clusters of Orthologous Genes (COG) database, a length normalized bit score (LNBS) was determined to be the best similarity measure for classification of proteins. LNBS achieved sensitivity and specificity of 98% each. Second, out of 5.1 million bacterial proteins, about two-thirds were assigned to significantly extended COG groups, encompassing 30 times more assigned proteins. Third, the remaining proteins were classified into protein functional groups using an innovative implementation of a single-linkage algorithm on an in-house Hadoop compute cluster. This implementation significantly reduces the run time for nonindexed queries and optimizes efficient clustering on a large scale. The performance was also verified on Amazon Elastic MapReduce. This clustering assigned nearly 2 million proteins to approximately half a million different functional groups. A similar approach was applied to classify 2.8 million eukaryotic sequences resulting in over 1 million proteins being assign to existing KOG groups and the remainder clustered into 100,000 functional groups.

  12. Interrogating Surface Functional Group Heterogeneity of Activated Thermoplastics Using Super-Resolution Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, Colleen E; Jackson, Joshua M; Shim, Sang-Hee; Soper, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel approach for characterizing surfaces utilizing super-resolution fluorescence microscopy with subdiffraction limit spatial resolution. Thermoplastic surfaces were activated by UV/O3 or O2 plasma treatment under various conditions to generate pendant surface-confined carboxylic acids (-COOH). These surface functional groups were then labeled with a photoswitchable dye and interrogated using single-molecule, localization-based, super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to elucidate the surface heterogeneity of these functional groups across the activated surface. Data indicated nonuniform distributions of these functional groups for both COC and PMMA thermoplastics with the degree of heterogeneity being dose dependent. In addition, COC demonstrated relative higher surface density of functional groups compared to PMMA for both UV/O3 and O2 plasma treatment. The spatial distribution of -COOH groups secured from super-resolution imaging were used to simulate nonuniform patterns of electroosmotic flow in thermoplastic nanochannels. Simulations were compared to single-particle tracking of fluorescent nanoparticles within thermoplastic nanoslits to demonstrate the effects of surface functional group heterogeneity on the electrokinetic transport process.

  13. Arrival order among native plant functional groups does not affect invasibility of constructed dune communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, T J; French, K; Jolley, D

    2013-10-01

    Different arrival order scenarios of native functional groups to a site may influence both resource use during development and final community structure. Arrival order may then indirectly influence community resistance to invasion. We present a mesocosm experiment of constructed coastal dune communities that monitored biotic and abiotic responses to different arrival orders of native functional groups. Constructed communities were compared with unplanted mesocosms. We then simulated a single invasion event by bitou (Chrysanthemoides monilifera ssp. rotundata), a dominant exotic shrub of coastal communities. We evaluated the hypothesis that plantings with simultaneous representation of grass, herb and shrub functional groups at the beginning of the experiment would more completely sequester resources and limit invasion than staggered plantings. Staggered plantings in turn would offer greater resource use and invasion resistance than unplanted mesocosms. Contrary to our expectations, there were few effects of arrival order on abiotic variables for the duration of the experiment and arrival order was unimportant in final community invasibility. All planted mesocosms supported significantly more invader germinants and significantly less invader abundance than unplanted mesocosms. Native functional group plantings may have a nurse effect during the invader germination and establishment phase and a competitive function during the invader juvenile and adult phase. Arrival order per se did not affect resource use and community invasibility in our mesocosm experiment. While grass, herb and shrub functional group plantings will not prevent invasion success in restored communities, they may limit final invader biomass.

  14. Capillary-wave models and the effective-average-action scheme of functional renormalization group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakubczyk, P

    2011-08-01

    We reexamine the functional renormalization-group theory of wetting transitions. As a starting point of the analysis we apply an exact equation describing renormalization group flow of the generating functional for irreducible vertex functions. We show how the standard nonlinear renormalization group theory of wetting transitions can be recovered by a very simple truncation of the exact flow equation. The derivation makes all the involved approximations transparent and demonstrates the applicability of the approach in any spatial dimension d≥2. Exploiting the nonuniqueness of the renormalization-group cutoff scheme, we find, however, that the capillary parameter ω is a scheme-dependent quantity below d=3. For d=3 the parameter ω is perfectly robust against scheme variation.

  15. Correlation functions in isotropic and anisotropic turbulence the role of the symmetry group

    CERN Document Server

    Arad, I; Procaccia, I; Arad, Itai; L'vov, Victor S.; Procaccia, Itamar

    1998-01-01

    The theory of fully developed turbulence is usually considered in an idealized homogeneous and isotropic state. Real turbulent flows exhibit the effects of anisotropic forcing. The analysis of correlation functions and structure functions in isotropic and anisotropic situations is facilitated and made rational when performed in terms of the irreducible representations of the relevant symmetry group which is the group of all rotations SO(3). In this paper we firstly consider the needed general theory and explain why we expect different (universal) scaling exponents in the different sectors of the symmetry group. We exemplify the theory context of isotropic turbulence (for third order tensorial structure functions) and in weakly anisotropic turbulence (for the second order structure function). The utility of the resulting expressions for the analysis of experimental data is demonstrated in the context of high Reynolds number measurements of turbulence in the atmosphere.

  16. Tensor renormalization group: Local magnetizations, correlation functions, and phase diagrams of systems with quenched randomness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Can; Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A. Nihat

    2011-03-01

    The tensor renormalization-group method, developed by Levin and Nave, brings systematic improvability to the position-space renormalization-group method and yields essentially exact results for phase diagrams and entire thermodynamic functions. The method, previously used on systems with no quenched randomness, is extended in this study to systems with quenched randomness. Local magnetizations and correlation functions as a function of spin separation are calculated as tensor products subject to renormalization-group transformation. Phase diagrams are extracted from the long-distance behavior of the correlation functions. The approach is illustrated with the quenched bond-diluted Ising model on the triangular lattice. An accurate phase diagram is obtained in temperature and bond-dilution probability for the entire temperature range down to the percolation threshold at zero temperature. This research was supported by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, the Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TÜBITAK), and the Academy of Sciences of Turkey.

  17. Tensor renormalization group: local magnetizations, correlation functions, and phase diagrams of systems with quenched randomness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Güven, Can; Hinczewski, Michael; Berker, A Nihat

    2010-11-01

    The tensor renormalization-group method, developed by Levin and Nave, brings systematic improvability to the position-space renormalization-group method and yields essentially exact results for phase diagrams and entire thermodynamic functions. The method, previously used on systems with no quenched randomness, is extended in this study to systems with quenched randomness. Local magnetizations and correlation functions as a function of spin separation are calculated as tensor products subject to renormalization-group transformation. Phase diagrams are extracted from the long-distance behavior of the correlation functions. The approach is illustrated with the quenched bond-diluted Ising model on the triangular lattice. An accurate phase diagram is obtained in temperature and bond-dilution probability for the entire temperature range down to the percolation threshold at zero temperature.

  18. Functional FX-bar Projections of the (Romanian Verbal Group and Sub-Groups on the Syntactic-Semantic Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neculai Curteanu

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate the syntactic / semantic substructures (called subgroups of the Romanian verbal group (VG [12], or verbal complex [25], starting with the achievements in the literature, and melted into the device of direct and inverse functional projection within FX-bar theory [7]. The paper examines several problems and their solutions for the syntactic-semantic theories of VG, as discussed in some fundamental papers, and we offer our explanation on the involved syntactic phenomena, the emphasis falling on the VG substructures (verbal subgroups, VSGs, VSG boundaries and composition within VG, direct and inverse FX-bar projections of VG, VG parsing, lexical semantics and intensional~/ extensional logic representations of the Romanian (verbal or nominal predicate.

  19. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  20. Radionuclide Reaction Chemistry as a Function of Temperature at the Cheshire Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, E A; Bruton, C J; Johnson, M R; Rard, J; Zavarin, M

    2005-10-31

    dominant complexes formed in NTS groundwaters, and data for these types of complexes are lacking for radionuclides as well as analog species. For the few species where enough data are available, the effect of temperature on radionuclide aqueous complexation has been calculated. These calculations allow partial estimation of the potential error that may be involved in ignoring speciation changes as a function of temperature, as was done in the Cheshire HST model (Pawloski et al., 2001). In some cases, differences between the most recent 25 C data available in the literature and data used in Pawloski et al. (2001) were more significant than calculated speciation changes as a function of temperature. To incorporate radionuclide speciation as a function of temperature, a robust set of temperature-dependent reaction constants is necessary. Based on our literature search and the few reactions that could be extrapolated to higher temperatures, the change in dominant complexes with temperature cannot be adequately addressed at this time. However, the effect of temperature on speciation can be qualitatively examined. In general, the log K values for radionuclide complexation reactions considered here increase with increasing temperature, suggesting that increasing temperature may enhance radionuclide aqueous complexation. However, complexation reactions often involve H{sup +} and reactant species such as carbonate which exhibit their own temperature-dependent speciation. Thus, any change in the value of a radionuclide complexation log K may be offset or enhanced by temperature effects on pH and carbonate speciation. In addition, sorption processes that involve surface complexation change with increasing temperature, and these reactions may enhance or negate the mobility effects of any increase in aqueous complexation with temperature. While increasing temperature may increase complexation, it also may reduce or increase ligand concentrations through shifts in speciation. Similarly

  1. Host-guest supramolecular chemistry at solid-liquid interface:An important strategy for preparing two-dimensional functional nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG XueMei; ZENG QingDao; WANG Chen

    2014-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly,an important strategy in nanotechnology,has been widely studied in the past two decades.In this review,we have introduced the recent progress on construction of two-dimensional(2D)nanostructures by host-guest supramolecular chemistry at solid-liquid interface,and the interactions between the host assembly and the guest molecules are the major concerns.At first,the hydrogen bonds connected hybrid structures are discussed.And then we have paid a close attention on the surface-confined condensation reactions that has flourished recently in direct preparing novel nanostructures with increasing structural complexity.In the end,the cavity confinement of the 2D supramolecular host-guest architectures has been studied.On the basis of the above-mentioned interactions,a group of functional hybrid structures have been prepared.Notably,scanning tunneling microscopy(STM),a unique technique to probe the surface morphology and information at the single molecule level,has been used to probe the formed structures on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite(HOPG)surface.

  2. Design and Synthesis of Structurally Well-Defined Functional Polyolefins via Transition Metal- Mediated Olefin Polymerization Chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JinYong Dong

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction In fact, ever since the commercialization of PE and PP in the 1950s, the functionalization of polyolefins has been a very interesting research subject attracting attentions from both academic and industrial communities. The so-called polyolefin functionalization is explained as introducing polar functional groups into polyolefins. With the precondition of maintaining the desired properties of polyolefins, polyolefin functionalization confers reactivity to polyolefins, improving adhesion and compatibility between polyolefins and other materials, such as pigments, paints, glass fibers, metals, carbon black, and most polymers. The application of polyolefins after functionalization can be extended to such areas that even involve catalyst supporting, medicament, photoelectron material, biomaterial, photo material, and environmental protection, which have never been previously accessed by polyolefins.

  3. Identification of target proteins of mangiferin in mice with acute lung injury using functionalized magnetic microspheres based on click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiajia; Nie, Yan; Li, Yunjuan; Hou, Yuanyuan; Zhao, Wei; Deng, Jiagang; Wang, Peng George; Bai, Gang

    2015-11-18

    Prevention of the occurrence and development of inflammation is a vital therapeutic strategy for treating acute lung injury (ALI). Increasing evidence has shown that a wealth of ingredients from natural foods and plants have potential anti-inflammatory activity. In the present study, mangiferin, a natural C-glucosyl xanthone that is primarily obtained from the peels and kernels of mango fruits and the bark of the Mangifera indica L. tree, alleviated the inflammatory responses in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI mice. Mangiferin-modified magnetic microspheres (MMs) were developed on the basis of click chemistry to capture the target proteins of mangiferin. Mass spectrometry and molecular docking identified 70 kDa heat-shock protein 5 (Hspa5) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase (Ywhae) as mangiferin-binding proteins. Furthermore, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) indicated that mangiferin exerted its anti-inflammatory effect by binding Hspa5 and Ywhae to suppress downstream mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Thoroughly revealing the mechanism and function of mangiferin will contribute to the development and utilization of agricultural resources from M. indica L.

  4. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Devroye, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  5. On the Green's function of the partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction for radiation chemistry codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plante, Ianik, E-mail: ianik.plante-1@nasa.gov [Wyle Science, Technology & Engineering, 1290 Hercules, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Devroye, Luc, E-mail: lucdevroye@gmail.com [School of Computer Science, McGill University, 3480 University Street, Montreal H3A 0E9 (Canada)

    2015-09-15

    Several computer codes simulating chemical reactions in particles systems are based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE). Indeed, many types of chemical systems have been simulated using the exact GFDE, which has also become the gold standard for validating other theoretical models. In this work, a simulation algorithm is presented to sample the interparticle distance for partially diffusion-controlled reversible ABCD reaction. This algorithm is considered exact for 2-particles systems, is faster than conventional look-up tables and uses only a few kilobytes of memory. The simulation results obtained with this method are compared with those obtained with the independent reaction times (IRT) method. This work is part of our effort in developing models to understand the role of chemical reactions in the radiation effects on cells and tissues and may eventually be included in event-based models of space radiation risks. However, as many reactions are of this type in biological systems, this algorithm might play a pivotal role in future simulation programs not only in radiation chemistry, but also in the simulation of biochemical networks in time and space as well.

  6. Prediction of gas-phase thermodynamic properties for polychlorinated naphthalenes using G3X model chemistry and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liming; Lv, Guowen

    2010-01-01

    The standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) have been predicted using G3X model chemistry, density functional theory (DFT), and second-order Muller-Plesset (MP2) theory. Two isodesmic reactions are used for better prediction of formation enthalpies. The first (IR1) employs chlorobenzene as a reference species and the second (IR2) employs polychlorinated benzenes as reference species. Among congeners, PCNs with simultaneous Cl-substitutions at positions 1 and 8 or 4 and 5 are the least stable, where the strong repulsion between Cl-atoms leads to non-planar structures for a few PCNs. The potential energy curves for ring-wagging motions in 1,8- or 4,5-PCNs are also extremely flat in the vicinity of equilibrium conformations, leading to extremely low harmonic frequencies for the ring-wagging modes. The contributions of these ring-wagging modes to entropy, heat capacity, and thermal corrections have been calculated using the numerically evaluated energy levels. The PCN isomer patterns are discussed based on the calculated Gibbs free energies.

  7. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Green's Function of the Diffusion Equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic radiation track structure codes are of great interest for space radiation studies and hadron therapy in medicine. These codes are used for a many purposes, notably for microdosimetry and DNA damage studies. In the last two decades, they were also used with the Independent Reaction Times (IRT) method in the simulation of chemical reactions, to calculate the yield of various radiolytic species produced during the radiolysis of water and in chemical dosimeters. Recently, we have developed a Green's function based code to simulate reversible chemical reactions with an intermediate state, which yielded results in excellent agreement with those obtained by using the IRT method. This code was also used to simulate and the interaction of particles with membrane receptors. We are in the process of including this program for use with the Monte-Carlo track structure code Relativistic Ion Tracks (RITRACKS). This recent addition should greatly expand the capabilities of RITRACKS, notably to simulate DNA damage by both the direct and indirect effect.

  8. Allyl functionalized phosphinite and phosphonite ligands: Synthesis, transition metal chemistry and orthopalladation reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Singappagudem Govindaraju; Guddekoppa S Ananthnag; Susmita Naik; Shaikh M Mobin; Maravanji S Balakrishn

    2012-07-01

    Allyl functionalized phosphinite PPh2(OAr) [Ar=C6H4(-C3H5)] (1) and phosphonite PPh(OAr)2 (2) ligands were prepared by the reactions of 2-allylphenol with PPh2Cl and PPhCl2, respectively. The ruthenium(II) complexes, [Ru(6--cymene)(PPh2(OAr))Cl2] (3) and [Ru(6--cymene)(PPh(OAr)2Cl2)] (4) were obtained by reacting 1 or 2 with [Ru(6--cymene)Cl2]2 in 2:1 molar ratios, respectively. Reactions of 1 or 2 with AuCl(SMe2) gave [Au{PPh2(OAr)}Cl] (5) or [Au{PPh(OAr)2}Cl] (6) in good yield. The palladium complex, [Pd{PPh(OAr)2}2Cl2] (7) was prepared by reacting Pd(COD)Cl2 with 2 in 1:2 molar ratio. The reaction between Pd(COD)Cl2 and 1 yielded a mixture of orthopalladated cis- and trans-[Pd(Ph2P(OAr))Cl]2 (8a and 8b). The treatment of 8 with PPh3 and Ph2PCH2PPh2 resulted in the cleavage of chloro bridge to give respectively, [Ph2(OAr)PPd(PPh3)Cl] (9) and [Ph2(ArO)PPd(2-dppm)]OTf (10). Single crystal X-ray structure of the ruthenium complex 3 is described.

  9. Energies of the adsorption of functional groups to calcium carbonate polymorphs: the importance of -OH and -COOH groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimenko, D V; Nissenbaum, J; Andersson, M P; Olsson, M H M; Stipp, S L S

    2013-09-01

    The adsorption behavior of calcium carbonate is an important factor in many processes in nature, industry, and biological systems. We determined and compared the adsorption energies for a series of small molecules of different sizes and polarities (i.e., water, several alcohols, and acetic acid) on three synthetic CaCO3 polymorphs (calcite, aragonite, and vaterite). We measured isosteric heats of adsorption from vapor adsorption isotherms for 273 < T < 293 K, and we used XRD and SEM to confirm that samples did not change phase during the experiments. Density functional calculations and molecular dynamics simulations complemented the experimental results and aided interpretation. Alcohols with molecular mass greater than that of methanol bind more strongly to the calcium carbonate polymorphs than water and acetic acid. The adsorption energies for the alcohols are typical of chemisorption and indicate alcohol displacement of water from calcium carbonate surfaces. This explains why organisms favor biomolecules that contain alcohol functional groups (-OH) to control which polymorph they use, the crystal face and orientation, and the particle shape and size in biomineralization processes. This new insight is also very useful in understanding organic molecule adsorption mechanisms in soils, sediments, and rocks, which is important for predicting the behavior of mineral-fluid interactions when the challenge is to remediate contaminated groundwater aquifers or to produce oil and gas from reservoirs.

  10. In-Medium Spectral Functions of Vector- and Axial-Vector Mesons from the Functional Renormalization Group

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Christopher; Tripolt, Ralf-Arno; von Smekal, Lorenz; Wambach, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present first results on vector and axial-vector meson spectral functions as obtained by applying the non-perturbative functional renormalization group approach to an effective low-energy theory motivated by the gauged linear sigma model. By using a recently proposed analytic continuation method, we study the in-medium behavior of the spectral functions of the $\\rho$ and $a_1$ mesons in different regimes of the phase diagram. In particular, we demonstrate explicitly how these spectral functions degenerate at high temperatures as well as at large chemical potentials, as a consequence of the restoration of chiral symmetry. In addition, we also compute the momentum dependence of the $\\rho$ and $a_1$ spectral functions and discuss the various time-like and space-like processes that can occur.

  11. Reticular Chemistry and Metal-Organic Frameworks: Design and Synthesis of Functional Materials for Clean Energy Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal A.

    2017-06-01

    Gaining control over the assembly of crystalline solid-state materials has been significantly advanced through the field of reticular chemistry and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs have emerged as a unique modular class of porous materials amenable to a rational design with targeted properties for given applications. Several design approaches have been deployed to construct targeted functional MOFs, where desired structural and geometrical attributes are incorporated in preselected building units prior to the assembly process. This dissertation illustrates the merit of the molecular building block approach (MBB) for the rational construction and discovery of stable and highly porous MOFs, and their exploration as potential gas storage medium for sustainable and clean energy applications. Specifically, emphasis was placed on gaining insights into the structure-property relationships that impact the methane (CH4) storage in MOFs and its subsequent delivery. The foreseen gained understanding is essential for the design of new adsorbent materials or adjusting existing MOF platforms to encompass the desired features that subsequently afford meeting the challenging targets for methane storage in mobile and stationary applications.In this context, we report the successful use of the MBB approach for the design and deliberate construction of a series of novel isoreticular, highly porous and stable, aluminum based MOFs with the square-octahedral (soc) underlying net topology. From this platform, Al-soc-MOF-1, with more than 6000 m2/g apparent Langmuir specific surface area, exhibits outstanding gravimetric CH4 uptake (total and working capacities). It is shown experimentally, for the first time, that the Al-soc-MOF platform can address the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) challenging gravimetric and volumetric targets for the CH4 working capacity for on-board CH4 storage. Furthermore, Al-soc-MOF-1 exhibits the highest total gravimetric and volumetric uptake for carbon

  12. Tuning of electronic properties and dynamical stability of graphene oxide with different functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabhi, Shweta D.; Jha, Prafulla K.

    2017-09-01

    The structural, electronic and vibrational properties of graphene oxide (GO) with varying proportion of epoxy and hydroxyl functional groups have been studied using density functional theory. The functional groups and oxygen density have an obvious influence on the electronic and vibrational properties. The dependence of band gap on associated functional groups and oxygen density shows a possibility of tuning the band gap of graphene by varying the functional groups as well as oxidation level. The absorption of high oxygen content in graphene leads to the gap opening and resulting in a transition from semimetal to semiconductor. Phonon dispersion curves show no imaginary frequency or no softening of any phonon mode throughout the Brillouin zone which confirms the dynamical stability of all considered GO models. Different groups and different oxygen density result into the varying characteristics of phonon modes. The computed results show good agreement with the experimental observations. Our results present interesting possibilities for engineering the electronic properties of graphene and GO and impact the fabrication of new electronics.

  13. The dual roles of functional groups in the photoluminescence of graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujun; Cole, Ivan S; Zhao, Dongyuan; Li, Qin

    2016-04-14

    The photoluminescent properties of graphene nanoparticle (named graphene quantum dots) have attracted significant research attention in recent years owing to their profound application potential. However, the photoluminescence (PL) origin of this class of nanocarbons is still unclear. In this paper, combining direct experimental evidence enabled by a facile size-tunable oxygenated graphene quantum dots (GQDs) synthesis method and theoretical calculations, the roles of the aromatic core, functional groups and disordered structures (i.e. defects and sp(3) carbon) in the PL of oxygenated GQDs are elucidated in detail. In particular, we found that the functional groups on GQDs play dual roles in the overall emission: (1) they enable π* → n and σ* → n transitions, resulting in a molecular type of PL, spectrally invariable with change of particle size or excitation energy; (2) similar to defects and sp(3) carbon, functional groups also induce structural deformation to the aromatic core, leading to mid-gap states or, in other words, energy traps, causing π* → mid-gap states → π transitions. Therefore, functional groups contribute to both the blue edge and the red shoulder of GQDs' PL spectra. The new insights on the role of functional groups in PL of fluorescent nanocarbons will enable better designs of this new class of materials.

  14. Effects of chemical functional groups on elemental mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Cheney, Marcos A; Wu, Fan; Li, Meng

    2011-02-15

    A systematic theoretical study using density functional theory is performed to provide molecular-level understanding of the effects of chemical functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surfaces. The zigzag and armchair edges were used in modeling the carbonaceous surfaces to simulate different adsorption sites. The edge atoms on the upper side of the models are unsaturated to simulate active sites. All calculations (optimizations, energies, and frequencies) were made at B3PW91 density functional theory level, using RCEP60VDZ basis set for mercury and 6-31G(d) pople basis set for other atoms. The results indicate that the embedding of halogen atom can increase the activity of its neighboring site which in turn increases the adsorption capacity of the carbonaceous surface for Hg(0). The adsorption belongs to chemisorptions, which is in good agreement with the experimental results. For the effects of oxygen functional groups, lactone, carbonyl and semiquinone favor Hg(0) adsorption because they increase the neighboring site's activity for mercury adsorption. On the contrary, phenol and carboxyl functional groups show a physisorption of Hg(0), and reduce Hg capture. This result can explain the seemingly conflicting experimental results reported in the literature concerning the influence of oxygen functional groups on mercury adsorption on carbonaceous surface.

  15. Design and synthesis of structurally well-defined functional polypropylenes via transition metal-mediated olefin polymerization chemistry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jinyong

    2006-01-01

    Functionalization of polyolefins is an industrially important yet scientifically challenging research subject.This paper summarizes our recent effort to access structurally well-defined functional polypropylenes via transition metal-mediated olefin polymerization.In one approach,polypropylenes containing side chain functional groups of controlled concentrations were obtained by Ziegler-Natta-catalyzed copolymerization of propylene in combination with either living anionic or controlled radical polymerization of polar monomers.The copolymerization of propylene with 1,4-divinylbenzene using an isospecific MgC12-supported TIC14 catalyst yielded potypropylenes containing pendant styrene moieties.Both metalation reaction with n-butyllithium and hydrochlorination reaction with dry hydrogen chloride selectively and quantitatively occurred at the pendant reactive sites,generating polymeric benzyllithium and 1-chloroethylbenzene species.These species initiated living anionic polymerization of styrene(S)and atom transfer radical polymerization(in the presence of CuC1 and pentamethyldiethylenetriamine) of methyl methacrylate(MMA),respectively,resulting in functional polypropylene graft copolymers(PP-g-PS and PP-g-PMMA)with controllable graft lengths.In another approach,chain end-functionalized polypropylenes containing a terminal OH-group with controlled molecular weights were directly prepared by propylene polymerization with a metaUocene catalyst through a selective aluminum chain transfer reaction.Both approaches proved to be desirable polyolefin functionalization routes in terms of efficiency and polymer structure controllability.

  16. Optimization of a ligand immobilization and azide group endcapping concept via "Click-Chemistry" for the preparation of adsorbents for antibody purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Jeannie; Hofer, Stefan; Lindner, Wolfgang

    2010-12-15

    This report describes and compares different strategies to deactivate (endcap) epoxide groups and azide groups on bio-chromatographic support surfaces, before and after ligand attachment. Adsorbents possessing epoxide groups were deactivated using acidic hydrolysis or were endcapped with 2-mercaptoethanol or 2-ethanolamine. The influence of surface-bound 2-ethanolamine was demonstrated for the triazine-type affinity adsorbent B14-2LP-FractoAIMs-1, which was tested in combination with the weak anion exchange material 3-aminoquinuclidine-FractoAIMs-3 (AQ-FA3). Azide groups were modified with 2-propargylalcohol using Click-Chemistry. Besides the conventional one-pot Click reaction, an alternative approach was introduced. This optimized Click protocol was employed (i) for the preparation of the weak anion exchange material AdQ-triazole-Fractogel (AdQ-TRZ-FG) and (ii) for the endcapping of residual azide groups with 3-propargyl alcohol. Using the new Click reaction protocol the ligand immobilization rate was doubled from 250 to 500 μmol/g dry adsorbent. Furthermore, the modified support surface was proven to be inert towards the binding of immunoglobulin G (IgG) as well as feed impurities. A thorough evaluation of modified surfaces and adsorbents was performed with dynamic binding experiments using cell culture supernatant containing monoclonal human immunoglobulin G (h-IgG-1). Besides SDS-Page, a recently introduced Protein A-size exclusion HPLC method (PSEC-HPLC) was used to visualize the feed impurity composition and the IgG content of all collected sample fractions in simple PSEC-Plots. A surprising outcome of this study was the irreversible binding of IgG to azide modified surfaces. It was found that organic azide compounds, e.g. 1-azide-3-(2-propen-1-yloxy)-2-propanol (AGE-N3) promote antibody aggregation to a slightly higher extent than the inorganic sodium azide. The possibility that the Hofmeister Series of salt anions may be applicable to predict the

  17. Sulfonimidamides in Medicinal and Agricultural Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinthakindi, Praveen K; Naicker, Tricia; Thota, Niranjan; Govender, Thavendran; Kruger, Hendrik G; Arvidsson, Per I

    2016-12-13

    The synthesis and evaluation of structural analogues and isosteres are of central importance in medicinal and agricultural chemistry. The sulfonamide functional group represents one of the most important amide isosteres in contemporary drug design, and about 500 such compounds have overcome both the pharmacological and regulatory hurdles that precede studies in humans. The mono aza analogues of sulfonamides, that is, sulfonimidamides, are rapidly gaining popularity as a novel functional group among synthetic chemists involved in the design of biologically active compounds for both pharmaceutical and agrochemical applications. Herein, we review these recent developments to showcase the promise of this functional group.

  18. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, J.; El Haddad, I.; Temime-Roussel, B.; Wortham, H.; Marchand, N. [Univ Aix Marseille, CNRS, Lab Chim Provence, Equipe Instrumentat and React Atmospher, UMR 6264, F-13331 Marseille 3 (France); Jaffrezo, J.L. [Univ Grenoble 1, CNRS, UMR 5183, Lab Glaciol and Geophys Environm, F-38402 St Martin Dheres (France)

    2010-07-01

    The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA) is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCIMS/MS). The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-R' respectively) and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO{sub 2}) scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA) produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular) to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation) of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France) during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalization rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60%. Finally, examples of functional

  19. Development of “Functional Groups in Molecules” Models For Fundamental Science Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowit KITTIWUTTHISAKDI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to teach quantum concepts to primary school students, new molecular models have been developed to better visualize a few typical molecules. Both computer and physical molecular models particularly those displaying functional groups were created from Atoms in Molecules (AIM theory. The surface of each model was calculated from 0.01 atomic unit (au electron density surface of the molecule. MORPHY was used to calculate an inter-atomic surface (IAS, and several software programs such as Gaussian, VMD, Points2Polys, and Vizx3D were utilized to create three dimensional models. Different functional groups were colored, and connections between the functional groups were shown by IAS. The final physical molecular models were prepared by a rapid prototype machine at Thailand National Metal and Materials Technology Center (MTEC.

  20. SPECIAL LINEAR GROUP SL(2, C AND GENERATING FUNCTIONS FOR ULTRASPHERICAL POLYNOMIALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.K.Khanna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the generating functions for ultraspherical polynomials Cα n (x (Gegenbaur polynomials are obtained by using the representa- tion theory of the Lie group SL(2, C (the complex special linear group giving a suitable interpretation to the index 0 n0 . Further, linearly inde- pendent differential J-operators derived, which generate a Lie algebra isomorphic to sl(2, C. The principle interest in our results lies in the fact that, how thecomplex special linear group can be applied suitably to the Gegenbaur polynomials in order to derive six bilinear/bilateral generating functions. The generating functions, in turn yield, Legendre polynomials as special cases. Many results obtained are well known but some of them are believed to be new in the theory of specialfunctions.

  1. Glass transition of polystyrene (PS) studied by Raman spectroscopic investigation of its phenyl functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldo Menezes, D.; Reyer, A.; Marletta, A.; Musso, M.

    2017-01-01

    In polymeric materials the glass transition (GT) is a well-known and very important relaxation process related to movements of functional groups in the polymeric chain. In this work, we show the potential of Raman spectroscopy for exploring the GT process in the polymer polystyrene. We collected Raman spectra during a step-by-step heating process of the sample, which allowed us to collect signatures of the GT process from peak parameters of specific vibrational modes, and to verify the GT temperature. Results of the latter were in accordance with published values obtained via other methods. We identified the aromatic ring vibrational modes of the phenyl functional groups to be those which, due to steric hindrance, suffer the largest influence during the GT process. This confirms that Raman spectroscopy can be used as a complementary technique to perform GT investigations in polymeric materials due to its sensitivity to small intermolecular changes affecting vibrational properties of relevant functional side groups.

  2. Plant diversity and functional groups affect Si and Ca pools in aboveground biomass of grassland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Jörg; Roscher, Christiane; Hillebrand, Helmut; Weigelt, Alexandra; Oelmann, Yvonne; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Ebeling, Anne; Weisser, Wolfgang W

    2016-09-01

    Plant diversity is an important driver of nitrogen and phosphorus stocks in aboveground plant biomass of grassland ecosystems, but plant diversity effects on other elements also important for plant growth are less understood. We tested whether plant species richness, functional group richness or the presence/absence of particular plant functional groups influences the Si and Ca concentrations (mmol g(-1)) and stocks (mmol m(-2)) in aboveground plant biomass in a large grassland biodiversity experiment (Jena Experiment). In the experiment including 60 temperate grassland species, plant diversity was manipulated as sown species richness (1, 2, 4, 8, 16) and richness and identity of plant functional groups (1-4; grasses, small herbs, tall herbs, legumes). We found positive species richness effects on Si as well as Ca stocks that were attributable to increased biomass production. The presence of particular functional groups was the most important factor explaining variation in aboveground Si and Ca stocks (mmol m(-2)). Grass presence increased the Si stocks by 140 % and legume presence increased the Ca stock by 230 %. Both the presence of specific plant functional groups and species diversity altered Si and Ca stocks, whereas Si and Ca concentration were affected mostly by the presence of specific plant functional groups. However, we found a negative effect of species diversity on Si and Ca accumulation, by calculating the deviation between mixtures and mixture biomass proportions, but in monoculture concentrations. These changes may in turn affect ecosystem processes such as plant litter decomposition and nutrient cycling in grasslands.

  3. Assessment of female sexual function in a group of uncircumcised obese Egyptian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elnashar, A R M; Ibrahim, N H; Ahmed, H-Eh; Hassanin, A M; Elgawady, M A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess female sexual function in an obese group (250 women) and to compare it with a control group (100 women), among 25-35-year-old uncircumcised Egyptian women, using female sexual function index (FSFI) score. FSFI total score of ⩽ 26.55 was considered diagnostic of Female Sexual Dysfunction (FSD). The percentage of FSD in the obese group was 73.6% while it was 71% in the control group, which was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05). The difference between both groups regarding the total (FSFI) score was insignificant (P > 0.05), but arousal and satisfaction domains scores were significantly lower in the obese group. In the obese group, a strong negative correlation between body mass index and arousal, orgasm and the total FSFI score was found. Women with excessive obesity had the lowest total FSFI score. In the obese group, college graduates had the highest total scores and all domain scores of FSFI followed by high school graduates while the least educated women had the lowest scores and when these subgroups were compared, significant differences were found among them. We conclude that in uncircumcised 25-35-year-old Egyptian women, obesity is not a major detrimental factor for FSD, but it may affect some sexual domains such as arousal and satisfaction, although excessive obesity is associated with FSD. Also, educational and cultural factors may have an impact on perception of sex and pleasure.

  4. General Dialdehyde Click Chemistry for Amine Bioconjugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahipanah, Sina; O'Brien, Paul J; Rogozhnikov, Dmitry; Yousaf, Muhammad N

    2017-05-17

    The development of methods for conjugating a range of molecules to primary amine functional groups has revolutionized the fields of chemistry, biology, and material science. The primary amine is a key functional group and one of the most important nucleophiles and bases used in all of synthetic chemistry. Therefore, tremendous interest in the synthesis of molecules containing primary amines and strategies to devise chemical reactions to react with primary amines has been at the core of chemical research. In particular, primary amines are a ubiquitous functional group found in biological systems as free amino acids, as key side chain lysines in proteins, and in signaling molecules and metabolites and are also present in many natural product classes. Due to its abundance, the primary amine is the most convenient functional group handle in molecules for ligation to other molecules for a broad range of applications that impact all scientific fields. Because of the primary amine's central importance in synthetic chemistry, acid-base chemistry, redox chemistry, and biology, many methods have been developed to efficiently react with primary amines, including activated carboxylic acids, isothiocyanates, Michael addition type systems, and reaction with ketones or aldehydes followed by in situ reductive amination. Herein, we introduce a new traceless, high-yield, fast click-chemistry method based on the rapid and efficient trapping of amine groups via a functionalized dialdehyde group. The click reaction occurs in mild conditions in organic solvents or aqueous media and proceeds in high yield, and the starting dialdehyde reagent and resulting dialdehyde click conjugates are stable. Moreover, no catalyst or dialdehyde-activating group is required, and the only byproduct is water. The initial dialdehyde and the resulting conjugate are both straightforward to characterize, and the reaction proceeds with high atom economy. To demonstrate the broad scope of this new click

  5. Chemistry Notes

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  6. Heterocyclic chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Hemming, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress in the synthesis of heterocyclic compounds is presented\\ud 2010 offered highlights in pericyclic chemistry, particularly 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition chemistry, asymmetric synthesis, gold catalysis, organocatalysis, hydroamination, C–H activation and multicomponent reactions.

  7. Chemistry Dashboard

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  8. Biophysical chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  9. Colour Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, J.; Rattee, I. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the course offerings in pure color chemistry at two universities and the three main aspects of study: dyestuff chemistry, color measurement, and color application. Indicates that there exists a constant challenge to ingenuity in the subject discipline. (CC)

  10. Changes in intrinsic functional connectivity and group relevant salience: The case of sport rivalry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Zargol; Mantini, Dante; Yankouskaya, Alla; Hewstone, Miles; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2017-08-14

    Studies have shown that attending to salient group relevant information could increase the BOLD activity across distributed neural networks. However, it is unclear how attending to group relevant information changes the functional connectivity across these networks. We investigated this issue combining resting states and task-based fMRI experiment. The task involved football fans learning associations between arbitrary geometric shapes and the badges of in-group, the rival and the neutral football teams. Upon learning, participants viewed different badge/shape pairs and their task was to judge whether the viewed pair was a match or a mismatch. For whole brain analyses increased activity was found in the IFG, DLPFC, AI, fusiform gyrus, precuneus and pSTS (all in the left hemisphere) for the rival over the in-group mismatch. Further, the ROI analyses revealed larger beta-values for the rival badge in the left pSTS, left AI and the left IFG. However, larger beta-values were found in the left pSTS and the left IFG (but not AI) for the in-group shape. The intrinsic functional connectivity analyses revealed that compare to the pre-task, post task functional connectivity was decreased between the left DLPFC and the left AI. In contrast, it was increased between the left IFG and the left AI and this was correlated with the difference in RT for the rival vs. in-group team. Our findings suggest that attending to group relevant information differentially affects the strength of functional coupling in attention networks and this can be explained by the saliency of the group relevant information. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Systematization of basic divergent integrals in perturbation theory and renormalization group functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, L.C.T. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Physics Department, ICEx, PO Box 702, 30.161-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: lctbrito@fisica.ufmg.br; Fargnoli, H.G. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Physics Department, ICEx, PO Box 702, 30.161-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: helvecio@fisica.ufmg.br; Baeta Scarpelli, A.P. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica, MG, Avenida Amazonas, 7675, 30510-000 Nova Gameleira, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: scarp@fisica.ufmg.br; Sampaio, Marcos [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Physics Department, ICEx, PO Box 702, 30.161-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: msampaio@fisica.ufmg.br; Nemes, M.C. [Federal University of Minas Gerais, Physics Department, ICEx, PO Box 702, 30.161-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: carolina@fisica.ufmg.br

    2009-03-23

    We show that to n loop order the divergent content of a Feynman amplitude is spanned by a set of basic (logarithmically divergent) integrals I{sub log}{sup (i)}({lambda}{sup 2}), i=1,2,...,n, {lambda} being the renormalization group scale, which need not be evaluated. Only the coefficients of the basic divergent integrals are show to determine renormalization group functions. Relations between these coefficients of different loop orders are derived.

  12. Characteristics and Changes in Health Status and Life Function among Female Elderly Participants of Group Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Hiromi; Yamada, Kazuko; Morioka, Ikuharu

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics of female elderly participants of a group exercise organized by the participants themselves and the changes in their physical, mental, and social health, and life function. Findings of this study will be used for promoting effective preventive care. The subjects whose characteristics were analyzed were 394 participants and 757 nonparticipants of the group exercise. Those whose changes in health were analyzed were 52 participants and 114 nonparticipants. Locomotion Check and self-rated health score were used as indices of physical health. World Health Organization-Five well-being (S-WHO-5-J) index and self-rated life satisfaction level were used as indices of mental health. Satisfaction level of social activities was one of indices of social health. The Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Gerontology Index of Competence was used as an index of life function. The health-examination data analyzed were Body Mass Index, waist circumference, blood pressure, lipid profiles, and HbA1c level. In the participant group, the proportions of those who lived alone, who were affluent, and who had no job were higher than those in the nonparticipant group. The indices of physical, mental and social health and life function were higher in the participant group. There was no significant difference in the 5-year trend of health-examination data between the two groups. There was no significant difference in the yearly change in the indices of physical health and life function. The S-WHO-5-J index, self-rated life satisfaction level, and satisfaction level of social activities were maintained or improved in the participant group. The results suggest the possible usefulness of the group exercise for maintaining the mental and social health of elderly women.

  13. Two characterization of BV functions on Carnot groups via the heat semigroup

    CERN Document Server

    Bramanti, Marco; Pallara, Diego

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we provide two different characterizations of sets with finite perimeter and functions of bounded variation in Carnot groups, analogous to those which hold in Euclidean spaces, in terms of the short-time behaviour of the heat semigroup. The second one holds under the hypothesis that the reduced boundary of a set of finite perimeter is rectifiable, a result that presently is known in Step 2 Carnot groups.

  14. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  15. Significance of Joint Features Derived from the Modified Group Delay Function in Speech Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murthy Hema A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure and the dynamic range of the speech spectrum primarily due to pitch periodicity effects. The group delay function is modified to suppress these spikes and to restore the dynamic range of the speech spectrum. Cepstral features are derived from the modified group delay function, which are called the modified group delay feature (MODGDF. The complementarity and robustness of the MODGDF when compared to the MFCC are also analyzed using spectral reconstruction techniques. Combination of several spectral magnitude-based features and the MODGDF using feature fusion and likelihood combination is described. These features are then used for three speech processing tasks, namely, syllable, speaker, and language recognition. Results indicate that combining MODGDF with MFCC at the feature level gives significant improvements for speech recognition tasks in noise. Combining the MODGDF and the spectral magnitude-based features gives a significant increase in recognition performance of 11% at best, while combining any two features derived from the spectral magnitude does not give any significant improvement.

  16. Significance of Joint Features Derived from the Modified Group Delay Function in Speech Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh M. Hegde

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the significance of combining cepstral features derived from the modified group delay function and from the short-time spectral magnitude like the MFCC. The conventional group delay function fails to capture the resonant structure and the dynamic range of the speech spectrum primarily due to pitch periodicity effects. The group delay function is modified to suppress these spikes and to restore the dynamic range of the speech spectrum. Cepstral features are derived from the modified group delay function, which are called the modified group delay feature (MODGDF. The complementarity and robustness of the MODGDF when compared to the MFCC are also analyzed using spectral reconstruction techniques. Combination of several spectral magnitude-based features and the MODGDF using feature fusion and likelihood combination is described. These features are then used for three speech processing tasks, namely, syllable, speaker, and language recognition. Results indicate that combining MODGDF with MFCC at the feature level gives significant improvements for speech recognition tasks in noise. Combining the MODGDF and the spectral magnitude-based features gives a significant increase in recognition performance of 11% at best, while combining any two features derived from the spectral magnitude does not give any significant improvement.

  17. Linking Keystone Species and Functional Groups: A New Operational Definition of the Keystone Species Concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Davic

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available The concept of the "keystone species" is redefined to allow for the a priori prediction of these species within ecosystems. A keystone species is held to be a strongly interacting species whose top-down effect on species diversity and competition is large relative to its biomass dominance within a functional group. This operational definition links the community importance of keystone species to a specific ecosystem process, e.g., the regulation of species diversity, within functional groups at lower trophic levels that are structured by competition for a limited resource. The a priori prediction of keystone species has applied value for the conservation of natural areas.

  18. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Interacting Proteins: Fine-Tuning Receptor Functions in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Francesconi, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate slow excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system and are critical to activity-dependent synaptic plasticity, a cellular substrate of learning and memory. Dysregulated receptor signaling is implicated in neuropsychiatric conditions ranging from neurodevelopmental to neurodegenerative disorders. Importantly, group I metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling functions can be modulated by interacting proteins that mediate receptor trafficking, expression and coupling efficiency to signaling effectors. These interactions afford cell- or pathway-specific modulation to fine-tune receptor function, thus representing a potential target for pharmacological interventions in pathological conditions.

  19. In Vivo Models to Address the Function of Polycomb Group Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantignies, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Initially discovered as repressors of homeotic gene expression in Drosophila, Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have now been shown to be involved in a plethora of biological processes. Indeed, by repressing a large number of target genes, including specific lineage genes, these chromatin factors play major roles in a multitude of cellular functions, such as pluripotency, differentiation, reprogramming, tissue regeneration, and nuclear organization. In this book chapter are presented in vivo approaches and technologies, which have been used in both mammalian and Drosophila systems to study the cellular functions of Polycomb group proteins.

  20. Functional group composition of ambient and source organic aerosols determined by tandem mass spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Dron

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The functional group composition of various organic aerosols (OA is investigated using a recently developed analytical approach based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation-tandem mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS. The determinations of three functional groups contents are performed quantitatively by neutral loss (carboxylic and carbonyl groups, R-COOH and R-CO-R´ respectively and precursor ion (nitro groups, R-NO2 scanning modes of a tandem mass spectrometer. Major organic aerosol sources are studied: vehicular emission and wood combustion for primary aerosol sources; and a secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced through photooxidation of o-xylene. The results reveal significant differences in the functional group contents of these source aerosols. The laboratory generated SOA is dominated by carbonyls while carboxylics are preponderate in the wood combustion particles. On the other hand, vehicular emissions are characterised by a strong nitro content. The total amount of the three functional groups accounts for 1.7% (vehicular to 13.5% (o-xylene photooxidation of the organic carbon. Diagnostic functional group ratios are then used to tentatively discriminate sources of particles collected in an urban background environment located in an Alpine valley (Chamonix, France during a strong winter pollution event. The three functional groups under study account for a total functionalisation rate of 2.2 to 3.8% of the organic carbon in this ambient aerosol, which is also dominated by carboxylic moieties. In this particular case study of a deep alpine valley during winter, we show that the nitro- and carbonyl-to-carboxylic diagnostic ratios can be a useful tool to discriminate sources. In these conditions, the total OA concentrations are highly dominated by wood combustion OA. This result is confirmed by an organic markers source apportionment approach which assess a wood burning organic carbon contribution of about 60

  1. A study of the effects that grouping laboratory partners based on logical thinking abilities have on their problem solving strategies in a general chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nammouz, Minory Suhil

    2005-07-01

    The development of problem solving skills and strategies is generally of importance in science education and specifically in chemistry, and is usually assessed by traditional methods such as laboratories, homework, and examinations. However, for instructors, developing a deep understanding of how students solve the problems is difficult and very time consuming. One potential way to address this problem is an internet-based software package known as IMMEX (Interactive Multimedia Exercises). Originally developed at the UCLA Medical School, it has now been expanded to K-12 and college classrooms. IMMEX Problems are case-based and cover a wide range of subject areas. Using this software the students are able to navigate throughout the problem space by choosing the necessary items from a range given to them. The student is provided with immediate feedback; if the student chooses an incorrect answer, most problems will allow for a review of the problem space and submit a second. The IMMEX system tracks the strategies used through a search path map for each problem the student answers; then these data are collected and analyzed using artificial neural networks for pattern recognition. In the present study, students were allowed to stabilize on a problem solving strategy by working five problems before conclusions were drawn regarding their acquired strategies. The major difference now being that any changes in strategy that occurred during and after the intervention of group-work would be by a student that had previously settled on a preferred strategy. The effects of group composition on students' problem solving strategies were also studied. The results presented in this study support the use of collaborative learning as a method that improves students' problem solving strategies. It was found that a collaborative learning environment would not only improve students' problem solving strategies in the groups, but would also carry over their individual subsequent

  2. Sulfoximines: a neglected opportunity in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücking, Ulrich

    2013-09-02

    Innovation has frequently been described as the key to drug discovery. However, in the daily routine, medicinal chemists often tend to stick to the functional groups and structural elements they know and love. Blockbuster cancer drug Velcade (bortezomib), for example, was rejected by more than 50 companies, supposedly because of its unusual boronic acid function (as often repeated: "only a moron would put boron in a drug!"). Similarly, in the discovery process of the pan-CDK inhibitor BAY 1000394, the unconventional proposal to introduce a sulfoximine group into the lead series also led to sneers and raised eyebrows, since sulfoximines have seldom been used in medicinal chemistry. However, it was the introduction of the sulfoximine group that finally allowed the fundamental issues of the project to be overcome, culminating in the identification of the clinical sulfoximine pan-CDK inhibitor BAY 1000394. This Minireview provides an overview of a widely neglected opportunity in medicinal chemistry--the sulfoximine group.

  3. Surface functional group characterization using chemical derivatization X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagst, Eda

    2011-03-18

    Chemical derivatization - X-ray photolectron spectroscopy (CD-XPS) was applied successfully in order to determine different functional groups on thin film surfaces. Different amino group carrying surfaces, prepared by spin coating, self-assembly and plasma polymerization, were successfully investigated by (XPS) and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Amino groups were derivatized with the widely used primary amino group tags, pentafluorobenzaldehyde (PFB) and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-benzaldehyde (TFBA), prior to analysis. Primary amino group quantification was then carried out according to the spectroscopical data. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of different terminal groups were prepared and investigated with XPS and spectra were compared with reference surfaces. An angle resolved NEXAFS measurement was applied to determine the orientation of SAMs. Plasma polymerized allylamine samples with different duty cycle, power and pressure values were prepared in order to study the effects of external plasma parameters on the primary amino group retention. CD-XPS was used to quantify the amino groups and experiments show, that the milder plasma conditions promote the retention of amino groups originating from the allylamine monomer. An interlaboratory comparison of OH group determination on plasma surfaces of polypropylene treated with oxygen plasma, was studied. The surfaces were investigated with XPS and the [OH] amount on the surfaces was calculated. (orig.)

  4. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  5. Combinatorial chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John

    1994-01-01

    An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds.......An overview of combinatorial chemistry is presented. Combinatorial chemistry, sometimes referred to as `irrational drug design,' involves the generation of molecular diversity. The resulting chemical library is then screened for biologically active compounds....

  6. Positronium chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James

    1964-01-01

    Positronium Chemistry focuses on the methodologies, reactions, processes, and transformations involved in positronium chemistry. The publication first offers information on positrons and positronium and experimental methods, including mesonic atoms, angular correlation measurements, annihilation spectra, and statistical errors in delayed coincidence measurements. The text then ponders on positrons in gases and solids. The manuscript takes a look at the theoretical chemistry of positronium and positronium chemistry in gases. Topics include quenching, annihilation spectrum, delayed coincidence

  7. Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: The Functional Significance of Cysteine in Protein Function and the Soft Acids/Bases Thiol Chemistry That Facilitates Cysteine Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wible, Ryan S; Sutter, Thomas R

    2017-03-20

    The unique biophysical and electronic properties of cysteine make this molecule one of the most biologically critical amino acids in the proteome. The defining sulfur atom in cysteine is much larger than the oxygen and nitrogen atoms more commonly found in the other amino acids. As a result of its size, the valence electrons of sulfur are highly polarizable. Unique protein microenvironments favor the polarization of sulfur, thus increasing the overt reactivity of cysteine. Here, we provide a brief overview of the endogenous generation of reactive oxygen and electrophilic species and specific examples of enzymes and transcription factors in which the oxidation or covalent modification of cysteine in those proteins modulates their function. The perspective concludes with a discussion of cysteine chemistry and biophysics, the hard and soft acids and bases model, and the proposal of the Soft Cysteine Signaling Network: a hypothesis proposing the existence of a complex signaling network governed by layered chemical reactivity and cross-talk in which the chemical modification of reactive cysteine in biological networks triggers the reorganization of intracellular biochemistry to mitigate spikes in endogenous or exogenous oxidative or electrophilic stress.

  8. Psychosocial functioning in patients with treatment-resistant depression after group cognitive behavioral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunisato Yoshihiko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although patients with Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD often have impaired social functioning, few studies have investigated the effectiveness of psychosocial treatment for these patients. We examined whether adding group cognitive behavioral therapy (group-CBT to medication would improve both the depressive symptoms and the social functioning of patient with mild TRD, and whether any improvements would be maintained over one year. Methods Forty-three patients with TRD were treated with 12 weekly sessions of group-CBT. Patients were assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF, the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD, the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS, and the Automatic Thought Questionnaire-Revised (ATQ-R at baseline, at the termination of treatment, and at the 12-month follow-up. Results Thirty-eight patients completed treatment; five dropped out. For the patients who completed treatment, post-treatment scores on the GAF and SF-36 were significantly higher than baseline scores. Scores on the HRSD, DAS, and ATQ-R were significantly lower after the treatment. Thus patients improved on all measurements of psychosocial functioning and mood symptoms. Twenty patients participated in the 12-month follow-up. Their improvements for psychosocial functioning, depressive symptoms, and dysfunctional cognitions were sustained at 12 months following the completion of group-CBT. Conclusions These findings suggest a positive effect that the addition of cognitive behavioural group therapy to medication on depressive symptoms and social functioning of mildly depressed patients, showing treatment resistance.

  9. Attachment theory and group processes: the association between attachment style and group-related representations, goals, memories, and functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Eldad; Mikulincer, Mario

    2003-06-01

    Four studies examined attachment-style differences in group-related cognitions and behaviors. In Studies 1-2, participants completed scales on group-related cognitions and emotions. In Studies 3-4, participants were divided into small groups, and their performance in group tasks as well as the cohesion of their group were assessed. Both attachment anxiety and avoidance in close relationships were associated with negative group-related cognitions and emotions. Anxiety was also related to the pursuit of closeness goals and impaired instrumental performance in group tasks. Avoidance was related to the pursuit of distance goals and deficits in socioemotional and instrumental performance. Group cohesion significantly moderated the effects of attachment anxiety. The discussion emphasizes the relevance of attachment theory within group contexts.

  10. The Plasma Chemistry of Polymer Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Friedrich, Jö

    2012-01-01

    This book illustrates plasma properties, polymer characteristics, surface specifics, and how to purposefully combine plasma and polymer chemistry. In so doing, it covers plasma polymerization, surface functionalization, etching, crosslinking, and deposition of monotype functional-group-bearing plasma polymers. It explains different techniques and plasma types, such as pressure-pulsed, remote, low-wattage plasmas and plasma polymerization in liquids. Finally, among the numerous applications discussed are plasmas for chemical synthesis, industrial processes or the modification of membranes and p

  11. Class-Wide Function-Related Intervention Teams: Effects of Group Contingency Programs in Urban Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Debra; Wills, Howard P.; Heitzman-Powell, Linda; Laylin, Jeff; Szoke, Carolyn; Petrillo, Tai; Culey, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the effectiveness of the Class-Wide Function-related Intervention Teams (CW-FIT) program, a group contingency intervention for whole classes, and for students with disruptive behaviors who are at risk for emotional/behavioral disorders (EBD). The CW-FIT program includes four elements designed from…

  12. Towards the five-loop beta function for a general gauge group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luthe, Thomas [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Teilchenphysik; Maier, Andreas [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology; Marquard, Peter [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Schroeder, York [Univ. del Bio-Bio, Chillan (Chile). Grupo de Fisica de Altas Energias

    2016-06-15

    We present analytical results for the N{sup 4}{sub f} and N{sup 3}{sub f} terms of the five-loop beta function, for a general gauge group. While the former term agrees with results available from large-N{sub f} studies, the latter is new and extends the value known for SU(3) from an independent calculation.

  13. Neuropsychological Functioning in Specific Learning Disorders--Reading, Writing and Mixed Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohli, Adarsh; Kaur, Manreet; Mohanty, Manju; Malhotra, Savita

    2006-01-01

    Aim: The study compared the pattern of deficits, intelligence and neuropsychological functioning in subcategories of learning disorders. Methods: Forty-six children (16 with reading disorders, 11 with writing disorders and 19 with both reading and writing disorders--mixed group) in the age range of 7-14 years were assessed using the NIMHANS Index…

  14. Unitary representations of three dimensional Lie groups revisited: A short tutorial via harmonic functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoamor-Stursberg, R.; Rausch de Traubenberg, M.

    2017-04-01

    The representation theory of three dimensional real and complex Lie groups is reviewed from the perspective of harmonic functions defined over certain appropriate manifolds. An explicit construction of all unitary representations is given. The realisations obtained are shown to be related with each other by either natural operations as real forms or Inönü-Wigner contractions.

  15. IMPORTANCE OF ACTIVATED CARBON'S OXYGEN SURFACE FUNCTIONAL GROUPS ON ELEMENTAL MERCURY ADSORPTION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of varying physical and chemical properties of activated carbons on adsorption of elemental mercury [Hg(0)] was studied by treating two activated carbons to modify their surface functional groups and pore structures. Heat treatment (1200 K) in nitrogen (N2), air oxidat...

  16. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  17. Group Social Skills Instruction for Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan W.; Koenig, Kathleen; Scahill, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Given the increased recognition of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and the chronic and pervasive nature of associated deficits, there is a pressing need for effective treatments. The feasibility and preliminary efficacy of a structured, group social skills training program for high-functioning youth with ASD was examined in this study. Fifteen…

  18. Detection of Differential Item Functioning for More than Two Groups: A Monte Carlo Comparison of Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, W. Holmes

    2016-01-01

    Differential item functioning (DIF) assessment is a crucial component in test construction, serving as the primary way in which instrument developers ensure that measures perform in the same way for multiple groups within the population. When such is not the case, scores may not accurately reflect the trait of interest for all individuals in the…

  19. Review of Social Skills Training Groups for Youth with Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappadocia, M. Catherine; Weiss, Jonathan A.

    2011-01-01

    Although social skills deficits represent core symptoms of Asperger Syndrome and High Functioning Autism, there is limited research investigating the empirical validity of social skills interventions currently being used with these populations. This literature review compares three types of social skills training groups: traditional, cognitive…

  20. Towards the five-loop Beta function for a general gauge group

    CERN Document Server

    Luthe, Thomas; Marquard, Peter; Schroder, York

    2016-01-01

    We present analytical results for the $N_f^4$ and $N_f^3$ terms of the five-loop Beta function, for a general gauge group. While the former term agrees with results available from large-$N_f$ studies, the latter is new and extends the value known for SU(3) from an independent calculation.

  1. Introduction of functional groups of polyethylene surfaces by a carbon dioxide plasma treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terlingen, J.G.A.; Terlingen, Johannes G.A.; Gerritsen, Hermina F.C.; Gerritsen, H.F.C.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Feijen, Jan

    1995-01-01

    Poly(ethylene) (PE) films were treated with a carbon dioxide (CO2) plasma to study the formation of oxygen-containing functional groups at the surface. Modified and nonmodified films were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and water contact angle measurements. During the CO2

  2. Forensic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  3. Comparing Executive Function and Behavioral Inhibition in Schizophrenia, Bipolar Mood Disorder Type I and Normal Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marziye Khodaee

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cognitive performance in patients with schizophrenia and Bipolar I disorder seems to be different from the normal individuals, that these defects affect their treatment results. Therefore, this study aimed to compare executive function and behavioral inhibition within patients suffering from schizophrenia, bipolar type I as well as a normal group. Methods: In this descriptive-comparative study, out of all patients hospitalized in daily psychiatric clinic in Najafabad in 2014 due to these disorders, 20 schizophrenia and 20 bipolar type I as well as 20 normal individuals were selected via the convinience sampling. All the study participants completed the computerizing tests including Tower of London and Go-No Go. The study data were analyzed utilizing SPSS software (ver 22 via MANOVA. Results: The study findings revealed a significant difference between the two patient groups and the normal group in regard with executive function and behavioral inhibition (p<0.05, whereas no differences were detected between schizophrenics and bipolar patient groups. Furthermore, patients suffering from schizophrenia and bipolar I mood disorder demonstrated significantly poor performance in cognitive function and behavioral inhibition compared to the normal group. Conclusion: The present study results can be significantly applied in pathology and therapy of these disorders, so as recognizing the inability of such patients can be effective in developing cognitive rehabilitation programs in these patients.

  4. Chemistry Education and Mythology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sule Aycan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to investigate the effect of mythological story in teaching chemistry. To this end the students in the class were divided into two homogenous groups. While the first group was thought in a traditional way, using a mythological story thought the second group. The story used was based on a Mountain just opposite the faculty.

  5. How Perspective-Taking Helps and Hinders Group-Based Guilt as a Function of Group Identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebel, Sven; Doosje, Bertjan; Spears, Russell

    2009-01-01

    In two studies we hypothesized that outgroup perspective-taking promotes group-based guilt among weakly identified perpetrator group members, but hinders it among higher identifiers. In Study 1, native Dutch participants (N = 153) confronted their group's past mistreatment of outgroups, while perspe

  6. Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica Functionalized with Sulfonic Acid Groups as Acid Catalyst for Glycerol Acetylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Van Der Voort

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A Periodic Mesoporous Organosilica (PMO functionalized with sulfonic acid groups has been successfully synthesized via a sequence of post-synthetic modification steps of a trans-ethenylene bridged PMO material. The double bond is functionalized via a bromination and subsequent substitution obtaining a thiol functionality. This is followed by an oxidation towards a sulfonic acid group. After full characterization, the solid acid catalyst is used in the acetylation of glycerol. The catalytic reactivity and reusability of the sulfonic acid modified PMO material is investigated. The catalyst showed a catalytic activity and kinetics that are comparable with the commercially available resin, Amberlyst-15, and furthermore our catalyst can be recycled for several subsequent catalytic runs and retains its catalytic activity.

  7. The Brazilian medicinal chemistry from 1998 to 2008 in the Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry [A química medicinal brasileira de 1998 a 2008 nos periódicos Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters e European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Bárbara Vasconcellos da Silva; Renato Saldanha Bastos; Angelo da Cunha Pinto

    2009-01-01

    In this article we present the Brazilian publications, the research groups involved, the contributions per states and the main diseases studied from 1998 to 2008 in the following periodicals: Journal of Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry, Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry Letters and European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry.

  8. Development of Acid Functional Groups and Lactones During the Thermal Degradation of Wood and Wood Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, David W.; Wershaw, Robert L.; Reeves, James B.

    2008-01-01

    Black carbon (pyrogenic materials including chars) in soils has been recognized as a substantial portion of soil organic matter, and has been shown to play a vital role in nutrient cycling; however, little is known concerning the properties of this material. Previous studies have largely been concerned with the creation of high-surface-area materials for use as sorbents. These materials have been manufactured at high temperature and have often been activated. Chars occurring in the environment can be formed over a wide range of temperature. Because it is extremely difficult to isolate black carbon once it has been incorporated in soils, chars produced in the laboratory under controlled conditions can be used to investigate the range of properties possible for natural chars. This report shows that charring conditions (temperature and time) have substantial impact on the acid functional group and lactone content of chars. Low temperatures (250?C) and long charring times (greater than 72 hours) produce chars with the highest acid functional group and lactone content. The charring of cellulose appears to be responsible for the creation of the acid functional group and lactones. The significance of this study is that low-temperature chars can have acid functional group contents comparable to humic materials (as high as 8.8 milliequivalents per gram). Acid functional group and lactone content decreases as charring temperature increases. The variation in formation conditions expected under natural fire conditions will result in a wide range of sorption properties for natural chars which are an important component of soil organic matter. By controlling the temperature and duration of charring, it is possible to tailor the sorption properties of chars, which may be used as soil amendments.

  9. Wetting properties of model interphases coated with defined organic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woche, Susanne K.; Goebel, Marc-O.; Guggenberger, Georg; Tunega, Daniel; Bachmann, Joerg

    2013-04-01

    Surface properties of soil particles are of particular interest regarding transport of water and sorption of solutes, especially hazardous xenobiotic species. Wetting properties (e.g. determined by contact angle, CA), governed by the functional groups exposed, are crucial to understand sorption processes in water repellent soils as well as for the geometry of water films sustaining microbial processes on the pore scale. Natural soil particle surfaces are characterized by a wide variety of mineralogical and chemical compounds. Their composition is almost impossible to identify in full. Hence, in order to get a better understanding about surface properties, an option is the usage of defined model surfaces, whereas the created surface should be comparable to natural soil interphases. We exposed smooth glass surfaces to different silane compounds, resulting in a coating covalently bound to the surface and exhibiting defined organic functional groups towards the pore space. The wetting properties as evaluated by CA and the surface free energy (SFE), calculated according to the Acid-Base Theory, were found to be a function of the specific functional group. Specifically, the treated surfaces showed a large variation of CA and SFE as function of chain length and polarity of the organic functional group. The study of wetting properties was accompanied by XPS analysis for selective detection of chemical compounds of the interphase. As the reaction mechanism of the coating process is known, the resulting interphase structure can be modeled based on energetic considerations. A next step is to use same coatings for the defined modification of the pore surfaces of porous media to study transport and sorption processes in complex three phase systems.

  10. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with -CH(n), -NH(n) fragments, -COOH and -OH groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milowska, Karolina Z; Majewski, Jacek A

    2013-05-21

    We present results of extensive theoretical studies concerning stability, morphology, and band structure of single wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) covalently functionalized by -CH(n) (for n = 2,3,4), -NH(n) (for n = 1,2,3,4), -COOH, and -OH groups. These studies are based on ab initio calculations in the framework of the density functional theory. For functionalized systems, we determine the dependence of the binding energies on the concentration of the adsorbed molecules, critical densities of adsorbed molecules, global and local changes in the morphology, and electronic structure paying particular attention to the functionalization induced changes of the band gaps. These studies reveal physical mechanisms that determine stability and electronic structure of functionalized systems and also provide valuable theoretical predictions relevant for application. In particular, we observe that functionalization of CNTs causes generally their elongation and locally sp(2) to sp(3) rehybridization in the neighborhood of chemisorbed molecules. For adsorbants making particularly strong covalent bonds with the CNTs, such as the -CH2 fragments, we observe formation of the characteristic pentagon/heptagon (5/7) defects. In systems functionalized with the -CH2, -NH4, and -OH groups, we determine critical density of molecules that could be covalently bound to the lateral surface of CNTs. Our studies show that functionalization of CNTs can be utilized for band gap engineering. Functionalization of CNTs can also lead to changes in their metallic/semiconductor character. In semiconducting CNTs, functionalizing molecules such as -CH3, -NH2, -OH, -COOH, and both -OH and -COOH, introduce "impurity" bands in the band gap of pristine CNTs. In the case of -CH3, -NH2 molecules, the induced band gaps are typically smaller than in the pure CNT and depend strongly on the concentration of adsorbants. However, functionalization of semiconducting CNTs with hydroxyl groups leads to the metallization

  11. Photochemical and antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with photoactive groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Thomas V; Kuriakose, Sunny

    2013-10-01

    Chitosan was functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid by the coupling of the hydroxyl functional groups of chitosan with carboxylic acid group of the dye by DCC coupling method. The silver nanoparticles were prepared by sol-gel method of nanoparticle synthesis. Silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was prepared by the phase transfer method. The products were characterized by FTIR, UV-Vis, fluorescence and NMR spectroscopic methods and by SEM and TEM analysis. The photochemical properties of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated chitosan functionalized with 4-((E)-2-(3-hydroxynaphthalen-2-yl)diazen-1-yl)benzoic acid was studied in detail. The light-fastening properties of the chromophoric system was enhanced when attached to chitosan, and it can be further improved by the encapsulation of silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial analysis of silver nanoparticle-encapsulated functionalized chitosan was carried out against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli and against fungal species such as Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus terreus. This study showed that silver nanoparticles-encapsulated functionalized chitosan can be used for antibacterial and antifungal applications.

  12. Fossil group origins V. The dependence of the luminosity function on the magnitude gap

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Barrena, R; Boschin, W; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Girardi, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kundert, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    In nature we observe galaxy aggregations that span a wide range of magnitude gaps between the two first-ranked galaxies of a system ($\\Delta m_{12}$). There are systems with gaps close to zero (e.g., the Coma cluster), and at the other extreme of the distribution, the largest gaps are found among the so-called fossil systems. Fossil and non-fossil systems could have different galaxy populations that should be reflected in their luminosity functions. In this work we study, for the first time, the dependence of the luminosity function parameters on $\\Delta m_{12}$ using data obtained by the fossil group origins (FOGO) project. We constructed a hybrid luminosity function for 102 groups and clusters at $z \\le 0.25$. We stacked all the individual luminosity functions, dividing them into bins of $\\Delta m_{12}$, and studied their best-fit Schechter parameters. We additionally computed a relative luminosity function, expressed as a function of the central galaxy luminosity, which boosts our capacity to detect differ...

  13. Matrix intensification alters avian functional group composition in adjacent rainforest fragments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justus P Deikumah

    Full Text Available Conversion of farmland land-use matrices to surface mining is an increasing threat to the habitat quality of forest remnants and their constituent biota, with consequences for ecosystem functionality. We evaluated the effects of matrix type on bird community composition and the abundance and evenness within avian functional groups in south-west Ghana. We hypothesized that surface mining near remnants may result in a shift in functional composition of avifaunal communities, potentially disrupting ecological processes within tropical forest ecosystems. Matrix intensification and proximity to the remnant edge strongly influenced the abundance of members of several functional guilds. Obligate frugivores, strict terrestrial insectivores, lower and upper strata birds, and insect gleaners were most negatively affected by adjacent mining matrices, suggesting certain ecosystem processes such as seed dispersal may be disrupted by landscape change in this region. Evenness of these functional guilds was also lower in remnants adjacent to surface mining, regardless of the distance from remnant edge, with the exception of strict terrestrial insectivores. These shifts suggest matrix intensification can influence avian functional group composition and related ecosystem-level processes in adjacent forest remnants. The management of matrix habitat quality near and within mine concessions is important for improving efforts to preserveavian biodiversity in landscapes undergoing intensification such as through increased surface mining.

  14. Green chemistry of carbon nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A

    2014-01-01

    The global trend of looking for more ecologically friendly, "green" techniques manifested itself in the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials. The main principles of green chemistry emphasize how important it is to avoid the use, or at least to reduce the consumption, of organic solvents for a chemical process. And it is precisely this aspect that was systematically addressed and emphasized by our research group since the very beginning of our work on the chemistry of carbon nanomaterials in early 2000s. The present review focuses on the results obtained to date on solvent-free techniques for (mainly covalent) functionalization of fullerene C60, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs, respectively), as well as nanodiamonds (NDs). We designed a series of simple and fast functionalization protocols based on thermally activated reactions with chemical compounds stable and volatile at 150-200 degrees C under reduced pressure, when not only the reactions take place at a high rate, but also excess reagents are spontaneously removed from the functionalized material, thus making its purification unnecessary. The main two classes of reagents are organic amines and thiols, including bifunctional ones, which can be used in conjunction with different forms of nanocarbons. The resulting chemical processes comprise nucleophilic addition of amines and thiols to fullerene C60 and to defect sites of pristine MWNTs, as well as direct amidation of carboxylic groups of oxidized nanotubes (mainly SWNTs) and ND. In the case of bifunctional amines and thiols, reactions of the second functional group can give rise to cross-linking effects, or be employed for further derivatization steps.

  15. Submicron aerosol organic functional groups, ions, and water content at the Centreville SEARCH site (Alabama), during SOAS campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggeri, G.; Ergin, G.; Modini, R. L.; Takahama, S.

    2013-12-01

    The SOAS campaign was conducted from June 1 to July 15 of 2013 in order to understand the relationship between biogenic and anthropogenic emissions in the South East US1,2. In this study, the organic and inorganic composition of submicron aerosol in the Centreville SEARCH site was measured by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and the Ambient Ion Monitor (AIM; URG Corporation), whereas the aerosol water content was measured with a Dry Ambient Aerosol Size Spectrometer (DAASS)3. Organic functional group analysis was performed on PM1 aerosol selected by cyclone and collected on teflon filters with a time resolution of 4-12 hours, using one inlet heated to 50 °C and the other operated either at ambient temperature or 70 °C 4. The AIM measured both condensed and gas phase composition with a time resolution of 1 hour, providing partitioning behavior of inorganic species such as NH3/NH4+, HNO3/NO3-. These measurements collectively permit calculation of pure-component vapor pressures of candidate organic compounds and activity coefficients of interacting components in the condensed phase, using models such as SIMPOL.15, E-AIM6, and AIOMFAC7. From these results, the water content of the aerosol is predicted, and a comparison between modeled and measured partitioning of inorganic compounds and water vapor are discussed, in addition to organic aerosol volatility prediction based on functional group analysis. [1]- Goldstein, A.H., et al., Biogenic carbon and anthropogenic pollutants combine to form a cooling haze over the southeastern United States. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 2009. 106(22), 8835-8840. [2]- Carlton, A.G., Turpin, B.J., 2013. Particle partitioning potential of organic compounds is highest in the Eastern US and driven by anthropogenic water. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions 13, 12743-12770. [3]- Khlystov, A., Stanier, C.O., Takahama, S., Pandis, S.N., 2005. Water content of ambient

  16. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  17. Moderator Chemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  18. The effect of affective bibliotherapy on clients' functioning in group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shechtman, Zipora; Nir-Shfrir, Rivka

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The effect of affective group bibliotherapy (GB) was compared to affective group therapy (GT) on patients' functioning in therapy and their session impression. Three small groups totaling twenty-five in-patients in a hospital in Israel participated in the study. Clients concurrently participated in both group types, undergoing three sessions in each condition. In-therapy behaviors were assessed through the Client Behavior System (CBS; Hill & O'Brien, 1999). Results indicated that in the GB condition compared to the GT condition, clients showed less resistance, used simple responses less frequently, and expressed greater affective exploration. The Session Evaluation Questionnaire (SEQ; Stiles et al., 1994) was used to measure clients' impressions of the sessions. Results indicated that patients evaluated the two treatment conditions equally. Overall, the results support earlier findings, suggesting that affective bibliotherapy can be an effective method of treatment.

  19. Reinforcing graphene oxide/cement composite with NH$_2$ functionalizing group

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M EBRAHIMIZADEH ABRISHAMI; V ZAHABI

    2016-08-01

    In this study, pure and NH$_2$-functionalized graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets have been added to the cement mortar with different weight percents (0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20 and 0.25 wt%). In addition, the effects of functionalizing GO on the microstructure and mechanical properties (flexural/compressive strengths) of cement composite have been investigated for the first time. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images showed that GO filledthe pores and well dispersed in concrete matrix, whereas exceeding GO additive from 0.10 wt% caused the formation of agglomerates and microcracks. In addition, mercury intrusion porosimetry confirmed the significant effects of GO and functionalizing groups on filling the pores. NH2-functionalizing helped to improve the cohesion between GO nanosheets and cement composite. Compressive strengths increased from 39 MPa for the sample without GO to54.23 MPa for the cement composites containing 0.10 wt% of NH$_2$-functionalized GO. Moreover, the flexural strength increased to 23.4 and 38.4% by compositing the cement paste with 0.10 wt% of pure and NH$_2$-functionalized GO, compared to the sample without GO, respectively. It was shown that functionalizing considerably enhanced the mechanical properties of GO/cement composite due to the interfacial strength between calcium silicatehydrates (C-S-H) gel and functionalized GO nanosheets as observed in SEM images. The morphological results were in good agreement with the trend obtained in mechanical properties of GO/cement composites.

  20. Monocarbaborane anion chemistry. [COOH], [CH2OH] and [CHO] units as functional groups on ten-vertex monocarbaborane anionic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Andreas; Carr, Michael J; Clegg, William; Kilner, Colin A; Kennedy, John D

    2004-11-01

    B(10)H(14) reacts with para-C(6)H(4)(CHO)(COOH) in aqueous KOH solution to give the [nido-6-CB(9)H(11)-6-(C(6)H(4)-para-COOH)](-) anion 1, which undergoes cage closure with iodine in alkaline solution to give the [closo-2-CB(9)H(9)-2-(C(6)H(4)-para-COOH)](-) anion 2. Upon heating, anion 2 rearranges to form the [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(C(6)H(4)-para-COOH)](-) anion 3. Similarly, B(10)H(14) with glyoxylic acid OHCCOOH in aqueous KOH gives the [arachno-6-CB(9)H(13)-6-(COOH)](-) anion 4, which undergoes cage closure with iodine in alkaline solution to give the [closo-2-CB(9)H(9)-2-(COOH)](-) anion 5. Upon heating, anion 5 rearranges to give the [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(COOH)](-) anion 6. Reduction of the [COOH] anions 3 and 6 with diisobutylaluminium hydride gives the [CH(2)OH] hydroxy anions [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(C(6)H(4)-para-CH(2)OH)](-) and [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(CH(2)OH)](-) 8 respectively. The [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(C(6)H(4)-para-CH(2)OH)](-) anion 7 can also be made via isomerisation of the [closo-2-CB(9)H(9)-2-(C(6)H(4)-para-CH(2)OH)](-) anion 9, in turn obtained from the [nido-6-CB(9)H(11)-6-(C(6)H(4)-para-CH(2)OH)](-) anion 10, which is obtained from the reaction of B(10)H(14) with terephthaldicarboxaldehyde, C(6)H(4)-para-(CHO)(2), in aqueous KOH solution. Oxidation of the hydroxy anions 7 and 8 with pyridinium dichromate gives the aldehydic [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(C(6)H(4)-para-CHO)](-) anion 11 and the aldehydic [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-(CHO)](-) anion 12 respectively, characterised as their 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazone derivatives, the [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-C(6)H(4)-para-CH=N-NHC(6)H(3)(NO(2))(2)](-) anion 13 and the [closo-1-CB(9)H(9)-1-CH=N-NHC(6)H(3)(NO(2))(2)](-) anion respectively.

  1. The Functional Model Approach to the Consulting for Vertically - Integrated Construction Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pimenova Anna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Managerial decision making in the framework of functional modeling of the consulting process have a direct effect on other business - processes of vertically - integrated group of construction companies. As a result, the experience of consulting companies tends to be used for the making managerial solutions. Consultancy is known as one of the most complicated types of buisiness process. It requires a huge and deep examines and researches of targeting area, therefore need to be provided with special methodology, included internal standards of the consulting companies. Correct methodological support, planning process and implementation of managerial solutions should be based on the survey of the direct and inverse connections and interdependence of all group’s business – processes. Functional - process modeling of the vertically - integrated construction group could be considered as an instrument of examination and analysis of the issue how the managerial solution impact on the business-process for the construction group functioning. The main result of the research is the formalized process-oriented model – prototype of the business - processes of vertically - integrated group of construction companies.

  2. Carboxylic acid functional group analysis using constant neutral loss scanning-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dron, Julien [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)], E-mail: julien.dron@up.univ-mrs.fr; Eyglunent, Gregory; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Marchand, Nicolas; Wortham, Henri [Laboratoire de Chimie et Environnement, Marseille Universites (case 29), 3 place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseille Cedex 3 (France)

    2007-12-12

    The present study describes the development of a new analytical technique for the functional group determination of the carboxylic moiety using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) operated in the constant neutral loss scanning (CNLS) mode. Carboxylic groups were first derivatized into their corresponding methyl esters by reacting with BF{sub 3}/methanol mix and the reaction mixture was then directly injected into the APCI chamber. The loss of methanol (m/z = 32 amu) resulting from the fragmentation of the protonated methyl esters was then monitored. Applying this method together with a statistical approach to reference mixtures containing 31 different carboxylic acids at randomly calculated concentrations demonstrated its suitability for quantitative functional group measurements with relative standard deviations below 15% and a detection limit of 0.005 mmol L{sup -1}. Its applicability to environmental matrices was also shown through the determination of carboxylic acid concentrations inside atmospheric aerosol samples. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time that the tandem mass spectrometry was successfully applied to functional group analysis, offering great perspectives in the characterization of complex mixtures which are prevailing in the field of environmental analysis as well as in the understanding of the chemical processes occurring in these matrices.

  3. Quantity of Hydrophobic Functional CH-Groups - Decisive for Soil Water Repellency Caused by Digestate Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkner, Amrei; Holthusen, Dörthe; Ellerbrock, Ruth H.; Horn, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Anaerobic digestates are used as organic fertilizers; however, they are suspected to interfere negatively with soils. To investigate the relevance of the anaerobic digestates composition on potential wettability and contact angle of the soil, we mixed in a laboratory experiment 30 m³ ha-1 of anaerobic digestates derived from mechanically pre-treated substrates from maize and sugar beet with a homogenized Cambic Luvisol. Fourier transform infrared-spectra and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform-spectra of particle intact and finely ground soilanaerobic digestates-mixtures were analyzed to determine the quantities of hydrophobic functional groups in the soil-anaerobic digestates-mixtures that are used here as an indicator for the potential hydrophobicity. The anaerobic digestates application increased the amount of hydrophobic functional groups of the mixtures and reduced the wettability of the soil. However, for intact particle samples an up to threefold higher amount of hydrophobic groups was found as compared to the finely ground ones, indicating a dilution effect of mechanical grinding on the effectivity of the organic matter that is presumably located as a coating on mineral soil particles. For the particle intact samples, the intensity of hydrophobic functional groups bands denoting hydrophobic brickstones in organic matter is indicative for the actual wettability of the soil-anaerobic digestates-mixtures.

  4. Random matrix theory, the exceptional Lie groups and L-functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keating, J P [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW, UK (United Kingdom); Linden, N [School of Mathematics, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1TW, UK (United Kingdom); Rudnick, Z [Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Mathematical Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2003-03-28

    There has recently been interest in relating properties of matrices drawn at random from the classical compact groups to statistical characteristics of number-theoretical L-functions. One example is the relationship conjectured to hold between the value distributions of the characteristic polynomials of such matrices and value distributions within families of L-functions. These connections are extended here to non-classical groups. We focus on an explicit example: the exceptional Lie group G{sub 2}. The value distributions for characteristic polynomials associated with the 7- and 14-dimensional representations of G{sub 2}, defined with respect to the uniform invariant (Haar) measure, are calculated using two of the Macdonald constant term identities. A one-parameter family of L-functions over a finite field is described whose value distribution in the limit as the size of the finite field grows is related to that of the characteristic polynomials associated with the seven-dimensional representation of G{sub 2}. The random matrix calculations extend to all exceptional Lie groups.

  5. Tunable Oxygen Functional Groups as Electrocatalysts on Graphite Felt Surfaces for All-Vanadium Flow Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Luis; Reed, David; Nie, Zimin; Schwarz, Ashleigh M; Nandasiri, Manjula I; Kizewski, James P; Wang, Wei; Thomsen, Edwin; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Sprenkle, Vincent; Li, Bin

    2016-06-22

    A dual oxidative approach using O2 plasma followed by treatment with H2 O2 to impart oxygen functional groups onto the surface of a graphite felt electrode. When used as electrodes for an all-vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) system, the energy efficiency of the cell is enhanced by 8.2 % at a current density of 150 mA cm(-2) compared with one oxidized by thermal treatment in air. More importantly, by varying the oxidative techniques, the amount and type of oxygen groups was tailored and their effects were elucidated. It was found that O-C=O groups improve the cells performance whereas the C-O and C=O groups degrade it. The reason for the increased performance was found to be a reduction in the cell overpotential after functionalization of the graphite felt electrode. This work reveals a route for functionalizing carbon electrodes to improve the performance of VRB cells. This approach can lower the cost of VRB cells and pave the way for more commercially viable stationary energy storage systems that can be used for intermittent renewable energy storage.

  6. A functional group oxidation model (FGOM for SOA formation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from a volatile organic compound (VOC involves multiple generations of oxidation that include functionalization and fragmentation of the parent carbon backbone and likely particle-phase oxidation and/or accretion reactions. Despite the typical complexity of the detailed molecular mechanism of SOA formation and aging, a relatively small number of functional groups characterize the oxidized molecules that constitute SOA. Given the carbon number and set of functional groups, the volatility of the molecule can be estimated. We present here a functional group oxidation model (FGOM that represents the process of SOA formation and aging. The FGOM contains a set of parameters that are to be determined by fitting of the model to laboratory chamber data: total organic aerosol concentration, and O : C and H : C atomic ratios. The sensitivity of the model prediction to variation of the adjustable parameters allows one to assess the relative importance of various pathways involved in SOA formation. An analysis of SOA formation from the high- and low-NOx photooxidation of four C12 alkanes (n-dodecane, 2-methylundecane, hexylcyclohexane, and cyclododecane using the FGOM is presented, and comparison with the statistical oxidation model (SOM of Cappa et al. (2013 is discussed.

  7. A Functional Group Oxidation Model (FGOM for SOA formation and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zhang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from a volatile organic compound (VOC involves multiple generations of oxidation that include functionalization and fragmentation of the parent carbon backbone and, likely, particle-phase oxidation and/or accretion reactions. Despite the typical complexity of the detailed molecular mechanism of SOA formation and aging, a relatively small number of functional groups characterize the oxidized molecules that constitute SOA. Given the carbon number and set of functional groups, the volatility of the molecule can be estimated. We present here a Functional Group Oxidation Model (FGOM that represents the process of SOA formation and aging. The FGOM contains a set of parameters that are to be determined by fitting of the model to laboratory chamber data: total organic aerosol concentration, and O:C and H:C atomic ratios. The sensitivity of the model prediction to variation of the adjustable parameters allows one to assess the relative importance of various pathways involved in SOA formation. An analysis of SOA formation from the high- and low-NOx photooxidation of four C12 alkanes (n-dodecane, 2-methylundecane, hexylcyclohexane, and cyclododecane using the FGOM is presented, and comparison with the Statistical Oxidation Model (SOM of Cappa et al. (2012 is discussed.

  8. Synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups on the hydrolysis of cellulose over activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Guo Shiou; Sievers, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    The chemical oxidation of activated carbon by H2 O2 and H2 SO4 is investigated, structural and chemical modifications are characterized, and the materials are used as catalysts for the hydrolysis of cellulose. Treatment with H2 O2 enlarges the pore size and imparts functional groups such as phenols, lactones, and carboxylic acids. H2 SO4 treatment targets the edges of carbon sheets primarily, and this effect is more pronounced with a higher temperature. Adsorption isotherms demonstrate that the adsorption of oligomers on functionalized carbon is dominated by van der Waals forces. The materials treated chemically are active for the hydrolysis of cellulose despite the relative weakness of most of their acid sites. It is proposed that a synergistic effect between defect sites and functional groups enhances the activity by inducing a conformational change in the glucan chains if they are adsorbed at defect sites. This activates the glycosidic bonds for hydrolysis by in-plane functional groups. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Nanomechanical characterization of chemical interaction between gold nanoparticles and chemical functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Hyungbeen; Nam, Kihwan; Han, Jae-Hee; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2012-10-01

    We report on how to quantify the binding affinity between a nanoparticle and chemical functional group using various experimental methods such as cantilever assay, PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical property mapping, and lateral force microscopy. For the immobilization of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a microscale silicon substrate, we have considered two different chemical functional molecules of amine and catecholamine (here, dopamine was used). It is found that catecholamine-modified surface is more effective for the functionalization of AuNPs onto the surface than the amine-modified surface, which has been shown from our various experiments. The dimensionless parameter (i.e., ratio of binding affinity) introduced in this work from such experiments is useful in quantitatively depicting such binding affinity, indicating that the binding affinity and stability between AuNPs and catecholamine is approximately 1.5 times stronger than that between amine and AuNPs. Our study sheds light on the experiment-based quantitative characterization of the binding affinity between nanomaterial and chemical groups, which will eventually provide an insight into how to effectively design the functional material using chemical groups.

  10. Nanomechanical characterization of chemical interaction between gold nanoparticles and chemical functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gyudo; Lee, Hyungbeen; Nam, Kihwan; Han, Jae-Hee; Yang, Jaemoon; Lee, Sang Woo; Yoon, Dae Sung; Eom, Kilho; Kwon, Taeyun

    2012-10-31

    We report on how to quantify the binding affinity between a nanoparticle and chemical functional group using various experimental methods such as cantilever assay, PeakForce quantitative nanomechanical property mapping, and lateral force microscopy. For the immobilization of Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a microscale silicon substrate, we have considered two different chemical functional molecules of amine and catecholamine (here, dopamine was used). It is found that catecholamine-modified surface is more effective for the functionalization of AuNPs onto the surface than the amine-modified surface, which has been shown from our various experiments. The dimensionless parameter (i.e., ratio of binding affinity) introduced in this work from such experiments is useful in quantitatively depicting such binding affinity, indicating that the binding affinity and stability between AuNPs and catecholamine is approximately 1.5 times stronger than that between amine and AuNPs. Our study sheds light on the experiment-based quantitative characterization of the binding affinity between nanomaterial and chemical groups, which will eventually provide an insight into how to effectively design the functional material using chemical groups.

  11. Effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal transport in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, L.; Kuang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Intrinsic thermal resistivity critically depends on features of phonon dispersions dictated by harmonic interatomic forces and masses. Here we present the effects of functional group mass variance on vibrational properties and thermal conductivity (κ ) of functionalized graphene from first-principles calculations. We use graphane, a buckled graphene backbone with covalently bonded hydrogen atoms on both sides, as the base material and vary the mass of the hydrogen atoms to simulate the effect of mass variance from other functional groups. We find nonmonotonic behavior of κ with increasing mass of the functional group and an unusual crossover from acoustic-dominated to optic-dominated thermal transport behavior. We connect this crossover to changes in the phonon dispersion with varying mass which suppress acoustic phonon velocities, but also give unusually high velocity optic modes. Further, we show that out-of-plane acoustic vibrations contribute significantly more to thermal transport than in-plane acoustic modes despite breaking of a reflection-symmetry-based scattering selection rule responsible for their large contributions in graphene. This work demonstrates the potential for manipulation and engineering of thermal transport properties in two-dimensional materials toward targeted applications.

  12. Effect of functional groups on thermal conductivity of graphene/paraffin nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabihi, Zabiholah; Araghi, Houshang, E-mail: araghi@aut.ac.ir

    2016-11-25

    In this paper, thermal conductivity of graphene/paraffin nanocomposite using micromechanical model has been studied. The behavior of thermal conductivity of nanocomposite as a function of volume fraction of graphene is studied. Then is shown that as the interfacial thermal resistance at the graphene–paraffin interface decreases, the thermal conductivity of nanocomposite increases. In order to reduce the interfacial thermal resistance, functional groups in the interface between graphene and paraffin are used. It can be observed that using functional groups of hydrogen, methyl and phenyl in the interface of nanocomposite, contributes to the improvement of the thermal conductivity. Moreover, as the rate of coverage of the surface of graphene with functional groups of H, CH{sub 3} and C{sub 6}H{sub 5} increases, the thermal conductivity of nanocomposite improves. - Highlights: • Thermal conductivity nanocomposite exhibit nonlinear behavior with volume faction. • Phenyl is better to form the thermal conductivity network in paraffin. • The thickness of interfacial layer can be obtained 12.75 nm.

  13. A first approach to a faunistic crenon typology based on functional feeding groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter NAGEL

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Springs are ecomorphologically and faunistically diverse freshwater ecosystems. Their limnological classification has been a focus of interest since crenic research began. Despite many attempts to include the crenic fauna in the classification of springs, there is no faunistic crenon typology. Over a three-year period we investigated the macroinvertebrate assemblages and the physical, chemical and ecomorphological conditions of 82 springs in the Swiss Jura Mountains, north-western Switzerland. Based on these data we selected the 25 least-disturbed springs to develop a faunistic crenon classification. Based on functional feeding groups we differentiated three crenon groups. An analysis of similarities and nonmetric multidimensional scaling for the substratum types supported the crenon groupings. In general we can distinguish between springs that are dominated by scrapers and characterized by a lotic environment, and those that are mostly inhabited by filtering collectors, associated with a lentic environment. Those two crenon types are the extremes of a continuum. Particular crenon forms, such as those with extensive carbonate deposits, lie between these extremes. This third group is characterized by gathering collectors and shredders. Using this approach we can distinguish faunistic crenon types, based on functional feeding groups, which reflect the abiotic conditions within the springs. We provide a foundation for a faunistic crenon typology which now can be tested in other landscapes and will then be applicable to other low mountain ranges in Europe.

  14. Effect of functional groups on sludge for biosorption of reactive dyes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Junxiong; CUI Longzhe; WANG Yanxin; LIU Chengfu

    2009-01-01

    The sludge, which was collected from a biological coke wastewater treatment plant, was used as a low-cost adsorbent in the removal of reactive dyes (methylene blue (MB) and reactive red 4 (RR4)) from aqueous solution. The pH of dye solution played an important role on the dye uptake. As the solution pH increase, the MB uptake increased, while the RR4 uptake decreased. The maximum uptake of RR4 by protonated sludge was 73.7 mg/g at pH 1, and the maximum uptake of MB by sludge was 235.3 mg/g at pH 9. Three functional groups, including carboxyl, phosphonate, and amine group, were identified by potentiometric titration, fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The anionic functional groups, phosphonate and carboxyl group, were identified as the binding sites for the cationic MB. Amine groups were identified to bind RR4. The main mechanism of the reactive dyestuffs adsorption is electrostatic interaction.

  15. Effects of functional groups and soluble matrices in fish otolith on calcium carbonate mineralization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Dongni; Li Zhuo; Gao Yonghua; Feng Qingling, E-mail: biomater@mail.tsinghua.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2010-10-01

    Calcium carbonate mineralization is significantly influenced by organic matrices in vivo. The effect mainly relies on functional groups in proteins. In order to study the influence of functional groups on calcium carbonate mineralization, -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were grafted onto single crystal silicon chips, and such modified chips were used as substrates in in vitro mineralization experiments. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) test was conducted to examine the grafting efficiency, and the three groups were successfully grafted. Calcium carbonate mineralization on a modified silicon substrate was examined by a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD), and the results showed that the effects of -OH, -NH{sub 2} and -COOH groups were quite different. Furthermore, a water-soluble protein matrix (WSM) and an acid-soluble protein matrix (ASM) extracted from fish otolith were adsorbed onto the -COOH-modified silicon substrate, and the effects of the protein matrices on calcium carbonate mineralization were studied. The results showed that both WSM and ASM of lapillus could mediate aragonite crystallization, but the size and morphology of the formed crystals were different. The WSM and ASM of asteriscus adsorbed on the silicon substrate had little effect on calcium carbonate mineralization; almost all the crystals were calcite, while both asteriscus WSM and ASM in solution could mediate vaterite crystals, and the morphologies of vaterite crystal aggregates were different.

  16. The faint-end of the galaxy luminosity function in groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, R E; Lambas, D G; Valotto, C

    2005-01-01

    We compute the galaxy luminosity function in groups and clusters extracted from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We apply a background subtraction method to a sample of 728 spectroscopically selected groups. The sample comprises systems in the redshift range $0.03 < z < 0.06$ and the virial mass range is $10^{11}M_\\odot < M_{vir} < 2\\times 10^{14}M_\\odot$. In the $r$ band, the composite galaxy luminosity function shows a slope of $\\alpha=-1.3$ in the bright--end, and an upturn of the slope in the faint--end ranging from -1.6 to -1.9. The upturn of the slope occurs at $M_r\\sim-18+5log(h)$ depending only weakly on group properties. We find that this feature is present also in the $i,g$ and $z$ bands and for all explored group subsamples, irrespective of the group mass or the presence of a hot intra-cluster gas with associated X-ray emission.

  17. Functionality of in vitro reconstituted group II intron RmInt1-derived ribonucleoprotein particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Dolores Molina-Sánchez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional unit of mobile group II introns is a ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP consisting of the intron-encoded protein (IEP and the excised intron RNA. The IEP has reverse transcriptase activity but also promotes RNA splicing, and the RNA-protein complex triggers site-specific DNA insertion by reverse splicing, in a process called retrohoming. In vitro reconstituted ribonucleoprotein complexes from the Lactococcus lactis group II intron Ll.LtrB, which produce a double strand break, have recently been studied as a means of developing group II intron-based gene targeting methods for higher organisms. The Sinorhizobium meliloti group II intron RmInt1 is an efficient mobile retroelement, the dispersal of which appears to be linked to transient single-stranded DNA during replication. The RmInt1IEP lacks the endonuclease domain (En and cannot cut the bottom strand to generate the 3’ end to initiate reverse transcription. We used an Escherichia coli expression system to produce soluble and active RmInt1 IEP and reconstituted RNPs with purified components in vitro. The RNPs generated were functional and reverse-spliced into a single-stranded DNA target. This work constitutes the starting point for the use of group II introns lacking DNA endonuclease domain-derived RNPs for highly specific gene targeting methods.

  18. Three- and four-body systems with the Functional Renormalization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raziel, Benjamín; Ávila, Jaramillo

    2016-10-01

    The Efimov effect arises in three-body systems near the unitary limit. Some of its features are universal, while others are not. This article uses a Functional-Renormalization- Group approach to discuss the Efimov effect and four-body systems. In this context, the Efimov effect appears as a consequence of the Renormalization-Group flow of couplings. On the four- body system, we find three tetramers below each Efimov trimer, and no evidence of four- body universality breaking. Two of these tetramers are in agreement with quantum-mechanical calculations and experimental results.

  19. Synthesis and Adsorption Properties of Chelating Resins Containing Sulfoxide and Heterocyclic Functional Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun Nuan JI; Xiu Juan ZHANG; Rong Jun QU; Hou CHEN; Chun Hua WANG; Chang Mei SUN

    2006-01-01

    Several of new chelating resins containing sulfoxide and heterocyclic functional groups (3-aminopyridine and 2-mercaptobenzothiazole) based on macroporous chloromethylated polystyrene were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and infrared spectra. Their adsorption capacities towards Zn2+, Cu2+, Pb2+, Hg2+ and Ag+ at pH 3.0 and 6.0 were investigated in detail. It was found that the adsorption capacities of the resins containing bis[(3-pyridylaminoethyl)sulfoxide or (2-benzothiazolylthioethyl)sulfoxide for the above ions were higher than that on ones containing single above-mentioned groups.

  20. Click chemistry with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The advent of click chemistry has led to an influx of new ideas in the nucleic acids field. The copper catalysed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is the method of choice for DNA click chemistry due to its remarkable efficiency. It has been used to label oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes, sugars, peptides and other reporter groups, to cyclise DNA, to synthesise DNA catenanes, to join oligonucleotides to PNA, and to produce analogues of DNA with modified nucleobases and backbone...