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Sample records for functional gap-junction complexes

  1. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  2. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Connexin 46 (Cx46) is important for gap junction channels formation which plays crucial role in the preservation of lens homeostasis and transparency. Previously, we have identified a missense mutation. (p.V44M) of Cx46 in a congenital cataract family. This study aims at dissecting the potential.

  3. Gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  4. Gap junctions in cells of the immune system: structure, regulation and possible functional roles

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    J.C. Sáez

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels are sites of cytoplasmic communication between contacting cells. In vertebrates, they consist of protein subunits denoted connexins (Cxs which are encoded by a gene family. According to their Cx composition, gap junction channels show different gating and permeability properties that define which ions and small molecules permeate them. Differences in Cx primary sequences suggest that channels composed of different Cxs are regulated differentially by intracellular pathways under specific physiological conditions. Functional roles of gap junction channels could be defined by the relative importance of permeant substances, resulting in coordination of electrical and/or metabolic cellular responses. Cells of the native and specific immune systems establish transient homo- and heterocellular contacts at various steps of the immune response. Morphological and functional studies reported during the last three decades have revealed that many intercellular contacts between cells in the immune response present gap junctions or "gap junction-like" structures. Partial characterization of the molecular composition of some of these plasma membrane structures and regulatory mechanisms that control them have been published recently. Studies designed to elucidate their physiological roles suggest that they might permit coordination of cellular events which favor the effective and timely response of the immune system.

  5. Interfering amino terminal peptides and functional implications for heteromeric gap junction formation

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    Richard David Veenstra

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Connexin43 (Cx43 is widely expressed in many different tissues of the human body. In cells of some organs, Cx43 is co-expressed with other connexins (Cx, including Cx46 and Cx50 in lens, Cx40 in atrium, Purkinje fibers, and the blood vessel wall, Cx45 in heart, and Cx37 in the ovary. Interactions with the co-expressed connexins may have profound functional implications. The abilities of Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 to function in heteromeric gap junction combinations with Cx43 are well documented. Different studies disagree regarding the ability of Cx43 and Cx40 to produce functional heteromeric gap junctions with each other. We review previous studies regarding the heteromeric interactions of Cx43. The possibility of negative functional interactions between the cytoplasmic pore-forming amino terminal (NT domains of these connexins was assessed using pentameric connexin sequence-specific NT domain (iNT peptides applied to cells expressing homomeric Cx40, Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 gap junctions. A Cx43 iNT peptide corresponding to amino acids 9 to 13 (Ac-KLLDK-NH2 specifically inhibited the electrical coupling of Cx40 gap junctions in a transjunctional (Vj voltage-dependent manner without affecting the function of homologous Cx37, Cx46, Cx50, and Cx45 gap junctions. A Cx40 iNT (Ac-EFLEE-OH peptide counteracted the Vj-dependent block of Cx40 gap junctions, whereas a similarly charged Cx50 iNT (Ac-EEVNE-OH peptide did not, suggesting that these NT domain interactions are not solely based on electrostatics. These data are consistent with functional Cx43 heteromeric gap junction formation with Cx37, Cx45, Cx46, and Cx50 and suggest that Cx40 uniquely experiences functional suppressive interactions with a Cx43 NT domain sequence. These findings present unique functional implications about the heteromeric interactions between Cx43 and Cx40 that may influence cardiac conduction in atrial myocardium and the specialized conduction system.

  6. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    OpenAIRE

    Axelsen, Lene N.; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several po...

  7. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Callø, Kirstine; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein...... expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open...

  8. Managing the complexity of communication: regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsen, Lene N; Calloe, Kirstine; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten S

    2013-10-22

    Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated, and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  9. Managing the complexity of communication; regulation of gap junctions by post-translational modification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lene Nygaard Axelsen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are comprised of connexins that form cell-to-cell channels which couple neighboring cells to accommodate the exchange of information. The need for communication does, however, change over time and therefore must be tightly controlled. Although the regulation of connexin protein expression by transcription and translation is of great importance, the trafficking, channel activity and degradation are also under tight control. The function of connexins can be regulated by several post translational modifications, which affect numerous parameters; including number of channels, open probability, single channel conductance or selectivity. The most extensively investigated post translational modifications are phosphorylations, which have been documented in all mammalian connexins. Besides phosphorylations, some connexins are known to be ubiquitinated, SUMOylated, nitrosylated, hydroxylated, acetylated, methylated and γ-carboxyglutamated. The aim of the present review is to summarize our current knowledge of post translational regulation of the connexin family of proteins.

  10. Calcium-mediated transductive systems and functionally active gap junctions in astrocyte-like GL15 cells

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    Steimberg Nathalie

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that GL15, a human cell line derived from glioblastoma multiforme, is a possible astroglial-like cell model, based on the presence of cytoplasmic glial fibrillary acidic protein. Results The aim of this work was to delineate the functional characteristics of GL15 cells using various experimental approaches, including the study of morphology, mechanism of induction of intracellular Ca2+ increase by different physiological agonists, and the presence and permeability of the gap-junction system during cell differentiation. Immunostaining experiments showed the presence and localization of specific glial markers, such as glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100B, and the lack of the neuronal marker S100A. Notably, all the Ca2+ pathways present in astrocytes were detected in GL15 cells. In particular, oscillations in intracellular Ca2+ levels were recorded either spontaneously, or in the presence of ATP or glutamate (but not KCl. Immunolabelling assays and confocal microscopy, substantiated by Western blot analyses, revealed the presence of connexin43, a subunit of astrocyte gap-junction channels. The protein is organised in characteristic spots on the plasma membrane at cell-cell contact regions, and its presence and distribution depends on the differentiative status of the cell. Finally, a microinjection/dye-transfer assay, employed to determine gap-junction functionality, clearly demonstrated that the cells were functionally coupled, albeit to varying degrees, in differentiated and undifferentiated phenotypes. Conclusions In conclusion, results from this study support the use of the GL15 cell line as a suitable in vitro astrocyte model, which provides a valuable guide for studying glial physiological features at various differentiation phases.

  11. Gap Junctions and Chagas Disease

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    Adesse, Daniel; Goldenberg, Regina Coeli; Fortes, Fabio S.; Jasmin; Iacobas, Dumitru A.; Iacobas, Sanda; de Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Campos; de Narareth Meirelles, Maria; Huang, Huan; Soares, Milena B.; Tanowitz, Herbert B.; Garzoni, Luciana Ribeiro; Spray, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Gap junction channels provide intercellular communication between cells. In the heart, these channels coordinate impulse propagation along the conduction system and through the contractile musculature, thereby providing synchronous and optimal cardiac output. As in other arrhythmogenic cardiac diseases, chagasic cardiomyopathy is associated with decreased expression of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) and its gene. Our studies of cardiac myocytes infected with Trypanosoma cruzi have revealed that synchronous contraction is greatly impaired and gap junction immunoreactivity is lost in infected cells. Such changes are not seen for molecules forming tight junctions, another component of the intercalated disc in cardiac myocytes. Transcriptomic studies of hearts from mouse models of Chagas disease and from acutely infected cardiac myocytes in vitro indicate profound remodelling of gene expression patterns involving heart rhythm determinant genes, suggesting underlying mechanisms of the functional pathology. One curious feature of the altered expression of Cx43 and its gene expression is that it is limited in both extent and location, suggesting that the more global deterioration in cardiac function may result in part from spread of damage signals from more seriously compromised cells to healthier ones. PMID:21884887

  12. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  13. Roles of gap junctions, connexins and pannexins in epilepsy

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    Shanthini eMylvaganam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced gap junctional communication (GJC between neurons is considered a major factor underlying the neuronal synchrony driving seizure activity. In addition, the hippocampal sharp wave ripple complexes, associated with learning and seizures, are diminished by GJC blocking agents. Although gap junctional blocking drugs inhibit experimental seizures, they all have other nonspecific actions. Besides interneuronal GJC between dendrites, inter-axonal and inter-glial GJC is also considered important for seizure generation. Interestingly, in most studies of cerebral tissue from animal seizure models and from human patients with epilepsy, there is up-regulation of glial, but not neuronal gap junctional mRNA and protein. Significant changes in the expression and post-translational modification of the astrocytic connexin Cx43, and Panx1 were observed in an in vitro Co++ seizure model, further supporting a role for glia in seizure-genesis, although the reasons for this remain unclear. Further suggesting an involvement of astrocytic GJC in epilepsy, is the fact that the expression of astrocytic Cx mRNAs (Cxs 30 and 43 is several fold higher than that of neuronal Cx mRNAs (Cxs 36 and 45, and the number of glial cells outnumber neuronal cells in mammalian hippocampal and cortical tissue. Pannexin expression is also increased in both animal and human epileptic tissues. Specific Cx43 mimetic peptides, Gap 27 and SLS, inhibit the docking of astrocytic connexin Cx43 proteins from forming intercellular gap junctions, diminishing spontaneous seizures. Besides GJs, Cx membrane hemichannels in glia and Panx membrane channels in neurons and glia are also inhibited by gap junctional pharmacological blockers. Although there is no doubt that connexin-based gap junctions and hemichannels, and pannexin-based membrane channels are related to epilepsy, the specific details of how they are involved and how we can modulate their function for therapeutic purposes remain to

  14. Analysis of trafficking, stability and function of human connexin 26 gap junction channels with deafness-causing mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix.

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    Cinzia Ambrosi

    Full Text Available Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26 that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P. Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels

  15. The psychostimulant modafinil enhances gap junctional communication in cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinhe; Petit, Jean-Marie; Ezan, Pascal; Gyger, Joël; Magistretti, Pierre; Giaume, Christian

    2013-12-01

    Sleep-wake cycle is characterized by changes in neuronal network activity. However, for the last decade there is increasing evidence that neuroglial interaction may play a role in the modulation of sleep homeostasis and that astrocytes have a critical impact in this process. Interestingly, astrocytes are organized into communicating networks based on their high expression of connexins, which are the molecular constituents of gap junction channels. Thus, neuroglial interactions should also be considered as the result of the interplay between neuronal and astroglial networks. Here, we investigate the effect of modafinil, a wakefulness-promoting agent, on astrocyte gap junctional communication. We report that in the cortex modafinil injection increases the expression of mRNA and protein of connexin 30 but not those of connexin 43, the other major astroglial connexin. These increases are correlated with an enhancement of intercellular dye coupling in cortical astrocytes, which is abolished when neuronal activity is silenced by tetrodotoxin. Moreover, gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, which at a millimolar concentration induces sleep, has an opposite effect on astroglial gap junctions in an activity-independent manner. These results support the proposition that astroglia may play an important role in complex physiological brain functions, such as sleep regulation, and that neuroglial networking interaction is modified during sleep-wake cycle. This article is part of the Special Issue Section entitled 'Current Pharmacology of Gap Junction Channels and Hemichannels'. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Regulation of gap junctions by protein phosphorylation

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    J.C. Sáez

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are constituted by intercellular channels and provide a pathway for transfer of ions and small molecules between adjacent cells of most tissues. The degree of intercellular coupling mediated by gap junctions depends on the number of gap junction channels and their activity may be a function of the state of phosphorylation of connexins, the structural subunit of gap junction channels. Protein phosphorylation has been proposed to control intercellular gap junctional communication at several steps from gene expression to protein degradation, including translational and post-translational modification of connexins (i.e., phosphorylation of the assembled channel acting as a gating mechanism and assembly into and removal from the plasma membrane. Several connexins contain sites for phosphorylation for more than one protein kinase. These consensus sites vary between connexins and have been preferentially identified in the C-terminus. Changes in intercellular communication mediated by protein phosphorylation are believed to control various physiological tissue and cell functions as well as to be altered under pathological conditions.

  17. Astroglial gap junctions shape neuronal network activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannasch, Ulrike; Derangeon, Mickael; Chever, Oana; Rouach, Nathalie

    2012-05-01

    Astrocytes, the third element of the tripartite synapse, are active players in neurotransmission. Up to now, their involvement in neuronal functions has primarily been investigated at the single cell level. However, a key property of astrocytes is that they communicate via extensive networks formed by gap junction channels. Recently, we have shown that this networking modulates the moment to moment basal synaptic transmission and plasticity via the regulation of extracellular potassium and glutamate levels. Here we show that astroglial gap junctional communication also regulates neuronal network activity. We discuss these findings and their implications for brain information processing.

  18. Functional assessment of gap junctions in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures of human tendon cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Kuzma-Kuzniarska, Maria; Yapp, Clarence; Pearson-Jones, Thomas W.; Jones, Andrew K.; Hulley, Philippa A.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction-mediated intercellular communication influences a variety of cellular activities. In tendons, gap junctions modulate collagen production, are involved in strain-induced cell death, and are involved in the response to mechanical stimulation. The aim of the present study was to investigate gap junction-mediated intercellular communication in healthy human tendon-derived cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). The FRAP is a noninvasive technique that allows qu...

  19. Symposia for a Meeting on Ion Channels and Gap Junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Sáez, Juan

    1997-01-01

    Ion channels allow us to see nature in all its magnificence, to hear a Bach suite, to smell the aroma of grandmother's cooking, and, in this regard, they put us in contact with the external world. These ion channels are protein molecules located in the cell membrane. In complex organisms, cells need to communicate in order to know about their metabolic status and to act in a coordinate manner. The latter is also accomplished by a class of ion channels able to pierce the lipid bilayer membranes of two adjacent cells. These intercellular channels are the functional subunits of gap junctions. Accordingly, the book is divided in two parts: the first part is dedicated to ion channels that look to the external world, and the second part is dedicated to gap junctions found at cell interfaces. This book is based on a series of symposia for a meeting on ion channels and gap junctions held in Santiago, Chile, on November 28-30, 1995. The book should be useful to graduate students taking the first steps in this field as...

  20. Gap junctions and motor behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiehn, Ole; Tresch, Matthew C.

    2002-01-01

    The production of any motor behavior requires coordinated activity in motor neurons and premotor networks. In vertebrates, this coordination is often assumed to take place through chemical synapses. Here we review recent data suggesting that electrical gap-junction coupling plays an important role...... to the production of motor behavior in adult mammals....

  1. Anchored PKA as a gatekeeper for gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidoux, Guillaume; Taskén, Kjetil

    2015-01-01

    Anchored protein kinase A (PKA) bound to A Kinase Anchoring Protein (AKAP) mediates effects of localized increases in cAMP in defined subcellular microdomains and retains the specificity in cAMP-PKA signaling to distinct extracellular stimuli. Gap junctions are pores between adjacent cells constituted by connexin proteins that provide means of communication and transfer of small molecules. While the PKA signaling is known to promote human trophoblast cell fusion, the gap junction communication through connexin 43 (Cx43) is a prerequisite for this process. We recently demonstrated that trophoblast fusion is regulated by ezrin, a known AKAP, which binds to Cx43 and delivers PKA in the vicinity gap junctions. We found that disruption of the ezrin-Cx43 interaction abolished PKA-dependent phosphorylation of Cx43 as well as gap junction communication and subsequently cell fusion. We propose that the PKA-ezrin-Cx43 macromolecular complex regulating gap junction communication constitutes a general mechanism to control opening of Cx43 gap junctions by phosphorylation in response to cAMP signaling in various cell types.

  2. Nonlinear gap junctions enable long-distance propagation of pulsating calcium waves in astrocyte networks.

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    Mati Goldberg

    Full Text Available A new paradigm has recently emerged in brain science whereby communications between glial cells and neuron-glia interactions should be considered together with neurons and their networks to understand higher brain functions. In particular, astrocytes, the main type of glial cells in the cortex, have been shown to communicate with neurons and with each other. They are thought to form a gap-junction-coupled syncytium supporting cell-cell communication via propagating Ca(2+ waves. An identified mode of propagation is based on cytoplasm-to-cytoplasm transport of inositol trisphosphate (IP(3 through gap junctions that locally trigger Ca(2+ pulses via IP(3-dependent Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release. It is, however, currently unknown whether this intracellular route is able to support the propagation of long-distance regenerative Ca(2+ waves or is restricted to short-distance signaling. Furthermore, the influence of the intracellular signaling dynamics on intercellular propagation remains to be understood. In this work, we propose a model of the gap-junctional route for intercellular Ca(2+ wave propagation in astrocytes. Our model yields two major predictions. First, we show that long-distance regenerative signaling requires nonlinear coupling in the gap junctions. Second, we show that even with nonlinear gap junctions, long-distance regenerative signaling is favored when the internal Ca(2+ dynamics implements frequency modulation-encoding oscillations with pulsating dynamics, while amplitude modulation-encoding dynamics tends to restrict the propagation range. As a result, spatially heterogeneous molecular properties and/or weak couplings are shown to give rise to rich spatiotemporal dynamics that support complex propagation behaviors. These results shed new light on the mechanisms implicated in the propagation of Ca(2+ waves across astrocytes and the precise conditions under which glial cells may participate in information processing in the brain.

  3. Gap junctions and connexin-interacting proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, Ben N G

    2004-01-01

    Gap junctions form channels between adjacent cells. The core proteins of these channels are the connexins. Regulation of gap junction communication (GJC) can be modulated by connexin-associating proteins, such as regulatory protein phosphatases and protein kinases, of which c-Src is the

  4. Hyperglycaemia and diabetes impair gap junctional communication among astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Gautam K; Ball, Kelly K; Cruz, Nancy F; Dienel, Gerald A

    2010-03-15

    Sensory and cognitive impairments have been documented in diabetic humans and animals, but the pathophysiology of diabetes in the central nervous system is poorly understood. Because a high glucose level disrupts gap junctional communication in various cell types and astrocytes are extensively coupled by gap junctions to form large syncytia, the influence of experimental diabetes on gap junction channel-mediated dye transfer was assessed in astrocytes in tissue culture and in brain slices from diabetic rats. Astrocytes grown in 15-25 mmol/l glucose had a slow-onset, poorly reversible decrement in gap junctional communication compared with those grown in 5.5 mmol/l glucose. Astrocytes in brain slices from adult STZ (streptozotocin)-treated rats at 20-24 weeks after the onset of diabetes also exhibited reduced dye transfer. In cultured astrocytes grown in high glucose, increased oxidative stress preceded the decrement in dye transfer by several days, and gap junctional impairment was prevented, but not rescued, after its manifestation by compounds that can block or reduce oxidative stress. In sharp contrast with these findings, chaperone molecules known to facilitate protein folding could prevent and rescue gap junctional impairment, even in the presence of elevated glucose level and oxidative stress. Immunostaining of Cx (connexin) 43 and 30, but not Cx26, was altered by growth in high glucose. Disruption of astrocytic trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules may alter interactions among astrocytes, neurons and endothelial cells and contribute to changes in brain function in diabetes. Involvement of the microvasculature may contribute to diabetic complications in the brain, the cardiovascular system and other organs.

  5. Chlorpromazine reduces the intercellular communication via gap junctions in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orellana, Juan A.; Palacios-Prado, Nicolas; Saez, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    In the work presented herein, we evaluated the effect of chlorpromazine (CPZ) on gap junctions expressed by two mammalian cell types; Gn-11 cells (cell line derived from mouse LHRH neurons) and rat cortical astrocytes maintained in culture. We also attempted to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of CPZ effects on gap junctions. CPZ, in concentrations comparable with doses used to treat human diseases, was found to reduce the intercellular communication via gap junctions as evaluated with measurements of dye coupling (Lucifer yellow). In both cell types, maximal inhibition of functional gap junctions was reached within about 1 h of treatment with CPZ, an recovery was almost complete at about 5 h after CPZ wash out. In both cell types, CPZ treatment increased the phosphorylation state of connexin43 (Cx43), a gap junction protein subunit. Moreover, CPZ reduced the reactivity of Cx43 (immunofluorescence) at cell interfaces and concomitantly increased its reactivity in intracellular vesicles, suggesting an increased retrieval from and/or reduced insertion into the plasma membrane. CPZ also caused cellular retraction reducing cell-cell contacts in a reversible manner. The reduction in contact area might destabilize existing gap junctions and abrogate formation of new ones. Moreover, the CPZ-induced reduction in gap junctional communication may depend on the connexins (Cxs) forming the junctions. If Cx43 were the only connexin expressed, MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of this connexin would induce closure of gap junction channels

  6. Increasing gap junctional coupling: a tool for dissecting the role of gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Haugan, Ketil; Stahlhut, Martin

    2007-01-01

    . In a number of cases, gap junctions have been implicated in the initiation and progress of disease, and experimental uncoupling has been used to investigate the exact role of coupling. The inverse approach, i.e., to increase coupling, has become possible in recent years and represents a new way of testing......Much of our current knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological role of gap junctions is based on experiments where coupling has been reduced by either chemical agents or genetic modification. This has brought evidence that gap junctions are important in many physiological processes...... the role of gap junctions. The aim of this review is to summarize the current knowledge obtained with agents that selectively increase gap junctional intercellular coupling. Two approaches will be reviewed: increasing coupling by the use of antiarrhythmic peptide and its synthetic analogs...

  7. Point correlation dimension can reveal functional changes caused by gap junction blockers in the 4-aminopyridine in vivo rat epilepsy model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardanhazy, Anett [Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged H-6725 (Hungary); Molnar, Mark [Department of Psychophysiology, Institute for Psychology of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 398, Budapest H-1394 (Hungary)], E-mail: molnar@cogpsyphy.hu; Jardanhazy, Tamas [Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Semmelweis u. 6, Szeged H-6725 (Hungary)], E-mail: jt@nepsy.szote.u-szeged.hu

    2009-04-15

    The contribution of gap junction (GJ) blockers to seizure initiation was reexamined by means of an analysis on nonlinear dynamics with point correlation dimension (PD2i) at as well as around the primary focus, and mirror focus in an already active 4-aminopyridine-induced in vivo epilepsy model. From the data base of the ECoGs of anesthetized adult rats treated with quinine, a selective blocker of Cx36, and in combination with an additional broad-spectrum GJ blocker, carbenoxolone, 14 cases of each condition were reexamined with a stationarity insensitive nonlinear PD2i method. The blockade of the Cx36 channels decreased the usual drop of the point correlation dimension at the beginning of the seizures, and this was enhanced by the additional use of the global blocker carbenoxolone. The so-called characteristic DC shift just prior to seizure onset denotes a low dimensional seizure event and the recognizable seizures display very variable, rapidly changing dynamics, as revealed by the PD2i analysis. This nonlinear PD2i analysis demonstrated that the different GJ blockers in the already active epileptic model helped seizure initiation, but exerted inhibitory effects on the seizure onset itself, acting differently on the local components of the network organization generating seizure discharges, possibly changing the coupling strengths and time delays in the GJ-s.

  8. Nogo-66 inhibits the dye-coupling of astrocytic gap junctions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yazhou; Wu, Yin; Liu, Mengdong; Wang, Jian; Ju, Gong

    2011-06-01

    Communication between astrocytes via the gap junction is crucial for maintaining homeostasis of the extra-neuronal microenvironment of the central nervous system. Dysfunction of astrocytic gap junctions is involved in many brain disorders. Our previous studies demonstrated a novel co-localization of Nogo-66 receptor at glial gap junctions in rat cerebellum and posterior pituitary. The present study was aimed at exploring whether Nogo-66 can modulate glial gap junctions in vitro. We confirmed the co-localization of Nogo-66 receptor with Cx43 in cultured astrocytes, and stimulated astrocytes with myelin extracts, or Nogo-66-Fc conditioned medium. Finally, we expressed and purified a functionally effective GST-Nogo-66 peptide. Lucifer yellow transfer assay was adopted to measure the gap junction permeability. The results showed that the spreading of Lucifer yellow was inhibited significantly by all three treatments as compared with their corresponding controls. Therefore, this study shows a novel inhibitory effect of Nogo-66 on the permeability of astrocytic gap junctions, suggesting a presumable role of Nogo-66 receptor in modulating the glial gap junction.

  9. The Microvascular Gap Junction Channel: A Route to Deliver MicroRNAs for Neurological Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Thuringer

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs separate the peripheral blood from the brain. These cells, which are surrounded by basal lamina, pericytes and glial cells, are highly interconnected through tight and gap junctions. Their permeability properties restrict the transfer of potentially useful therapeutic agents. In such a hermetic system, the gap junctional exchange of small molecules between cerebral endothelial and non-endothelial cells is crucial for maintaining tissue homeostasis. MicroRNA were shown to cross gap junction channels, thereby modulating gene expression and function of the recipient cell. It was also shown that, when altered, BMEC could be regenerated by endothelial cells derived from pluripotent stem cells. Here, we discuss the transfer of microRNA through gap junctions between BMEC, the regeneration of BMEC from induced pluripotent stem cells that could be engineered to express specific microRNA, and how such an innovative approach could benefit to the treatment of glioblastoma and other neurological diseases.

  10. [Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication protects astrocytes from hypoxia/reoxygenation injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xu-Hui; Gu, Yu-Chen; Jiao, Hao; Yu, Li; Dong, Shu-Ying

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the effects of inhibiting gap junctional intercellular communication on hypoxia/reoxygenation injury in astrocytes. Primary cultured cerebral cortical astrocytes of neonate rats were divided into normal control group, hypoxia reoxygenation injury group and 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid and oleamide (gap junctional intercellular channel inhibitors) group. The gap junction intercellular communication was determined by Parachute assay. The viability of astrocyes was detected by MTT assay. The apoptosis of astrocytes were detected with annexin V/PI and Hoechst 33258 staining. Compared with the normal control group, the gap junctional function of astrocytes was increased significantly in ischemia/reperfusion group (Pastrocytes decreased significantly (Pastrocytes in18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid and oleamide group decreased significantly (Pastrocytes increased significantly (Pastrocytes.

  11. Connexin 43 Expression on Peripheral Blood Eosinophils: Role of Gap Junctions in Transendothelial Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harissios Vliagoftis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils circulate in the blood and are recruited in tissues during allergic inflammation. Gap junctions mediate direct communication between adjacent cells and may represent a new way of communication between immune cells distinct from communication through cytokines and chemokines. We characterized the expression of connexin (Cx43 by eosinophils isolated from atopic individuals using RT-PCR, Western blotting, and confocal microscopy and studied the biological functions of gap junctions on eosinophils. The formation of functional gap junctions was evaluated measuring dye transfer using flow cytometry. The role of gap junctions on eosinophil transendothelial migration was studied using the inhibitor 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid. Peripheral blood eosinophils express Cx43 mRNA and protein. Cx43 is localized not only in the cytoplasm but also on the plasma membrane. The membrane impermeable dye BCECF transferred from eosinophils to epithelial or endothelial cells following coculture in a dose and time dependent fashion. The gap junction inhibitors 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid and octanol did not have a significant effect on dye transfer but reduced dye exit from eosinophils. The gap junction inhibitor 18-a-glycyrrhetinic acid inhibited eosinophil transendothelial migration in a dose dependent manner. Thus, eosinophils from atopic individuals express Cx43 constitutively and Cx43 may play an important role in eosinophil transendothelial migration and function in sites of inflammation.

  12. Gap junctions-guards of excitability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances...... of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane....

  13. Role of Non-Myocyte Gap Junctions and Connexin Hemichannels in Cardiovascular Health and Disease: Novel Therapeutic Targets?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Johnson

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The heart is a complex organ composed of multiple cell types, including cardiomyocytes and different non-myocyte populations, all working closely together to determine the hearts properties and maintain normal cardiac function. Connexins are abundantly expressed proteins that form plasma membrane hemichannels and gap junctions between cells. Gap junctions are intracellular channels that allow for communication between cells, and in the heart they play a crucial role in cardiac conduction by coupling adjacent cardiomyocytes. Connexins are expressed in both cardiomyocytes and non-myocytes, including cardiac fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and macrophages. Non-myocytes are the largest population of cells in the heart, and therefore it is important to consider what roles connexins, hemichannels, and gap junctions play in these cell types. The aim of this review is to provide insight into connexin-based signalling in non-myocytes during health and disease, and highlight how targeting these proteins could lead to the development of novel therapies. We conclude that connexins in non-myocytes contribute to arrhythmias and adverse ventricular remodelling following myocardial infarction, and are associated with the initiation and development of atherosclerosis. Therefore, therapeutic interventions targeting these connexins represent an exciting new research avenue with great potential.

  14. GAP junctional communication in brain secondary organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosone, Camilla; Andreu, Abraham; Echevarria, Diego

    2016-06-01

    Gap junctions (GJs) are integral membrane proteins that enable the direct cytoplasmic exchange of ions and low molecular weight metabolites between adjacent cells. They are formed by the apposition of two connexons belonging to adjacent cells. Each connexon is formed by six proteins, named connexins (Cxs). Current evidence suggests that gap junctions play an important part in ensuring normal embryo development. Mutations in connexin genes have been linked to a variety of human diseases, although the precise role and the cell biological mechanisms of their action remain almost unknown. Among the big family of Cxs, several are expressed in nervous tissue but just a few are expressed in the anterior neural tube of vertebrates. Many efforts have been made to elucidate the molecular bases of Cxs cell biology and how they influence the morphogenetic signal activity produced by brain signaling centers. These centers, orchestrated by transcription factors and morphogenes determine the axial patterning of the mammalian brain during its specification and regionalization. The present review revisits the findings of GJ composed by Cx43 and Cx36 in neural tube patterning and discuss Cx43 putative enrollment in the control of Fgf8 signal activity coming from the well known secondary organizer, the isthmic organizer. © 2016 The Authors. Development, Growth & Differentiation published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  15. Gap junction coupling confers isopotentiality on astrocyte syncytium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baofeng; Buckalew, Richard; Du, Yixing; Kiyoshi, Conrad M.; Alford, Catherine C.; Wang, Wei; McTigue, Dana D.; Enyeart, John J.; Terman, David; Zhou, Min

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes are extensively coupled through gap junctions into a syncytium. However, the basic role of this major brain network remains largely unknown. Using electrophysiological and computational modeling methods, we demonstrate that the membrane potential (VM) of an individual astrocyte in a hippocampal syncytium, but not in a single, freshly isolated cell preparation, can be well-maintained at quasi-physiological levels when recorded with reduced or K+ free pipette solutions that alter the K+ equilibrium potential to non-physiological voltages. We show that an astrocyte’s associated syncytium provides powerful electrical coupling, together with ionic coupling at a lesser extent, that equalizes the astrocyte’s VM to levels comparable to its neighbors. Functionally, this minimizes VM depolarization attributable to elevated levels of local extracellular K+ and thereby maintains a sustained driving force for highly efficient K+ uptake. Thus, gap junction coupling functions to achieve isopotentiality in astrocytic networks, whereby a constant extracellular environment can be powerfully maintained for crucial functions of neural circuits. PMID:26435164

  16. The role of gap junctions in stretch-induced atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Mitsuru; Honjo, Haruo; Kodama, Itsuo; Kamiya, Kaichiro

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the role of gap junctions in atrial fibrillation (AF) by analysing the effects of a gap junction enhancer and blocker on AF vulnerability and electrophysiological properties of isolated hearts. The acute atrial stretch model of AF in the isolated rabbit heart was used. Sustained AF (SAF) was induced by a burst of high-frequency stimulation of the Bachmann's bundle. The effective refractory period (ERP) was measured, and the total conduction time (TCT) and the pattern of conduction of the anterior surface of the left atrium were monitored by using an optical mapping system. The effect of enhancing gap junction function by 100-1000 nM rotigaptide (ZP123) and block by 30 μM carbenoxolone on these parameters was measured. SAF inducibility was increased with an elevation of intra-atrial pressure. Enhanced gap junction conductance induced by treatment with 100-1000 nM rotigaptide reduced SAF inducibility, and the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone increased SAF inducibility. In the absence of gap junction enhancer or blocker, normal conduction was observed at 0 cmH2O. When intra-atrial pressure was raised to 12 cmH2O, the conduction pattern was changed to a heterogeneous zig-zag pattern and TCT was prolonged. Conduction pattern was not affected by either agent. Rotigaptide shortened TCT, whereas carbenoxolone prolonged TCT. ERP was significantly shortened with an increase in intra-atrial pressure, but ERP was unaffected by either agent. Gap junction modulators changed AF inducibility through their effects on atrial conduction, not by altering ERP. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  17. Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Breast Cancer Metastasis to Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Donahue, Henry

    2001-01-01

    .... We found that: 1) expressing the metastasis suppressing gene BRMS1 in diverse cancer cell lines, including breast and melanoma, restores homotypic gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC); 2...

  18. Meclofenamic acid blocks the gap junction communication between the retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, N; Wen, Y; Li, Y; Li, J

    2013-11-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are commonly used to manage the pain and inflammation. NSAIDs can cause serious side effects, including vision problems. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the effect of meclofenamic acid (MFA) on retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). In our study, we applied image analysis and whole-cell patch clamp recording to directly measure the effect of MFA on the gap junctional coupling between RPE cells. Analysis of Lucifer yellow (LY) transfer revealed that the gap junction communication existed between RPE cells. Functional experiments using the whole-cell configuration of the patch clamp technique showed that a gap junction conductance also existed between this kind of cells. Importantly, MFA largely inhibited the gap junction conductance and induced the uncoupling of RPE cells. Other NSAIDs, like aspirin and flufenamic acid (FFA), had the same effect. The gap junction functionally existed in RPE cells, which can be blocked by MFA. These findings may explain, at least partially, the vision problems with certain clinically used NSAIDs.

  19. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIJUAN CHEN

    2017-12-20

    insoluble fractions. Cell lysates were loaded on a 10% SDS acrylamide gel and analysed by western blotting. The intensities of bands were analysed using den- sitometry by NIH Image J software. Scrape loading dye transfer assay.

  20. Methamphetamine compromises gap junctional communication in astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Paul; Nwagbo, Chisom; Martinez, Luis R; Eugenin, Eliseo A

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine (meth) is a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant that results in psychological and physical dependency. The long-term effects of meth within the CNS include neuronal plasticity changes, blood-brain barrier compromise, inflammation, electrical dysfunction, neuronal/glial toxicity, and an increased risk to infectious diseases including HIV. Most of the reported meth effects in the CNS are related to dysregulation of chemical synapses by altering the release and uptake of neurotransmitters, especially dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. However, little is known about the effects of meth on connexin (Cx) containing channels, such as gap junctions (GJ) and hemichannels (HC). We examined the effects of meth on Cx expression, function, and its role in NeuroAIDS. We found that meth altered Cx expression and localization, decreased GJ communication between neurons and astrocytes, and induced the opening of Cx43/Cx36 HC. Furthermore, we found that these changes in GJ and HC induced by meth treatment were mediated by activation of dopamine receptors, suggesting that dysregulation of dopamine signaling induced by meth is essential for GJ and HC compromise. Meth-induced changes in GJ and HC contributed to amplified CNS toxicity by dysregulating glutamate metabolism and increasing the susceptibility of neurons and astrocytes to bystander apoptosis induced by HIV. Together, our results indicate that connexin containing channels, GJ and HC, are essential in the pathogenesis of meth and increase the sensitivity of the CNS to HIV CNS disease. Methamphetamine (meth) is an extremely addictive central nervous system stimulant. Meth reduced gap junctional (GJ) communication by inducing internalization of connexin-43 (Cx43) in astrocytes and reducing expression of Cx36 in neurons by a mechanism involving activation of dopamine receptors (see cartoon). Meth-induced changes in Cx containing channels increased extracellular levels of glutamate and resulted in higher

  1. Novel methods of automated quantification of gap junction distribution and interstitial collagen quantity from animal and human atrial tissue sections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Yan

    Full Text Available Gap junctions (GJs are the principal membrane structures that conduct electrical impulses between cardiac myocytes while interstitial collagen (IC can physically separate adjacent myocytes and limit cell-cell communication. Emerging evidence suggests that both GJ and interstitial structural remodeling are linked to cardiac arrhythmia development. However, automated quantitative identification of GJ distribution and IC deposition from microscopic histological images has proven to be challenging. Such quantification is required to improve the understanding of functional consequences of GJ and structural remodeling in cardiac electrophysiology studies.Separate approaches were employed for GJ and IC identification in images from histologically stained tissue sections obtained from rabbit and human atria. For GJ identification, we recognized N-Cadherin (N-Cad as part of the gap junction connexin 43 (Cx43 molecular complex. Because N-Cad anchors Cx43 on intercalated discs (ID to form functional GJ channels on cell membranes, we computationally dilated N-Cad pixels to create N-Cad units that covered all ID-associated Cx43 pixels on Cx43/N-Cad double immunostained confocal images. This approach allowed segmentation between ID-associated and non-ID-associated Cx43. Additionally, use of N-Cad as a unique internal reference with Z-stack layer-by-layer confocal images potentially limits sample processing related artifacts in Cx43 quantification. For IC quantification, color map thresholding of Masson's Trichrome blue stained sections allowed straightforward and automated segmentation of collagen from non-collagen pixels. Our results strongly demonstrate that the two novel image-processing approaches can minimize potential overestimation or underestimation of gap junction and structural remodeling in healthy and pathological hearts. The results of using the two novel methods will significantly improve our understanding of the molecular and structural

  2. Deletion of the last five C-terminal amino acid residues of connexin43 leads to lethal ventricular arrhythmias in mice without affecting coupling via gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lübkemeier, Indra; Requardt, Robert Pascal; Lin, Xianming; Sasse, Philipp; Andrié, René; Schrickel, Jan Wilko; Chkourko, Halina; Bukauskas, Feliksas F; Kim, Jung-Sun; Frank, Marina; Malan, Daniela; Zhang, Jiong; Wirth, Angela; Dobrowolski, Radoslaw; Mohler, Peter J; Offermanns, Stefan; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Delmar, Mario; Willecke, Klaus

    2013-05-01

    The cardiac intercalated disc harbors mechanical and electrical junctions as well as ion channel complexes mediating propagation of electrical impulses. Cardiac connexin43 (Cx43) co-localizes and interacts with several of the proteins located at intercalated discs in the ventricular myocardium. We have generated conditional Cx43D378stop mice lacking the last five C-terminal amino acid residues, representing a binding motif for zonula occludens protein-1 (ZO-1), and investigated the functional consequences of this mutation on cardiac physiology and morphology. Newborn and adult homozygous Cx43D378stop mice displayed markedly impaired and heterogeneous cardiac electrical activation properties and died from severe ventricular arrhythmias. Cx43 and ZO-1 were co-localized at intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts, and the Cx43D378stop gap junction channels showed normal coupling properties. Patch clamp analyses of isolated adult Cx43D378stop cardiomyocytes revealed a significant decrease in sodium and potassium current densities. Furthermore, we also observed a significant loss of Nav1.5 protein from intercalated discs in Cx43D378stop hearts. The phenotypic lethality of the Cx43D378stop mutation was very similar to the one previously reported for adult Cx43 deficient (Cx43KO) mice. Yet, in contrast to Cx43KO mice, the Cx43 gap junction channel was still functional in the Cx43D378stop mutant. We conclude that the lethality of Cx43D378stop mice is independent of the loss of gap junctional intercellular communication, but most likely results from impaired cardiac sodium and potassium currents. The Cx43D378stop mice reveal for the first time that Cx43 dependent arrhythmias can develop by mechanisms other than impairment of gap junction channel function.

  3. The antiarrhythmic peptide analog rotigaptide (ZP123) stimulates gap junction intercellular communication in human osteoblasts and prevents decrease in femoral trabecular bone strength in ovariectomized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Teilmann, Stefan Cuoni; Henriksen, Zanne

    2005-01-01

    Gap junctions play an important role in bone development and function, but the lack of pharmacological tools has hampered the gap junction research. The antiarrhythmic peptides stimulate gap junction communication between cardiomyocytes, but effects in noncardiac tissue are unknown. The purpose...... of this study was to examine whether antiarrhythmic peptides, which are small peptides increasing gap junctional conductivity, show specific binding to osteoblasts and investigate the effect of the stable analog rotigaptide (ZP123) on gap junctional intercellular communication in vitro and on bone mass...... weight) or by continuous ip infusion (158 nmol per kilogram body weight per day). During metabolic stress, a high affinity-binding site (KD=0.1 nM) with low density (15 fmol/mg protein) for [125I]di-I-AAP10 was demonstrated. During physiological conditions, specific binding sites for [125I]AAP10 could...

  4. Sustained inhibition of rat myometrial gap junctions and contractions by lindane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grindatti Carmen M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gap junctions increase in size and abundance coincident with parturition, forming an intercellular communication network that permits the uterus to develop the forceful, coordinated contractions necessary for delivery of the fetus. Lindane, a pesticide used in the human and veterinary treatment of scabies and lice as well as in agricultural applications, inhibits uterine contractions in vitro, inhibits myometrial gap junctions, and has been associated with prolonged gestation length in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether brief exposures to lindane would elicit sustained inhibition of rat uterine contractile activity and myometrial gap junction intercellular communication. Methods To examine effects on uterine contraction, longitudinal uterine strips isolated from late gestation (day 20 rats were exposed to lindane in muscle baths and monitored for changes in spontaneous phasic contractions during and after exposure to lindane. Lucifer yellow dye transfer between myometrial cells in culture was used to monitor gap junction intercellular communication. Results During a 1-h exposure, 10 micro M and 100 micro M lindane decreased peak force and frequency of uterine contraction but 1 micro M lindane did not. After removal of the exposure buffer, contraction force remained significantly depressed in uterine strips exposed to 100 micro M lindane, returning to less than 50% basal levels 5 h after cessation of lindane exposure. In cultured myometrial myocytes, significant sustained inhibition of Lucifer yellow dye transfer was observed 24 h after lindane exposures as brief as 10 min and as low as 0.1 micro M lindane. Conclusion Brief in vitro exposures to lindane have long-term effects on myometrial functions that are necessary for parturition, inhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions in late gestation rat uterus and gap junction intercellular communication in myometrial cell cultures.

  5. Sustained inhibition of rat myometrial gap junctions and contractions by lindane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch-Caruso, Rita K; Criswell, Kay A; Grindatti, Carmen M; Brant, Kelly A

    2003-01-01

    Background Gap junctions increase in size and abundance coincident with parturition, forming an intercellular communication network that permits the uterus to develop the forceful, coordinated contractions necessary for delivery of the fetus. Lindane, a pesticide used in the human and veterinary treatment of scabies and lice as well as in agricultural applications, inhibits uterine contractions in vitro, inhibits myometrial gap junctions, and has been associated with prolonged gestation length in rats. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether brief exposures to lindane would elicit sustained inhibition of rat uterine contractile activity and myometrial gap junction intercellular communication. Methods To examine effects on uterine contraction, longitudinal uterine strips isolated from late gestation (day 20) rats were exposed to lindane in muscle baths and monitored for changes in spontaneous phasic contractions during and after exposure to lindane. Lucifer yellow dye transfer between myometrial cells in culture was used to monitor gap junction intercellular communication. Results During a 1-h exposure, 10 micro M and 100 micro M lindane decreased peak force and frequency of uterine contraction but 1 micro M lindane did not. After removal of the exposure buffer, contraction force remained significantly depressed in uterine strips exposed to 100 micro M lindane, returning to less than 50% basal levels 5 h after cessation of lindane exposure. In cultured myometrial myocytes, significant sustained inhibition of Lucifer yellow dye transfer was observed 24 h after lindane exposures as brief as 10 min and as low as 0.1 micro M lindane. Conclusion Brief in vitro exposures to lindane have long-term effects on myometrial functions that are necessary for parturition, inhibiting spontaneous phasic contractions in late gestation rat uterus and gap junction intercellular communication in myometrial cell cultures. PMID:14567758

  6. Ginsenoside Rg1 alleviates corticosterone-induced dysfunction of gap junctions in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Cong-Yuan; Chu, Shi-Feng; Zhang, Shuai; Gao, Yan; Ren, Qian; Lou, Yu-Xia; Luo, Piao; Tian, Man-Tong; Wang, Zhi-Qi; Du, Guo-Hua; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Yamakuni, Tohru; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Zhen-Zhen; Chen, Nai-Hong

    2017-08-17

    Ginsenoside Rg1 (Rg1), one of the major bioactive ingredients of Panax ginseng C. A. Mey, has neuroprotective effects in animal models of depression, but the mechanism underlying these effects is still largely unknown AIM OF THE STUDY: Gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) dysfunction is a potentially novel pathogenic mechanism for depression. Thus, we investigated that whether antidepressant-like effects of Rg1 were related to GJIC. Primary rat prefrontal cortical and hippocampal astrocytes cultures were treated with 50μM CORT for 24h to induce gap junction damage. Rg1 (0.1, 1, or 10μM) or fluoxetine (1μM) was added 1h prior to CORT treatment. A scrape loading and dye transfer assay was performed to identify the functional capacity of gap junctions. Western blot was used to detect the expression and phosphorylation of connexin43 (Cx43), the major component of gap junctions. Treatment of primary astrocytes with CORT for 24h inhibited GJIC, decreased total Cx43 expression, and increased the phosphorylation of Cx43 at serine368 in a dose-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with 1μM and 10μM Rg1 significantly improved GJIC in CORT-treated astrocytes from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, respectively, and this was accompanied by upregulation of Cx43 expression and downregulation of Cx43 phosphorylation. These findings provide the first evidence indicating that Rg1 can alleviate CORT-induced gap junction dysfunction, which may have clinical significance in the treatment of depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gap junction modulation by extracellular signaling molecules: the thymus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alves L.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions are intercellular channels which connect adjacent cells and allow direct exchange of molecules of low molecular weight between them. Such a communication has been described as fundamental in many systems due to its importance in coordination, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, it has been shown that gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC can be modulated by several extracellular soluble factors such as classical hormones, neurotransmitters, interleukins, growth factors and some paracrine substances. Herein, we discuss some aspects of the general modulation of GJIC by extracellular messenger molecules and more particularly the regulation of such communication in the thymus gland. Additionally, we discuss recent data concerning the study of different neuropeptides and hormones in the modulation of GJIC in thymic epithelial cells. We also suggest that the thymus may be viewed as a model to study the modulation of gap junction communication by different extracellular messengers involved in non-classical circuits, since this organ is under bidirectional neuroimmunoendocrine control.

  8. Ouabain Increases Gap Junctional Communication in Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo Ponce

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The finding that endogenous ouabain acts as a hormone prompted efforts to elucidate its physiological function. In previous studies, we have shown that 10 nM ouabain (i.e., a concentration within the physiological range modulates cell-cell contacts such as tight junctions and apical/basolateral polarity. In this study, we examined whether 10 nM ouabain affects another important cell-cell feature: gap junction communication (GJC. Methods: We employed two different approaches: 1 analysis of the cell-to-cell diffusion of neurobiotin injected into a particular MDCK cell (epithelial cells from dog kidneys in a confluent monolayer by counting the number of neighboring cells reached by the probe and 2 measurement of the electrical capacitance. Results: We found that 10 nM ouabain increase GJC by 475% within 1 hour. The Na+-K+-ATPase acts as a receptor of ouabain. In previous works we have shown that ouabain activates c-Src and ERK1/2 in 1 hour; in the present study we show that the inhibition of these proteins block the effect of ouabain on GJC. This increase in GJC does not require synthesis of new protein components, because the inhibitors cycloheximide and actinomycin D did not affect this phenomenon. Using silencing assays we also demonstrate that this ouabain-induced enhancement of GJC involves connexins 32 and 43. Conclusion: Ouabain 10 nM increases GJC in MDCK cells.

  9. Gap Junctions and Cancer: Communicating for 50 Years’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasen, Trond; Mesnil, Marc; Naus, Christian C.; Lampe, Paul D.; Laird, Dale W.

    2017-01-01

    Fifty years ago, tumour cells were found to lack electrical coupling, leading to the hypothesis that loss of direct intercellular communication is commonly associated with cancer onset and progression. Subsequent studies linked this phenomenon to gap junctions composed of connexin proteins. While many studies support the notion that connexins are tumour suppressors, recent evidence suggests that, in some tumour types, they may facilitate specific stages of tumour progression through both junctional and non-junctional signalling pathways. This Timeline article highlights the milestones connecting gap junctions to cancer, and underscores important unanswered questions, controversies and therapeutic opportunities in the field. PMID:27782134

  10. Pallidal gap junctions-triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.; Heida, T.; Zhao, Y.; Gils, S.A. van; Wezel, R.J.A. van

    2014-01-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a

  11. Pallidal gap junctions - Triggers of synchrony in Parkinson's disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.; Heida, Tjitske; Zhao, Yan; van Gils, Stephanus A.; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton

    2014-01-01

    Although increased synchrony of the neural activity in the basal ganglia may underlie the motor deficiencies exhibited in Parkinson's disease (PD), how this synchrony arises, propagates through the basal ganglia, and changes under dopamine replacement remains unknown. Gap junctions could play a

  12. [Gap junctions: A new therapeutic target in major depressive disorder?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarrouilhe, D; Dejean, C

    2015-11-01

    Major depressive disorder is a multifactorial chronic and debilitating mood disease with high lifetime prevalence and is associated with excess mortality, especially from cardiovascular diseases and through suicide. The treatments of this disease with tricyclic antidepressants and monoamine oxidase inhibitors are poorly tolerated and those that selectively target serotonin and norepinephrine re-uptake are not effective in all patients, showing the need to find new therapeutic targets. Post-mortem studies of brains from patients with major depressive disorders described a reduced expression of the gap junction-forming membrane proteins connexin 30 and connexin 43 in the prefrontal cortex and the locus coeruleus. The use of chronic unpredictable stress, a rodent model of depression, suggests that astrocytic gap junction dysfunction contributes to the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. Chronic treatments of rats with fluoxetine and of rat cultured cortical astrocytes with amitriptyline support the hypothesis that the upregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication between brain astrocytes could be a novel mechanism for the therapeutic effect of antidepressants. In conclusion, astrocytic gap junctions are emerging as a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of patients with major depressive disorder. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Gap junctions in developing thalamic and neocortical neuronal networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niculescu, Dragos; Lohmann, C.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of direct, cytoplasmatic, communication between neurons in the brain of vertebrates has been demonstrated a long time ago. These gap junctions have been characterized in many brain areas in terms of subunit composition, biophysical properties, neuronal connectivity patterns, and

  14. The effect of gap junctional distribution on defibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, James P.

    1998-03-01

    We summarize a mathematical theory for direct activation and defibrillation of cardiac tissue. We show that the direct stimulus and defibrillation thresholds are likely to be strongly affected by the gap junctional distribution and density, suggesting an indirect experimental test of the theory.

  15. A unified framework for spiking and gap-junction interactions in distributed neuronal network simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan eHahne

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary simulators for networks of point and few-compartment model neurons come with a plethora of ready-to-use neuron and synapse models and support complex network topologies. Recent technological advancements have broadened the spectrum of application further to the efficient simulation of brain-scale networks on supercomputers. In distributed network simulations the amount of spike data that accrues per millisecond and process is typically low, such that a common optimization strategy is to communicate spikes at relatively long intervals, where the upper limit is given by the shortest synaptic transmission delay in the network. This approach is well-suited for simulations that employ only chemical synapses but it has so far impeded the incorporation of gap-junction models, which require instantaneous neuronal interactions. Here, we present a numerical algorithm based on a waveform-relaxation technique which allows for network simulations with gap junctions in a way that is compatible with the delayed communication strategy. Using a reference implementation in the NEST simulator, we demonstrate that the algorithm and the required data structures can be smoothly integrated with existing code such that they complement the infrastructure for spiking connections. To show that the unified framework for gap-junction and spiking interactions achieves high performance and delivers high accuracy...

  16. Low Level Pro-inflammatory Cytokines Decrease Connexin36 Gap Junction Coupling in Mouse and Human Islets through Nitric Oxide-mediated Protein Kinase Cδ*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Nikki L.; Walter, Rachelle L.; Hemmati, Alireza; Westacott, Matthew J.; Benninger, Richard K. P.

    2016-01-01

    Pro-inflammatory cytokines contribute to the decline in islet function during the development of diabetes. Cytokines can disrupt insulin secretion and calcium dynamics; however, the mechanisms underlying this are poorly understood. Connexin36 gap junctions coordinate glucose-induced calcium oscillations and pulsatile insulin secretion across the islet. Loss of gap junction coupling disrupts these dynamics, similar to that observed during the development of diabetes. This study investigates the mechanisms by which pro-inflammatory cytokines mediate gap junction coupling. Specifically, as cytokine-induced NO can activate PKCδ, we aimed to understand the role of PKCδ in modulating cytokine-induced changes in gap junction coupling. Isolated mouse and human islets were treated with varying levels of a cytokine mixture containing TNF-α, IL-1β, and IFN-γ. Islet dysfunction was measured by insulin secretion, calcium dynamics, and gap junction coupling. Modulators of PKCδ and NO were applied to determine their respective roles in modulating gap junction coupling. High levels of cytokines caused cell death and decreased insulin secretion. Low levels of cytokine treatment disrupted calcium dynamics and decreased gap junction coupling, in the absence of disruptions to insulin secretion. Decreases in gap junction coupling were dependent on NO-regulated PKCδ, and altered membrane organization of connexin36. This study defines several mechanisms underlying the disruption to gap junction coupling under conditions associated with the development of diabetes. These mechanisms will allow for greater understanding of islet dysfunction and suggest ways to ameliorate this dysfunction during the development of diabetes. PMID:26668311

  17. INHIBITION OF GAP JUNCTIONAL INTERCELLULAR COMMUNICATION BY PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS IN RAT LIVER AND DOLPHIN KIDNEY EPITHELIAL CELL LINES IN VITRO AND SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS IN VIVO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication (GJIC) is the major pathway of intercellular signal transduction, and is, thus, important for normal cell growth and function. Recent studies have revealed a global distribution of some perfluorinated organic compounds e...

  18. GnRH Episodic Secretion Is Altered by Pharmacological Blockade of Gap Junctions: Possible Involvement of Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinet-Charvet, Caroline; Geller, Sarah; Desroziers, Elodie; Ottogalli, Monique; Lomet, Didier; Georgelin, Christine; Tillet, Yves; Franceschini, Isabelle; Vaudin, Pascal; Duittoz, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Episodic release of GnRH is essential for reproductive function. In vitro studies have established that this episodic release is an endogenous property of GnRH neurons and that GnRH secretory pulses are associated with synchronization of GnRH neuron activity. The cellular mechanisms by which GnRH neurons synchronize remain largely unknown. There is no clear evidence of physical coupling of GnRH neurons through gap junctions to explain episodic synchronization. However, coupling of glial cells through gap junctions has been shown to regulate neuron activity in their microenvironment. The present study investigated whether glial cell communication through gap junctions plays a role in GnRH neuron activity and secretion in the mouse. Our findings show that Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein-expressing glial cells located in the median eminence in close vicinity to GnRH fibers expressed Gja1 encoding connexin-43. To study the impact of glial-gap junction coupling on GnRH neuron activity, an in vitro model of primary cultures from mouse embryo nasal placodes was used. In this model, GnRH neurons possess a glial microenvironment and were able to release GnRH in an episodic manner. Our findings show that in vitro glial cells forming the microenvironment of GnRH neurons expressed connexin-43 and displayed functional gap junctions. Pharmacological blockade of the gap junctions with 50 μM 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid decreased GnRH secretion by reducing pulse frequency and amplitude, suppressed neuronal synchronization and drastically reduced spontaneous electrical activity, all these effects were reversed upon 18-α-glycyrrhetinic acid washout.

  19. Inhibition of hepatocyte gap junctional intercellular communication by tumor promoters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruch, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor promoters enhance neoplasia are poorly understood. One effect common to most tumor promoters is their ability to inhibit the cell-to-cell exchange of small molecules and ions through gap junctions, i.e., gap junctional intercellular communication (IC). IC maybe necessary for normal growth control and the loss of IC may predispose cells to enhanced growth. In the present studies, the effects of liver tumor promoters and other agents on IC between rodent hepatocytes in primary culture has been studied. IC was detected between hepatocytes: (1) autoradiographically following the passage and incorporation of (5-{sup 3}H)uridine nucleotides from pre-labeled donor hepatocytes to non-labeled, adjacent recipient hepatocytes and (2) by fluorescence microscopy after microinjection of fluorescent Lucifer Yellow CH dye into hepatocytes and visualizing dye spread into adjacent hepatocytes.

  20. Inhibition of hepatocyte gap junctional intercellular communication by tumor promoters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruch, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanisms by which tumor promoters enhance neoplasia are poorly understood. One effect common to most tumor promoters is their ability to inhibit the cell-to-cell exchange of small molecules and ions through gap junctions, i.e., gap junctional intercellular communication (IC). IC maybe necessary for normal growth control and the loss of IC may predispose cells to enhanced growth. In the present studies, the effects of liver tumor promoters and other agents on IC between rodent hepatocytes in primary culture has been studied. IC was detected between hepatocytes: (1) autoradiographically following the passage and incorporation of [5- 3 H]uridine nucleotides from pre-labeled donor hepatocytes to non-labeled, adjacent recipient hepatocytes and (2) by fluorescence microscopy after microinjection of fluorescent Lucifer Yellow CH dye into hepatocytes and visualizing dye spread into adjacent hepatocytes

  1. Potential involvement of gap junctions in pathology of addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzaro, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine abuse represents a huge social problem for the widespread in the world and for the many health risks associated. Moreover, a significative percentage of cocaine users develop an addiction with loss of control on drug intake. Several molecular modifications occurs with cocaine use, some of which seem occur only in addicted individuals. Gap junctions (GJs) allow cellular communication, indeed they are fundamental to regulate cellular synchronization, cellular growth and metabolic co...

  2. Gap-junction coupling and ATP-sensitive potassium channels in human β -cell clusters: Effects on emergent dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loppini, A.; Pedersen, M. G.; Braun, M.; Filippi, S.

    2017-09-01

    The importance of gap-junction coupling between β cells in pancreatic islets is well established in mouse. Such ultrastructural connections synchronize cellular activity, confine biological heterogeneity, and enhance insulin pulsatility. Dysfunction of coupling has been associated with diabetes and altered β -cell function. However, the role of gap junctions between human β cells is still largely unexplored. By using patch-clamp recordings of β cells from human donors, we previously estimated electrical properties of these channels by mathematical modeling of pairs of human β cells. In this work we revise our estimate by modeling triplet configurations and larger heterogeneous clusters. We find that a coupling conductance in the range 0.005 -0.020 nS/pF can reproduce experiments in almost all the simulated arrangements. We finally explore the consequence of gap-junction coupling of this magnitude between β cells with mutant variants of the ATP-sensitive potassium channels involved in some metabolic disorders and diabetic conditions, translating studies performed on rodents to the human case. Our results are finally discussed from the perspective of therapeutic strategies. In summary, modeling of more realistic clusters with more than two β cells slightly lowers our previous estimate of gap-junction conductance and gives rise to patterns that more closely resemble experimental traces.

  3. Proinflammatory cytokines downregulate connexin 43-gap junctions via the ubiquitin-proteasome system in rat spinal astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang Fang; Morioka, Norimitsu; Kitamura, Tomoya; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-09-04

    Astrocytic gap junctions formed by connexin 43 (Cx43) are crucial for intercellular communication between spinal cord astrocytes. Various neurological disorders are associated with dysfunctional Cx43-gap junctions. However, the mechanism modulating Cx43-gap junctions in spinal astrocytes under pathological conditions is not entirely clear. A previous study showed that treatment of spinal astrocytes in culture with pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) decreased both Cx43 expression and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) via a c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent pathway. The current study further elaborates the intracellular mechanism that decreases Cx43 under an inflammatory condition. Cycloheximide chase analysis revealed that TNF-α (10 ng/ml) alone or in combination with IFN-γ (5 ng/ml) accelerated the degradation of Cx43 protein in cultured spinal astrocytes. The reduction of both Cx43 expression and GJIC induced by a mixture of TNF-α and IFN-γ were blocked by pretreatment with proteasome inhibitors MG132 (0.5 μM) and epoxomicin (25 nM), a mixture of TNF-α and IFN-γ significantly increased proteasome activity and Cx43 ubiquitination. In addition, TNF-α and IFN-γ-induced activation of ubiquitin-proteasome systems was prevented by SP600125, a JNK inhibitor. Together, these results indicate that a JNK-dependent ubiquitin-proteasome system is induced under an inflammatory condition that disrupts astrocytic gap junction expression and function, leading to astrocytic dysfunction and the maintenance of the neuroinflammatory state. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The effects of the Histone Deacetylase (HDAC Inhibitor 4-Phenylbutyrate on gap junction conductance and permeability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua eKaufman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Longitudinal resistance is a key factor in determining cardiac action potential propagation. Action potential conduction velocity has been shown to be proportional to the square root of longitudinal resistance. A major determinant of longitudinal resistance in myocardium is the gap junction channel, comprised of connexin proteins. Within the ventricular myocardium connexin 43 (Cx43 is the dominantly expressed connexin. Reduced numbers of gap junction channels will result in an increase in longitudinal resistance creating the possibility of slowed conduction velocity while increased numbers of channels would potentially result in an increase in conduction velocity. We sought to determine if inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC by 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB, a known inhibitor of HDAC resulted in an increase in junctional conductance and permeability, which is not the result of changes in single channel unitary conductance. These experiments were performed using HEK-293 cells and HeLa cells stably transfected with Cx43. Following treatment with increasing concentrations of 4-PB up-regulation of Cx43 was observed via Western blot analysis. Junctional (gj conductance and unitary single channel conductance were measured via whole-cell patch clamp. In addition intercellular transfer of Lucifer Yellow (LY was determined by fluorescence microscopy. The data in this study indicates that 4-PB is able to enhance functional Cx43 gap junction coupling as indicated by LY dye transfer and multichannel and single channel data along with Western blot analysis. As a corollary, pharmacological agents such as 4-PB have the potential, by increasing intercellular coupling, to reduce the effect of ischemia. It remains to be seen whether drugs like 4-PB will be effective in preventing cardiac maladies.

  5. Mefloquine gap junction blockade and risk of pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevin, Remington Lee

    2012-09-01

    Obstetric use of the antimalarial drug mefloquine has historically been discouraged during the first trimester and immediately before conception owing to concerns of potential fetal harm. With the rise of resistance to the antimalarial drug sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), mefloquine is now being considered as a replacement for SP for universal antenatal administration to women from malaria-endemic regions. Recent recommendations have also suggested that mefloquine may be used cautiously among pregnant travelers who cannot otherwise avoid visiting these areas. Mefloquine has been demonstrated to cause blockade of gap junction protein alpha 1 (GJA1) gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC), and recent evidence suggests that GJA1 GJIC is critical to successful embryonic implantation and early placental development. During routine use, mefloquine accumulates in organ and peripheral tissue, crosses the blood-placental barrier, and may plausibly accumulate in developing decidua and trophoblast at concentrations sufficient to interfere with GJA1 GJIC and, thus, cause deleterious effects on fetal outcomes. This conclusion is supported by epidemiological evidence that demonstrates use of the drug during early development is associated with an increased risk of miscarriage and stillbirth. Confirmatory studies are pending, but the available experimental and epidemiological evidence support renewed adherence, where feasible, to existing mefloquine package insert guidance that women avoid the drug during the periconceptional period.

  6. ATP- and gap junction-dependent intercellular calcium signaling in osteoblastic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, N R; Geist, S T; Civitelli, R

    1997-01-01

    mechanically induced calcium waves in two rat osteosarcoma cell lines that differ in the gap junction proteins they express, in their ability to pass microinjected dye from cell to cell, and in their expression of P2Y2 (P2U) purinergic receptors. ROS 17/2.8 cells, which express the gap junction protein...... connexin43 (Cx43), are well dye coupled, and lack P2U receptors, transmitted slow gap junction-dependent calcium waves that did not require release of intracellular calcium stores. UMR 106-01 cells predominantly express the gap junction protein connexin 45 (Cx45), are poorly dye coupled, and express P2U...

  7. Xenobiotic Modulation of Human Mammary Epithelial Cell Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and Growth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruch, Randall

    1999-01-01

    .... These agents also inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). This inhibition may contribute to the enhancement of breast epithelial growth and breast cancer formation by xenobiotics...

  8. Gap junction structure: unraveled, but not fully revealed [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Beyer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Gap junction channels facilitate the intercellular exchange of ions and small molecules, a process that is critical for the function of many different kinds of cells and tissues. Recent crystal structures of channels formed by one connexin isoform (connexin26 have been determined, and they have been subjected to molecular modeling. These studies have provided high-resolution models to gain insights into the mechanisms of channel conductance, molecular permeability, and gating. The models share similarities, but there are some differences in the conclusions reached by these studies. Many unanswered questions remain to allow an atomic-level understanding of intercellular communication mediated by connexin26. Because some domains of the connexin polypeptides are highly conserved (like the transmembrane regions, it is likely that some features of the connexin26 structure will apply to other members of the family of gap junction proteins. However, determination of high-resolution structures and modeling of other connexin channels will be required to account for the diverse biophysical properties and regulation conferred by the differences in their sequences.

  9. Nonspecific effects of the gap junction blocker mefloquine on fast hippocampal network oscillations in the adult rat in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, C J; Ul Haq, R; Liotta, A; Anderson, M L; Heinemann, U

    2011-09-29

    It has been suggested that gap junctions are involved in the synchronization during high frequency oscillations as observed during sharp wave-ripple complexes (SPW-Rs) and during recurrent epileptiform discharges (REDs). Ripple oscillations during SPW-Rs, possibly involved in memory replay and memory consolidation, reach frequencies of up to 200 Hz while ripple oscillations during REDs display frequencies up to 500 Hz. These fast oscillations may be synchronized by intercellular interactions through gap junctions. In area CA3, connexin 36 (Cx36) proteins are present and potentially sensitive to mefloquine. Here, we used hippocampal slices of adult rats to investigate the effects of mefloquine, which blocks Cx36, Cx43 and Cx50 gap junctions on both SPW-Rs and REDs. SPW-Rs were induced by high frequency stimulation in the CA3 region while REDs were recorded in the presence of the GABA(A) receptor blocker bicuculline (5 μM). Both, SPW-Rs and REDs were blocked by the gap junction blocker carbenoxolone. Mefloquine (50 μM), which did not affect stimulus-induced responses in area CA3, neither changed SPW-Rs nor superimposed ripple oscillations. During REDs, 25 and 50 μM mefloquine exerted only minor effects on the expression of REDs but significantly reduced the amplitude of superimposed ripples by ∼17 and ∼54%, respectively. Intracellular recordings of CA3 pyramidal cells revealed that mefloquine did not change their resting membrane potential and input resistance but significantly increased the afterhyperpolarization following evoked action potentials (APs) resulting in reduced probability of AP firing during depolarizing current injection. Similarly, mefloquine caused a reduction in AP generation during REDs. Together, our data suggest that mefloquine depressed RED-related ripple oscillations by reducing high frequency discharges and not necessarily by blocking electrical coupling. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The unstoppable connexin43 carboxyl-terminus: new roles in gap junction organization and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourdie, Robert G; Ghatnekar, Gautam S; O'Quinn, Michael; Rhett, Matthew J; Barker, Ralph J; Zhu, Ching; Jourdan, Jane; Hunter, Andrew W

    2006-10-01

    Intercellular connectivity mediated by gap junctions (GJs) composed of connexin43 (Cx43) is critical to the function of excitable tissues such as the heart and brain. Disruptions to Cx43 GJ organization are thought to be a factor in cardiac arrhythmias and are also implicated in epilepsy. This article is based on a presentation to the 4th Larry and Horti Fairberg Workshop on Interactive and Integrative Cardiology and summarizes the work of Gourdie and his lab on Cx43 GJs in the heart. Background and perspective of recently published studies on the function of Cx43-interacting protein zonula occludens-(ZO)-1 in determining the organization of GJ plaques are provided. In addition how a peptide containing a PDZ-binding sequence of Cx43, developed as part of the work on cardiac GJ organization is also described, which has led to evidence for novel and unexpected roles for Cx43 in modulating healing following tissue injury.

  11. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  12. Infusion of gliotoxins or a gap junction blocker in the prelimbic cortex increases alcohol preference in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel-Hidalgo, J; Shoyama, Y; Wanzo, V

    2009-07-01

    Postmortem research has revealed that there is a lower density of glial cells in regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of uncomplicated alcoholics when compared with control subjects. Impairment of astrocyte function in the PFC may contribute to malfunction in circuits involved in emotion- and reward-related subcortical centers, heavily connected with the PFC and directly involved in the pathophysiology of addictive behaviours. The hypothesis was tested that infusion of gliotoxins known to injure astrocytes or of a gap junction blocker into the prelimbic area of the rat PFC results in increased preference for ethanol in rats exposed to free choice between water and 10% ethanol. Fluorocitric acid, L-alpha-aminoadipic acid (AAD) or the gap junction blocker 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid (AGA) were bilaterally infused once into the rat prelimbic cortex and alcohol preference (ratio of 10% ethanol consumed to total liquid ingested) was measured before and after infusion. Infusion of AAD or AGA dissolved in their vehicles, but not of their vehicles alone, resulted in significant transient increase of preference for 10% ethanol. The present data suggest that impaired integrity of glial cells or the gap junctional communication between them in the rat PFC may contribute to changes in ethanol preference.

  13. Integrating evolutionary game theory into an agent-based model of ductal carcinoma in situ: Role of gap junctions in cancer progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekian, Negin; Habibi, Jafar; Zangooei, Mohammad Hossein; Aghakhani, Hojjat

    2016-11-01

    There are many cells with various phenotypic behaviors in cancer interacting with each other. For example, an apoptotic cell may induce apoptosis in adjacent cells. A living cell can also protect cells from undergoing apoptosis and necrosis. These survival and death signals are propagated through interaction pathways between adjacent cells called gap junctions. The function of these signals depends on the cellular context of the cell receiving them. For instance, a receiver cell experiencing a low level of oxygen may interpret a received survival signal as an apoptosis signal. In this study, we examine the effect of these signals on tumor growth. We make an evolutionary game theory component in order to model the signal propagation through gap junctions. The game payoffs are defined as a function of cellular context. Then, the game theory component is integrated into an agent-based model of tumor growth. After that, the integrated model is applied to ductal carcinoma in situ, a type of early stage breast cancer. Different scenarios are explored to observe the impact of the gap junction communication and parameters of the game theory component on cancer progression. We compare these scenarios by using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test succeeds in proving a significant difference between the tumor growth of the model before and after considering the gap junction communication. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test also proves that the tumor growth significantly depends on the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis. In this study, the gap junction communication is modeled by using evolutionary game theory to illustrate its role at early stage cancers such as ductal carcinoma in situ. This work indicates that the gap junction communication and the oxygen threshold of turning survival signals into apoptosis can notably affect cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Gap junction protein connexin43 exacerbates lung vascular permeability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J O'Donnell

    Full Text Available Increased vascular permeability causes pulmonary edema that impairs arterial oxygenation and thus contributes to morbidity and mortality associated with Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome and sepsis. Although components of intercellular adhesive and tight junctions are critical for maintaining the endothelial barrier, there has been limited study of the roles of gap junctions and their component proteins (connexins. Since connexins can modulate inflammatory signaling in other systems, we hypothesized that connexins may also regulate pulmonary endothelial permeability. The relationships between connexins and the permeability response to inflammatory stimuli were studied in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. Prolonged treatment with thrombin, lipopolysaccharide, or pathological cyclic stretch increased levels of mRNA and protein for the major connexin, connexin43 (Cx43. Thrombin and lipopolysaccharide both increased intercellular communication assayed by transfer of microinjected Lucifer yellow. Although thrombin decreased transendothelial resistance in these cells, the response was attenuated by pretreatment with the connexin inhibitor carbenoxolone. Additionally, the decreases of transendothelial resistance produced by either thrombin or lipopolysaccharide were attenuated by reducing Cx43 expression by siRNA knockdown. Both carbenoxolone and Cx43 knockdown also abrogated thrombin-induced phosphorylation of myosin light chain. Taken together, these data suggest that increased lung vascular permeability induced by inflammatory conditions may be amplified via increased expression of Cx43 and intercellular communication among pulmonary endothelial cells.

  15. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesan, Shanthi, E-mail: shanthig@iastate.edu; Nteeba, Jackson, E-mail: nteeba@iastate.edu; Keating, Aileen F., E-mail: akeating@iastate.edu

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. - Highlights: • Ovarian gap junction proteins are affected by ovarian aging and obesity. • DMBA exposure negatively impacts gap junction proteins. • Altered gap junction proteins may contribute to infertility.

  16. Impact of obesity on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced altered ovarian connexin gap junction proteins in female mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganesan, Shanthi; Nteeba, Jackson; Keating, Aileen F.

    2015-01-01

    The ovarian gap junction proteins alpha 4 (GJA4 or connexin 37; CX37), alpha 1 (GJA1 or connexin 43; CX43) and gamma 1 (GJC1 or connexin 45; CX45) are involved in cell communication and folliculogenesis. 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) alters Cx37 and Cx43 expression in cultured neonatal rat ovaries. Additionally, obesity has an additive effect on DMBA-induced ovarian cell death and follicle depletion, thus, we investigated in vivo impacts of obesity and DMBA on CX protein levels. Ovaries were collected from lean and obese mice aged 6, 12, 18, or 24 wks. A subset of 18 wk old mice (lean and obese) were dosed with sesame oil or DMBA (1 mg/kg; ip) for 14 days and ovaries collected 3 days thereafter. Cx43 and Cx45 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 18 wks while Cx37 mRNA and protein levels decreased (P < 0.05) after 24 wks in obese ovaries. Cx37 mRNA and antral follicle protein staining intensity were reduced (P < 0.05) by obesity while total CX37 protein was reduced (P < 0.05) in DMBA exposed obese ovaries. Cx43 mRNA and total protein levels were decreased (P < 0.05) by DMBA in both lean and obese ovaries while basal protein staining intensity was reduced (P < 0.05) in obese controls. Cx45 mRNA, total protein and protein staining intensity level were decreased (P < 0.05) by obesity. These data support that obesity temporally alters gap junction protein expression and that DMBA-induced ovotoxicity may involve reduced gap junction protein function. - Highlights: • Ovarian gap junction proteins are affected by ovarian aging and obesity. • DMBA exposure negatively impacts gap junction proteins. • Altered gap junction proteins may contribute to infertility

  17. Effect of apigenin on gap junctional intercellular communication in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shanshan; Wang, Jibing; Zou, Huihui; Huang, Xudong

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effect of apigenin on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in human Tenon's capsule fibroblasts (HTFs) and its underlying mechanism. After a 48 h treatment of cultured HTFs with apigenin (80 micromol/L), the GJIC was detected by a scrape-loading/dye transfer technique with Lucifer yellow dye and rhodamine (Rh) dextran. The coupling index represents a quantification of GJIC where a high coupling index is associated with a greater number of cells demonstrating cell-cell communication through gap junction channels. The changes in connexin 43 (Cx43) distribution and the expression of Cx43 at the protein and mRNA levels were statistically compared between the two groups by means of immunocytochemistry, western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functioning of GJIC in the HTFs was significantly enhanced after 48 hours by apigenin treatment when compared with the control cells. In the apigenin group, the intercellular dye transfer grade was above 9, while this value was only grade 3-4 in the control group. The coupling index was significantly increased up to 9.205+/-0.3621 in the apigenin group, compared with 5.1775+/-0.3177 in the control group (F=279.581, P=0.000). The expression of Cx43 at the protein and mRNA levels was significantly up-regulated in the apigenin group compared with the control group. Apigenin can significantly enhance the function of GJIC in HTFs by up-regulating the expression of Cx43 at both the protein and mRNA levels, suggesting that the enhancement of GJIC in HTFs by apigenin probably acts as an important mechanism underlying the inhibitory effect of apigenin on HTF proliferation.

  18. (V44M) impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    LIJUAN CHEN

    2017-12-20

    Dec 20, 2017 ... Hela cells transfected with wt-Cx46 and Cx46 V44M were plated on 35 mm dishes to reach over 95% confluency. The medium was changed to HBSS plus the fluorescent dye Alexa Fluor 350 (Thermo Fisher Scientific, Waltham,. USA), and a scalpel blade was used to make many paral- lel lines on the dish.

  19. Sulforaphane counteracts aggressiveness of pancreatic cancer driven by dysregulated Cx43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiyao; Isayev, Orkhan; Heilmann, Katharina; Schoensiegel, Frank; Liu, Li; Nessling, Michelle; Richter, Karsten; Labsch, Sabrina; Nwaeburu, Clifford C.; Mattern, Juergen; Gladkich, Jury; Giese, Nathalia; Werner, Jens; Schemmer, Peter; Gross, Wolfgang; Gebhard, Martha M.; Gerhauser, Clarissa; Schaefer, Michael; Herr, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The extreme aggressiveness of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) has been associated with blocked gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs). We examined whether disturbed GJIC is responsible for a CSC phenotype in established and primary cancer cells and patient tissue of PDA using interdisciplinary methods based in physiology, cell and molecular biology, histology and epigenetics. Flux of fluorescent dyes and gemcitabine through gap junctions (GJs) was intact in less aggressive cells but not in highly malignant cells with morphological dysfunctional GJs. Among several connexins, only Cx43 was expressed on the cell surface of less aggressive and GJIC-competent cells, whereas Cx43 surface expression was absent in highly malignant, E-cadherin-negative and GJIC-incompetent cells. The levels of total Cx43 protein and Cx43 phosphorylated at Ser368 and Ser279/282 were high in normal tissue but low to absent in malignant tissue. si-RNA-mediated inhibition of Cx43 expression in GJIC-competent cells prevented GJIC and induced colony formation and the expression of stem cell-related factors. The bioactive substance sulforaphane enhanced Cx43 and E-cadherin levels, inhibited the CSC markers c-Met and CD133, improved the functional morphology of GJs and enhanced GJIC. Sulforaphane altered the phosphorylation of several kinases and their substrates and inhibition of GSK3, JNK and PKC prevented sulforaphane-induced CX43 expression. The sulforaphane-mediated expression of Cx43 was not correlated with enhanced Cx43 RNA expression, acetylated histone binding and Cx43 promoter de-methylation, suggesting that posttranslational phosphorylation is the dominant regulatory mechanism. Together, the absence of Cx43 prevents GJIC and enhances aggressiveness, whereas sulforaphane counteracts this process, and our findings highlight dietary co-treatment as a viable treatment option for PDA. PMID:24742583

  20. Influence of drugs on gap junctions in glioma cell lines and primary astrocytes in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra eMoinfar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Gap junctions (GJs are hemichannels on cell membrane. Once they are intercellulary connected to the neighboring cells, they build a functional syncytium which allows rapid transfer of ions and molecules between cells. This characteristic makes GJs a potential modulator in proliferation, migration and development of the cells. So far, several types of GJs are recognized on different brain cells as well as in glioma. Astrocytes, as one of the major cells that maintain neuronal homeostasis, express different types of GJs that let them communicate with neurons, oligodendrocytes and endothelial cells of the blood brain barrier; however, the main GJ in astrocytes is connexin 43. There are different cerebral diseases in which astrocyte GJs might play a role. Several drugs have been reported to modulate gap junctional communication in the brain which can consequently have beneficial or detrimental effects on the course of treatment in certain diseases. However, the exact cellular mechanism behind those pharmaceutical efficacies on GJs is not well-understood. Accordingly, how specific drugs would affect GJs and what some consequent specific brain diseases would be are the interests of the authors of this chapter. We would focus on pharmaceutical effects on GJs on astrocytes in specific diseases where GJs could possibly play a role including: 1 migraine and a novel therapy for migraine with aura, 2 neuroautoimmune diseases and immunomodulatory drugs in the treatment of demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system such as multiple sclerosis, 3 glioma and antineoplastic and anti-inflammatory agents that are used in treating brain tumors and 4 epilepsy and anticonvulsants that are widely used for seizures therapy. All of the above-mentioned therapeutic categories can possibly affect GJs expression of astrocytes and the role is discussed in the upcoming chapter.

  1. Gap-junction channels inhibit transverse propagation in cardiac muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasamy Lakshminarayanan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The effect of adding many gap-junctions (g-j channels between contiguous cells in a linear chain on transverse propagation between parallel chains was examined in a 5 × 5 model (5 parallel chains of 5 cells each for cardiac muscle. The action potential upstrokes were simulated using the PSpice program for circuit analysis. Either a single cell was stimulated (cell A1 or the entire chain was stimulated simultaneously (A-chain. Transverse velocity was calculated from the total propagation time (TPT from when the first AP crossed a Vm of -20 mV and the last AP crossed -20 mV. The number of g-j channels per junction was varied from zero to 100, 1,000 and 10,000 (Rgj of ∞, 100 MΩ, 10 MΩ, 1.0 MΩ, respectively. The longitudinal resistance of the interstitial fluid (ISF space between the parallel chains (Rol2 was varied between 200 KΩ (standard value and 1.0, 5.0, and 10 MΩ. The higher the Rol2 value, the tighter the packing of the chains. It was found that adding many g-j channels inhibited transverse propagation by blocking activation of all 5 chains, unless Rol2 was greatly increased above the standard value of 200 KΩ. This was true for either method of stimulation. This was explained by, when there is strong longitudinal coupling between all 5 cells of a chain awaiting excitation, there must be more transfer energy (i.e., more current to simultaneously excite all 5 cells of a chain.

  2. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaku, Yasuharu; Hwang, Jung Shan; Wolf, Alexander; Böttger, Angelika; Shimizu, Hiroshi; David, Charles N; Gojobori, Takashi

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  3. Innexin gap junctions in nerve cells coordinate spontaneous contractile behavior in Hydra polyps

    KAUST Repository

    Takaku, Yasuharu

    2014-01-07

    Nerve cells and spontaneous coordinated behavior first appeared near the base of animal evolution in the common ancestor of cnidarians and bilaterians. Experiments on the cnidarian Hydra have demonstrated that nerve cells are essential for this behavior, although nerve cells in Hydra are organized in a diffuse network and do not form ganglia. Here we show that the gap junction protein innexin-2 is expressed in a small group of nerve cells in the lower body column of Hydra and that an anti-innexin-2 antibody binds to gap junctions in the same region. Treatment of live animals with innexin-2 antibody eliminates gap junction staining and reduces spontaneous body column contractions. We conclude that a small subset of nerve cells, connected by gap junctions and capable of synchronous firing, act as a pacemaker to coordinate the contraction of the body column in the absence of ganglia.

  4. Chaotic synchronization with gap junction of multi-neurons in external electrical stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Bin; Wang Jiang; Fei Xiangyang

    2005-01-01

    The synchronization of n(n 3) neurons coupled with gap junction in external electrical stimulation is investigated. In this paper, the coupled model is established on the basis of nonlinear cable model, and then the relation between coupling strength of the gap junction and the synchronization is discussed in detail. The sufficient condition of complete synchronization is attained from rigorous mathematical derivation. The synchronizations of periodic neurons and chaotic neurons are studied respectively

  5. Modelling the effect of gap junctions on tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology

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    Doug Bruce

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available When modelling tissue-level cardiac electrophysiology, continuum approximations to the discrete cell-level equations are used to maintain computational tractability. One of the most commonly used models is represented by the bidomain equations, the derivation of which relies on a homogenisation technique to construct a suitable approximation to the discrete model. This derivation does not explicitly account for the presence of gap junctions connecting one cell to another. It has been seen experimentally [Rohr, Cardiovasc. Res. 2004] that these gap junctions have a marked effect on the propagation of the action potential, specifically as the upstroke of the wave passes through the gap junction. In this paper we explicitly include gap junctions in a both a 2D discrete model of cardiac electrophysiology, and the corresponding continuum model, on a simplified cell geometry. Using these models we compare the results of simulations using both continuum and discrete systems. We see that the form of the action potential as it passes through gap junctions cannot be replicated using a continuum model, and that the underlying propagation speed of the action potential ceases to match up between models when gap junctions are introduced. In addition, the results of the discrete simulations match the characteristics of those shown in Rohr 2004. From this, we suggest that a hybrid model — a discrete system following the upstroke of the action potential, and a continuum system elsewhere — may give a more accurate description of cardiac electrophysiology.

  6. Abundance of gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in adult Mosquitofish spinal cord neurons

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    Jose L Serrano-Velez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Dye-coupling, whole-mount immunohistochemistry for gap junction channel protein connexin 35 (Cx35, and freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling (FRIL reveal an abundance of electrical synapses/gap junctions at glutamatergic mixed synapses in the 14th spinal segment that innervates the adult male gonopodium of Western Mosquitofish, Gambusia affinis (Mosquitofish.To study gap junctions’ role in fast motor behavior, we used a minimally-invasive neural-tract-tracing technique to introduce gap junction-permeant or -impermeant dyes into deep muscles controlling the gonopodium of the adult male Mosquitofish, a teleost fish that rapidly transfers (complete in 50 of the 62 gap junctions at mixed synapses are in the 14th spinal segment.Our results support and extend studies showing gap junctions at mixed synapses in spinal cord segments involved in control of genital reflexes in rodents, and they suggest a link between mixed synapses and fast motor behavior. The findings provide a basis for studies of specific roles of spinal neurons in the generation/regulation of sex-specific behavior and for studies of gap junctions’ role in regulating fast motor behavior. Finally, the CoPA IN provides a novel candidate neuron for future studies of gap junctions and neural control of fast motor behaviors.

  7. The Display of Single-Domain Antibodies on the Surfaces of Connectosomes Enables Gap Junction-Mediated Drug Delivery to Specific Cell Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadok, Avinash K; Zhao, Chi; Meriwether, Amanda I; Ferrati, Silvia; Rowley, Tanner G; Zoldan, Janet; Smyth, Hugh D C; Stachowiak, Jeanne C

    2018-01-09

    Gap junctions, transmembrane protein channels that directly connect the cytoplasm of neighboring cells and enable the exchange of molecules between cells, are a promising new frontier for therapeutic delivery. Specifically, cell-derived lipid vesicles that contain functional gap junction channels, termed Connectosomes, have recently been demonstrated to substantially increase the effectiveness of small molecule chemotherapeutics. However, because gap junctions are present in nearly all tissues, Connectosomes have no intrinsic ability to target specific cell types, which potentially limits their therapeutic effectiveness. To address this challenge, here we display targeting ligands consisting of single-domain antibodies on the surfaces of Connectosomes. We demonstrate that these targeted Connectosomes selectively interact with cells that express a model receptor, promoting the selective delivery of the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin to this target cell population. More generally, our approach has the potential to boost cytoplasmic delivery of diverse therapeutic molecules to specific cell populations while protecting off-target cells, a critical step toward realizing the therapeutic potential of gap junctions.

  8. Lack of connexin43-mediated Bergmann glial gap junctional coupling does not affect cerebellar long-term depression, motor coordination, or eyeblink conditioning

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    Mika Tanaka

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Bergmann glial cells are specialized astrocytes in the cerebellum. In the mature cerebellar molecular layer, Bergmann glial processes are closely associated with Purkinje cells, enclosing Purkinje cell dendritic synapses with a glial sheath. There is intensive gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial processes, but their significance in cerebellar functions is not known. Connexin43 (Cx43, a major component of astrocytic gap junction channels, is abundantly expressed in Bergmann glial cells. To examine the role of Cx43-mediated gap junctions between Bergmann glial cells in cerebellar functions, we generated Cx43 conditional knockout mice with the S100b-Cre transgenic line (Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre, which exhibited a significant loss of Cx43 in the Bergmann glial cells and astrocytes in the cerebellum with a postnatal onset. The Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal cerebellar architecture. Although gap junctional coupling between the Bergmann glial cells measured by spreading of microinjected Lucifer yellow was virtually abolished in Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice, electrophysiologic analysis revealed that cerebellar long-term depression could be induced and maintained normally in thier cerebellar slices. In addition, at the behavioral level, Cx43fl/fl:S100b-Cre mice had normal motor coordination in the rotarod task and normal conditioned eyelid response. Our findings suggest that Cx43-mediated gap junctional coupling between Bergmann glial cells is not necessary for the neuron-glia interactions required for cerebellum-dependent motor coordination and motor learning.

  9. Gap Junctions Contribute to Ictal/Interictal Genesis in Human Hypothalamic Hamartomas

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    Jie Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human hypothalamic hamartoma (HH is a rare subcortical lesion associated with treatment-resistant epilepsy. Cellular mechanisms responsible for epileptogenesis are unknown. We hypothesized that neuronal gap junctions contribute to epileptogenesis through synchronous activity within the neuron networks in HH tissue. We studied surgically resected HH tissue with Western-blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, biocytin microinjection of recorded HH neurons, and microelectrode patch clamp recordings with and without pharmacological blockade of gap junctions. Normal human hypothalamus tissue was used as a control. Western blots showed increased expression of both connexin-36 (Cx36 and connexin-43 (Cx43 in HH tissue compared with normal human mammillary body tissue. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Cx36 and Cx43 are expressed in HH tissue, but Cx36 was mainly expressed within neuron clusters while Cx43 was mainly expressed outside of neuron clusters. Gap-junction profiles were observed between small HH neurons with electron microscopy. Biocytin injection into single recorded small HH neurons showed labeling of adjacent neurons, which was not observed in the presence of a neuronal gap-junction blocker, mefloquine. Microelectrode field recordings from freshly resected HH slices demonstrated spontaneous ictal/interictal-like discharges in most slices. Bath-application of gap-junction blockers significantly reduced ictal/interictal-like discharges in a concentration-dependent manner, while not affecting the action-potential firing of small gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA neurons observed with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from the same patient's HH tissue. These results suggest that neuronal gap junctions between small GABAergic HH neurons participate in the genesis of epileptic-like discharges. Blockade of gap junctions may be a new therapeutic strategy for controlling seizure activity in HH patients.

  10. Astrocytic Gap Junctional Communication is Reduced in Amyloid-β-Treated Cultured Astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's Disease Transgenic Mice

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    Nancy F Cruz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-β on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β1-40 (1 μmol/l for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue, NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  11. Astrocytic gap junctional communication is reduced in amyloid-β-treated cultured astrocytes, but not in Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Nancy F; Ball, Kelly K; Dienel, Gerald A

    2010-08-17

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by accumulation of amyloid deposits in brain, progressive cognitive deficits and reduced glucose utilization. Many consequences of the disease are attributed to neuronal dysfunction, but roles of astrocytes in its pathogenesis are not well understood. Astrocytes are extensively coupled via gap junctions, and abnormal trafficking of metabolites and signalling molecules within astrocytic syncytia could alter functional interactions among cells comprising the neurovascular unit. To evaluate the influence of amyloid-beta on astrocyte gap junctional communication, cultured astrocytes were treated with monomerized amyloid-β(1-40) (1 μmol/l) for intervals ranging from 2 h to 5 days, and the areas labelled by test compounds were determined by impaling a single astrocyte with a micropipette and diffusion of material into coupled cells. Amyloid-β-treated astrocytes had rapid, sustained 50-70% reductions in the area labelled by Lucifer Yellow, anionic Alexa Fluor® dyes and energy-related compounds, 6-NBDG (a fluorescent glucose analogue), NADH and NADPH. Amyloid-β treatment also caused a transient increase in oxidative stress. In striking contrast with these results, spreading of Lucifer Yellow within astrocytic networks in brain slices from three regions of 8.5-14-month-old control and transgenic Alzheimer's model mice was variable, labelling 10-2000 cells; there were no statistically significant differences in the number of dye-labelled cells among the groups or with age. Thus amyloid-induced dysfunction of gap junctional communication in cultured astrocytes does not reflect the maintenance of dye transfer through astrocytic syncytial networks in transgenic mice; the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease is not appropriately represented by the cell culture system.

  12. HDAC inhibition amplifies gap junction communication in neural progenitors: Potential for cell-mediated enzyme prodrug therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zahidul; Akhtar, Monira; Asklund, Thomas; Juliusson, Bengt; Almqvist, Per M.; Ekstroem, Tomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Enzyme prodrug therapy using neural progenitor cells (NPCs) as delivery vehicles has been applied in animal models of gliomas and relies on gap junction communication (GJC) between delivery and target cells. This study investigated the effects of histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors on GJC for the purpose of facilitating transfer of therapeutic molecules from recombinant NPCs. We studied a novel immortalized midbrain cell line, NGC-407 of embryonic human origin having neural precursor characteristics, as a potential delivery vehicle. The expression of gap junction protein connexin 43 (C x 43) was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. While C x 43 levels were decreased in untreated differentiating NGC-407 cells, the HDAC inhibitor 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PB) increased C x 43 expression along with increased membranous deposition in both proliferating and differentiating cells. Simultaneously, Ser 279/282-phosphorylated form of C x 43 was declined in both culture conditions by 4-PB. The 4-PB effect in NGC-407 cells was verified by using HNSC.100 human neural progenitors and Trichostatin A. Improved functional GJC is of imperative importance for therapeutic strategies involving intercellular transport of low molecular-weight compounds. We show here an enhancement by 4-PB, of the functional GJC among NGC-407 cells, as well as between NGC-407 and human glioma cells, as indicated by increased fluorescent dye transfer

  13. In Vitro Evaluation of Damage by Heavy Metals in Tight and Gap Junctions of Sertoli Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Treviño, Juan; Bassol-Mayagoitia, Susana; Ruiz-Flores, Pablo; Espino-Silva, Perla Karina; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Villa-Cedillo, Sheila Adela; Nava-Hernández, Martha P

    2017-10-01

    The Sertoli cell plays a vital role during the spermatogenesis process and has been identified as one of the main targets of the toxic action of heavy metals on the seminiferous epithelium. In the present work, the effect of lead (Pb), Arsenic (As), and Cadmium (Cd) in primary cultures of Sertoli cells was analyzed by measuring the expression of the genes Cldn11, Ocln, and Gja1 that participate in the tight and gap junctions, which are responsible for maintaining the blood-testis barrier. Sertoli cells were isolated from the testes of Wistar rats. Sertoli cell cultures were exposed separately and at the same concentrations of three heavy metals for 48 h. Subsequently, gene expression was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. In the morphological analysis of the cultures, after 24 h, the cultures exposed to Cd showed greatest detachment of the monolayer, followed by those exposed to As and Pb. As for gene expression patterns, As induced a decrease in the expression of the Cldn11 gene at 24 and 48 h (p metals generated different expression patterns in the three genes, we can postulate that the mechanisms of damage that they induce are different; therefore, the effect that they exert on the Sertoli cell occurs through different pathways, generating changes in structural proteins, altering Sertoli cell morphology, and compromising its function in the regulation of the spermatogenesis process.

  14. Barreloid Borders and Neuronal Activity Shape Panglial Gap Junction-Coupled Networks in the Mouse Thalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, Lena; Philippot, Camille; Griemsmann, Stephanie; Timmermann, Aline; Jabs, Ronald; Henneberger, Christian; Kettenmann, Helmut; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The ventral posterior nucleus of the thalamus plays an important role in somatosensory information processing. It contains elongated cellular domains called barreloids, which are the structural basis for the somatotopic organization of vibrissae representation. So far, the organization of glial networks in these barreloid structures and its modulation by neuronal activity has not been studied. We have developed a method to visualize thalamic barreloid fields in acute slices. Combining electrophysiology, immunohistochemistry, and electroporation in transgenic mice with cell type-specific fluorescence labeling, we provide the first structure-function analyses of barreloidal glial gap junction networks. We observed coupled networks, which comprised both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. The spread of tracers or a fluorescent glucose derivative through these networks was dependent on neuronal activity and limited by the barreloid borders, which were formed by uncoupled or weakly coupled oligodendrocytes. Neuronal somata were distributed homogeneously across barreloid fields with their processes running in parallel to the barreloid borders. Many astrocytes and oligodendrocytes were not part of the panglial networks. Thus, oligodendrocytes are the cellular elements limiting the communicating panglial network to a single barreloid, which might be important to ensure proper metabolic support to active neurons located within a particular vibrissae signaling pathway. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Astrocytic gap junctional networks suppress cellular damage in an in vitro model of ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinotsuka, Takanori; Yasui, Masato; Nuriya, Mutsuo

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Astrocytes exhibit characteristic changes in [Ca 2+ ] i under OGD. • Astrocytic [Ca 2+ ] i increase is synchronized with a neuronal anoxic depolarization. • Gap junctional couplings protect neurons as well as astrocytes during OGD. - Abstract: Astrocytes play pivotal roles in both the physiology and the pathophysiology of the brain. They communicate with each other via extracellular messengers as well as through gap junctions, which may exacerbate or protect against pathological processes in the brain. However, their roles during the acute phase of ischemia and the underlying cellular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we imaged changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) in astrocytes in mouse cortical slices under oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD) condition using two-photon microscopy. Under OGD, astrocytes showed [Ca 2+ ] i oscillations followed by larger and sustained [Ca 2+ ] i increases. While the pharmacological blockades of astrocytic receptors for glutamate and ATP had no effect, the inhibitions of gap junctional intercellular coupling between astrocytes significantly advanced the onset of the sustained [Ca 2+ ] i increase after OGD exposure. Interestingly, the simultaneous recording of the neuronal membrane potential revealed that the onset of the sustained [Ca 2+ ] i increase in astrocytes was synchronized with the appearance of neuronal anoxic depolarization. Furthermore, the blockade of gap junctional coupling resulted in a concurrent faster appearance of neuronal depolarizations, which remain synchronized with the sustained [Ca 2+ ] i increase in astrocytes. These results indicate that astrocytes delay the appearance of the pathological responses of astrocytes and neurons through their gap junction-mediated intercellular network under OGD. Thus, astrocytic gap junctional networks provide protection against tissue damage during the acute phase of ischemia

  16. Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isaac E.; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshimi; Olivero, Pablo; Pérez-Acle, Tomás; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C.; Contreras, Jorge E.; Martínez, Agustín D.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like Keratitis Ichthyosis Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin Cx26 is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and since KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channels functions remain unknown. In this study we demonstrate that syndromic mutations at the N-terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) show exacerbated hemichannel activity, but nonfunctional gap junction channels; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca2+ overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin. PMID:25625422

  17. BAAV Mediated GJB2 Gene Transfer Restores Gap Junction Coupling in Cochlear Organotypic Cultures from Deaf Cx26Sox10Cre Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, Giulia; Di Pasquale, Giovanni; Scimemi, Pietro; Rodriguez, Laura; Galindo Ramirez, Fabian; De Siati, Romolo Daniele; Santarelli, Rosa Maria; Arslan, Edoardo; Bortolozzi, Mario; Chiorini, John A.; Mammano, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The deafness locus DFNB1 contains GJB2, the gene encoding connexin26 and GJB6, encoding connexin30, which appear to be coordinately regulated in the inner ear. In this work, we investigated the expression and function of connexin26 and connexin30 from postnatal day 5 to adult age in double transgenic Cx26Sox10Cre mice, which we obtained by crossing connexin26 floxed mice with a deleter Sox10–Cre line. Cx26Sox10Cre mice presented with complete connexin26 ablation in the epithelial gap junction network of the cochlea, whereas connexin30 expression was developmentally delayed; immunolabeling patterns for both connexins were normal in the cochlear lateral wall. In vivo electrophysiological measurements in Cx26Sox10Cre mice revealed profound hearing loss accompanied by reduction of endocochlear potential, and functional experiments performed in postnatal cochlear organotypic cultures showed impaired gap junction coupling. Transduction of these cultures with a bovine adeno associated virus vector restored connexin26 protein expression and rescued gap junction coupling. These results suggest that restoration of normal connexin levels by gene delivery via recombinant adeno associated virus could be a way to rescue hearing function in DFNB1 mouse models and, in future, lead to the development of therapeutic interventions in humans. PMID:21876744

  18. BAAV mediated GJB2 gene transfer restores gap junction coupling in cochlear organotypic cultures from deaf Cx26Sox10Cre mice.

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    Giulia Crispino

    Full Text Available The deafness locus DFNB1 contains GJB2, the gene encoding connexin26 and GJB6, encoding connexin30, which appear to be coordinately regulated in the inner ear. In this work, we investigated the expression and function of connexin26 and connexin30 from postnatal day 5 to adult age in double transgenic Cx26(Sox10Cre mice, which we obtained by crossing connexin26 floxed mice with a deleter Sox10-Cre line. Cx26(Sox10Cre mice presented with complete connexin26 ablation in the epithelial gap junction network of the cochlea, whereas connexin30 expression was developmentally delayed; immunolabeling patterns for both connexins were normal in the cochlear lateral wall. In vivo electrophysiological measurements in Cx26(Sox10Cre mice revealed profound hearing loss accompanied by reduction of endocochlear potential, and functional experiments performed in postnatal cochlear organotypic cultures showed impaired gap junction coupling. Transduction of these cultures with a bovine adeno associated virus vector restored connexin26 protein expression and rescued gap junction coupling. These results suggest that restoration of normal connexin levels by gene delivery via recombinant adeno associated virus could be a way to rescue hearing function in DFNB1 mouse models and, in future, lead to the development of therapeutic interventions in humans.

  19. Modulation of outer hair cell electromotility by cochlear supporting cells and gap junctions.

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    Ning Yu

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Outer hair cell (OHC or prestin-based electromotility is an active cochlear amplifier in the mammalian inner ear that can increase hearing sensitivity and frequency selectivity. In situ, Deiters supporting cells are well-coupled by gap junctions and constrain OHCs standing on the basilar membrane. Here, we report that both electrical and mechanical stimulations in Deiters cells (DCs can modulate OHC electromotility. There was no direct electrical conductance between the DCs and the OHCs. However, depolarization in DCs reduced OHC electromotility associated nonlinear capacitance (NLC and distortion products. Increase in the turgor pressure of DCs also shifted OHC NLC to the negative voltage direction. Destruction of the cytoskeleton in DCs or dissociation of the mechanical-coupling between DCs and OHCs abolished these effects, indicating the modulation through the cytoskeleton activation and DC-OHC mechanical coupling rather than via electric field potentials. We also found that changes in gap junctional coupling between DCs induced large membrane potential and current changes in the DCs and shifted OHC NLC. Uncoupling of gap junctions between DCs shifted NLC to the negative direction. These data indicate that DCs not only provide a physical scaffold to support OHCs but also can directly modulate OHC electromotility through the DC-OHC mechanical coupling. Our findings reveal a new mechanism of cochlear supporting cells and gap junctional coupling to modulate OHC electromotility and eventually hearing sensitivity in the inner ear.

  20. Gap junctions and hemichannels composed of connexins: potential therapeutic targets for neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideyuki eTakeuchi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are macrophage-like resident immune cells that contribute to the maintenance of homeostasis in the central nervous system (CNS. Abnormal activation of microglia can cause damage in the CNS, and accumulation of activated microglia is a characteristic pathological observation in neurologic conditions such as trauma, stroke, inflammation, epilepsy, and neurodegenerative diseases. Activated microglia secrete high levels of glutamate, which damages CNS cells and has been implicated as a major cause of neurodegeneration in these conditions. Glutamate-receptor blockers and microglia inhibitors (e.g. minocycline have been examined as therapeutic candidates for several neurodegenerative diseases; however, these compounds exerted little therapeutic benefit because they either perturbed physiological glutamate signals or suppressed the actions of protective microglia. The ideal therapeutic approach would hamper the deleterious roles of activated microglia without diminishing their protective effects. We recently found that abnormally activated microglia secrete glutamate via gap-junction hemichannels on the cell surface. Moreover, administration of gap-junction inhibitors significantly suppressed excessive microglial glutamate release and improved disease symptoms in animal models of neurologic conditions such as stroke, multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease. Recent evidence also suggests that neuronal and glial communication via gap junctions amplifies neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Elucidation of the precise pathologic roles of gap junctions and hemichannels may lead to a novel therapeutic strategies that can slow and halt the progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  1. Chemopreventive agents attenuate rapid inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication induced by environmental toxicants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Babica, Pavel; Čtveráčková, Lucie; Lenčešová, Zuzana; Trosko, J. E.; Upham, B. L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 68, č. 5 (2016), s. 827-837 ISSN 0163-5581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12034 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : gap junctional intercellular communication * chemopreventive agents * environmental toxicants Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry Impact factor: 2.447, year: 2016

  2. Restricted distribution of connexin40, a gap junctional protein, in mammalian heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gros, D.; Jarry-Guichard, T.; ten Velde, I.; de Maziere, A.; van Kempen, M. J.; Davoust, J.; Briand, J. P.; Moorman, A. F.; Jongsma, H. J.

    1994-01-01

    Connexin40 (Cx40) is a member of the connexin family of gap junction proteins. Its mRNA, abundant in lung, is also present in mammalian heart, although in lower amount. Rabbit antipeptide antibodies directed to the COOH terminus (residues 335 to 356) of rat Cx40 were characterized to investigate the

  3. The effect of cilostamide on gap junction communication dynamics, chromatin remodeling, and competence acquisition in pig oocytes following parthenogenetic activation and nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieci, Cecilia; Lodde, Valentina; Franciosi, Federica; Lagutina, Irina; Tessaro, Irene; Modina, Silvia C; Albertini, David F; Lazzari, Giovanna; Galli, Cesare; Luciano, Alberto M

    2013-09-01

    In the pig, the efficiency of in vitro embryo production and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) procedures remains limited. It has been suggested that prematuration treatments (pre-IVM) based on the prolongation of a patent, bidirectional crosstalk between the oocyte and the cumulus cells through gap junction mediate communication (GJC), with the maintenance of a proper level of cAMP, could improve the developmental capability of oocytes. The aim of this study was to assess: 1) dose-dependent effects of cilostamide on nuclear maturation kinetics, 2) the relationship between treatments on GJC functionality and large-scale chromatin configuration changes, and 3) the impact of treatments on developmental competence acquisition after parthenogenetic activation (PA) and SCNT. Accordingly, cumulus-oocyte complexes were collected from 3- to 6-mm antral follicles and cultured for 24 h in defined culture medium with or without 1 μM cilostamide. GJC functionality was assessed by Lucifer yellow microinjection, while chromatin configuration was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy after nuclear staining. Cilostamide administration sustained functional coupling for up to 24 h of culture and delayed meiotic resumption, as only 25.6% of cilostamide-treated oocytes reached the pro-metaphase I stage compared to the control (69.7%; P < 0.05). Moreover, progressive chromatin condensation was delayed before meiotic resumption based upon G2/M biomarker phosphoprotein epitope acquisition using immunolocalization. Importantly, cilostamide treatment under these conditions improved oocyte developmental competence, as reflected in higher blastocyst quality after both parthenogenetic activation and SCNT.

  4. Histone deacetylase inhibition reduces cardiac Connexin43 expression and gap junction communication

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    Qin eXu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone deactylase (HDAC inhibitors are being investigated as novel therapies for cancer, inflammation, neurodegeneration, and heart failure. The effects of HDAC inhibitors on the functional expression of cardiac gap junctions (GJ are essentially unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of trichostatin A (TSA and vorinostat (VOR on functional GJ expression in ventricular cardiomyocytes. The effects of HDAC inhibition on connexin43 (Cx43 expression and functional GJ assembly were examined in primary cultured neonatal mouse ventricular myocytes. TSA and VOR reduced Cx43 mRNA, protein expression, and immunolocalized Cx43 GJ plaque area within ventricular myocyte monolayer cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed altered protein interactions with the Cx43 promoter. VOR also altered the phosphorylation state of several key regulatory Cx43 phospho-serine sites. Patch clamp analysis revealed reduced electrical coupling between isolated ventricular myocyte pairs, altered transjunctional voltage-dependent inactivation kinetics, and steady state junctional conductance inactivation and recovery relationships. Single GJ channel conductance was reduced to 54 pS only by maximum inhibitory doses of TSA (>= 100 nM. These two hydroxamate pan-HDAC inhibitors exert multiple levels of regulation on ventricular GJ communication by altering Cx43 expression, GJ area, post-translational modifications (e.g. phosphorylation, acetylation, gating, and channel conductance. Although a 50% downregulation of Cx43 GJ communication alone may not be sufficient to slow ventricular conduction or induce arrhythmias, the development of class-selective HDAC inhibitors may help avoid the potential negative cardiovascular effects of pan-HDACI.

  5. Modulation of Asymmetric Flux in Heterotypic Gap Junctions by Pore Shape, Particle Size and Charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhijit; Sachse, Frank B; Moreno, Alonso P

    2017-01-01

    Gap junction channels play a vital role in intercellular communication by connecting cytoplasm of adjoined cells through arrays of channel-pores formed at the common membrane junction. Their structure and properties vary depending on the connexin isoform(s) involved in forming the full gap junction channel. Lack of information on the molecular structure of gap junction channels has limited the development of computational tools for single channel studies. Currently, we rely on cumbersome experimental techniques that have limited capabilities. We have earlier reported a simplified Brownian dynamics gap junction pore model and demonstrated that variations in pore shape at the single channel level can explain some of the differences in permeability of heterotypic channels observed in in vitro experiments. Based on this computational model, we designed simulations to study the influence of pore shape, particle size and charge in homotypic and heterotypic pores. We simulated dye diffusion under whole cell voltage clamping. Our simulation studies with pore shape variations revealed a pore shape with maximal flux asymmetry in a heterotypic pore. We identified pore shape profiles that match the in silico flux asymmetry results to the in vitro results of homotypic and heterotypic gap junction formed out of Cx43 and Cx45. Our simulation results indicate that the channel's pore-shape established flux asymmetry and that flux asymmetry is primarily regulated by the sizes of the conical and/or cylindrical mouths at each end of the pore. Within the set range of particle size and charge, flux asymmetry was found to be independent of particle size and directly proportional to charge magnitude. While particle charge was vital to creating flux asymmetry, charge magnitude only scaled the observed flux asymmetry. Our studies identified the key factors that help predict asymmetry. Finally, we suggest the role of such flux asymmetry in creating concentration imbalances of messenger

  6. Articular chondrocyte network mediated by gap junctions: role in metabolic cartilage homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayan, Maria D; Gago-Fuentes, Raquel; Carpintero-Fernandez, Paula; Fernandez-Puente, Patricia; Filgueira-Fernandez, Purificacion; Goyanes, Noa; Valiunas, Virginijus; Brink, Peter R; Goldberg, Gary S; Blanco, Francisco J

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study investigated whether chondrocytes within the cartilage matrix have the capacity to communicate through intercellular connections mediated by voltage-gated gap junction (GJ) channels. Methods Frozen cartilage samples were used for immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry assays. Samples were embedded in cacodylate buffer before dehydration for scanning electron microscopy. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and mass spectrometry (MS) were performed to identify proteins that interact with the C-terminal end of Cx43. GJ communication was studied through in situ electroporation, electrophysiology and dye injection experiments. A transwell layered culture system and MS were used to identify and quantify transferred amino acids. Results Microscopic images revealed the presence of multiple cellular projections connecting chondrocytes within the matrix. These projections were between 5 and 150 μm in length. MS data analysis indicated that the C-terminus of Cx43 interacts with several cytoskeletal proteins implicated in Cx trafficking and GJ assembly, including α-tubulin and β-tubulin, actin, and vinculin. Electrophysiology experiments demonstrated that 12-mer oligonucleotides could be transferred between chondrocytes within 12 min after injection. Glucose was homogeneously distributed within 22 and 35 min. No transfer was detected when glucose was electroporated into A549 cells, which have no GJs. Transwell layered culture systems coupled with MS analysis revealed connexins can mediate the transfer of L-lysine and L-arginine between chondrocytes. Conclusions This study reveals that intercellular connections between chondrocytes contain GJs that play a key role in cell-cell communication and a metabolic function by exchange of nutrients including glucose and essential amino acids. A three-dimensional cellular network mediated through GJs might mediate metabolic and physiological homeostasis to maintain cartilage tissue. PMID:24225059

  7. Gap junction mediated intercellular metabolite transfer in the cochlea is compromised in connexin30 null mice.

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    Qing Chang

    Full Text Available Connexin26 (Cx26 and connexin30 (Cx30 are two major protein subunits that co-assemble to form gap junctions (GJs in the cochlea. Mutations in either one of them are the major cause of non-syndromic prelingual deafness in humans. Because the mechanisms of cochlear pathogenesis caused by Cx mutations are unclear, we investigated effects of Cx30 null mutation on GJ-mediated ionic and metabolic coupling in the cochlea of mice. A novel flattened cochlear preparation was used to directly assess intercellular coupling in the sensory epithelium of the cochlea. Double-electrode patch clamp recordings revealed that the absence of Cx30 did not significantly change GJ conductance among the cochlear supporting cells. The preserved electrical coupling is consistent with immunolabeling data showing extensive Cx26 GJs in the cochlea of the mutant mice. In contrast, dye diffusion assays showed that the rate and extent of intercellular transfer of multiple fluorescent dyes (including a non-metabolizable D-glucose analogue, 2-NBDG among cochlear supporting cells were severely reduced in Cx30 null mice. Since the sensory epithelium in the cochlea is an avascular organ, GJ-facilitated intercellular transfer of nutrient and signaling molecules may play essential roles in cellular homeostasis. To test this possibility, NBDG was used as a tracer to study the contribution of GJs in transporting glucose into the cochlear sensory epithelium when delivered systemically. NBDG uptake in cochlear supporting cells was significantly reduced in Cx30 null mice. The decrease was also observed with GJ blockers or glucose competition, supporting the specificity of our tests. These data indicate that GJs facilitate efficient uptake of glucose in the supporting cells. This study provides the first direct experimental evidence showing that the transfer of metabolically-important molecules in cochlear supporting cells is dependent on the normal function of GJs, thereby suggesting a

  8. Asymmetric configurations and N-terminal rearrangements in connexin26 gap junction channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshima, Atsunori; Tani, Kazutoshi; Toloue, Masoud M; Hiroaki, Yoko; Smock, Amy; Inukai, Sayaka; Cone, Angela; Nicholson, Bruce J; Sosinsky, Gina E; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-21

    Gap junction channels are unique in that they possess multiple mechanisms for channel closure, several of which involve the N terminus as a key component in gating, and possibly assembly. Here, we present electron crystallographic structures of a mutant human connexin26 (Cx26M34A) and an N-terminal deletion of this mutant (Cx26M34Adel2-7) at 6-Å and 10-Å resolutions, respectively. The three-dimensional map of Cx26M34A was improved by data from 60° tilt images and revealed a breakdown of the hexagonal symmetry in a connexin hemichannel, particularly in the cytoplasmic domain regions at the ends of the transmembrane helices. The Cx26M34A structure contained an asymmetric density in the channel vestibule ("plug") that was decreased in the Cx26M34Adel2-7 structure, indicating that the N terminus significantly contributes to form this plug feature. Functional analysis of the Cx26M34A channels revealed that these channels are predominantly closed, with the residual electrical conductance showing normal voltage gating. N-terminal deletion mutants with and without the M34A mutation showed no electrical activity in paired Xenopus oocytes and significantly decreased dye permeability in HeLa cells. Comparing this closed structure with the recently published X-ray structure of wild-type Cx26, which is proposed to be in an open state, revealed a radial outward shift in the transmembrane helices in the closed state, presumably to accommodate the N-terminal plug occluding the pore. Because both Cx26del2-7 and Cx26M34Adel2-7 channels are closed, the N terminus appears to have a prominent role in stabilizing the open configuration. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Abrogation of Gap Junctional Communication in ES Cells Results in a Disruption of Primitive Endoderm Formation in Embryoid Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörsdörfer, Philipp; Bosen, Felicitas; Gebhardt, Martina; Russ, Nicole; Zimmermann, Katrin; Komla Kessie, David; Sekaran, Thileepan; Egert, Angela; Ergün, Süleyman; Schorle, Hubert; Pfeifer, Alexander; Edenhofer, Frank; Willecke, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been suggested to be involved in early embryonic development but the actual functional role remained elusive. Connexin (Cx) 43 and Cx45 are co-expressed in embryonic stem (ES) cells, form gap junctions and are considered to exhibit adhesive function and/or to contribute to the establishment of defined communication compartments. Here, we describe the generation of Cx43/Cx45-double deficient mouse ES cells to achieve almost complete breakdown of GJIC. Cre-loxP induced deletion of both, Cx43 and Cx45, results in a block of differentiation in embryoid bodies (EBs) without affecting pluripotency marker expression and proliferation in ES cells. We demonstrate that GJIC-incompetent ES cells fail to form primitive endoderm in EB cultures, representing the inductive key step of further differentiation events. Lentiviral overexpression of either Cx43 or Cx45 in Cx43/45 mutants rescued the observed phenotype, confirming the specificity and indicating a partially redundant function of both connexins. Upon differentiation GJIC-incompetent ES cells exhibit a strikingly altered subcellular localization pattern of the transcription factor NFATc3. Control EBs exhibit significantly more activated NFATc3 in cellular nuclei than mutant EBs suggesting that Cx-mediated communication is needed for synchronized NFAT activation to induce orchestrated primitive endoderm formation. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of NFATc3 activation by Cyclosporin A, a well-described inhibitor of calcineurin, phenocopies the loss of GJIC in control cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:859-871. © 2016 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  10. Altered detrusor gap junction communications induce storage symptoms in bladder inflammation: a mouse cyclophosphamide-induced model of cystitis.

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    Takeshi Okinami

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS include storage, voiding and post-micturition symptoms, featuring many urological diseases. Storage symptoms are the most frequent among these and associated with overactive bladder and non-bacterial bladder inflammation such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS. Gap junction, a key regulator of hyperactive conditions in the bladder, has been reported to be involved in pathological bladder inflammation. Here we report involvement of gap junction in the etiology of storage symptoms in bladder inflammation. In this study, cyclophosphamide-induced cystitis was adapted as a model of bladder inflammation. Cyclophosphamide-treated mice showed typical storage symptoms including increased urinary frequency and reduced bladder capacity, with concurrent up-regulation of connexin 43 (GJA1, one of the major gap junction proteins in the bladder. In isometric tension study, bladder smooth muscle strips taken from the treated mice showed more pronounced spontaneous contraction than controls, which was attenuated by carbenoxolone, a gap junction inhibitor. In voiding behavior studies, the storage symptoms in the treated mice characterized by frequent voiding were alleviated by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid, another gap junction inhibitor. These results demonstrate that cyclophosphamide-induced mouse model of cystitis shows clinical storage symptoms related with bladder inflammation and that gap junction in the bladder may be a key molecule of these storage symptoms. Therefore, gap junction in the bladder might be an alternative therapeutic target for storage symptoms in bladder inflammation.

  11. Effect of sound on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling: Calcium waves under acoustic irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deymier, P A; Swinteck, N; Runge, K; Deymier-Black, A; Hoying, J B

    2015-01-01

    We present a previously unrecognized effect of sound waves on gap-junction-based intercellular signaling such as in biological tissues composed of endothelial cells. We suggest that sound irradiation may, through temporal and spatial modulation of cell-to-cell conductance, create intercellular calcium waves with unidirectional signal propagation associated with nonconventional topologies. Nonreciprocity in calcium wave propagation induced by sound wave irradiation is demonstrated in the case of a linear and a nonlinear reaction-diffusion model. This demonstration should be applicable to other types of gap-junction-based intercellular signals, and it is thought that it should be of help in interpreting a broad range of biological phenomena associated with the beneficial therapeutic effects of sound irradiation and possibly the harmful effects of sound waves on health.

  12. Estimation of the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient in cell monolayers coupled by gap junctions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Hofgaard, Johannes P; von Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-01-01

    A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non-electropo......A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non......-electroporated parts of the monolayer enables estimation of the intercellular coupling. So far, the extent of dye spread has been analyzed in qualitative terms only and not in a manner based directly on the physics of the underlying diffusion process....

  13. Gap junctions in C. elegans: Their roles in behavior and development

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, David H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans utilizes gap junctions in different fashions in virtually all of its cells. This model animal has a surprisingly large number of innexin genes within its genome, and many nematode cell types can express multiple innexins at once, leading to the formation of diverse junction types and enough redundancy to limit the effect of single gene knockdowns on animal development or behavioral phenotypes. Here, we review the general properties of these junctio...

  14. Central sensitization in medullary dorsal horn involves gap junctions and hemichannels

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, Chen Yu; Li, Zhaohui; Dostrovsky, Jonathan O.; Sessle, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Central sensitization is a fundamental mechanism contributing to acute and chronic pain conditions. Our previous studies have documented a glutamatergic-, purinergic- and glial-dependent central sensitization that can be induced in rat medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons by mustard oil (MO) application to the tooth pulp. The present study demonstrated that carbenoxolone, a potent gap junction and hemichannel blocker, completely blocked all parameters of MO-induced central sensitiz...

  15. Gap junction intercellular communication mediated by connexin43 in astrocytes is essential for their resistance to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Hoa T; Sin, Wun Chey; Lozinsky, Shannon; Bechberger, John; Vega, José Luis; Guo, Xu Qiu; Sáez, Juan C; Naus, Christian C

    2014-01-17

    Oxidative stress induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is associated with various neurological disorders including aging, neurodegenerative diseases, as well as traumatic and ischemic insults. Astrocytes have an important role in the anti-oxidative defense in the brain. The gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) forms intercellular channels as well as hemichannels in astrocytes. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of Cx43 to astrocytic death induced by the ROS hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the mechanism by which Cx43 exerts its effects. Lack of Cx43 expression or blockage of Cx43 channels resulted in increased ROS-induced astrocytic death, supporting a cell protective effect of functional Cx43 channels. H2O2 transiently increased hemichannel activity, but reduced gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). GJIC in wild-type astrocytes recovered after 7 h, but was absent in Cx43 knock-out astrocytes. Blockage of Cx43 hemichannels incompletely inhibited H2O2-induced hemichannel activity, indicating the presence of other hemichannel proteins. Panx1, which is predicted to be a major hemichannel contributor in astrocytes, did not appear to have any cell protective effect from H2O2 insults. Our data suggest that GJIC is important for Cx43-mediated ROS resistance. In contrast to hypoxia/reoxygenation, H2O2 treatment decreased the ratio of the hypophosphorylated isoform to total Cx43 level. Cx43 has been reported to promote astrocytic death induced by hypoxia/reoxygenation. We therefore speculate the increase in Cx43 dephosphorylation may account for the facilitation of astrocytic death. Our findings suggest that the role of Cx43 in response to cellular stress is dependent on the activation of signaling pathways leading to alteration of Cx43 phosphorylation states.

  16. Cut-loading: a useful tool for examining the extent of gap junction tracer coupling between retinal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hee Joo; Ribelayga, Christophe P; Mangel, Stuart C

    2012-01-12

    In addition to chemical synaptic transmission, neurons that are connected by gap junctions can also communicate rapidly via electrical synaptic transmission. Increasing evidence indicates that gap junctions not only permit electrical current flow and synchronous activity between interconnected or coupled cells, but that the strength or effectiveness of electrical communication between coupled cells can be modulated to a great extent(1,2). In addition, the large internal diameter (~1.2 nm) of many gap junction channels permits not only electric current flow, but also the diffusion of intracellular signaling molecules and small metabolites between interconnected cells, so that gap junctions may also mediate metabolic and chemical communication. The strength of gap junctional communication between neurons and its modulation by neurotransmitters and other factors can be studied by simultaneously electrically recording from coupled cells and by determining the extent of diffusion of tracer molecules, which are gap junction permeable, but not membrane permeable, following iontophoretic injection into single cells. However, these procedures can be extremely difficult to perform on neurons with small somata in intact neural tissue. Numerous studies on electrical synapses and the modulation of electrical communication have been conducted in the vertebrate retina, since each of the five retinal neuron types is electrically connected by gap junctions(3,4). Increasing evidence has shown that the circadian (24-hour) clock in the retina and changes in light stimulation regulate gap junction coupling(3-8). For example, recent work has demonstrated that the retinal circadian clock decreases gap junction coupling between rod and cone photoreceptor cells during the day by increasing dopamine D2 receptor activation, and dramatically increases rod-cone coupling at night by reducing D2 receptor activation(7,8). However, not only are these studies extremely difficult to perform on

  17. Oxaliplatin enhances gap junction-mediated coupling in cell cultures of mouse trigeminal ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Jeppe Nørgaard; Warwick, Rebekah; Duroux, Meg; Hanani, Menachem; Gazerani, Parisa

    2015-08-01

    Communications between satellite glial cells and neighboring neurons within sensory ganglia may contribute to neuropathic and inflammatory pain. To elucidate the role of satellite glial cells in chemotherapy-induced pain, we examined the effects of oxaliplatin on the gap junction-mediated coupling between these cells. We also examined whether the gap junction blocker, carbenoxolone, can reverse the coupling. Primary cultures of mice trigeminal ganglia, 24-48h after cell isolation, were used. Satellite glial cells were injected with Lucifer yellow in the presence or absence of oxaliplatin (60 μM). In addition, the effect of carbenoxolone (100 μM) on coupling, and the expression of connexin 43 proteins were evaluated. Dye coupling between adjacent satellite glial cells was significantly increased (2.3-fold, Peffect. Hence, it is proposed that increased gap junction-mediated coupling was seen between satellite glial cells in TG. This observation together with our previous data obtained from a behavioral study suggests that this phenomenon might contribute to chemotherapy-induced nociception following oxaliplatin treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. NBT-II carcinoma behaviour is not dependent on cell-cell communication through gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesueur, F; Mesnil, M; Delouvée, A; Girault, J M; Yamasaki, H; Thiery, J P; Jouanneau, J

    2002-05-31

    To study the mechanism(s) underlying the proliferation of heterogeneous cell populations within a solid tumour, the NBT-II rat bladder carcinoma system was used. It has been first investigated whether the different cell populations are coupled through gap junctions (GJIC). Cells overexpressing the Cx43 were generated to test for any tumour suppressive activity in vivo. To determine whether GJIC is essential for tumour proliferation and the establishment of a cooperative community effect, NBT-II cells that are incompetent for cell coupling were generated. The data report that (i) carcinoma cells expressing or not FGF-1 are coupled through GJIC in vitro and in coculture and express the gap junction protein Cx43, (ii) overexpression of Cx43 in these cells does not affect their in vitro coupling capacities and in vivo tumourigenic growth properties, (iii) inhibition of GJIC through antisense strategy has no in vivo obvious consequence on the tumour growth properties of the carcinoma, and (iv) the community effect between two carcinoma cell populations does not critically involve cell coupling through gap junctions.

  19. Combinational treatment of gap junctional activator and tamoxifen in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gakhar, Gunjan; Hua, Duy H; Nguyen, Thu Annelise

    2010-01-01

    Tamoxifen is a drug of choice for endocrine-responsive breast tumor patients. However, tamoxifen resistance has become a major concern for the treatment of breast cancer. Combinational therapies of tamoxifen and different drugs are being frequently studied. In this study, we tested the efficacy of substituted quinolines (code name=PQ1; a gap junctional activator) in combination with tamoxifen in T47D cells. Colony growth assay was performed using soft agar to measure the colony growth, whereas cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay in T47D cells. The level of Ki67, survivin, and BAX was measured using confocal microscopy along with western blot analysis. Apoptosis-bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate labeling was also examined in the induced treatment of T47D cells. We observed a 55% decrease in the colony growth in the presence of combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen, whereas tamoxifen alone had little effect. A combination of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1 resulted in only 16% cell viability compared with controls at 48 h in T47D cells by the MTT assay. We found a significant increase in BAX protein at 1 h in the presence of 500 nmol/l PQ1 alone, 10 micromol/l tamoxifen alone, and the combination of PQ1 and tamoxifen. A two-fold increase was observed in active caspase 3 in the presence of combinational treatment of 10 micromol/l tamoxifen and 200 or 500 nmol/l PQ1. In addition, flow cytometric analysis showed a 50% increase in the number of apoptotic cells in the presence of the combination of tamoxifen and PQ1 compared with the control. Furthermore, the results show that combinational treatment of tamoxifen and PQ1 significantly reduces the expression of survivin in T47D cells. Gap junction inhibitor studies with carbenexolone were also performed confirming the role of gap junctions in cell proliferation and cell death. The combinational treatment of PQ1 and tamoxifen has a significant increase in BAX expression, caspase 3 activation, and DNA

  20. Costimulation of N-methyl-d-aspartate and muscarinic neuronal receptors modulates gap junctional communication in striatal astrocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Rouach, N.; Tencé, M.; Glowinski, J.; Giaume, C.

    2002-01-01

    Cocultures of neurons and astrocytes from the rat striatum were used to determine whether the stimulation of neuronal receptors could affect the level of intercellular communication mediated by gap junctions in astrocytes. The costimulation of N-methyl-D-asparte (NMDA) and muscarinic receptors led to a prominent reduction of astrocyte gap junctional communication (GJC) in coculture. This treatment was not effective in astrocyte cultures, these cells being devoid of NMDA receptors. Both types ...

  1. Fenamates block gap junction coupling and potentiate BKCa channels in guinea pig arteriolar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Zhi; Ma, Ke-Tao; Guan, Bing-Cai; Li, Li; Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Zhong-Shuang; Si, Jun-Qiang; Jiang, Zhi-Gen

    2013-01-01

    We determined the actions of the fenamates, flufenamic acid (FFA) and niflumic acid (NFA), on gap junction-mediated intercellular coupling between vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) in situ of acutely isolated arteriole segments from the three vascular beds: the spiral modiolar artery (SMA), anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) and mesenteric artery (MA), and on non-junctional membrane channels in dispersed VSMCs. Conventional whole-cell recording methods were used. FFA reversibly suppressed the input conductance (Ginput) or increased the input resistance (Rinput) in a concentration dependent manner, with slightly different IC50s for the SMA, AICA and MA segments (26, 33 and 56 μM respectively, P>0.05). Complete electrical isolation of the recorded VSMC was normally reached at ≥300 μM. NFA had a similar effect on gap junction among VSMCs with an IC50 of 40, 48 and 62 μM in SMA, AICA and MA segments, respectively. In dispersed VSMCs, FFA and NFA increased outward rectifier K+-current mediated by the big conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BKCa) in a concentration-dependent manner, with a similar EC50 of ~300 μM for both FFA and NFA in the three vessels. Iberiotoxin, a selective blocker of the BKCa, suppressed the enhancement of the BKCa by FFA and NFA. The KV blocker 4-AP had no effect on the fenamates-induced K+-current enhancement. We conclude that FFA and NFA blocked the vascular gap junction mediated electrical couplings uniformly in arterioles of the three vascular beds, and complete electrical isolation of the recorded VSMC is obtained at ≧300 μM; FFA and NFA also activate BKCa channels in the arteriolar smooth muscle cells in addition to their known inhibitory effects on chloride channels. PMID:23420003

  2. Long-range gap junctional signaling controls oncogene-mediated tumorigenesis in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brook T Chernet

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the immediate microenvironment, long-range signaling may be an important component of cancer. Molecular-genetic analyses have implicated gap junctions – key mediators of cell-cell communication – in carcinogenesis. We recently showed that the resting voltage potential of distant cell groups is a key determinant of metastatic transformation and tumor induction. Here, we show in the Xenopus laevis model that gap junctional communication (GJC is a modulator of the long-range bioelectric signaling that regulates tumor formation. Genetic disruption of GJC taking place within tumors, within remote host tissues, or between the host and tumors – significantly lowers the incidence of tumors induced by KRAS mutations. The most pronounced suppression of tumor incidence was observed upon GJC disruption taking place farther away from oncogene-expressing cells, revealing a role for GJC in distant cells in the control of tumor growth. In contrast, enhanced GJC communication through the overexpression of wild-type connexin Cx26 increased tumor incidence. Our data confirm a role for GJC in tumorigenesis, and reveal that this effect is non-local. Based on these results and on published data on movement of ions through GJs, we present a quantitative model linking the GJC coupling and bioelectrical state of cells to the ability of oncogenes to initiate tumorigenesis. When integrated with data on endogenous bioelectric signaling during left-right patterning, the model predicts differential tumor incidence outcomes depending on the spatial configurations of gap junction paths relative to tumor location and major anatomical body axes. Testing these predictions, we found that the strongest influence of GJ modulation on tumor suppression by hyperpolarization occurred along the embryonic left-right axis. Together, these data reveal new, long-range aspects of cancer control by the host’s physiological parameters.

  3. Effect and its threshold of ELF magnetic fields on gap junctional intercellular communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Yiti; Hu Genlin; Zeng Qunli; Jiang Huai; Xu Zhengping

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To explore the relationship between extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields and carcinogenesis. Methods: The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) technique was used to determine the effect of ELF magnetic fields and its threshold on gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). Results: FRAP analysis indicated that 0.4 mT ELF or more could inhibit GJIC, and 0.2 mT ELF or more could enhance the inhibition of GJIC by TPA. Conclusion: ELF magnetic fields might act as a cancer promoter or work in synergy with other cancer promoters

  4. Connexin 30 expression and frequency of connexin heterogeneity in astrocyte gap junction plaques increase with age in the rat retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Mansour

    Full Text Available We investigated age-associated changes in retinal astrocyte connexins (Cx by assaying Cx numbers, plaque sizes, protein expression levels and heterogeneity of gap junctions utilizing six-marker immunohistochemistry (IHC. We compared Wistar rat retinal wholemounts in animals aged 3 (young adult, 9 (middle-aged and 22 months (aged. We determined that retinal astrocytes have gap junctions composed of Cx26, -30, -43 and -45. Cx30 was consistently elevated at 22 months compared to younger ages both when associated with parenchymal astrocytes and vascular-associated astrocytes. Not only was the absolute number of Cx30 plaques significantly higher (P<0.05 but the size of the plaques was significantly larger at 22 months compared to younger ages (p<0.05. With age, Cx26 increased significantly initially, but returned to basal levels; whereas Cx43 expression remained low and stable with age. Evidence that astrocytes alter connexin compositions of gap junctions was demonstrated by the significant increase in the number of Cx26/Cx45 gap junctions with age. We also found gap junctions comprised of 1, 2, 3 or 4 Cx proteins suggesting that retinal astrocytes use various connexin protein combinations in their gap junctions during development and aging. These data provides new insight into the dynamic and extensive Cx network utilized by retinal astrocytes for communication within both the parenchyma and vasculature for the maintenance of normal retinal physiology with age. This characterisation of the changes in astrocytic gap junctional communication with age in the CNS is crucial to the understanding of physiological aging and age-related neurodegenerative diseases.

  5. Amitriptyline up-regulates connexin43-gap junction in rat cultured cortical astrocytes via activation of the p38 and c-Fos/AP-1 signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, N; Suekama, K; Zhang, F F; Kajitani, N; Hisaoka-Nakashima, K; Takebayashi, M; Nakata, Y

    2014-06-01

    Intercellular communication via gap junctions, comprised of connexin (Cx) proteins, allow for communication between astrocytes, which in turn is crucial for maintaining CNS homeostasis. The expression of Cx43 is decreased in post-mortem brains from patients with major depression. A potentially novel mechanism of tricyclic antidepressants is to increase the expression and functioning of gap junctions in astrocytes. The effect of amitriptyline on the expression of Cx43 and gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in rat primary cultured cortical astrocytes was investigated. We also investigated the role of p38 MAPK intracellular signalling pathway in the amitriptyline-induced expression of Cx43 and GJIC. Treatment with amitriptyline for 48 h significantly up-regulated Cx43 mRNA, protein and GJIC. The up-regulation of Cx43 was not monoamine-related since noradrenaline, 5-HT and dopamine did not induce Cx43 expression and pretreatment with α- and β-adrenoceptor antagonists had no effect. Intracellular signalling involved p38 MAPK, as amitriptyline significantly increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation and Cx43 expression and GJIC were significantly blocked by the p38 inhibitor SB 202190. Furthermore, amitriptyline-induced Cx43 expression and GJIC were markedly reduced by transcription factor AP-1 inhibitors (curcumin and tanshinone IIA). The translocation of c-Fos from the cytosol and the nucleus of cortical astrocytes was increased by amitriptyline, and this response was dependent on p38 activity. These findings indicate a novel mechanism of action of amitriptyline through cortical astrocytes, and further suggest that targeting this mechanism could lead to the development of a new class of antidepressants. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  6. The gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate protects against acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by inhibiting cytochrome P450 enzymes and c-jun N-terminal kinase activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Kuo; Williams, C. David; McGill, Mitchell R.; Xie, Yuchao [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States); Farhood, Anwar [Department of Pathology, St. David' s North Austin Medical Center, Austin, TX 78756 (United States); Vinken, Mathieu [Department of Toxicology, Center for Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vrije Universiteit Brussels, 1090 Brussels (Belgium); Jaeschke, Hartmut, E-mail: hjaeschke@kumc.edu [Department of Pharmacology, Toxicology and Therapeutics, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is the leading cause of acute liver failure in the US. Although many aspects of the mechanism are known, recent publications suggest that gap junctions composed of connexin32 function as critical intercellular communication channels which transfer cytotoxic mediators into neighboring hepatocytes and aggravate liver injury. However, these studies did not consider off-target effects of reagents used in these experiments, especially the gap junction inhibitor 2-aminoethoxy-diphenyl-borate (2-APB). In order to assess the mechanisms of protection of 2-APB in vivo, male C56Bl/6 mice were treated with 400 mg/kg APAP to cause extensive liver injury. This injury was prevented when animals were co-treated with 20 mg/kg 2-APB and was attenuated when 2-APB was administered 1.5 h after APAP. However, the protection was completely lost when 2-APB was given 4–6 h after APAP. Measurement of protein adducts and c-jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation indicated that 2-APB reduced both protein binding and JNK activation, which correlated with hepatoprotection. Although some of the protection was due to the solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), in vitro experiments clearly demonstrated that 2-APB directly inhibits cytochrome P450 activities. In addition, JNK activation induced by phorone and tert-butylhydroperoxide in vivo was inhibited by 2-APB. The effects against APAP toxicity in vivo were reproduced in primary cultured hepatocytes without use of DMSO and in the absence of functional gap junctions. We conclude that the protective effect of 2-APB was caused by inhibition of metabolic activation of APAP and inhibition of the JNK signaling pathway and not by blocking connexin32-based gap junctions. - Highlights: • 2-APB protected against APAP-induced liver injury in mice in vivo and in vitro • 2-APB protected by inhibiting APAP metabolic activation and JNK signaling pathway • DMSO inhibited APAP metabolic activation as the solvent of 2-APB

  7. Transient suppression of gap junctional intercellular communication after exposure to 100-nanosecond pulsed electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steuer, Anna; Schmidt, Anke; Labohá, Petra; Babica, Pavel; Kolb, Juergen F

    2016-12-01

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) is an important mechanism that is involved and affected in many diseases and injuries. So far, the effect of nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) on the communication between cells was not investigated. An in vitro approach is presented with rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells grown and exposed in a monolayer. In order to observe sub-lethal effects, cells were exposed to pulsed electric fields with a duration of 100ns and amplitudes between 10 and 20kV/cm. GJIC strongly decreased within 15min after treatment but recovered within 24h. Gene expression of Cx43 was significantly decreased and associated with a reduced total amount of Cx43 protein. In addition, MAP kinases p38 and Erk1/2, involved in Cx43 phosphorylation, were activated and Cx43 became hyperphosphorylated. Immunofluorescent staining of Cx43 displayed the disassembly of gap junctions. Further, a reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton was observed whereas tight junction protein ZO-1 was not significantly affected. All effects were field- and time-dependent and most pronounced within 30 to 60min after treatment. A better understanding of a possible manipulation of GJIC by nsPEFs might eventually offer a possibility to develop and improve treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Gap junctions are essential for generating the correlated spike activity of neighboring retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béla Völgyi

    Full Text Available Neurons throughout the brain show spike activity that is temporally correlated to that expressed by their neighbors, yet the generating mechanism(s remains unclear. In the retina, ganglion cells (GCs show robust, concerted spiking that shapes the information transmitted to central targets. Here we report the synaptic circuits responsible for generating the different types of concerted spiking of GC neighbors in the mouse retina. The most precise concerted spiking was generated by reciprocal electrical coupling of GC neighbors via gap junctions, whereas indirect electrical coupling to a common cohort of amacrine cells generated the correlated activity with medium precision. In contrast, the correlated spiking with the lowest temporal precision was produced by shared synaptic inputs carrying photoreceptor noise. Overall, our results demonstrate that different synaptic circuits generate the discrete types of GC correlated activity. Moreover, our findings expand our understanding of the roles of gap junctions in the retina, showing that they are essential for generating all forms of concerted GC activity transmitted to central brain targets.

  9. Gap junction channel. Its aqueous nature as indicated by deuterium oxide effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verselis, V.; Brink, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of temperature and solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) on axoplasmic (ga) and gap junctional (gj) conductances were examined in the earthworm septate median giant axon (MGA). The temperature coefficients (Q10) for ga and gj were 1.4 and 1.5, respectively, between 5 and 15 degrees C. Substitution with D 2 O rapidly reduced both ga and gj by 20% and increased the Q10's to 1.5 and 1.8, respectively. The reduction in ga upon substitution with D 2 O and with cooling in either solvent reflects the changes that occur in solvent viscosity, which indicates that ion mobility in axoplasm, as in free solution, is primarily governed by viscous properties of the solvent. The similar initial reduction observed for gj suggests that solvent occupies the gap junction channel volume and influences transjunctional ion mobility. With time there was a further reduction in gj at 20 degrees C and a larger Q10 in D 2 O. The enhanced effects of D 2 O on gj cannot be accounted for by solvent viscosity alone and may be due to an increased hydration of the channels and/or the transport ions and by isotope effects of hydrogen-deuterium exchange on the channel protein that reduce gj

  10. The effect of hyaluronic acid on insulin secretion in HIT-T15 cells through the enhancement of gap-junctional intercellular communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuping; Nagira, Tsutomu; Tsuchiya, Toshie

    2006-03-01

    The transplantation of bioartificial pancreas has the potential to restore endogenous insulin secretion in type I diabetes. The bioartificial pancreas is constructed in vitro from cells and a support matrix. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is an extremely ubiquitous polysaccharide of extracellular matrix in the body and plays various biological roles. It has been suggested that high molecular weight (HMW) HA increases in the function of gap-junctional intercellular communications (GJIC) and the expression of connexin-43 (Cx43). To determine whether the function of pancreatic beta-cells is affected by gap junctions after HMW HA-treatment, we exposed HIT-T15, a clonal pancreatic beta-cell line, in various concentrations of HA for 24h, and then detected the insulin secretion and content, using an insulin assay kit by ELISA technique. The cellular functions of GJIC were assayed by dye-transfer method using the dye solution of Lucifer yellow. HA-treatment resulted in the enhancement of GJIC function, the increase of insulin release and insulin content. The results obtained in this study suggest that HA-coating increases the insulin secretion of HIT-T15 cells by the enhancement of Cx43-mediated GJIC. The results give useful information on design biocompatibility of HA when is used as a biomaterial for bioartificial pancreas.

  11. GABA and Gap Junctions in the Development of Synchronized Activity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Meeri Eeva-Liisa; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    The electrical activity of the brain arises from single neurons communicating with each other. However, how single neurons interact during early development to give rise to neural network activity remains poorly understood. We studied the emergence of synchronous neural activity in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neural networks simultaneously on a single-neuron level and network level. The contribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and gap junctions to the development of synchronous activity in hPSC-derived neural networks was studied with GABA agonist and antagonist and by blocking gap junctional communication, respectively. We characterized the dynamics of the network-wide synchrony in hPSC-derived neural networks with high spatial resolution (calcium imaging) and temporal resolution microelectrode array (MEA). We found that the emergence of synchrony correlates with a decrease in very strong GABA excitation. However, the synchronous network was found to consist of a heterogeneous mixture of synchronously active cells with variable responses to GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Furthermore, we show how single-cell distributions give rise to the network effect of GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Finally, based on our observations, we suggest that the earliest form of synchronous neuronal activity depends on gap junctions and a decrease in GABA induced depolarization but not on GABAA mediated signaling. PMID:29559893

  12. GABA and Gap Junctions in the Development of Synchronized Activity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäkinen, Meeri Eeva-Liisa; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    The electrical activity of the brain arises from single neurons communicating with each other. However, how single neurons interact during early development to give rise to neural network activity remains poorly understood. We studied the emergence of synchronous neural activity in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived neural networks simultaneously on a single-neuron level and network level. The contribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and gap junctions to the development of synchronous activity in hPSC-derived neural networks was studied with GABA agonist and antagonist and by blocking gap junctional communication, respectively. We characterized the dynamics of the network-wide synchrony in hPSC-derived neural networks with high spatial resolution (calcium imaging) and temporal resolution microelectrode array (MEA). We found that the emergence of synchrony correlates with a decrease in very strong GABA excitation. However, the synchronous network was found to consist of a heterogeneous mixture of synchronously active cells with variable responses to GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Furthermore, we show how single-cell distributions give rise to the network effect of GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Finally, based on our observations, we suggest that the earliest form of synchronous neuronal activity depends on gap junctions and a decrease in GABA induced depolarization but not on GABA A mediated signaling.

  13. GABA and Gap Junctions in the Development of Synchronized Activity in Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeri Eeva-Liisa Mäkinen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrical activity of the brain arises from single neurons communicating with each other. However, how single neurons interact during early development to give rise to neural network activity remains poorly understood. We studied the emergence of synchronous neural activity in human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived neural networks simultaneously on a single-neuron level and network level. The contribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA and gap junctions to the development of synchronous activity in hPSC-derived neural networks was studied with GABA agonist and antagonist and by blocking gap junctional communication, respectively. We characterized the dynamics of the network-wide synchrony in hPSC-derived neural networks with high spatial resolution (calcium imaging and temporal resolution microelectrode array (MEA. We found that the emergence of synchrony correlates with a decrease in very strong GABA excitation. However, the synchronous network was found to consist of a heterogeneous mixture of synchronously active cells with variable responses to GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Furthermore, we show how single-cell distributions give rise to the network effect of GABA, GABA agonists and gap junction blockers. Finally, based on our observations, we suggest that the earliest form of synchronous neuronal activity depends on gap junctions and a decrease in GABA induced depolarization but not on GABAA mediated signaling.

  14. Through gap junction communications, co-cultured mast cells and fibroblasts generate fibroblast activities allied with hypertrophic scarring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Theodore T; Ehrlich, H Paul

    2013-05-01

    The prominent inflammatory cell identified in excessive scarring is the mast cell. Hypertrophic scar exhibits myofibroblasts derived from the transformation of fibroblasts, increased collagen synthesis, and stationary nonmigratory resident cells. The co-culture of fibroblasts with an established rat mast cell line (RMC-1) was used to explore the hypothesis of whether mast cells through gap junctional intercellular communications guide fibroblasts in promoting excessive scarring. Human dermal fibroblasts were cultured alone or co-cultured with RMC-1 cells as is or with either blocked gap junctional intercellular communications or devoid of cytoplasmic granules. Collagen synthesis was analyzed by dot blot analysis; immunohistology identified myofibroblasts, and a cell migration assay measured fibroblast locomotion. Fibroblasts co-cultured with RMC-1 cells transformed into myofibroblasts, had increased collagen synthesis, and showed retarded cell migration. In contrast, RMC-1 cells unable to form gap junctional intercellular communications were similar to fibroblasts alone, failing to promote these activities. Degranulated RMC-1 cells were as effective as intact RMC-1 cells. Mast cells induce fibroblast activities associated with hypertrophic scarring through gap junctional intercellular communications. Eliminating the mast cell or its gap junctional intercellular communications with fibroblasts may be a possible approach in preventing hypertrophic scarring or reducing fibrotic conditions.

  15. Cytokine effects on gap junction communication and connexin expression in human bladder smooth muscle cells and suburothelial myofibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Heinrich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The last decade identified cytokines as one group of major local cell signaling molecules related to bladder dysfunction like interstitial cystitis (IC and overactive bladder syndrome (OAB. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC is essential for the coordination of normal bladder function and has been found to be altered in bladder dysfunction. Connexin (Cx 43 and Cx45 are the most important gap junction proteins in bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC and suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF. Modulation of connexin expression by cytokines has been demonstrated in various tissues. Therefore, we investigate the effect of interleukin (IL 4, IL6, IL10, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα and transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGFβ1 on GJIC, and Cx43 and Cx45 expression in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC and human suburothelial myofibroblasts (hsMF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HBSMC and hsMF cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy. In cytokine stimulated cultured hBSMC and hsMF GJIC was analyzed via Fluorescence Recovery after Photo-bleaching (FRAP. Cx43 and Cx45 expression was assessed by quantitative PCR and confocal immunofluorescence. Membrane protein fraction of Cx43 and Cx45 was quantified by Dot Blot. Upregulation of cell-cell-communication was found after IL6 stimulation in both cell types. In hBSMC IL4 and TGFβ1 decreased both, GJIC and Cx43 protein expression, while TNFα did not alter communication in FRAP-experiments but increased Cx43 expression. GJ plaques size correlated with coupling efficacy measured, while Cx45 expression did not correlate with modulation of GJIC. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our finding of specific cytokine effects on GJIC support the notion that cytokines play a pivotal role for pathophysiology of OAB and IC. Interestingly, the effects were independent from the classical definition of pro- and antiinflammatory cytokines. We conclude, that

  16. Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome-associated Cx26 mutants produce nonfunctional gap junctions but hyperactive hemichannels when co-expressed with wild type Cx43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Isaac E; Maripillán, Jaime; Jara, Oscar; Ceriani, Ricardo; Palacios-Muñoz, Angelina; Ramachandran, Jayalakshmi; Olivero, Pablo; Perez-Acle, Tomas; González, Carlos; Sáez, Juan C; Contreras, Jorge E; Martínez, Agustín D

    2015-05-01

    Mutations in Cx26 gene are found in most cases of human genetic deafness. Some mutations produce syndromic deafness associated with skin disorders, like the Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness syndrome (KID). Because in the human skin connexin 26 (Cx26) is co-expressed with other connexins, like Cx43 and Cx30, and as the KID syndrome is inherited as autosomal dominant condition, it is possible that KID mutations change the way Cx26 interacts with other co-expressed connexins. Indeed, some Cx26 syndromic mutations showed gap junction dominant negative effect when co-expressed with wild-type connexins, including Cx26 and Cx43. The nature of these interactions and the consequences on hemichannels and gap junction channel (GJC) functions remain unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that syndromic mutations, at the N terminus segment of Cx26, change connexin oligomerization compatibility, allowing aberrant interactions with Cx43. Strikingly, heteromeric oligomer formed by Cx43/Cx26 (syndromic mutants) shows exacerbated hemichannel activity but nonfunctional GJCs; this also occurs for those Cx26 KID mutants that do not show functional homomeric hemichannels. Heterologous expression of these hyperactive heteromeric hemichannels increases cell membrane permeability, favoring ATP release and Ca(2+) overload. The functional paradox produced by oligomerization of Cx43 and Cx26 KID mutants could underlie the severe syndromic phenotype in human skin.

  17. Differential Connexin Function Enhances Self-Renewal in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hitomi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of complex tumor processes requires cells to rapidly modify their phenotype and is achieved by direct cell-cell communication through gap junction channels composed of connexins. Previous reports have suggested that gap junctions are tumor suppressive based on connexin 43 (Cx43, but this does not take into account differences in connexin-mediated ion selectivity and intercellular communication rate that drive gap junction diversity. We find that glioblastoma cancer stem cells (CSCs possess functional gap junctions that can be targeted using clinically relevant compounds to reduce self-renewal and tumor growth. Our analysis reveals that CSCs express Cx46, while Cx43 is predominantly expressed in non-CSCs. During differentiation, Cx46 is reduced, while Cx43 is increased, and targeting Cx46 compromises CSC maintenance. The difference between Cx46 and Cx43 is reflected in elevated cell-cell communication and reduced resting membrane potential in CSCs. Our data demonstrate a pro-tumorigenic role for gap junctions that is dependent on connexin expression.

  18. Prevention of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by the inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication in auditory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Ju; Kim, Jangho; Tian, Chunjie; Lim, Hye Jin; Kim, Young Sun; Chung, Jong Hoon; Choung, Yun-Hoon

    2014-10-01

    Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin) is an effective chemotherapeutic drug for cancer therapy. However, most patients treated with cisplatin are at a high risk of ototoxicity, which causes severe hearing loss. Inspired by the "Good Samaritan effect" or "bystander effect" from gap junction coupling, we investigated the role of gap junctions in cisplatin-induced ototoxicity as a potential therapeutic method. We showed that connexin 43 (Cx43) was highly expressed in House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 (HEI-OC1) cells, mediating cell-cell communication. The viability of HEI-OC1 cells was greatly decreased by cisplatin treatment, and cisplatin-treated HEI-OC1 cells showed lower Cx43 expression compared to that of untreated HEI-OC1 cells. In particular, high accumulation of Cx43 was observed around the nucleus of cisplatin-treated cells, whereas scattered punctuate expression of Cx43 was observed in the cytoplasm and membrane in normal cells, suggesting that cisplatin may interrupt the normal gap junction communication by inhibiting the trafficking of Cx43 to cell membranes in HEI-OC1 cells. Interestingly, we found that the inhibition of gap junction activity reduced cisplatin-induced apoptosis of auditory hair cells. Cx43 siRNA- or 18α-GA-treated HEI-OC1 cells showed higher cell viability compared to control HEI-OC1 cells during cisplatin treatment; this was also supported by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching studies. Inhibition of gap junction activity reduced recovery of calcein acetoxymethyl ester fluorescence compared to control cells. Additionally, analysis of the mechanisms involved demonstrated that highly activate extracellular signal-regulated kinase and protein kinase B, combined with inhibition of gap junctions may promote cell viability during cisplatin treatment.

  19. Evidence for intercellular communication in mosquito renal tubules: a putative role of gap junctions in coordinating and regulating the rapid diuretic effects of neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermarini, Peter M; Calkins, Travis L

    2014-07-01

    Adult female mosquitoes require a blood meal from a vertebrate host to successfully reproduce. During a single blood feeding, a female may ingest more than the equivalent of her own body mass, resulting in an acute stress to osmotic and ionic homeostasis. In response to this stress, the renal (Malpighian) tubules mediate a rapid diuresis that commences as soon as blood is ingested. The diuresis is regulated by neuropeptides (e.g., kinins, calcitonin-like peptide) that act on receptors in the Malpighian tubule epithelium. Interestingly, the expression of these receptors is discontinuous throughout the epithelium, which raises the question as to how Malpighian tubules mount such a rapid and synchronized response to neuropeptide stimulation. Here we propose a hypothesis that gap junctions functionally couple the epithelial cells of Malpighian tubules, resulting in a coordinated physiological response to the binding of neuropeptides. We review recent, relevant literature on the electrophysiology, physiology, and molecular biology of mosquito Malpighian tubules that indicate the presence of gap junctions in the epithelium. We also provide new physiological and immunochemical data that are consistent with the proposed hypothesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evolution of Microbial Quorum Sensing to Human Global Quorum Sensing: An Insight into How Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication Might Be Linked to the Global Metabolic Disease Crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trosko, James E

    2016-06-15

    The first anaerobic organism extracted energy for survival and reproduction from its source of nutrients, with the genetic means to ensure protection of its individual genome but also its species survival. While it had a means to communicate with its community via simple secreted molecules ("quorum sensing"), the eventual shift to an aerobic environment led to multi-cellular metazoan organisms, with evolutionary-selected genes to form extracellular matrices, stem cells, stem cell niches, and a family of gap junction or "connexin" genes. These germinal and somatic stem cells responded to extracellular signals that triggered intra-cellular signaling to regulate specific genes out of the total genome. These extra-cellular induced intra-cellular signals also modulated gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) in order to regulate the new cellular functions of symmetrical and asymmetrical cell division, cell differentiation, modes of cell death, and senescence. Within the hierarchical and cybernetic concepts, differentiated by neurons organized in the brain of the Homo sapiens, the conscious mind led to language, abstract ideas, technology, myth-making, scientific reasoning, and moral decision-making, i.e., the creation of culture. Over thousands of years, this has created the current collision between biological and cultural evolution, leading to the global "metabolic disease" crisis.

  1. Neuroprotective Role of Gap Junctions in a Neuron Astrocyte Network Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Gemma; Joglekar, Anoushka; Messi, Leopold Matamba; Buckalew, Richard; Wong, Sarah; Terman, David

    2016-07-26

    A detailed biophysical model for a neuron/astrocyte network is developed to explore mechanisms responsible for the initiation and propagation of cortical spreading depolarizations and the role of astrocytes in maintaining ion homeostasis, thereby preventing these pathological waves. Simulations of the model illustrate how properties of spreading depolarizations, such as wave speed and duration of depolarization, depend on several factors, including the neuron and astrocyte Na(+)-K(+) ATPase pump strengths. In particular, we consider the neuroprotective role of astrocyte gap junction coupling. The model demonstrates that a syncytium of electrically coupled astrocytes can maintain a physiological membrane potential in the presence of an elevated extracellular K(+) concentration and efficiently distribute the excess K(+) across the syncytium. This provides an effective neuroprotective mechanism for delaying or preventing the initiation of spreading depolarizations. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Regulation of gap junction conductance by calcineurin through Cx43 phosphorylation: implications for action potential conduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabr, Rita I; Hatch, Fiona S; Salvage, Samantha C; Orlowski, Alejandro; Lampe, Paul D; Fry, Christopher H

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias are associated with raised intracellular [Ca 2+ ] and slowed action potential conduction caused by reduced gap junction (GJ) electrical conductance (Gj). Ventricular GJs are composed of connexin proteins (Cx43), with Gj determined by Cx43 phosphorylation status. Connexin phosphorylation is an interplay between protein kinases and phosphatases but the precise pathways are unknown. We aimed to identify key Ca 2+ -dependent phosphorylation sites on Cx43 that regulate cardiac gap junction conductance and action potential conduction velocity. We investigated the role of the Ca 2+ -dependent phosphatase, calcineurin. Intracellular [Ca 2+ ] was raised in guinea-pig myocardium by a low-Na solution or increased stimulation. Conduction velocity and Gj were measured in multicellular strips. Phosphorylation of Cx43 serine residues (S365 and S368) and of the intermediary regulator I1 at threonine35 was measured by Western blot. Measurements were made in the presence and absence of inhibitors to calcineurin, I1 or protein phosphatase-1 and phosphatase-2.Raised [Ca 2 + ] i decreased Gj, reduced Cx43 phosphorylation at S365 and increased it at S368; these changes were reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Cx43-S368 phosphorylation was reversed by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine. Raised [Ca 2+ ] i also decreased I1 phosphorylation, also prevented by calcineurin inhibitors, to increase activity of the Ca 2+ -independent phosphatase, PPI. The PP1 inhibitor, tautomycin, prevented Cx43-365 dephosphorylation, Cx43-S368 phosphorylation and Gj reduction in raised [Ca 2+ ] i . PP2A had no role. Conduction velocity was reduced by raised [Ca 2+ ] i and reversed by calcineurin inhibitors. Reduced action potential conduction and Gj in raised [Ca 2+ ] are regulated by calcineurin-dependent Cx43-S365 phosphorylation, leading to Cx43-S368 dephosphorylation. The calcineurin action is indirect, via I1 dephosphorylation and subsequent activation of PP1.

  3. Interaction of c-Src with gap junction protein connexin-43. Role in the regulation of cell-cell communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, B N; Hengeveld, T; Postma, Friso R.; Moolenaar, W H

    2001-01-01

    Cell-cell communication via connexin-43 (Cx43)-based gap junctions is transiently inhibited by certain mitogens, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are incompletely understood. Our previous studies have implicated the c-Src tyrosine kinase in mediating transient closure of Cx43-based gap

  4. Modulation of gap-junctional intercellular communication by a series of cyanobacterial samples from nature and laboratory cultures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, K.; Babica, Pavel; Adamovský, O.; Bláha, Luděk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2011), s. 76-84 ISSN 0041-0101 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA524/08/0496 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : cyanotoxins * gap-junctional intercellular communication * tumor promotion Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.508, year: 2011

  5. The gap junction protein connexin43 interacts with the second PDZ domain of the zona occludens-1 protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giepmans, B N; Moolenaar, W H

    1998-01-01

    Gap junctions mediate cell-cell communication in almost all tissues and are composed of channel-forming integral membrane proteins, termed connexins [1-3]. Connexin43 (Cx43) is the most widely expressed and the most well-studied member of this family. Cx43-based cell-cell communication is regulated

  6. Inhibition of dye-coupling in Patella (mollusca) embryos by microinjection of antiserum against Nephrops (arthropoda) gap junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serras, F.; Buultjens, T.E.J.; Finbow, M.E.

    1988-01-01

    Antiserum raised against Nephrops gap junctions was injected into single cells of the 2-, 4-, 8-, 16-, and 32-cell stage of the Patella vulgata embryos. The pattern of junctional communication by iontophoresis of Lucifer Yellow CH was tested at the 32-cell stage. The results show that the normal

  7. Effect of Mefloquine, a Gap Junction Blocker, on Circadian Period2 Gene Oscillation in the Mouse Suprachiasmatic Nucleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinmi Koo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn mammals, the master circadian pacemaker is localized in an area of the ventral hypothalamus known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. Previous studies have shown that pacemaker neurons in the SCN are highly coupled to one another, and this coupling is crucial for intrinsic self-sustainability of the SCN central clock, which is distinguished from peripheral oscillators. One plausible mechanism underlying the intercellular communication may involve direct electrical connections mediated by gap junctions.MethodsWe examined the effect of mefloquine, a neuronal gap junction blocker, on circadian Period 2 (Per2 gene oscillation in SCN slice cultures prepared from Per2::luciferase (PER2::LUC knock-in mice using a real-time bioluminescence measurement system.ResultsAdministration of mefloquine causes instability in the pulse period and a slight reduction of amplitude in cyclic PER2::LUC expression. Blockade of gap junctions uncouples PER2::LUC-expressing cells, in terms of phase transition, which weakens synchrony among individual cellular rhythms.ConclusionThese findings suggest that neuronal gap junctions play an important role in synchronizing the central pacemaker neurons and contribute to the distinct self-sustainability of the SCN master clock.

  8. Adenosine receptors regulate gap junction coupling of the human cerebral microvascular endothelial cells hCMEC/D3 by Ca2+influx through cyclic nucleotide-gated channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, Almke; Bintig, Willem; Begandt, Daniela; Klett, Anne; Siller, Ina G; Gregor, Carola; Schaarschmidt, Frank; Weksler, Babette; Romero, Ignacio; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier; Hell, Stefan W; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2017-04-15

    Gap junction channels are essential for the formation and regulation of physiological units in tissues by allowing the lateral cell-to-cell diffusion of ions, metabolites and second messengers. Stimulation of the adenosine receptor subtype A 2B increases the gap junction coupling in the human blood-brain barrier endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Although the increased gap junction coupling is cAMP-dependent, neither the protein kinase A nor the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP were involved in this increase. We found that cAMP activates cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels and thereby induces a Ca 2+ influx, which leads to the increase in gap junction coupling. The report identifies CNG channels as a possible physiological link between adenosine receptors and the regulation of gap junction channels in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. The human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3 was used to characterize the physiological link between adenosine receptors and the gap junction coupling in endothelial cells of the blood-brain barrier. Expressed adenosine receptor subtypes and connexin (Cx) isoforms were identified by RT-PCR. Scrape loading/dye transfer was used to evaluate the impact of the A 2A and A 2B adenosine receptor subtype agonist 2-phenylaminoadenosine (2-PAA) on the gap junction coupling. We found that 2-PAA stimulated cAMP synthesis and enhanced gap junction coupling in a concentration-dependent manner. This enhancement was accompanied by an increase in gap junction plaques formed by Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase A did not affect the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. In contrast, the cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel inhibitor l-cis-diltiazem, as well as the chelation of intracellular Ca 2+ with BAPTA, or the absence of external Ca 2+ , suppressed the 2-PAA-related enhancement of gap junction coupling. Moreover, we observed a 2-PAA-dependent activation of CNG channels by a combination of

  9. Effects of maturation-inducing hormone on heterologous gap junctional coupling in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizaki, G.; Patino, R.; Thomas, P.; Bolamba, D.; Chang, Xiaotian

    2001-01-01

    A previous ultrastructural study of heterologous (granulosa cell-oocyte) gap junction (GJ) contacts in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker suggested that these contacts disappear late during the process of resumption of oocyte meiosis. This observation suggested that, unlike scenarios proposed for a number of other species, uncoupling of GJ is not necessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in croaker follicles. However, the functionality of heterologous GJ contacts and the temporal association between maturation-inducing hormone (MIH)-induced changes in heterologous coupling and resumption of oocyte meiosis have not been examined in Atlantic croaker. These questions were addressed with a cell-cell coupling assay that is based on the transfer of a GJ marker, Lucifer Yellow, from oocytes to granulosa cells. Follicle-enclosed oocytes injected with Lucifer Yellow allowed transfer of the dye into the follicle cell layer, thus confirming that there is functional heterologous coupling between the oocyte and the granulosa cells. Dye transfer was observed in vitellogenic, full-grown/maturation-incompetent, and full-grown /maturation-competent follicles. Treatment of maturation-competent follicles with MIH caused a time-dependent decline in the number of follicles transferring dye. However, although GJ uncoupling in some of the follicles was observed before germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD, index of meiotic resumption), about 50% of the follicles maintained the ability to transfer dye even after GVBD had occurred. Further, a known GJ inhibitor (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate) blocked heterologous GJ within a time frame similar to that seen with MIH but without inducing any of the morphological changes (including GVBD) associated with follicular maturation. In conclusion, uncoupling of heterologous GJ seems insufficient and unnecessary for the onset of meiotic resumption in ovarian follicles of Atlantic croaker. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science.

  10. Characterization of a variant of gap junction protein α8 identified in a family with hereditary cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debbie S Kuo

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts occur in isolation in about 70% of cases or are associated with other abnormalities such as anterior segment dysgenesis and microphthalmia. We identified a three-generation family in the University of California San Francisco glaucoma clinic comprising three individuals with congenital cataracts and aphakic glaucoma, one of whom also had microphthalmia. The purpose of this study was to identify a possible causative mutation in this family and to investigate its pathogenesis.We performed exome sequencing and identified a putative mutation in gap junction protein α8 (GJA8. We used PCR and DNA sequencing of GJA8 in affected and unaffected members of the pedigree to test segregation of the variant with the phenotype. We tested cellular distribution and function of the variant protein by immunofluorescence and intercellular transfer of Neurobiotin in transiently transfected HeLa cells.Exome sequencing revealed a variant in GJA8 (c.658A>G encoding connexin50 (Cx50 that resulted in a missense change (p.N220D in transmembrane domain 4. The variant was present in all three affected family members, but was also present in the proband's grandfather who was reported to be unaffected. The mutant protein localized to the plasma membrane and supported intercellular Neurobiotin transfer in HeLa cells.We identified a variant in transmembrane domain 4 of Cx50 in a family with autosomal dominant congenital cataracts. This variant has been previously identified in other cataract cohorts, but it is also present in unaffected individuals. Our study demonstrates that the mutant protein localized to the plasma membrane and formed functional intercellular channels. These data suggest that GJA8 c.658A>G is most likely a benign rare variant.

  11. Role of gap junctions and protein kinase A during the development of oocyte maturational competence in Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Yoshizaki, G.; Takeuchi, T.; Soyano, K.; Patino, R.

    2008-01-01

    Meiotic resumption in teleost oocytes is induced by a maturation-inducing hormone (MIH). The sensitivity of oocytes to MIH, also known as oocyte maturational competence (OMC), is induced by LH via mechanisms that are not fully understood. A previous study of Ayu (Plecoglossus altivelis) showed the presence of functional heterologous gap junctions (GJs) between oocytes and their surrounding granulosa cells. The objectives of this study were to determine the role of ovarian GJs and of protein kinase A (PKA) during the acquisition of OMC. We examined the effects of the specific GJ inhibitor carbenoxolone (CBX) and 18??-glycyrrhetinic acid (??-GA) on the LH-(hCG)-dependent acquisition of OMC and on MIH-(17,20??-dihydroxy-4-pregnen-3-one)-dependent meiotic resumption; measured the cAMP content of ovarian follicles during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC; and determined the effects of PK activators and inhibitors on hCG-dependent OMC. Production of follicular cAMP increased during the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC. Both GJ inhibitors and the PKA inhibitor H8-dihydrochloride, but not the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, suppressed the hCG-dependent acquisition of OMC in a dose-dependent manner. The PKA activator forskolin induced OMC with a similar potency to hCG. Unlike previous observations with teleosts where disruption of heterologous GJ either blocks or stimulates meiotic resumption, treatment with GJ inhibitors did not affect MIH-dependent meiotic resumption in maturationally competent follicles of Ayu. These observations suggest that ovarian GJs are essential for LH-dependent acquisition of OMC but not for MIH-dependent meiotic resumption, and that the stimulation of OMC by LH is mediated by cAMP-dependent PKA. They are also consistent with the view that a precise balance between GJ-mediated signals (positive or negative) and oocyte maturational readiness is required for hormonally regulated meiotic resumption. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Gap junctions and hydrogen peroxide are involved in endothelium-derived hyperpolarising responses to bradykinin in omental arteries and veins isolated from pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Stephanie; Mathewson, Alastair M; Baker, Philip N; Mayhew, Terry M; Dunn, William R

    2011-10-01

    Altered endothelial function may underlie human cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, diabetes and pre-eclampsia. While much is known about endothelial function in small arteries, very little is known about endothelial responses in small veins isolated from humans. Therefore, we assessed endothelium-dependent responses in omental arteries and veins isolated from healthy pregnant women, focussing on endothelium-dependent hyperpolarising (EDH) mechanisms. Human omental arteries and veins were obtained from women undergoing elective caesarean sections and examined using pressure myography. In pressurised vessels, the effects of proposed inhibitors of EDH production/function were examined on responses to bradykinin. The expression of connexins Cx37, 40 and 43 was assessed using immunohistochemistry. Bradykinin caused vasodilatation in human pressurised omental arteries and veins. In both vessels, responses to bradykinin were partially blocked in the presence of the gap junction uncoupler, carbenoxolone, and reduced further with the addition of catalase, which acts to degrade H(2)O(2). The effect of catalase alone was more pronounced in venous preparations. All three connexins were expressed in both arteries and veins, with a similar distribution pattern, where Cx37 and Cx40 were located mainly in the endothelium and Cx43 located mostly in the media. These data show that, in human omental vessels, an EDH mechanism is produced in response to bradykinin that involves gap junction communication and the production of H(2)O(2). These mechanisms may be involved in the haemodynamic alterations that take place during pregnancy, and any aberration in their function could contribute to raised blood pressure in hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, such as pre-eclampsia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Estimation of the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient in cell monolayers coupled by gap junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesen, Niels Erik; Hofgaard, Johannes P; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik; Nielsen, Morten Schak; Jacobsen, Jens Christian Brings

    2012-07-16

    A recently developed dye-based assay to study gap junction permeability is analysed. The assay is based on electroporation of dye into a large number of connexin 43 expressing cells, grown to confluency on electrically conductive slides. The subsequent intercellular spread of dye to non-electroporated parts of the monolayer enables estimation of the intercellular coupling. So far, the extent of dye spread has been analyzed in qualitative terms only and not in a manner based directly on the physics of the underlying diffusion process. We apply a continuum approximation assuming that the observed dye spread can be described by Fick's law of diffusion. Deduced from Fick's law, new measures are presented which directly relate the observed spread of dye to the diffusion coefficient. The theoretical framework enables the estimation of an effective diffusion coefficient from Fick's law independently of the specific indicator substance used in the assay. For Lucifer Yellow, diffusion stops within few minutes after the electroporation. Therefore only an order-of-magnitude estimate of the diffusion coefficient can be given for this dye. In terms of the underlying diffusion coefficient, the hitherto used measures give a relatively poor degree of quantification. In contrast, the present methods may yield direct information on the effective intercellular diffusion coefficient and hence provide additional and more precise information as to the permeability modulating effect of various substances. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Astrocytes protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and upregulate survival genes via gap junctional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qingtang; Liu, Zhao; Ling, Feng; Xu, Geng

    2016-02-01

    Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumor. Using current standard treatment regimens, the prognosis of patients with gliomas remains poor, which is predominantly due to the resistance of glioma cells to chemotherapy. The organ microenvironment has been implicated in the pathogenesis and survival of tumor cells. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that astrocytes (the housekeeping cells of the brain microenvironment) may protect glioma cells from chemotherapy and to investigate the underlying mechanism. Immunofluorescent and scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that glioma cells were surrounded and infiltrated by activated astrocytes. In vitro co-culture of glioma cells with astrocytes significantly reduced the cytotoxic effects on glioma cells caused by various chemotherapeutic agents, as demonstrated by fluorescein isothiocyanate-propidium iodide flow cytometry. Transwell experiments indicated that this protective effect was dependent on physical contact and the gap junctional communication (GJC) between astrocytes and glioma cells. Microarray expression profiling further revealed that astrocytes upregulated the expression levels of various critical survival genes in the glioma cells via GJC. The results of the present study indicated that the organ microenvironment may affect the biological behavior of tumor cells and suggest a novel mechanism of resistance in glioma cells, which may be of therapeutic relevance clinically.

  15. Recovery effect of onion peel extract against H2 O2 -induced inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication is mediated through quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Jun; Seo, Sang Gwon; Choi, Keunhwa; Kim, Jong Eun; Kang, Heerim; Chung, Min-Yu; Lee, Ki Won; Lee, Hyong Joo

    2014-05-01

    Cellular oxidative damage mediated by reactive oxygen species has been reported to inhibit gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC). In turn, the inhibition of GJIC can be attenuated by functional food compounds with antioxidant properties. In this study, we compared the protective effects of onion peel extract (OPE) and onion flesh extract (OFE) on oxidative stress-mediated GJIC inhibition, and investigated the mechanisms of action responsible. OPE restored H2 O2 -induced GJIC inhibition to a higher degree than OFE in WB-F344 rat liver epithelial cells. OPE was found to inhibit H2 O2 -induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Cx43. A radical scavenging assay demonstrated superiority of OPE over OFE, suggesting that the observed effects might be mediated via an antioxidant mechanism. Quercetin is the major compound that is likely to be responsible for the protective effect against H2 O2 -mediated GJIC inhibition. This study suggests that OPE, a material often discarded, may be of value for the future development of functional food products. This study demonstrates that onion peel extract (OPE) exhibits a protective effect against the inhibition of gap-junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) mediated by H2 O2 , which is likely to occur via its antioxidant activity. OPE contains significant concentrations of bioactive phenolic compounds. Reductions in oxidative stress can lead to recovery of GJIC, which has been reported to be implicated in the prevention and treatment of cancers. These findings suggest that onion peel, a common waste product, could be used as potential resources for functional food development. Onion peel could be processed into a quercetin-rich powder or a pill for the prevention of cancer and other oxidative stress-related diseases. © 2014 Institute of Food Technologists®

  16. Relating proton pumps with gap junctions: colocalization of ductin, the channel-forming subunit c of V-ATPase, with subunit a and with innexins 2 and 3 during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautemann, Julia; Bohrmann, Johannes

    2016-07-13

    Ion-transport mechanisms and gap junctions are known to cooperate in creating bioelectric phenomena, like pH gradients, voltage gradients and ion fluxes within single cells, tissues, organs, and whole organisms. Such phenomena have been shown to play regulatory roles in a variety of developmental and regenerative processes. Using Drosophila oogenesis as a model system, we aim at characterizing in detail the mechanisms underlying bioelectric phenomena in order to reveal their regulatory functions. We, therefore, investigated the stage-specific distribution patterns of V-ATPase components in relation to gap-junction proteins. We analysed the localization of the V-ATPase components ductin (subunit c) and subunit a, and the gap-junction components innexins 2 and 3, especially in polar cells, border cells, stalk cells and centripetally migrating cells. These types of follicle cells had previously been shown to exhibit characteristic patterns of membrane channels as well as membrane potential and intracellular pH. Stage-specifically, ductin and subunit a were found either colocalized or separately enriched in different regions of soma and germ-line cells. While ductin was often more prominent in plasma membranes, subunit a was more prominent in cytoplasmic and nuclear vesicles. Particularly, ductin was enriched in polar cells, stalk cells, and nurse-cell membranes, whereas subunit a was enriched in the cytoplasm of border cells, columnar follicle cells and germ-line cells. Comparably, ductin and both innexins 2 and 3 were either colocalized or separately enriched in different cellular regions. While ductin often showed a continuous membrane distribution, the distribution of both innexins was mostly punctate. Particularly, ductin was enriched in polar cells and stalk cells, whereas innexin 2 was enriched in the oolemma, and innexin 3 in centripetally migrating follicle cells. In lateral follicle-cell membranes, the three proteins were found colocalized as well as

  17. Gap junction proteins in the blood-brain barrier control nutrient-dependent reactivation of Drosophila neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spéder, Pauline; Brand, Andrea H

    2014-08-11

    Neural stem cells in the adult brain exist primarily in a quiescent state but are reactivated in response to changing physiological conditions. How do stem cells sense and respond to metabolic changes? In the Drosophila CNS, quiescent neural stem cells are reactivated synchronously in response to a nutritional stimulus. Feeding triggers insulin production by blood-brain barrier glial cells, activating the insulin/insulin-like growth factor pathway in underlying neural stem cells and stimulating their growth and proliferation. Here we show that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier glia mediate the influence of metabolic changes on stem cell behavior, enabling glia to respond to nutritional signals and reactivate quiescent stem cells. We propose that gap junctions in the blood-brain barrier are required to translate metabolic signals into synchronized calcium pulses and insulin secretion. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The extracellular regulated kinases (ERK) 1/2 mediate cannabinoid-induced inhibition of gap junctional communication in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, R P; Popp, R; Ott, G; Bredenkötter, D; Wallner, C; Busse, R; Fleming, I

    2002-01-01

    Cannabinoids are potent inhibitors of endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF)-mediated relaxations. We set out to study the mechanism underlying this effect and the possible role of cannabinoid-induced changes in intercellular gap junction communication.In cultured endothelial cells, Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) and the cannabinoid receptor agonist HU210, increased the phosphorylation of extracellular regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) and inhibited gap junctional communication, as determined by Lucifer Yellow dye transfer and electrical capacity measurements.Δ9-THC elicited a pronounced increase in the phosphorylation of connexin 43, which was sensitive to PD98059 and U0126, two inhibitors of ERK1/2 activation. Inhibition of ERK1/2 also prevented the Δ9-THC-induced inhibition of gap junctional communication.Δ9-THC prevented both the bradykinin-induced hyperpolarization and the nitric oxide and prostacyclin-independent relaxation of pre-contracted rings of porcine coronary artery. These effects were prevented by PD98059 as well as U0126.In the absence of Δ9-THC, neither PD98059 nor U0126 affected the NO-mediated relaxation of coronary artery rings but both substances induced a leftward shift in the concentration – relaxation curve to bradykinin when diclofenac and Nωnitro-L-arginine were present. Moreover, PD98059 and U0126 prolonged the bradykinin-induced hyperpolarization of porcine coronary arteries, without affecting the magnitude of the response.These results indicate that the cannabinoid-induced activation of ERK1/2, which leads to the phosphorylation of connexin 43 and inhibition of gap junctional communication, may partially account for the Δ9-THC-induced inhibition of EDHF-mediated relaxation. Moreover, the activation of ERK1/2 by endothelial cell agonists such as bradykinin, appears to exert a negative feedback inhibition on EDHF-mediated responses. PMID:12086980

  19. Mono-Heteromeric Configurations of Gap Junction Channels Formed by Connexin43 and Connexin45 Reduce Unitary Conductance and Determine both Voltage Gating and Metabolic Flux Asymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Guoqiang; Akoum, Nazem; Appadurai, Daniel A.; Hayrapetyan, Volodya; Ahmed, Osman; Martinez, Agustin D.; Beyer, Eric C.; Moreno, Alonso P.

    2017-01-01

    In cardiac tissues, the expression of multiple connexins (Cx40, Cx43, Cx45, and Cx30.2) is a requirement for proper development and function. Gap junctions formed by these connexins have distinct permeability and gating mechanisms. Since a single cell can express more than one connexin isoform, the formation of hetero-multimeric gap junction channels provides a tissue with an enormous repertoire of combinations to modulate intercellular communication. To study further the perm-selectivity and gating properties of channels containing Cx43 and Cx45, we studied two monoheteromeric combinations in which a HeLa cell co-transfected with Cx43 and Cx45 was paired with a cell expressing only one of these connexins. Macroscopic measurements of total conductance between cell pairs indicated a drastic reduction in total conductance for mono-heteromeric channels. In terms of Vj dependent gating, Cx43 homomeric connexons facing heteromeric connexons only responded weakly to voltage negativity. Cx45 homomeric connexons exhibited no change in Vj gating when facing heteromeric connexons. The distributions of unitary conductances (γj) for both mono-heteromeric channels were smaller than predicted, and both showed low permeability to the fluorescent dyes Lucifer yellow and Rhodamine123. For both mono-heteromeric channels, we observed flux asymmetry regardless of dye charge: flux was higher in the direction of the heteromeric connexon for MhetCx45 and in the direction of the homomeric Cx43 connexon for MhetCx43. Thus, our data suggest that co-expression of Cx45 and Cx43 induces the formation of heteromeric connexons with greatly reduced permeability and unitary conductance. Furthermore, it increases the asymmetry for voltage gating for opposing connexons, and it favors asymmetric flux of molecules across the junction that depends primarily on the size (not the charge) of the crossing molecules. PMID:28611680

  20. Estrogenic compounds inhibit gap junctional intercellular communication in mouse Leydig TM3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwase, Yumiko; Fukata, Hideki; Mori, Chisato

    2006-01-01

    Some estrogenic compounds are reported to cause testicular disorders in humans and/or experimental animals by direct action on Leydig cells. In carcinogenesis and normal development, gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays an essential role in maintaining homeostasis. In this study, we examine the effects of diethylstilbestrol (DES, a synthetic estrogen), 17β-estradiol (E 2 , a natural estrogen), and genistein (GEN, a phytoestrogen) on GJIC between mouse Leydig TM3 cells using Lucifer yellow microinjection. The three compounds tested produced GJIC inhibition in the TM3 cells after 24 h. Gradually, 10 μM DES began to inhibit GJIC for 24 h and this effect was observed until 72 h. On the other hand, both 20 μM E 2 and 25 μM GEN rapidly inhibited GJIC in 6 h and 2 h, respectively. The effects continued until 24 h, but weakened by 72 h. Furthermore, a combined effect at μM level between DES and E 2 on GJIC inhibition was observed, but not between GEN and E 2 . DES and E 2 showed GJIC inhibition at low dose levels (nearly physiological estrogen levels) after 72 h, but GEN did not. DES-induced GJIC inhibition at 10 pM and 10 μM was completely counteracted by ICI 182,780 (ICl), an estrogen receptor antagonist. On the other hand, the inhibitory effects on GJIC with E 2 (10 pM and 20 μM) and GEN (25 μM) were partially blocked by ICI or calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, and were completely blocked by the combination of ICI and calphostin C. These results demonstrate that DES inhibits GJIC between Leydig cells via the estrogen receptor (ER), and that E 2 and GEN inhibit GJIC via ER and PKC. These estrogenic compounds may have different individual nongenotoxic mechanism including PKC pathway on testicular carcinogenesis or development

  1. Neuroinflammation leads to region-dependent alterations in astrocyte gap junction communication and hemichannel activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Nikolay; Burkovetskaya, Maria; Fritz, Teresa; Angle, Amanda; Kielian, Tammy

    2011-01-12

    Inflammation attenuates gap junction (GJ) communication in cultured astrocytes. Here we used a well-characterized model of experimental brain abscess as a tool to query effects of the CNS inflammatory milieu on astrocyte GJ communication and electrophysiological properties. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed on green fluorescent protein (GFP)-positive astrocytes in acute brain slices from glial fibrillary acidic protein-GFP mice at 3 or 7 d after Staphylococcus aureus infection in the striatum. Astrocyte GJ communication was significantly attenuated in regions immediately surrounding the abscess margins and progressively increased to levels typical of uninfected brain with increasing distance from the abscess proper. Conversely, astrocytes bordering the abscess demonstrated hemichannel activity as evident by enhanced ethidium bromide (EtBr) uptake that could be blocked by several pharmacological inhibitors, including the connexin 43 (Cx43) mimetic peptide Gap26, carbenoxolone, the pannexin1 (Panx1) mimetic peptide (10)Panx1, and probenecid. However, hemichannel opening was transient with astrocytic EtBr uptake observed near the abscess at day 3 but not day 7 after infection. The region-dependent pattern of hemichannel activity at day 3 directly correlated with increases in Cx43, Cx30, Panx1, and glutamate transporter expression (glial L-glutamate transporter and L-glutamate/L-aspartate transporter) along the abscess margins. Changes in astrocyte resting membrane potential and input conductance correlated with the observed changes in GJ communication and hemichannel activity. Collectively, these findings indicate that astrocyte coupling and electrical properties are most dramatically affected near the primary inflammatory site and reveal an opposing relationship between the open states of GJ channels versus hemichannels during acute infection. This relationship may extend to other CNS diseases typified with an inflammatory component.

  2. Visfatin Reduces Gap Junction Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication in Proximal Tubule-Derived Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire E. Hills

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: In the current study we examined if the adipocytokine, visfatin, alters connexin-mediated intercellular communication in proximal tubule-derived epithelial cells. Methods: The effects of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on cell viability and cytotoxicity in HK2-cells were assessed by MTT, crystal violet and lactate dehydrogenase assays. Western blot analysis was used to confirm expression of Cx26, Cx40 and Cx43. The effect of visfatin (10-200ng/mL on TGF-β1 secretion was confirmed by ELISA, and the effects of both TGF-β1 (2-10ng/mL and visfatin (10-200ng/mL on connexin expression were assessed by western blot. Functional intercellular communication was determined using transfer of Lucifer Yellow and paired-whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology. Results: In low glucose (5mM, visfatin (10-200ng/mL did not affect membrane integrity, cytotoxicity or cell viability at 48hrs, but did evoke a concentration-dependent reduction in Cx26 and Cx43 expression. The expression of Cx40 was unaffected. At 48hrs, visfatin (10-200ng/mL increased the secretion of TGF-β1 and the visfatin-evoked changes in connexin expression were mimicked by exogenous application of the pro-fibrotic cytokine (2-10ng/ml. Visfatin reduced dye transfer between coupled cells and decreased functional conductance, with levels falling by 63% as compared to control. Although input resistance was increased following visfatin treatment by 166%, the change was not significant as compared to control. The effects of visfatin on Cx-expression and cell-coupling were blocked in the presence of a TGF-β1 specific neutralizing antibody. Conclusions: The adipocytokine visfatin selectively evoked a non-toxic reduction in connexin expression in HK2-cells. The loss in gap-junction associated proteins was mirrored by a loss in functional conductance between coupled cells. Visfatin increased TGF-β secretion and the pattern of change for connexins expression was mimicked by exogenous

  3. On Biophysical Properties and Sensitivity to Gap Junction Blockers of Connexin 39 Hemichannels Expressed in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Anibal A.; Cisterna, Bruno A.; Saavedra-Leiva, Fujiko; Urrutia, Carolina; Cea, Luis A.; Vielma, Alex H.; Gutierrez-Maldonado, Sebastian E.; Martin, Alberto J. M.; Pareja-Barrueto, Claudia; Escalona, Yerko; Schmachtenberg, Oliver; Lagos, Carlos F.; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Sáez, Juan C.

    2017-01-01

    Although connexins (Cxs) are broadly expressed by cells of mammalian organisms, Cx39 has a very restricted pattern of expression and the biophysical properties of Cx39-based channels [hemichannels (HCs) and gap junction channels (GJCs)] remain largely unknown. Here, we used HeLa cells transfected with Cx39 (HeLa-Cx39 cells) in which intercellular electrical coupling was not detected, indicating the absence of GJCs. However, functional HCs were found on the surface of cells exposed to conditions known to increase the open probability of other Cx HCs (e.g., extracellular divalent cationic-free solution (DCFS), extracellular alkaline pH, mechanical stimulus and depolarization to positive membrane potentials). Cx39 HCs were blocked by some traditional Cx HC blockers, but not by others or a pannexin1 channel blocker. HeLa-Cx39 cells showed similar resting membrane potentials (RMPs) to those of parental cells, and exposure to DCFS reduced RMPs in Cx39 transfectants, but not in parental cells. Under these conditions, unitary events of ~75 pS were frequent in HeLa-Cx39 cells and absent in parental cells. Real-time cellular uptake experiments of dyes with different physicochemical features, as well as the application of a machine-learning approach revealed that Cx39 HCs are preferentially permeable to molecules characterized by six categories of descriptors, namely: (1) electronegativity, (2) ionization potential, (3) polarizability, (4) size and geometry, (5) topological flexibility and (6) valence. However, Cx39 HCs opened by mechanical stimulation or alkaline pH were impermeable to Ca2+. Molecular modeling of Cx39-based channels suggest that a constriction present at the intracellular portion of the para helix region co-localizes with an electronegative patch, imposing an energetic and steric barrier, which in the case of GJCs may hinder channel function. Results reported here demonstrate that Cx39 form HCs and add to our understanding of the functional roles of Cx39 HCs

  4. On complex functions analyticity

    CERN Document Server

    Karavashkin, S B

    2002-01-01

    We analyse here the conventional definitions of analyticity and differentiability of functions of complex variable. We reveal the possibility to extend the conditions of analyticity and differentiability to the functions implementing the non-conformal mapping. On this basis we formulate more general definitions of analyticity and differentiability covering those conventional. We present some examples of such functions. By the example of a horizontal belt on a plane Z mapped non-conformally onto a crater-like harmonic vortex, we study the pattern of trajectory variation of a body motion in such field in case of field power function varying in time. We present the technique to solve the problems of such type with the help of dynamical functions of complex variable implementing the analytical non-conformal mapping

  5. The connexin 46 mutant (V44M) impairs gap junction function ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plasmids carrying wild-type (wt) and mutant (V44M) of Cx46 were constructed and expressed in Hela cells respectively.Western blotting and fluorescence microscopy were applied to analyse the expression and subcellular localization of recombinant proteins, respectively. Scrape loading dye transferexperiment was ...

  6. Complex function theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sarason, Donald

    2007-01-01

    Complex Function Theory is a concise and rigorous introduction to the theory of functions of a complex variable. Written in a classical style, it is in the spirit of the books by Ahlfors and by Saks and Zygmund. Being designed for a one-semester course, it is much shorter than many of the standard texts. Sarason covers the basic material through Cauchy's theorem and applications, plus the Riemann mapping theorem. It is suitable for either an introductory graduate course or an undergraduate course for students with adequate preparation. The first edition was published with the title Notes on Co

  7. Implanted neural progenitor cells regulate glial reaction to brain injury and establish gap junctions with host glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaverón, Rocío; Matarredona, Esperanza R; de la Cruz, Rosa R; Macías, David; Gálvez, Victoria; Pastor, Angel M

    2014-04-01

    Transplantation of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) in the lesioned brain is able to restore morphological and physiological alterations induced by different injuries. The local microenvironment created at the site of grafting and the communication between grafted and host cells are crucial in the beneficial effects attributed to the NPC implants. We have previously described that NPC transplantation in an animal model of central axotomy restores firing properties and synaptic coverage of lesioned neurons and modulates their trophic factor content. In this study, we aim to explore anatomical relationships between implanted NPCs and host glia that might account for the implant-induced neuroprotective effects. Postnatal rat subventricular zone NPCs were isolated and grafted in adult rats after transection of the medial longitudinal fascicle. Brains were removed and analyzed eight weeks later. Immunohistochemistry for different glial markers revealed that NPC-grafted animals displayed significantly greater microglial activation than animals that received only vehicle injections. Implanted NPCs were located in close apposition to activated microglia and reactive astrocytes. The gap junction protein connexin43 was present in NPCs and glial cells at the lesion site and was often found interposed within adjacent implanted and glial cells. Gap junctions were identified between implanted NPCs and host astrocytes and less frequently between NPCs and microglia. Our results show that implanted NPCs modulate the glial reaction to lesion and establish the possibility of communication through gap junctions between grafted and host glial cells which might be involved in the restorative effects of NPC implants. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stat3 is a positive regulator of gap junctional intercellular communication in cultured, human lung carcinoma cells

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    Geletu Mulu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neoplastic transformation of cultured cells by a number of oncogenes such as src suppresses gap junctional, intercellular communication (GJIC; however, the role of Src and its effector Signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (Stat3 upon GJIC in non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC has not been defined. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed high Src activity in NSCLC biopsy samples compared to normal tissues. Here we explored the potential effect of Src and Stat3 upon GJIC, by assessing the levels of tyr418-phosphorylated Src and tyr705-phosphorylated Stat3, respectively, in a panel of NSCLC cell lines. Methods Gap junctional communication was examined by electroporating the fluorescent dye Lucifer yellow into cells grown on a transparent electrode, followed by observation of the migration of the dye to the adjacent, non-electroporated cells under fluorescence illumination. Results An inverse relationship between Src activity levels and GJIC was noted; in five lines with high Src activity GJIC was absent, while two lines with extensive GJIC (QU-DB and SK-LuCi6 had low Src levels, similar to a non-transformed, immortalised lung epithelial cell line. Interestingly, examination of the mechanism indicated that Stat3 inhibition in any of the NSCLC lines expressing high endogenous Src activity levels, or in cells where Src was exogenously transduced, did not restore GJIC. On the contrary, Stat3 downregulation in immortalised lung epithelial cells or in the NSCLC lines displaying extensive GJIC actually suppressed junctional permeability. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that although Stat3 is generally growth promoting and in an activated form it can act as an oncogene, it is actually required for gap junctional communication both in nontransformed lung epithelial cells and in certain lung cancer lines that retain extensive GJIC.

  9. The endothelial component of cannabinoid-induced relaxation in rabbit mesenteric artery depends on gap junctional communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaytor, A T; Martin, P E M; Evans, W H; Randall, M D; Griffith, T M

    1999-01-01

    We have shown that the endocannabinoid anandamide and its stable analogue methanandamide relax rings of rabbit superior mesenteric artery through endothelium-dependent and -independent mechanisms that are unaffected by blockade of NO synthase and cyclooxygenase. The endothelium-dependent component of the responses was attenuated by the gap junction inhibitor 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA; 50 μm), and a synthetic connexin-mimetic peptide homologous to the extracellular Gap 27 sequence of connexin 43 (43Gap 27, SRPTEKTIFII; 300 μm). By contrast, the corresponding connexin 40 peptide (40Gap 27, SRPTEKNVFIV) was inactive. The cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (10 μm) also attenuated endothelium-dependent relaxations but this inhibition was not observed with the CB1 receptor antagonist LY320135 (10 μm). Furthermore, SR141716A mimicked the effects of 43Gap 27 peptide in blocking Lucifer Yellow dye transfer between coupled COS-7 cells (a monkey fibroblast cell line), whereas LY320135 was without effect, thus suggesting that the action of SR141716A was directly attributable to effects on gap junctions. The endothelium-dependent component of cannabinoid-induced relaxation was also attenuated by AM404 (10 μm), an inhibitor of the high-affinity anandamide transporter, which was without effect on dye transfer. Taken together, the findings suggest that cannabinoids derived from arachidonic acid gain access to the endothelial cytosol via a transporter mechanism and subsequently stimulate relaxation by promoting diffusion of an to adjacent smooth muscle cells via gap junctions. Relaxations of endothelium-denuded preparations to anandamide and methanandamide were unaffected by 43Gap 27 peptide, 18α-GA, SR141716A, AM404 and indomethacin and their genesis remains to be established. PMID:10523421

  10. Gold nanoparticle-mediated (GNOME) laser perforation: a new method for a high-throughput analysis of gap junction intercellular coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begandt, Daniela; Bader, Almke; Antonopoulos, Georgios C; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo; Ngezahayo, Anaclet

    2015-10-01

    The present report evaluates the advantages of using the gold nanoparticle-mediated laser perforation (GNOME LP) technique as a computer-controlled cell optoperforation to introduce Lucifer yellow (LY) into cells in order to analyze the gap junction coupling in cell monolayers. To permeabilize GM-7373 endothelial cells grown in a 24 multiwell plate with GNOME LP, a laser beam of 88 μm in diameter was applied in the presence of gold nanoparticles and LY. After 10 min to allow dye uptake and diffusion through gap junctions, we observed a LY-positive cell band of 179 ± 8 μm width. The presence of the gap junction channel blocker carbenoxolone during the optoperforation reduced the LY-positive band to 95 ± 6 μm. Additionally, a forskolin-related enhancement of gap junction coupling, recently found using the scrape loading technique, was also observed using GNOME LP. Further, an automatic cell imaging and a subsequent semi-automatic quantification of the images using a java-based ImageJ-plugin were performed in a high-throughput sequence. Moreover, the GNOME LP was used on cells such as RBE4 rat brain endothelial cells, which cannot be mechanically scraped as well as on three-dimensionally cultivated cells, opening the possibility to implement the GNOME LP technique for analysis of gap junction coupling in tissues. We conclude that the GNOME LP technique allows a high-throughput automated analysis of gap junction coupling in cells. Moreover this non-invasive technique could be used on monolayers that do not support mechanical scraping as well as on cells in tissue allowing an in vivo/ex vivo analysis of gap junction coupling.

  11. Role of intramolecular interaction in connexin50: mediating the Ca2+-dependent binding of calmodulin to gap junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xianrong; Qi, Yipeng

    2005-08-15

    Gap junction channels formed by connexin50 (Cx50) are critical for maintenance of eye lens transparency. Cleavage of the carboxyl terminus (CT) of Cx50 to produce truncated Cx50 (Cx50trunc) occurred naturally during maturation of lens fiber cells. The mechanism of its altered properties is under confirmation. It has been suggested that calmodulin (CaM) participates in gating some kinds of gap junction. Here, we performed confocal colocalization and co-immunoprecipitation experiments to study the relationships between Cx50 and CaM. Results exhibited that the CaM could colocalize Ca2+ dependently with CT in the linear area of cell-to-cell contact formed by Cx50trunc, while it could not localize in the linear area without expression of CT. Further study indicated that the CT could interact Ca2+ independently with the cytoplasmic loop (CL) of Cx50. These data put forward the importance of Ca2+-independent intramolecular interaction between CT and CL of Cx50, which mediate the Ca2+-dependent binding of CaM to Cx50. These intra- and intermolecular interactions may further improve our understanding of biological significance of the Cx50 in the eye lens.

  12. Gap Junctions Are Involved in the Rescue of CFTR-Dependent Chloride Efflux by Amniotic Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Coculture with Cystic Fibrosis CFBE41o- Cells

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    Annalucia Carbone

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs in coculture with CF immortalised airway epithelial cells (CFBE41o- line, CFBE on Transwell® filters acquired an epithelial phenotype and led to the expression of a mature and functional CFTR protein. In order to explore the role of gap junction- (GJ- mediated intercellular communication (GJIC in this rescue, cocultures (hAMSC : CFBE, 1 : 5 ratio were studied for the formation of GJIC, before and after silencing connexin 43 (Cx43, a major component of GJs. Functional GJs in cocultures were inhibited when the expression of the Cx43 protein was downregulated. Transfection of cocultures with siRNA against Cx43 resulted in the absence of specific CFTR signal on the apical membrane and reduction in the mature form of CFTR (band C, and in parallel, the CFTR-dependent chloride channel activity was significantly decreased. Cx43 downregulation determined also a decrease in transepithelial resistance and an increase in paracellular permeability as compared with control cocultures, implying that GJIC may regulate CFTR expression and function that in turn modulate airway epithelium tightness. These results indicate that GJIC is involved in the correction of CFTR chloride channel activity upon the acquisition of an epithelial phenotype by hAMSCs in coculture with CF cells.

  13. All-trans retinoic acid restores gap junctional intercellular communication between oral cancer cells with upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 expressions in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Dai, Yaohui; Huang, Yulei; Chen, Xiaohua; Wang, Hong; Hong, Yun; Xia, Juan; Cheng, Bin

    2013-07-01

    All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) has been demonstrated to inhibit tumor growth by restoration of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) via upregulation of connexin (Cx) expression in some solid tumors. However, the relationship between ATRA and GJIC remains unclear in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ATRA on the GJIC function of OSCC. We measured the effects of ATRA on the viability and cell cycle distribution of SCC9 and Tca8113 OSCC cells. The GJIC function was observed using the scrape-loading dye transfer technique, and the mRNA and protein levels of Cx32 and Cx43 were detected by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence assays. ATRA inhibited the growth of OSCC cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner (P <0.05) and caused cell cycle arrest. ATRA-treated cells showed a 2.69-fold and 2.06-fold enhancement of GJIC in SCC9 and Tca8113 cells, respectively (P <0.05). Moreover, ATRA induced upregulation of Cx32 and Cx43 at both the mRNA and protein levels in OSCC cells. Our results indicated that restoration of GJIC via enhanced Cx32 and Cx43 expression might serve as a novel mechanism for the anti-tumor effect of ATRA in OSCC.

  14. Application of Stochastic Automata Networks for Creation of Continuous Time Markov Chain Models of Voltage Gating of Gap Junction Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mindaugas Snipas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary goal of this work was to study advantages of numerical methods used for the creation of continuous time Markov chain models (CTMC of voltage gating of gap junction (GJ channels composed of connexin protein. This task was accomplished by describing gating of GJs using the formalism of the stochastic automata networks (SANs, which allowed for very efficient building and storing of infinitesimal generator of the CTMC that allowed to produce matrices of the models containing a distinct block structure. All of that allowed us to develop efficient numerical methods for a steady-state solution of CTMC models. This allowed us to accelerate CPU time, which is necessary to solve CTMC models, ∼20 times.

  15. S-diclofenac Protects against Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiomyopathy in Mice via Ameliorating Cardiac Gap Junction Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huili; Zhang, Alian; Guo, Changfa; Shi, Chunzhi; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Qing; Sparatore, Anna; Wang, Changqian

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), as a novel gaseous mediator, plays important roles in mammalian cardiovascular tissues. In the present study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid 4-(3H-1,2,dithiol-3-thione-5-yl)phenyl ester), a novel H2S-releasing derivative of diclofenac, in a murine model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. After a single dose injection of doxorubicin (15 mg/kg, i.p.), male C57BL/6J mice were given daily treatment of S-diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), NaHS (50 µmol/kg, i.p.), or same volume of vehicle. The cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac was observed after 14 days. It showed that S-diclofenac, but not diclofenac, dose-dependently inhibited the doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cardiac gap junction proteins (connexin 43 and connexin 45) and thus reversed the remodeling of gap junctions in hearts. It also dose-dependently suppressed doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK in hearts. Furthermore, S-diclofenac produced a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect in this model. As a result, S-diclofenac significantly attenuated doxorubicin-related cardiac injury and cardiac dysfunction, and improved the survival rate of mice with doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These effects of S-diclofenac were mimicked in large part by NaHS. Therefore, we propose that H2S released from S-diclofenac in vivo contributes to the protective effect in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These data also provide evidence for a critical role of H2S in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. PMID:22039489

  16. Autophagy and gap junctional intercellular communication inhibition are involved in cadmium-induced apoptosis in rat liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Hui [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China); Zhuo, Liling [College of Life Science, Zaozhuang University, Zaozhuang, Shandong, 277160 (China); Han, Tao; Hu, Di; Yang, Xiaokang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Gu, Jianhong; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, and Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou, Jiangsu, 225009 (China)

    2015-04-17

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to induce hepatotoxicity, yet the underlying mechanism of how this occurs is not fully understood. In this study, Cd-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in rat liver cells (BRL 3A) with apoptotic nuclear morphological changes and a decrease in cell index (CI) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. The role of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) and autophagy in Cd-induced apoptosis was investigated. Cd significantly induced GJIC inhibition as well as downregulation of connexin 43 (Cx43). The prototypical gap junction blocker carbenoxolone disodium (CBX) exacerbated the Cd-induced decrease in CI. Cd treatment was also found to cause autophagy, with an increase in mRNA expression of autophagy-related genes Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1, and microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 (LC3) conversion from cytosolic LC3-I to membrane-bound LC3-II. The autophagic inducer rapamycin (RAP) prevented the Cd-induced CI decrease, while the autophagic inhibitor chloroquine (CQ) caused a further reduction in CI. In addition, CBX promoted Cd-induced autophagy, as well as changes in expression of Atg-5, Atg-7, Beclin-1 and LC3. CQ was found to block the Cd-induced decrease in Cx43 and GJIC inhibition, whereas RAP had opposite effect. These results demonstrate that autophagy plays a protective role during Cd-induced apoptosis in BRL 3A cells during 6 h of experiment, while autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition which has a negative effect on cellular fate. - Highlights: • GJIC and autophagy is crucial for biological processes. • Cd exposure causes GJIC inhibition and autophagy increase in BRL 3A cells. • Autophagy protects Cd induced BRL 3A cells apoptosis at an early stage. • Autophagy exacerbates Cd-induced GJIC inhibition. • GJIC plays an important role in autophagy induced cell death or survival.

  17. S-diclofenac protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in mice via ameliorating cardiac gap junction remodeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huili Zhang

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H(2S, as a novel gaseous mediator, plays important roles in mammalian cardiovascular tissues. In the present study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenylamino] benzeneacetic acid 4-(3H-1,2,dithiol-3-thione-5-ylphenyl ester, a novel H(2S-releasing derivative of diclofenac, in a murine model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. After a single dose injection of doxorubicin (15 mg/kg, i.p., male C57BL/6J mice were given daily treatment of S-diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p., diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p., NaHS (50 µmol/kg, i.p., or same volume of vehicle. The cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac was observed after 14 days. It showed that S-diclofenac, but not diclofenac, dose-dependently inhibited the doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cardiac gap junction proteins (connexin 43 and connexin 45 and thus reversed the remodeling of gap junctions in hearts. It also dose-dependently suppressed doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK in hearts. Furthermore, S-diclofenac produced a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect in this model. As a result, S-diclofenac significantly attenuated doxorubicin-related cardiac injury and cardiac dysfunction, and improved the survival rate of mice with doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These effects of S-diclofenac were mimicked in large part by NaHS. Therefore, we propose that H(2S released from S-diclofenac in vivo contributes to the protective effect in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These data also provide evidence for a critical role of H(2S in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy.

  18. S-diclofenac protects against doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy in mice via ameliorating cardiac gap junction remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huili; Zhang, Alian; Guo, Changfa; Shi, Chunzhi; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Qing; Sparatore, Anna; Wang, Changqian

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S), as a novel gaseous mediator, plays important roles in mammalian cardiovascular tissues. In the present study, we investigated the cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac (2-[(2,6-dichlorophenyl)amino] benzeneacetic acid 4-(3H-1,2,dithiol-3-thione-5-yl)phenyl ester), a novel H(2)S-releasing derivative of diclofenac, in a murine model of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. After a single dose injection of doxorubicin (15 mg/kg, i.p.), male C57BL/6J mice were given daily treatment of S-diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), diclofenac (25 and 50 µmol/kg, i.p.), NaHS (50 µmol/kg, i.p.), or same volume of vehicle. The cardioprotective effect of S-diclofenac was observed after 14 days. It showed that S-diclofenac, but not diclofenac, dose-dependently inhibited the doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cardiac gap junction proteins (connexin 43 and connexin 45) and thus reversed the remodeling of gap junctions in hearts. It also dose-dependently suppressed doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK in hearts. Furthermore, S-diclofenac produced a dose-dependent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effect in this model. As a result, S-diclofenac significantly attenuated doxorubicin-related cardiac injury and cardiac dysfunction, and improved the survival rate of mice with doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These effects of S-diclofenac were mimicked in large part by NaHS. Therefore, we propose that H(2)S released from S-diclofenac in vivo contributes to the protective effect in doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy. These data also provide evidence for a critical role of H(2)S in the pathogenesis of doxorubicin-induced cardiomyopathy.

  19. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sovadinová, I.; Babica, Pavel; Böke, H.; Kumar, E.; Wilke, A.; Park, J.-S.; Trosko, J. E.; Upham, B. L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, 5 no.e0124454 (2015), s. 1-16 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12034 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : gap junctional intercellular communication * resveratrol * phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.057, year: 2015

  20. Conserved glycine at position 45 of major cochlear connexins constitutes a vital component of the Ca²⁺ sensor for gating of gap junction hemichannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanping; Hao, Hongxia

    2013-07-05

    Mutations in gap junction (GJ) family of proteins, especially in the connexin (Cx) 26, are responsible for causing severe congenital hearing loss in a significant portion of patients (30-50% in various ethnic groups). Substitution of glycine at the position 45 of Cx26 to glutamic acid (p.G45E mutation) causes the Keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID) syndrome. Previous studies have suggested that this point mutation caused a gain-of-function defect. However, the molecular mechanism of KID syndrome remains unclear. Since glycine at this position is conserved in many Cxs expressed in the cochlea, we tested the hypothesis that glycine at position 45 is an important component of the sensor regulating the Ca(2+) gating of GJ hemichannels. Using reconstituted Cx30, 32 and 43 expressed in the HEK 293 cells, we compared the functions of wild type and p.G45E mutant Cxs. We found that G45E in Cx30 resulted in similar deleterious cellular effects as Cx26 did. Cell death occurred within 24h of transfection, which was rescued by increasing extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]o). Dye loading assay showed that Cx30 G45E, similar to Cx26 G45E, had leaky hemichannels at physiological [Ca(2+)]o (1.2 mM). Higher [Ca(2+)]o reduced the dye loading in a dose-dependent manner. Whole cell membrane current recordings also indicated that G45E caused increased hemichannel activities. p.G45E mutations of Cx32 and 43 also resulted in leaky hemichannels compared to their respective wild types in lower [Ca(2+)]o. Our data in this study provided further support for the hypothesis that glycine at position 45 is a conserved Ca(2+) sensor for the gating of GJ hemichannels among multiple Cx subtypes expressed in the cochlea. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. ZP123 increases gap junctional conductance and prevents reentrant ventricular tachycardia during myocardial ischemia in open chest dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xing, Dezhi; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Nielsen, Morten S

    2003-01-01

    demonstrated that 10 nM ZP123 improved gap junctional intercellular conductance by 69% +/- 20% in pairs of guinea pig ventricular myocytes. VT was induced by programmed stimulation in alpha-chloralose anaesthetized open chest dogs 1 to 4 hours after coronary artery occlusion. Three-dimensional activation...... mapping was done using six bipolar electrograms on each of 23 multipolar needles in the risk zone. When VT was reproducibly induced, dogs were randomly assigned to receive either saline or ZP123 cumulatively at three dose levels (intravenous bolus followed by 30-min infusion per dose). Attempts to induce...... VT were repeated in each infusion period. Mass spectrometry was used to measure ZP123 plasma concentrations. Twenty-six dogs with reentrant VT were included. ZP123 significantly prevented reentrant VT at all plasma concentrations vs saline: 1.0 +/- 0.2 nM: 6/12 vs 0/12; 7.7 +/- 0.6 nM: 7/13 vs 1...

  2. Possible Mechanisms of Mercury Toxicity and Cancer Promotion: Involvement of Gap Junction Intercellular Communications and Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Zefferino

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of observations indicate that heavy metals are able to alter cellular metabolic pathways through induction of a prooxidative state. Nevertheless, the outcome of heavy metal-mediated effects in the development of human diseases is debated and needs further insights. Cancer is a well-established DNA mutation-linked disease; however, epigenetic events are perhaps more important and harmful than genetic alterations. Unfortunately, we do not have reliable screening methods to assess/validate the epigenetic (promoter effects of a physical or a chemical agent. We propose a mechanism of action whereby mercury acts as a possible promoter carcinogen. In the present contribution, we resume our previous studies on mercury tested at concentrations comparable with its occurrence as environmental pollutant. It is shown that Hg(II elicits a prooxidative state in keratinocytes linked to inhibition of gap junction-mediated intercellular communication and proinflammatory cytokine production. These combined effects may on one hand isolate cells from tissue-specific homeostasis promoting their proliferation and on the other hand tamper the immune system defense/surveillance checkmating the whole organism. Since Hg(II is not a mutagenic/genotoxic compound directly affecting gene expression, in a broader sense, mercury might be an example of an epigenetic tumor promoter or, further expanding this concept, a “metagenetic” effector.

  3. Rescue of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS)-mediated Sertoli cell injury by overexpression of gap junction protein connexin 43

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Mruk, Dolores D.; Chen, Haiqi; Wong, Chris K. C.; Lee, Will M.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-07-01

    Perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) is an environmental toxicant used in developing countries, including China, as a stain repellent for clothing, carpets and draperies, but it has been banned in the U.S. and Canada since the late 2000s. PFOS perturbed the Sertoli cell tight junction (TJ)-permeability barrier, causing disruption of actin microfilaments in cell cytosol, perturbing the localization of cell junction proteins (e.g., occluden-ZO-1, N-cadherin-ß-catenin). These changes destabilized Sertoli cell blood-testis barrier (BTB) integrity. These findings suggest that human exposure to PFOS might induce BTB dysfunction and infertility. Interestingly, PFOS-induced Sertoli cell injury associated with a down-regulation of the gap junction (GJ) protein connexin43 (Cx43). We next investigated if overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells could rescue the PFOS-induced cell injury. Indeed, overexpression of Cx43 in Sertoli cells with an established TJ-barrier blocked the disruption in PFOS-induced GJ-intercellular communication, resulting in the re-organization of actin microfilaments, which rendered them similar to those in control cells. Furthermore, cell adhesion proteins that utilized F-actin for attachment became properly distributed at the cell-cell interface, resealing the disrupted TJ-barrier. In summary, Cx43 is a good target that might be used to manage PFOS-induced reproductive dysfunction.

  4. Stem cells can form gap junctions with cardiac myocytes and exert pro-arrhythmic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoline Willemijn Smit

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has been suggested to be a promising option for regeneration of injured myocardium, for example following a myocardial infarction. For clinical use cell-based therapies have to be safe and applicable and are aimed to renovate the architecture of the heart. Yet for functional and coordinated activity synchronized with the host myocardium stem cells have to be capable of forming electrical connections with resident cardiomyocytes. In this paper we discuss whether stem cells are capable of establishing functional electrotonic connections with cardiomyocytes and whether these may generate a risk for arrhythmias. Application of stem cells in the clinical setting with outcomes concerning arrhythmogenic safety and future perspectives will also briefly be touched upon.

  5. Gap junctions in the ovary of Drosophila melanogaster: localization of innexins 1, 2, 3 and 4 and evidence for intercellular communication via innexin-2 containing channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimmermann Jennifer

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Drosophila ovary, germ-line and soma cells are interconnected via gap junctions. The main gap-junction proteins in invertebrates are members of the innexin family. In order to reveal the role that innexins play in cell-cell communication during oogenesis, we investigated the localization of innexins 1, 2, 3 and 4 using immunohistochemistry, and analyzed follicle development following channel blockade. Results We found innexin 1 predominantly localized to the baso-lateral domain of follicle cells, whereas innexin 2 is positioned apico-laterally as well as apically between follicle cells and germ-line cells. Innexin 3 was observed laterally in follicle cells and also in nurse cells, and innexin 4 was detected in the oolemma up to stage 8 and in nurse-cell membranes up to stage 12. In order to test whether innexins form channels suitable for intercellular communication, we microinjected innexin antibodies in combination with a fluorescent tracer into the oocyte of stage-10 follicles. We found that dye-coupling between oocyte and follicle cells was largely reduced by innexin-2 antibodies directed against the intracellular C-terminus as well as against the intracellular loop. Analyzing in vitro, between stages 10 and 14, the developmental capacities of follicles following microinjections of innexin-2 antibodies revealed defects in follicle-cell differentiation, nurse-cell regression, oocyte growth and choriogenesis. Conclusion Our results suggest that all analyzed innexins are involved in the formation of gap junctions in the ovary. While innexins 2 and 3 are colocalized between soma cells, innexins 2 and 4 are colocalized between soma and germ-line cells. Innexin 2 is participating in cell-cell communication via hemichannels residing in the oolemma. It is obvious that gap-junctional communication between germ-line and soma cells is essential for several processes during oogenesis.

  6. Inhibition of gap junctional intercellular communication by noncoplanar polychlorinated biphenyls: Inhibitory potencies and screening for potential mode(s) of action

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Machala, M.; Bláha, L.; Vondráček, Jan; Trosko, J. E.; Scott, J.; Upham, B. L.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 1 (2003), s. 102-111 ISSN 1096-6080 R&D Projects: GA MZe QC0194; GA ČR GA525/00/D101 Grant - others:National Institute of Health(US) P42 ES04911-07 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : WB-F344 cell line * gap junction * PCB congeners Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.067, year: 2003

  7. HYS-32, a novel analogue of combretastatin A-4, enhances connexin43 expression and gap junction intercellular communication in rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Chun; Shen, Chien-Chang; Liao, Chih-Kai; Jow, Guey-Mei; Chiu, Chi-Ting; Chung, Tun-Hui; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2013-05-01

    HYS-32 [4-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-(naphthalen-2-yl)-2(5H)-furanone] is a new analogue of the anti-tumor compound combretastatin A-4 containing a cis-stilbene moiety. In this study, we investigated its effects on Cx43 gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and the signaling pathway involved in rat primary astrocytes. Western blot analyses showed that HYS-32 dose- and time-dependently upregulated Cx43 expression. A confocal microscopic study and scrape-loading/dye transfer analyses demonstrated that HYS-32 (5μM) induced microtubule coiling, accumulation of Cx43 in gap junction plaques, and increased GJIC in astrocytes. The HYS-32-induced microtubule coiling and Cx43 accumulation in gap junction plaques was reversed when HYS-32 was removed. Treatment of astrocytes with cycloheximide resulted in time-dependent degradation of by co-treatment with HYS-32 by increasing the half-life of Cx43. Co-treatment with HYS-32 also prevented the LPS-induced downregulation of Cx43 and inhibition of GJIC in astrocytes. HYS-32 induced activation of PKC, ERK, and JNK, and co-treatment with the PKC inhibitor Go6976 or the ERK inhibitor PD98059, but not the JNK inhibitor SP600125, prevented the HYS-32-induced increase in Cx43 expression and GJIC. Go6976 suppressed the HYS-32-induced PKC phosphorylation and increase in phospho-ERK levels, while PD98059 did not prevent the HYS-32-induced increase in phospho-PKC levels, suggesting that PKC is an upstream effector of ERK. In conclusion, our results show that HYS-32 increases the half-life of Cx43 and enhances Cx43 expression and GJIC in astrocytes via a PKC-ERK signaling cascade. These novel biological effects of HYS-32 on astrocyte gap junctions support its potential for therapeutic use as a protective agent for the central nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A novel role of dendritic gap junction and mechanisms underlying its interaction with thalamocortical conductance in fast spiking inhibitory neurons

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    Sun Qian-Quan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the roles of dendritic gap junctions (GJs of inhibitory interneurons in modulating temporal properties of sensory induced responses in sensory cortices. Electrophysiological dual patch-clamp recording and computational simulation methods were used in combination to examine a novel role of GJs in sensory mediated feed-forward inhibitory responses in barrel cortex layer IV and its underlying mechanisms. Results Under physiological conditions, excitatory post-junctional potentials (EPJPs interact with thalamocortical (TC inputs within an unprecedented few milliseconds (i.e. over 200 Hz to enhance the firing probability and synchrony of coupled fast-spiking (FS cells. Dendritic GJ coupling allows fourfold increase in synchrony and a significant enhancement in spike transmission efficacy in excitatory spiny stellate cells. The model revealed the following novel mechanisms: 1 rapid capacitive current (Icap underlies the activation of voltage-gated sodium channels; 2 there was less than 2 milliseconds in which the Icap underlying TC input and EPJP was coupled effectively; 3 cells with dendritic GJs had larger input conductance and smaller membrane response to weaker inputs; 4 synchrony in inhibitory networks by GJ coupling leads to reduced sporadic lateral inhibition and increased TC transmission efficacy. Conclusion Dendritic GJs of neocortical inhibitory networks can have very powerful effects in modulating the strength and the temporal properties of sensory induced feed-forward inhibitory and excitatory responses at a very high frequency band (>200 Hz. Rapid capacitive currents are identified as main mechanisms underlying interaction between two transient synaptic conductances.

  9. Experimental blunt chest trauma-induced myocardial inflammation and alteration of gap-junction protein connexin 43.

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    Miriam Kalbitz

    Full Text Available Severe blunt chest trauma in humans is associated with high mortality rates. Whereas lung tissue damage and lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma have extensively been investigated, the traumatic and posttraumatic effects on the heart remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to define cardiac injury patterns in an experimental blunt chest trauma model in rats.Experimental blunt chest trauma was induced by a blast wave in rats, with subsequent analysis of its effects on the heart. The animals were subjected either to a sham or trauma procedure. Systemic markers for cardiac injury were determined after 24 h and 5 days. Postmortem analysis of heart tissue addressed structural injury and inflammation 24 h and 5 days after trauma.Plasma levels of extracellular histones were elevated 24 h and 5 days after blunt chest trauma compared to sham-treated animals. In the heart, up-regulation of interleukin-1β 24 h after trauma and increased myeloperoxidase activity 24 h and 5 days after trauma were accompanied by reduced complement C5a receptor-1 expression 24 h after trauma. Histological analysis revealed extravasation of erythrocytes and immunohistochemical analysis alteration of the pattern of the gap-junction protein connexin 43. Furthermore, a slight reduction of α-actinin and desmin expression in cardiac tissue was found after trauma together with a minor increase in sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticlulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA expression.The clinically highly relevant rat model of blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma is associated with cardiac inflammation and structural alterations in cardiac tissue.

  10. Experimental blunt chest trauma-induced myocardial inflammation and alteration of gap-junction protein connexin 43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalbitz, Miriam; Amann, Elisa Maria; Bosch, Belinda; Palmer, Annette; Schultze, Anke; Pressmar, Jochen; Weber, Birte; Wepler, Martin; Gebhard, Florian; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Brenner, Rolf; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Severe blunt chest trauma in humans is associated with high mortality rates. Whereas lung tissue damage and lung inflammation after blunt chest trauma have extensively been investigated, the traumatic and posttraumatic effects on the heart remain poorly understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to define cardiac injury patterns in an experimental blunt chest trauma model in rats. Experimental blunt chest trauma was induced by a blast wave in rats, with subsequent analysis of its effects on the heart. The animals were subjected either to a sham or trauma procedure. Systemic markers for cardiac injury were determined after 24 h and 5 days. Postmortem analysis of heart tissue addressed structural injury and inflammation 24 h and 5 days after trauma. Plasma levels of extracellular histones were elevated 24 h and 5 days after blunt chest trauma compared to sham-treated animals. In the heart, up-regulation of interleukin-1β 24 h after trauma and increased myeloperoxidase activity 24 h and 5 days after trauma were accompanied by reduced complement C5a receptor-1 expression 24 h after trauma. Histological analysis revealed extravasation of erythrocytes and immunohistochemical analysis alteration of the pattern of the gap-junction protein connexin 43. Furthermore, a slight reduction of α-actinin and desmin expression in cardiac tissue was found after trauma together with a minor increase in sarcoplasmatic/endoplasmatic reticlulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA) expression. The clinically highly relevant rat model of blast wave-induced blunt chest trauma is associated with cardiac inflammation and structural alterations in cardiac tissue.

  11. Gap junctional intercellular communication and endoplasmic reticulum stress regulate chronic cadmium exposure induced apoptosis in HK-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zehe; Diao, Haipeng; Ji, Xiaoli; Liu, Qingping; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Wu, Qing

    2018-05-15

    Cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, is known to induce renal toxicity by primarily targeting at renal proximal tubule. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) regulate many pathophysiological processes. Yet, how ER stress and GJIC regulate Cd-induced nephrotoxicity remain elusive. In this study, we treated human proximal tubule (HK-2) cells with 1 μM CdCl 2 every other day for 12 days and found that Cd significantly increased cell apoptosis at 10 and 12 days. This cytotoxicity correlated with activation of ER stress and apoptotic signaling evidenced by upregulation of inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1α), splice X-box binding protein-1 (XBP-1s), and apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) proteins. Interestingly, the AKT signaling was activated at 2- and 4-day and then inhibited at 10- and 12-day of Cd treatment; by contrast, Cd decreased GJIC levels at 2- and 4-day followed by a significant increase at 10- and 12-day treatment. Activation of AKT by SC79 or inhibition of GJIC by 18α-glycyrrhetinic acid (18α-GA) completely abolished Cd-induced AKT inhibition and IRE1α-ASK1 activation. Importantly, pretreatment with ER stress inhibitor or 18α-GA significantly mitigated Cd-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that GJIC collaborates with AKT signaling and ER stress in regulating prolonged Cd-treatment-induced apoptosis in HK-2 cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Making the Tent Function Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprows, David J.

    2010-01-01

    This note can be used to illustrate to the student such concepts as periodicity in the complex plane. The basic construction makes use of the Tent function which requires only that the student have some working knowledge of binary arithmetic.

  13. Tanshinone IIA increases the bystander effect of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir gene therapy via enhanced gap junctional intercellular communication.

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    Jianyong Xiao

    Full Text Available The bystander effect is an intriguing phenomenon by which adjacent cells become sensitized to drug treatment during gene therapy with herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV-tk/GCV. This effect is reported to be mediated by gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC, and therefore, we postulated that upregulation of genes that facilitate GJIC may enhance the HSV-tk/GCV bystander effect. Previous findings have shown Tanshinone IIA (Tan IIA, a chemical substance derived from a Chinese medicine herb, promotes the upregulation of the connexins Cx26 and Cx43 in B16 cells. Because gap junctions are formed by connexins, we hypothesized that Tan IIA might increase GJIC. Our results show that Tan IIA increased GJIC in B16 melanoma cells, leading to more efficient GCV-induced bystander killing in cells stably expressing HSV-tk. Additionally, in vivo experiments demonstrated that tumors in mice with 10% HSV-tk positive B16 cells and 90% wild-type B16 cells became smaller following treatment with the combination of GCV and Tan IIA as compared to GCV or Tan IIA alone. These data demonstrate that Tan IIA can augment the bystander effect of HSV-tk/GCV system through increased gap junction coupling, which adds strength to the promising strategy that develops connexins inducer to potentiate the effects of suicide gene therapy.

  14. Astrocyte calcium waves propagate proximally by gap junction and distally by extracellular diffusion of ATP released from volume-regulated anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Yuki; Maekawa, Shohei; Morita, Mitsuhiro

    2017-10-13

    Wave-like propagation of [Ca 2+ ] i increases is a remarkable intercellular communication characteristic in astrocyte networks, intercalating neural circuits and vasculature. Mechanically-induced [Ca 2+ ] i increases and their subsequent propagation to neighboring astrocytes in culture is a classical model of astrocyte calcium wave and is known to be mediated by gap junction and extracellular ATP, but the role of each pathway remains unclear. Pharmacologic analysis of time-dependent distribution of [Ca 2+ ] i revealed three distinct [Ca 2+ ] i increases, the largest being in stimulated cells independent of extracellular Ca 2+ and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced Ca 2+ release. In addition, persistent [Ca 2+ ] i increases were found to propagate rapidly via gap junctions in the proximal region, and transient [Ca 2+ ] i increases were found to propagate slowly via extracellular ATP in the distal region. Simultaneous imaging of astrocyte [Ca 2+ ] i and extracellular ATP, the latter of which was measured by an ATP sniffing cell, revealed that ATP was released within the proximal region by volume-regulated anion channel in a [Ca 2+ ] i independent manner. This detailed analysis of a classical model is the first to address the different contributions of two major pathways of calcium waves, gap junctions and extracellular ATP.

  15. Gingko biloba extracts protect auditory hair cells from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity by inhibiting perturbation of gap junctional intercellular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S J; Kim, S W; Lee, J B; Lim, H J; Kim, Y J; Tian, C; So, H S; Park, R; Choung, Y-H

    2013-08-06

    Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) may play an important role in the hearing process. Cisplatin is an anticancer drug that causes hearing loss and Gingko biloba extracts (EGb 761) have been used as an antioxidant and enhancer for GJIC. The purpose of this study was to examine the efficiency of EGb 761 in protecting against cisplatin-induced apoptosis and disturbance of GJIC. House Ear Institute-Organ of Corti 1 auditory cells were cultured and treated with cisplatin (50 μM) and EGb (300 μg/ml) for 24h, and then analyzed by immunocytochemistry (Annexin V/propidium iodide) and Western blots. GJIC was evaluated by scrape-loading dye transfer (SLDT). Basal turn organ of Corti (oC) explants from neonatal (p3) rats were exposed to cisplatin (1-10 μM) and EGb (50-400 μg/ml). The number of intact hair cells was counted by co-labeling with phalloidin and MyoVIIa. EGb prevented cisplatin-induced apoptosis in immunostaining and decreased caspase 3 and poly-ADP-ribose polymerase bands, which were increased in cisplatin-treated cells in Western blots. EGb prevented abnormal intracellular locations of connexin (Cx) 26, 30, 31, and 43 in cells treated with cisplatin and increased quantities of Cx bands. EGb also prevented cisplatin-induced disturbance of GJIC in SLDT. In oC explants, EGb significantly prevented hair cell damage induced by cisplatin. In animal studies, EGb significantly prevented cisplatin-induced hearing loss across 16 and 32 kHz. These results show that cisplatin induces ototoxicity including hearing loss as well as down-regulation of GJIC and inhibition of Cxs in auditory cells. EGb prevents hearing loss in cisplatin-treated rats by inhibiting down-regulation of Cx expression and GJIC. The disturbance of GJIC or Cx expression may be one of the important mechanisms of cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On the role of the gap junction protein Cx43 (GJA1 in human cardiac malformations with Fallot-pathology. a study on paediatric cardiac specimen.

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    Aida Salameh

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Gap junction channels are involved in growth and differentiation. Therefore, we wanted to elucidate if the main cardiac gap junction protein connexin43 (GJA1 is altered in patients with Tetralogy of Fallot or double-outlet right ventricle of Fallot-type (62 patients referred to as Fallot compared to other cardiac anomalies (21 patients referred to as non-Fallot. Patients were divided into three age groups: 0-2years, 2-12years and >12years. Myocardial tissue samples were collected during corrective surgery and analysis of cell morphology, GJA1- and N-cadherin (CDH2-distribution, as well as GJA1 protein- and mRNA-expression was carried out. Moreover, GJA1-gene analysis of 16 patients and 20 healthy subjects was performed. RESULTS: Myocardial cell length and width were significantly increased in the oldest age group compared to the younger ones. GJA1 distribution changed significantly during maturation with the ratio of polar/lateral GJA1 increasing from 2.93±0.68 to 8.52±1.41. While in 0-2years old patients ∼6% of the lateral GJA1 was co-localised with CDH2 this decreased with age. Furthermore, the changes in cell morphology and GJA1-distribution were not due to the heart defect itself but were significantly dependent on age. Total GJA1 protein expression decreased during growing-up, whereas GJA1-mRNA remained unchanged. Sequencing of the GJA1-gene revealed only few heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms within the Fallot and the healthy control group. CONCLUSION: During maturation significant changes in gap junction remodelling occur which might be necessary for the growing and developing heart. In our study point mutations within the Cx43-gene could not be identified as a cause of the development of TOF.

  17. 17beta-estradiol reduces the effect of metabolic inhibition on gap junction intercellular communication in rat cardiomyocytes via the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Tun-Hui; Wang, Seu-Mei; Wu, Jiahn-Chun

    2004-11-01

    The effects of 17beta-estradiol (E2) on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) were assessed by Lucifer yellow dye coupling in cultured neonatal rat cardiomyocytes after metabolic inhibition (MI) using potassium cyanide and sodium iodoacetate. MI significantly reduced dye coupling of cardiomyocytes to 8.5% +/- 0.6% of control levels, and pretreatment with E2, but not its inactive isomer 17alpha-estradiol, dose-dependently (EC(50) = 0.41 microM) increased the dye coupling up to 76% +/- 15% of control levels. The effect of E2 on MI-induced dye uncoupling was abolished by tamoxifen, a potent estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist. The ligand, E2-BSA-FITC, labeled the cardiomyocyte surface, whereas BSA-FITC did not, suggesting the presence of membrane-associated E2 receptors. Double immunofluorescence microscopy showed that MI-induced the accumulation of non-phosphorylated Cx43 at the gap junction and that this was prevented by E2 pretreatment. Labeling of Lucifer yellow-microinjected cardiomyocytes with antibodies specific for Ser368-phosphorylated Cx43 (Ser368Cx43) or non-phosphorylated Cx43 confirmed that E2 reduced the MI-induced inhibition of dye coupling and accumulation of non-phosphorylated Cx43 concomitant with the reappearance of Ser368Cx43 at the gap junction. MI caused a decrease in Ser368Cx43 protein levels, and pretreatment with E2 significantly increased the levels of Ser368Cx43. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with chelerythrine blocked the E2-induced increase of Ser368Cx43 levels in MI-treated cardiomyocytes. These results suggest that E2 attenuates the inhibitory effect of MI on GJIC in cardiomyocytes by affecting the phosphorylation of Cx43, possibly mediated by activation of PKC via a membrane-associated signaling mechanism.

  18. Participation of gap junction communication in potentially lethal damage repair and DNA damage in human fibroblasts exposed to low- or high-LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autsavapromporn, Narongchai; Suzuki, Masao; Plante, Ianik; Liu, Cuihua; Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Murakami, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Existing research has not fully explained how different types of ionizing radiation (IR) modulate the responses of cell populations or tissues. In our previous work, we showed that gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) mediates the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high linear energy transfer (LET) radiations, in which almost every cells is traversed by an IR track. In the present study, we conducted an in-depth study of the role of GJIC in modulating the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) and micronuclei formation in cells exposed to low- or high-LET IR. Confluent human fibroblasts were exposed in the presence or absence of a gap junction inhibitor to 200 kV X rays (LET ∼ 1.7 keV/µm), carbon ions (LET ∼ 76 keV/µm), silicon ions (LET ∼ 113 keV/µm) or iron ions (LET ∼ 400 keV/µm) that resulted in isosurvival levels. The fibroblasts were incubated for various times at 37 °C. As expected, high-LET IR were more effective than were low-LET X rays at killing cells and damaging DNA shortly after irradiation. However, when cells were held in a confluent state for several hours, PLDR associated with a reduction in DNA damage, occurred only in cells exposed to X rays. Interestingly, inhibition of GJIC eliminated the enhancement of toxic effects, which resulted in an increase of cell survival and reduction in the level of micronucleus formation in cells exposed to high, but not in those exposed to low-LET IR. The experiment shows that gap-junction communication plays an important role in the propagation of stressful effects among irradiated cells exposed to high-LET IR while GJIC has only a minimal effect on PLDR and DNA damage following low-LET irradiation. Together, our results show that PLDR and induction of DNA damage clearly depend on gap-junction communication and radiation quality. PMID:23867854

  19. Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced apoptosis in airway epithelial cells is mediated by gap junctional communication in a JNK-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losa, Davide; Köhler, Thilo; Bellec, Jessica; Dudez, Tecla; Crespin, Sophie; Bacchetta, Marc; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw See; Morel, Sandrine; Nguyen, Tuan H; van Delden, Christian; Chanson, Marc

    2014-05-15

    Chronic infection and inflammation of the airways is a hallmark of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. The response of the CF airway epithelium to the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa is characterized by altered inflammation and apoptosis. In this study, we examined innate immune recognition and epithelial responses at the level of the gap junction protein connexin43 (Cx43) in polarized human airway epithelial cells upon infection by PAO1. We report that PAO1 activates cell surface receptors to elicit an intracellular signaling cascade leading to enhancement of gap junctional communication. Expression of Cx43 involved an opposite regulation exerted by JNK and p38 MAPKs. PAO1-induced apoptosis was increased in the presence of a JNK inhibitor, but latter effect was prevented by lentiviral expression of a Cx43-specific short hairpin RNA. Moreover, we found that JNK activity was upregulated by pharmacological inhibition of CFTR in Calu-3 cells, whereas correction of a CF airway cell line (CF15 cells) by adenoviral expression of CFTR reduced the activation of this MAPK. Interestingly, CFTR inhibition in Calu-3 cells was associated with decreased Cx43 expression and reduced apoptosis. These results indicate that Cx43 expression is a component of the response of airway epithelial cells to innate immune activation by regulating the survival/apoptosis balance. Defective CFTR could alter this equilibrium with deleterious consequences on the CF epithelial response to P. aeruginosa.

  20. A protective role of cumulus cells after short-term exposure of rat cumulus cell-oocyte complexes to lifestyle or environmental contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campen, Kelly A; McNatty, Kenneth P; Pitman, Janet L

    2017-04-01

    Ovarian follicular fluid provides a potential reservoir for exogenous compounds that may adversely affect oocyte quality. This study examined the effects of common lifestyle and environmental contaminants, namely bisphenol-A (BPA), caffeine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), nicotine and Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on gap junction genes (Gja1, Gja4) and proteins (GJA1), glucose metabolism genes (Gfpt1, Pfkp) and oocyte growth factor genes (Bmp15, Gdf9), as well as gap junction transfer rate, in rat cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs). In vitro exposure to MDMA and THC accelerated the timing of meiotic resumption and all contaminants altered either gap junction gene expression (BPA, caffeine, MDMA and THC) or transfer rate (BPA and nicotine). In vitro exposure of COCs to MDMA also altered glucose metabolism genes. Overall, oocyte-derived genes were largely unaffected following exposure to any contaminant. In summary, the impact of short-term exposure to lifestyle and environmental contaminants on oocyte function may be diminished due to protective properties of cumulus cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 in human cumulus cells is associated with regulating autophagy and apoptosis, maintaining gap junction integrity and progesterone synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hongshan; Zhang, Fan; Duan, Ping; Zhu, Nan; Zhang, Jiayan; Ye, Feijun; Shan, Dan; Chen, Hua; Lu, XiaoSheng; Zhu, ChunFang; Ge, Renshan; Lin, Zhenkun

    2017-03-05

    To explore the roles of mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 (UCP2) in cumulus cells (CCs), human CCs were cultured in vitro, and the UCP2 was inhibited by treatment with Genipin, a special UCP inhibitor, or by RNA interference targeting UCP2. No significant differences in adenosine triphosphate levels and the ratio of ADP/ATP were observed after UCP2 inhibition. UCP2 inhibition caused a significant increase in cellular oxidative damage, which was reflected in alterations to several key parameters, including reactive oxygen species (ROS) and lipid peroxidation levels and the ratio of reduced GSH to GSSG. UCP2 blocking resulted in an obvious increase in active Caspase-3, accompanied by the decline of proactive Caspase-3 and a significant increase in the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio, suggesting that UCP2 inhibition triggered cellular apoptosis and autophagy. The mRNA and protein expression of connexin 43 (Cx43), a gap junction channel protein, were significantly reduced after treatment with Genipin or siRNA. The progesterone level in the culture medium was also significantly decreased after UCP2 inhibition. Our data indicated that UCP2 plays highly important roles in mediating ROS production and regulating apoptosis and autophagy, as well as maintaining gap junction integrity and progesterone synthesis, which suggests that UCP2 is involved in the regulation of follicle development and early embryo implantation and implies that it might serve as a potential biomarker for oocyte quality and competency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Complex Functions with GeoGebra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breda, Ana Maria D'azevedo; Dos Santos, José Manuel Dos Santos

    2016-01-01

    Complex functions, generally feature some interesting peculiarities, seen as extensions of real functions. The visualization of complex functions properties usually requires the simultaneous visualization of two-dimensional spaces. The multiple Windows of GeoGebra, combined with its ability of algebraic computation with complex numbers, allow the…

  3. Silver nanoparticles increase connexin43-mediated gap junctional intercellular communication in HaCaT cells through activation of reactive oxygen species and mitogen-activated protein kinase signal pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qin, Yu; Han, Limin; Yang, Di

    2017-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are widely used in health and consumer products that routinely contact skin. However, the biological effects and possible mechanisms of AgNPs on skin remain unclear. Gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) plays a critical role in multicellular organisms to ...

  4. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovadinova, Iva; Babica, Pavel; Böke, Hatice; Kumar, Esha; Wilke, Andrew; Park, Joon-Suk; Trosko, James E; Upham, Brad L

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC) has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC. the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap junction channels

  5. Phosphatidylcholine Specific PLC-Induced Dysregulation of Gap Junctions, a Robust Cellular Response to Environmental Toxicants, and Prevention by Resveratrol in a Rat Liver Cell Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva Sovadinova

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC has been associated with different pathologies, including cancer; however, molecular mechanisms regulating GJIC are not fully understood. Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK-dependent mechanisms of GJIC-dysregulation have been well-established, however recent discoveries have implicated phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC in the regulation of GJIC. What is not known is how prevalent these two signaling mechanisms are in toxicant/toxin-induced dysregulation of GJIC, and do toxicants/toxins work through either signaling mechanisms or both, or through alternative signaling mechanisms. Different chemical toxicants were used to assess whether they dysregulate GJIC via MEK or PC-PLC, or both Mek and PC-PLC, or through other signaling pathways, using a pluripotent rat liver epithelial oval-cell line, WB-F344. Epidermal growth factor, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, thrombin receptor activating peptide-6 and lindane regulated GJIC through a MEK1/2-dependent mechanism that was independent of PC-PLC; whereas PAHs, DDT, PCB 153, dicumylperoxide and perfluorodecanoic acid inhibited GJIC through PC-PLC independent of Mek. Dysregulation of GJIC by perfluorooctanoic acid and R59022 required both MEK1/2 and PC-PLC; while benzoylperoxide, arachidonic acid, 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid, perfluorooctane sulfonic acid, 1-monolaurin, pentachlorophenol and alachlor required neither MEK1/2 nor PC-PLC. Resveratrol prevented dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that acted either through MEK1/2 or PC-PLC. Except for alachlor, resveratrol did not prevent dysregulation of GJIC by toxicants that worked through PC-PLC-independent and MEK1/2-independent pathways, which indicated at least two other, yet unidentified, pathways that are involved in the regulation of GJIC.the dysregulation of GJIC is a contributing factor to the cancer process; however the underlying mechanisms by which gap

  6. Neuropeptide Y, substance P, and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 stimulate human osteoblast osteogenic activity by enhancing gap junction intercellular communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, W.H.; Liu, Y.J.; Wang, W.; Zhang, Y.Z. [The Third Hospital of Hebei Medical University, The Provincial Key Laboratory for Orthopedic Biomechanics of Hebei, Shijiazhuang, Hebei Province (China)

    2015-02-13

    Bone homeostasis seems to be controlled by delicate and subtle “cross talk” between the nervous system and “osteo-neuromediators” that control bone remodeling. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of interactions between neuropeptides and human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (hBMP2) on human osteoblasts. We also investigated the effects of neuropeptides and hBMP2 on gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC). Osteoblasts were treated with neuropeptide Y (NPY), substance P (SP), or hBMP2 at three concentrations. At various intervals after treatment, cell viability was measured by the MTT assay. In addition, cellular alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin were determined by colorimetric assay and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effects of NPY, SP and hBMP on GJIC were determined by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The viability of cells treated with neuropeptides and hBMP2 increased significantly in a time-dependent manner, but was inversely associated with the concentration of the treatments. ALP activity and osteocalcin were both reduced in osteoblasts exposed to the combination of neuropeptides and hBMP2. The GJIC of osteoblasts was significantly increased by the neuropeptides and hBMP2. These results suggest that osteoblast activity is increased by neuropeptides and hBMP2 through increased GJIC. Identification of the GJIC-mediated signal transduction capable of modulating the cellular activities of bone cells represents a novel approach to studying the biology of skeletal innervation.

  7. Prostaglandin-induced cervical remodelling in humans in the first trimester is associated with increased expression of specific tight junction, but not gap junction proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghulé Vidita V

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostaglandins (PG are widely employed to induce cervical remodelling (CR in pregnancy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Tight junctions (TJ and gap junctions (GJ regulate paracellular and intercellular solute transport respectively but their role in the process of CR remains unexplored. We hypothesized that the synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue Misoprostol (M, widely used in clinical practice to induce CR, may alter TJ and GJ expression as part of the changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM associated with remodelling. We investigated the effects of Misoprostol exposure on the expression of cervical TJ (claudins 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and occludin and GJ (connexins 43, 30 and 26 in the 1st trimester. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from pregnant women and comparisons of TJ and GJ protein expression (by western blotting and immunolocalisation (laser scanning confocal microscopy made between those who were administered vaginal Misoprostol (n = 10 and those who were not (n = 5. Results We found that Misoprostol-treated tissue (M+ had higher expression of Claudins 1,2,4,7 and occludin (p Conclusion Our observations suggest, for the first time, that increased expression of tight junction proteins may be one of the mechanisms by which Misoprostol induces CR in humans. Further studies are needed to explore if TJ proteins may be therapeutic targets to alter timing of CR in clinical practice.

  8. Antiproliferative Action of Conjugated Linoleic Acid on Human MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells Mediated by Enhancement of Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication through Inactivation of NF-κB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdur Rakib

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The major conjugated linoleic acid (CLA isomers, c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA, have anticancer effects; however, the exact mechanisms underlying these effects are unknown. Evidence suggests that reversal of reduced gap junctional intercellular communication (GJIC in cancer cells inhibits cell growth and induces cell death. Hence, we determined that CLA isomers enhance GJIC in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and investigated the underlying molecular mechanisms. The CLA isomers significantly enhanced GJIC of MCF-7 cells at 40 μM concentration, whereas CLA inhibited cell growth and induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. CLA increased connexin43 (Cx43 expression both at the transcriptional and translational levels. CLA inhibited nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB activity and enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation. No significant difference was observed in the efficacy of c9,t11-CLA and t10,c12-CLA. These results suggest that the anticancer effect of CLA is associated with upregulation of GJIC mediated by enhanced Cx43 expression through inactivation of NF-κB and generation of ROS in MCF-7 cells.

  9. 17β estradiol regulation of connexin 43-based gap junction and mechanosensitivity through classical estrogen receptor pathway in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells.

    KAUST Repository

    Ren, Jian

    2013-04-01

    Connexin 43 (Cx43) plays an essential role in osteocyte mechanotransduction. Although estrogen involves in the adaptive responses of bone cells to mechanical loadings, its effects on osteocytic Cx43-based gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) remain obscure. We found that 17β estradiol (E2) up-regulated Cx43, and enhanced GJIC in osteocyte-like MLO-Y4 cells in fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) assay. Combination of E2 pre-treatment and oscillating fluid flow (OFF) further enhanced Cx43 expression and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation, comparing to E2 or OFF treatment alone. Both blocking of classical estrogen receptors (ERα/β) by fulvestrant and ERα knockdown by small interfering RNA inhibited E2-mediated Cx43 increase, while a GPR30-specific agonist G-1 failed to promote Cx43 expression. Our results suggest that the presence of E2 enhanced Cx43-based GJIC mainly via ERα/β pathway, and sensitized osteocytes to mechanical loading. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of different cryopreservation protocols on cytoskeleton and gap junction mediated communication integrity in feline germinal vesicle stage oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, Alberto M; Chigioni, Sara; Lodde, Valentina; Franciosi, Federica; Luvoni, Gaia C; Modina, Silvia C

    2009-08-01

    Oocyte cryopreservation in carnivores can significantly improve assisted reproductive technologies in animal breeding and preservation programs for endangered species. However, the cooling process severely affects the integrity and the survival of the oocyte after thawing and may irreversibly compromise its subsequent developmental capability. In the present study, two different methods of oocyte cryopreservation, slow freezing and vitrification, were evaluated in order to assess which of them proved more suitable for preserving the functional coupling with cumulus cells as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic competence after warming of immature feline oocytes. From a total of 422 cumulus enclosed oocytes (COCs) obtained from queens after ovariectomy, 137 were stored by vitrification in open pulled straws, 147 by slow freezing and 138 untreated oocytes were used as controls. Immediately after collection and then after warming, functional coupling was assessed by lucifer yellow injection and groups of fresh and cryopreserved oocytes were fixed to analyze tubulin and actin distribution, and chromatin organization. Finally, COCs cryopreserved with both treatments were matured in vitro after warming. In most cases, oocytes cryopreserved by slow freezing showed a cytoskeletal distribution similar to control oocytes, while the process of vitrification induced a loss of organization of cytoskeletal elements. The slow freezing protocol ensured a significantly higher percentage of COCs with functionally open and partially open communications (37.2 vs. 19.0) and higher maturational capability (32.5 vs. 14.1) compared to vitrified oocytes. We conclude that although both protocols impaired intercellular junctions, slow freezing represents a suitable method of GV stage cat oocytes banking since it more efficiently preserves the functional coupling with cumulus cells after thawing as well as nuclear and cytoplasmic competence. Further studies are needed to technically overcome the

  11. Infusion of gliotoxins or a gap junction blocker in the prelimbic cortex increases alcohol preference in Wistar rats

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel-Hidalgo, J; Shoyama, Y; Wanzo, V

    2008-01-01

    Postmortem research has revealed that there is a lower density of glial cells in regions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of uncomplicated alcoholics when compared with control subjects. Impairment of astrocyte function in the PFC may contribute to malfunction in circuits involved in emotion- and reward-related subcortical centers, heavily connected with the PFC and directly involved in the pathophysiology of addictive behaviours. The hypothesis was tested that infusion of gliotoxins known to i...

  12. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  13. Computation of the Complex Probability Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trainer, Amelia Jo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ledwith, Patrick John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-22

    The complex probability function is important in many areas of physics and many techniques have been developed in an attempt to compute it for some z quickly and e ciently. Most prominent are the methods that use Gauss-Hermite quadrature, which uses the roots of the nth degree Hermite polynomial and corresponding weights to approximate the complex probability function. This document serves as an overview and discussion of the use, shortcomings, and potential improvements on the Gauss-Hermite quadrature for the complex probability function.

  14. Prostaglandin-induced cervical remodelling in humans in the first trimester is associated with increased expression of specific tight junction, but not gap junction proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Prostaglandins (PG) are widely employed to induce cervical remodelling (CR) in pregnancy. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Tight junctions (TJ) and gap junctions (GJ) regulate paracellular and intercellular solute transport respectively but their role in the process of CR remains unexplored. We hypothesized that the synthetic prostaglandin E1 analogue Misoprostol (M), widely used in clinical practice to induce CR, may alter TJ and GJ expression as part of the changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM) associated with remodelling. We investigated the effects of Misoprostol exposure on the expression of cervical TJ (claudins 1, 2, 4, 5, 7 and occludin) and GJ (connexins 43, 30 and 26) in the 1st trimester. Methods Cervical biopsies were obtained from pregnant women and comparisons of TJ and GJ protein expression (by western blotting) and immunolocalisation (laser scanning confocal microscopy) made between those who were administered vaginal Misoprostol (n = 10) and those who were not (n = 5). Results We found that Misoprostol-treated tissue (M+) had higher expression of Claudins 1,2,4,7 and occludin (p < 0.05) than untreated (M-) tissue. Expression levels of Claudins 1, 2 and 4 were positively correlated to interval from Misoprostol treatment to biopsy, whilst occludin was negatively correlated. Misoprostol-treated cervical tissue demonstrated more endothelial claudin-5 and occludin, whilst expression of GJs were unchanged. Conclusion Our observations suggest, for the first time, that increased expression of tight junction proteins may be one of the mechanisms by which Misoprostol induces CR in humans. Further studies are needed to explore if TJ proteins may be therapeutic targets to alter timing of CR in clinical practice. PMID:22397627

  15. Three novel mutations and genetic epidemiology analysis of the Gap Junction Beta 1 (GJB1) gene among Hungarian Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milley, Gyorgy Mate; Varga, Edina Timea; Grosz, Zoltan; Bereznai, Benjamin; Aranyi, Zsuzsanna; Boczan, Judit; Dioszeghy, Peter; Kálmán, Bernadette; Gal, Aniko; Molnar, Maria Judit

    2016-10-01

    Pathogenic variants of the gap junction beta 1 (GJB1) gene are responsible for the Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy X type 1 (CMTX1). In this study, we report the mutation frequency of GJB1 in 210 Hungarian CMT patients and the phenotype comparison between male and female CMTX1 patients. Altogether, 13 missense substitutions were found in the GJB1 gene. Among them, 10 have been previously described as pathogenic variants (p.Arg15Trp, p.Val63Ile, p.Leu89Val, p.Ala96Gly, p.Arg107Trp, p.Arg142Gln, p.Arg164Trp, p.Arg164Gln, p.Pro172Ala and p.Asn205Ser), while 3 were novel, likely pathogenic alterations (p.Val13Glu, p.Glu186Gly, p.Met194Ile). These variants were not present in controls and were predicted as disease causing by in silico analysis. The frequency of the variants was 6.7% in our cohort which refers to a common cause of hereditary neuropathy among Hungarian patients. In addition to the classical phenotype, CNS involvement was proved in 26.1% of the CMTX1 patients. GJB1 pathogenic alterations were found mainly in males but we also detected them in female probands. The statistical analysis of CMTX1 patients revealed a significant difference between the two genders regarding the age of onset, Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathy and examination scores. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Transient, recurrent, white matter lesions in x-linked Charcot-Marie-tooth disease with novel mutation of gap junction protein beta 1 gene in China: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuan; Xie, Yanchen; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Huigang; Li, Yao; Li, Jimei

    2014-08-03

    Transient white matter lesions have been rarely reported in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. We describe a 15-year-old boy who presented transient and recurrent weakness of the limbs for 5 days. His mother, his mother's mother and his mother's sister presented pes cavus. MRI and electrophysiology were performed in the proband. Gap junction protein beta l gene was analyzed by PCR-sequencing in the proband and his parents. The electrophysiological studies showed a mixed demyelinating and axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. MRI showed white matter lesions in the internal capsule, corpus callosum and periventricular areas, which showed almost complete resolution after two months. T278G mutation in Gap junction protein beta l gene was detected in the proband and his mother. This case report highlights that the novel T278G mutation of Gap junction protein beta l maybe could result in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 with predominant leucoencephalopathy. The white matter changes in MRI of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 patient are reversible.

  17. Analytic functions of several complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Gunning, Robert C

    2009-01-01

    The theory of analytic functions of several complex variables enjoyed a period of remarkable development in the middle part of the twentieth century. After initial successes by Poincaré and others in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the theory encountered obstacles that prevented it from growing quickly into an analogue of the theory for functions of one complex variable. Beginning in the 1930s, initially through the work of Oka, then H. Cartan, and continuing with the work of Grauert, Remmert, and others, new tools were introduced into the theory of several complex variables that resol

  18. Plasma Dispersion Functions for Complex Frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlov, S. S.; Castejon, F.

    2005-07-01

    Plasma dispersion functions for complex wave propagation frequency in the weak relativistic regime for arbitrary longitudinal refractive index are estimated and presented in this work. These functions, that are know as Shkarofsky functions in the case of real frequency, are estimated using a new method that avoids the singularities that appear in previous calculations shown in the preceding literature. These results can be used to obtain the properties of plasma instabilities in the weakly relativistic regime. (Author) 14 refs.

  19. Plasma Dispersion Functions for Complex Frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlov, S. S.; Castejon, F.

    2005-01-01

    Plasma dispersion functions for complex wave propagation frequency in the weak relativistic regime for arbitrary longitudinal refractive index are estimated and presented in this work. These functions, that are know as Shkarofsky functions in the case of real frequency, are estimated using a new method that avoids the singularities that appear in previous calculations shown in the preceding literature. These results can be used to obtain the properties of plasma instabilities in the weakly relativistic regime. (Author) 14 refs

  20. COMPLEX FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF THE HIP JOINT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maya S. Krastanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In relation to the study reporting the effects of applying phased complex rehabilitation in patients with total hip arthroplasty, it has been concluded that the everyday clinical practice in Bulgaria does not apply complex examination, giving an objective picture about the extent of functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Aim: The main goal of this report is to present a test which incorporates all known and routine research and in which the total number of points determines the functional status of patients with trauma and diseases of the hip. Material and Methods: Based on the Hip dysfunction and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score, the Harris Hip Score modified test, scale D’Aubigne and Postel and Iowa’s test for complex functional evaluation of the hip joint, we have developed a test including information about the degree of pain; goniometry and manual muscle testing of the hip; locomotor test – type of gait and adjuvants; test for Daily Activities of Life. The test has been developed on the basis of expert assessment by doctors and physiotherapists of the proposed indicators for evaluation and determination of the weighting factors’ contribution to the general condition of the patient. Conclusion: The developed and tested method of complex functional assessment of the hip joint enables our colleagues, dealing with trauma and diseases of the hip, to use it in various research and scientific projects, as well as in general medical practice.

  1. Complex Regression Functional And Load Tests Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Andreevich Krasnopevtsev

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article describes practical approaches for realization of automatized regression functional and load testing on random software-hardware complex, based on «MARSh 3.0» sample. Testing automatization is being realized for «MARSh 3.0» information security increase.

  2. Function theory of several complex variables

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, Steven G

    2001-01-01

    The theory of several complex variables can be studied from several different perspectives. In this book, Steven Krantz approaches the subject from the point of view of a classical analyst, emphasizing its function-theoretic aspects. He has taken particular care to write the book with the student in mind, with uniformly extensive and helpful explanations, numerous examples, and plentiful exercises of varying difficulty. In the spirit of a student-oriented text, Krantz begins with an introduction to the subject, including an insightful comparison of analysis of several complex variables with th

  3. Mechanotransductive Regulation of Gap-Junction Activity Between MLO-Y4 Osteocyte-Like and MC3T3-E1 Osteoblast-Like Cells in Three-Dimensional Co-Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, C. M.; Blaber, E. A.; Almeida, E. A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Cell and animal studies conducted onboard the International Space Station and formerly on Shuttle flights have provided groundbreaking data illuminating the deleterious biological response of bone to mechanical unloading. However the intercellular communicative mechanisms associated with the regulation of bone synthesis and bone resorption cells are still largely unknown. Connexin-43 (CX43), a gap junction protein, is hypothesized to play a significant role in osteoblast and osteocyte signaling. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate within a novel three-dimensional microenvironment how the osteocyte-osteoblast gap-junction expression changes when cultures are exposed to exaggerated mechanical load. MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells were cultured on a 3D-Biotek polystyrene insert and placed in direct contact with an MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblast co-cultured monolayer and exposed to 48 h of mechanical stimulation (pulsatile fluid flow (PFF) or monolayer cyclic stretch (MCS)) then evaluated for viability, proliferation, metabolism, and CX43 expression. Mono-cultured MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 control experiments were conducted under PFF and MCS stimulation to observe how strain application stimuli (PFF cell membrane shear or MCS cell focal adhesion/attachment loading) initiates different signaling pathways or downstream regulatory controls. TotalLive cell count, viability and metabolic reduction (Trypan Blue, LIVEDead and Alamar Blue analysis respectively) indicate that mechanical activation of MC3T3-E1 cells inhibits proliferation while maintaining an average 1.04E4 reductioncell metabolic rate, *p0.05 n4. MLO-Y4s in monolayer culture increase in number when exposed to MCS loading but the percent of live cells within the population is low (46.3 total count, *p0.05 n4), these results may indicate an apoptotic signaling cascade. PFF stimulation of the three-dimensional co-cultures elicits a universal increase in CX43 in MLO-Y4 and MC3T3-E1 cells, illustrated by

  4. Molecular cloning, functional expression, and tissue distribution of a novel human gap junction-forming protein, connexin-31.9. Interaction with zona occludens protein-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Peter A; Beahm, Derek L; Giepmans, Ben N G; Baruch, Amos; Hall, James E; Kumar, Nalin M

    2002-01-01

    A novel human connexin gene (GJA11) was cloned from a genomic library. The open reading frame encoded a hypothetical protein of 294 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 31,933, hence referred to as connexin-31.9 (Cx31.9) or alpha 11 connexin. A clone in GenBank containing the

  5. Synthesis, radiometric determination of functional groups, complexation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pompe, S.; Bubner, M.; Schmeide, K.; Heise, K.H.; Bernhard, G.; Nitsche, H.

    2000-01-01

    The interaction behavior of humic acids with uranium(VI) and the influence of humic substances on the migration behavior of uranium was investigated. A main focus of this work was the synthesis of four different humic acid model substances and their characterization and comparison to the natural humic acid from Aldrich. A radiometric method for the determination of humic acid functional groups was applied in addition to conventional methods for the determination of the functionality of humic acids. The humic acid model substances show functional and structural properties comparable to natural humic acids. Modified humic acids with blocked phenolic OH were synthesized to determine the influence of phenolic OH groups on the complexation behavior of humic acids. A synthesis method for 14 C-labeled humic acids with high specific activity was developed. The complexation behavior of synthetic and natural humic acids with uranium(VI) was investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy and FTIR spectroscopy. The synthetic model substances show an interaction behavior with uranium(VI) that is comparable to natural humic acids. This points to the fact that the synthetic humic acids simulate the functionality of their natural analogues very well. For the first time the influence of phenolic OH groups on the complexation behavior of humic acids was investigated by applying a modified humic acid with blocked phenolic OH groups. The formation of a uranyl hydroxy humate complex was identified by laserspectroscopic investigations of the complexation of Aldrich humic acid with uranium(VI) at pH 7. The migration behavior of uranium in a sandy aquifer system rich is humic substances was investigated in column experiments. A part of uranium migrates non-retarded through the sediment, bound to humic colloids. The uranium migration behavior is strongly influenced by the kinetically controlled interaction processes of uranium with the humic colloids

  6. Some Properties on Complex Functional Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Bo Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We obtain some results on the transcendental meromorphic solutions of complex functional difference equations of the form ∑λ∈Iαλ(z(∏j=0nf(z+cjλj=R(z,f∘p=((a0(z+a1(z(f∘p+ ⋯ +as(z (f∘ps/(b0(z+b1(z(f∘p+ ⋯ +bt(z(f∘pt, where I is a finite set of multi-indexes λ=(λ0,λ1,…,λn, c0=0,cj∈ℂ∖{0} (j=1,2,…,n are distinct complex constants, p(z is a polynomial, and αλ(z  (λ∈I, ai(z  (i=0,1,…,s, and bj(z  (j=0,1,…,t are small meromorphic functions relative to f(z. We further investigate the above functional difference equation which has special type if its solution has Borel exceptional zero and pole.

  7. Complexity functions for networks: Dynamical hubs and complexity clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afraimovich, Valentin; Dmitrichev, Aleksei; Shchapin, Dmitry; Nekorkin, Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    A method for studying the behavior of the elements of dynamical networks is introduced. We measure the amount of instability stored at each element according to the value of the mean complexity related to this element. Elements with close values of the mean complexity can be unified into complexity clusters; elements with the smallest values of complexities form dynamical hubs. The effectiveness of the method is manifested by its successive application to networks of coupled Lorenz systems.

  8. Complex Analyses of Plankton Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl E. Havens

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically evaluates some complex methods that have been used to characterize the structure and function of freshwater plankton communities. The focus is on methods related to plankton size structure and carbon transfer. The specific methods reviewed are 1 size spectrum analysis, 2 size-fractionated phytoplankton productivity, 3 size-fractionated zooplankton grazing, 4 plankton ecological transfer efficiency, and 5 grazer effects on phytoplankton community structure. Taken together, these methods can provide information on community ecological properties that are directly related to practical issues including water quality and fisheries productivity. However, caution is warranted since application without a complete understanding of assumptions and context of the manipulations could lead to erroneous conclusions. As an example, experimental studies involving the addition or removal of zooplankton, especially when coupled with nutrient addition treatments, could provide information on the degree of consumer vs. resource control of phytoplankton. Resource managers subsequently could use this information in developing effective measures for controlling nuisance algal biomass. However, the experiments must be done critically and with sufficient safeguards and other measurements to ensure that treatments (e.g., zooplankton exclosure by screening of water actually are successful and do not introduce other changes in the community (e.g., removal of large algae. In all of the methods described here, the investigator must take care when generalizing results and, in particular, carry out a sufficient number of replications to encompass both the major seasonal and spatial variation that occurs in the ecosystem.

  9. A complexity analysis of functional interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernest, Mircea-Dan; Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    2005-01-01

    Summary: We give a quantitative analysis of Gödel's functional     interpretation and its monotone variant. The two have been used     for the extraction of programs and numerical bounds as well as     for conservation results. They apply both to (semi-)intuitionistic     as well as (combined...... with negative translation) classical proofs.     The proofs may be formalized in systems ranging from weak base     systems to arithmetic and analysis (and numerous fragments of     these). We give upper bounds in basic proof data on the depth,     size, maximal type degree and maximal type arity...... of the extracted     terms as well as on the depth of the verifying proof. In all     cases terms of size linear in the size of the proof at input     can be extracted and the corresponding extraction algorithms     have cubic worst-time complexity. The verifying proofs have depth     linear in the depth...

  10. Atrial fibrillation-linked germline GJA5/connexin40 mutants showed an increased hemichannel function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiguo Sun

    Full Text Available Mutations in GJA5 encoding the gap junction protein connexin40 (Cx40 have been linked to lone atrial fibrillation. Some of these mutants result in impaired gap junction function due to either abnormal connexin localization or impaired gap junction channels, which may play a role in promoting atrial fibrillation. However, the effects of the atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants on hemichannel function have not been studied. Here we investigated two atrial fibrillation-linked germline Cx40 mutants, V85I and L221I. These two mutants formed putative gap junction plaques at cell-cell interfaces, with similar gap junction coupling conductance as that of wild-type Cx40. Connexin deficient HeLa cells expressing either one of these two mutants displayed prominent propidium iodide-uptake distinct from cells expressing wild-type Cx40 or other atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants, I75F, L229M, and Q49X. Propidium iodide-uptake was sensitive to [Ca2+]o and the hemichannel blockers, carbenoxolone, flufenamic acid and mefloquine, but was not affected by the pannexin 1 channel blocking agent, probenecid, indicating that uptake is most likely mediated via connexin hemichannels. A gain-of-hemichannel function in these two atrial fibrillation-linked Cx40 mutants may provide a novel mechanism underlying the etiology of atrial fibrillation.

  11. Convergence of Complex Fuzzy一valued Function Defined in Complex Fuzzy Number

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BI Shu-juan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The author defines all fuzzy number which are symmetric respect to y-axis as zero fuzzy number,on the basis,the author defines the limitation of complex fuzzy-valued function and discusses the properties of convergence. This eater obtains a series of results about limited complex fuzzy -valued function,including the limitation of complex fuzzy-valued function is unique,the limited complex fuzzy-valued function has local boundedness and local protection,as well as the linear operation properties of the limitation. Furthermore,the convergence criterion and the Cauchy convergence criterion of complex fuzzy-valued function are given. In this paper,it is shown that the complex fuzzy-valued function is defined in a complex fuzzy set F( Cwhich valued the complex fuzzy number in F( C(set of all complex fuzzy number .

  12. Executive Functions in the Context of Complex Learning: Malleable Moderators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaighofer, Matthias; Bühner, Markus; Fischer, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Executive functions are crucial for complex learning in addition to prior knowledge. In this article, we argue that executive functions can moderate the effectiveness of instructional approaches that vary with respect to the demand on these functions. In addition, we suggest that engagement in complex activity contexts rather than specific…

  13. Complex analysis a modern first course in function theory

    CERN Document Server

    Muir, Jerry R

    2015-01-01

    A thorough introduction to the theory of complex functions emphasizing the beauty, power, and counterintuitive nature of the subject Written with a reader-friendly approach, Complex Analysis: A Modern First Course in Function Theory features a self-contained, concise development of the fundamental principles of complex analysis. After laying groundwork on complex numbers and the calculus and geometric mapping properties of functions of a complex variable, the author uses power series as a unifying theme to define and study the many rich and occasionally surprising properties of analytic fun

  14. Abelian Complexity Function of the Tribonacci Word

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Turek, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2015), 15.3.4 ISSN 1530-7638 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14004 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : 4-bonacci word * Abelian complexity * Finite automaton * Tribonacci word Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics

  15. Tuberous Sclerosis Complex: mutations, functions and phenotypes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O. Sancak (Ozgur)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractTuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterised by the development of hamartomas in multiple organs and tissues. TSC is caused by mutations in either the TSC1 or TSC2 gene. We searched for mutations in both genes in a cohort of 490 patients diagnosed

  16. Complex network perspective on structure and function of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    , uncovering complex network structure and function from these networks is becoming one of the most important topics in system biology. This work aims at studying the structure and function of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) metabolic ...

  17. Efficacy and safety of tonabersat, a gap-junction modulator, in the acute treatment of migraine: a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlöf, C G H; Hauge, A W; Olesen, J

    2009-01-01

    tolerated and had no effect on vital signs, electrocardiogram recordings or laboratory values. The lack of efficacy may be a function of the slow absorption of tonabersat. As a consequence of slow absorption, daily administration of tonabersat as prophylaxis for migraine attacks is under investigation...

  18. Solving Nonlinear Optimization Problems of Real Functions in Complex Variables by Complex-Valued Iterative Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songchuan; Xia, Youshen

    2018-01-01

    Much research has been devoted to complex-variable optimization problems due to their engineering applications. However, the complex-valued optimization method for solving complex-variable optimization problems is still an active research area. This paper proposes two efficient complex-valued optimization methods for solving constrained nonlinear optimization problems of real functions in complex variables, respectively. One solves the complex-valued nonlinear programming problem with linear equality constraints. Another solves the complex-valued nonlinear programming problem with both linear equality constraints and an -norm constraint. Theoretically, we prove the global convergence of the proposed two complex-valued optimization algorithms under mild conditions. The proposed two algorithms can solve the complex-valued optimization problem completely in the complex domain and significantly extend existing complex-valued optimization algorithms. Numerical results further show that the proposed two algorithms have a faster speed than several conventional real-valued optimization algorithms.

  19. A Complexity Analysis of Functional Interpretations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernest, Mircea-Dan; Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    We give a quantitative analysis of G ̈odel’s functional interpretation and its monotone variant. The two have been used for the extraction of programs and numerical bounds as well as for conservation results. They apply both to (semi-)intuitionistic as well as (combined with negative translation...

  20. Functional Interactions Between Sae2 and the Mre11 Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Vijayakumar, Sangeetha; Reger, Mike; Harrison, Jacob C.; Haber, James E.; Weil, Clifford; Petrini, John H. J.

    2008-01-01

    The Mre11 complex functions in double-strand break (DSB) repair, meiotic recombination, and DNA damage checkpoint pathways. Sae2 deficiency has opposing effects on the Mre11 complex. On one hand, it appears to impair Mre11 nuclease function in DNA repair and meiotic DSB processing, and on the other, Sae2 deficiency activates Mre11-complex-dependent DNA-damage-signaling via the Tel1–Mre11 complex (TM) pathway. We demonstrate that SAE2 overexpression blocks the TM pathway, suggesting that Sae2 antagonizes Mre11-complex checkpoint functions. To understand how Sae2 regulates the Mre11 complex, we screened for sae2 alleles that behaved as the null with respect to Mre11-complex checkpoint functions, but left nuclease function intact. Phenotypic characterization of these sae2 alleles suggests that Sae2 functions as a multimer and influences the substrate specificity of the Mre11 nuclease. We show that Sae2 oligomerizes independently of DNA damage and that oligomerization is required for its regulatory influence on the Mre11 nuclease and checkpoint functions. PMID:18245357

  1. Functions of a complex variable and some of their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, B A; Sneddon, I N; Ulam, S

    1961-01-01

    Functions of a Complex Variable and Some of Their Applications, Volume 1, discusses the fundamental ideas of the theory of functions of a complex variable. The book is the result of a complete rewriting and revision of a translation of the second (1957) Russian edition. Numerous changes and additions have been made, both in the text and in the solutions of the Exercises. The book begins with a review of arithmetical operations with complex numbers. Separate chapters discuss the fundamentals of complex analysis; the concept of conformal transformations; the most important of the elementary fun

  2. Correlations of differentially expressed gap junction connexins Cx26, Cx30, Cx32, Cx43 and Cx46 with breast cancer progression and prognosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivett Teleki

    Full Text Available Connexins and their cell membrane channels contribute to the control of cell proliferation and compartmental functions in breast glands and their deregulation is linked to breast carcinogenesis. Our aim was to correlate connexin expression with tumor progression and prognosis in primary breast cancers.Meta-analysis of connexin isotype expression data of 1809 and 1899 breast cancers from the Affymetrix and Illumina array platforms, respectively, was performed. Expressed connexins were also monitored at the protein level in tissue microarrays of 127 patients equally representing all tumor grades, using immunofluorescence and multilayer, multichannel digital microscopy. Prognostic correlations were plotted in Kaplan-Meier curves and tested using the log-rank test and cox-regression analysis in univariate and multivariate models.The expression of GJA1/Cx43, GJA3/Cx46 and GJB2/Cx26 and, for the first time, GJA6/Cx30 and GJB1/Cx32 was revealed both in normal human mammary glands and breast carcinomas. Within their subfamilies these connexins can form homo- and heterocellular epithelial channels. In cancer, the array datasets cross-validated each other's prognostic results. In line with the significant correlations found at mRNA level, elevated Cx43 protein levels were linked with significantly improved breast cancer outcome, offering Cx43 protein detection as an independent prognostic marker stronger than vascular invasion or necrosis. As a contrary, elevated Cx30 mRNA and protein levels were associated with a reduced disease outcome offering Cx30 protein detection as an independent prognostic marker outperforming mitotic index and necrosis. Elevated versus low Cx43 protein levels allowed the stratification of grade 2 tumors into good and poor relapse free survival subgroups, respectively. Also, elevated versus low Cx30 levels stratified grade 3 patients into poor and good overall survival subgroups, respectively.Differential expression of Cx43 and Cx

  3. New factors influencing G protein coupled receptors' system functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New factors such as the G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) surrounding's chemical environment, cell membrane constituents, the existent gap junction, endogenous receptor affinity status and animal species have been shown to influence the GPCR physiology and variations of those factors can modify the functions of the ...

  4. Hexavalent chromium at low concentration alters Sertoli cell barrier and connexin 43 gap junction but not claudin-11 and N-cadherin in the rat seminiferous tubule culture model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carette, Diane [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Perrard, Marie-Hélène, E-mail: marie-helene.durand@ens-lyon.fr [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Prisant, Nadia [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Gilleron, Jérome; Pointis, Georges [INSERM U 1065, Team 5 “Physiopathology of Germ Cell Control: Genomic and Non Genomic Mechanisms” C3M, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Nice (France); Segretain, Dominique [University of Versailles/St Quentin-en-Yvelines (France); UMR S775, University Paris Descartes, 45 rue des Saints Pères, 75006, Paris (France); Durand, Philippe [Institut de Génomique Fonctionnelle de Lyon, Université de Lyon, Université Lyon I, CNRS, INRA, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France); Kallistem SAS Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to toxic metals, specifically those belonging to the nonessential group leads to human health defects and among them reprotoxic effects. The mechanisms by which these metals produce their negative effects on spermatogenesis have not been fully elucidated. By using the Durand's validated seminiferous tubule culture model, which mimics the in vivo situation, we recently reported that concentrations of hexavalent chromium, reported in the literature to be closed to that found in the blood circulation of men, increase the number of germ cell cytogenetic abnormalities. Since this metal is also known to affect cellular junctions, we investigated, in the present study, its potential influence on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins present at this level such as connexin 43, claudin-11 and N-cadherin. Cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers expressed the three junctional proteins and ZO-1 for at least 12 days. Exposure to low concentrations of chromium (10 μg/l) increased the trans-epithelial resistance without major changes of claudin-11 and N-cadherin expressions but strongly delocalized the gap junction protein connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells. The possibility that the hexavalent chromium-induced alteration of connexin 43 indirectly mediates the effect of the toxic metal on the blood–testis barrier dynamic is postulated. - Highlights: ► Influence of Cr(VI) on the Sertoli cell barrier and on junctional proteins ► Use of cultured seminiferous tubules in bicameral chambers ► Low concentrations of Cr(VI) (10 μg/l) altered the trans-epithelial resistance. ► Cr(VI) did not alter claudin-11 and N-cadherin. ► Cr(VI) delocalized connexin 43 from the membrane to the cytoplasm of Sertoli cells.

  5. Impulsive generalized function synchronization of complex dynamical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Qunjiao; Chen, Juan; Wan, Li

    2013-01-01

    This Letter investigates generalized function synchronization of continuous and discrete complex networks by impulsive control. By constructing the reasonable corresponding impulsively controlled response networks, some criteria and corollaries are derived for the generalized function synchronization between the impulsively controlled complex networks, continuous and discrete networks are both included. Furthermore, the generalized linear synchronization and nonlinear synchronization are respectively illustrated by several examples. All the numerical simulations demonstrate the correctness of the theoretical results

  6. Ouabain modulates cell contacts as well as functions that depend on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larre, Isabel; Contreras, Ruben G; Cereijido, Marcelino

    2011-01-01

    Ouabain, a toxic of vegetal origin used for centuries to treat heart failure, has recently been demonstrated to have an endogenous counterpart, most probably ouabain itself, which behaves as a hormone. Therefore, the challenge now is to discover the physiological role of hormone ouabain. We have recently shown that it modulates cell contacts such as gap junctions, which communicate neighboring cells, as well as tight junctions (TJs), which are one of the two differentiated features of epithelial cells, the other being apical/basolateral polarity. The importance of cell contacts can be hardly overestimated, since the most complex object in the universe, the brain, assembles itself depending on what cells contacts what other(s) how, when, and how is the molecular composition and special arrangement of the contacts involved. In the present chapter, we detail the protocols used to demonstrate the effect of ouabain on the molecular structure and functional properties of one of those cell-cell contacts: the TJ.

  7. COULCC: A continued-fraction algorithm for Coulomb functions of complex order with complex arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, I.J.; Barnett, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The routine COULCC calculates both the oscillating and the exponentially varying Coulomb wave functions, and their radial derivations, for complex eta(Sommerfeld parameter), complex energies and complex angular momenta. The functions for uncharged scattering (spherical Bessels) and cylindrical Bessel functions are special cases which are more easily solved. Two linearly independent solutions are found, in general, to the differential equation f''(x)+g(x)f(x)=0, where g(x) has x 0 , x -1 and x -2 terms, with coefficients 1, -2eta and -lambda(lambda+1), respectively. (orig.)

  8. Gap junctions in development and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winterhager, Elke

    2005-01-01

    ...,sequencingofseveralvertebrategenomes,generationofmice carrying mutations of the different connexin genes, and targeting of inherited human diseases to mutated connexin genes have given completely...

  9. Integrative structure and functional anatomy of a nuclear pore complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Joong; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Nudelman, Ilona; Shi, Yi; Zhang, Wenzhu; Raveh, Barak; Herricks, Thurston; Slaughter, Brian D.; Hogan, Joanna A.; Upla, Paula; Chemmama, Ilan E.; Pellarin, Riccardo; Echeverria, Ignacia; Shivaraju, Manjunatha; Chaudhury, Azraa S.; Wang, Junjie; Williams, Rosemary; Unruh, Jay R.; Greenberg, Charles H.; Jacobs, Erica Y.; Yu, Zhiheng; de La Cruz, M. Jason; Mironska, Roxana; Stokes, David L.; Aitchison, John D.; Jarrold, Martin F.; Gerton, Jennifer L.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Akey, Christopher W.; Chait, Brian T.; Sali, Andrej; Rout, Michael P.

    2018-03-01

    Nuclear pore complexes play central roles as gatekeepers of RNA and protein transport between the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. However, their large size and dynamic nature have impeded a full structural and functional elucidation. Here we determined the structure of the entire 552-protein nuclear pore complex of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae at sub-nanometre precision by satisfying a wide range of data relating to the molecular arrangement of its constituents. The nuclear pore complex incorporates sturdy diagonal columns and connector cables attached to these columns, imbuing the structure with strength and flexibility. These cables also tie together all other elements of the nuclear pore complex, including membrane-interacting regions, outer rings and RNA-processing platforms. Inwardly directed anchors create a high density of transport factor-docking Phe-Gly repeats in the central channel, organized into distinct functional units. This integrative structure enables us to rationalize the architecture, transport mechanism and evolutionary origins of the nuclear pore complex.

  10. Modularized Functions of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA core complex provides the essential E3 ligase function for spatially defined FANCD2 ubiquitination and FA pathway activation. Of the seven FA gene products forming the core complex, FANCL possesses a RING domain with demonstrated E3 ligase activity. The other six components do not have clearly defined roles. Through epistasis analyses, we identify three functional modules in the FA core complex: a catalytic module consisting of FANCL, FANCB, and FAAP100 is absolutely required for the E3 ligase function, and the FANCA-FANCG-FAAP20 and the FANCC-FANCE-FANCF modules provide nonredundant and ancillary functions that help the catalytic module bind chromatin or sites of DNA damage. Disruption of the catalytic module causes complete loss of the core complex function, whereas loss of any ancillary module component does not. Our work reveals the roles of several FA gene products with previously undefined functions and a modularized assembly of the FA core complex.

  11. Significance tests for functional data with complex dependence structure

    KAUST Repository

    Staicu, Ana-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We propose an L (2)-norm based global testing procedure for the null hypothesis that multiple group mean functions are equal, for functional data with complex dependence structure. Specifically, we consider the setting of functional data with a multilevel structure of the form groups-clusters or subjects-units, where the unit-level profiles are spatially correlated within the cluster, and the cluster-level data are independent. Orthogonal series expansions are used to approximate the group mean functions and the test statistic is estimated using the basis coefficients. The asymptotic null distribution of the test statistic is developed, under mild regularity conditions. To our knowledge this is the first work that studies hypothesis testing, when data have such complex multilevel functional and spatial structure. Two small-sample alternatives, including a novel block bootstrap for functional data, are proposed, and their performance is examined in simulation studies. The paper concludes with an illustration of a motivating experiment.

  12. 3D printing of bacteria into functional complex materials

    OpenAIRE

    Schaffner, Manuel; Rühs, Patrick A.; Coulter, Fergal; Kilcher, Samuel; Studart, André R.

    2017-01-01

    Despite recent advances to control the spatial composition and dynamic functionalities of bacteria embedded in materials, bacterial localization into complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries remains a major challenge. We demonstrate a 3D printing approach to create bacteria-derived functional materials by combining the natural diverse metabolism of bacteria with the shape design freedom of additive manufacturing. To achieve this, we embedded bacteria in a biocompatible and functionalized 3D ...

  13. Functional analysis for complex systems of nuclear fusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinna, Tonio, E-mail: tonio.pinna@enea.it; Dongiovanni, Danilo Nicola; Iannone, Francesco

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Functional analysis for complex systems. • Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD). • IDEFØ diagrams. • Petri Net algorithm - Abstract: In system engineering context, a functional analysis is the systematic process of identifying, describing and correlating the functions a system must perform in order to be successful at any foreseen life-cycle phase or operational state/mode. By focusing on what the system must do disregarding the implementation, the functional analysis supports an unbiased system requirement allocation analysis. The system function architecture is defined in terms of process, protection (interlock) or nuclear safety functions. Then, the system functions are analyzed from several points of view in order to highlight the various pieces of information defining the way the system is designed to accomplish its mission as defined in the system requirement documents. The process functional flow is identified and represented by Functional Flow Block Diagrams (FFBD) while the system function interfaces are identified and represented by IDEFØ diagrams. Function interfaces are defined as relationships across identified functions in terms of function input (from other functions or requirements), output (added value or outcome of the function), controls (from other functions or systems) and mechanisms necessary to fulfill the function. The function architecture is further detailed by considering for each function: a) the phase of application, b) the actions performed c) the controlled variable and control actions to be foreseen in the implementation of the functions, d) the system involved in the control action, e) the equipment involved in the function, f) the requirements allocated to the function. The methodology here presented are suggested for the designing of fusion facilities and reactors already from the first phases of the pre-conceptual design, as it is now for DEMO.

  14. The Dystrophin Complex: Structure, Function, and Implications for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Quan Q; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2015-07-01

    The dystrophin complex stabilizes the plasma membrane of striated muscle cells. Loss of function mutations in the genes encoding dystrophin, or the associated proteins, trigger instability of the plasma membrane, and myofiber loss. Mutations in dystrophin have been extensively cataloged, providing remarkable structure-function correlation between predicted protein structure and clinical outcomes. These data have highlighted dystrophin regions necessary for in vivo function and fueled the design of viral vectors and now, exon skipping approaches for use in dystrophin restoration therapies. However, dystrophin restoration is likely more complex, owing to the role of the dystrophin complex as a broad cytoskeletal integrator. This review will focus on dystrophin restoration, with emphasis on the regions of dystrophin essential for interacting with its associated proteins and discuss the structural implications of these approaches. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  15. Functional Diversity of AAA+ Protease Complexes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsholz, Alexander K. W.; Birk, Marlene S.; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Turgay, Kürşad

    2017-01-01

    Here, we review the diverse roles and functions of AAA+ protease complexes in protein homeostasis, control of stress response and cellular development pathways by regulatory and general proteolysis in the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis. We discuss in detail the intricate involvement of AAA+ protein complexes in controlling sporulation, the heat shock response and the role of adaptor proteins in these processes. The investigation of these protein complexes and their adaptor proteins has revealed their relevance for Gram-positive pathogens and their potential as targets for new antibiotics. PMID:28748186

  16. Virus Innexins induce alterations in insect cell and tissue function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Daniel K; Erickson, Stephanie L; Hersh, Bradley M; Turnbull, Matthew W

    2017-04-01

    Polydnaviruses are dsDNA viruses that induce immune and developmental alterations in their caterpillar hosts. Characterization of polydnavirus gene families and family members is necessary to understand mechanisms of pathology and evolution of these viruses, and may aid to elucidate the role of host homologues if present. For example, the polydnavirus vinnexin gene family encodes homologues of insect gap junction genes (innexins) that are expressed in host immune cells (hemocytes). While the roles of Innexin proteins and gap junctions in insect immunity are largely unclear, we previously demonstrated that Vinnexins form functional gap junctions and alter the junctional characteristics of a host Innexin when co-expressed in paired Xenopus oocytes. Here, we test the effect of ectopic vinnexin expression on host cell physiology using both a lepidopteran cell culture model and a dipteran whole organism model. Vinnexin expression in the cell culture system resulted in gene-specific alterations in cell morphology and a slight, but non-statistically significant, reduction in gap junction activity as measured by dye transfer, while ectopic expression of a lepidopteran innexin2 gene led to morphological alterations and increase in gap junction activity. Global ectopic expression in the model dipteran, Drosophila melanogaster, of one vinnexin (vinnexinG) or D. melanogaster innexin2 (Dm-inx2) resulted in embryonic lethality, while expression of the other vinnexin genes had no effect. Furthermore, ectopic expression of vinnexinG, but not other vinnexin genes or Dm-inx2, in D. melanogaster larval gut resulted in developmental arrest in the pupal stage. These data indicate the vinnexins likely have gene-specific roles in host manipulation. They also support the use of Drosophila in further analysis of the role of Vinnexins and other polydnavirus genes in modifying host physiological processes. Finally, our findings suggest the vinnexin genes may be useful to perturb and

  17. A new procedure for obtaining the Voigt function dependent upon the complex error function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luque, J.M.; Calzada, M.D.; Saez, M.

    2005-01-01

    This work proposes a new method for obtaining the differential equation of the Voigt function and, from this equation, expressing the Voigt function as dependent upon the complex error function. In addition, the integral expression of the successive derivatives of the Voigt function is given, and from this a method is generalized which permits the representation, also, of other functions depending on the complex error function. This enables us to simplify other functions which are the convolution of a Gaussian function with rational polynomial functions. Moreover, the relationship between the Lorentzian (w L ), Gaussian (w G ) and Voigt (w V ) widths at half maximum for the function is given, which is of great interest in diverse branches of physics, such as plasma spectroscopy, astrophysics, nuclear magnetic resonance, etc

  18. Enabling complex queries to drug information sources through functional composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Lee; Mortensen, Jonathan; Nguyen, Thang; Bodenreider, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Our objective was to enable an end-user to create complex queries to drug information sources through functional composition, by creating sequences of functions from application program interfaces (API) to drug terminologies. The development of a functional composition model seeks to link functions from two distinct APIs. An ontology was developed using Protégé to model the functions of the RxNorm and NDF-RT APIs by describing the semantics of their input and output. A set of rules were developed to define the interoperable conditions for functional composition. The operational definition of interoperability between function pairs is established by executing the rules on the ontology. We illustrate that the functional composition model supports common use cases, including checking interactions for RxNorm drugs and deploying allergy lists defined in reference to drug properties in NDF-RT. This model supports the RxMix application (http://mor.nlm.nih.gov/RxMix/), an application we developed for enabling complex queries to the RxNorm and NDF-RT APIs.

  19. Ruthenium complexes of chelating amido-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ruthenium complexes of chelating amido-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ligands: Synthesis, structure and DFT studies. SACHIN KUMARa, ANANTHA NARAYANANa, MITTA NAGESWAR RAOa,. MOBIN M SHAIKHb and PRASENJIT GHOSHa,∗. aDepartment of Chemistry and bNational Single Crystal X-ray ...

  20. Studies on the structure and function of pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abreu, de R.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to obtain more information of the structure and function of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complexes from Azotobacter vinelandii and Escherichia coli.

    In chapter 2 a survey is given of the recent literature on

  1. Structure and function of the spermathecal complex in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    [Ilango K 2005 Structure and function of the spermathecal complex in the phlebotomine sandfly Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae): I. ... The spermatheca plays a critical role in insect reproduc- tion because sperms can be ...... sandfly species studied here shows a remarkable varia- tion from the basic ...

  2. Integration of functional complex oxide nanomaterials on silicon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel eVila-Fungueiriño

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The combination of standard wafer-scale semiconductor processing with the properties of functional oxides opens up to innovative and more efficient devices with high value applications that can be produced at large scale. This review uncovers the main strategies that are successfully used to monolithically integrate functional complex oxide thin films and nanostructures on silicon: the chemical solution deposition approach (CSD and the advanced physical vapor deposition techniques such as oxide molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Special emphasis will be placed on complex oxide nanostructures epitaxially grown on silicon using the combination of CSD and MBE. Several examples will be exposed, with a particular stress on the control of interfaces and crystallization mechanisms on epitaxial perovskite oxide thin films, nanostructured quartz thin films, and octahedral molecular sieve nanowires. This review enlightens on the potential of complex oxide nanostructures and the combination of both chemical and physical elaboration techniques for novel oxide-based integrated devices.

  3. 3D printing of bacteria into functional complex materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffner, Manuel; Rühs, Patrick A; Coulter, Fergal; Kilcher, Samuel; Studart, André R

    2017-12-01

    Despite recent advances to control the spatial composition and dynamic functionalities of bacteria embedded in materials, bacterial localization into complex three-dimensional (3D) geometries remains a major challenge. We demonstrate a 3D printing approach to create bacteria-derived functional materials by combining the natural diverse metabolism of bacteria with the shape design freedom of additive manufacturing. To achieve this, we embedded bacteria in a biocompatible and functionalized 3D printing ink and printed two types of "living materials" capable of degrading pollutants and of producing medically relevant bacterial cellulose. With this versatile bacteria-printing platform, complex materials displaying spatially specific compositions, geometry, and properties not accessed by standard technologies can be assembled from bottom up for new biotechnological and biomedical applications.

  4. Disorder and strain-induced complexity in functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    Saxena, Avadh; Planes, Antoni; Kakeshita, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together an emerging consensus on our understanding of the complex functional materials including ferroics, perovskites, multiferroics, CMR and high-temperature superconductors. The common theme is the existence of many competing ground states and frustration as a collusion of spin, charge, orbital and lattice degrees of freedom in the presence of disorder and (both dipolar and elastic) long-range forces. An important consequence of the complex unit cell and the competing interactions is that the emergent materials properties are very sensitive to external fields thus rendering these materials with highly desirable, technologically important applications enabled by cross-response.

  5. Diverse Effects, Complex Causes: Children Use Information about Machines' Functional Diversity to Infer Internal Complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahl, Richard E.; Keil, Frank C.

    2017-01-01

    Four studies explored the abilities of 80 adults and 180 children (4-9 years), from predominantly middle-class families in the Northeastern United States, to use information about machines' observable functional capacities to infer their internal, "hidden" mechanistic complexity. Children as young as 4 and 5 years old used machines'…

  6. An adaptive complex network model for brain functional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio J Gomez Portillo

    Full Text Available Brain functional networks are graph representations of activity in the brain, where the vertices represent anatomical regions and the edges their functional connectivity. These networks present a robust small world topological structure, characterized by highly integrated modules connected sparsely by long range links. Recent studies showed that other topological properties such as the degree distribution and the presence (or absence of a hierarchical structure are not robust, and show different intriguing behaviors. In order to understand the basic ingredients necessary for the emergence of these complex network structures we present an adaptive complex network model for human brain functional networks. The microscopic units of the model are dynamical nodes that represent active regions of the brain, whose interaction gives rise to complex network structures. The links between the nodes are chosen following an adaptive algorithm that establishes connections between dynamical elements with similar internal states. We show that the model is able to describe topological characteristics of human brain networks obtained from functional magnetic resonance imaging studies. In particular, when the dynamical rules of the model allow for integrated processing over the entire network scale-free non-hierarchical networks with well defined communities emerge. On the other hand, when the dynamical rules restrict the information to a local neighborhood, communities cluster together into larger ones, giving rise to a hierarchical structure, with a truncated power law degree distribution.

  7. Properties of the Statistical Complexity Functional and Partially Deterministic HMMs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Löhr

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Statistical complexity is a measure of complexity of discrete-time stationary stochastic processes, which has many applications. We investigate its more abstract properties as a non-linear function of the space of processes and show its close relation to the Knight’s prediction process. We prove lower semi-continuity, concavity, and a formula for the ergodic decomposition of statistical complexity. On the way, we show that the discrete version of the prediction process has a continuous Markov transition. We also prove that, given the past output of a partially deterministic hidden Markov model (HMM, the uncertainty of the internal state is constant over time and knowledge of the internal state gives no additional information on the future output. Using this fact, we show that the causal state distribution is the unique stationary representation on prediction space that may have finite entropy.

  8. Nitrogen reduction and functionalization by a multimetallic uranium nitride complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marta; Chatelain, Lucile; Scopelliti, Rosario; Živković, Ivica; Mazzanti, Marinella

    2017-07-01

    Molecular nitrogen (N2) is cheap and widely available, but its unreactive nature is a challenge when attempting to functionalize it under mild conditions with other widely available substrates (such as carbon monoxide, CO) to produce value-added compounds. Biological N2 fixation can do this, but the industrial Haber-Bosch process for ammonia production operates under harsh conditions (450 degrees Celsius and 300 bar), even though both processes are thought to involve multimetallic catalytic sites. And although molecular complexes capable of binding and even reducing N2 under mild conditions are known, with co-operativity between metal centres considered crucial for the N2 reduction step, the multimetallic species involved are usually not well defined, and further transformation of N2-binding complexes to achieve N-H or N-C bond formation is rare. Haber noted, before an iron-based catalyst was adopted for the industrial Haber-Bosch process, that uranium and uranium nitride materials are very effective heterogeneous catalysts for ammonia production from N2. However, few examples of uranium complexes binding N2 are known, and soluble uranium complexes capable of transforming N2 into ammonia or organonitrogen compounds have not yet been identified. Here we report the four-electron reduction of N2 under ambient conditions by a fully characterized complex with two UIII ions and three K+ centres held together by a nitride group and a flexible metalloligand framework. The addition of H2 and/or protons, or CO to the resulting complex results in the complete cleavage of N2 with concomitant N2 functionalization through N-H or N-C bond-forming reactions. These observations establish that a molecular uranium complex can promote the stoichiometric transformation of N2 into NH3 or cyanate, and that a flexible, electron-rich, multimetallic, nitride-bridged core unit is a promising starting point for the design of molecular complexes capable of cleaving and functionalizing N2 under

  9. Spin Propensities of Octahedral Complexes From Density Functional Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sara R.; Kepp, Kasper Planeta

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental balance between high- and low-spin states of transition metal systems depends on both the metal ion and the ligands surrounding it, as often visualized by the spectrochemical series. Most density functionals do not reproduce this balance, and real spin state propensities depend...... on orbital pairing and vibrational entropies absent in the spectrochemical series. Thus, we systematically computed the tendency toward high or low spin of "text-book" octahedral metal complexes versus ligand and metal type, using eight density functionals. Dispersion effects were generally ... assessment of spin state propensities versus ligand and metal type and reveal, e.g., that CN- is consistently weaker than CO for M(II) but stronger than CO for M(III) and SCN- and NCS- change order in M(II) versus M(III) complexes. Contrary to expectation based on the spectrochemical series, Cl- and Br...

  10. Developments in 99Tcm complexes for functional imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, N.

    1998-01-01

    Technetium-99m coordination complexes constitute the backbone of diagnostic nuclear medicine. Early exciting advances in products for excretory organs / pathways were followed by arduous research efforts to design and optimise 99 Tc m compounds for imaging renal tubular function and mapping blood flow to myocardium and brain. A variety of neutral, cationic and anionic complexes of technetium, mostly in +5 or +3 oxidation states and usually involving N, S. P, O as coordinating atoms, have dominated the field. Blending the well-known versatile coordination chemistry of technetium with biochemical principles and pharmacology of some functional groups has helped achieve desirable properties in at least some of the resultant 99 Tc m complexes. Fascinating developments to tap the merits of 99 Tc m tracer for more sophisticated targeting approach involving biological substrates have yielded promising results. Use of appropriate ligands as bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) to form 99 Tc m labelled radiopharmaceuticals has also led to development of several new 99 Tc m complexes. Although 99 Tc m complexes for metabolism or receptor imaging may still be far from a clinical reality, many useful efficacious clinical applications have become feasible with the advent of some new 99 Tc m complexes, e.g. imaging infection / inflammation, certain tumours and even hypoxia. A strong synergism between academic universities and industries has evolved, amidst the rush for patenting all products and processes, despite low chances of success in developing a clinically useful product. The enormous research costs have made the new products very expensive and, in turn, driven many developing countries and large hospital radiopharmacies to seek alternate means of formulating equivalent products in-house or evolve modified protocols with commercial products for better economy. This review covers the major investigations of the last decade (but by no means exhaustive) after touching upon the

  11. Altered expression pattern of molecular factors involved in colonic smooth muscle functions: an immunohistochemical study in patients with diverticular disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letizia Mattii

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD.By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors.This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease.

  12. Altered Expression Pattern of Molecular Factors Involved in Colonic Smooth Muscle Functions: An Immunohistochemical Study in Patients with Diverticular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattii, Letizia; Ippolito, Chiara; Segnani, Cristina; Battolla, Barbara; Colucci, Rocchina; Dolfi, Amelio; Bassotti, Gabrio; Blandizzi, Corrado; Bernardini, Nunzia

    2013-01-01

    Background The pathogenesis of diverticular disease (DD) is thought to result from complex interactions among dietary habits, genetic factors and coexistence of other bowel abnormalities. These conditions lead to alterations in colonic pressure and motility, facilitating the formation of diverticula. Although electrophysiological studies on smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have investigated colonic motor dysfunctions, scarce attention has been paid to their molecular abnormalities, and data on SMCs in DD are lacking. Accordingly, the main purpose of this study was to evaluate the expression patterns of molecular factors involved in the contractile functions of SMCs in the tunica muscularis of colonic specimens from patients with DD. Methods and Findings By means of immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we examined the expression of Cx26 and Cx43, which are prominent components of gap junctions in human colonic SMCs, as well as pS368-Cx43, PKCps, RhoA and αSMA, all known to regulate the functions of gap junctions and the contractile activity of SMCs. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant abnormalities in DD samples, concerning both the expression and distribution patterns of most of the investigated molecular factors. Conclusion This study demonstrates, for the first time, that an altered pattern of factors involved in SMC contractility is present at level of the tunica muscularis of DD patients. Moreover, considering that our analysis was conducted on colonic tissues not directly affected by diverticular lesions or inflammatory reactions, it is conceivable that these molecular alterations may precede and predispose to the formation of diverticula, rather than being mere consequences of the disease. PMID:23437299

  13. Relationship between the complex susceptibility and the plasma dispersion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Cabral P, A.

    1991-04-01

    It is shown that when magnetization processes in a spin system and resonant excitation of spin n states occur in the presence of internal and or external random line-broadening mechanisms, the complex magnetic susceptibility of the plasma dispersion function. letter could be useful spin in system is proportional to the relationship found in this spectroscopies such as EPR and NMR, for example, as its fitting to experimental absorption and dispersion profiles produces their Lorentzian and Gaussian contents. (Author)

  14. Complexity of Gaussian-Radial-Basis Networks Approximating Smooth Functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kainen, P.C.; Kůrková, Věra; Sanguineti, M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 1 (2009), s. 63-74 ISSN 0885-064X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA201/08/1744 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Gaussian-radial-basis-function networks * rates of approximation * model complexity * variation norms * Bessel and Sobolev norms * tractability of approximation Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 1.227, year: 2009

  15. Relationship between the complex susceptibility and the plasma dispersion function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez D, H.; Cabral P, A

    1991-04-15

    It is shown that when magnetization processes in a spin system and resonant excitation of spin n states occur in the presence of internal and or external random line-broadening mechanisms, the complex magnetic susceptibility of the plasma dispersion function. letter could be useful spin in system is proportional to the relationship found in this spectroscopies such as EPR and NMR, for example, as its fitting to experimental absorption and dispersion profiles produces their Lorentzian and Gaussian contents. (Author)

  16. Model Complexities of Shallow Networks Representing Highly Varying Functions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kůrková, Věra; Sanguineti, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 171, 1 January (2016), s. 598-604 ISSN 0925-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD13002 Grant - others:grant for Visiting Professors(IT) GNAMPA-INdAM Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : shallow networks * model complexity * highly varying functions * Chernoff bound * perceptrons * Gaussian kernel units Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 3.317, year: 2016

  17. Functionalization of protein crystals with metal ions, complexes and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Satoshi; Maity, Basudev; Ueno, Takafumi

    2018-04-01

    Self-assembled proteins have specific functions in biology. With inspiration provided by natural protein systems, several artificial protein assemblies have been constructed via site-specific mutations or metal coordination, which have important applications in catalysis, material and bio-supramolecular chemistry. Similar to natural protein assemblies, protein crystals have been recognized as protein assemblies formed of densely-packed monomeric proteins. Protein crystals can be functionalized with metal ions, metal complexes or nanoparticles via soaking, co-crystallization, creating new metal binding sites by site-specific mutations. The field of protein crystal engineering with metal coordination is relatively new and has gained considerable attention for developing solid biomaterials as well as structural investigations of enzymatic reactions, growth of nanoparticles and catalysis. This review highlights recent and significant research on functionalization of protein crystals with metal coordination and future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The kinesin–tubulin complex: considerations in structural and functional complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olmsted ZT

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Zachary T Olmsted, Andrew G Colliver, Janet L Paluh State University of New York Polytechnic Institute, Colleges of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, College of Nanoscale Science, Nanobioscience Constellation, Albany, NY, USA Abstract: The ability of cells to respond to external cues by appropriately manipulating their internal environment requires a dynamic microtubule cytoskeleton that is facilitated by associated kinesin motor interactions. The evolutionary adaptations of kinesins and tubulins when merged generate a highly adaptable communication and infrastructure cellular network that is important to understanding specialized cell functions, human disease, and disease therapies. Here, we review the state of the field in the complex relationship of kinesin–tubulin interactions. We propose 12 mechanistic specializations of kinesins. In one category, referred to as sortability, we describe how kinesin interactions with tubulin isoforms, isotypes, or posttranslationally modified tubulins contribute to diverse cellular roles. Fourteen kinesin families have previously been described. Here, we illustrate the great depth of functional complexity that is possible in members within a single kinesin family by mechanistic specialization through discussion of the well-studied Kinesin-14 family. This includes new roles of Kinesin-14 in regulating supramolecular structures such as the microtubule-organizing center γ-tubulin ring complex of centrosomes. We next explore the value of an improved mechanistic understanding of kinesin–tubulin interactions in regard to human development, disease mechanisms, and improving treatments that target kinesin–tubulin complexes. The ability to combine the current kinesin nomenclature along with a more precisely defined kinesin and tubulin molecular toolbox is needed to support more detailed exploration of kinesin–tubulin interaction mechanisms including functional uniqueness, redundancy, or adaptations to new

  19. Cyclodextrins as functional excipients: methods to enhance complexation efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftsson, Thorsteinn; Brewster, Marcus E

    2012-09-01

    Cyclodextrins have gained currency as useful solubilizing excipients with an ever increasing list of beneficial properties and functionalities. Although their use in liquid dosage forms including oral and parenteral solutions is straightforward, their application to solids can be confounded by the added bulk that is contributed to the formulation. This factor has limited the use of cyclodextrin in tablets and relates systems mainly to potent drug substances. Increasing the ability of cyclodextrins to complex with drug through a manipulation of their complexation efficiency (CE) may expand the use of these materials to the increasing list of drug candidates and marketed drugs who may benefit from this technology. This brief review assesses tools and materials that have been suggested for increasing the CE for pharmaceutically useful cyclodextrins and drugs. The relative importance of impacting the drug solubility (S(0) ) and phase-solubility isotherm slope is discussed in the context of drug ionization and salt use; the impact of polymers, charge interactions, and charge shielding; and the coincidental formation of other complex types in the media. The influence of drug form as well as supersaturation is also discussed in the context of the responsible mechanisms along with aggregation, inclusion, and noninclusion complex formation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. DNA complexes with Ni nanoparticles: structural and functional properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatarinova, Olga N.; Smirnov, Igor P.; Safenkova, Irina V.; Varizhuk, Anna M.; Pozmogova, Galina E.

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular complexes of biopolymers based on magnetic nanoparticles play an important role in creation of biosensors, implementation of theragnostic and gene therapeutic methods and biosafety evaluation. We investigated the impact of DNA interactions with nanoparticles of nickel (nNi) on the integrity and functionality of DNA. Data obtained by mass spectrometry, electrophoresis, TEM and AFM microscopy techniques, bacterial transformation, and real-time PCR provide evidence that ssDNA and plasmid DNA (pDNA) efficiently form complexes with nNi. AFM data suggest that the complexes are necklace-type structures, in which nanoparticles are randomly distributed along the DNA chains, rather than highly entangled clot-type structures. After desorption, observed DNA characteristics in bioanalytical and biological systems remain unchanged. Only supercoiled pDNA was nicked, but remained, as well as a plasmid–nNi complex, active in expression vector assays. These results are very important for creation of new methods of DNA immobilization and controlled manipulation.

  1. Commuting quantum circuits and complexity of Ising partition functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2017-01-01

    Instantaneous quantum polynomial-time (IQP) computation is a class of quantum computation consisting only of commuting two-qubit gates and is not universal. Nevertheless, it has been shown that if there is a classical algorithm that can simulate IQP efficiently, the polynomial hierarchy collapses to the third level, which is highly implausible. However, the origin of the classical intractability is still less understood. Here we establish a relationship between IQP and computational complexity of calculating the imaginary-valued partition functions of Ising models. We apply the established relationship in two opposite directions. One direction is to find subclasses of IQP that are classically efficiently simulatable by using exact solvability of certain types of Ising models. Another direction is applying quantum computational complexity of IQP to investigate (im)possibility of efficient classical approximations of Ising partition functions with imaginary coupling constants. Specifically, we show that a multiplicative approximation of Ising partition functions is #P-hard for almost all imaginary coupling constants even on planar lattices of a bounded degree. (paper)

  2. Myeloperoxidase, paraoxonase-1, and HDL form a functional ternary complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Zhiping; Riwanto, Meliana; Gao, Shengqiang; Levison, Bruce S.; Gu, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoming; Wagner, Matthew A.; Besler, Christian; Gerstenecker, Gary; Zhang, Renliang; Li, Xin-Min; DiDonato, Anthony J.; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W.H. Wilson; Smith, Jonathan D.; Plow, Edward F.; Fox, Paul L.; Shih, Diana M.; Lusis, Aldons J.; Fisher, Edward A.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Landmesser, Ulf; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) are high-density lipoprotein–associated (HDL-associated) proteins mechanistically linked to inflammation, oxidant stress, and atherosclerosis. MPO is a source of ROS during inflammation and can oxidize apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) of HDL, impairing its atheroprotective functions. In contrast, PON1 fosters systemic antioxidant effects and promotes some of the atheroprotective properties attributed to HDL. Here, we demonstrate that MPO, PON1, and HDL bind to one another, forming a ternary complex, wherein PON1 partially inhibits MPO activity, while MPO inactivates PON1. MPO oxidizes PON1 on tyrosine 71 (Tyr71), a modified residue found in human atheroma that is critical for HDL binding and PON1 function. Acute inflammation model studies with transgenic and knockout mice for either PON1 or MPO confirmed that MPO and PON1 reciprocally modulate each other’s function in vivo. Further structure and function studies identified critical contact sites between APOA1 within HDL, PON1, and MPO, and proteomics studies of HDL recovered from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects revealed enhanced chlorotyrosine content, site-specific PON1 methionine oxidation, and reduced PON1 activity. HDL thus serves as a scaffold upon which MPO and PON1 interact during inflammation, whereupon PON1 binding partially inhibits MPO activity, and MPO promotes site-specific oxidative modification and impairment of PON1 and APOA1 function. PMID:23908111

  3. Density functional theory calculations of Rh-β-diketonato complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradie, J

    2015-01-28

    Density functional theory (DFT) results on the geometry, energies and charges of selected Rh-β-diketonato reactants, products and transition states are discussed. Various DFT techniques are used to increase our understanding of the orientation of ligands coordinated to Rh, to identify the lowest energy geometry of possible geometrical isomers and to get a molecular orbital understanding of ground and transition states. Trends and relationships obtained between DFT calculated energies and charges, experimentally measured values and electronic parameters describing the electron donating power of groups and ligands, enable the design of ligands and complexes of specific reactivity.

  4. Structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, S. A.; Oretskaya, T. S.

    2016-05-01

    The review summarizes published data on the results and achievements in the field of structure and function analysis of protein-nucleic acid complexes by means of main physical and biochemical methods, including X-ray diffraction, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, electron and atomic force microscopy, small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering, footprinting and cross-linking. Special attention is given to combined approaches. The advantages and limitations of each method are considered, and the prospects of their application for wide-scale structural studies in vivo are discussed. The bibliography includes 145 references.

  5. Identification of Functional Information Subgraphs in Complex Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettencourt, Luis M. A.; Gintautas, Vadas; Ham, Michael I.

    2008-01-01

    We present a general information theoretic approach for identifying functional subgraphs in complex networks. We show that the uncertainty in a variable can be written as a sum of information quantities, where each term is generated by successively conditioning mutual informations on new measured variables in a way analogous to a discrete differential calculus. The analogy to a Taylor series suggests efficient optimization algorithms for determining the state of a target variable in terms of functional groups of other nodes. We apply this methodology to electrophysiological recordings of cortical neuronal networks grown in vitro. Each cell's firing is generally explained by the activity of a few neurons. We identify these neuronal subgraphs in terms of their redundant or synergetic character and reconstruct neuronal circuits that account for the state of target cells

  6. Complex analysis fundamentals of the classical theory of functions

    CERN Document Server

    Stalker, John

    1998-01-01

    This clear, concise introduction to the classical theory of one complex variable is based on the premise that "anything worth doing is worth doing with interesting examples." The content is driven by techniques and examples rather than definitions and theorems. This self-contained monograph is an excellent resource for a self-study guide and should appeal to a broad audience. The only prerequisite is a standard calculus course. The first chapter deals with a beautiful presentation of special functions. . . . The third chapter covers elliptic and modular functions. . . in much more detail, and from a different point of view, than one can find in standard introductory books. . . . For [the] subjects that are omitted, the author has suggested some excellent references for the reader who wants to go through these topics. The book is read easily and with great interest. It can be recommended to both students as a textbook and to mathematicians and physicists as a useful reference. ---Mathematical Reviews Mainly or...

  7. Complex analysis I entire and meromorphic functions polyanalytic functions and their generalizations

    CERN Document Server

    Havin, V; Nikolski, N

    1997-01-01

    The first part of the volume contains a comprehensive description of the theory of entire and meromorphic functions of one complex variable and its applications. It includes the fundamental notions, methods and results on the growth of entire functions and the distribution of their zeros, the Rolf Nevanlinna theory of distribution of values of meromorphic functions including the inverse problem, the theory of completely regular growth, the concept of limit sets for entire and subharmonic functions. The authors describe the interpolation by entire functions, to entire and meromorphic solutions of ordinary differential equations, to the Riemann boundary problem with an infinite index and to the arithmetic of the convolution semigroup of probability distributions. Polyanalytic functions form one of the most natural generalizations of analytic functions and are described in Part II. They emerged for the first time in plane elasticity theory where they found important applications (due to Kolossof, Mushelishvili e...

  8. Architecture and function of plant light-harvesting complexes II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhenfeng; Li, Mei; Chang, Wenrui

    2013-08-01

    The antenna system associated with plant photosystem II (PSII) comprises a series of light-harvesting complexes II (LHCIIs) which are supramolecular assemblies of chlorophylls, carotenoids, lipids and integral membrane proteins. These complexes not only function in capturing and transmitting light energy, but also have pivotal roles in photoprotection under high-light conditions through a mechanism known as non-photochemical quenching process. Among them, the most abundant major species (majLHCII) is located at the periphery of PSII and forms homo/hetero-trimers. Besides, three minor species, named CP29, CP26 and CP24, are adjacent to the PSII core, exist in monomeric form and bridge the majLHCII trimers with the core complex. Structural studies on majLHCII and CP29 have revealed the overall architecture of plant LHC family, the binding sites of pigment molecules and the distribution pattern of chromophores in three-dimensional space. The high-resolution structural data of LHCIIs serve as fundamental bases for an improved understanding on the mechanisms of light harvesting, energy transfer and photoprotection processes in plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Emergence of Complexity in Protein Functions and Metabolic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andzej

    2009-01-01

    In modern organisms proteins perform a majority of cellular functions, such as chemical catalysis, energy transduction and transport of material across cell walls. Although great strides have been made towards understanding protein evolution, a meaningful extrapolation from contemporary proteins to their earliest ancestors is virtually impossible. In an alternative approach, the origin of water-soluble proteins was probed through the synthesis of very large libraries of random amino acid sequences and subsequently subjecting them to in vitro evolution. In combination with computer modeling and simulations, these experiments allow us to address a number of fundamental questions about the origins of proteins. Can functionality emerge from random sequences of proteins? How did the initial repertoire of functional proteins diversify to facilitate new functions? Did this diversification proceed primarily through drawing novel functionalities from random sequences or through evolution of already existing proto-enzymes? Did protein evolution start from a pool of proteins defined by a frozen accident and other collections of proteins could start a different evolutionary pathway? Although we do not have definitive answers to these questions, important clues have been uncovered. Considerable progress has been also achieved in understanding the origins of membrane proteins. We will address this issue in the example of ion channels - proteins that mediate transport of ions across cell walls. Remarkably, despite overall complexity of these proteins in contemporary cells, their structural motifs are quite simple, with -helices being most common. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and simple, natural channels, I will show that, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during

  10. Improved functional overview of protein complexes using inferred epistatic relationships

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, Colm

    2011-05-23

    Abstract Background Epistatic Miniarray Profiling(E-MAP) quantifies the net effect on growth rate of disrupting pairs of genes, often producing phenotypes that may be more (negative epistasis) or less (positive epistasis) severe than the phenotype predicted based on single gene disruptions. Epistatic interactions are important for understanding cell biology because they define relationships between individual genes, and between sets of genes involved in biochemical pathways and protein complexes. Each E-MAP screen quantifies the interactions between a logically selected subset of genes (e.g. genes whose products share a common function). Interactions that occur between genes involved in different cellular processes are not as frequently measured, yet these interactions are important for providing an overview of cellular organization. Results We introduce a method for combining overlapping E-MAP screens and inferring new interactions between them. We use this method to infer with high confidence 2,240 new strongly epistatic interactions and 34,469 weakly epistatic or neutral interactions. We show that accuracy of the predicted interactions approaches that of replicate experiments and that, like measured interactions, they are enriched for features such as shared biochemical pathways and knockout phenotypes. We constructed an expanded epistasis map for yeast cell protein complexes and show that our new interactions increase the evidence for previously proposed inter-complex connections, and predict many new links. We validated a number of these in the laboratory, including new interactions linking the SWR-C chromatin modifying complex and the nuclear transport apparatus. Conclusion Overall, our data support a modular model of yeast cell protein network organization and show how prediction methods can considerably extend the information that can be extracted from overlapping E-MAP screens.

  11. Characterization of the Tetraspan Junctional Complex (4JC) superfamily.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Amy; Lee, Andre; Hendargo, Kevin J; Reddy, Vamsee S; Shlykov, Maksim A; Kuppusamykrishnan, Harikrishnan; Medrano-Soto, Arturo; Saier, Milton H

    2017-03-01

    Connexins or innexins form gap junctions, while claudins and occludins form tight junctions. In this study, statistical data, derived using novel software, indicate that these four junctional protein families and eleven other families of channel and channel auxiliary proteins are related by common descent and comprise the Tetraspan (4 TMS) Junctional Complex (4JC) Superfamily. These proteins all share similar 4 transmembrane α-helical (TMS) topologies. Evidence is presented that they arose via an intragenic duplication event, whereby a 2 TMS-encoding genetic element duplicated tandemly to give 4 TMS proteins. In cases where high resolution structural data were available, the conclusion of homology was supported by conducting structural comparisons. Phylogenetic trees reveal the probable relationships of these 15 families to each other. Long homologues containing fusions to other recognizable domains as well as internally duplicated or fused domains are reported. Large "fusion" proteins containing 4JC domains proved to fall predominantly into family-specific patterns as follows: (1) the 4JC domain was N-terminal; (2) the 4JC domain was C-terminal; (3) the 4JC domain was duplicated or occasionally triplicated and (4) mixed fusion types were present. Our observations provide insight into the evolutionary origins and subfunctions of these proteins as well as guides concerning their structural and functional relationships. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional complexity of the axonal growth cone: a proteomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estrada-Bernal

    Full Text Available The growth cone, the tip of the emerging neurite, plays a crucial role in establishing the wiring of the developing nervous system. We performed an extensive proteomic analysis of axonal growth cones isolated from the brains of fetal Sprague-Dawley rats. Approximately 2000 proteins were identified at ≥ 99% confidence level. Using informatics, including functional annotation cluster and KEGG pathway analysis, we found great diversity of proteins involved in axonal pathfinding, cytoskeletal remodeling, vesicular traffic and carbohydrate metabolism, as expected. We also found a large and complex array of proteins involved in translation, protein folding, posttranslational processing, and proteasome/ubiquitination-dependent degradation. Immunofluorescence studies performed on hippocampal neurons in culture confirmed the presence in the axonal growth cone of proteins representative of these processes. These analyses also provide evidence for rough endoplasmic reticulum and reveal a reticular structure equipped with Golgi-like functions in the axonal growth cone. Furthermore, Western blot revealed the growth cone enrichment, relative to fetal brain homogenate, of some of the proteins involved in protein synthesis, folding and catabolism. Our study provides a resource for further research and amplifies the relatively recently developed concept that the axonal growth cone is equipped with proteins capable of performing a highly diverse range of functions.

  13. Complex Subduction Imaged by Diffractional Tomography of USArray Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Subduction of a large oceanic plate beneath a continental plate is a complex process. In the Western United States, fragmentation of the Farallon slab has been reported in recent tomographic models. In this study, we measure finite-frequency travel times of P410s and P660s receiver functions recorded at USArray Transportable Array (TA) stations for teleseismic events occurred between 2015 and 2011. We calculate the finite-frequency sensitivities of receiver functions to depth perturbations of the 410-km and 660-km discontinuities to obtain high resolution mantle transition zone models based on diffractional tomography. The high-resolution discontinuity models reveal several interesting anomalies associated with complex subduction of the Farallon plate. In particular, we observe a linear feature in both the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity models. This mantle transition zone anomaly is roughly located in the western Snake River Plain and aligns with a major slab gap imaged in an earlier finite-frequency S-wave velocity model. We show that non-stationary upwellings generated by eastward propagation of a slab tearing event, together with a westward motion of the North American plate at a rate of about 1 to 1.5 centimeters per year (comparable to the half spreading rate of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge) in the past 16 million years can explain the age-progressive Snake River Plain / Yellowstone volcanic track. The slab to the west of the anomaly shows a near vertical subduction, it is heavily fragmented and the 410-km and 660-km discontinuity topography indicates that the southern fragment north of the Mendocino triple junction has subducted down to the mantle transition zone.

  14. Ontogenetic functional diversity: size structure of a keystone predator drives functioning of a complex ecosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolf, Volker H W; Rasmussen, Nick L

    2013-05-01

    A central challenge in community ecology is to understand the connection between biodiversity and the functioning of ecosystems. While traditional approaches have largely focused on species-level diversity, increasing evidence indicates that there exists substantial ecological diversity among individuals within species. By far, the largest source of this intraspecific diversity stems from variation among individuals in ontogenetic stage and size. Although such ontogenetic shifts are ubiquitous in natural communities, whether and how they scale up to influence the structure and functioning of complex ecosystems is largely unknown. Here we take an experimental approach to examine the consequences of ontogenetic niche shifts for the structure of communities and ecosystem processes. In particular we experimentally manipulated the stage structure in a keystone predator, larvae of the dragonfly Anax junius, in complex experimental pond communities to test whether changes in the population stage or size structure of a keystone species scale up to alter community structure and ecosystem processes, and how functional differences scale with relative differences in size among stages. We found that the functional role of A. junius was stage-specific. Altering what stages were present in a pond led to concurrent changes in community structure, primary producer biomass (periphyton and phytoplankton), and ultimately altered ecosystem processes (respiration and net primary productivity), indicating a strong, but stage-specific, trophic cascade. Interestingly, the stage-specific effects did not simply scale with size or biomass of the predator, but instead indicated clear ontogenetic niche shifts in ecological interactions. Thus, functional differences among stages within a keystone species scaled up to alter the functioning of entire ecosystems. Therefore, our results indicate that the classical approach of assuming an average functional role of a species can be misleading because

  15. Zinc surface complexes on birnessite: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kideok D.; Refson, Keith; Sposito, Garrison

    2009-01-05

    Biogeochemical cycling of zinc is strongly influenced by sorption on birnessite minerals (layer-type MnO2), which are found in diverse terrestrial and aquatic environments. Zinc has been observed to form both tetrahedral (Zn{sup IV}) and octahedral (Zn{sup VI}) triple-corner-sharing surface complexes (TCS) at Mn(IV) vacancy sites in hexagonal birnessite. The octahedral complex is expected to be similar to that of Zn in the Mn oxide mineral, chalcophanite (ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O), but the reason for the occurrence of the four-coordinate Zn surface species remains unclear. We address this issue computationally using spin-polarized Density Functional Theory (DFT) to examine the Zn{sub IV}-TCS and Zn{sup VI}-TCS species. Structural parameters obtained by DFT geometry optimization were in excellent agreement with available experimental data on Zn-birnessites. Total energy, magnetic moments, and electron-overlap populations obtained by DFT for isolated Zn{sup IV}-TCS revealed that this species is stable in birnessite without a need for Mn(III) substitution in the octahedral sheet and that it is more effective in reducing undersaturation of surface O at a Mn vacancy than is Zn{sub VI}-TCS. Comparison between geometry-optimized ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} 3H{sub 2}O (chalcophanite) and the hypothetical monohydrate mineral, ZnMn{sub 3}O{sub 7} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, which contains only tetrahedral Zn, showed that the hydration state of Zn significantly affects birnessite structural stability. Finally, our study also revealed that, relative to their positions in an ideal vacancy-free MnO{sub 2}, Mn nearest to Zn in a TCS surface complex move toward the vacancy by 0.08-0.11 {angstrom}, while surface O bordering the vacancy move away from it by 0.16-0.21 {angstrom}, in agreement with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopic analyses.

  16. Complexity of autonomic nervous system function in individuals with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Manata Vanzella

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate autonomic modulation in individuals with COPD, compared with healthy controls, via recurrence plots (RPs and linear heart rate variability (HRV indices. Methods: We analyzed data on 74 volunteers, who were divided into two groups: COPD (n = 43 and control (n = 31. For calculation of HRV indices, heart rate was measured beat-by-beat during 30 min of supine rest using a heart-rate meter. We analyzed linear indices in the time and frequency domains, as well as indices derived from the RPs. Results: In comparison with the control group, the COPD group showed significant increases in the indices derived from the RPs, as well as significant reductions in the linear indices in the time and frequency domains. No significant differences were observed in the linear indices in the frequency domains expressed in normalized units or in the low frequency/high frequency ratio. Conclusions: Individuals with COPD show a reduction in both sympathetic and parasympathetic activity, associated with decreased complexity of autonomic nervous system function, as identified by RPs, which provide important complementary information in the detection of autonomic changes in this population.

  17. Functionalized diamond nanopowder for phosphopeptides enrichment from complex biological fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Dilshad [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad, E-mail: najamulhaq@bzu.edu.pk [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80-82, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Jabeen, Fahmida; Ashiq, Muhammad N.; Athar, Muhammad [Division of Analytical Chemistry, Institute of Chemical Sciences, Bahauddin Zakariya University, Multan 60800 (Pakistan); Rainer, Matthias; Huck, Christian W.; Bonn, Guenther K. [Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Leopold-Franzens University, Innrain 80-82, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

    2013-05-02

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Derivatization of diamond nanopowder as IMAC and RP. •Characterization with SEM, EDX and FT-IR. •Phosphopeptide enrichment from standard as well as real samples. •Desalting and human serum profiling with reproducible results. •MALDI-MS analysis with database identification. -- Abstract: Diamond is known for its high affinity and biocompatibility towards biomolecules and is used exclusively in separation sciences and life science research. In present study, diamond nanopowder is derivatized as Immobilized Metal Ion Affinity Chromatographic (IMAC) material for the phosphopeptides enrichment and as Reversed Phase (C-18) media for the desalting of complex mixtures and human serum profiling through MALDI-TOF-MS. Functionalized diamond nanopowder is characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Diamond-IMAC is applied to the standard protein (β-casein), spiked human serum, egg yolk and non-fat milk for the phosphopeptides enrichment. Results show the selectivity of synthesized IMAC-diamond immobilized with Fe{sup 3+} and La{sup 3+} ions. To comprehend the elaborated use, diamond-IMAC is also applied to the serum samples from gall bladder carcinoma for the potential biomarkers. Database search is carried out by the Mascot program ( (www.matrixscience.com)) for the assignment of phosphorylation sites. Diamond nanopowder is thus a separation media with multifunctional use and can be applied to cancer protein profiling for the diagnosis and biomarker identification.

  18. Computational assessment of the functional role of sinoatrial node exit pathways in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharche, Sanjay R; Vigmond, Edward; Efimov, Igor R; Dobrzynski, Halina

    2017-01-01

    The human right atrium and sinoatrial node (SAN) anatomy is complex. Optical mapping experiments suggest that the SAN is functionally insulated from atrial tissue except at discrete SAN-atrial electrical junctions called SAN exit pathways, SEPs. Additionally, histological imaging suggests the presence of a secondary pacemaker close to the SAN. We hypothesise that a) an insulating border-SEP anatomical configuration is related to SAN arrhythmia; and b) a secondary pacemaker, the paranodal area, is an alternate pacemaker but accentuates tachycardia. A 3D electro-anatomical computational model was used to test these hypotheses. A detailed 3D human SAN electro-anatomical mathematical model was developed based on our previous anatomical reconstruction. Electrical activity was simulated using tissue specific variants of the Fenton-Karma action potential equations. Simulation experiments were designed to deploy this complex electro-anatomical system to assess the roles of border-SEPs and paranodal area by mimicking experimentally observed SAN arrhythmia. Robust and accurate numerical algorithms were implemented for solving the mono domain reaction-diffusion equation implicitly, calculating 3D filament traces, and computing dominant frequency among other quantitative measurements. A centre to periphery gradient of increasing diffusion was sufficient to permit initiation of pacemaking at the centre of the 3D SAN. Re-entry within the SAN, micro re-entry, was possible by imposing significant SAN fibrosis in the presence of the insulating border. SEPs promoted the micro re-entry to generate more complex SAN-atrial tachycardia. Simulation of macro re-entry, i.e. re-entry around the SAN, was possible by inclusion of atrial fibrosis in the presence of the insulating border. The border shielded the SAN from atrial tachycardia. However, SAN micro-structure intercellular gap junctional coupling and the paranodal area contributed to prolonged atrial fibrillation. Finally, the micro

  19. Functional MR imaging in the patients with complex partial seizures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Jin Il; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song, In Chan; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Moon Hee; Kim, Sam Soo

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of functional MR imaging (fMRI) for localization of the cerebral motor and sensory cortices and language center in patients with complex partial seizure. A total of 47 fMRIs were obtained in 14 patients (M:F = 9:5; age 15-50 years; 13 right handed and 1 ambidextrous) with complex partial seizure (6 temporal lobe epilepsy, 6 frontal lobe epilepsy, 1 occipitotemporal lobe epilepsy, 1 hemispheric epilepsy). Conventional MR imaging revealed no abnormality in four patients, localized cerebral atrophy in one, hippocampal sclerosis in four, and benign neoplasm in the remaining five. fMRI was performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon) using gradient-echo singleshot EPI. Nineteen fMRIs were obtained in eight patients who performed the language task, 16 fMRIs in ten who performed the motor task and 12 fMRIs in ten who performed the somatosensory task. The activation task consisted of three language tasks (silent picture naming , word generation from a character, categorical word generation), motor tasks (opposition of thumb and index finger for hand/dorsifexion or extension for foot), and sensory tasks (passive tactile stimulation of hand or foot using a toothbrush). The data were analyzed using z-score (p<0.05), clustering, and cross-correlation analysis based upon homemade software, IDL 5.1. The success rate for obtaining meaningful fMRI was evaluated and activated regions were assessed on the basis of each fMRI obtained during, language, motor, and somatosensory tasks. fMRI findings were compared with those of the Wada test (n = 7) for language lateralization and with invasive cortical mapping (n = 3) for the localization of eloquent cerebral cortex, especially around the central sulcus. The overall success rate of fMRI was 79 % (37/47); success rates of fMRI with language, sensory, and motor task were 89% (17/19), 83 % (10/12), and 63 % (10/16), respectively. Areas activated during language tasks (n=17) included the

  20. Functional MR imaging in the patients with complex partial seizures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Jin Il; Chang, Kee Hyun; Song, In Chan; Goo, Jin Mo; Chung, Chun Kee; Lee, Sang Kun; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Moon Hee [Seoul National Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sam Soo [Boramae City Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-09-01

    To evaluate the clinical usefulness of functional MR imaging (fMRI) for localization of the cerebral motor and sensory cortices and language center in patients with complex partial seizure. A total of 47 fMRIs were obtained in 14 patients (M:F = 9:5; age 15-50 years; 13 right handed and 1 ambidextrous) with complex partial seizure (6 temporal lobe epilepsy, 6 frontal lobe epilepsy, 1 occipitotemporal lobe epilepsy, 1 hemispheric epilepsy). Conventional MR imaging revealed no abnormality in four patients, localized cerebral atrophy in one, hippocampal sclerosis in four, and benign neoplasm in the remaining five. fMRI was performed on a 1.5 T MR scanner (GE Signa Horizon) using gradient-echo singleshot EPI. Nineteen fMRIs were obtained in eight patients who performed the language task, 16 fMRIs in ten who performed the motor task and 12 fMRIs in ten who performed the somatosensory task. The activation task consisted of three language tasks (silent picture naming , word generation from a character, categorical word generation), motor tasks (opposition of thumb and index finger for hand/dorsifexion or extension for foot), and sensory tasks (passive tactile stimulation of hand or foot using a toothbrush). The data were analyzed using z-score (p<0.05), clustering, and cross-correlation analysis based upon homemade software, IDL 5.1. The success rate for obtaining meaningful fMRI was evaluated and activated regions were assessed on the basis of each fMRI obtained during, language, motor, and somatosensory tasks. fMRI findings were compared with those of the Wada test (n = 7) for language lateralization and with invasive cortical mapping (n = 3) for the localization of eloquent cerebral cortex, especially around the central sulcus. The overall success rate of fMRI was 79 % (37/47); success rates of fMRI with language, sensory, and motor task were 89% (17/19), 83 % (10/12), and 63 % (10/16), respectively. Areas activated during language tasks (n=17) included the

  1. Functional group diversity increases with modularity in complex food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, D; Yallop, M L; Memmott, J

    2015-06-10

    Biodiversity increases the ability of ecosystems to provide multiple functions. Most studies report a positive relationship between species richness and the number of ecosystem functions. However, it is not known whether the number of functional groups is related to the structure of the underlying species interaction network. Here we present food web data from 115 salt marsh islands and show that network structure is associated with the number of functional groups present. Functional group diversity is heterogeneously distributed across spatial scales, with some islands hosting more functional groups than others. Functional groups form modules within the community so that food webs with more modular architectures have more functional group diversity. Further, in communities with different interaction types, modularity can be seen as the multifunctional equivalent of trophic complementarity. Collectively, these findings reveal spatial heterogeneity in the number of functional groups that emerges from patterns in the structure of the food web.

  2. complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and pyridine ...

  3. Structure and function of the spermathecal complex in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The spermathecal complex of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli (Diptera: Psychodidae) undergoes histological and physiological changes during its gonotropic cycle. The present histochemical study revealed a mucopolysaccharide secretory mass in the spermathecae of the newly emerged sandfly. Sperm competition occurs ...

  4. Ruthenium(II) complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and.

  5. The MRB1 complex functions in kinetoplastid RNA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Acestor, N.; Panigrahi, A. K.; Jason, C.; Zíková, Alena; Stuart, K. D.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 2 (2009), s. 277-286 ISSN 1355-8382 Keywords : Trypanosoma * RNA editing * mitochondria * RNAi * protein complex Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.198, year: 2009

  6. Ruthenium (II) complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bromopyridine with 1- substituted imidazoles. These imidazolium salts (1a–d) were successfully employed as ligand precursors for the syntheses of new ruthenium(II) complexes bearing neutral bidentate ligands of N-heterocyclic carbene and pyridine ...

  7. Optimized implementations of rational approximations—a case study on the Voigt and complex error function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Franz; Kohlert, Dieter

    2008-10-01

    Rational functions are frequently used as efficient yet accurate numerical approximations for real and complex valued special functions. For the complex error function w(x+iy), whose real part is the Voigt function K(x,y), the rational approximation developed by Hui, Armstrong, and Wray [Rapid computation of the Voigt and complex error functions, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 19 (1978) 509-516] is investigated. Various optimizations for the algorithm are discussed. In many applications, where these functions have to be calculated for a large x grid with constant y, an implementation using real arithmetic and factorization of invariant terms is especially efficient.

  8. On the growth estimates of entire functions of double complex variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjib Datta

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently Datta et al. (2016 introduced the idea of relative type and relative weak type of entire functions of two complex variables with respect to another entire function of two complex variables and prove some related growth properties of it. In this paper, further we study some growth properties of entire functions of two complex variables on the basis of their relative types and relative weak types as introduced by Datta et al (2016.

  9. Dystrophin complex functions as a scaffold for signalling proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, Bruno

    2014-02-01

    Dystrophin is a 427kDa sub-membrane cytoskeletal protein, associated with the inner surface membrane and incorporated in a large macromolecular complex of proteins, the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC). In addition to dystrophin the DAPC is composed of dystroglycans, sarcoglycans, sarcospan, dystrobrevins and syntrophin. This complex is thought to play a structural role in ensuring membrane stability and force transduction during muscle contraction. The multiple binding sites and domains present in the DAPC confer the scaffold of various signalling and channel proteins, which may implicate the DAPC in regulation of signalling processes. The DAPC is thought for instance to anchor a variety of signalling molecules near their sites of action. The dystroglycan complex may participate in the transduction of extracellular-mediated signals to the muscle cytoskeleton, and β-dystroglycan was shown to be involved in MAPK and Rac1 small GTPase signalling. More generally, dystroglycan is view as a cell surface receptor for extracellular matrix proteins. The adaptor proteins syntrophin contribute to recruit and regulate various signalling proteins such as ion channels, into a macromolecular complex. Although dystrophin and dystroglycan can be directly involved in signalling pathways, syntrophins play a central role in organizing signalplex anchored to the dystrophin scaffold. The dystrophin associated complex, can bind up to four syntrophin through binding domains of dystrophin and dystrobrevin, allowing the scaffold of multiple signalling proteins in close proximity. Multiple interactions mediated by PH and PDZ domains of syntrophin also contribute to build a complete signalplex which may include ion channels, such as voltage-gated sodium channels or TRPC cation channels, together with, trimeric G protein, G protein-coupled receptor, plasma membrane calcium pump, and NOS, to enable efficient and regulated signal transduction and ion transport. This article is part

  10. Cx43 expression and function in the nervous system—implications for stem cell mediated regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Carola; Rosenkranz, Katja

    2014-01-01

    Pathological conditions of the brain such as ischemia cause major sensorimotor and cognitive impairments. In novel therapeutic approaches to brain injury, stem cells have been applied to ameliorate the pathological outcome. In several experimental models, including hypoxia-ischemia and trauma, transplantation of stem cells correlated with an improved functional and structural outcome. At the cellular level, brain insults also change gap junction physiology and expression, leading to altered i...

  11. Reference levels in PTCA as a function of procedure complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterzol, A.; Quai, E.; Padovani, R.; Bernardi, G.; Kotre, C. J.; Dowling, A.

    2005-01-01

    The multicentre assessment of a procedure complexity index (CI) for the introduction of reference levels (RLs) in percutaneous transluminal coronary angio-plasties (PTCA) is presented here. PTCAs were investigated based on methodology proposed by Bernardi et al. Multiple linear stepwise regression analysis, including clinical, anatomical and technical factors, was performed to obtain fluoroscopy time predictors. Based on these regression coefficients, a scoring system was defined and CI obtained. CI was used to classify dose values into three groups: low, medium and high complexity procedures, since there was good correlation (r = 0.41; P 2 , and 12, 20 and 27 min for fluoroscopy time, for the three CI groups. (authors)

  12. Cluster-modified function projective synchronisation of complex ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SHUGUO WANG

    2018-01-18

    Jan 18, 2018 ... system by state transformation with scaling function matrix. Numerical simulation results are presented finally to ... and the response systems could be synchronised up to a desired scaling function matrix. Particularly, MFPS is ..... the Preeminent Youth Fund of Zhejiang University of. Finance and Economics.

  13. Application of functional derivatives to analysis of complex systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beran, Zdeněk; Čelikovský, Sergej

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 350, č. 10 (2013), s. 2982-2993 ISSN 0016-0032 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-20433S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : complex systems * linear equation * modeling Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 2.260, year: 2013 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2013/TR/beran-0398123.pdf

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells and glioma cells form a structural as well as a functional syncytium in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schichor, Christian; Albrecht, Valerie; Korte, Benjamin; Buchner, Alexander; Riesenberg, Rainer; Mysliwietz, Josef; Paron, Igor; Motaln, Helena; Turnšek, Tamara Lah; Jürchott, Kathrin; Selbig, Joachim; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2012-03-01

    The interaction of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and tumor cells has been investigated in various contexts. HMSCs are considered as cellular treatment vectors based on their capacity to migrate towards a malignant lesion. However, concerns about unpredictable behavior of transplanted hMSCs are accumulating. In malignant gliomas, the recruitment mechanism is driven by glioma-secreted factors which lead to accumulation of both, tissue specific stem cells as well as bone marrow derived hMSCs within the tumor. The aim of the present work was to study specific cellular interactions between hMSCs and glioma cells in vitro. We show, that glioma cells as well as hMSCs differentially express connexins, and that they interact via gap-junctional coupling. Besides this so-called functional syncytium formation, we also provide evidence of cell fusion events (structural syncytium). These complex cellular interactions led to an enhanced migration and altered proliferation of both, tumor and mesenchymal stem cell types in vitro. The presented work shows that glioma cells display signs of functional as well as structural syncytium formation with hMSCs in vitro. The described cellular phenomena provide new insight into the complexity of interaction patterns between tumor cells and host cells. Based on these findings, further studies are warranted to define the impact of a functional or structural syncytium formation on malignant tumors and cell based therapies in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. No Evidence for Connectivity between the Bushveld Igneous Complex and the Molopo Farms Complex from Forward Modeling of Receiver Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skryzalin, P. A.; Ramirez, C.; Durrheim, R. J.; Raveloson, A.; Nyblade, A.; Feineman, M. D.

    2016-12-01

    The Bushveld Igneous Complex contains one of the most studied and economically important layered mafic intrusions in the world. The Rustenburg Layered Suite outcrops in northern South Africa over an area of 65,000 km2, and has a volume of up to 1,000,000 km3. Both the Bushveld Igneous Complex and the Molopo Farms Complex in Botswana intruded the crust at 2.05 Ga. Despite being extensively exploited by the mining industry, many questions still exist regarding the structure of the Bushveld Igneous Complex, specifically the total size and connectivity of the different outcrops. In this study, we used receiver function analysis, a technique for determining the seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle, to search for evidence of the Bushveld at station LBTB, which lies in Botswana, between the Far Western Limb of the Bushveld and the Molopo Farms Complex. The goal of our study was to determine whether a fast, high-density mafic body can be seen in the crust beneath this region using receiver functions. Observation of a high density layer would argue in favor of connectivity of the Bushveld between The Far Western Limb and the Molopo Farms Complex. We forward modeled stacks of receiver functions as well as sub-stacks that were split into azimuthal groups which share similar characteristics. We found that there was no evidence for a high velocity zone in the crust, and that the Moho in this region is located at a depth of 38 ± 3 km, about 8-9 km shallower than Moho depths determined beneath the Bushveld Complex. These two lines of evidence give no reason to assume connectivity between the Bushveld Igneous Complex and the Molopo Farms Complex, and rather suggest two separate intrusive suites.

  16. Large-scale chromatin morpho-functional changes during mammalian oocyte growth and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luciano, A M; Lodde, V; Franciosi, F; Tessaro, I; Corbani, D; Modina, S

    2012-08-10

    Mammalian oocyte development is characterized by impressive changes in chromatin structure and function within the germinal vesicle (GV). These changes are crucial to confer the oocyte with meiotic and developmental competencies. In cow, oocytes collected from early and middle antral follicles present four patterns of chromatin configuration, from GV0 to GV3, and its progressive condensation has been related to the achievement of developmental potential. During oogenesis, follicular cells are essential for the acquisition of meiotic and developmental competencies and communicate with the oocyte by paracrine and gap junction mediated mechanisms. We recently analyzed the role of gap junction communications (GJC) on chromatin remodeling process during the specific phase of folliculogenesis that coincides with the transcriptional silencing and sequential acquisition of meiotic and developmental capabilities. Our studies demonstrated that GJC between germinal and somatic compartments plays a fundamental role in the regulation of chromatin remodeling and transcription activities during the final oocyte differentiation, throughout cAMP dependent mechanism(s).

  17. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio eRodrigues

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures with different functions strongly suggest that additional molecular complexes with unknown properties may exist in fungal pathogens. Moreover, the identification of these novel complexes has stimulated the search of new immunogens with potential to protect human and animal hosts against systemic mycoses.

  18. Functional Complexity and Web Site Design : Evaluating the Online Presence of UNESCO World Heritage Sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Menno D.T.; Wu, Yuguang

    2018-01-01

    Functional complexity is a widespread and underresearched phenomenon in Web sites. This article explores a specific case of functional complexity by analyzing the content of UNESCO World Heritage Web sites, which have to meet demands from both World Heritage and tourism perspectives. Based on a

  19. The complexity, function and applications of RNA in circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alton eEtheridge

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Blood carries a wide array of biomolecules, including nutrients, hormones and molecules that are secreted by cells for specific biological functions. The recent finding of stable RNA of both endogenous and exogenous origin in the circulation raises a number of questions and opens a broad, new field: exploring the origins, functions and applications of these extracellular RNA molecules. These findings raise many important questions, including: what are the mechanisms of export and cellular uptake, what is the nature and source of their stability, what molecules do they interact with in the blood, and what are the possible biological functions of the circulating RNA. This review summarizes some key recent developments in circulating RNA research and discusses some of the open questions in the field.

  20. Cobalt dinitrosoalkane complexes in the C-H functionalization of olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Jennifer M; Boyd, W Christopher; Stewart, Ian C; Toste, F Dean; Bergman, Robert G

    2008-03-26

    The use of cobalt dinitrosoalkane complexes in the C-H functionalization of alkenes has been demonstrated. Reaction of a series of alkenes with Me4CpCo(CO)2 in the presence of NO generates intermediate cobalt dinitrosoalkane complexes that can be deprotonated alpha to the nitrosyl group and added to various Michael acceptors. The resultant products can then undergo retrocycloaddition reactions in the presence of the original alkene to regenerate the starting cobalt dinitrosoalkane complex and release the functionalized alkene.

  1. complexes bearing pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ately substituted pyridine-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbenes with Ag2O forming the NHC–silver bromide in situ followed by .... vacuum-line system. Unless otherwise stated, reagents were used as received from commercial sources. Sol- vents were deoxygenated immediately prior to use. All. Ag2O reactions were ...

  2. STABILITY OF A FUNCTIONAL EQUATION IN COMPLEX BANACH SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PRATAP MONDAL

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using fixed point technique, in the present paper , we wish to examine gen- eralization of the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability theorem for the functional equations f ( 2 x + i y + f ( x + 2 i y = 4 f ( x + i y + f ( x + f ( y (0.1 and f ( 2 x + i y .

  3. Complexity of Identification and Dualization of Positive Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor); T. Ibaraki

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWe consider in this paper the problem of identifying min T(f{hook}) and max F(f{hook}) of a positive (i.e., monotone) Boolean function f{hook}, by using membership queries only, where min T(f{hook}) (max F(f{hook})) denotes the set of minimal true vectors (maximal false vectors) of

  4. Gender Characteristics of Cerebral Hemodynamics during Complex Cognitive Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Maria; Duschek, Stefan; Richter, Andre; Grimm, Simone; Rezk, Markus; Kraehenmann, Rainer; Boeker, Heinz; Seifritz, Erich; Schuepbach, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Functional Transcranial Doppler sonography (fTCD) has been applied to assess peak mean cerebral blood flow velocity (MFV) with a high temporal resolution during cognitive activation. Yet, little attention has been devoted to gender-related alterations of MFV, including spectral analysis. In healthy subjects, fTCD was used to investigate a series…

  5. STABILITY OF A FUNCTIONAL EQUATION IN COMPLEX BANACH SPACES

    OpenAIRE

    PRATAP MONDAL; T.K. SAMANTA

    2016-01-01

    Using fixed point technique, in the present paper , we wish to examine gen- eralization of the Hyers-Ulam-Rassias stability theorem for the functional equations f ( 2 x + i y ) + f ( x + 2 i y ) = 4 f ( x + i y ) + f ( x ) + f ( y ) (0.1) and f ( 2 x + i y ) .

  6. The CORVET complex: compositions, function, and impact on cellular behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonker, CTH

    2016-01-01

    The endolysosomal system is positioned on the crossroad of the intracellular and extracellular environment and is therefore crucial to regulate many cellular processes. Proper function of the endolysosomal system greatly depends on the concept of membrane identity; the controlled protein and lipid

  7. Identity effects dominate the impacts of multiple species extinctions on the functioning of complex food webs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Eric; Séguin, Annie; Nozais, Christian; Archambault, Philippe; Gravel, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the impacts of species extinctions on the functioning of food webs is a challenging task because of the complexity of ecological interactions. We report the impacts of experimental species extinctions on the functioning of two food webs of freshwater and marine systems. We used a linear model to partition the variance among the multiple components of the diversity effect (linear group richness, nonlinear group richness, and identity). The identity of each functional group was the best explaining variable of ecosystem functioning for both systems. We assessed the contribution of each functional group in multifunctional space and found that, although the effect of functional group varied across ecosystem functions, some functional groups shared common effects on functions. This study is the first experimental demonstration that functional identity dominates the effects of extinctions on ecosystem functioning, suggesting that generalizations are possible despite the inherent complexity of interactions.

  8. Complex GABAB receptor complexes: how to generate multiple functionally distinct units from a single receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan eXU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA, acts on both ligand-gated and G protein-coupled receptors, the GABAA/C and GABAB receptors, respectively. The later play important roles in modulating many synapses, both at the pre- and post-synaptic levels, and are then still considered as interesting targets to treat a number of brain diseases, including addiction. For many years, several subtypes of GABAB receptors were expected, but cloning revealed only two genes that work in concert to generate a single type of GABAB receptor composed of two subunits. Here we will show that the signaling complexity of this unit receptor type can be largely increased through various ways, including receptor stoichiometry, subunit isoforms, membrane expression and localization, crosstalk with other receptors or interacting proteins. These recent data revealed how complexity of a receptor unit can be increased, observation that certainly are not unique to the GABAB receptor.

  9. Boolean Functions with a Simple Certificate for CNF Complexity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čepek, O.; Kučera, P.; Savický, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 160, 4-5 (2012), s. 365-382 ISSN 0166-218X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GP201/07/P168; GA ČR(CZ) GAP202/10/1188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Boolean functions * CNF representations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.718, year: 2012

  10. Functional equivalence and evolutionary convergence in complex communities of microbial sponge symbionts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Lu; Reynolds, David; Liu, Michael; Stark, Manuel; Kjelleberg, Staffan; Webster, Nicole S; Thomas, Torsten

    2012-07-03

    Microorganisms often form symbiotic relationships with eukaryotes, and the complexity of these relationships can range from those with one single dominant symbiont to associations with hundreds of symbiont species. Microbial symbionts occupying equivalent niches in different eukaryotic hosts may share functional aspects, and convergent genome evolution has been reported for simple symbiont systems in insects. However, for complex symbiont communities, it is largely unknown how prevalent functional equivalence is and whether equivalent functions are conducted by evolutionarily convergent mechanisms. Sponges represent an evolutionarily divergent group of species with common physiological and ecological traits. They also host complex communities of microbial symbionts and thus are the ideal model to test whether functional equivalence and evolutionary convergence exist in complex symbiont communities across phylogenetically divergent hosts. Here we use a sampling design to determine the phylogenetic and functional profiles of microbial communities associated with six sponge species. We identify common functions in the six microbiomes, demonstrating the existence of functional equivalence. These core functions are consistent with our current understanding of the biological and ecological roles of sponge-associated microorganisms and also provide insight into symbiont functions. Importantly, core functions also are provided in each sponge species by analogous enzymes and biosynthetic pathways. Moreover, the abundance of elements involved in horizontal gene transfer suggests their key roles in the genomic evolution of symbionts. Our data thus demonstrate evolutionary convergence in complex symbiont communities and reveal the details and mechanisms that underpin the process.

  11. Calibration of two complex ecosystem models with different likelihood functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidy, Dóra; Haszpra, László; Pintér, Krisztina; Nagy, Zoltán; Barcza, Zoltán

    2014-05-01

    The biosphere is a sensitive carbon reservoir. Terrestrial ecosystems were approximately carbon neutral during the past centuries, but they became net carbon sinks due to climate change induced environmental change and associated CO2 fertilization effect of the atmosphere. Model studies and measurements indicate that the biospheric carbon sink can saturate in the future due to ongoing climate change which can act as a positive feedback. Robustness of carbon cycle models is a key issue when trying to choose the appropriate model for decision support. The input parameters of the process-based models are decisive regarding the model output. At the same time there are several input parameters for which accurate values are hard to obtain directly from experiments or no local measurements are available. Due to the uncertainty associated with the unknown model parameters significant bias can be experienced if the model is used to simulate the carbon and nitrogen cycle components of different ecosystems. In order to improve model performance the unknown model parameters has to be estimated. We developed a multi-objective, two-step calibration method based on Bayesian approach in order to estimate the unknown parameters of PaSim and Biome-BGC models. Biome-BGC and PaSim are a widely used biogeochemical models that simulate the storage and flux of water, carbon, and nitrogen between the ecosystem and the atmosphere, and within the components of the terrestrial ecosystems (in this research the developed version of Biome-BGC is used which is referred as BBGC MuSo). Both models were calibrated regardless the simulated processes and type of model parameters. The calibration procedure is based on the comparison of measured data with simulated results via calculating a likelihood function (degree of goodness-of-fit between simulated and measured data). In our research different likelihood function formulations were used in order to examine the effect of the different model

  12. Typological diversity of tall buildings and complexes in relation to their functional structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generalov, Viktor P.; Generalova, Elena M.; Kalinkina, Nadezhda A.; Zhdanova, Irina V.

    2018-03-01

    The paper focuses on peculiarities of tall buildings and complexes, their typology and its formation in relation to their functional structure. The research is based on the analysis of tall buildings and complexes and identifies the following main functional elements of their formation: residential, administrative (office), hotel elements. The paper also considers the following services as «disseminated» in the space-planning structure: shops, medicine, entertainment, kids and sports facilities, etc., their location in the structure of the total bulk of the building and their impact on typological diversity. Research results include suggestions to add such concepts as «single-function tall buildings» and «mixed-use tall buildings and complexes» into the classification of tall buildings. In addition, if a single-function building or complex performs serving functions, it is proposed to add such concepts as «a residential tall building (complex) with provision of services», «an administrative (public) tall building (complex) with provision of services» into the classification of tall buildings. For mixed-use buildings and complexes the following terms are suggested: «a mixed-use tall building with provision of services», «a mixed-use tall complex with provision of services».

  13. Typological diversity of tall buildings and complexes in relation to their functional structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Generalov Viktor P.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on peculiarities of tall buildings and complexes, their typology and its formation in relation to their functional structure. The research is based on the analysis of tall buildings and complexes and identifies the following main functional elements of their formation: residential, administrative (office, hotel elements. The paper also considers the following services as «disseminated» in the space-planning structure: shops, medicine, entertainment, kids and sports facilities, etc., their location in the structure of the total bulk of the building and their impact on typological diversity. Research results include suggestions to add such concepts as «single-function tall buildings» and «mixed-use tall buildings and complexes» into the classification of tall buildings. In addition, if a single-function building or complex performs serving functions, it is proposed to add such concepts as «a residential tall building (complex with provision of services», «an administrative (public tall building (complex with provision of services» into the classification of tall buildings. For mixed-use buildings and complexes the following terms are suggested: «a mixed-use tall building with provision of services», «a mixed-use tall complex with provision of services».

  14. Molecular Architecture and Function of the SEA Complex, a Modulator of the TORC1 Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algret, Romain; Fernandez-Martinez, Javier; Shi, Yi; Kim, Seung Joong; Pellarin, Riccardo; Cimermancic, Peter; Cochet, Emilie; Sali, Andrej; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Dokudovskaya, Svetlana

    2014-01-01

    The TORC1 signaling pathway plays a major role in the control of cell growth and response to stress. Here we demonstrate that the SEA complex physically interacts with TORC1 and is an important regulator of its activity. During nitrogen starvation, deletions of SEA complex components lead to Tor1 kinase delocalization, defects in autophagy, and vacuolar fragmentation. TORC1 inactivation, via nitrogen deprivation or rapamycin treatment, changes cellular levels of SEA complex members. We used affinity purification and chemical cross-linking to generate the data for an integrative structure modeling approach, which produced a well-defined molecular architecture of the SEA complex and showed that the SEA complex comprises two regions that are structurally and functionally distinct. The SEA complex emerges as a platform that can coordinate both structural and enzymatic activities necessary for the effective functioning of the TORC1 pathway. PMID:25073740

  15. Assembly and function of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) I peptide-loading complex are conserved across higher vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Andreas; Jedamzick, Johanna; Herbring, Valentina; Fischbach, Hanna; Hartmann, Jessica; Parcej, David; Koch, Joachim; Tampé, Robert

    2014-11-28

    Antigen presentation to cytotoxic T lymphocytes via major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules depends on the heterodimeric transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP). For efficient antigen supply to MHC I molecules in the ER, TAP assembles a macromolecular peptide-loading complex (PLC) by recruiting tapasin. In evolution, TAP appeared together with effector cells of adaptive immunity at the transition from jawless to jawed vertebrates and diversified further within the jawed vertebrates. Here, we compared TAP function and interaction with tapasin of a range of species within two classes of jawed vertebrates. We found that avian and mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 form heterodimeric complexes across taxa. Moreover, the extra N-terminal domain TMD0 of mammalian TAP1 and TAP2 as well as avian TAP2 recruits tapasin. Strikingly, however, only TAP1 and TAP2 from the same taxon can form a functional heterodimeric translocation complex. These data demonstrate that the dimerization interface between TAP1 and TAP2 and the tapasin docking sites for PLC assembly are conserved in evolution, whereas elements of antigen translocation diverged later in evolution and are thus taxon specific. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Compact composition operators on real Banach spaces of complex-valued bounded Lipschitz functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davood Alimohammadi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We characterize compact composition operators on real Banachspaces of complex-valued bounded Lipschitz functions on metricspaces, not necessarily compact, with Lipschitz involutions anddetermine their spectra.

  17. The Bessel functions J0 and J1 of complex argument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ardill, R.W.B.; Moriarty, K.J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The Bessel function appears in a wide range of physical applications. The package Bessel contains complex function routines to calculate J 0 (z) and J 1 (z) for complex z. Bessel functions of higher order n 0 (z) and J 1 (z) for all values of mod(z) up to machine overflow. For mod(z) 10, the results diverge quite rapidly from their actual values. The accuracy for mod(z)<=10 is sufficient for most physical applications, and the polynomial approximations provide a quicker calculation of Bessel functions than the use of the ascending series formula used previously, particularly for values of mod(z) near 10. (Auth.)

  18. Exchange coupling interactions in a Fe6 complex: A theoretical study using density functional theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauchy, Thomas; Ruiz, Eliseo; Alvarez, Santiago

    2006-01-01

    Theoretical methods based on density functional theory have been employed to analyze the exchange interactions in an Fe 6 complex. The calculated exchange coupling constants are consistent with an S=5 ground state and agree well with those reported previously for other Fe III polynuclear complexes. Ferromagnetic interactions may appear through exchange pathways formed by two bridging hydroxo or oxo ligands

  19. Improved design architecture to minimize functional complexity of plant protection system for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, JaeCheon, E-mail: jcjung@kings.ac.kr

    2016-12-01

    An improved design architecture method to minimize the functional complexity of PPS (Plant Protection System) is proposed in this work. Firstly, the design concerns are identified with both AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) analysis. AHP is able to identify the source of design concerns using pairwise comparison. AHP result shows CCF is the primary concern and the complexity is the secondly. Even though complexity is the second largest concern to the effectiveness of digital I&C system, but it has not been highlighted as CCF. This is the reason why this work focuses on the sources of complexity to maximize the effectiveness of digital system in the viewpoint of design architecture. The proposed methods are, separating non-safety functions from bistable logics and simplifying communication links and network. In order to verify the new concept, EFFBD (Enhanced Functional Flow Block Diagram) models are developed for two bistable logics of PPS and the complexities are measured using Halstead’s program maintainability measures. This measure specifies what provokes functional complexity. Periodic testing and operating bypass function are the source of complexity in this analysis.

  20. Improved design architecture to minimize functional complexity of plant protection system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, JaeCheon

    2016-01-01

    An improved design architecture method to minimize the functional complexity of PPS (Plant Protection System) is proposed in this work. Firstly, the design concerns are identified with both AHP (Analytic Hierarchy Process) analysis. AHP is able to identify the source of design concerns using pairwise comparison. AHP result shows CCF is the primary concern and the complexity is the secondly. Even though complexity is the second largest concern to the effectiveness of digital I&C system, but it has not been highlighted as CCF. This is the reason why this work focuses on the sources of complexity to maximize the effectiveness of digital system in the viewpoint of design architecture. The proposed methods are, separating non-safety functions from bistable logics and simplifying communication links and network. In order to verify the new concept, EFFBD (Enhanced Functional Flow Block Diagram) models are developed for two bistable logics of PPS and the complexities are measured using Halstead’s program maintainability measures. This measure specifies what provokes functional complexity. Periodic testing and operating bypass function are the source of complexity in this analysis.

  1. In good company: association between fungal glycans generates molecular complexes with unique functions

    OpenAIRE

    Marcio eRodrigues; Marcio eRodrigues; Leonardo eNimrichter

    2012-01-01

    The biological properties of fungal immunogens have historically utilized testing of isolated molecules. Recent findings, however, indicate that fungal glycans differing in structure and function can interact to form hybrid complexes with unique properties. In the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans, chitin-like molecules associate with capsular glucuronoxylomannan to form functionally distinct glycan complexes. Such interactions between glycans that result in the formation of structures...

  2. Representations of complex functions, means on the regular n-gon and applications to gravitational potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, D; Elmabsout, B

    2003-01-01

    We present a method to analytically compute means of functions on regular n-gons and to study cyclic quantities of the complex variable. To achieve this, we construct representations of complex functions and compact expressions of their mean based on the use of a scalar product. Applied in the field of celestial mechanics, this method leads to results concerning gravitational potential and relative equilibrium composed by nested polygons

  3. Do gap junctions regulate synchrony in the parkinsonian basal ganglia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) typically suffer severely from different types of symptoms. Motor symptoms, restricting the patients’ ability to perform controlled movements in daily life, are of special clinical interest and have been related to neural activity in the basal ganglia.

  4. Structure modeling and mutational analysis of gap junction beta 2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therefore, a 3D structure of GJB2 was developed using comparative modeling approach. For modeling, a template was selected by blastp at NCBI and the best template selected was 2ZW3. By comparing the template-target sequence, a model was created using MODELLER, a program for homology modeling.

  5. Possible roles of neural gap junctions in Parkinson's disease pathology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwab, B.C.; van Wezel, Richard Jack Anton; Heida, Tjitske; van Gils, Stephanus A.

    2013-01-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by modified behavior of neuronal networks in the basal ganglia after depletion of dopamine. PD states show bursting neural activity and high synchronization among neurons as well as altered oscillations in local field potentials. These

  6. Conduction slowing by the gap junctional uncoupler carbenoxolone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, [No Value; Veenstra, T; Verkerk, AO; Wilders, R; Smits, JPP; Wilms-Schopman, FJG; Wiegerinck, RF; Bourier, J; Belterman, CNW; Coronel, R; Verheijck, EE

    2003-01-01

    Background: Cellular electrical coupling is essential for normal propagation of the cardiac action potential, whereas reduced electrical coupling is associated with arrhythrmas. Known cellular uncoupling agents have severe side effects on membrane ionic currents. We investigated the effect of

  7. Studies on combined model based on functional objectives of large scale complex engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuting, Wang; Jingchun, Feng; Jiabao, Sun

    2018-03-01

    As various functions were included in large scale complex engineering, and each function would be conducted with completion of one or more projects, combined projects affecting their functions should be located. Based on the types of project portfolio, the relationship of projects and their functional objectives were analyzed. On that premise, portfolio projects-technics based on their functional objectives were introduced, then we studied and raised the principles of portfolio projects-technics based on the functional objectives of projects. In addition, The processes of combined projects were also constructed. With the help of portfolio projects-technics based on the functional objectives of projects, our research findings laid a good foundation for management of large scale complex engineering portfolio management.

  8. A spatial compression technique for head-related transfer function interpolation and complexity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shekarchi, Sayedali; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob; Hallam, John

    2015-01-01

    A head-related transfer function (HRTF) model employing Legendre polynomials (LPs) is evaluated as an HRTF spatial complexity indicator and interpolation technique in the azimuth plane. LPs are a set of orthogonal functions derived on the sphere which can be used to compress an HRTF dataset...

  9. On the Communication Complexity of Secure Function Evaluation with Long Output

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hubacek, Pavel; Wichs, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We study the communication complexity of secure function evaluation (SFE). Consider a setting where Alice has a short input χA, Bob has an input χB and we want Bob to learn some function y = f(χA, χB) with large output size. For example, Alice has a small secret decryption key, Bob has a large en...

  10. A Two Layer Approach to the Computability and Complexity of Real Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambov, Branimir Zdravkov

    2003-01-01

    We present a new model for computability and complexity of real functions together with an implementation that it based on it. The model uses a two-layer approach in which low-type basic objects perform the computation of a real function, but, whenever needed, can be complemented with higher type...

  11. A View of Man's Role and Function in a Complex System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Francis H.

    In this paper the roles and functions of man in the evolution and development of two complex specific systems within the Army operational environment are discussed. It is pointed out that throughout the course of historical development, the basic system functions and objectives have remained unchanged even though the system equipments have varied.…

  12. Complex ABCC8 DNA variations in congenital hyperinsulinism: lessons from functional studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzyamba, Morris; Farzaneh, Tabasum; Behe, Phillip

    2007-01-01

    singly or in combination led to intracellular retention of the channel complex and loss of function. By contrast, V1572I is trafficked appropriately and is functional, consistent with a mechanism of reduction to hemizygosity of paternal ABCC8 in focal disease. V1572I is likely to be a benign DNA variant...

  13. Implication of Ccr4-Not complex function in mRNA quality control in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assenholt, Jannie; Mouaikel, John; Saguez, Cyril

    2011-01-01

    RNPs are exported to the cytoplasm. The Ccr4-Not complex, which constitutes the major S. cerevisiae cytoplasmic deadenylase, has recently been implied in nuclear exosome–related processes. Consistent with a possible nuclear function of the complex, the deletion or mutation of Ccr4-Not factors also elicits...... transcription phenotypes. Here we use genetic depletion of the Mft1p protein of the THO transcription/mRNP packaging complex as a model system to link the Ccr4-Not complex to nuclear mRNP QC. We reveal strong genetic interactions between alleles of the Ccr4-Not complex with both the exosomal RRP6 and MFT1 genes....... Moreover, Rrp6p-dependent in vivo QC phenotypes of Δmft1 cells can be rescued by codeletion of several Ccr4-Not components. We discuss how the Ccr4-Not complex may connect with the mRNP QC pathway...

  14. The Possibility Using the Power Production Function of Complex Variable for Economic Forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Gennadyevich Svetunkov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of dynamic analysis and forecasting production results using the power production functions of complex variables with real coefficients is considered. This model expands the arsenal of instrumental methods and allows multivariate production forecasts which are unattainable by other methods of real variables as the functions of complex variables simulate the production differently in comparison with the models of real variables. The values of coefficients of the power production functions of complex variables can be calculated for each statistical observation. This allows to consider the change of the coefficients over time, to analyze this trend and predict the values of the coefficients for a given term, thereby to predict the form of the production function, which forecasts the operating results. Thus, the model of the production function with variable coefficients is introduced into the scientific circulation. With this model, the inverse problem of forecasting might be solved, such as the determination of the necessary quantities of labor and capital to achieve the desired operational results. The study is based on the principles of the modern methodology of complex-valued economy, one of its sections is the complex-valued patterns of production functions. In the article, the possibility of economic forecasting is tested on the example of the UK economy. The results of this prediction are compared with the forecasts obtained by other methods, which have led to the conclusion about the effectiveness of the proposed approach and the method of forecasting at the macro levels of production systems. A complex-valued power model of the production function is recommended for the multivariate prediction of sustainable production systems — the global economy, the economies of individual countries, major industries and regions.

  15. How executive functions predict development in syntactic complexity of narrative writing in the upper elementary grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijbooms, Elise; Groen, Margriet A; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of transcription skills, oral language skills, and executive functions to growth in narrative writing between fourth and sixth grade. While text length and story content of narratives did not increase with age, syntactic complexity of narratives showed a clear developmental progression. Results from path analyses revealed that later syntactic complexity of narrative writing was, in addition to initial syntactic complexity, predicted by oral grammar, inhibition, and planning. These results are discussed in light of the changes that characterize writing development in the upper elementary grades. More specifically, this study emphasizes the relevance of syntactic complexity as a developmental marker as well as the importance of executive functions for later writing development.

  16. Association between gross-motor and executive function depends on age and motor task complexity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spedden, Meaghan Elizabeth; Malling, Anne Sofie B; Andersen, Ken Kjøller

    2017-01-01

    The objective was to examine associations between motor and executive function across the adult lifespan and to investigate the role of motor complexity in these associations. Young, middle-aged and older adults (n = 82; 19-83y) performed two gross-motor tasks with different levels of complexity...... and a Stroop-like computer task. Performance was decreased in older adults. The association between motor and cognitive performance was significant for older adults in the complex motor task (p = 0.03, rs = -0.41), whereas no significant associations were found for young or middle-aged groups, suggesting...... that the link between gross-motor and executive function emerges with age and depends on motor complexity....

  17. Complex Estimation of Intersystem Relations of Functional Reactions on Physical Load

    OpenAIRE

    Romanchuk, A.P.

    2015-01-01

    The studying of features of functional mutual relations in the group of persons engaged in physical culture was the purpose of this paper. The complex research including the survey of 55 examinees engaged in physical culture and 50 persons of control group was carried out. The results of the carried out complex researches had allowed allocating the number of attributes showing the intersystem mutual relation at the persons engaged in physical culture. They cardinally differ from parameters in...

  18. Antiplasmodial activities of gold(I) complexes involving functionalized N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmert, Catherine; Ramadani, Arba Pramundita; Boselli, Luca; Fernández Álvarez, Álvaro; Paloque, Lucie; Augereau, Jean-Michel; Gornitzka, Heinz; Benoit-Vical, Françoise

    2016-07-01

    A series of twenty five molecules, including imidazolium salts functionalized by N-, O- or S-containing groups and their corresponding cationic, neutral or anionic gold(I) complexes were evaluated on Plasmodium falciparum in vitro and then on Vero cells to determine their selectivity. Among them, eight new compounds were synthesized and fully characterized by spectroscopic methods. The X-ray structures of three gold(I) complexes are presented. Except one complex (18), all the cationic gold(I) complexes show potent antiplasmodial activity with IC50 in the micro- and submicromolar range, correlated with their lipophilicity. Structure-activity relationships enable to evidence a lead-complex (21) displaying a good activity (IC50=210nM) close to the value obtained with chloroquine (IC50=514nM) and a weak cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Quasicompact and Riesz unital endomorphisms of real Lipschitz algebras of complex-valued functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Mayghani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We first show that a bounded linear operator $ T $ on a real Banach space $ E $ is quasicompact (Riesz, respectively if and only if $T': E_{mathbb{C}}longrightarrow E_{mathbb{C}}$ is quasicompact  (Riesz, respectively, where the complex Banach space $E_{mathbb{C}}$ is a suitable complexification of $E$ and $T'$ is the complex linear operator on $E_{mathbb{C}}$ associated with $T$. Next, we prove that every unital endomorphism of real Lipschitz algebras of complex-valued functions on compact metric spaces with Lipschitz involutions is a composition operator. Finally, we study some properties of quasicompact and Riesz unital endomorphisms of these algebras.

  20. Structure function relationship in complex brain networks expressed by hierarchical synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Changsong; Zemanová, Lucia; Zamora-López, Gorka; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Kurths, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    The brain is one of the most complex systems in nature, with a structured complex connectivity. Recently, large-scale corticocortical connectivities, both structural and functional, have received a great deal of research attention, especially using the approach of complex network analysis. Understanding the relationship between structural and functional connectivity is of crucial importance in neuroscience. Here we try to illuminate this relationship by studying synchronization dynamics in a realistic anatomical network of cat cortical connectivity. We model the nodes (cortical areas) by a neural mass model (population model) or by a subnetwork of interacting excitable neurons (multilevel model). We show that if the dynamics is characterized by well-defined oscillations (neural mass model and subnetworks with strong couplings), the synchronization patterns are mainly determined by the node intensity (total input strengths of a node) and the detailed network topology is rather irrelevant. On the other hand, the multilevel model with weak couplings displays more irregular, biologically plausible dynamics, and the synchronization patterns reveal a hierarchical cluster organization in the network structure. The relationship between structural and functional connectivity at different levels of synchronization is explored. Thus, the study of synchronization in a multilevel complex network model of cortex can provide insights into the relationship between network topology and functional organization of complex brain networks.

  1. Functional significance of octameric RuvA for a branch migration complex from Thermus thermophilus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yoshie; Mayanagi, Kouta; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2008-01-01

    The RuvAB complex promotes migration of Holliday junction at the late stage of homologous recombination. The RuvA tetramer specifically recognizes Holliday junction to form two types of complexes. A single tetramer is bound to the open configuration of the junction DNA in complex I, while the octameric RuvA core structure sandwiches the same junction in complex II. The hexameric RuvB rings, symmetrically bound to both sides of RuvA on Holliday junction, pump out DNA duplexes, depending upon ATP hydrolysis. We investigated functional differences between the wild-type RuvA from Thermus thermophilus and mutants impaired the ability of complex II formation. These mutant RuvA, exclusively forming complex I, reduced activities of branch migration and ATP hydrolysis, suggesting that the octameric RuvA is essential for efficient branch migration. Together with our recent electron microscopic analysis, this finding provides important insights into functional roles of complex II in the coordinated branch migration mechanism

  2. Selected topics in the classical theory of functions of a complex variable

    CERN Document Server

    Heins, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    Elegant and concise, this text is geared toward advanced undergraduate students acquainted with the theory of functions of a complex variable. The treatment presents such students with a number of important topics from the theory of analytic functions that may be addressed without erecting an elaborate superstructure. These include some of the theory's most celebrated results, which seldom find their way into a first course. After a series of preliminaries, the text discusses properties of meromorphic functions, the Picard theorem, and harmonic and subharmonic functions. Subsequent topics incl

  3. Structural and functional characterization of the yeast Ski2-Ski3-Ski8 complex

    OpenAIRE

    Halbach, Felix

    2013-01-01

    The Ski2-Ski3-Ski8 (SKI) complex is a conserved multi-protein assembly required for the cytoplasmic functions of the exosome, including messenger RNA (mRNA) turnover, surveillance and interference. The helicase Ski2, the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein Ski3 and the �-propeller Ski8 assemble in a heterotetramer with 1:1:2 stoichiometry. While the function of the Ski2-Ski3-Ski8 complex as a general cofactor of the cytoplasmic exosome has been well established, it remains largely uncle...

  4. Complexes with mixed primary and secondary cellulose synthases are functional in Arabidopsis thaliana plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carroll, Andrew; Mansoori, N; Li, Shundai; Lei, Lei; Vernhettes, Samantha; Visser, Richard G. F.; Somerville, Chris R; Gu, Ying; Trindade, Luisa M.

    2012-10-01

    In higher plants, cellulose is synthesized by so-called rosette protein complexes with cellulose synthases (CESAs) as catalytic subunits of the complex. The CESAs are divided into two distinct families, three of which are thought to be specialized for the primary cell wall and three for the secondary cell wall. In this article, the potential of primary and secondary CESAs forming a functional rosette complex has been investigated. The membrane-based yeast two-hybrid and biomolecular fluorescence systems were used to assess the interactions between three primary (CESA1, CESA3, CESA6), and three secondary (CESA4, CESA7, CESA8) Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CESAs. The results showed that all primary CESAs can physically interact both in vitro and in planta with all secondary CESAs. Although CESAs are broadly capable of interacting in pairwise combinations, they are not all able to form functional complexes in planta. Analysis of transgenic lines showed that CESA7 can partially rescue defects in the primary cell wall biosynthesis in a weak cesa3 mutant. Green fluorescent protein-CESA protein fusions revealed that when CESA3 was replaced by CESA7 in the primary rosette, the velocity of the mixed complexes was slightly faster than the native primary complexes. CESA1 in turn can partly rescue defects in secondary cell wall biosynthesis in a cesa8ko mutant, resulting in an increase of cellulose content relative to cesa8ko. These results demonstrate that sufficient parallels exist between the primary and secondary complexes for cross-functionality and open the possibility that mixed complexes of primary and secondary CESAs may occur at particular times.

  5. INVESTIGATION OF INFLUENCE OF ENCODING FUNCTION COMPLEXITY ON DISTRIBUTION OF ERROR MASKING PROBABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Levina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Error detection codes are mechanisms that enable robust delivery of data in unreliable communication channels and devices. Unreliable channels and devices are error-prone objects. Respectively, error detection codes allow detecting such errors. There are two classes of error detecting codes - classical codes and security-oriented codes. The classical codes have high percentage of detected errors; however, they have a high probability to miss an error in algebraic manipulation. In order, security-oriented codes are codes with a small Hamming distance and high protection to algebraic manipulation. The probability of error masking is a fundamental parameter of security-oriented codes. A detailed study of this parameter allows analyzing the behavior of the error-correcting code in the case of error injection in the encoding device. In order, the complexity of the encoding function plays an important role in the security-oriented codes. Encoding functions with less computational complexity and a low probability of masking are the best protection of encoding device against malicious acts. This paper investigates the influence of encoding function complexity on the error masking probability distribution. It will be shownthat the more complex encoding function reduces the maximum of error masking probability. It is also shown in the paper that increasing of the function complexity changes the error masking probability distribution. In particular, increasing of computational complexity decreases the difference between the maximum and average value of the error masking probability. Our resultshave shown that functions with greater complexity have smoothed maximums of error masking probability, which significantly complicates the analysis of error-correcting code by attacker. As a result, in case of complex encoding function the probability of the algebraic manipulation is reduced. The paper discusses an approach how to measure the error masking

  6. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Shehryar, E-mail: sherkhan@fysik.su.se; Odelius, Michael, E-mail: odelius@fysik.su.se [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland); Kruk, Danuta [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Sloneczna 54, Olsztyn PL-10710 (Poland); Kowalewski, Jozef [Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, Arrhenius Laboratory, Stockholm University, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-01-21

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H{sub 2}O){sup −}, Gd(III)DTPA(H{sub 2}O){sup 2−}, and Gd(III)(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}{sup 3+} in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  7. Optimized implementations of rational approximations for the Voigt and complex error function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreier, Franz

    2011-01-01

    Rational functions are frequently used as efficient yet accurate numerical approximations for real and complex valued functions. For the complex error function w(x+iy), whose real part is the Voigt function K(x,y), code optimizations of rational approximations are investigated. An assessment of requirements for atmospheric radiative transfer modeling indicates a y range over many orders of magnitude and accuracy better than 10 -4 . Following a brief survey of complex error function algorithms in general and rational function approximations in particular the problems associated with subdivisions of the x, y plane (i.e., conditional branches in the code) are discussed and practical aspects of Fortran and Python implementations are considered. Benchmark tests of a variety of algorithms demonstrate that programming language, compiler choice, and implementation details influence computational speed and there is no unique ranking of algorithms. A new implementation, based on subdivision of the upper half-plane in only two regions, combining Weideman's rational approximation for small |x|+y<15 and Humlicek's rational approximation otherwise is shown to be efficient and accurate for all x, y.

  8. A relativistic density functional study of uranyl hydrolysis and complexation by carboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Rupashree Shyama

    2009-02-10

    In this work, the complexation of uranium in its most stable oxidation state VI in aqueous solution was studied computationally, within the framework of density functional (DF) theory. The thesis is divided into the following parts: Chapter 2 briefly summarizes the relevant general aspects of actinide chemistry and then focuses on actinide environmental chemistry. Experimental results on hydrolysis, actinide complexation by carboxylic acids, and humic substances are presented to establish a background for the subsequent discussion. Chapter 3 describes the computational method used in this work and the relevant features of the parallel quantum chemistry code PARAGAUSS employed. First, the most relevant basics of the applied density functional approach are presented focusing on relativistic effects. Then, the treatment of solvent effects, essential for an adequate modeling of actinide species in aqueous solution, will be introduced. At the end of this chapter, computational parameters and procedures will be summarized. Chapter 4 presents the computational results including a comparison to available experimental data. In the beginning, the mononuclear hydrolysis product of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, [UO{sub 2}OH]{sup +}, will be discussed. The second part deals with actinide complexation by carboxylate ligands. First of all the coordination number for uranylacetate will be discussed with respect to implications for the complexation of actinides by humic substances followed by the uranyl complexation of aromatic carboxylic acids in comparison to earlier results for aliphatic ones. In the end, the ternary uranyl-hydroxo-acetate are discussed, as models of uranyl humate complexation at ambient condition.

  9. Genome Analysis of Structure-Function Relationships in Respiratory Complex I, an Ancient Bioenergetic Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degli Esposti, Mauro

    2015-11-27

    Respiratory complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is a ubiquitous bioenergetic enzyme formed by over 40 subunits in eukaryotes and a minimum of 11 subunits in bacteria. Recently, crystal structures have greatly advanced our knowledge of complex I but have not clarified the details of its reaction with ubiquinone (Q). This reaction is essential for bioenergy production and takes place in a large cavity embedded within a conserved module that is homologous to the catalytic core of Ni-Fe hydrogenases. However, how a hydrogenase core has evolved into the protonmotive Q reductase module of complex I has remained unclear. This work has exploited the abundant genomic information that is currently available to deduce structure-function relationships in complex I that indicate the evolutionary steps of Q reactivity and its adaptation to natural Q substrates. The results provide answers to fundamental questions regarding various aspects of complex I reaction with Q and help re-defining the old concept that this reaction may involve two Q or inhibitor sites. The re-definition leads to a simplified classification of the plethora of complex I inhibitors while throwing a new light on the evolution of the enzyme function. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  10. Electronic and optical response of functionalized Ru(II) complexes: joint theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilina, Svetlana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tretiak, Sergei [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albert, Victor [UNIV OF FLORIDA; Badaeva, Ekaterina [UNIV OF WASHINGTON; Koposov, Alexey [UNIV OF WASHINGTON

    2008-01-01

    New photovoltaic and photocatalysis applications have been recently proposed based on the hybrid Ru(II)-bipyridine-complex/semiconductor quantum dot systems. In order to attach the Ru(II) complex to the surface of a semiconductor, a linking bridge -- a carboxyl group -- needs to be added to one or two of the 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands. Such changes in the ligand structure affect electronic and optical properties and, consequently, the charge transfer reactivity of Ru(II)-systems. In this study, we analyze the effects brought by functionalization of bipyridine ligands with the methyl, carboxyl, and carboxilate groups on the electronic structure and optical response of the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} complex. First principle calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) and time dependent DFT (TDDFT) are used to simulate the ground and excited-state properties, respectively, of functionalized Ru-complexes in the gas phase and acetonitrile solution. In addition, an effective Frenkel exciton model is used to explain the optical activity and splitting patterns of the low-energy excited states in all molecules. All theoretical results nicely complement and allow for detailed interpretation of experimental absorption spectra of Ru-complexes that have been done in parallel with our theoretical investigations. We found that the carboxyl group breaks the degeneracy of two low-energy optically bright excited states and red-shifts the absorption spectrum, while leaves ionization and affinity energies of complexes almost unchanged. Experimental studies show that deprotonation of the carboxyl group in the Ru-complexes results in a slight blue shift and decrease of oscillator strengths of the low energy absorption peaks. Comparison of experimental and theoretical linear response spectra of deprotonated complexes demonstrate strong agreement if the theoretical calculations are performed with the addition of a dielectric continuum model. A polar solvent is found to

  11. The accuracy of geometries for iron porphyrin complexes from density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydberg, Patrik Åke Anders; Olsen, Lars

    2009-01-01

    Iron porphyrin complexes are cofactors in many important proteins such as cytochromes P450, hemoglobin, heme peroxidases, etc. Many computational studies on these systems have been done over the past decade. In this study, the performance of some of the most commonly used density functional theor...

  12. How executive functions predict development in syntactic complexity of narrative writing in the upper elementary grades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijbooms, E.; Groen, M.A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the contribution of transcription skills, oral language skills, and executive functions to growth in narrative writing between fourth and sixth grade. While text length and story content of narratives did not increase with age, syntactic complexity of narratives

  13. Occupancy and Functional Architecture of the Pigment Binding Sites of Photosystem II Antenna Complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Mozzo, Milena; Croce, Roberta; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  14. Pigment binding sites occupancy and functional architecture of the Photosystem II antenna complex Lhcb5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballottari, M.; Mozzo, M.; Croce, R.; Morosinotto, T.; Bassi, R.

    2009-01-01

    Lhcb5 is an antenna protein that is highly conserved in plants and green algae. It is part of the inner layer of photosystem II antenna system retained in high light acclimated plants. To study the structure-function relation and the role of individual pigments in this complex, we (i) "knocked out"

  15. AIZ, BIZ: two Fortran 77 routines for the computation of complex Airy functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gil (Amparo); J. Segura (Javier); N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTwo Fortran 77 routines for the evaluation of Airy functions of complex arguments $Ai(z)$, $Bi(z)$ and their first derivatives are presented. The routines are based on the use of Gaussian quadrature, Maclaurin series and asymptotic expansions. Comparison with a previous code by D.E. Amos

  16. GIZ, HIZ: two Fortran 77 routines for the computation of complex Scorer functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gil (Amparo); J. Segura (Javier); N.M. Temme (Nico)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractTwo Fortran 77 routines for the evaluation of Scorer functions of complex arguments $Gi(z)$, $Hi(z)$ and their derivatives are presented. The routines are based on the use of quadrature, Maclaurin series and asymptotic expansions. For real $z$ comparison with a previous code by A.J.

  17. OC21 - Psychosocial functioning of parents of infants diagnosed with complex congenital heart defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsios, Konstantinos; Matziou, Vassiliki; Voutoufianaki, Ioanna; Manatou, Anna; Azariadis, Prodromos; Rammos, Spiros

    2016-05-09

    Theme: Parenting/parenthood. The diagnosis of complex CHD impacts the psychosocial status of parents and their functioning. A critical evaluation of the literature concerning the psychosocial parental response to their infant's diagnosis of complex CHD. Systematic review of 18 articles published after 2000 in PubMed and CINAHL. The impact of an infant's CHD on the family functioning is determined both by child's medical condition and family's psychosocial factors. The majority of parents experience intense loss and numerous stressors. Nurses and physicians need to be sensitive to the needs, thoughts and experiences of the parents when discussing treatment options. Families with poor social support networks may have the greatest need for professional interventions. Appropriate interventions assist the majority of parents to adapt to the diagnosis of complex CHD. However, there are a number of parents with an increased psychosocial risk associated with higher rates of emotional distress.

  18. Prairie wetland complexes as landscape functional units in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W. Carter; Werner, Brett; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Voldseth, Richard A.; Millett, Bruce; Naugle, David E.; Tulbure, Mirela; Carroll, Rosemary W.H.; Tracy, John; Olawsky, Craig

    2010-01-01

    The wetland complex is the functional ecological unit of the prairie pothole region (PPR) of central North America. Diverse complexes of wetlands contribute high spatial and temporal environmental heterogeneity, productivity, and biodiversity to these glaciated prairie landscapes. Climatewarming simulations using the new model WETLANDSCAPE (WLS) project major reductions in water volume, shortening of hydroperiods, and less-dynamic vegetation for prairie wetland complexes. The WLS model portrays the future PPR as a much less resilient ecosystem: The western PPR will be too dry and the eastern PPR will have too few functional wetlands and nesting habitat to support historic levels of waterfowl and other wetland-dependent species. Maintaining ecosystem goods and services at current levels in a warmer climate will be a major challenge for the conservation community.

  19. The Sarcoglycan complex is expressed in the cerebrovascular system and is specifically regulated by astroglial Cx30 channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Cécile eBoulay

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes, the most prominent glial cell type in the brain, send specialized processes called endfeet, around blood vessels and express a large molecular repertoire regulating the cerebrovascular system physiology. One of the most striking properties of astrocyte endfeet is their enrichment in gap junction protein Connexin 43 and 30 (Cx43 and Cx30 allowing in particular for direct intercellular trafficking of ions and small signaling molecules through perivascular astroglial networks. In this study, we addressed the specific role of Cx30 at the gliovascular interface. Using an inactivation mouse model for Cx30 (Cx30Δ/Δ, we showed that absence of Cx30 does not affect blood-brain barrier (BBB organization and permeability. However, it results in the cerebrovascular fraction, in a strong upregulation of Sgcg encoding γ-Sarcoglycan (SG, a member of the Dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC connecting cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. The same molecular event occurs in Cx30T5M/T5M mutated mice, where Cx30 channels are closed, demonstrating that Sgcg regulation relied on Cx30 channel functions. We further characterized the expression of other Sarcoglycan complex (SGC molecules in the cerebrovascular system and showed the presence of α-, β-, δ-, γ-, ε- and ζ- SG, as well as Sarcospan. Their expression was however not modified in Cx30Δ/Δ. These results suggest that a full SGC might be present in the cerebrovascular system, and that expression of one of its member, γ-Sarcoglycan, depends on Cx30 channels. As described in skeletal muscles, the SGC may contribute to membrane stabilization and signal transduction in the cerebrovascular system, which may therefore be regulated by Cx30 channel-mediated functions.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of functional copolymer/organo-silicate nanoarchitectures through interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The functional copolymers, having a combination of rigid/flexible linkages and an ability of complex-formation with interlayered surface of organo-silicate, and their nanocomposites have been synthesized by interlamellar complex-radical (coterpolymerization of intercalated monomer complexes of maleic anhydride (MA and itaconic acid (IA with dimethyl dodecylamine surface modified montmorillonite (organo-MMT (MA…DMDA-MMT and IA…DMDA-MMT n-butyl methacrylate (BMA and/or BMA/styrene monomer mixtures. The results of nanocomposite structure–composition– property relationship studies indicate that interlamellar complex-formation between anhydride/acid units and surface alkyl amine and rigid/flexible linkage balance in polymer chains are important factors providing the effective intercalation/ exfoliation of the polymer chains into the silicate galleries, the formation of nanostructural hybrids with higher thermal stability, dynamic mechanical behaviour and well dispersed morphology.

  1. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional calculations on titanium-dinitrogen complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Hae-Wook; Choi, Changhyeok; Cho, Soo Gyeong; Jung, Yousung; Choi, Myong Yong

    2018-04-01

    Titanium-nitrogen complexes were generated by laser ablated titanium (Ti) atoms and N2 gas molecules in this study. These complexes were isolated on the pre-deposited solid Ar matrix on the pre-cooled KBr window (T ∼ 5.4 K), allowing infrared spectra to be measured. Laser ablation experiments with 15N2 isotope provided distinct isotopic shifts in the infrared spectra that strongly implicated the formation of titanium-nitrogen complexes, Ti(NN)x. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to investigate the molecular structures, electronic ground state, relative energies, and IR frequencies of the anticipated Ti(NN)x complexes. Based on laser ablation experiments and DFT calculations, we were able to assign multiple Ti(NN)x (x = 1-6) species. Particularly, Ti(NN)5 and Ti(NN)6, which have high nitrogen content, may serve as good precursors in preparing polynitrogens.

  2. Generating functional analysis of complex formation and dissociation in large protein interaction networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coolen, A C C; Rabello, S

    2009-01-01

    We analyze large systems of interacting proteins, using techniques from the non-equilibrium statistical mechanics of disordered many-particle systems. Apart from protein production and removal, the most relevant microscopic processes in the proteome are complex formation and dissociation, and the microscopic degrees of freedom are the evolving concentrations of unbound proteins (in multiple post-translational states) and of protein complexes. Here we only include dimer-complexes, for mathematical simplicity, and we draw the network that describes which proteins are reaction partners from an ensemble of random graphs with an arbitrary degree distribution. We show how generating functional analysis methods can be used successfully to derive closed equations for dynamical order parameters, representing an exact macroscopic description of the complex formation and dissociation dynamics in the infinite system limit. We end this paper with a discussion of the possible routes towards solving the nontrivial order parameter equations, either exactly (in specific limits) or approximately.

  3. Functional cooperation between FACT and MCM is coordinated with cell cycle and differential complex formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chih-Li

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Functional cooperation between FACT and the MCM helicase complex constitutes an integral step during DNA replication initiation. However, mode of regulation that underlies the proper functional interaction of FACT and MCM is poorly understood. Methods & Results Here we present evidence indicating that such interaction is coordinated with cell cycle progression and differential complex formation. We first demonstrate the existence of two distinct FACT-MCM subassemblies, FACT-MCM2/4/6/7 and FACT-MCM2/3/4/5. Both complexes possess DNA unwinding activity and are subject to cell cycle-dependent enzymatic regulation. Interestingly, analysis of functional attributes further suggests that they act at distinct, and possibly sequential, steps during origin establishment and replication initiation. Moreover, we show that the phosphorylation profile of the FACT-associated MCM4 undergoes a cell cycle-dependent change, which is directly correlated with the catalytic activity of the FACT-MCM helicase complexes. Finally, at the quaternary structure level, physical interaction between FACT and MCM complexes is generally dependent on persistent cell cycle and further stabilized upon S phase entry. Cessation of mitotic cycle destabilizes the complex formation and likely leads to compromised coordination and activities. Conclusions Together, our results correlate FACT-MCM functionally and temporally with S phase and DNA replication. They further demonstrate that enzymatic activities intrinsically important for DNA replication are tightly controlled at various levels, thereby ensuring proper progression of, as well as exit from, the cell cycle and ultimately euploid gene balance.

  4. Defining ATM-Independent Functions of the Mre11 Complex with a Novel Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Alessia; Nicolas, Laura; Yang-Lott, Katherine; Guryanova, Olga A; Levine, Ross L; Bassing, Craig H; Chaudhuri, Jayanta; Petrini, John H J

    2016-02-01

    The Mre11 complex (Mre11, Rad50, and Nbs1) occupies a central node of the DNA damage response (DDR) network and is required for ATM activation in response to DNA damage. Hypomorphic alleles of MRE11 and NBS1 confer embryonic lethality in ATM-deficient mice, indicating that the complex exerts ATM-independent functions that are essential when ATM is absent. To delineate those functions, a conditional ATM allele (ATM(flox)) was crossed to hypomorphic NBS1 mutants (Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) mice). Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) Atm(-/-) hematopoietic cells derived by crossing to vav(cre) were viable in vivo. Nbs1(ΔB/ΔB) Atm(-/-) (VAV) mice exhibited a pronounced defect in double-strand break repair and completely penetrant early onset lymphomagenesis. In addition to repair defects observed, fragile site instability was noted, indicating that the Mre11 complex promotes genome stability upon replication stress in vivo. The data suggest combined influences of the Mre11 complex on DNA repair, as well as the responses to DNA damage and DNA replication stress. A novel mouse model was developed, by combining a vav(cre)-inducible ATM knockout mouse with an NBS1 hypomorphic mutation, to analyze ATM-independent functions of the Mre11 complex in vivo. These data show that the DNA repair, rather than DDR signaling functions of the complex, is acutely required in the context of ATM deficiency to suppress genome instability and lymphomagenesis. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  5. Density functional study of Cu(2+)-phenylalanine complex under micro-solvation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Dreyer, Jens; Wang, Feng; Akola, Jaakko; Larrucea, Julen

    2013-09-01

    We present an atomistic study carried out using density functional calculations including structural relaxations and Car-Parrinello Molecular Dynamics (CPMD) simulations, aiming to investigate the structures of phenylalanine-copper (II) ([Phe-Cu](2+)) complexes and their micro-solvation processes. The structures of the [Phe-Cu](2+) complex with up to four water molecules are optimized using the B3LYP/6-311++G** model in gas phase to identify the lowest energy structures at each degree of solvation (n=0-4). It is found that the phenylalanine appears to be in the neutral form in isolated and mono-hydrated complexes, but in the zwitterionic form in other hydrated complexes (with n≥2). The most stable structures of the complexes suggest that the Cu(2+)-π interactions are not dominant in the [Phe-Cu](2+) complexes. The present CPMD simulations of the lowest energy micro-hydrated [Phe-Cu](2+) complexes also reveal that the maximum coordination of Cu(2+) in the presence of the Phe ligand does not exceed four: the oxygen atoms from three water molecules and one carboxyl oxygen atom of Phe. Any excess water molecules will migrate to the second solvation shell. Moreover a unique structural motif, (N)H···O(3)···H2O-Cu(2+) is present in the lowest energy complexes, which is recognized to be significant in stabilizing the structures of the complexes. Extensively rich information of the structures, energetics, hydrogen bonds and dynamics of the lowest energy complexes are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Density functional study of isoguanine tetrad and pentad sandwich complexes with alkali metal ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Michael; Steinke, Thomas; Sühnel, Jürgen

    2007-02-01

    Isoguanine tetraplexes and pentaplexes contain two or more stacked polyads with intercalating metal ions. We report here the results of a density functional study of sandwiched isoguanine tetrad and pentad complexes consisting of two polyads with Na(+), K(+) and Rb(+) ions at the B3LYP level. In comparison to single polyad metal ion complexes, there is a trend towards increased non-planarity of the polyads in the sandwich complexes. In general, the pentad sandwiches have relatively planar polyad structures, whereas the tetrad complexes contain highly non-planar polyad building blocks. As in other sandwich complexes and in metal ion complexes with single polyads, the metal ion-base interaction energy plays an essential role. In iG sandwich structures, this interaction energy is slightly larger than in the corresponding guanine sandwich complexes. Because the base-base interaction energy is even more increased in passing from guanine to isoguanine, the isoguanine sandwiches are thus far the only examples where the base-base interaction energy is larger than the base-metal ion interaction energy. Stacking interactions have been studied in smaller models consisting of two bases, retaining the geometry from the complete complex structures. From the data obtained at the B3LYP and BH&H levels and with Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, one can conclude that the B3LYP method overestimates the repulsion in stacked base dimers. For the complexes studied in this work, this is only of minor importance because the direct inter-tetrad or inter-pentad interaction is supplemented by a strong metal ion-base interaction. Using a microsolvation model, the metal ion preference K(+) approximately Rb(+) > Na(+) is found for tetrad complexes. On the other hand, for pentads the ordering is Rb(+) > K(+) > Na(+). In the latter case experimental data are available that agree with this prediction.

  7. Comparative organization of the claustrum: what does structure tell us about function?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan S Baizer

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The claustrum is a subcortical nucleus present in all placental mammals. Many anatomical studies have shown that its inputs are predominantly from the cerebral cortex and its outputs are back to the cortex. This connectivity thus suggests that the claustrum serves to amplify or facilitate information processing in the cerebral cortex. The size and the complexity of the cerebral cortex change dramatically over evolution. Rodents are lissencephalic, with few cortical areas, while many primates have a greatly expanded cortex and many cortical areas. This evolutionary diversity in the cerebral cortex raises several questions about the claustrum. Does its volume expand in coordination with the expansion of cortex and does it acquire new functions related to the new cortical functions? We have examined the organization of the claustrum in animals with large brains, including great apes and cetaceans. Our data suggest that the claustrum is not always a continuous structure. In monkeys and gorillas there are a few isolated islands of cells near the main body of the nucleus. In cetaceans, however, there are many isolated cell islands. These data suggest constraints on the possible function of the claustrum. Some authors propose that the claustrum has a more global role in perception or consciousness that requires intraclaustral integration of information. These theories postulate mechanisms like gap junctions between claustral cells or a syncytium to mediate intraclaustral processing. The presence of discontinuities in the structure of the claustrum, present but minimal in primates, but dramatically clear in cetaceans, argues against the proposed mechanisms of intraclaustral processing of information. The best interpretation of function, then, is that each functional subdivision of the claustrum simply contributes to the function of its cortical partner.

  8. CO assisted N2 functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex: a DFT mechanistic exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xuelu; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Wenchao; Lei, Ming

    2013-01-21

    In this paper, the reaction mechanisms of CO assisted N(2) cleavage and functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex are studied using a density function theory (DFT) method. Several key intermediates (Ia, Ib, Ic and Id) with axial/equatorial N=C=O coordination structures are found to be of importance along reaction pathways of CO assisted N(2) functionalization, which could provide a profound theoretical insight into the C-N bond formation and N-N bond cleavage. There are two different attack directions to insert the first CO molecule into the Hf-N bonds of the dinuclear hafnium complex, which lead to C-N bond formation. The calculated results imply that CO insertion into the Hf(1)-N(3) bond (Path A1) reacts more easily than that into the Hf(2)-N(3) bond (Path A3). But for the insertion of the second CO insertion to give 2A, there are two possibilities (Path A1 and Path A2) according to this insertion being after/before N-N bond cleavage. Two pathways (Path A1 and Path A2) are proved to be possible to form final dinitrogen functionalized products (oxamidide 2A, 2B and 2C) in this study, which explain the formation of different oxamidide isomers in CO assisted N(2) functionalization activated by a dinuclear hafnium complex.

  9. Amino acid residues contributing to function of the heteromeric insect olfactory receptor complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuro Nakagawa

    Full Text Available Olfactory receptors (Ors convert chemical signals--the binding of odors and pheromones--to electrical signals through the depolarization of olfactory sensory neurons. Vertebrates Ors are G-protein-coupled receptors, stimulated by odors to produce intracellular second messengers that gate ion channels. Insect Ors are a heteromultimeric complex of unknown stoichiometry of two seven transmembrane domain proteins with no sequence similarity to and the opposite membrane topology of G-protein-coupled receptors. The functional insect Or comprises an odor- or pheromone-specific Or subunit and the Orco co-receptor, which is highly conserved in all insect species. The insect Or-Orco complex has been proposed to function as a novel type of ligand-gated nonselective cation channel possibly modulated by G-proteins. However, the Or-Orco proteins lack homology to any known family of ion channel and lack known functional domains. Therefore, the mechanisms by which odors activate the Or-Orco complex and how ions permeate this complex remain unknown. To begin to address the relationship between Or-Orco structure and function, we performed site-directed mutagenesis of all 83 conserved Glu, Asp, or Tyr residues in the silkmoth BmOr-1-Orco pheromone receptor complex and measured functional properties of mutant channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 13 of 83 mutations in BmOr-1 and BmOrco altered the reversal potential and rectification index of the BmOr-1-Orco complex. Three of the 13 amino acids (D299 and E356 in BmOr-1 and Y464 in BmOrco altered both current-voltage relationships and K(+ selectivity. We introduced the homologous Orco Y464 residue into Drosophila Orco in vivo, and observed variable effects on spontaneous and evoked action potentials in olfactory neurons that depended on the particular Or-Orco complex examined. Our results provide evidence that a subset of conserved Glu, Asp and Tyr residues in both subunits are essential for channel activity of the

  10. Functional role of a high mol mass protein complex in the sea urchin yolk granule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Aruni; Davis, Philip; Robinson, John J

    2004-04-01

    We have investigated the biochemical and functional characteristics of the major protein constituents of the yolk granule organelle present in sea urchin eggs and embryos. Compositional analysis, using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, revealed distinctly different polypeptide patterns under reducing and non-reducing conditions. In the presence of reducing agent, a 240 kDa species dissociated into polypeptides of apparent mol mass 160, 120 and 90 k. The relatedness of these polypeptides to the 240 kDa species was demonstrated in protein gel blot and peptide mapping analyses. The profile of yolk granule polypeptides was dynamic during embryonic development with the disappearance of the 160 kDa species and the coincidental appearance of lower mol mass polypeptides. However, the 240 kDa complex was detected even after the disappearance of the 160 kDa polypeptide. The 240 kDa complex was released from yolk granules in the absence of calcium and the purified species was shown to bind liposomes in a calcium-dependent manner. In addition, the 240 kDa complex possessed a calcium-dependent, liposome aggregating activity. The 240 kDa species could also induce the aggregation of yolk granules, previously denuded of the complex following treatment with either ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid or trypsin. Collectively, these results demonstrate the dynamic characteristics of the yolk granule 240 kDa protein complex and offer insights into a possible functional role.

  11. A new oxovanadium complex enhances renal function by improving insulin signaling pathway in diabetic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Chen, D D; Xing, Y H; Ge, N; Zhang, Y; Liu, J; Zou, W

    2014-01-01

    Since vanadium complexes have insulin-mimetic effects and can be used to treat complications of diabetes, we aimed to screen a new oxovanadium complex with a low toxicity, and investigate its insulin-mimetic effects, as well as the mechanism of improvement to diabetic mouse renal function. Cells were treated with oxovanadium complexes, and viability was assessed by MTT assay. Diabetic mouse model was established using alloxan. Blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and serum creatinine (SCr) in the mice were measured using an automatic biochemical analyzer, and blood glucose was measured using a Glucoval Compact meter. Expression of proteins related to the insulin signaling pathway in the renal cortex of mice was measured by Western blot analysis. Diabetic mice developed high blood glucose, BUN and SCr levels compared with control mice. The new oxovanadium complex with 3,5-dimethyl-pyrazolyl ligand, VO(HB(3,5-Me2pz)3)(3,5-Me2pz)(SCN)(SCNH)2, showed low toxicity and significantly reduced blood glucose, BUN and SCr levels in the diabetic mice. Additionally, p42/p44MAPK and Akt phosphorylation was markedly increased in diabetic mice and was decreased by treatment with the new oxovanadium complex. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) expression was greatly decreased in diabetic mice and significantly increased after treatment with the new oxovanadium complex. The new oxovanadium complex, with 3,5-dimethyl-pyrazolyl ligand, improves kidney function in diabetic mice, and its mechanism may involve regulation of the insulin signaling pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. High-Frequency Promoter Firing Links THO Complex Function to Heavy Chromatin Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouaikel, John; Causse, Sébastien Z; Rougemaille, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    The THO complex is involved in transcription, genome stability, and messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) formation, but its precise molecular function remains enigmatic. Under heat shock conditions, THO mutants accumulate large protein-DNA complexes that alter the chromatin density of target genes......-molecule fluorescence insitu hybridization measurements show that heavy chromatin formation correlates with an unusually high firing pace of the promoter with more than 20 transcription events per minute. Heavy chromatin formation closely follows the modulation of promoter firing and strongly correlates with polymerase...

  13. Function theory on planar domains a second course in complex analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, Stephen D

    2007-01-01

    A high-level treatment of complex analysis, this text focuses on function theory on a finitely connected planar domain. Clear and complete, it emphasizes domains bounded by a finite number of disjoint analytic simple closed curves.The first chapter and parts of Chapters 2 and 3 offer background material, all of it classical and important in its own right. The remainder of the text presents results in complex analysis from the far, middle, and recent past, all selected for their interest and merit as substantive mathematics. Suitable for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this te

  14. Methods for the analysis of complex fluorescence decays: sum of Becquerel functions versus sum of exponentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Filipe; Fedorov, Alexander; Baleizão, Carlos; Berberan-Santos, Mário N; Valeur, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Ensemble fluorescence decays are usually analyzed with a sum of exponentials. However, broad continuous distributions of lifetimes, either unimodal or multimodal, occur in many situations. A simple and flexible fitting function for these cases that encompasses the exponential is the Becquerel function. In this work, the applicability of the Becquerel function for the analysis of complex decays of several kinds is tested. For this purpose, decays of mixtures of four different fluorescence standards (binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures) are measured and analyzed. For binary and ternary mixtures, the expected sum of narrow distributions is well recovered from the Becquerel functions analysis, if the correct number of components is used. For ternary mixtures, however, satisfactory fits are also obtained with a number of Becquerel functions smaller than the true number of fluorophores in the mixture, at the expense of broadening the lifetime distributions of the fictitious components. The quaternary mixture studied is well fitted with both a sum of three exponentials and a sum of two Becquerel functions, showing the inevitable loss of information when the number of components is large. Decays of a fluorophore in a heterogeneous environment, known to be represented by unimodal and broad continuous distributions (as previously obtained by the maximum entropy method), are also measured and analyzed. It is concluded that these distributions can be recovered by the Becquerel function method with an accuracy similar to that of the much more complex maximum entropy method. It is also shown that the polar (or phasor) plot is not always helpful for ascertaining the degree (and kind) of complexity of a fluorescence decay. (paper)

  15. Near-atomic structural model for bacterial DNA replication initiation complex and its functional insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Masahiro; Noguchi, Yasunori; Sakiyama, Yukari; Kawakami, Hironori; Katayama, Tsutomu; Takada, Shoji

    2016-12-13

    Upon DNA replication initiation in Escherichia coli, the initiator protein DnaA forms higher-order complexes with the chromosomal origin oriC and a DNA-bending protein IHF. Although tertiary structures of DnaA and IHF have previously been elucidated, dynamic structures of oriC-DnaA-IHF complexes remain unknown. Here, combining computer simulations with biochemical assays, we obtained models at almost-atomic resolution for the central part of the oriC-DnaA-IHF complex. This complex can be divided into three subcomplexes; the left and right subcomplexes include pentameric DnaA bound in a head-to-tail manner and the middle subcomplex contains only a single DnaA. In the left and right subcomplexes, DnaA ATPases associated with various cellular activities (AAA+) domain III formed helices with specific structural differences in interdomain orientations, provoking a bend in the bound DNA. In the left subcomplex a continuous DnaA chain exists, including insertion of IHF into the DNA looping, consistent with the DNA unwinding function of the complex. The intervening spaces in those subcomplexes are crucial for DNA unwinding and loading of DnaB helicases. Taken together, this model provides a reasonable near-atomic level structural solution of the initiation complex, including the dynamic conformations and spatial arrangements of DnaA subcomplexes.

  16. A functional approach to the structural complexity of coral assemblages based on colony morphological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Vianney; Ribas-Deulofeu, Lauriane; Sturaro, Nicolas; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2017-08-29

    Colony morphological features is among the best predictor of the scleractinian coral's function in reef ecosystems. However, morphological traits are categorical and to convert this information into a quantitative value as well as estimate their influence on ecosystem process remain a challenge. Here, we propose a trait-based approach to quantify morphological diversity and assess the structural complexity of the habitat provided by corals. We used a previously published dataset that is related to a bleaching event that affected the coral reef off Tikus Island in Indonesia in 1983. We found clear signs of recovery of the coral assemblage's complexity toward pre El Niño conditions five years after the event. Independent of the change observed in species richness, this return in structural complexity was accompanied by a global decrease in species number associated with each particular morphological entity (Functional Redundancy) and an increase in the number of single-species entities (Functional Vulnerability). Together with species loss, we show an overall functional erosion of the coral assemblage and suggest that the role of the coral reef habitat could be strongly imperiled under repeated or synergistic disturbances. This approach offers an opportunity for a better understanding of coral responses to natural and anthropogenic disturbances.

  17. Morpho-functional architecture of the Golgi complex of neuroendocrine cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma eMartínez-Alonso

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In neuroendocrine cells, prohormones move from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, where they are sorted and packed into secretory granules. The Golgi complex is considered the central station of the secretory pathway of proteins and lipids en route to their final destination. In most mammalian cells, it is formed by several stacks of cisternae connected by tubules, forming a continuous ribbon. This organelle shows an extraordinary structural and functional complexity, which is exacerbated by the fact that its architecture is cell type-specific and also tuned by the functional status of the cell. It is, indeed, one the most beautiful cellular organelles and, for that reason, perhaps the most extensively photographed by electron microscopists. In recent decades, an exhaustive dissection of the molecular machinery involved in membrane traffic and other Golgi functions has been carried out. Concomitantly, detailed morphological studies have been performed, including 3D analysis by electron tomography, and the precise location of key proteins has been identified by immunoelectron microscopy. Despite all this effort, some basic aspects of Golgi functioning remain unsolved. For instance, the mode of intra-Golgi transport is not known, and two opposing theories (vesicular transport and cisternal maturation models have polarized the field for many years. Neither of these theories explains all the experimental data so that new theories and combinations thereof have recently been proposed. Moreover, the specific role of the small vesicles and tubules which surround the stacks needs to be clarified. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the Golgi architecture in relation with its function and the mechanisms of intra-Golgi transport. Within the same framework, the characteristics of the Golgi complex of neuroendocrine cells are analyzed.

  18. Structural and functional similarity between the Vgll1-TEAD and the YAP-TEAD complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pobbati, Ajaybabu V; Chan, Siew Wee; Lee, Ian; Song, Haiwei; Hong, Wanjin

    2012-07-03

    The structure of the complex between the transcription cofactor Vgll1 and the transcription factor TEAD4, the mammalian equivalent of the Drosophila Vestigial and Scalloped, respectively, is determined in this study. Remarkably, Vgll1 interacts with TEAD in a manner similar to the transcription coactivators, as well as oncogenes YAP and TAZ, despite having a varied primary sequence. Vgll1-TEAD complex upregulates the expression of IGFBP-5, a proliferation-promoting gene, and facilitates anchorage-independent cell proliferation. The YAP/TAZ-TEAD complex also upregulates several other proliferation-promoting genes and also promotes anchorage-independent cell proliferation. Given its structural and functional similarity to YAP/TAZ, Vgll1 has the potential to promote cancer progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donges, Jonathan; Heitzig, Jobst; Beronov, Boyan; Wiedermann, Marc; Runge, Jakob; Feng, Qing Yi; Tupikina, Liubov; Stolbova, Veronika; Donner, Reik; Marwan, Norbert; Dijkstra, Henk; Kurths, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the pyunicorn (Pythonic unified complex network and recurrence analysis toolbox) open source software package for applying and combining modern methods of data analysis and modeling from complex network theory and nonlinear time series analysis. pyunicorn is a fully object-oriented and easily parallelizable package written in the language Python. It allows for the construction of functional networks such as climate networks in climatology or functional brain networks in neuroscience representing the structure of statistical interrelationships in large data sets of time series and, subsequently, investigating this structure using advanced methods of complex network theory such as measures and models for spatial networks, networks of interacting networks, node-weighted statistics, or network surrogates. Additionally, pyunicorn provides insights into the nonlinear dynamics of complex systems as recorded in uni- and multivariate time series from a non-traditional perspective by means of recurrence quantification analysis, recurrence networks, visibility graphs, and construction of surrogate time series. The range of possible applications of the library is outlined, drawing on several examples mainly from the field of climatology. pyunicorn is available online at https://github.com/pik-copan/pyunicorn. Reference: J.F. Donges, J. Heitzig, B. Beronov, M. Wiedermann, J. Runge, Q.-Y. Feng, L. Tupikina, V. Stolbova, R.V. Donner, N. Marwan, H.A. Dijkstra, and J. Kurths, Unified functional network and nonlinear time series analysis for complex systems science: The pyunicorn package, Chaos 25, 113101 (2015), DOI: 10.1063/1.4934554, Preprint: arxiv.org:1507.01571 [physics.data-an].

  20. Functional modelling for integration of human-software-hardware in complex physical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modarres, M.

    1996-01-01

    A framework describing the properties of complex physical systems composed of human-software-hardware interactions in terms of their functions is described. It is argued that such a framework is domain-general, so that functional primitives present a language that is more general than most other modeling methods such as mathematical simulation. The characteristics and types of functional models are described. Examples of uses of the framework in modeling physical systems composed of human-software-hardware (hereby we refer to them as only physical systems) are presented. It is concluded that a function-centered model of a physical system provides a capability for generating a high-level simulation of the system for intelligent diagnostic, control or other similar applications

  1. Radionuclide diagnosis of hepatobiliary system functional state at complex treatment of uterine cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vusik, Yi.M.; Slabodchikov, M.Je.; Nesterov, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    The study involved 68 patients with uterine cancer (stage II-III) who underwent complex treatment and 16 healthy women aged 27-69. The patients were performed hepatography (44 of them - dynamic liver scintigraphy with Tc 99m - mezida) before the treatment, immediately after and 1-1.5 and 2-3 years after the course of radiotherapy. Latent disturbance of hepatobiliary system function which can be revealed with radionuclide study is shown to be observed in the patients with uterine cancer before the treatment. The level of hepatocytes functioning after the treatment depends largely on their initial functional state. Computer assisted multichannel radiography with evaluation of effective blood flow in the liver and effective fraction of minute volume of the blood flow is the most reasonable for monitoring hepatocytes function during treatment in the patients with uterine cancer

  2. Proteomics approaches for the analysis of enriched microbial subpopulations and visualization of complex functional information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jörg; Michalik, Stephan; Wollscheid, Bernd; Völker, Uwe; Schmidt, Frank

    2013-02-01

    Advances in the separation of microbial subpopulations and in proteomics technologies have paved the way for the global molecular characterization of microbial cells that share common functional characteristics. Quantitative characterization of the dynamics of microbial proteomes enables an unprecedented view of the adaptive responses of microbes to environmental stimuli or during interaction with other species or host cells. However, the intrinsic complexity of such data requires sophisticated visualization methods for the display, mining, interpretation and efficient exploitation of these data resources. In this review, we discuss how new approaches in data visualization such as streamgraphs, network graphs or Voronoi treemaps are being used in the field to provide new insights into the functional complexity of microbial cells, populations and multispecies consortia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Loudness of complex sounds as a function of the standard stimulus and the number of components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Florentine, Mary; Buus, Søren; Bonding, Per

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold: to determine if the measured loudness level of a signal depends on the standard stimulus used and to measure loudness as a function of the number of components in a wide-band signal. The stimuli were a pure tone, tone complexes with frequency separations...... and the measured loudness level of a wide-band sound increased as a function of the number of components. Individual observers were consistent in their loudness estimations; the greatest source of variability was among subjects. Additional measurements indicated that the rate at which loudness increased beyond...... the critical band appeared to be greater for noise bands than for two-tone complexes....

  4. Imparting the unique properties of DNA into complex material architectures and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Phyllis F.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Domaille, Dylan W.; Nakatsuka, Matthew A.; Goodwin, Andrew P.; Cha, Jennifer N.

    2014-01-01

    While the remarkable chemical and biological properties of DNA have been known for decades, these properties have only been imparted into materials with unprecedented function much more recently. The inimitable ability of DNA to form programmable, complex assemblies through stable, specific, and reversible molecular recognition has allowed the creation of new materials through DNA’s ability to control a material’s architecture and properties. In this review we discuss recent progress in how DNA has brought unmatched function to materials, focusing specifically on new advances in delivery agents, devices, and sensors. PMID:25525408

  5. The relation between geometry and function of the ankle joint complex: a biomechanical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleipool, Roeland P; Blankevoort, Leendert

    2010-05-01

    This review deals with the relation between the anatomy and function of the ankle joint complex. The questions addressed are how high do the forces in the ankle joint get, where can the joints go (range of motion) and where do they go during walking and running. Finally the role of the ligaments and the articular surfaces is discussed, i.e. how does it happen. The magnitude of the loads on the ankle joint complex are primarily determined by muscle activity and can be as high as four times the body weight during walking. For the maximal range of motion, plantar and dorsiflexion occurs in the talocrural joint and marginally at the subtalar joint. In-eversion takes place at both levels. The functional range of motion is well within the limits of the maximal range of motion. The ligaments do not contribute to the forces for the functional range of motion but determine the maximal range of motion together with the articular surfaces. The geometry of the articular surfaces primarily determines the kinematics. Clinical studies must include these anatomical aspects to better understand the mechanism of injury, recovery, and interventions. Models can elucidate the mechanism by which the anatomy relates to the function. The relation between the anatomy and mechanical properties of the joint structures and joint function should be considered for diagnosis and treatment of ankle joint pathology.

  6. Study of chemical bonding in the interhalogen complexes based on density functional theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poleshchuk, O. Kh., E-mail: poleshch@tspu.edu.ru [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University (Russian Federation); Fateev, A. V.; Yarkova, A. G. [Tomsk State Pedagogical University (Russian Federation); Ermakhanov, M. N.; Saidakhmetov, P. A. [M. Auezov South Kazakhstan State University (Kazakhstan)

    2016-12-15

    The density functional theory analysis was used for a number XYL complexes (XY is a dihalogen molecule and L is a Lewis base), formed between molecules I{sub 2}, ICl, IBr and pyridine. The calculated geometrical parameters, IR spectra and nuclear quadrupole interaction constants of iodine are consistent with the data of microwave spectroscopy and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The good correlation between the experimental and calculated binding energies of the inner electrons of iodine, chlorine and nitrogen atoms were found with the calculation using both Gaussian and Slater functions. The comparison of experimental and calculated changes in the electron density on the atoms upon complex formation suggested the choice of scheme for calculating the effective charge on the atoms, which allow us to interpret the experimental spectra. It is shown that the use of both calculated schemes allows us to predict the enthalpy of complex formation in close agreement with the experimental values. The energy analysis shows that in the complexes the electrostatic binding energy dominates that of covalent binding.

  7. Recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with ruthenium complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thangavel P

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Prakash Thangavel,1 Buddolla Viswanath,1 Sanghyo Kim1,2 1Department of Bionanotechnology, Gachon University, Bokjeong-Dong, Sujeong-Gu, Seongnam-Si, Gyeonggi-Do, 2Graduate Gachon Medical Research Institute, Gil Medical Center, Incheon, Republic of Korea Abstract: In recent years, the field of metal-based drugs has been dominated by other existing precious metal drugs, and many researchers have focused their attention on the synthesis of various ruthenium (Ru complexes due to their potential medical and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial properties of Ru, which make it a highly promising therapeutic agent, include its variable oxidation states, low toxicity, high selectivity for diseased cells, ligand exchange properties, and the ability to mimic iron binding to biomolecules. In addition, Ru complexes have favorable adsorption properties, along with excellent photochemical and photophysical properties, which make them promising tools for photodynamic therapy. At present, nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes have become an efficient way to administer Ru-based anticancer drugs for cancer treatment. In this review, the recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors are discussed. In addition, information on “traditional” (ie, non-nanostructured Ru-based cancer therapies is included in a precise manner. Keywords: metallodrugs, nanotechnology, cancer treatment, cell apoptosis, DNA damage, toxicity

  8. A functional TOC complex contributes to gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohm, Allison K; Barrett-Wilt, Greg A; Masson, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Although plastid sedimentation has long been recognized as important for a plant's perception of gravity, it was recently shown that plastids play an additional function in gravitropism. The Translocon at the Outer envelope membrane of Chloroplasts (TOC) complex transports nuclear-encoded proteins into plastids, and a receptor of this complex, Toc132, was previously hypothesized to contribute to gravitropism either by directly functioning as a gravity signal transducer or by indirectly mediating the plastid localization of a gravity signal transducer. Here we show that mutations in multiple genes encoding TOC complex components affect gravitropism in a genetically sensitized background and that the cytoplasmic acidic domain of Toc132 is not required for its involvement in this process. Furthermore, mutations in TOC132 enhance the gravitropic defect of a mutant whose amyloplasts lack starch. Finally, we show that the levels of several nuclear-encoded root proteins are altered in toc132 mutants. These data suggest that the TOC complex indirectly mediates gravity signal transduction in Arabidopsis and support the idea that plastids are involved in gravitropism not only through their ability to sediment but also as part of the signal transduction mechanism.

  9. Recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with ruthenium complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thangavel, Prakash; Viswanath, Buddolla; Kim, Sanghyo

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the field of metal-based drugs has been dominated by other existing precious metal drugs, and many researchers have focused their attention on the synthesis of various ruthenium (Ru) complexes due to their potential medical and pharmaceutical applications. The beneficial properties of Ru, which make it a highly promising therapeutic agent, include its variable oxidation states, low toxicity, high selectivity for diseased cells, ligand exchange properties, and the ability to mimic iron binding to biomolecules. In addition, Ru complexes have favorable adsorption properties, along with excellent photochemical and photophysical properties, which make them promising tools for photodynamic therapy. At present, nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes have become an efficient way to administer Ru-based anticancer drugs for cancer treatment. In this review, the recent developments in the nanostructured materials functionalized with Ru complexes for targeted drug delivery to tumors are discussed. In addition, information on "traditional" (ie, non-nanostructured) Ru-based cancer therapies is included in a precise manner.

  10. Regular Functions with Values in Ternary Number System on the Complex Clifford Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Eun Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We define a new modified basis i^ which is an association of two bases, e1 and e2. We give an expression of the form z=x0+ i ^z0-, where x0 is a real number and z0- is a complex number on three-dimensional real skew field. And we research the properties of regular functions with values in ternary field and reduced quaternions by Clifford analysis.

  11. Electrospinning of functional poly(methyl methacrylate) nanofibers containing cyclodextrin-menthol inclusion complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uyar, Tamer; Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000, Aarhus C (Denmark); Nur, Yusuf; Hacaloglu, Jale [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara, 06530 (Turkey)], E-mail: tamer@inano.dk, E-mail: tamer@unam.bilkent.edu.tr

    2009-03-25

    Electrospinning of nanofibers with cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (CD-ICs) is particularly attractive since distinct properties can be obtained by combining the nanofibers with specific functions of the CD-ICs. Here we report on the electrospinning of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanofibers containing cyclodextrin-menthol inclusion complexes (CD-menthol-ICs). These CD-menthol-IC functionalized nanofibers were developed with the purpose of producing functional nanofibers that contain fragrances/flavors with high temperature stability, and menthol was used as a model fragrance/flavor material. The PMMA nanofibers were electrospun with CD-menthol-ICs using three type of CD: {alpha}-CD, {beta}-CD, and {gamma}-CD. Direct pyrolysis mass spectrometry (DP-MS) studies showed that the thermal evaporation of menthol occurred over a very high and a broad temperature range (100-355 deg. C) for PMMA/CDmenthol-IC nanowebs, demonstrating the complexation of menthol with the CD cavity and its high temperature stability. Furthermore, as the size of CD cavity increased in the order {alpha}-CD<{beta}-CD<{gamma}-CD, the thermal evolution of menthol shifted to higher temperatures, suggesting that the strength of interaction between menthol and the CD cavity is in the order {gamma}-CD>{beta}-CD>{alpha}-CD.

  12. Electrospinning of functional poly(methyl methacrylate) nanofibers containing cyclodextrin-menthol inclusion complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uyar, Tamer; Besenbacher, Flemming; Nur, Yusuf; Hacaloglu, Jale

    2009-01-01

    Electrospinning of nanofibers with cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (CD-ICs) is particularly attractive since distinct properties can be obtained by combining the nanofibers with specific functions of the CD-ICs. Here we report on the electrospinning of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) nanofibers containing cyclodextrin-menthol inclusion complexes (CD-menthol-ICs). These CD-menthol-IC functionalized nanofibers were developed with the purpose of producing functional nanofibers that contain fragrances/flavors with high temperature stability, and menthol was used as a model fragrance/flavor material. The PMMA nanofibers were electrospun with CD-menthol-ICs using three type of CD: α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD. Direct pyrolysis mass spectrometry (DP-MS) studies showed that the thermal evaporation of menthol occurred over a very high and a broad temperature range (100-355 deg. C) for PMMA/CDmenthol-IC nanowebs, demonstrating the complexation of menthol with the CD cavity and its high temperature stability. Furthermore, as the size of CD cavity increased in the order α-CD β-CD>α-CD.

  13. Functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) bipyridine complexes: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic application in hydrogenation of ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Suna, Yuki; Himeda, Yuichiro; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-07-14

    A series of highly functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) complexes, [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) (Cp' = substituted cyclopentadienyl), was synthesized from various multi-substituted cyclopentadienes (Cp'H). [Rh(cod)Cl]2 and Cp'H were firstly converted to [Cp'Rh(cod)] complexes, which were then treated with Br2 to give the rhodium(III) dibromides [Cp'RhBr2]2. The novel complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were obtained readily by the reaction of 2,2'-bipyridine with [Cp'RhBr2]2. These rhodium complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were fully characterized and utilized in the hydrogenation of cyclohexanone and acetophenone with generally high yields, but they did not exhibit the same reactivity trends for the two substrate ketones. The different activity of these complexes for the different substrates may be due to the influence of the substituents on the Cp' rings.

  14. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory June 3, 2016 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. L. Huang S.g... Density Functional Theory L. Huang, S.G. Lambrakos, A. Shabaev,1 and L. Massa2 Naval Research Laboratory, Code 6394 4555 Overlook Avenue, SW...absorption spectra for As-H2O complexes using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). DFT and TD-DFT can

  15. complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    e-mail: lahiri@ether.chem.iitb.ac.in. Abstract. The interactions of potentially ... electronic communication between the metal centres is essentially controlled by the electronic nature of the bridging units, ... Bridging function mediated intermetallic electronic coupling is known to control the ground and excited state properties of ...

  16. Hardware-Software Complex for Functional and Parametric Tests of ARM Microcontrollers STM32F1XX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egorov Aleksey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the hardware-software complex for functional and parametric tests of ARM microcontrollers STM32F1XX. The complex is based on PXI devices by National Instruments and LabVIEW software environment. Data exchange procedure between a microcontroller under test and the complex hardware is describes. Some test results are also presented.

  17. The role of adenosine triphosphate in the function of human origin recognition complex 4 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEKSANDRA DIVAC

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Human origin recognition complex 4 (ORC4 protein, a subunit of the origin recognition complex, belongs to the AAA+ superfamily of adenosine triphosphate (ATP ases. Proteins belonging to this family require ATP for their function and interactions with ATP lead to conformational changes in them or in their partners. Human ORC4 protein induces structural changes in DNA substrates, promoting renaturation and formation of non-canonical structures, as well as conversion of single-stranded into multi-stranded oligonucleotide structures. The aim of this study was to further investigate the role of ATP in the function of human ORC4 protein. For this purpose, a mutant in the conserved Walker B motif of ORC4, which is able to bind but not to hydrolyze ATP, was constructed and its activity in DNA restructuring reactions was investigated. The obtained results showed that ATP hydrolysis is not necessary for the function of human ORC4. It is proposed that ATP has a structural role as a cofactor in the function of human ORC4 as a DNA restructuring agent.

  18. SSFSE sequence functional MRI of the human cervical spinal cord with complex finger tapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Chuhai; Kong Kangmei; Guan Jitian; Chen Yexi; He Jiankang; Qi Weili; Wang Xinjia; Shen Zhiwei; Wu Renhua

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Functional MR imaging of the human cervical spinal cord was carried out on volunteers during alternated rest and a complex finger tapping task, in order to detect image intensity changes arising from neuronal activity. Methods: Functional MR imaging data using single-shot fast spin-echo sequence (SSFSE) with echo time 42.4 ms on a 1.5 T GE Clinical System were acquired in eight subjects performing a complex finger tapping task. Cervical spinal cord activation was measured both in the sagittal and transverse imaging planes. Postprocessing was performed by AFNI (Analysis of Functional Neuroimages) software system. Results: Intensity changes (5.5-7.6%) were correlated with the time course of stimulation and were consistently detected in both sagittal and transverse imaging planes of the cervical spinal cord. The activated regions localized to the ipsilateral side of the spinal cord in agreement with the neural anatomy. Conclusion: Functional MR imaging signals can be reliably detected with finger tapping activity in the human cervical spinal cord using a SSFSE sequence with 42.4 ms echo time. The anatomic location of neural activity correlates with the muscles used in the finger tapping task.

  19. Interactions between default mode and control networks as a function of increasing cognitive reasoning complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearne, Luke; Cocchi, Luca; Zalesky, Andrew; Mattingley, Jason B

    2015-07-01

    Successful performance of challenging cognitive tasks depends on a consistent functional segregation of activity within the default-mode network, on the one hand, and control networks encompassing frontoparietal and cingulo-opercular areas on the other. Recent work, however, has suggested that in some cognitive control contexts nodes within the default-mode and control networks may actually cooperate to achieve optimal task performance. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether the ability to relate variables while solving a cognitive reasoning problem involves transient increases in connectivity between default-mode and control regions. Participants performed a modified version of the classic Wason selection task, in which the number of variables to be related is systematically varied across trials. As expected, areas within the default-mode network showed a parametric deactivation with increases in relational complexity, compared with neural activity in null trials. Critically, some of these areas also showed enhanced connectivity with task-positive control regions. Specifically, task-based connectivity between the striatum and the angular gyri, and between the thalamus and right temporal pole, increased as a function of relational complexity. These findings challenge the notion that functional segregation between regions within default-mode and control networks invariably support cognitive task performance, and reveal previously unknown roles for the striatum and thalamus in managing network dynamics during cognitive reasoning. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Rfc5p regulates alternate RFC complex functions in sister chromatid pairing reactions in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maradeo, Marie E; Garg, Anisha; Skibbens, Robert V

    2010-11-01

    Sister chromatid pairing reactions, termed cohesion establishment, occur during S-phase and appear to be regulated by Replication Factor C (RFC) complexes. For instance, RFCs that contain Ctf18p exhibit pro-establishment activities while those that contain Elg1p exhibit anti-establishment activities. It remains unknown whether Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC functions are simply opposing or instead reveal complicated and non-parallel regulatory mechanisms. To better understand the nature of these novel pathways, we analyzed the small RFC subunit Rfc5p that is common to both Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC. Despite this commonality, the data show that diminished Rfc5p function rescues ctf7/eco1 mutant cell phenotypes, revealing that Rfc5p promotes anti-establishment activities. This rescue is specific to establishment pathways in that rfc5-1 greatly accentuates growth defects when expressed in scc2 (deposition), mcd1/scc1 or smc3 (cohesion maintenance) mutated cells. Our results reveal for the first time a role for small RFC subunits in directing RFC complex functions-in this case towards anti-establishment pathways. We further report that Pds5p exhibits both establishment and anti-establishment functions in cohesion. This duality suggests that categorizations of establishment and anti-establishment activities require further examination.

  1. A density functional study of EPR hyperfine coupling of vanadocene(IV) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honzicek, Jan; Vinklarek, Jaromir; Nachtigall, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Suitability of various exchange-correlation functionals for calculations of HFC tensors was investigated. It was found that A iso calculated with B3PW91 functional correlates fairly well with experimental A iso for broad range of vanadocene compounds. Simple scaling of calculated A iso was proposed. A good correspondence between experimental HFC tensors and those calculated at DFT optimised geometries was found. It is shown that structure of vanadocene complex can be assigned based on the comparison of experimental and theoretical HFC tensors and several examples are presented. The exchange functionals with large mixing of exact exchange (BHPB86) give A iso with an error that depends on the extent of spin-contamination of the wavefunction

  2. Functional dissection of the proton pumping modules of mitochondrial complex I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Dröse

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial complex I, the largest and most complicated proton pump of the respiratory chain, links the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone to the pumping of four protons from the matrix into the intermembrane space. In humans, defects in complex I are involved in a wide range of degenerative disorders. Recent progress in the X-ray structural analysis of prokaryotic and eukaryotic complex I confirmed that the redox reactions are confined entirely to the hydrophilic peripheral arm of the L-shaped molecule and take place at a remarkable distance from the membrane domain. While this clearly implies that the proton pumping within the membrane arm of complex I is driven indirectly via long-range conformational coupling, the molecular mechanism and the number, identity, and localization of the pump-sites remains unclear. Here, we report that upon deletion of the gene for a small accessory subunit of the Yarrowia complex I, a stable subcomplex (nb8mΔ is formed that lacks the distal part of the membrane domain as revealed by single particle analysis. The analysis of the subunit composition of holo and subcomplex by three complementary proteomic approaches revealed that two (ND4 and ND5 of the three subunits with homology to bacterial Mrp-type Na(+/H(+ antiporters that have been discussed as prime candidates for harbouring the proton pumps were missing in nb8mΔ. Nevertheless, nb8mΔ still pumps protons at half the stoichiometry of the complete enzyme. Our results provide evidence that the membrane arm of complex I harbours two functionally distinct pump modules that are connected in series by the long helical transmission element recently identified by X-ray structural analysis.

  3. Effects of Environmental Air Pollution on Pulmonary Function Level of Residents in Korean Industrial Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eunju Hong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to identify environmental air pollution adversely affecting pulmonary function among a community-based general population living in Korean industrial complexes. A total of 1963 residents participated in a pulmonary function test (PFT. The sample population consisted of an exposed group (n = 1487 living within a radius of 5 km of industrial complexes and a control group (n = 476 living over a radius of 10 km from the industrial complexes in Gwangyang and Yeosu cities. PFT results were calculated for each resident of the study population. On-site questionnaire surveys with face-to-face interviews were also conducted to collect more detailed information on personal lifestyles, medical history, exposure to air pollution, and respiratory disease and related symptoms. A total of 486 measured samples were collected by eight automated air-monitoring stations installed in four counties of Gwangyang and four counties of Yeosu in South Korea from January 2006 to February 2007. Mean levels of SO2 (0.012 ppm, CO (0.648 ppm, NO2 (0.02 ppm, O3 (0.034 ppm, and PM10 (43.07 μg/m3, collected within a radius of 5 km, were significantly higher than those collected over a radius of 10 km from Gwangyang and Yeosu industrial complexes. Prevalence odds ratio (OR of abnormal pulmonary function in the exposed group of residents (<5 km was elevated at 1.24 (95% CI 0.71–1.96, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05. In multiple linear regression analysis, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and forced vital capacity (FVC levels significantly declined as SO2, CO, and O3 levels increased when adjusting for age, sex, body mass index (BMI, alcohol, smoking, secondhand smoke, and respiratory disease and related symptoms (n = 1963 (p < 0.05. These results suggest that exposure to air pollution affects pulmonary function levels of residents living in Korean industrial complexes.

  4. Functional competence of a partially engaged GPCR-β-arrestin complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Punita; Srivastava, Ashish; Banerjee, Ramanuj; Ghosh, Eshan; Gupta, Pragya; Ranjan, Ravi; Chen, Xin; Gupta, Bhagyashri; Gupta, Charu; Jaiman, Deepika; Shukla, Arun K

    2016-11-09

    G Protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest family of cell surface receptors and drug targets. GPCR signalling and desensitization is critically regulated by β-arrestins (βarr). GPCR-βarr interaction is biphasic where the phosphorylated carboxyl terminus of GPCRs docks to the N-domain of βarr first and then seven transmembrane core of the receptor engages with βarr. It is currently unknown whether fully engaged GPCR-βarr complex is essential for functional outcomes or partially engaged complex can also be functionally competent. Here we assemble partially and fully engaged complexes of a chimeric β 2 V 2 R with βarr1, and discover that the core interaction is dispensable for receptor endocytosis, ERK MAP kinase binding and activation. Furthermore, we observe that carvedilol, a βarr biased ligand, does not promote detectable engagement between βarr1 and the receptor core. These findings uncover a previously unknown aspect of GPCR-βarr interaction and provide novel insights into GPCR signalling and regulatory paradigms.

  5. Uranium (VI)Bis(imido) chalcogenate complexes:synthesis and density functional theory analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, Liam P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boncella, James M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yang, Ping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Brian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imido) uranium(VI) trans- and cis-dichalcogenate complexes with the general formula U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 (EAr = O-2-tBuC6H4, SPh, SePh, TePh) and U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(R2bpy) (EAr = SPh, SePh, TePh) (R2bpy = 4,4'-disubstituted-2,2'-bipyridyl, R = Me, tBu) have been prepared. This family of complexes includes the first reported monodentate selenolate and tellurolate complexes of uranium(VI). Density functional theory calculations show that covalent interactions in the U-E bond increase in the trans-dichalcogenate series U(NtBu)2(EAr)2(OPPh3)2 as the size of the chalcogenate donor increases and that both 5f and 6d orbital participation is important in the M-E bonds of U-S, U-Se, and U-Te complexes.

  6. TEXT COMPLEXITY IN SENIOR HIGH SCHOOL ENGLISH TEXTBOOKS: A SYSTEMIC FUNCTIONAL PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhani Aldila Putra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Textbooks have been considered to play a key role in the processes of education by researchers and educators, and the need to explore the language of textbooks has become increasingly recognized. However, although textbooks are an important learning tool, textbook language and composition have not been widely explored especially from textual perspectives. The purpose of the present study is to investigate text complexity progression in the reading texts of English textbooks published for senior high school students in Indonesia. The nature and rate of that progression are addressed within the framework of Systemic Functional Linguistics. Being largely qualitative, this study examines three consecutive textbooks issued by the Ministry of Education, which are available online for classroom use. Data were collected and sampled from the reading texts found in the textbooks and were analyzed with regard to lexical density, lexical variation and grammatical intricacy in order to find the complexity of the texts. The results of the analyses show that regardless of the inconsistent progression of text complexity within each textbook, there is a consistent pattern of text complexity progression across grade levels. In other words, the lexical density, lexical variation and grammatical intricacy across the textbooks were found to have consistent progression from one grade level to another of which the direction is positive. It could be concluded that in general the language used in the texts becomes increasingly sophisticated, especially at lexical level, in accordance with grade level progression to cater for students’ intellectual development.

  7. η6-Arene complexes of ruthenium and osmium with pendant donor functionalities

    KAUST Repository

    Reiner, Thomas

    2010-11-01

    Conversion of 4′-(2,5-dihydrophenyl)butanol or N-trifluoroacetyl-2,5- dihydrobenzylamine with MCl3·n H2O (M = Ru, Os) affords the corresponding dimeric η6-arene complexes in good to excellent yields. Under similar reaction conditions, the amine functionalized arene precursor 2,5-dihydrobenzylamine yields the corresponding Ru(II) complex. For osmium, HCl induced oxidation leads to formation of [OsCl6] 2- salts. However, under optimized reaction conditions, conversion of the precursor 2,5-dihydrobenzylamine chloride results in clean formation of η6-arene Os(II) complex. X-ray structures of [(η6- benzyl ammonium)(dmso)RuCl2] and (2,5-dihydrobenzyl ammonium) 4[OsCl6]2confirm the spectroscopic data. High stability towards air and acid as well as enhanced solubility in water is observed for all η6-arene complexes. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. RYBP and Cbx7 Define Specific Biological Functions of Polycomb Complexes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

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    Lluis Morey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1 is required for decisions of stem cell fate. In mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs, two major variations of PRC1 complex, defined by the mutually exclusive presence of Cbx7 or RYBP, have been identified. Here, we show that although the genomic localization of the Cbx7- and RYBP-containing PRC1 complexes overlaps in certain genes, it can also be mutually exclusive. At the molecular level, Cbx7 is necessary for recruitment of Ring1B to chromatin, whereas RYBP enhances the PRC1 enzymatic activity. Genes occupied by RYBP show lower levels of Ring1B and H2AK119ub and are consequently more highly transcribed than those bound by Cbx7. At the functional level, we show that genes occupied by RYBP are primarily involved in the regulation of metabolism and cell-cycle progression, whereas those bound by Cbx7 predominantly control early-lineage commitment of ESCs. Altogether, our results indicate that different PRC1 subtypes establish a complex pattern of gene regulation that regulates common and nonoverlapping aspects of ESC pluripotency and differentiation.

  9. Structure of the Pds5-Scc1 Complex and Implications for Cohesin Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle W. Muir

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sister chromatid cohesion is a fundamental prerequisite to faithful genome segregation. Cohesion is precisely regulated by accessory factors that modulate the stability with which the cohesin complex embraces chromosomes. One of these factors, Pds5, engages cohesin through Scc1 and is both a facilitator of cohesion, and, conversely also mediates the release of cohesin from chromatin. We present here the crystal structure of a complex between budding yeast Pds5 and Scc1, thus elucidating the molecular basis of Pds5 function. Pds5 forms an elongated HEAT repeat that binds to Scc1 via a conserved surface patch. We demonstrate that the integrity of the Pds5-Scc1 interface is indispensable for the recruitment of Pds5 to cohesin, and that its abrogation results in loss of sister chromatid cohesion and cell viability.

  10. Translating inter-individual genetic variation to biological function in complex phenotypes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yadav, Rachita

    and phosphor-proteome in chemotherapy resistant breast cancer cell lines with high TIMP-1 gene expression. In summary, this thesis work demonstrates applications of various omic variations at different levels of complexity and their integration using systems biology based methodologies to associate them...... artificial neural network (ANN) based methodology of selecting genetic and clinical features with predictive power for childhood asthma. The goal of these studies is to understand the complex genetics of childhood asthma. The third part of this thesis (chapters 5 and 6) focuses on various mechanisms involved...... populations. Next, the second portion of this chapter describes a personalised genome study of an ancient genome which was conducted by calculating the genetic risk scores to unravel phenotypes. Appendix section (Chapter 8) comprises of an integrative functional analysis study of the changing proteome...

  11. Tuning the Phosphorescence and Solid State Luminescence of Triarylborane-Functionalized Acetylacetonato Platinum Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Kumar, George; Thilagar, Pakkirisamy

    2016-12-05

    A new series of luminescent cyclometalated platinum complexes with triarylborane-functionalized acetylacetonate ligands is reported. The complexes exhibit solid state luminescence and phosphorescence under ambient conditions. The luminescence color can be tuned from green to red by varying the cyclometalating ligand [2-phenylpyridine (for 1 and 2), 2-thiophenylpyridine (for 3 and 4), 2-thianapthenylpyridine (for 5 and 6)]. The luminescence originates from mixed 3 MLCT/ 3 IL [MLCT, metal to ligand charge transfer; IL, intraligand] states of square planar platinum and borane moieties. The π spacer (phenyl or duryl) which connects the boryl and platinum entities has a significant role in determining the photoluminescence efficiency. The bulky duryl spacer in 2, 4, and 6 significantly reduces π-π stacking of the square planar platinum moiety in the solid state and provides a rigid backbone, thereby increasing their quantum yield significantly. The role of Lewis-acidic borane on the photoluminescence features is evaluated by fluoride binding experiments.

  12. Structure and function study of the complex that synthesizes S-adenosylmethionine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Murray

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available S-Adenosylmethionine (SAMe is the principal methyl donor of the cell and is synthesized via an ATP-driven process by methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT enzymes. It is tightly linked with cell proliferation in liver and colon cancer. In humans, there are three genes, mat1A, mat2A and mat2B, which encode MAT enzymes. mat2A and mat2B transcribe MATα2 and MATβ enzyme subunits, respectively, with catalytic and regulatory roles. The MATα2β complex is expressed in nearly all tissues and is thought to be essential in providing the necessary SAMe flux for methylation of DNA and various proteins including histones. In human hepatocellular carcinoma mat2A and mat2B genes are upregulated, highlighting the importance of the MATα2β complex in liver disease. The individual subunits have been structurally characterized but the nature of the complex has remained elusive despite its existence having been postulated for more than 20 years and the observation that MATβ is often co-localized with MATα2. Though SAMe can be produced by MAT(α24 alone, this paper shows that the Vmax of the MATα2β complex is three- to fourfold higher depending on the variants of MATβ that participate in complex formation. Using X-ray crystallography and solution X-ray scattering, the first structures are provided of this 258 kDa functional complex both in crystals and solution with an unexpected stoichiometry of 4α2 and 2βV2 subunits. It is demonstrated that the N-terminal regulates the activity of the complex and it is shown that complex formation takes place surprisingly via the C-terminal of MATβV2 that buries itself in a tunnel created at the interface of the MAT(α22. The structural data suggest a unique mechanism of regulation and provide a gateway for structure-based drug design in anticancer therapies.

  13. Fractal zeta functions and fractal drums higher-dimensional theory of complex dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Lapidus, Michel L; Žubrinić, Darko

    2017-01-01

    This monograph gives a state-of-the-art and accessible treatment of a new general higher-dimensional theory of complex dimensions, valid for arbitrary bounded subsets of Euclidean spaces, as well as for their natural generalization, relative fractal drums. It provides a significant extension of the existing theory of zeta functions for fractal strings to fractal sets and arbitrary bounded sets in Euclidean spaces of any dimension. Two new classes of fractal zeta functions are introduced, namely, the distance and tube zeta functions of bounded sets, and their key properties are investigated. The theory is developed step-by-step at a slow pace, and every step is well motivated by numerous examples, historical remarks and comments, relating the objects under investigation to other concepts. Special emphasis is placed on the study of complex dimensions of bounded sets and their connections with the notions of Minkowski content and Minkowski measurability, as well as on fractal tube formulas. It is shown for the f...

  14. Global high-frequency source imaging accounting for complexity in Green's functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, V.; Zhan, Z.

    2017-12-01

    The general characterization of earthquake source processes at long periods has seen great success via seismic finite fault inversion/modeling. Complementary techniques, such as seismic back-projection, extend the capabilities of source imaging to higher frequencies and reveal finer details of the rupture process. However, such high frequency methods are limited by the implicit assumption of simple Green's functions, which restricts the use of global arrays and introduces artifacts (e.g., sweeping effects, depth/water phases) that require careful attention. This motivates the implementation of an imaging technique that considers the potential complexity of Green's functions at high frequencies. We propose an alternative inversion approach based on the modest assumption that the path effects contributing to signals within high-coherency subarrays share a similar form. Under this assumption, we develop a method that can combine multiple high-coherency subarrays to invert for a sparse set of subevents. By accounting for potential variability in the Green's functions among subarrays, our method allows for the utilization of heterogeneous global networks for robust high resolution imaging of the complex rupture process. The approach also provides a consistent framework for examining frequency-dependent radiation across a broad frequency spectrum.

  15. Fast axonal transport of the proteasome complex depends on membrane interaction and molecular motor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Maria G; Alloatti, Matías; Cromberg, Lucas E; Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Encalada, Sandra E; Pozo Devoto, Victorio M; Bruno, Luciana; Goldstein, Lawrence S B; Falzone, Tomás L

    2014-04-01

    Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in neurons depends on the correct delivery of the proteasome complex. In neurodegenerative diseases, aggregation and accumulation of proteins in axons link transport defects with degradation impairments; however, the transport properties of proteasomes remain unknown. Here, using in vivo experiments, we reveal the fast anterograde transport of assembled and functional 26S proteasome complexes. A high-resolution tracking system to follow fluorescent proteasomes revealed three types of motion: actively driven proteasome axonal transport, diffusive behavior in a viscoelastic axonema and proteasome-confined motion. We show that active proteasome transport depends on motor function because knockdown of the KIF5B motor subunit resulted in impairment of the anterograde proteasome flux and the density of segmental velocities. Finally, we reveal that neuronal proteasomes interact with intracellular membranes and identify the coordinated transport of fluorescent proteasomes with synaptic precursor vesicles, Golgi-derived vesicles, lysosomes and mitochondria. Taken together, our results reveal fast axonal transport as a new mechanism of proteasome delivery that depends on membrane cargo 'hitch-hiking' and the function of molecular motors. We further hypothesize that defects in proteasome transport could promote abnormal protein clearance in neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Trophic complexity enhances ecosystem functioning in an aquatic detritus-based model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabiol, Jérémy; McKie, Brendan G; Bruder, Andreas; Bernadet, Caroline; Gessner, Mark O; Chauvet, Eric

    2013-09-01

    1. Understanding the functional significance of species interactions in ecosystems has become a major challenge as biodiversity declines rapidly worldwide. Ecosystem consequences arising from the loss of diversity either within trophic levels (horizontal diversity) or across trophic levels (vertical diversity) are well documented. However, simultaneous losses of species at different trophic levels may also result in interactive effects, with potentially complex outcomes for ecosystem functioning. 2. Because of logistical constraints, the outcomes of such interactions have been difficult to assess in experiments involving large metazoan species. Here, we take advantage of a detritus-based model system to experimentally assess the consequences of biodiversity change within both horizontal and vertical food-web components on leaf-litter decomposition, a fundamental process in a wide range of ecosystems. 3. Our concurrent manipulation of fungal decomposer diversity (0, 1 or 5 species), detritivore diversity (0, 1 or 3 species), and the presence of predatory fish scent showed that trophic complexity is key to eliciting diversity effects on ecosystem functioning. Specifically, although fungi and detritivores tended to promote decomposition individually, rates were highest in the most complete community where all trophic levels were represented at the highest possible species richness. In part, the effects were trait-mediated, reflected in the contrasting foraging responses of the detritivore species to predator scent. 4. Our results thus highlight the importance of interactive effects of simultaneous species loss within multiple trophic levels on ecosystem functioning. If a common phenomenon, this outcome suggests that functional ecosystem impairment resulting from widespread biodiversity loss could be more severe than inferred from previous experiments confined to varying diversity within single trophic levels. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2013

  17. Complex correction of erectile and copulative violations at patients with obesity and reproductive function violation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotenko K.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed the development and assessment of features of corrective action of a medical complex on a lipid imbalance at patients with obesity. Material and methods. For an assessment of features of corrective action of a medical complex on a lipid imbalance at patients with obesity in research I was 50 male patients with obesity and frustration of the reproductive sphere aged from 24 to 68 years are included, middle age was 38,5±6,1 years and 7 healthy persons, men of comparable age without any pathological states, results of which all researches were accepted to values of norm. To all patients included in research, except all-clinical inspection calculation of an index of body weight and the relation of a circle of a waist to a circle of hips, measurement of arterial pressure were applied questioning concerning food and food behavior, anthropometry (growth the body weight, a circle of a waist and hips. Besides all patients conducted laboratory methods the researches including definition of atherogenic fractions of lipids (the general cholesterol, triglycerides, LPNP and LPVP. Researches were conducted before treatment and after a course of treatment. Results. The effective complex program for restoration of reproductive function at patients with obesity is developed. Conclusion. Application of the developed complex program more than its separate components caused the expressed reduction of body weight, mainly due to reduction of fatty tissue and manifestations of visceral obesity in patients with obesity and violation of reproductive function, including due to elimination of a metabolic imbalance.

  18. Evolution of heteromeric nitrilase complexes in Poaceae with new functions in nitrile metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenrich, Roland; Trompetter, Inga; Bak, Søren; Olsen, Carl Erik; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Piotrowski, Markus

    2007-01-01

    Members of the nitrilase 4 (NIT4) family of higher plants catalyze the conversion of β-cyanoalanine to aspartic acid and asparagine, a key step in cyanide detoxification. Grasses (Poaceae) possess two different NIT4 homologs (NIT4A and NIT4B), but none of the recombinant Poaceae enzymes analyzed showed activity with β-cyanoalanine, whereas protein extracts of the same plants clearly posses this activity. Sorghum bicolor contains three NIT4 isoforms SbNIT4A, SbNIT4B1, and SbNIT4B2. Individually, each isoform does not possess enzymatic activity whereas the heteromeric complexes SbNIT4A/B1 and SbNIT4A/B2 hydrolyze β-cyanoalanine with high activity. In addition, the SbNIT4A/B2 complex accepts additional substrates, the best being 4-hydroxyphenylacetonitrile. Corresponding NIT4A and NIT4B isoforms from other Poaceae species can functionally complement the sorghum isoforms in these complexes. Site-specific mutagenesis of the active site cysteine residue demonstrates that hydrolysis of β-cyanoalanine is catalyzed by the NIT4A isoform in both complexes whereas hydrolysis of 4-hydroxyphenylacetonitrile occurs at the NIT4B2 isoform. 4-Hydroxyphenylacetonitrile was shown to be an in vitro breakdown product of the cyanogenic glycoside dhurrin, a main constituent in S. bicolor. The results indicate that the SbNIT4A/B2 heterocomplex plays a key role in an endogenous turnover of dhurrin proceeding via 4-hydroxyphenylacetonitrile and thereby avoiding release of toxic hydrogen cyanide. The operation of this pathway would enable plants to use cyanogenic glycosides as transportable and remobilizable nitrogenous storage compounds. Through combinatorial biochemistry and neofunctionalizations, the small family of nitrilases has gained diverse biological functions in nitrile metabolism. PMID:18003897

  19. Rev and Rex proteins of human complex retroviruses function with the MMTV Rem-responsive element

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dudley Jaquelin P

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV encodes the Rem protein, an HIV Rev-like protein that enhances nuclear export of unspliced viral RNA in rodent cells. We have shown that Rem is expressed from a doubly spliced RNA, typical of complex retroviruses. Several recent reports indicate that MMTV can infect human cells, suggesting that MMTV might interact with human retroviruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV, and human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K. In this report, we test whether the export/regulatory proteins of human complex retroviruses will increase expression from vectors containing the Rem-responsive element (RmRE. Results MMTV Rem, HIV Rev, and HTLV Rex proteins, but not HERV-K Rec, enhanced expression from an MMTV-based reporter plasmid in human T cells, and this activity was dependent on the RmRE. No RmRE-dependent reporter gene expression was detectable using Rev, Rex, or Rec in HC11 mouse mammary cells. Cell fractionation and RNA quantitation experiments suggested that the regulatory proteins did not affect RNA stability or nuclear export in the MMTV reporter system. Rem had no demonstrable activity on export elements from HIV, HTLV, or HERV-K. Similar to the Rem-specific activity in rodent cells, the RmRE-dependent functions of Rem, Rev, or Rex in human cells were inhibited by a dominant-negative truncated nucleoporin that acts in the Crm1 pathway of RNA and protein export. Conclusion These data argue that many retroviral regulatory proteins recognize similar complex RNA structures, which may depend on the presence of cell-type specific proteins. Retroviral protein activity on the RmRE appears to affect a post-export function of the reporter RNA. Our results provide additional evidence that MMTV is a complex retrovirus with the potential for viral interactions in human cells.

  20. Motor sequencing in older adulthood: relationships with executive functioning and effects of complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niermeyer, Madison A; Suchy, Yana; Ziemnik, Rosemary E

    2017-04-01

    Older adults' motor sequencing performance is more reliant on executive functioning (EF) and more susceptible to complexity than that of younger adults. This study examined for which aspects of motor sequencing performance these relationships hold. Fifty-seven younger and 90 non-demented, community-dwelling, older adults completed selected subtests from the Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System as indices of EF and component processes (CP; graphomotor speed; visual scanning; etc.), as well as a computerized motor sequencing task (Push Turn Taptap task; PTT). The PTT requires participants to perform motor sequences that become progressively more complex across the task's four blocks, and is designed to assess action planning, action learning, and motor control speed and accuracy. Hierarchical regressions using each discrete aspect of performance as the dependent variable revealed that action planning is the only aspect of motor sequencing that is uniquely related to EF (beyond the CP composite) for both age groups. Action learning and motor control accuracy are uniquely associated with EF for older adults only, and only if the sequences are complex. Component processes do not fully account for the unique relationships between motor sequencing and EF in older adults. These results clarify prior findings by showing (a) more aspects of motor sequencing relate to EF for older compared to younger adults and (b) for these unique relationships, EF is only related to action during the generation of sequences that are complex. These findings further our understanding of how aging shapes the links between EF and motor actions, and can be used in evidence-based and theoretically driven intervention programs that promote healthy aging.

  1. Towards the identification of protein complexes and functional modules by integrating PPI network and gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Min

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identification of protein complexes and functional modules from protein-protein interaction (PPI networks is crucial to understanding the principles of cellular organization and predicting protein functions. In the past few years, many computational methods have been proposed. However, most of them considered the PPI networks as static graphs and overlooked the dynamics inherent within these networks. Moreover, few of them can distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules. Results In this paper, a new framework is proposed to distinguish between protein complexes and functional modules by integrating gene expression data into protein-protein interaction (PPI data. A series of time-sequenced subnetworks (TSNs is constructed according to the time that the interactions were activated. The algorithm TSN-PCD was then developed to identify protein complexes from these TSNs. As protein complexes are significantly related to functional modules, a new algorithm DFM-CIN is proposed to discover functional modules based on the identified complexes. The experimental results show that the combination of temporal gene expression data with PPI data contributes to identifying protein complexes more precisely. A quantitative comparison based on f-measure reveals that our algorithm TSN-PCD outperforms the other previous protein complex discovery algorithms. Furthermore, we evaluate the identified functional modules by using “Biological Process” annotated in GO (Gene Ontology. The validation shows that the identified functional modules are statistically significant in terms of “Biological Process”. More importantly, the relationship between protein complexes and functional modules are studied. Conclusions The proposed framework based on the integration of PPI data and gene expression data makes it possible to identify protein complexes and functional modules more effectively. Moveover, the proposed new framework and

  2. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I

    2011-01-01

    Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors, such as drugs, contribute to diseases. The

  3. Constructing Markov State Models to elucidate the functional conformational changes of complex biomolecules

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Wei

    2017-10-06

    The function of complex biomolecular machines relies heavily on their conformational changes. Investigating these functional conformational changes is therefore essential for understanding the corresponding biological processes and promoting bioengineering applications and rational drug design. Constructing Markov State Models (MSMs) based on large-scale molecular dynamics simulations has emerged as a powerful approach to model functional conformational changes of the biomolecular system with sufficient resolution in both time and space. However, the rapid development of theory and algorithms for constructing MSMs has made it difficult for nonexperts to understand and apply the MSM framework, necessitating a comprehensive guidance toward its theory and practical usage. In this study, we introduce the MSM theory of conformational dynamics based on the projection operator scheme. We further propose a general protocol of constructing MSM to investigate functional conformational changes, which integrates the state-of-the-art techniques for building and optimizing initial pathways, performing adaptive sampling and constructing MSMs. We anticipate this protocol to be widely applied and useful in guiding nonexperts to study the functional conformational changes of large biomolecular systems via the MSM framework. We also discuss the current limitations of MSMs and some alternative methods to alleviate them.

  4. Ecological safety of the Carpathian region as a process of oil and gas complexes functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgiy Rudko

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available There have been considered the main ecological problems of Western Ukraine and changes of geological environment under the influence of oil and gas complexes functioning. Ecochemical investigations of the environment give us a possibility to reveal the areas with abnormal hydrocarbon concentration in the near-surface layers and in ground waters. On the basis of the investigation results there have been worked out organizational, technological and environmental measures to eliminate pollution or to reduce its negative influence on geological environment.

  5. Foundations of complex analysis in non locally convex spaces function theory without convexity condition

    CERN Document Server

    Bayoumi, A

    2003-01-01

    All the existing books in Infinite Dimensional Complex Analysis focus on the problems of locally convex spaces. However, the theory without convexity condition is covered for the first time in this book. This shows that we are really working with a new, important and interesting field. Theory of functions and nonlinear analysis problems are widespread in the mathematical modeling of real world systems in a very broad range of applications. During the past three decades many new results from the author have helped to solve multiextreme problems arising from important situations, non-convex and

  6. Rfc5p regulates alternate RFC complex functions in sister chromatid pairing reactions in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Maradeo, Marie E; Garg, Anisha; Skibbens, Robert V

    2010-01-01

    Sister chromatid pairing reactions, termed cohesion establishment, occur during S phase and appear to be regulated by replication factor C (RFC) complexes. For instance, RFCs that contain Ctf18p exhibit pro-establishment activities while those that contain Elg1p exhibit anti-establishment activities. It remains unknown whether Ctf18p-RFC and Elg1p-RFC functions are simply opposing or instead reveal complicated and non-parallel regulatory mechanisms. To better understand the nature of these no...

  7. Biogenetic mechanisms predisposing to complex phenotypes in parents may function differently in their children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulminski, Alexander M; Arbeev, Konstantin G; Christensen, Kaare

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on the participants of the Long Life Family Study to elucidate whether biogenetic mechanisms underlying relationships among heritable complex phenotypes in parents function in the same way for the same phenotypes in their children. Our results reveal 3 characteristic groups...... of relationships among phenotypes in parents and children. One group composed of 3 pairs of phenotypes confirms that associations among some phenotypes can be explained by the same biogenetic mechanisms working in parents and children. Two other groups including 9 phenotype pairs show that this is not a common......-related processes in changing environment may be conceptually underestimated in current genetic association studies using genome wide resources....

  8. Long-distance mechanism of neurotransmitter recycling mediated by glial network facilitates visual function in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Ratna; Reddig, Keith; Li, Hong-Sheng

    2014-02-18

    Neurons rely on glia to recycle neurotransmitters such as glutamate and histamine for sustained signaling. Both mammalian and insect glia form intercellular gap-junction networks, but their functional significance underlying neurotransmitter recycling is unknown. Using the Drosophila visual system as a genetic model, here we show that a multicellular glial network transports neurotransmitter metabolites between perisynaptic glia and neuronal cell bodies to mediate long-distance recycling of neurotransmitter. In the first visual neuropil (lamina), which contains a multilayer glial network, photoreceptor axons release histamine to hyperpolarize secondary sensory neurons. Subsequently, the released histamine is taken up by perisynaptic epithelial glia and converted into inactive carcinine through conjugation with β-alanine for transport. In contrast to a previous assumption that epithelial glia deliver carcinine directly back to photoreceptor axons for histamine regeneration within the lamina, we detected both carcinine and β-alanine in the fly retina, where they are found in photoreceptor cell bodies and surrounding pigment glial cells. Downregulating Inx2 gap junctions within the laminar glial network causes β-alanine accumulation in retinal pigment cells and impairs carcinine synthesis, leading to reduced histamine levels and photoreceptor synaptic vesicles. Consequently, visual transmission is impaired and the fly is less responsive in a visual alert analysis compared with wild type. Our results suggest that a gap junction-dependent laminar and retinal glial network transports histamine metabolites between perisynaptic glia and photoreceptor cell bodies to mediate a novel, long-distance mechanism of neurotransmitter recycling, highlighting the importance of glial networks in the regulation of neuronal functions.

  9. Physicochemical characterization of functionalized-nanostructured-titania as a carrier of copper complexes for cancer treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Tessy [Nanotechnology and Nanomedicine Laboratory, Metropolitan Autonomous University-Xochimilco, Calzada del Hueso 1100, Villa Quietud, Coyoacán, 04960 México D.F. (Mexico); Nanotechnology Laboratory, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery “MVS”, Avenida Insurgentes Sur 3877, La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269 México D.F. (Mexico); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Tulane University, 6823 St. Charles Avenue, New Orleans (United States); Ortiz, Emma, E-mail: emma170@hotmail.com [Nanotechnology Laboratory, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery “MVS”, Avenida Insurgentes Sur 3877, La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269 México D.F. (Mexico); Guevara, Patricia [Neuroimmunology Laboratory, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery “MVS”, Insurgentes Sur 3877, La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269 México D.F. (Mexico); Gómez, Esteban [Nanotechnology Laboratory, National Institute of Neurology and Neurosurgery “MVS”, Avenida Insurgentes Sur 3877, La Fama, Tlalpan, 14269 México D.F. (Mexico); Novaro, Octavio [Institute of Physics-UNAM, Circuito de la Investigación Científica Ciudad Universitaria, CP 04510 México D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    In the present paper we report the preparation and characterization of functionalized-TiO{sub 2} (F-TiO{sub 2}) to obtain a biocompatible material to be used as carrier of alternative anticancer agents: copper acetate and copper acetylacetonate. The sol–gel procedure was used to prepare the fuctionalized titania material through hydrolysis and condensation of the titanium's butoxide. Sulfate, amine and phosphate ions served as functional groups which were anchored to the titania's surface. Mineral acids and gamma amine butyric acid were the precursors and they were added at the initial step of the synthesis. The copper complexes were loaded on titania and were also added to the reactor synthesis from the beginning. Infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopies were the principal techniques used to the characterization of F-TiO{sub 2} and copper complexes loaded on titania materials. Transmission Electronic Microscopy (TEM) was used to complement the characterization's studies. The biocompatibility of F-TiO{sub 2} was evaluated by treating different cancer cell lines with increased concentration of this compound. The amine, the sulfate and the phosphate on the titania's surface, as well as the integral structures of the metal complexes on titania were well identified by infrared and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopies. The TEM photographs of Cu(acac){sub 2}/F-TiO{sub 2} and Cu(Oac){sub 2}/F-TiO{sub 2} materials showed the formation of nanoparticles, which have sizes ranging from 4 to 10 nm, with no morphology alterations in comparison with F-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, suggesting that the presence of low quantities of copper do not affect the structure of the nanoparticles. The Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) confirms the presence of copper on the titania's nanoparticles. The biological results indicate that there is more than 90% cell survival, thus suggesting that F-TiO{sub 2} does not cause damage to the cells. Therefore

  10. Calculation of equilibrium stable isotope partition function ratios for aqueous zinc complexes and metallic zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jay R.; Kavner, Abby; Schauble, Edwin A.

    2011-02-01

    The goal of this study is to determine reduced partition function ratios for a variety of species of zinc, both as a metal and in aqueous solutions in order to calculate equilibrium stable isotope partitioning. We present calculations of the magnitude of Zn stable-isotope fractionation ( 66,67,68Zn/ 64Zn) between aqueous species and metallic zinc using measured vibrational spectra (fit from neutron scattering studies of metallic zinc) and a variety of electronic structure models. The results show that the reduced metal, Zn(0), will be light in equilibrium with oxidized Zn(II) aqueous species, with the best estimates for the Zn(II)-Zn(0) fractionation between hexaquo species and metallic zinc being Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 1.6‰ at 25 °C, and Δ 66/64Zn aq-metal ˜ 0.8‰ between the tetrachloro zinc complex and metallic zinc at 25 °C using B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory and basis set. To examine the behavior of zinc in various aqueous solution chemistries, models for Zn(II) complex speciation were used to determine which species are thermodynamically favorable and abundant under a variety of different conditions relevant to natural waters, experimental and industrial solutions. The optimal molecular geometries for [Zn(H 2O) 6] 2+, [Zn(H 2O) 6]·SO 4, [ZnCl 4] 2- and [Zn(H 2O) 3(C 3H 5O(COO) 3)] - complexes in various states of solvation, protonation and coordination were calculated at various levels of electronic structure theory and basis set size. Isotopic reduced partition function ratios were calculated from frequency analyses of these optimized structures. Increasing the basis set size typically led to a decrease in the calculated reduced partition function ratios of ˜0.5‰ with values approaching a plateau using the aug-cc-pVDZ basis set or larger. The widest range of species were studied at the B3LYP/LAN2DZ/6-31G ∗ level of theory and basis-set size for comparison. Aqueous zinc complexes where oxygen is bound to the metal center tended to have the

  11. Synaptonemal Complex Components Are Required for Meiotic Checkpoint Function in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohr, Tisha; Ashley, Guinevere; Eggleston, Evan; Firestone, Kyra; Bhalla, Needhi

    2016-01-01

    Synapsis involves the assembly of a proteinaceous structure, the synaptonemal complex (SC), between paired homologous chromosomes, and is essential for proper meiotic chromosome segregation. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the synapsis checkpoint selectively removes nuclei with unsynapsed chromosomes by inducing apoptosis. This checkpoint depends on pairing centers (PCs), cis-acting sites that promote pairing and synapsis. We have hypothesized that the stability of homolog pairing at PCs is monitored by this checkpoint. Here, we report that SC components SYP-3, HTP-3, HIM-3, and HTP-1 are required for a functional synapsis checkpoint. Mutation of these components does not abolish PC function, demonstrating they are bona fide checkpoint components. Further, we identify mutant backgrounds in which the instability of homolog pairing at PCs does not correlate with the synapsis checkpoint response. Altogether, these data suggest that, in addition to homolog pairing, SC assembly may be monitored by the synapsis checkpoint. PMID:27605049

  12. Coordination functionalization of graphene oxide with tetraazamacrocyclic complexes of nickel(II): Generation of paramagnetic centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Alzate-Carvajal, Natalia; Henao-Holguín, Laura V.; Rybak-Akimova, Elena V.; Basiuk, Elena V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • [Ni(cyclam)] 2+ and [Ni(tet b)] 2+ cations coordinate to carboxylic groups of GO. • The coordination takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based medium. • The coordination results in the conversion from low-spin to high-spin Ni(II). • Functionalized GO samples were characterized by various instrumental techniques. - Abstract: We describe a novel approach to functionalization of graphene oxide (GO) which allows for a facile generation of paramagnetic centers from two diamagnetic components. Coordination attachment of [Ni(cyclam)] 2+ or [Ni(tet b)] 2+ tetraazamacrocyclic cations to carboxylic groups of GO takes place under basic conditions in aqueous-based reaction medium. The procedure is very straightforward and does not require high temperatures or other harsh conditions. Changing the coordination geometry of Ni(II) from square-planar tetracoordinated to pseudooctahedral hexacoordinated brings about the conversion from low-spin to high-spin state of the metal centers. Even though the content of tetraazamacrocyclic complexes in functionalized GO samples was found to be relatively low (nickel content of ca. 1 wt%, as determined by thermogravimetric analysis, elemental analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), room temperature magnetic susceptibility measurements easily detected the appearance of paramagnetic properties in GO + [Ni(cyclam)] and GO + [Ni(tet b)] nanohybrids, with effective magnetic moments of 1.95 BM and 2.2 BM for, respectively. According to density functional theory calculations, the main spin density is localized at the macrocyclic complexes, without considerable extension to graphene sheet, which suggests insignificant ferromagnetic coupling in the nanohybrids, in agreement with the results of magnetic susceptibility measurements. The coordination attachment of Ni(II) tetraazamacrocycles to GO results in considerable changes in Fourier-transform infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra, as well as in GO

  13. Complex networks of functional connectivity in a wetland reconnected to its floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Laurel G.; Newman, Susan; Saunders, Colin; Harvey, Judson

    2017-01-01

    Disturbances such as fire or flood, in addition to changing the local magnitude of ecological, hydrological, or biogeochemical processes, can also change their functional connectivity—how those processes interact in space. Complex networks offer promise for quantifying functional connectivity in watersheds. The approach resolves connections between nodes in space based on statistical similarities in perturbation signals (derived from solute time series) and is sensitive to a wider range of timescales than traditional mass-balance modeling. We use this approach to test hypotheses about how fire and flood impact ecological and biogeochemical dynamics in a wetland (Everglades, FL, USA) that was reconnected to its floodplain. Reintroduction of flow pulses after decades of separation by levees fundamentally reconfigured functional connectivity networks. The most pronounced expansion was that of the calcium network, which reflects periphyton dynamics and may represent an indirect influence of elevated nutrients, despite the comparatively smaller observed expansion of phosphorus networks. With respect to several solutes, periphyton acted as a “biotic filter,” shifting perturbations in water-quality signals to different timescales through slow but persistent transformations of the biotic community. The complex-networks approach also revealed portions of the landscape that operate in fundamentally different regimes with respect to dissolved oxygen, separated by a threshold in flow velocity of 1.2 cm/s, and suggested that complete removal of canals may be needed to restore connectivity with respect to biogeochemical processes. Fire reconfigured functional connectivity networks in a manner that reflected localized burn severity, but had a larger effect on the magnitude of solute concentrations.

  14. O tabagismo está associado com a remodelação de junções comunicantes no coração de ratos: explicação do paradoxo dos fumantes? Smoking is associated with remodeling of gap junction in the rat heart: smoker's paradox explanation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Novo

    2013-03-01

    reperfusion. OBJECTIVE: Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of exposure to tobacco smoke on intensity, distribution or phosphorylation of connexin 43 in the rat heart. METHODS: Wistar rats weighing 100 g were randomly allocated into 2 groups: 1 Control (n = 25; 2 Exposed to tobacco smoke (ETS, n = 23. After 5 weeks, left ventricular morphometric analysis, immunohisthochemistry and western blotting for connexin 43 (Cx43 were performed. RESULTS: Collagen volume fraction, cross-sectional areas, and ventricular weight were not statistically different between control and ETS. ETS showed lower stain intensity of Cx43 at intercalated disks (Control: 2.32 ± 0.19; ETS: 1.73 ± 0.18; p = 0.04. The distribution of CX43 at intercalated disks did not differ between the groups (Control: 3.73 ± 0.12; ETS: 3.20 ± 0.17; p = 0.18. ETS rats showed higher levels of dephosphorylated form of Cx43 (Control: 0.45 ± 0.11; ETS: 0.90 ± 0.11; p = 0.03. On the other hand, total Cx43 did not differ between control and ETS groups (Control: 0.75 ± 0.19; ETS: 0.93 ± 0.27; p = 0.58. CONCLUSION: Exposure to tobacco smoke resulted in cardiac gap junction remodeling, characterized by alterations in the quantity and phosphorylation of the Cx43, in rats hearts. This finding could explain the smoker's paradox observed in some studies.

  15. Use of Functional Polymorphisms To Elucidate the Peptide Binding Site of TAP Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jie; Pogozheva, Irina D; Mosberg, Henry I; Raghavan, Malini

    2015-10-01

    TAP1/TAP2 complexes translocate peptides from the cytosol to the endoplasmic reticulum lumen to enable immune surveillance by CD8(+) T cells. Peptide transport is preceded by peptide binding to a cytosol-accessible surface of TAP1/TAP2 complexes, but the location of the TAP peptide-binding pocket remains unknown. Guided by the known contributions of polymorphic TAP variants to peptide selection, we combined homology modeling of TAP with experimental measurements to identify several TAP residues that interact with peptides. Models for peptide-TAP complexes were generated, which indicate bent conformation for peptides. The peptide binding site of TAP is located at the hydrophobic boundary of the cytosolic membrane leaflet, with striking parallels to the glutathione binding site of NaAtm1, a transporter that functions in bacterial heavy metal detoxification. These studies illustrate the conservation of the ligand recognition modes of bacterial and mammalians transporters involved in peptide-guided cellular surveillance. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  16. Plasticity of empty major histocompatibility complex class I molecules determines peptide-selector function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hateren, Andy; Bailey, Alistair; Werner, Jörn M; Elliott, Tim

    2015-12-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) proteins provide protection from intracellular pathogens and cancer via each of a cell's MHC I molecules binding and presenting a peptide to cytotoxic T lymphocytes. MHC I genes are highly polymorphic and can have significant diversity, with polymorphisms predominantly localised in the peptide-binding groove where they can change peptide-binding specificity. However, polymorphic residues may also determine other functional properties, such as how dependent MHC I alleles are on the peptide-loading complex for optimal acquisition of peptide cargo. We describe how differences in the peptide-binding properties of two MHC I alleles correlates with altered conformational flexibility in the peptide-empty state. We hypothesise that plasticity is an intrinsic property encoded by the protein sequence, and that co-ordinated movements of the membrane-proximal and membrane-distal domains collectively determines how dependent MHC I are on the peptide-loading complex for efficient assembly with high affinity peptides. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Complex extraordinary dielectric function of Mg-doped lithium niobate crystals at terahertz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, K. A.; Kitaeva, G. Kh.; Kovalev, S. P.; Germansky, S. A.; Buryakov, A. M.; Tuchak, A. N.; Penin, A. N.

    2016-08-01

    We study the dispersion of the extraordinary dielectric function real and imaginary parts in the wide terahertz-frequency range of the lowest polariton branch for bulk LiNbO3 and Mg:LiNbO3 crystals. At frequencies 0.1-2.5 THz, both dispersion parts are measured by means of standard time-domain terahertz spectroscopy, and at higher frequencies up to 5.5 THz, the dielectric function real part is determined using a common scheme of spontaneous parametric down-conversion under near-forward Raman scattering by phonon polaritons. A special approach is applied for measuring of the dielectric function imaginary part at frequencies 1-3 THz, based on the analysis of visibility of three-wave second-order interference under spontaneous parametric down-conversion. The generalized approximate expressions are obtained for complex dielectric function dispersion within the lower polariton branches of LiNbO3 and Mg:LiNbO3. It is shown that the well-known decrease in terahertz-wave absorption of lithium niobate crystals under Mg-doping is caused by changes in the defect structure and reduction of coupling of the terahertz-frequency polaritons with Debye relaxational mode.

  18. Structure and function of the non-classical major histocompatibility complex molecule MR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krovi, S Harsha; Gapin, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    Polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a central role in the vertebrate adaptive immune system. By presenting short peptides derived from pathogen-derived proteins, these "classical" MHC molecules can alert the T cell branch of the immune system of infected cells and clear the pathogen. There exist other "non-classical" MHC molecules, which while similar in structure to classical MHC proteins, are contrasted by their limited polymorphism. While the functions of many class Ib MHC molecules have still to be elucidated, the nature and diversity of antigens (if any) that some of them might present to the immune system is expected to be more restricted and might function as another approach to distinguish self from non-self. The MHC-related 1 (MR1) molecule is a member of this family of non-classical MHC proteins. It was recently shown to present unique antigens in the form of vitamin metabolites found in certain microbes. MR1 is strongly conserved genetically, structurally, and functionally through mammalian evolution, indicating its necessity in ensuring an effective immune system for members of this class. Although MR1 will be celebrating 21 years this year since its discovery, most of our understanding of how this molecule functions has only been uncovered in the past decade. Herein, we discuss where MR1 is expressed, how it selectively is able to bind to its appropriate antigens and how it, then, is able to specifically activate a distinct population of T cells.

  19. Dinitrogen functionalization with bis(cyclopentadienyl) complexes of zirconium and hafnium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirik, Paul J

    2007-01-07

    The rich chemistry of substituted bis(cyclopentadienyl)zirconium and hafnium complexes bearing side-on coordinated dinitrogen ligands is highlighted in this Perspective. Our studies in this area were initially motivated by the desire to understand side-on vs. end-on dinitrogen coordination in bimetallic zirconocene and hafnocene N2 compounds. In the cases where eta2,eta2-dinitrogen compounds were isolated, both structural and computational data have established significant imido character in the metal-nitrogen bonds. This additional bonding interaction, which is diminished in end-on complexes bearing both terminal and bridging N2 ligands, facilitates dinitrogen functionalization by non-polar reagents including dihydrogen, carbon-hydrogen bonds and weak Brønsted acids such as water and ethanol. In hafnocene chemistry, where unwanted side-on, end-on isomerization is suppressed, cycloaddition of phenylisocyanate to coordinated N2 has also been accomplished. For N-H bond forming reactions involving H2, kinetic measurements, in addition to isotopic labelling and computational studies, are consistent with dinitrogen functionalization by 1,2-addition involving a highly ordered, four-centred transition structure.

  20. Mdm35p imports Ups proteins into the mitochondrial intermembrane space by functional complex formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Yasushi; Iijima, Miho; Sesaki, Hiromi

    2010-09-01

    Ups1p, Ups2p, and Ups3p are three homologous proteins that control phospholipid metabolism in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS). The Ups proteins are atypical IMS proteins in that they lack the two major IMS-targeting signals, bipartite presequences and cysteine motifs. Here, we show that Ups protein import is mediated by another IMS protein, Mdm35p. In vitro import assays show that import of Ups proteins requires Mdm35p. Loss of Mdm35p led to a decrease in steady state levels of Ups proteins in mitochondria. In addition, mdm35Delta cells displayed a similar phenotype to ups1Deltaups2Deltaups3Delta cells. Interestingly, unlike typical import machineries, Mdm35p associated stably with Ups proteins at a steady state after import. Demonstrating that Mdm35p is a functional component of Ups-Mdm35p complexes, restoration of Ups protein levels in mdm35Delta mitochondria failed to restore phospholipid metabolism. These findings provide a novel mechanism in which the formation of functional protein complexes drives mitochondrial protein import.

  1. The Food Web of Potter Cove (Antarctica): complexity, structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Tomás I.; Salinas, Vanesa; Cordone, Georgina; Campana, Gabriela; Moreira, Eugenia; Deregibus, Dolores; Torre, Luciana; Sahade, Ricardo; Tatián, Marcos; Barrera Oro, Esteban; De Troch, Marleen; Doyle, Santiago; Quartino, María Liliana; Saravia, Leonardo A.; Momo, Fernando R.

    2018-01-01

    Knowledge of the food web structure and complexity are central to better understand ecosystem functioning. A food-web approach includes both species and energy flows among them, providing a natural framework for characterizing species' ecological roles and the mechanisms through which biodiversity influences ecosystem dynamics. Here we present for the first time a high-resolution food web for a marine ecosystem at Potter Cove (northern Antarctic Peninsula). Eleven food web properties were analyzed in order to document network complexity, structure and topology. We found a low linkage density (3.4), connectance (0.04) and omnivory percentage (45), as well as a short path length (1.8) and a low clustering coefficient (0.08). Furthermore, relating the structure of the food web to its dynamics, an exponential degree distribution (in- and out-links) was found. This suggests that the Potter Cove food web may be vulnerable if the most connected species became locally extinct. For two of the three more connected functional groups, competition overlap graphs imply high trophic interaction between demersal fish and niche specialization according to feeding strategies in amphipods. On the other hand, the prey overlap graph shows also that multiple energy pathways of carbon flux exist across benthic and pelagic habitats in the Potter Cove ecosystem. Although alternative food sources might add robustness to the web, network properties (low linkage density, connectance and omnivory) suggest fragility and potential trophic cascade effects.

  2. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichaud, Franck

    2018-01-01

    The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM) and zonula adherens (ZA) , thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1) gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  3. PAR-Complex and Crumbs Function During Photoreceptor Morphogenesis and Retinal Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franck Pichaud

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The fly photoreceptor has long been used as a model to study sensory neuron morphogenesis and retinal degeneration. In particular, elucidating how these cells are built continues to help further our understanding of the mechanisms of polarized cell morphogenesis, intracellular trafficking and the causes of human retinal pathologies. The conserved PAR complex, which in flies consists of Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka, and the transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb are key players during photoreceptor morphogenesis. While the PAR complex regulates polarity in many cell types, Crb function in polarity is relatively specific to epithelial cells. Together Cdc42-PAR6-aPKC-Bazooka and Crb orchestrate the differentiation of the photoreceptor apical membrane (AM and zonula adherens (ZA, thus allowing these cells to assemble into a neuro-epithelial lattice. In addition to its function in epithelial polarity, Crb has also been shown to protect fly photoreceptors from light-induced degeneration, a process linked to Rhodopsin expression and trafficking. Remarkably, mutations in the human Crumbs1 (CRB1 gene lead to retinal degeneration, making the fly photoreceptor a powerful disease model system.

  4. Genome-wide functional analysis on the molecular mechanism of specifically biosynthesized fluorescence Eu complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jing; Dong, Xiawei; Jiang, Xuerui; Jiang, Hui; Li, Chen-Zhong; Wang, Xuemei

    2017-09-22

    Fluorescence imaging as an attractive diagnostic technique is widely employed for early diagnosis of cancer. Self-biosynthesized fluorescent Eu complex in situ in Hela cells have realized specifically and accurately fluorescence imaging for cancer cells. But the molecular mechanism of the in situ biosynthesized process is still unclear. In order to reveal this mechanism, we have investigated whole-genome expression profiles with cDNA microarray, incubated with Eu solution in Hela cells for 24 h. Methylthiazoltetrazolium (MTT) assay and laser confocal fluorescence microscopy study showed the low cytotoxicity and specifically fluorescence imaging of Eu complex in Hela cells. It is observed that 563 up-regulated genes and 274 down-regulated genes were differentially expressed. Meanwhile, quantitative RT-PCR was utilized to measure the expression of some important genes, which validated the results of microarray data analysis. Besides, GO analysis showed that a wide range of differential expression functional genes involved in three groups, including cellular component, molecular function and cellular biological process. It was evident that some important biological pathways were apparently affected through KEGG pathway analysis, including focal adhesion pathway and PI3K (phosphatidylinositol 3' -kinase)-Akt signaling pathway, which can influence glycolytic metabolism and NAD(P)H-oxidases metabolic pathway.

  5. Imaging and structural studies of DNA–protein complexes and membrane ion channels

    KAUST Repository

    Marini, Monica

    2017-01-17

    In bio-imaging by electron microscopy, damage of the sample and limited contrast are the two main hurdles for reaching high image quality. We extend a new preparation method based on nanofabrication and super-hydrophobicity to the imaging and structural studies of nucleic acids, nucleic acid-protein complexes (DNA/Rad51 repair protein complex) and neuronal ion channels (gap-junction, K+ and GABA(A) channels) as paradigms of biological significance and increasing complexity. The preparation method is based on the liquid phase and is compatible with physiological conditions. Only in the very last stage, samples are dried for TEM analysis. Conventional TEM and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) were used to achieve a resolution of 3.3 and 1.5 angstrom, respectively. The EM dataset quality allows the determination of relevant structural and metrological information on the DNA structure, DNA-protein interactions and ion channels, allowing the identification of specific macromolecules and their structure.

  6. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with porphyrins: meso-tetraphenylporphine and its transition metal complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basiuk, Elena V; Basiuk, Vladimir A; Santiago, Patricia; Puente-Lee, Iván

    2007-01-01

    Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes with meso-tetraphenylporphine (H2TPP) and its metal(II) complexes NiTPP and CoTPP was studied by means of different experimental techniques and theoretical calculations. As follows from the experimental adsorption curves, free H2TPP ligand exhibits the strongest adsorption of three porphyrins tested, followed by CoTPP and NiTPP. At the highest porphyrin concentrations studied, the adsorption at multi-walled carbon nanotubes was about 2% (by weight) for H2TPP, 1% for CoTPP, and 0.5% for NiTPP. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed carbon nanotubes with a variable degree of surface coverage with porphyrin molecules. According to scanning electron microscopy, the nanotubes glue together rather than debundle; apparently, a large porphyrin excess resulting in polymolecular adsorption is essential for exfoliation/debundling of the nanotube ropes. The nanotube/porphyrins hybrids were studied by infrared and Raman spectroscopy, as well as by scanning tunneling microscopy. Electronic structure calculations were performed at the B3LYP/LANL2MB theoretical level with the unsubstituted porphine (H2P) and its Co(II) complex, on one hand, and open-end armchair (5,5) (ANT) and zigzag (8,0) (ZNT) SWNT models, on the other hand. The interaction of H2P with ANT was found to be by 3.9 kcal mol(-1) stronger than that of CoP. At the same time, CoP+ZNT complex is more stable by 42.7 kcal mol(-1) as compared to H2P+ZNT According to these calculated results, the free porphyrins interact less selectively with zigzag and armchair (i.e., semiconducting and metallic) nanotubes, whereas the difference becomes very large for the metal porphyrins. HOMO-LUMO structure, electrostatic potential and spin density distribution for the paramagnetic cobalt(II) complexes were analyzed.

  7. Inferring the physical connectivity of complex networks from their functional dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holm Liisa

    2010-05-01

    background network to the observed change of the functional activities in the system. Conclusions The results presented in this study indicate a strong relationship between the structure and dynamics of complex network systems. As coupling strength increases, synchronization emerges among hub nodes and recruits small-degree nodes. The results show that the onset of global synchronization in the system hinders the reconstruction of an underlying complex structure. Our analysis helps to clarify how the synchronization is achieved in systems of different network topologies.

  8. Reaction of Non-Symmetric Schiff Base Metallo-Ligand Complexes Possessing an Oxime Function with Ln Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Costes

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The preparation of non-symmetric Schiff base ligands possessing one oxime function that is associated to a second function such as pyrrole or phenol function is first described. These ligands, which possess inner N4 or N3O coordination sites, allow formation of cationic or neutral non-symmetric CuII or NiII metallo-ligand complexes under their mono- or di-deprotonated forms. In presence of Lanthanide ions the neutral complexes do not coordinate to the LnIII ions, the oxygen atom of the oxime function being only hydrogen-bonded to a water molecule that is linked to the LnIII ion. This surprising behavior allows for the isolation of LnIII ions by non-interacting metal complexes. Reaction of cationic NiII complexes possessing a protonated oxime function with LnIII ions leads to the formation of original and dianionic (Gd(NO352− entities that are well separated from each other. This work highlights the preparation of well isolated mononuclear LnIII entities into a matrix of diamagnetic metal complexes. These new complexes complete our previous work dealing with the complexing ability of the oxime function toward Lanthanide ions. It could open the way to the synthesis of new entities with interesting properties, such as single-ion magnets for example.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of palladium(II) and nickel(II) alcoholate-functionalized NHC complexes and of mixed nickel(II)-lithium(I) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameury, Sophie; de Frémont, Pierre; Breuil, Pierre-Alain R; Olivier-Bourbigou, Hélène; Braunstein, Pierre

    2014-05-19

    The synthesis of Pd(II) and Ni(II) alcohol-functionalized N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complexes was explored to examine the possible influence of the functional arm attached to the NHC backbone on their structure and reactivity and, in the case of a Ni(II) complex, on its catalytic properties in ethylene oligomerization. Starting from the alcohol-functionalized imidazolium salt [ImDiPP(C2OH)]Cl (2), the new functionalized NHC palladium(II) complex [PdCl(acac){ImDiPP(C2OH)-CNHC}] (3) was synthesized and fully characterized. Two byproducts, [PdCl{μ-ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,O}]2 (4) and trans-[PdCl2{ImDiPP(C2OH)-CNHC}2] (5), formed during the synthesis of 3, were also fully characterized. Acids promoted the transformation of 3 into the new CNHC-bound complex [PdCl(μ-Cl){ImDiPP(C2OH)-CNHC}]2 (6), unveiling the lability of the acac ligand and the resistance of the Pd-NHC bond to acids. Complex 6 reacted with a base to afford complex 4, in which alkoxide coordination to Pd(II) has occurred to generate a CNHC,O chelate. The stability of 3 was also assessed under basic conditions, and the new complex [Pd(acac){ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,O}] (7) was characterized. The new nickel(II) alcoholate-functionalized NHC complex [NiCl{μ-ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,O}]2 (8) was synthesized by the reaction of the imidazolium salt 2 with n-BuLi and [NiCl2(dme)]. The reaction of 8 with HCl regenerates the imidazolium and alcohol functions to give [ImDiPP(C2OH)]2[NiCl4] (9). The mixed-metal Ni(II)-Li(I) complexes [Ni2{μ-ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,μ-O}4Li]BF4 (10), [Ni2{μ-ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,μ-O}4Li]Cl (11), and [Ni{ImDiPP(C2O)-CNHC,μ-O}2LiBr] (12) were isolated and characterized. However, it was not possible to synthesize a Ni(II) alcohol-functionalized NHC complex in high yield. Small amounts of the square-planar complex [NiCl2{ImDiPP(C2OH)-CNHC}2] (13) could be isolated, and this complex was characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. In 13, only the CNHC atom of the alcohol-functionalized NHC ligand is bound

  10. Sulfur-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Pd(II: Syntheses, Structures and Catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs can be easily modified by introducing functional groups at the nitrogen atoms, which leads to versatile coordination chemistry as well as diverse catalytic applications of the resulting complexes. This article summarizes our contributions to the field of NHCs bearing different types of sulfur functions, i.e., thioether, sulfoxide, thiophene, and thiolato. The experimental evidence for the truly hemilabile coordination behavior of a Pd(II thioether-NHC complex has been reported as well. In addition, complexes bearing rigid CSC-pincer ligands have been synthesized and the reasons for pincer versus pseudo-pincer formation investigated. Incorporation of the electron-rich thiolato function resulted in the isolation of structurally diverse complexes. The catalytic activities of selected complexes have been tested in Suzuki-Miyaura, Mizoroki-Heck and hydroamination reactions.

  11. A Variant of GJD2, Encoding for Connexin 36, Alters the Function of Insulin Producing β-Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Cigliola

    Full Text Available Signalling through gap junctions contributes to control insulin secretion and, thus, blood glucose levels. Gap junctions of the insulin-producing β-cells are made of connexin 36 (Cx36, which is encoded by the GJD2 gene. Cx36-null mice feature alterations mimicking those observed in type 2 diabetes (T2D. GJD2 is also expressed in neurons, which share a number of common features with pancreatic β-cells. Given that a synonymous exonic single nucleotide polymorphism of human Cx36 (SNP rs3743123 associates with altered function of central neurons in a subset of epileptic patients, we investigated whether this SNP also caused alterations of β-cell function. Transfection of rs3743123 cDNA in connexin-lacking HeLa cells resulted in altered formation of gap junction plaques and cell coupling, as compared to those induced by wild type (WT GJD2 cDNA. Transgenic mice expressing the very same cDNAs under an insulin promoter revealed that SNP rs3743123 expression consistently lead to a post-natal reduction of islet Cx36 levels and β-cell survival, resulting in hyperglycemia in selected lines. These changes were not observed in sex- and age-matched controls expressing WT hCx36. The variant GJD2 only marginally associated to heterogeneous populations of diabetic patients. The data document that a silent polymorphism of GJD2 is associated with altered β-cell function, presumably contributing to T2D pathogenesis.

  12. Moral Complexity: The Fatal Attraction of Truthiness and the Importance of Mature Moral Functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narvaez, Darcia

    2010-03-01

    Recently, intuitionist theories have been effective in capturing the academic discourse about morality. Intuitionist theories, like rationalist theories, offer important but only partial understanding of moral functioning. Both can be fallacious and succumb to truthiness: the attachment to one's opinions because they "feel right," potentially leading to harmful action or inaction. Both intuition and reasoning are involved in deliberation and expertise. Both are malleable from environmental and educational influence, making questions of normativity-which intuitions and reasoning skills to foster-of utmost importance. Good intuition and reasoning inform mature moral functioning, which needs to include capacities that promote sustainable human well-being. Individual capacities for habituated empathic concern and moral metacognition-moral locus of control, moral self-regulation, and moral self-reflection-comprise mature moral functioning, which also requires collective capacities for moral dialogue and moral institutions. These capacities underlie moral innovation and are necessary for solving the complex challenges humanity faces. © The Author(s) 2010.

  13. Chinese scalp acupuncture relieves pain and restores function in complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hommer, Dean H

    2012-10-01

    Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS) can result from trauma or after surgery. It is often difficult to manage effectively. If not recognized early, it can result in significant debilitation. Symptoms attributed to CRPS include neuropathic pain, allodynia, sudomotor changes, and decreased range of motion. It can occur with (Type II) or without (Type I) nerve injury. A number of soldiers sustaining extremity injuries during combat have manifested these symptoms. Two subjects were diagnosed with CRPS after sustaining upper extremity injuries during military operations. After failing conservative treatment, Chinese Scalp Acupuncture (CSA) was used once to twice a week for 1 to 4 weeks. CSA resulted in improvement in the pain visual analog scale or numeric rating scale by over 80% in two soldiers with upper extremity CRPS. Additionally, decreased sensory changes and improved function were noted on exam and therapy assessments. Notably, the pain reduction, functional improvement, and normalization of sensation have been fully maintained between treatments. The treatment response had been sustained at 20-month follow-up with no recurrence. CSA provided lasting pain reduction, and improved function and sensation in this group of combatants with upper extremity CRPS.

  14. Spectral correlation functions of the sum of two independent complex Wishart matrices with unequal covariances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Checinski, Tomasz; Kieburg, Mario

    2016-01-01

    We compute the spectral statistics of the sum H of two independent complex Wishart matrices, each of which is correlated with a different covariance matrix. Random matrix theory enjoys many applications including sums and products of random matrices. Typically ensembles with correlations among the matrix elements are much more difficult to solve. Using a combination of supersymmetry, superbosonisation and bi-orthogonal functions we are able to determine all spectral k -point density correlation functions of H for arbitrary matrix size N . In the half-degenerate case, when one of the covariance matrices is proportional to the identity, the recent results by Kumar for the joint eigenvalue distribution of H serve as our starting point. In this case the ensemble has a bi-orthogonal structure and we explicitly determine its kernel, providing its exact solution for finite N . The kernel follows from computing the expectation value of a single characteristic polynomial. In the general non-degenerate case the generating function for the k -point resolvent is determined from a supersymmetric evaluation of the expectation value of k ratios of characteristic polynomials. Numerical simulations illustrate our findings for the spectral density at finite N and we also give indications how to do the asymptotic large- N analysis. (paper)

  15. Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ complexes cooperatively regulate mesenchymal stem cell function and bone formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yi; Weiss, Stephen J

    2017-03-04

    Snail and Slug are zinc-finger transcription factors that play key roles in directing the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) programs associated with normal development as well as disease progression. More recent work suggests that these EMT-associated transcription factors also modulate the function of both embryonic and adult stem cells. Interestingly, YAP and TAZ, the co-transcriptional effectors of the Hippo pathway, likewise play an important role in stem cell self-renewal and lineage commitment. While direct intersections between the Snail/Slug and Hippo pathways have not been described previously, we recently described an unexpected cooperative interaction between Snail/Slug and YAP/TAZ that controls the self-renewal and differentiation properties of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a cell population critical to bone development. Additional studies revealed that both Snail and Slug are able to form binary complexes with either YAP or TAZ that, together, control YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity and function throughout mouse development. Given the more recent observations that MSC-like cell populations are found in association throughout the vasculature where they participate in tissue regeneration, fibrosis and cancer, the Snail/Slug-YAP/TAZ axis is well-positioned to regulate global stem cell function in health and disease.

  16. Formation of complexes between functionalized chitosan membranes and copper: A study by angle resolved XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurado-López, Belén [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Vieira, Rodrigo Silveira [Chemical Engineering Department, Universidade Federal do Ceará, UFC, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Rabelo, Rodrigo Balloni; Beppu, Marisa Masumi [School of Chemical Engineering, University of Campinas, UNICAMP, P.O. Box 6066, 13081-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Casado, Juan [Departamento de Química-Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain); Rodríguez-Castellón, Enrique, E-mail: castellon@uma.es [Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Málaga, 29071 Málaga (Spain)

    2017-01-01

    Chitosan is a biopolymer with potential applications in various fields. Recently, it has been used for heavy metals removal like copper, due to the presence of amino and hydroxyl groups in its structure. Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents, such as iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. These membranes were used for copper adsorption and the formed complexes were characterized. Thermal and crystalline properties of chitosan membranes were studied by TG-DCS and X-ray diffraction. Raman, XPS and FT-IR data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups. The oxidation state of copper-chitosan membranes were also studied by angle resolved XPS, and by UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. - Highlights: • Chitosan membranes were crosslinked with epichlorohydrin and bisoxirano and functionalized with chelating agents. • The chelating agent were iminodiacetic acid, aspartic acid and tris-(2-amino-ethyl) polyamine. • The functionalized membranes were used for copper adsorption and studied by ARXPS, Raman, TG-DCS, FT-IR and XRD. • Spectroscopic data confirmed that copper is linked to the modified chitosan membranes by the amino groups.

  17. Functional anatomy of 5-HT2A receptors in the amygdala and hippocampal complex: relevance to memory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombardi, Cristiano; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe

    2013-10-01

    The amygdaloid complex and hippocampal region contribute to emotional activities, learning, and memory. Mounting evidence suggests a primary role for serotonin (5-HT) in the physiological basis of memory and its pathogenesis by modulating directly the activity of these two areas and their cross-talk. Indeed, both the amygdala and the hippocampus receive remarkably dense serotoninergic inputs from the dorsal and median raphe nuclei. Anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological evidence indicates the 5-HT2A receptor as one of the principal postsynaptic targets mediating 5-HT effects. In fact, the 5-HT2A receptor is the most abundant 5-HT receptor expressed in these brain structures and is expressed on both amygdalar and hippocampal pyramidal glutamatergic neurons as well as on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-containing interneurons. 5-HT2A receptors on GABAergic interneurons stimulate GABA release, and thereby have an important role in regulating network activity and neural oscillations in the amygdala and hippocampal region. This review will focus on the distribution and physiological functions of the 5-HT2A receptor in the amygdala and hippocampal region. Taken together the results discussed here suggest that 5-HT2A receptor may be a potential therapeutic target for those disorders related to hippocampal and amygdala dysfunction.

  18. Gene-Disease Network Analysis Reveals Functional Modules in Mendelian, Complex and Environmental Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Mehren, Anna; Bundschus, Markus; Rautschka, Michael; Mayer, Miguel A.; Sanz, Ferran; Furlong, Laura I.

    2011-01-01

    Background Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. Principal Findings We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. Conclusions For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and environmental factors

  19. Gene-disease network analysis reveals functional modules in mendelian, complex and environmental diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bauer-Mehren

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scientists have been trying to understand the molecular mechanisms of diseases to design preventive and therapeutic strategies for a long time. For some diseases, it has become evident that it is not enough to obtain a catalogue of the disease-related genes but to uncover how disruptions of molecular networks in the cell give rise to disease phenotypes. Moreover, with the unprecedented wealth of information available, even obtaining such catalogue is extremely difficult. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a comprehensive gene-disease association database by integrating associations from several sources that cover different biomedical aspects of diseases. In particular, we focus on the current knowledge of human genetic diseases including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases. To assess the concept of modularity of human diseases, we performed a systematic study of the emergent properties of human gene-disease networks by means of network topology and functional annotation analysis. The results indicate a highly shared genetic origin of human diseases and show that for most diseases, including mendelian, complex and environmental diseases, functional modules exist. Moreover, a core set of biological pathways is found to be associated with most human diseases. We obtained similar results when studying clusters of diseases, suggesting that related diseases might arise due to dysfunction of common biological processes in the cell. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, we include mendelian, complex and environmental diseases in an integrated gene-disease association database and show that the concept of modularity applies for all of them. We furthermore provide a functional analysis of disease-related modules providing important new biological insights, which might not be discovered when considering each of the gene-disease association repositories independently. Hence, we present a suitable framework for the study of how genetic and

  20. Functional anatomy of the lateral collateral ligament complex of the elbow. Configuration of Y and its role

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seki, A.; Olsen, B.S.; Jensen, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    A previous anatomic study has revealed that the lateral collateral ligament (LCL) complex of the elbow has a Y-shaped configuration, which consists of a superior, an anterior, and a posterior band. The LCL complex, including the annular ligament, functions as a 3-dimensional (3D) Y-shaped structure...

  1. New carboxy-functionalized terpyridines as precursors for zwitterionic ruthenium complexes for polymer-based solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duprez, V.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    New carboxy-terpyridines selectively functionalized at the 4-, 4'- and 4"-positions were prepared in a three-step procedure with good yields using, the Krohnke reaction followed by saponification. Their complexation with ruthenium led to symmetric and unsymmetric terpyridinyl zwitterionic complexes...

  2. Phosphorescence Imaging of Living Cells with Amino Acid-Functionalized Tris(2-phenylpyridine)iridium(III) Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steunenberg, P.; Ruggi, A.; Berg, van den N.S.; Buckle, T.; Kuil, J.; Leeuwen, van F.W.B.; Velders, A.H.

    2012-01-01

    A series of nine luminescent cyclometalated octahedral iridium(III) tris(2-phenylpyridine) complexes has been synthesized, functionalized with three different amino acids (glycine, alanine, and lysine), on one, two, or all three of the phenylpyridine ligands. All starting complexes and final

  3. Nuclear excitation function and particle emission from complex nuclei following muon capture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifshitz, M.; Singer, P.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the calculation of the nuclear excitation function following muon capture in complex nuclei and of the ensuing emission is presented. The capturing nucleus is treated as consisting of quasifree nucleons moving in a momentum-dependent potential and having an effective nucleon-momentum distribution. The emission of protons, deuterons, α particles, and neutrons is calculated by considering both pre-equilibrium and compound-nucleus emission. The model accounts well for the observed charged particles emission rates from capturing nuclei over the wide range 23 < or = A < or = 209. The proton emission is shown to become mainly of pre-equilibrium nature for the heavier nuclei. The results for neutron emission are also in satisfactory agreement with experimentally measured multiplicities and spectra

  4. High-resolution metagenomics targets major functional types in complex microbial communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Lapidus, Alla; Ivanova, Natalia; Copeland, Alex C.; McHardy, Alice C.; Szeto, Ernest; Salamov, Asaf; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Suciu, Dominic; Levine, Samuel R.; Markowitz, Victor M.; Rigoutsos, Isidore; Tringe, Susannah G.; Bruce, David C.; Richardson, Paul M.; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2009-08-01

    Most microbes in the biosphere remain uncultured and unknown. Whole genome shotgun (WGS) sequencing of environmental DNA (metagenomics) allows glimpses into genetic and metabolic potentials of natural microbial communities. However, in communities of high complexity metagenomics fail to link specific microbes to specific ecological functions. To overcome this limitation, we selectively targeted populations involved in oxidizing single-carbon (C{sub 1}) compounds in Lake Washington (Seattle, USA) by labeling their DNA via stable isotope probing (SIP), followed by WGS sequencing. Metagenome analysis demonstrated specific sequence enrichments in response to different C{sub 1} substrates, highlighting ecological roles of individual phylotypes. We further demonstrated the utility of our approach by extracting a nearly complete genome of a novel methylotroph Methylotenera mobilis, reconstructing its metabolism and conducting genome-wide analyses. This approach allowing high-resolution genomic analysis of ecologically relevant species has the potential to be applied to a wide variety of ecosystems.

  5. Cognitive function predicts listening effort performance during complex tasks in normally aging adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennine Harvey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study examines whether cognitive function, as measured by the subtests of the Woodcock–Johnson III (WCJ-III assessment, predicts listening-effort performance during dual tasks across the adults of varying ages. Materials and Methods: Participants were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 14 listeners (number of females = 11 who were 41–61 years old [mean = 53.18; standard deviation (SD = 5.97]. Group 2 consisted of 15 listeners (number of females = 9 who were 63–81 years old (mean = 72.07; SD = 5.11. Participants were administered the WCJ-III Memory for Words, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Matching, and Decision Speed subtests. All participants were tested in each of the following three dual-task experimental conditions, which were varying in complexity: (1 auditory word recognition + visual processing, (2 auditory working memory (word + visual processing, and (3 auditory working memory (sentence + visual processing in noise. Results: A repeated measures analysis of variance revealed that task complexity significantly affected the performance measures of auditory accuracy, visual accuracy, and processing speed. Linear regression revealed that the cognitive subtests of the WCJ-III test significantly predicted performance across dependent variable measures. Conclusion: Listening effort is significantly affected by task complexity, regardless of age. Performance on the WCJ-III test may predict listening effort in adults and may assist speech-language pathologist (SLPs to understand challenges faced by participants when subjected to noise.

  6. A psychosocial intervention for the management of functional dysphonia: complex intervention development and pilot randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deary, Vincent; McColl, Elaine; Carding, Paul; Miller, Tracy; Wilson, Janet

    2018-01-01

    Medically unexplained loss or alteration of voice-functional dysphonia-is the commonest presentation to speech and language therapists (SLTs). Besides the impact on personal and work life, functional dysphonia is also associated with increased levels of anxiety and depression and poor general health. Voice therapy delivered by SLTs improves voice but not these associated symptoms. The aims of this research were the systematic development of a complex intervention to improve the treatment of functional dysphonia, and the trialling of this intervention for feasibility and acceptability to SLTs and patients in a randomised pilot study. A theoretical model of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) was elaborated through literature review and synthesis. This was initially applied as an assessment format in a series of patient interviews. Data from this stage and a small consecutive cohort study were used to design and refine a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) training intervention for a SLT. This was then implemented in an external pilot patient randomised trial where one SLT delivered standard voice therapy or voice therapy plus CBT to 74 patients. The primary outcomes were of the acceptability of the intervention to patients and the SLT, and the feasibility of changing the SLT's clinical practice through a brief training. This was measured through monitoring treatment flow and through structured analysis of the content of intervention for treatment fidelity and inter-treatment contamination. As measured by treatment flow, the intervention was as acceptable as standard voice t