WorldWideScience

Sample records for functional diffusion maps

  1. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    Schjøth, Lars; Fogh Olsen, Ole; Sporring, Jon

    2007-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  2. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    Schjøth, Lars; Olsen, Ole Fogh; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    . To address this problem we introduce a novel photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way we preserve the important illumination features......, while eliminating noise. We call our method diffusion based photon mapping....

  3. The Functional Diffusion Map: An Imaging Biomarker for the Early Prediction of Cancer Treatment Outcome

    Bradford A. Moffat

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional diffusion map (fDM has been recently reported as an early and quantitative biomarker of clinical brain tumor treatment outcome. This MRI approach spatially maps and quantifies treatment-induced changes in tumor water diffusion values resulting from alterations in cell density/cell membrane function and microenvironment. This current study was designed to evaluate the capability of fDM for preclinical evaluation of dose escalation studies and to determine if these changes were correlated with outcome measures (cell kill and overall survival. Serial T2-weighted and diffusion MRI were carried out on rodents with orthotopically implanted 9L brain tumors receiving three doses of 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (6.65, 13.3, and 26.6 mg/kg, i.p.. All images were coregistered to baseline T2-weighted images for fDM analysis. Analysis of tumor fDM data on day 4 posttreatment detected dosedependent changes in tumor diffusion values, which were also found to be spatially dependent. Histologic analysis of treated tumors confirmed spatial changes in cellularity as observed by fDM. Early changes in tumor diffusion values were found to be highly correlative with drug dose and independent biologic outcome measures (cell kill and survival. Therefore, the fDM imaging biomarker for early prediction of treatment efficacy can be used in the drug development process.

  4. Function-specific and Enhanced Brain Structural Connectivity Mapping via Joint Modeling of Diffusion and Functional MRI.

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Parhi, Keshab K; Lenglet, Christophe

    2018-03-16

    A joint structural-functional brain network model is presented, which enables the discovery of function-specific brain circuits, and recovers structural connections that are under-estimated by diffusion MRI (dMRI). Incorporating information from functional MRI (fMRI) into diffusion MRI to estimate brain circuits is a challenging task. Usually, seed regions for tractography are selected from fMRI activation maps to extract the white matter pathways of interest. The proposed method jointly analyzes whole brain dMRI and fMRI data, allowing the estimation of complete function-specific structural networks instead of interactively investigating the connectivity of individual cortical/sub-cortical areas. Additionally, tractography techniques are prone to limitations, which can result in erroneous pathways. The proposed framework explicitly models the interactions between structural and functional connectivity measures thereby improving anatomical circuit estimation. Results on Human Connectome Project (HCP) data demonstrate the benefits of the approach by successfully identifying function-specific anatomical circuits, such as the language and resting-state networks. In contrast to correlation-based or independent component analysis (ICA) functional connectivity mapping, detailed anatomical connectivity patterns are revealed for each functional module. Results on a phantom (Fibercup) also indicate improvements in structural connectivity mapping by rejecting false-positive connections with insufficient support from fMRI, and enhancing under-estimated connectivity with strong functional correlation.

  5. Diffusion Based Photon Mapping

    Schjøth, Lars; Sporring, Jon; Fogh Olsen, Ole

    2008-01-01

    . To address this problem, we introduce a photon mapping algorithm based on nonlinear anisotropic diffusion. Our algorithm adapts according to the structure of the photon map such that smoothing occurs along edges and structures and not across. In this way, we preserve important illumination features, while...

  6. Quantitative probabilistic functional diffusion mapping in newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with radiochemotherapy.

    Ellingson, Benjamin M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Lai, Albert; Nghiemphu, Phioanh L; Liau, Linda M; Pope, Whitney B

    2013-03-01

    Functional diffusion mapping (fDM) is a cancer imaging technique that uses voxel-wise changes in apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) to evaluate response to treatment. Despite promising initial results, uncertainty in image registration remains the largest barrier to widespread clinical application. The current study introduces a probabilistic approach to fDM quantification to overcome some of these limitations. A total of 143 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who were undergoing standard radiochemotherapy were enrolled in this retrospective study. Traditional and probabilistic fDMs were calculated using ADC maps acquired before and after therapy. Probabilistic fDMs were calculated by applying random, finite translational, and rotational perturbations to both pre-and posttherapy ADC maps, then repeating calculation of fDMs reflecting changes after treatment, resulting in probabilistic fDMs showing the voxel-wise probability of fDM classification. Probabilistic fDMs were then compared with traditional fDMs in their ability to predict progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Probabilistic fDMs applied to patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma treated with radiochemotherapy demonstrated shortened PFS and OS among patients with a large volume of tumor with decreasing ADC evaluated at the posttreatment time with respect to the baseline scans. Alternatively, patients with a large volume of tumor with increasing ADC evaluated at the posttreatment time with respect to baseline scans were more likely to progress later and live longer. Probabilistic fDMs performed better than traditional fDMs at predicting 12-month PFS and 24-month OS with use of receiver-operator characteristic analysis. Univariate log-rank analysis on Kaplan-Meier data also revealed that probabilistic fDMs could better separate patients on the basis of PFS and OS, compared with traditional fDMs. Results suggest that probabilistic fDMs are a more predictive biomarker in

  7. Evaluation of low-grade glioma structural changes after chemotherapy using DTI-based histogram analysis and functional diffusion maps

    Castellano, Antonella; Iadanza, Antonella; Falini, Andrea [San Raffaele Scientific Institute and Vita-Salute San Raffaele University, Neuroradiology Unit and CERMAC, Milano (Italy); Donativi, Marina [University of Salento, Department of Mathematics and Physics ' ' Ennio De Giorgi' ' and A.D.A.M. (Advanced Data Analysis in Medicine), Lecce (Italy); Ruda, Roberta; Bertero, Luca; Soffietti, Riccardo [University of Torino, Department of Neuro-oncology, Turin (Italy); De Nunzio, Giorgio [University of Salento, Department of Mathematics and Physics ' ' Ennio De Giorgi' ' and A.D.A.M. (Advanced Data Analysis in Medicine), Lecce (Italy); INFN (National Institute of Nuclear Physics), Lecce (Italy); Riva, Marco; Bello, Lorenzo [Universita degli Studi di Milano, Milan, and Humanitas Research Hospital, Department of Medical Biotechnology and Translational Medicine, Rozzano, MI (Italy); Rucco, Matteo [University of Camerino, School of Science and Technology, Computer Science Division, Camerino, MC (Italy)

    2016-05-15

    To explore the role of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-based histogram analysis and functional diffusion maps (fDMs) in evaluating structural changes of low-grade gliomas (LGGs) receiving temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy. Twenty-one LGG patients underwent 3T-MR examinations before and after three and six cycles of dose-dense TMZ, including 3D-fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) sequences and DTI (b = 1000 s/mm{sup 2}, 32 directions). Mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), and tensor-decomposition DTI maps (p and q) were obtained. Histogram and fDM analyses were performed on co-registered baseline and post-chemotherapy maps. DTI changes were compared with modifications of tumour area and volume [according to Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (RANO) criteria], and seizure response. After three cycles of TMZ, 20/21 patients were stable according to RANO criteria, but DTI changes were observed in all patients (Wilcoxon test, P ≤ 0.03). After six cycles, DTI changes were more pronounced (P ≤ 0.005). Seventy-five percent of patients had early seizure response with significant improvement of DTI values, maintaining stability on FLAIR. Early changes of the 25th percentiles of p and MD predicted final volume change (R{sup 2} = 0.614 and 0.561, P < 0.0005, respectively). TMZ-related changes were located mainly at tumour borders on p and MD fDMs. DTI-based histogram and fDM analyses are useful techniques to evaluate the early effects of TMZ chemotherapy in LGG patients. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of ultraviolet Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements of diffusers used in the calibration of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)

    Butler, J.J.; Park, H.; Barnes, P.Y.; Early, E.A.; Eijk-Olij, C. van; Zoutman, A.E.; Buller-Leeuwen, S. van; Groote Schaarsberg, J.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement and long-term monitoring of global total ozone by ultraviolet albedo measuring satellite instruments require accurate and precise determination of the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in the pre-launch calibration of those instruments. To assess the ability of laboratories to provide accurate Ultra Violet (UV) diffuse BRDF measurements, a BRDF measurement comparison was initiated by the NASA Total Ozone Mapping Spectrom...

  9. Diffusion Maps for Multimodal Registration

    Gemma Piella

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Multimodal image registration is a difficult task, due to the significant intensity variations between the images. A common approach is to use sophisticated similarity measures, such as mutual information, that are robust to those intensity variations. However, these similarity measures are computationally expensive and, moreover, often fail to capture the geometry and the associated dynamics linked with the images. Another approach is the transformation of the images into a common space where modalities can be directly compared. Within this approach, we propose to register multimodal images by using diffusion maps to describe the geometric and spectral properties of the data. Through diffusion maps, the multimodal data is transformed into a new set of canonical coordinates that reflect its geometry uniformly across modalities, so that meaningful correspondences can be established between them. Images in this new representation can then be registered using a simple Euclidean distance as a similarity measure. Registration accuracy was evaluated on both real and simulated brain images with known ground-truth for both rigid and non-rigid registration. Results showed that the proposed approach achieved higher accuracy than the conventional approach using mutual information.

  10. Dynamical behaviour of the coupled diffusion map lattice

    Wei Wang; Cerdeira, H.A.

    1993-10-01

    In this paper we report the dynamical study of a coupled diffusive map lattice with the coupling between the elements only through the bifurcation parameter of the mapping function. The diffusive process of the lattice from an initially random distribution state to a homogeneous one and the stable range of the diffusive homogeneous attractor are discussed. For various coupling strengths we find that there are several types of spatio-temporal structures. In addition, the evolution of the lattice into chaos is studied and a largest Lyapunov exponent is used to characterize the dynamical behaviour. (author). 22 refs, 9 figs

  11. Diffusion in membranes: Toward a two-dimensional diffusion map

    Toppozini Laura

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For decades, quasi-elastic neutron scattering has been the prime tool for studying molecular diffusion in membranes over relevant nanometer distances. These experiments are essential to our current understanding of molecular dynamics of lipids, proteins and membrane-active molecules. Recently, we presented experimental evidence from X-ray diffraction and quasi-elastic neutron scattering demonstrating that ethanol enhances the permeability of membranes. At the QENS 2014/WINS 2014 conference we presented a novel technique to measure diffusion across membranes employing 2-dimensional quasi-elastic neutron scattering. We present results from our preliminary analysis of an experiment on the cold neutron multi-chopper spectrometer LET at ISIS, where we studied the self-diffusion of water molecules along lipid membranes and have the possibility of studying the diffusion in membranes. By preparing highly oriented membrane stacks and aligning them horizontally in the spectrometer, our aim is to distinguish between lateral and transmembrane diffusion. Diffusion may also be measured at different locations in the membranes, such as the water layer and the hydrocarbon membrane core. With a complete analysis of the data, 2-dimensional mapping will enable us to determine diffusion channels of water and ethanol molecules to quantitatively determine nanoscale membrane permeability.

  12. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    Cristadoro, Giampaolo [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Str. 38, D 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2006-03-10

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyse low-dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand, even simple one-dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non-smooth dependence of global observables on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one-dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant, we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero. (letter to the editor)

  13. Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    Cristadoro, Giampaolo

    2006-01-01

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyse low-dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand, even simple one-dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non-smooth dependence of global observables on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one-dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant, we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero. (letter to the editor)

  14. Deterministic Diffusion in Delayed Coupled Maps

    Sozanski, M.

    2005-01-01

    Coupled Map Lattices (CML) are discrete time and discrete space dynamical systems used for modeling phenomena arising in nonlinear systems with many degrees of freedom. In this work, the dynamical and statistical properties of a modified version of the CML with global coupling are considered. The main modification of the model is the extension of the coupling over a set of local map states corresponding to different time iterations. The model with both stochastic and chaotic one-dimensional local maps is studied. Deterministic diffusion in the CML under variation of a control parameter is analyzed for unimodal maps. As a main result, simple relations between statistical and dynamical measures are found for the model and the cases where substituting nonlinear lattices with simpler processes is possible are presented. (author)

  15. Mapping functional connectivity

    Peter Vogt; Joseph R. Ferrari; Todd R. Lookingbill; Robert H. Gardner; Kurt H. Riitters; Katarzyna Ostapowicz

    2009-01-01

    An objective and reliable assessment of wildlife movement is important in theoretical and applied ecology. The identification and mapping of landscape elements that may enhance functional connectivity is usually a subjective process based on visual interpretations of species movement patterns. New methods based on mathematical morphology provide a generic, flexible,...

  16. Diffusion, confusion and functional MRI

    Le Bihan, Denis

    2012-01-01

    Diffusion MRI has been introduced in 1985 and has had a very successful life on its own. While it has become a standard for imaging stroke and white matter disorders, the borders between diffusion MRI and the general field of fMRI have always remained fuzzy. First, diffusion MRI has been used to obtain images of brain function, based on the idea that diffusion MRI could also be made sensitive to blood flow, through the intra-voxel incoherent motion (IVIM) concept. Second, the IVIM concept helped better understand the contribution from different vasculature components to the BOLD fMRI signal. Third, it has been shown recently that a genuine fMRI signal can be obtained with diffusion MRI. This 'DfMRI' signal is notably different from the BOLD fMRI signal, especially for its much faster response to brain activation both at onset and offset, which points out to structural changes in the neural tissues, perhaps such as cell swelling, occurring in activated neural tissue. This short article reviews the major steps which have paved the way for this exciting development, underlying how technical progress with MRI equipment has each time been instrumental to expand the horizon of diffusion MRI toward the field of fMRI. (authors)

  17. Comparison of ultraviolet Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) measurements of diffusers used in the calibration of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)

    Butler, J.J.; Park, H.; Barnes, P.Y.; Early, E.A.; Eijk-Olij, C. van; Zoutman, A.E.; Buller-Leeuwen, S. van; Groote Schaarsberg, J.

    2002-01-01

    The measurement and long-term monitoring of global total ozone by ultraviolet albedo measuring satellite instruments require accurate and precise determination of the Bi-directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) of laboratory-based diffusers used in the pre-launch calibration of those

  18. Spatiotemporal mapping of diffusion dynamics and organization in plasma membranes

    Bag, Nirmalya; Ng, Xue Wen; Sankaran, Jagadish; Wohland, Thorsten

    2016-09-01

    Imaging fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and the related FCS diffusion law have been applied in recent years to investigate the diffusion modes of lipids and proteins in membranes. These efforts have provided new insights into the membrane structure below the optical diffraction limit, new information on the existence of lipid domains, and on the influence of the cytoskeleton on membrane dynamics. However, there has been no systematic study to evaluate how domain size, domain density, and the probe partition coefficient affect the resulting imaging FCS diffusion law parameters. Here, we characterize the effects of these factors on the FCS diffusion law through simulations and experiments on lipid bilayers and live cells. By segmenting images into smaller 7  ×  7 pixel areas, we can evaluate the FCS diffusion law on areas smaller than 2 µm and thus provide detailed maps of information on the membrane structure and heterogeneity at this length scale. We support and extend this analysis by deriving a mathematical expression to calculate the mean squared displacement (MSDACF) from the autocorrelation function of imaging FCS, and demonstrate that the MSDACF plots depend on the existence of nanoscopic domains. Based on the results, we derive limits for the detection of domains depending on their size, density, and relative viscosity in comparison to the surroundings. Finally, we apply these measurements to bilayers and live cells using imaging total internal reflection FCS and single plane illumination microscopy FCS.

  19. Brain microstructure mapping using quantitative and diffusion MRI

    Lebois, Alice

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the human brain microstructure mapping using quantitative and diffusion MRI. The T1/T2 quantitative imaging relies on sequences dedicated to the mapping of T1 and T2 relaxation times. Their variations within the tissue are linked to the presence of different water compartments defined by a specific organization of the tissue at the cell scale. Measuring these parameters can help, therefore, to better characterize the brain microstructure. The dMRI, on the other hand, explores the brownian motion of water molecules in the brain tissue, where the water molecules' movement is constrained by natural barriers, such as cell membranes. Thus, the information on their displacement carried by the dMRI signal gives access to the underlying cyto-architecture. Combination of these two modalities is, therefore, a promising way to probe the brain tissue microstructure. The main goal of the present thesis is to set up the methodology to study the microstructure of the white matter of the human brain in vivo. The first part includes the acquisition of a unique MRI database of 79 healthy subjects (the Archi/CONNECT), which includes anatomical high resolution data, relaxometry data, diffusion-weighted data at high spatio-angular resolution and functional data. This database has allowed us to build the first atlas of the anatomical connectivity of the healthy brain through the automatic segmentation of the major white matter bundles, providing an appropriate anatomical reference for the white matter to study individually the quantitative parameters along each fascicle, characterizing its microstructure organization. Emphasis was placed on the construction of the first atlas of the T1/T2 profiles along the major white matter pathways. The profiles of the T1 and T2 relaxation times were then correlated to the quantitative profiles computed from the diffusion MRI data (fractional anisotropy, radial and longitudinal diffusivities, apparent diffusion coefficient

  20. Spatial Mapping of Translational Diffusion Coefficients Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Mathematical Description.

    Shetty, Anil N; Chiang, Sharon; Maletic-Savatic, Mirjana; Kasprian, Gregor; Vannucci, Marina; Lee, Wesley

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the theoretical background for diffusion weighted imaging and diffusion tensor imaging. Molecular diffusion is a random process involving thermal Brownian motion. In biological tissues, the underlying microstructures restrict the diffusion of water molecules, making diffusion directionally dependent. Water diffusion in tissue is mathematically characterized by the diffusion tensor, the elements of which contain information about the magnitude and direction of diffusion and is a function of the coordinate system. Thus, it is possible to generate contrast in tissue based primarily on diffusion effects. Expressing diffusion in terms of the measured diffusion coefficient (eigenvalue) in any one direction can lead to errors. Nowhere is this more evident than in white matter, due to the preferential orientation of myelin fibers. The directional dependency is removed by diagonalization of the diffusion tensor, which then yields a set of three eigenvalues and eigenvectors, representing the magnitude and direction of the three orthogonal axes of the diffusion ellipsoid, respectively. For example, the eigenvalue corresponding to the eigenvector along the long axis of the fiber corresponds qualitatively to diffusion with least restriction. Determination of the principal values of the diffusion tensor and various anisotropic indices provides structural information. We review the use of diffusion measurements using the modified Stejskal-Tanner diffusion equation. The anisotropy is analyzed by decomposing the diffusion tensor based on symmetrical properties describing the geometry of diffusion tensor. We further describe diffusion tensor properties in visualizing fiber tract organization of the human brain.

  1. Hash function based on chaotic map lattices.

    Wang, Shihong; Hu, Gang

    2007-06-01

    A new hash function system, based on coupled chaotic map dynamics, is suggested. By combining floating point computation of chaos and some simple algebraic operations, the system reaches very high bit confusion and diffusion rates, and this enables the system to have desired statistical properties and strong collision resistance. The chaos-based hash function has its advantages for high security and fast performance, and it serves as one of the most highly competitive candidates for practical applications of hash function for software realization and secure information communications in computer networks.

  2. Granger-Causality Maps of Diffusion Processes

    Wahl, B.; Feudel, U.; Hlinka, Jaroslav; Wächter, M.; Peinke, J.; Freund, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 93, č. 2 16 February (2016), č. článku 022213. ISSN 2470-0045 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-23940S; GA MZd(CZ) NV15-29835A Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : Granger causality * stochastic process * diffusion process * nonlinear dynamical systems Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.366, year: 2016

  3. Axon diameter mapping in crossing fibers with diffusion MRI

    Zhang, Hui; Dyrby, Tim B; Alexander, Daniel C

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes a technique for a previously unaddressed problem, namely, mapping axon diameter in crossing fiber regions, using diffusion MRI. Direct measurement of tissue microstructure of this kind using diffusion MRI offers a new class of biomarkers that give more specific information about...... tissue than measures derived from diffusion tensor imaging. Most existing techniques for axon diameter mapping assume a single axon orientation in the tissue model, which limits their application to only the most coherently oriented brain white matter, such as the corpus callosum, where the single...... model to enable axon diameter mapping in voxels with crossing fibers. We show in simulation that the technique can provide robust axon diameter estimates in a two-fiber crossing with the crossing angle as small as 45 degrees. Using ex vivo imaging data, we further demonstrate the feasibility...

  4. Symmetries and modelling functions for diffusion processes

    Nikitin, A G; Spichak, S V; Vedula, Yu S; Naumovets, A G

    2009-01-01

    A constructive approach to the theory of diffusion processes is proposed, which is based on application of both symmetry analysis and the method of modelling functions. An algorithm for construction of the modelling functions is suggested. This algorithm is based on the error function expansion (ERFEX) of experimental concentration profiles. The high-accuracy analytical description of the profiles provided by ERFEX approximation allows a convenient extraction of the concentration dependence of diffusivity from experimental data and prediction of the diffusion process. Our analysis is exemplified by its employment in experimental results obtained for surface diffusion of lithium on the molybdenum (1 1 2) surface precovered with dysprosium. The ERFEX approximation can be directly extended to many other diffusion systems.

  5. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term".

  6. Ischemic lesion volume determination on diffusion weighted images vs. apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    Bråtane, Bernt Tore; Bastan, Birgul; Fisher, Marc; Bouley, James; Henninger, Nils

    2009-07-07

    Though diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) is frequently used for identifying the ischemic lesion in focal cerebral ischemia, the understanding of spatiotemporal evolution patterns observed with different analysis methods remains imprecise. DWI and calculated apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were serially obtained in rat stroke models (MCAO): permanent, 90 min, and 180 min temporary MCAO. Lesion volumes were analyzed in a blinded and randomized manner by 2 investigators using (i) a previously validated ADC threshold, (ii) visual determination of hypointense regions on ADC maps, and (iii) visual determination of hyperintense regions on DWI. Lesion volumes were correlated with 24 hour 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazoliumchloride (TTC)-derived infarct volumes. TTC-derived infarct volumes were not significantly different from the ADC and DWI-derived lesion volumes at the last imaging time points except for significantly smaller DWI lesions in the pMCAO model (p=0.02). Volumetric calculation based on TTC-derived infarct also correlated significantly stronger to volumetric calculation based on last imaging time point derived lesions on ADC maps than DWI (pdetermined lesion volumes on ADC maps and DWI by both investigators correlated significantly with threshold-derived lesion volumes on ADC maps with the former method demonstrating a stronger correlation. There was also a better interrater agreement for ADC map analysis than for DWI analysis. Ischemic lesion determination by ADC was more accurate in final infarct prediction, rater independent, and provided exclusive information on ischemic lesion reversibility.

  7. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz in temperature and seven bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive a consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-year WMAP sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided with angular resolutions varying between 7.5 arcmin and 1 deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, wi...

  8. Diffusion by extrinsic noise in the kicked Harper map

    Park, Gunyoung; Chang, C. S.

    2001-01-01

    A significantly improved analytic understanding of the extrinsically driven diffusion process is presented in a nonlinear dynamical system in which the phase space is divided into periodic two-dimensional tiles of regular motion, separated by a connected separatrix network (web) [previously studied by A. J. Lichtenberg and Blake P. Wood, Phys. Rev. Lett. >62, 2213 (1989)]. The system is represented by the usual 'kicked Harper map' with added extrinsic noise terms. Three different diffusion regimes are found depending upon the strength of the extrinsic perturbation l relative to the web and regular motions. When the extrinsic noise is dominant over the intrinsic stochasticity and the regular rotation motions in the tile, diffusion obeys the random phase scaling l 2 . When the extrinsic noise is dominant over the intrinsic stochasticity, but weaker than the regular rotation motion, the diffusion scales as lK 1/2 , where K is the strength of the intrinsic kick. These findings agree well with numerical simulation results. When the extrinsic noise process is weaker than the stochastic web process, we analytically reproduce the well-known numerical result: The web diffusion is reduced by the ratio of phase-space areas of intrinsic to extrinsic stochasticity

  9. Mapping human whole-brain structural networks with diffusion MRI.

    Patric Hagmann

    Full Text Available Understanding the large-scale structural network formed by neurons is a major challenge in system neuroscience. A detailed connectivity map covering the entire brain would therefore be of great value. Based on diffusion MRI, we propose an efficient methodology to generate large, comprehensive and individual white matter connectional datasets of the living or dead, human or animal brain. This non-invasive tool enables us to study the basic and potentially complex network properties of the entire brain. For two human subjects we find that their individual brain networks have an exponential node degree distribution and that their global organization is in the form of a small world.

  10. Reflectance diffuse optical tomography. Its application to human brain mapping

    Ueda, Yukio; Yamanaka, Takeshi; Yamashita, Daisuke; Suzuki, Toshihiko; Ohmae, Etsuko; Oda, Motoki; Yamashita, Yutaka

    2005-01-01

    We report the successful application of reflectance diffuse optical tomography (DOT) using near-infrared light with the new reconstruction algorithm that we developed to the observation of regional hemodynamic changes in the brain under specific mental tasks. Our results reveal the heterogeneous distribution of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in the brain, showing complementary images of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin changes in certain regions. We conclude that our reflectance DOT has practical potential for human brain mapping, as well as in the diagnostic imaging of brain diseases. (author)

  11. FAST Mapping of Diffuse HI Gas in the Local Universe

    Zhu, M.; Pisano, D. J.; Ai, M.; Jiao, Q.

    2016-02-01

    We propose to use the Five hundred meter Aperture Spherical radio Telescope (FAST) to map the diffuse intergalactic HI gas in the local universe at column densities of NHI=1018 cm-2 and below. The major science goal is to study gas accretion during galaxy evolution, and trace cosmic web features in the local universe. We disuss the technical feasibilty of such a deep survey, and have conducted test observations with the Arecibo 305 m telescope. Our preliminary results shows that, with about a few thousand hours of observing time, FAST will be able to map several hundred square degree regions at 1 σ of NHI=2×1017 cm-2 level out to a distance of 5-10 Mpc, and with a volume 1000 larger than that of the Local Group.

  12. Shape Analysis Using the Auto Diffusion Function

    Gebal, Katarzyna; Bærentzen, Jakob Andreas; Aanæs, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Scalar functions defined on manifold triangle meshes is a starting point for many geometry processing algorithms such as mesh parametrization, skeletonization, and segmentation. In this paper, we propose the Auto Diffusion Function (ADF) which is a linear combination of the eigenfunctions......, it is controlled by a single parameter which can be interpreted as feature scale, and, finally, the ADF is invariant to rigid and isometric deformations. We describe the ADF and its properties in detail and compare it to other choices of scalar functions on manifolds. As an example of an application, we present...

  13. Nonparametric functional mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    Yang, Jie; Wu, Rongling; Casella, George

    2009-03-01

    Functional mapping is a useful tool for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTL) that control dynamic traits. It incorporates mathematical aspects of biological processes into the mixture model-based likelihood setting for QTL mapping, thus increasing the power of QTL detection and the precision of parameter estimation. However, in many situations there is no obvious functional form and, in such cases, this strategy will not be optimal. Here we propose to use nonparametric function estimation, typically implemented with B-splines, to estimate the underlying functional form of phenotypic trajectories, and then construct a nonparametric test to find evidence of existing QTL. Using the representation of a nonparametric regression as a mixed model, the final test statistic is a likelihood ratio test. We consider two types of genetic maps: dense maps and general maps, and the power of nonparametric functional mapping is investigated through simulation studies and demonstrated by examples.

  14. Diffusion Forecasting Model with Basis Functions from QR-Decomposition

    Harlim, John; Yang, Haizhao

    2017-12-01

    The diffusion forecasting is a nonparametric approach that provably solves the Fokker-Planck PDE corresponding to Itô diffusion without knowing the underlying equation. The key idea of this method is to approximate the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation with a discrete representation of the shift (Koopman) operator on a set of basis functions generated via the diffusion maps algorithm. While the choice of these basis functions is provably optimal under appropriate conditions, computing these basis functions is quite expensive since it requires the eigendecomposition of an N× N diffusion matrix, where N denotes the data size and could be very large. For large-scale forecasting problems, only a few leading eigenvectors are computationally achievable. To overcome this computational bottleneck, a new set of basis functions constructed by orthonormalizing selected columns of the diffusion matrix and its leading eigenvectors is proposed. This computation can be carried out efficiently via the unpivoted Householder QR factorization. The efficiency and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm will be shown in both deterministically chaotic and stochastic dynamical systems; in the former case, the superiority of the proposed basis functions over purely eigenvectors is significant, while in the latter case forecasting accuracy is improved relative to using a purely small number of eigenvectors. Supporting arguments will be provided on three- and six-dimensional chaotic ODEs, a three-dimensional SDE that mimics turbulent systems, and also on the two spatial modes associated with the boreal winter Madden-Julian Oscillation obtained from applying the Nonlinear Laplacian Spectral Analysis on the measured Outgoing Longwave Radiation.

  15. A Mapping Between Structural and Functional Brain Networks.

    Meier, Jil; Tewarie, Prejaas; Hillebrand, Arjan; Douw, Linda; van Dijk, Bob W; Stufflebeam, Steven M; Van Mieghem, Piet

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between structural and functional brain networks is still highly debated. Most previous studies have used a single functional imaging modality to analyze this relationship. In this work, we use multimodal data, from functional MRI, magnetoencephalography, and diffusion tensor imaging, and assume that there exists a mapping between the connectivity matrices of the resting-state functional and structural networks. We investigate this mapping employing group averaged as well as individual data. We indeed find a significantly high goodness of fit level for this structure-function mapping. Our analysis suggests that a functional connection is shaped by all walks up to the diameter in the structural network in both modality cases. When analyzing the inverse mapping, from function to structure, longer walks in the functional network also seem to possess minor influence on the structural connection strengths. Even though similar overall properties for the structure-function mapping are found for different functional modalities, our results indicate that the structure-function relationship is modality dependent.

  16. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Fractal diffusion coefficient from dynamical zeta functions

    Cristadoro, Giampaolo

    2006-03-01

    Dynamical zeta functions provide a powerful method to analyse low-dimensional dynamical systems when the underlying symbolic dynamics is under control. On the other hand, even simple one-dimensional maps can show an intricate structure of the grammar rules that may lead to a non-smooth dependence of global observables on parameters changes. A paradigmatic example is the fractal diffusion coefficient arising in a simple piecewise linear one-dimensional map of the real line. Using the Baladi-Ruelle generalization of the Milnor-Thurnston kneading determinant, we provide the exact dynamical zeta function for such a map and compute the diffusion coefficient from its smallest zero.

  17. destiny: diffusion maps for large-scale single-cell data in R.

    Angerer, Philipp; Haghverdi, Laleh; Büttner, Maren; Theis, Fabian J; Marr, Carsten; Buettner, Florian

    2016-04-15

    : Diffusion maps are a spectral method for non-linear dimension reduction and have recently been adapted for the visualization of single-cell expression data. Here we present destiny, an efficient R implementation of the diffusion map algorithm. Our package includes a single-cell specific noise model allowing for missing and censored values. In contrast to previous implementations, we further present an efficient nearest-neighbour approximation that allows for the processing of hundreds of thousands of cells and a functionality for projecting new data on existing diffusion maps. We exemplarily apply destiny to a recent time-resolved mass cytometry dataset of cellular reprogramming. destiny is an open-source R/Bioconductor package "bioconductor.org/packages/destiny" also available at www.helmholtz-muenchen.de/icb/destiny A detailed vignette describing functions and workflows is provided with the package. carsten.marr@helmholtz-muenchen.de or f.buettner@helmholtz-muenchen.de Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Diffusion abnormality maps in demyelinating disease: Correlations with clinical scores

    Onu, Mihaela; Roceanu, Adina; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Bendic, Robert; Tarta, Eugen; Preoteasa, Florentin; Bajenaru, Ovidiu

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been explored as a noninvasive tool to assess pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. However, the correlation between classical MRI measures and physical disability is modest in MS. The diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI technique holds particular promise in this regard. The present study shows brain regions where FA and individual diffusivities abnormalities are present and check their correlations with physical disability clinical scores. Methods: Eight patients and 12 matched healthy controls were recruited. The Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite was administered. For MR-DTI acquisitions, a Genesis Signa 1.5T MR system, an EP/SE scanning sequence, 25 gradient directions were used. Results: Tract Based Spatial Statistics (TBSS) group comparisons showed reduced FA and increased individual diffusivities in several brain regions in patients. Significant correlations were found between FA and: EDSS, 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW score; between λ 2 and: P100 (r and l), 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW; between λ 3 and: 9-HPT(NON)DOM and 25FW score. Conclusions: Fractional anisotropy and individual radial diffusivities proved to be important markers of motor disabilities in MS patients when the disease duration mean and the disability scores values range are relatively high.

  19. Planck 2015 results: X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    We report that Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100–353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature

  20. Road Map For Diffusion Of Innovation In Health Care.

    Balas, E Andrew; Chapman, Wendy W

    2018-02-01

    New scientific knowledge and innovation are often slow to disseminate. In other cases, providers rush into adopting what appears to be a clinically relevant innovation, based on a single clinical trial. In reality, adopting innovations without appropriate translation and repeated testing of practical application is problematic. In this article we provide examples of clinical innovations (for example, tight glucose control in critically ill patients) that were adopted inappropriately and that caused what we term a malfunction. To address the issue of malfunctions, we review various examples and suggest frameworks for the diffusion of knowledge leading to the adoption of useful innovations. The resulting model is termed an integrated road map for coordinating knowledge transformation and innovation adoption. We make recommendations for the targeted development of practice change procedures, practice change assessment, structured descriptions of tested interventions, intelligent knowledge management technologies, and policy support for knowledge transformation, including further standardization to facilitate sharing among institutions.

  1. Diffusion Length Mapping for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Lucio Cinà

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The diffusion length (L of photogenerated carriers in the nanoporous electrode is a key parameter that summarizes the collection efficiency behavior in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs. At present, there are few techniques able to spatially resolve L over the active area of the device. Most of them require contact patterning and, hence, are intrinsically destructive. Here, we present the first electron diffusion length mapping system for DSCs based on steady state incident photon to collected electron (IPCE conversion efficiency ( η I P C E analysis. The measurement is conducted by acquiring complete transmittance ( T DSC and η I P C E spectra from the photo electrode (PE and counter electrode (CE for each spatial point in a raster scan manner. L ( x , y is obtained by a least square fitting of the IPCE ratio spectrum ( I P C E R = η I P C E -CE η I P C E -PE . An advanced feature is the ability to acquire η I P C E spectra using low-intensity probe illumination under weakly-absorbed background light (625 nm with the device biased close to open circuit voltage. These homogeneous conditions permit the linearization of the free electron continuity equation and, hence, to obtain the collection efficiency expressions ( η COL-PE and η COL-CE . The influence of the parameter’s uncertainty has been quantified by a sensitivity study of L. The result has been validated by quantitatively comparing the average value of L map with the value estimated from electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS.

  2. Kosambi and the Genetic Mapping Function

    Research Centre, Indian. Agricultural ... Gregor Johann Mendel discovered that segregation of simple traits in pea ... Cytology furnishes mechanism that the experimental evidence demands” .... practice, however, the existence of interference may cause over .... Morgan's mapping function of true additivity; incomplete inter-.

  3. Edgeworth expansion for functionals of continuous diffusion processes

    Podolskij, Mark; Yoshida, Nakahiro

    This paper presents new results on the Edgeworth expansion for high frequency functionals of continuous diffusion processes. We derive asymptotic expansions for weighted functionals of the Brownian motion and apply them to provide the Edgeworth expansion for power variation of diffusion processes....... Our methodology relies on martingale embedding, Malliavin calculus and stable central limit theorems for semimartingales. Finally, we demonstrate the density expansion for studentized statistics of power variations.......This paper presents new results on the Edgeworth expansion for high frequency functionals of continuous diffusion processes. We derive asymptotic expansions for weighted functionals of the Brownian motion and apply them to provide the Edgeworth expansion for power variation of diffusion processes...

  4. Investigating the tradeoffs between spatial resolution and diffusion sampling for brain mapping with diffusion tractography: time well spent?

    Calabrese, Evan; Badea, Alexandra; Coe, Christopher L; Lubach, Gabriele R; Styner, Martin A; Johnson, G Allan

    2014-11-01

    Interest in mapping white matter pathways in the brain has peaked with the recognition that altered brain connectivity may contribute to a variety of neurologic and psychiatric diseases. Diffusion tractography has emerged as a popular method for postmortem brain mapping initiatives, including the ex-vivo component of the human connectome project, yet it remains unclear to what extent computer-generated tracks fully reflect the actual underlying anatomy. Of particular concern is the fact that diffusion tractography results vary widely depending on the choice of acquisition protocol. The two major acquisition variables that consume scan time, spatial resolution, and diffusion sampling, can each have profound effects on the resulting tractography. In this analysis, we determined the effects of the temporal tradeoff between spatial resolution and diffusion sampling on tractography in the ex-vivo rhesus macaque brain, a close primate model for the human brain. We used the wealth of autoradiography-based connectivity data available for the rhesus macaque brain to assess the anatomic accuracy of six time-matched diffusion acquisition protocols with varying balance between spatial and diffusion sampling. We show that tractography results vary greatly, even when the subject and the total acquisition time are held constant. Further, we found that focusing on either spatial resolution or diffusion sampling at the expense of the other is counterproductive. A balanced consideration of both sampling domains produces the most anatomically accurate and consistent results. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. High-Dimensional Intrinsic Interpolation Using Gaussian Process Regression and Diffusion Maps

    Thimmisetty, Charanraj A.; Ghanem, Roger G.; White, Joshua A.; Chen, Xiao

    2017-01-01

    This article considers the challenging task of estimating geologic properties of interest using a suite of proxy measurements. The current work recast this task as a manifold learning problem. In this process, this article introduces a novel regression procedure for intrinsic variables constrained onto a manifold embedded in an ambient space. The procedure is meant to sharpen high-dimensional interpolation by inferring non-linear correlations from the data being interpolated. The proposed approach augments manifold learning procedures with a Gaussian process regression. It first identifies, using diffusion maps, a low-dimensional manifold embedded in an ambient high-dimensional space associated with the data. It relies on the diffusion distance associated with this construction to define a distance function with which the data model is equipped. This distance metric function is then used to compute the correlation structure of a Gaussian process that describes the statistical dependence of quantities of interest in the high-dimensional ambient space. The proposed method is applicable to arbitrarily high-dimensional data sets. Here, it is applied to subsurface characterization using a suite of well log measurements. The predictions obtained in original, principal component, and diffusion space are compared using both qualitative and quantitative metrics. Considerable improvement in the prediction of the geological structural properties is observed with the proposed method.

  6. Diffusion changes predict cognitive and functional outcome

    Jokinen, Hanna; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ropele, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine whether diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) abnormalities in normal-appearing brain tissue (NABT) and in white matter hyperintensities (WMH) predict longitudinal cognitive decline and disability in older individuals independently of the concomitant magnetic...

  7. Mapping specific soil functions based on digital soil property maps

    Pásztor, László; Fodor, Nándor; Farkas-Iványi, Kinga; Szabó, József; Bakacsi, Zsófia; Koós, Sándor

    2016-04-01

    Quantification of soil functions and services is a great challenge in itself even if the spatial relevance is supposed to be identified and regionalized. Proxies and indicators are widely used in ecosystem service mapping. Soil services could also be approximated by elementary soil features. One solution is the association of soil types with services as basic principle. Soil property maps however provide quantified spatial information, which could be utilized more versatilely for the spatial inference of soil functions and services. In the frame of the activities referred as "Digital, Optimized, Soil Related Maps and Information in Hungary" (DOSoReMI.hu) numerous soil property maps have been compiled so far with proper DSM techniques partly according to GSM.net specifications, partly by slightly or more strictly changing some of its predefined parameters (depth intervals, pixel size, property etc.). The elaborated maps have been further utilized, since even DOSoReMI.hu was intended to take steps toward the regionalization of higher level soil information (secondary properties, functions, services). In the meantime the recently started AGRAGIS project requested spatial soil related information in order to estimate agri-environmental related impacts of climate change and support the associated vulnerability assessment. One of the most vulnerable services of soils in the context of climate change is their provisioning service. In our work it was approximated by productivity, which was estimated by a sequential scenario based crop modelling. It took into consideration long term (50 years) time series of both measured and predicted climatic parameters as well as accounted for the potential differences in agricultural practice and crop production. The flexible parametrization and multiple results of modelling was then applied for the spatial assessment of sensitivity, vulnerability, exposure and adaptive capacity of soils in the context of the forecasted changes in

  8. Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Maps of Pediatric Mass Lesions with Free-Breathing Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance: Feasibility Study

    Olsen, Oe.E.; Sebire, N.J.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the technical feasibility of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) mapping based on free-breathing diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MR) outside the CNS in children. Material and Methods: Twelve children with mass lesions of varied histopathology were scanned with short-tau inversion recovery (STIR), contrast-enhanced T1-weighted (CE-T1W), and diffusion-weighted (b = 0, 500 and 1,000 s/mm 2 ) sequences. ADC maps were calculated. Lesion-to-background signal intensity ratios were measured and compared between STIR/CE-T1W/ADC overall (Friedman test) and between viable embryonal tumors and other lesions (Kruskal-Wallis test). Results: ADC maps clearly depicted all lesions. Lesion-to-background signal intensity ratios of STIR (median 3.7), CE-T1W (median 1.4), and ADC (median 1.6) showed no overall difference (chi-square = 3.846; P = 0.146), and there was no difference between viable embryonal tumors and other lesions within STIR/CE-T1W/ADC (chi-square 1.118/0.669/<0.001; P = 0.290/0.414/1.000, respectively). Conclusion: ADC mapping is feasible in free-breathing imaging of pediatric mass lesions outside the CNS using standard clinical equipment. Keywords: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging; infants and children; neoplasms

  9. Study on monostable and bistable reaction-diffusion equations by iteration of travelling wave maps

    Yi, Taishan; Chen, Yuming

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, based on the iterative properties of travelling wave maps, we develop a new method to obtain spreading speeds and asymptotic propagation for monostable and bistable reaction-diffusion equations. Precisely, for Dirichlet problems of monostable reaction-diffusion equations on the half line, by making links between travelling wave maps and integral operators associated with the Dirichlet diffusion kernel (the latter is NOT invariant under translation), we obtain some iteration properties of the Dirichlet diffusion and some a priori estimates on nontrivial solutions of Dirichlet problems under travelling wave transformation. We then provide the asymptotic behavior of nontrivial solutions in the space-time region for Dirichlet problems. These enable us to develop a unified method to obtain results on heterogeneous steady states, travelling waves, spreading speeds, and asymptotic spreading behavior for Dirichlet problem of monostable reaction-diffusion equations on R+ as well as of monostable/bistable reaction-diffusion equations on R.

  10. Functional mapping in biology and medicine

    McEachron, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 10 selections. Some of the titles are: Two Views of Functional Mapping and Autoradiography; Quantitative Analysis of Autoradiographs; Hardware and Software Design Considerations in Engineering an Image Processing Workstation: Autoradiographic Analysis with DUMAS and the BRAIN Autoradiograph Analysis Software Package (with 1 color plate); and Quantitative Autoradiography and in vitro Radioligand Binding

  11. Planck 2015 results: X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps wi...

  12. Mapping brain function to brain anatomy

    Valentino, D.J.; Huang, H.K.; Mazziotta, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    In Imaging the human brain, MRI is commonly used to reveal anatomical structure, while PET is used to reveal tissue function. This paper presents a protocol for correlating data between these two imaging modalities; this correlation can provide in vivo regional measurements of brain function which are essential to our understanding of the human brain. The authors propose a general protocol to standardize the acquisition and analysis of functional image data. First, MR and PET images are collected to form three-dimensional volumes of structural and functional image data. Second, these volumes of image data are corrected for distortions inherent in each imaging modality. Third, the image volumes are correlated to provide correctly aligned structural and functional images. The functional images are then mapped onto the structural images in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional representations. Finally, morphometric techniques can be used to provide statistical measures of the structure and function of the human brain

  13. Planck 2015 results IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    We present foreground-reduced cosmic microwave background (CMB) maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz......, and between 4.5 and 6.1μK averaged over pixels. The cosmological parameters derived from the analysis of temperature power spectra are in agreement at the 1σ level with the Planck 2015 likelihood. Unresolved mismatches between the noise properties of the data and simulations prevent a satisfactory description...... of the higher-order statistical properties of the polarization maps. Thus, the primary applications of these polarization maps are those that do not require massive simulations for accurate estimation of uncertainties, for instance estimation of cross-spectra and cross-correlations, or stacking analyses...

  14. Temperature mapping, thermal diffusivity and subsoil heat flux at ...

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    vide an understanding of the gain or loss of heat by the soil from the atmosphere. Many studies made earlier have been related to sim- ilar issues such as prediction of soil tempera- tures; heat storage variations; thermal diffusivity of the soil, etc. (Kelkar et al 1980; Chowdhury et al 1991; Lamba and Khambete 1991; Retnaku ...

  15. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  16. Two views of functional mapping and autoradiography

    McEachron, D.L.; Adler, N.T.; Tretiak, O.J.

    1986-01-01

    This chapter is meant to serve as an initial introduction into the use and analysis of functional mapping with radiotracers and film autoradiography. The first section describes functional autoradiography from a biologist's point of view, reviewing the advantages of radiotracers for bridging the gap between behavior and neurophysiology. The physical and chemical assumptions underlying the use of radiotracers in biological systems are then examined. The second section looks at the autoradiogram from an engineering standpoint and investigates how the basic physics of radioactive decay influences the measured parameters of autoradiographs. The problems of video densitometry and the quantification of optical density and isotope concentrations are discussed

  17. Planck 2015 results. IX. Diffuse component separation: CMB maps

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Casaponsa, B.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-01-01

    We present foreground-reduced CMB maps derived from the full Planck data set in both temperature and polarization. Compared to the corresponding Planck 2013 temperature sky maps, the total data volume is larger by a factor of 3.2 for frequencies between 30 and 70 GHz, and by 1.9 for frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz. In addition, systematic errors in the forms of temperature-to-polarization leakage, analogue-to-digital conversion uncertainties, and very long time constant errors have been dramatically reduced, to the extent that the cosmological polarization signal may now be robustly recovered on angular scales $\\ell\\gtrsim40$. On the very largest scales, instrumental systematic residuals are still non-negligible compared to the expected cosmological signal, and modes with $\\ell < 20$ are accordingly suppressed in the current polarization maps by high-pass filtering. As in 2013, four different CMB component separation algorithms are applied to these observations, providing a measure of stability with re...

  18. One- and two-cluster synchronized dynamics of non-diffusively coupled Tchebycheff map networks

    Schäfer, Mirko; Greiner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    We use the master stability formalism to discuss one- and two-cluster synchronization of coupled Tchebycheff map networks. For diffusively coupled map systems, the one-cluster synchronized dynamics is given by the behaviour of the individual maps, and the coupling only determines the stability of the coherent state. For the case of non-diffusive coupling and for two-cluster synchronization, the synchronized dynamics on networks is different from the behaviour of the single individual map. Depending on the coupling, we study numerically the characteristics of various forms of the resulting synchronized dynamics. The stability properties of the respective one-cluster synchronized states are discussed for arbitrary network structures. For the case of two-cluster synchronization on bipartite networks we also present analytical expressions for fixed points and zig-zag patterns, and explicitly determine the linear stability of these orbits for the special case of ring-networks.

  19. Anatomic mapping of molecular subtypes in diffuse glioma.

    Tang, Qisheng; Lian, Yuxi; Yu, Jinhua; Wang, Yuanyuan; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Liang

    2017-09-15

    Tumor location served as an important prognostic factor in glioma patients was considered to postulate molecular features according to cell origin theory. However, anatomic distribution of unique molecular subtypes was not widely investigated. The relationship between molecular phenotype and histological subgroup were also vague based on tumor location. Our group focuses on the study of glioma anatomic location of distinctive molecular subgroups and histology subtypes, and explores the possibility of their consistency based on clinical background. We retrospectively reviewed 143 cases with both molecular information (IDH1/TERT/1p19q) and MRI images diagnosed as cerebral diffuse gliomas. The anatomic distribution was analyzed between distinctive molecular subgroups and its relationship with histological subtypes. The influence of tumor location, molecular stratification and histology diagnosis on survival outcome was investigated as well. Anatomic locations of cerebral diffuse glioma indicate varied clinical outcome. Based on that, it can be stratified into five principal molecular subgroups according to IDH1/TERT/1p19q status. Triple-positive (IDH1 and TERT mutation with 1p19q codeletion) glioma tended to be oligodendroglioma present with much better clinical outcome compared to TERT mutation only group who is glioblastoma inclined (median overall survival 39 months VS 18 months). Five molecular subgroups were demonstrated with distinctive locational distribution. This kind of anatomic feature is consistent with its corresponding histological subtypes. Each molecular subgroup in glioma has unique anatomic location which indicates distinctive clinical outcome. Molecular diagnosis can be served as perfect complementary tool for the precise diagnosis. Integration of histomolecular diagnosis will be much more helpful in routine clinical practice in the future.

  20. Functional materials discovery using energy-structure-function maps.

    Pulido, Angeles; Chen, Linjiang; Kaczorowski, Tomasz; Holden, Daniel; Little, Marc A; Chong, Samantha Y; Slater, Benjamin J; McMahon, David P; Bonillo, Baltasar; Stackhouse, Chloe J; Stephenson, Andrew; Kane, Christopher M; Clowes, Rob; Hasell, Tom; Cooper, Andrew I; Day, Graeme M

    2017-03-30

    Molecular crystals cannot be designed in the same manner as macroscopic objects, because they do not assemble according to simple, intuitive rules. Their structures result from the balance of many weak interactions, rather than from the strong and predictable bonding patterns found in metal-organic frameworks and covalent organic frameworks. Hence, design strategies that assume a topology or other structural blueprint will often fail. Here we combine computational crystal structure prediction and property prediction to build energy-structure-function maps that describe the possible structures and properties that are available to a candidate molecule. Using these maps, we identify a highly porous solid, which has the lowest density reported for a molecular crystal so far. Both the structure of the crystal and its physical properties, such as methane storage capacity and guest-molecule selectivity, are predicted using the molecular structure as the only input. More generally, energy-structure-function maps could be used to guide the experimental discovery of materials with any target function that can be calculated from predicted crystal structures, such as electronic structure or mechanical properties.

  1. FADTTS: functional analysis of diffusion tensor tract statistics.

    Zhu, Hongtu; Kong, Linglong; Li, Runze; Styner, Martin; Gerig, Guido; Lin, Weili; Gilmore, John H

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a functional analysis of a diffusion tensor tract statistics (FADTTS) pipeline for delineating the association between multiple diffusion properties along major white matter fiber bundles with a set of covariates of interest, such as age, diagnostic status and gender, and the structure of the variability of these white matter tract properties in various diffusion tensor imaging studies. The FADTTS integrates five statistical tools: (i) a multivariate varying coefficient model for allowing the varying coefficient functions in terms of arc length to characterize the varying associations between fiber bundle diffusion properties and a set of covariates, (ii) a weighted least squares estimation of the varying coefficient functions, (iii) a functional principal component analysis to delineate the structure of the variability in fiber bundle diffusion properties, (iv) a global test statistic to test hypotheses of interest, and (v) a simultaneous confidence band to quantify the uncertainty in the estimated coefficient functions. Simulated data are used to evaluate the finite sample performance of FADTTS. We apply FADTTS to investigate the development of white matter diffusivities along the splenium of the corpus callosum tract and the right internal capsule tract in a clinical study of neurodevelopment. FADTTS can be used to facilitate the understanding of normal brain development, the neural bases of neuropsychiatric disorders, and the joint effects of environmental and genetic factors on white matter fiber bundles. The advantages of FADTTS compared with the other existing approaches are that they are capable of modeling the structured inter-subject variability, testing the joint effects, and constructing their simultaneous confidence bands. However, FADTTS is not crucial for estimation and reduces to the functional analysis method for the single measure. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Strain Map of the Tongue in Normal and ALS Speech Patterns from Tagged and Diffusion MRI.

    Xing, Fangxu; Prince, Jerry L; Stone, Maureen; Reese, Timothy G; Atassi, Nazem; Wedeen, Van J; El Fakhri, Georges; Woo, Jonghye

    2018-02-01

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a neurological disease that causes death of neurons controlling muscle movements. Loss of speech and swallowing functions is a major impact due to degeneration of the tongue muscles. In speech studies using magnetic resonance (MR) techniques, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is used to capture internal tongue muscle fiber structures in three-dimensions (3D) in a non-invasive manner. Tagged magnetic resonance images (tMRI) are used to record tongue motion during speech. In this work, we aim to combine information obtained with both MR imaging techniques to compare the functionality characteristics of the tongue between normal and ALS subjects. We first extracted 3D motion of the tongue using tMRI from fourteen normal subjects in speech. The estimated motion sequences were then warped using diffeomorphic registration into the b0 spaces of the DTI data of two normal subjects and an ALS patient. We then constructed motion atlases by averaging all warped motion fields in each b0 space, and computed strain in the line of action along the muscle fiber directions provided by tractography. Strain in line with the fiber directions provides a quantitative map of the potential active region of the tongue during speech. Comparison between normal and ALS subjects explores the changing volume of compressing tongue tissues in speech facing the situation of muscle degradation. The proposed framework provides for the first time a dynamic map of contracting fibers in ALS speech patterns, and has the potential to provide more insight into the detrimental effects of ALS on speech.

  3. Dynamics of chaotic maps for modelling the multifractal spectrum of human brain Diffusion Tensor Images

    Provata, A.; Katsaloulis, P.; Verganelakis, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Calculation of human brain multifractal spectra. ► Calculations are based on Diffusion Tensor MRI Images. ► Spectra are modelled by coupled Ikeda map dynamics. ► Coupled lattice Ikeda maps model well only positive multifractal spectra. ► Appropriately modified coupled lattice Ikeda maps give correct spectra. - Abstract: The multifractal spectra of 3d Diffusion Tensor Images (DTI) obtained by magnetic resonance imaging of the human brain are studied. They are shown to deviate substantially from artificial brain images with the same white matter intensity. All spectra, obtained from 12 healthy subjects, show common characteristics indicating non-trivial moments of the intensity. To model the spectra the dynamics of the chaotic Ikeda map are used. The DTI multifractal spectra for positive q are best approximated by 3d coupled Ikeda maps in the fully developed chaotic regime. The coupling constants are as small as α = 0.01. These results reflect not only the white tissue non-trivial architectural complexity in the human brain, but also demonstrate the presence and importance of coupling between neuron axons. The architectural complexity is also mirrored by the deviations in the negative q-spectra, where the rare events dominate. To obtain a good agreement in the DTI negative q-spectrum of the brain with the Ikeda dynamics, it is enough to slightly modify the most rare events of the coupled Ikeda distributions. The representation of Diffusion Tensor Images with coupled Ikeda maps is not unique: similar conclusions are drawn when other chaotic maps (Tent, Logistic or Henon maps) are employed in the modelling of the neuron axons network.

  4. Extended substitution-diffusion based image cipher using chaotic standard map

    Kumar, Anil; Ghose, M. K.

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes an extended substitution-diffusion based image cipher using chaotic standard map [1] and linear feedback shift register to overcome the weakness of previous technique by adding nonlinearity. The first stage consists of row and column rotation and permutation which is controlled by the pseudo-random sequences which is generated by standard chaotic map and linear feedback shift register, second stage further diffusion and confusion is obtained in the horizontal and vertical pixels by mixing the properties of the horizontally and vertically adjacent pixels, respectively, with the help of chaotic standard map. The number of rounds in both stage are controlled by combination of pseudo-random sequence and original image. The performance is evaluated from various types of analysis such as entropy analysis, difference analysis, statistical analysis, key sensitivity analysis, key space analysis and speed analysis. The experimental results illustrate that performance of this is highly secured and fast.

  5. Functional Maps of Neocortical Local Circuitry

    Thomson, Alex M.; Lamy, Christophe

    2007-01-01

    This review aims to summarize data obtained with different techniques to provide a functional map of the local circuit connections made by neocortical neurones, a reference for those interested in cortical circuitry and the numerical information required by those wishing to model the circuit. A brief description of the main techniques used to study circuitry is followed by outline descriptions of the major classes of neocortical excitatory and inhibitory neurones and the connections that each layer makes with other cortical and subcortical regions. Maps summarizing the projection patterns of each class of neurone within the local circuit and tables of the properties of these local circuit connections are provided. This review relies primarily on anatomical studies that have identified the classes of neurones and their local and long distance connections and on paired intracellular and whole-cell recordings which have documented the properties of the connections between them. A large number of different types of synaptic connections have been described, but for some there are only a few published examples and for others the details that can only be obtained with paired recordings and dye-filling are lacking. A further complication is provided by the range of species, technical approaches and age groups used in these studies. Wherever possible the range of available data are summarised and compared. To fill some of the more obvious gaps for the less well-documented cases, data obtained with other methods are also summarized. PMID:18982117

  6. Mapping and Visiting in Functional and Object-oriented Programming

    Nørmark, Kurt; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2008-01-01

    Mapping and visiting represent different programming styles for traversals of collections of data.  Mapping is rooted in the functional programming paradigm, and visiting is rooted in the object-oriented programming paradigm.  This paper explores the similarities and differences between mapping...... and visiting, seen across the traditions in the two different programming paradigms. The paper is concluded with recommendations for mapping and visiting in programming languages that support both the functional and the object-oriented paradigms....

  7. Unpacking the cognitive map: the parallel map theory of hippocampal function.

    Jacobs, Lucia F; Schenk, Françoise

    2003-04-01

    In the parallel map theory, the hippocampus encodes space with 2 mapping systems. The bearing map is constructed primarily in the dentate gyrus from directional cues such as stimulus gradients. The sketch map is constructed within the hippocampus proper from positional cues. The integrated map emerges when data from the bearing and sketch maps are combined. Because the component maps work in parallel, the impairment of one can reveal residual learning by the other. Such parallel function may explain paradoxes of spatial learning, such as learning after partial hippocampal lesions, taxonomic and sex differences in spatial learning, and the function of hippocampal neurogenesis. By integrating evidence from physiology to phylogeny, the parallel map theory offers a unified explanation for hippocampal function.

  8. MR diffusion tensor analysis of schizophrenic brain using statistical parametric mapping

    Yamada, Haruyasu; Abe, Osamu; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate diffusion anisotropy in the schizophrenic brain by voxel-based analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), using statistical parametric mapping (SPM). We studied 33 patients with schizophrenia diagnosed by diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM)-IV criteria and 42 matched controls. The data was obtained with a 1.5 T MRI system. We used single-shot spin-echo planar sequences (repetition time/echo time (TR/TE)=5000/102 ms, 5 mm slice thickness and 1.5 mm gap, field of view (FOV)=21 x 21 cm 2 , number of excitation (NEX)=4, 128 x 128 pixel matrix) for diffusion tensor acquisition. Diffusion gradients (b-value of 500 or 1000 s/mm 2 ) were applied on two axes simultaneously. Diffusion properties were measured along 6 non-linear directions. The structural distortion induced by the large diffusion gradients was corrected, based on each T 2 -weighted echo-planar image (b=0 s/mm 2 ). The fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were generated on a voxel-by-voxel basis. T 2 -weighted echo-planar images were then segmented into gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid, using SPM (Wellcome Department of Imaging, University College London, UK). All apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and FA maps in native space were transformed to the stereotactic space by registering each of the images to the same template image. The normalized data was smoothed and analyzed using SPM. The significant FA decrease in the patient group was found in the uncinate fasciculus, parahippocampal white matter, anterior cingulum and other areas (corrected p<0.05). No significant increased region was noted. Our results may reflect reduced diffusion anisotropy of the white matter pathway of the limbic system as shown by the decreased FA. Manual region-of-interest analysis is usually more sensitive than voxel-based analysis, but it is subjective and difficult to set with anatomical reproducibility. Voxel-based analysis of the diffusion tensor

  9. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping in medulloblastoma predicts non-infiltrative surgical planes.

    Marupudi, Neena I; Altinok, Deniz; Goncalves, Luis; Ham, Steven D; Sood, Sandeep

    2016-11-01

    An appropriate surgical approach for posterior fossa lesions is to start tumor removal from areas with a defined plane to where tumor is infiltrating the brainstem or peduncles. This surgical approach minimizes risk of damage to eloquent areas. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the current standard preoperative imaging obtained for diagnosis and surgical planning of pediatric posterior fossa tumors, it offers limited information on the infiltrative planes between tumor and normal structures in patients with medulloblastomas. Because medulloblastomas demonstrate diffusion restriction on apparent diffusion coefficient map (ADC map) sequences, we investigated the role of ADC map in predicting infiltrative and non-infiltrative planes along the brain stem and/or cerebellar peduncles by medulloblastomas prior to surgery. Thirty-four pediatric patients with pathologically confirmed medulloblastomas underwent surgical resection at our facility from 2004 to 2012. An experienced pediatric neuroradiologist reviewed the brain MRIs/ADC map, assessing the planes between the tumor and cerebellar peduncles/brain stem. An independent evaluator documented surgical findings from operative reports for comparison to the radiographic findings. The radiographic findings were statistically compared to the documented intraoperative findings to determine predictive value of the test in identifying tumor infiltration of the brain stem cerebellar peduncles. Twenty-six patients had preoperative ADC mapping completed and thereby, met inclusion criteria. Mean age at time of surgery was 8.3 ± 4.6 years. Positive predictive value of ADC maps to predict tumor invasion of the brain stem and cerebellar peduncles ranged from 69 to 88 %; negative predictive values ranged from 70 to 89 %. Sensitivity approached 93 % while specificity approached 78 %. ADC maps are valuable in predicting the infiltrative and non-infiltrative planes along the tumor and brain stem interface in

  10. Damage detection on mesosurfaces using distributed sensor network and spectral diffusion maps

    Chinde, V; Vaidya, U; Laflamme, S; Cao, L

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop a data-driven method for the diagnosis of damage in mesoscale mechanical structures using an array of distributed sensor networks. The proposed approach relies on comparing intrinsic geometries of data sets corresponding to the undamaged and damaged states of the system. We use a spectral diffusion map approach to identify the intrinsic geometry of the data set. In particular, time series data from distributed sensors is used for the construction of diffusion maps. The low dimensional embedding of the data set corresponding to different damage levels is obtained using a singular value decomposition of the diffusion map. We construct appropriate metrics in the diffusion space to compare the different data sets corresponding to different damage cases. The developed algorithm is applied for damage diagnosis of wind turbine blades. To achieve this goal, we developed a detailed finite element-based model of CX-100 blade in ANSYS using shell elements. Typical damage, such as crack or delamination, will lead to a loss of stiffness, is modeled by altering the stiffness of the laminate layer. One of the main challenges in the development of health monitoring algorithms is the ability to use sensor data with a relatively small signal-to-noise ratio. Our developed diffusion map-based algorithm is shown to be robust to the presence of sensor noise. The proposed diffusion map-based algorithm is advantageous by enabling the comparison of data from numerous sensors of similar or different types of data through data fusion, hereby making it attractive to exploit the distributed nature of sensor arrays. This distributed nature is further exploited for the purpose of damage localization. We perform extensive numerical simulations to demonstrate that the proposed method can successfully determine the extent of damage on the wind turbine blade and also localize the damage. We also present preliminary results for the application of the developed algorithm on

  11. The Functional State of Intestinal Microcirculation in Diffuse Peritonitis

    A. A. Kosovskikh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the functional state of intestinal microcirculation in diffuse peritonitis caused by hollow organ perforation and to determine its possible relationship to skin microcirculation. Subjects and methods. Seventeen patients with diffuse peritonitis resulting from hollow organ perforation were examined. The patients’ mean age was 58.5±2.8 years; a control group consisted of 35 apparently healthy individuals. The functional state of the intestinal microcirculatory bed (the mid-transverse colon, the ileum at a distance of 60 cm from the ileocecal corner, the small bowel at a distance of 50 cm of the ligament of Treitz, and an area next hollow organ perforation and skin was evaluated by laser Doppler flowmetry by means of a ЛАКК-02 laser capillary blood flow analyzer made in the Russian Federation (LAZMA Research-and-Production Association, Russian Federation. Results. Perforation of the affected intestinal portion became worse in patients with diffuse peritonitis. Blood flow stability was ensured by the higher effect of mainly active components of vascular tone regulation on the microvascular bed. Regulatory changes were equally pronounced at both the intraorgan and skin levels. Conclusion. The findings suggest that the patients with diffuse peritonitis have changes in microcirculatory regulation aimed at maintaining tissue perfusion. These changes are universal at both the intraorgan and skin levels. Key words: microcirculation, micro blood flow, intestine, peritonitis, tissue perfusion.

  12. Reducing surgical levels by paraspinal mapping and diffusion tensor imaging techniques in lumbar spinal stenosis

    Chen, Hua-Biao; Wan, Qi; Xu, Qi-Feng; Chen, Yi; Bai, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Correlating symptoms and physical examination findings with surgical levels based on common imaging results is not reliable. In patients who have no concordance between radiological and clinical symptoms, the surgical levels determined by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurogenic examination (NE) may lead to a more extensive surgery and significant complications. We aimed to confirm that whether the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and paraspinal mapping (PM...

  13. Nanoscale diffusive memristor crossbars as physical unclonable functions.

    Zhang, R; Jiang, H; Wang, Z R; Lin, P; Zhuo, Y; Holcomb, D; Zhang, D H; Yang, J J; Xia, Q

    2018-02-08

    Physical unclonable functions have emerged as promising hardware security primitives for device authentication and key generation in the era of the Internet of Things. Herein, we report novel physical unclonable functions built upon the crossbars of nanoscale diffusive memristors that translate the stochastic distribution of Ag clusters in a SiO 2 matrix into a random binary bitmap that serves as a device fingerprint. The random dispersion of Ag led to an uneven number of clusters at each cross-point, which in turn resulted in a stochastic ability to switch in the Ag:SiO 2 diffusive memristors in an array. The randomness of the dispersion was a barrier to fingerprint cloning and the unique fingerprints of each device were persistent after fabrication. Using an optimized fabrication procedure, we maximized the randomness and achieved an inter-class Hamming distance of 50.68%. We also discovered that the bits were not flipping after over 10 4 s at 400 K, suggesting superior reliability of our physical unclonable functions. In addition, our diffusive memristor-based physical unclonable functions were easy to fabricate and did not require complicated post-processing for digitization and thus, provide new opportunities in hardware security applications.

  14. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A.; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space

  15. Diffusion maps, clustering and fuzzy Markov modeling in peptide folding transitions

    Nedialkova, Lilia V.; Amat, Miguel A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Kevrekidis, Ioannis G., E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Hummer, Gerhard, E-mail: yannis@princeton.edu, E-mail: gerhard.hummer@biophys.mpg.de [Department of Theoretical Biophysics, Max Planck Institute of Biophysics, Max-von-Laue-Str. 3, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-09-21

    Using the helix-coil transitions of alanine pentapeptide as an illustrative example, we demonstrate the use of diffusion maps in the analysis of molecular dynamics simulation trajectories. Diffusion maps and other nonlinear data-mining techniques provide powerful tools to visualize the distribution of structures in conformation space. The resulting low-dimensional representations help in partitioning conformation space, and in constructing Markov state models that capture the conformational dynamics. In an initial step, we use diffusion maps to reduce the dimensionality of the conformational dynamics of Ala5. The resulting pretreated data are then used in a clustering step. The identified clusters show excellent overlap with clusters obtained previously by using the backbone dihedral angles as input, with small—but nontrivial—differences reflecting torsional degrees of freedom ignored in the earlier approach. We then construct a Markov state model describing the conformational dynamics in terms of a discrete-time random walk between the clusters. We show that by combining fuzzy C-means clustering with a transition-based assignment of states, we can construct robust Markov state models. This state-assignment procedure suppresses short-time memory effects that result from the non-Markovianity of the dynamics projected onto the space of clusters. In a comparison with previous work, we demonstrate how manifold learning techniques may complement and enhance informed intuition commonly used to construct reduced descriptions of the dynamics in molecular conformation space.

  16. Diffusion

    Kubaschewski, O.

    1983-01-01

    The diffusion rate values of titanium, its compounds and alloys are summarized and tabulated. The individual chemical diffusion coefficients and self-diffusion coefficients of certain isotopes are given. Experimental methods are listed which were used for the determination of diffusion coefficients. Some values have been taken over from other studies. Also given are graphs showing the temperature dependences of diffusion and changes in the diffusion coefficient with concentration changes

  17. Lung function study and diffusion capacity in anorexia nervosa.

    Pieters, T; Boland, B; Beguin, C; Veriter, C; Stanescu, D; Frans, A; Lambert, M

    2000-08-01

    In humans, malnutrition alters the respiratory system in different ways. It impairs the ventilatory drive, decreases respiratory muscle strength and reduces immune competence. In addition, typical emphysema-like changes were demonstrated in starved animals. The presence of emphysema has never been demonstrated in starved humans. Our objective was to investigate whether pulmonary emphysema occurs in anorexia nervosa by means of a pulmonary function study. We examined 24 women aged between 14 and 38 years (nine smokers). We studied the lung function including lung volumes, ventilatory capacity, maximal respiratory pressures and transfer factor, as well as PaO2. All respiratory tests were within normal limits with the exception of decreased maximal inspiratory (59% of predicted values) and expiratory pressures (35%), and increased residual volume (162%). Diffusion capacity (98.1 +/- 16.2%) and transfer coefficient (98.4 +/- 16.2%) were also normal. The diffusion coefficient was lower in current smokers than in those who had never smoked (P anorexia nervosa, pulmonary function tests are within normal limits with the exception of maximal pressures and residual volume. Diffusion capacity is not decreased. The present results within the limitations of the used method are not compatible with the hypothesis of starvation-induced pulmonary emphysema.

  18. The velocity correlation function in cosmic-ray diffusion theory

    Forman, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of velocity correlation functions is introduced and applied to the calculation of cosmic ray spatial diffusion coefficients. It is assumed that the pitch angle scattering coefficient is already known from some other theory, and is reasonably well-behaved. Previous results for the coefficient for diffusion parallel to the mean field are recovered when the velocity-changing mechanism is artificially restricted to pitch angle scattering. The velocity correlation method is then applied to the more general case where there are fluctuations in the local mean field. It is found that the parallel diffusion coefficient is reduced in proportion to the amplitude of the field fluctuations, and that the ratio of the perpendicular to parallel diffusion coefficients cannot be greater than 2 >/B 0 2 . It is shown in the appendix that the Liouville form of the scattering equation implies that the Fokker-Planck coefficients (Δμ 2 )/Δt=2Dsub(μμ) and (Δμ)/Δt=deltaDsub(μμ)/deltaμ, and that all higher-order coefficients are identically zero. (Auth.)

  19. Calculation and mapping of direct and diffuse solar radiation in Costa Rica

    Wright, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    Knowledge of direct and diffuse solar radiation has been of vital importance in assessing the energy potential of Costa Rica. The work is focused on the calculation and plotting of contour maps of the direct and diffuse solar radiation, based in sixty-two radiometric stations scattered throughout the country. In tracing these contours have been used experimental and predicted values of direct and diffuse radiation. Additionally, direct and diffuse solar radiation is compared during the dry season and the rainy season in the six climatic regions of the country: Valle Central, North Pacific, Central Pacific, South Pacific, North Zone and Caribbean Region. Daily average levels of radiation observed directly have been from 6.1 and 10.1 MJ/m 2 , with higher values in the northern sections of the Pacific Slope, west of Valle Central and the tops of the highest mountains. The lowest values have coincided with the North Zone and Caribbean Region. The highest values of diffuse radiation have coincided with the North Zone and South Pacific. An increase in direct solar radiation by 40% is observed in the month of the dry season. (author) [es

  20. Benchmark calculations of excess electrons in water cluster cavities: balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions versus floating diffuse functions.

    Zhang, Changzhe; Bu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-14

    Diffuse functions have been proved to be especially crucial for the accurate characterization of excess electrons which are usually bound weakly in intermolecular zones far away from the nuclei. To examine the effects of diffuse functions on the nature of the cavity-shaped excess electrons in water cluster surroundings, both the HOMO and LUMO distributions, vertical detachment energies (VDEs) and visible absorption spectra of two selected (H2O)24(-) isomers are investigated in the present work. Two main types of diffuse functions are considered in calculations including the Pople-style atom-centered diffuse functions and the ghost-atom-based floating diffuse functions. It is found that augmentation of atom-centered diffuse functions contributes to a better description of the HOMO (corresponding to the VDE convergence), in agreement with previous studies, but also leads to unreasonable diffuse characters of the LUMO with significant red-shifts in the visible spectra, which is against the conventional point of view that the more the diffuse functions, the better the results. The issue of designing extra floating functions for excess electrons has also been systematically discussed, which indicates that the floating diffuse functions are necessary not only for reducing the computational cost but also for improving both the HOMO and LUMO accuracy. Thus, the basis sets with a combination of partial atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions are recommended for a reliable description of the weakly bound electrons. This work presents an efficient way for characterizing the electronic properties of weakly bound electrons accurately by balancing the addition of atom-centered diffuse functions and floating diffuse functions and also by balancing the computational cost and accuracy of the calculated results, and thus is very useful in the relevant calculations of various solvated electron systems and weakly bound anionic systems.

  1. Functional imaging of small tissue volumes with diffuse optical tomography

    Klose, Alexander D.; Hielscher, Andreas H.

    2006-03-01

    Imaging of dynamic changes in blood parameters, functional brain imaging, and tumor imaging are the most advanced application areas of diffuse optical tomography (DOT). When dealing with the image reconstruction problem one is faced with the fact that near-infrared photons, unlike X-rays, are highly scattered when they traverse biological tissue. Image reconstruction schemes are required that model the light propagation inside biological tissue and predict measurements on the tissue surface. By iteratively changing the tissue-parameters until the predictions agree with the real measurements, a spatial distribution of optical properties inside the tissue is found. The optical properties can be related to the tissue oxygenation, inflammation, or to the fluorophore concentration of a biochemical marker. If the model of light propagation is inaccurate, the reconstruction process will lead to an inaccurate result as well. Here, we focus on difficulties that are encountered when DOT is employed for functional imaging of small tissue volumes, for example, in cancer studies involving small animals, or human finger joints for early diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Most of the currently employed image reconstruction methods rely on the diffusion theory that is an approximation to the equation of radiative transfer. But, in the cases of small tissue volumes and tissues that contain low scattering regions diffusion theory has been shown to be of limited applicability Therefore, we employ a light propagation model that is based on the equation of radiative transfer, which promises to overcome the limitations.

  2. Characterizing the structure of diffuse emission in Hi-GAL maps

    Elia, D.; Molinari, S.; Rygl, K. L. J.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Pestalozzi, M.; Liu, S. J. [INAF-IAPS, Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Strafella, F.; Maruccia, Y. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica E. De Giorgi, Università del Salento, CP 193, I-73100 Lecce (Italy); Schneider, N. [Univ. Bordeaux, LAB, CNRS, UMR 5804, 33270, Floirac (France); Paladini, R. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Vavrek, R. [Herschel Science Centre, European Space Astronomy Centre, Villafranca del Castillo, Apartado de Correos 78, E-28080 Madrid (Spain); Noriega-Crespo, A.; Pezzuto, S.; Schisano, E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Traficante, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Calzoletti, L.; Natoli, P. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana Science Data Center, c/o ESRIN, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Huang, M. [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Martin, P. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Fukui, Y., E-mail: davide.elia@iaps.inaf.it [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); and others

    2014-06-10

    We present a study of the structure of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) through the Δ-variance technique, related to the power spectrum and the fractal properties of infrared/submillimeter maps. Through this method, it is possible to provide quantitative parameters, which are useful for characterizing different morphological and physical conditions, and better constraining the theoretical models. In this respect, the Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey, carried out at five photometric bands from 70 to 500 μm, constitutes a unique database for applying statistical tools to a variety of regions across the Milky Way. In this paper, we derive a robust estimate of the power-law portion of the power spectrum of four contiguous 2° × 2° Hi-GAL tiles located in the third Galactic quadrant (217° ≲ ℓ ≲ 225°, –2° ≲ b ≲ 0°). The low level of confusion along the line of sight, testified by CO observations, makes this region an ideal case. We find very different values for the power spectrum slope from tile to tile but also from wavelength to wavelength (2 ≲ β ≲ 3), with similarities between fields attributable to components located at the same distance. Thanks to comparisons with models of turbulence, an explanation of the determined slopes in terms of the fractal geometry is also provided, and possible relations with the underlying physics are investigated. In particular, an anti-correlation between ISM fractal dimension and star formation efficiency is found for the two main distance components observed in these fields. A possible link between the fractal properties of the diffuse emission and the resulting clump mass function is discussed.

  3. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Hirokazu Takahashi

    Full Text Available The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  4. Response variance in functional maps: neural darwinism revisited.

    Takahashi, Hirokazu; Yokota, Ryo; Kanzaki, Ryohei

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms by which functional maps and map plasticity contribute to cortical computation remain controversial. Recent studies have revisited the theory of neural Darwinism to interpret the learning-induced map plasticity and neuronal heterogeneity observed in the cortex. Here, we hypothesize that the Darwinian principle provides a substrate to explain the relationship between neuron heterogeneity and cortical functional maps. We demonstrate in the rat auditory cortex that the degree of response variance is closely correlated with the size of its representational area. Further, we show that the response variance within a given population is altered through training. These results suggest that larger representational areas may help to accommodate heterogeneous populations of neurons. Thus, functional maps and map plasticity are likely to play essential roles in Darwinian computation, serving as effective, but not absolutely necessary, structures to generate diverse response properties within a neural population.

  5. Characterization of Diffusion Metric Map Similarity in Data From a Clinical Data Repository Using Histogram Distances

    Warner, Graham C.; Helmer, Karl G.

    2018-01-01

    As the sharing of data is mandated by funding agencies and journals, reuse of data has become more prevalent. It becomes imperative, therefore, to develop methods to characterize the similarity of data. While users can group data based on the acquisition parameters stored in the file headers, these gives no indication whether a file can be combined with other data without increasing the variance in the data set. Methods have been implemented that characterize the signal-to-noise ratio or identify signal drop-outs in the raw image files, but potential users of data often have access to calculated metric maps and these are more difficult to characterize and compare. Here we describe a histogram-distance-based method applied to diffusion metric maps of fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity that were generated using data extracted from a repository of clinically-acquired MRI data. We describe the generation of the data set, the pitfalls specific to diffusion MRI data, and the results of the histogram distance analysis. We find that, in general, data from GE scanners are less similar than are data from Siemens scanners. We also find that the distribution of distance metric values is not Gaussian at any selection of the acquisition parameters considered here (field strength, number of gradient directions, b-value, and vendor). PMID:29568257

  6. Functional imaging of submandibular glands: diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation

    Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R.; Graessner, J.; Petersen, K.; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) to depict the submandibular glands and to measure different functional conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were examined. Diffusion weighted sequence was performed prior to stimulation. Exactly 30 seconds after a commercially available lemon juice was given orally, the diffusion weighted sequence was repeated. All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The lower part of the circularly polarized (CP) head coil and a standard two-element CP neck array coil were used. The flexibility of the neck array coil allowed positioning the N1 element (upper part of the coil) right next to the submandibular gland. The axial diffusion-weighted EPI (echo planar imaging) sequence was performed using a matrix of 119 x 128, a field of view of 250 x 250 mm (pixel size 2.1 x 1.95 mm), a section thickness of 5 mm with an interslice gap of 1 mm. The b factors used were 0 sec/mm 2 , 500 sec/mm 2 and 1000 sec/mm 2 . Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain). After detecting the submandibular glands a region of interest (ROI) was placed manually exactly within the boarder of both submandibular glands, excluding the external carotid artery on ADC maps. These procedures were performed on all ADC slices the submandibular glands could be differentiated in before and after oral stimulation. For statistical comparison of results, a student's t-test was performed with an overall two-tailed significance level of p=0.05. Results: The visualization of the submandibular glands using the diffusion-weighted EPI sequence was possible in all of the 27 volunteers. Prior to oral stimulation an ADC of 1.31 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec (95% CI, 1

  7. Glioma grade assessment by using histogram analysis of diffusion tensor imaging-derived maps

    Jakab, Andras; Berenyi, Ervin; Molnar, Peter; Emri, Miklos

    2011-01-01

    Current endeavors in neuro-oncology include morphological validation of imaging methods by histology, including molecular and immunohistochemical techniques. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an up-to-date methodology of intracranial diagnostics that has gained importance in studies of neoplasia. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of discriminant analysis applied to histograms of preoperative diffusion tensor imaging-derived images for the prediction of glioma grade validated by histomorphology. Tumors of 40 consecutive patients included 13 grade II astrocytomas, seven oligoastrocytomas, six grade II oligodendrogliomas, three grade III oligoastrocytomas, and 11 glioblastoma multiformes. Preoperative DTI data comprised: unweighted (B 0 ) images, fractional anisotropy, longitudinal and radial diffusivity maps, directionally averaged diffusion-weighted imaging, and trace images. Sampling consisted of generating histograms for gross tumor volumes; 25 histogram bins per scalar map were calculated. The histogram bins that allowed the most precise determination of low-grade (LG) or high-grade (HG) classification were selected by multivariate discriminant analysis. Accuracy of the model was defined by the success rate of the leave-one-out cross-validation. Statistical descriptors of voxel value distribution did not differ between LG and HG tumors and did not allow classification. The histogram model had 88.5% specificity and 85.7% sensitivity in the separation of LG and HG gliomas; specificity was improved when cases with oligodendroglial components were omitted. Constructing histograms of preoperative radiological images over the tumor volume allows representation of the grade and enables discrimination of LG and HG gliomas which has been confirmed by histopathology. (orig.)

  8. Estimating Functions with Prior Knowledge, (EFPK) for diffusions

    Nolsøe, Kim; Kessler, Mathieu; Madsen, Henrik

    2003-01-01

    In this paper a method is formulated in an estimating function setting for parameter estimation, which allows the use of prior information. The main idea is to use prior knowledge of the parameters, either specified as moments restrictions or as a distribution, and use it in the construction of a...... of an estimating function. It may be useful when the full Bayesian analysis is difficult to carry out for computational reasons. This is almost always the case for diffusions, which is the focus of this paper, though the method applies in other settings.......In this paper a method is formulated in an estimating function setting for parameter estimation, which allows the use of prior information. The main idea is to use prior knowledge of the parameters, either specified as moments restrictions or as a distribution, and use it in the construction...

  9. Identification of myocardial diffuse fibrosis by 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping

    Vassiliou, Vassilios S; Wassilew, Katharina; Cameron, Donnie

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Our objectives involved identifying whether repeated averaging in basal and mid left ventricular myocardial levels improves precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction for 11 heartbeat MOLLI T 1 mapping versus assessment at a single ventricular level. MATERIALS AND METHODS...... and ECV. To assess correlation of T 1 mapping with collagen volume fraction, a separate cohort of ten aortic stenosis patients scheduled to undergo surgery underwent one CMR scan with this 11 heartbeat MOLLI scheme, followed by intraoperative tru-cut myocardial biopsy. Six models of myocardial diffuse...... fibrosis assessment were established with incremental inclusion of imaging by averaging of the basal and mid-myocardial left ventricular levels, and each model was assessed for precision and correlation with collagen volume fraction. RESULTS: A model using 11 heart beat MOLLI imaging of two basal and two...

  10. Nanomechanical mapping of graphene layers and interfaces in suspended graphene nanostructures grown via carbon diffusion

    Robinson, B.J. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Rabot, C. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Mazzocco, R. [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Delamoreanu, A. [Microelectronics Technology Laboratory (LTM), Joseph Fourier University, French National Research Center (CNRS), 17 Avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Zenasni, A. [CEA-LETI-Minatec Campus, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 09 (France); Kolosov, O.V., E-mail: o.kolosov@lancaster.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-01

    Graphene's remarkable mechanical, electronic and thermal properties are strongly determined by both the mechanism of its growth and its interaction with the underlying substrate. Evidently, in order to explore the fundamentals of these mechanisms, efficient nanoscale methods that enable observation of features hidden underneath the immediate surface are needed. In this paper we use nanomechanical mapping via ultrasonic force microscopy that employs MHz frequency range ultrasonic vibrations and allows the observation of surface composition and subsurface interfaces with nanoscale resolution, to elucidate the morphology of few layer graphene (FLG) films produced via a recently reported method of carbon diffusion growth (CDG) on platinum-metal based substrate. CDG is known to result in FLG suspended over large areas, which could be of high importance for graphene transfer and applications where a standalone graphene film is required. This study directly reveals the detailed mechanism of CDG three-dimensional growth and FLG film detachment, directly linking the level of graphene decoupling with variations of the substrate temperature during the annealing phase of growth. We also show that graphene initially and preferentially decouples at the substrate grain boundaries, likely due to its negative expansion coefficient at cooling, forming characteristic “nano-domes” at the intersections of the grain boundaries. Furthermore, quantitative nanomechanical mapping of flexural stiffness of suspended FLG “nano-domes” using kHz frequency range force modulation microscopy uncovers the progression of “nano-dome” stiffness from single to bi-modal distribution as CDG growth progresses, suggesting growth instability at advanced CDG stages. - Highlights: • Exploring growth and film-substrate decoupling in carbon diffusion grown graphene • Nanomechanical mapping of few layer graphene and graphene–substrate interfaces • Quantitative stiffness mapping of

  11. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    Zheng, B.; Wang, L. L.; Du, L.; Pan, Y.; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Du, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    Zheng, B.

    2016-05-11

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Joint brain connectivity estimation from diffusion and functional MRI data

    Chu, Shu-Hsien; Lenglet, Christophe; Parhi, Keshab K.

    2015-03-01

    Estimating brain wiring patterns is critical to better understand the brain organization and function. Anatomical brain connectivity models axonal pathways, while the functional brain connectivity characterizes the statistical dependencies and correlation between the activities of various brain regions. The synchronization of brain activity can be inferred through the variation of blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal from functional MRI (fMRI) and the neural connections can be estimated using tractography from diffusion MRI (dMRI). Functional connections between brain regions are supported by anatomical connections, and the synchronization of brain activities arises through sharing of information in the form of electro-chemical signals on axon pathways. Jointly modeling fMRI and dMRI data may improve the accuracy in constructing anatomical connectivity as well as functional connectivity. Such an approach may lead to novel multimodal biomarkers potentially able to better capture functional and anatomical connectivity variations. We present a novel brain network model which jointly models the dMRI and fMRI data to improve the anatomical connectivity estimation and extract the anatomical subnetworks associated with specific functional modes by constraining the anatomical connections as structural supports to the functional connections. The key idea is similar to a multi-commodity flow optimization problem that minimizes the cost or maximizes the efficiency for flow configuration and simultaneously fulfills the supply-demand constraint for each commodity. In the proposed network, the nodes represent the grey matter (GM) regions providing brain functionality, and the links represent white matter (WM) fiber bundles connecting those regions and delivering information. The commodities can be thought of as the information corresponding to brain activity patterns as obtained for instance by independent component analysis (ICA) of fMRI data. The concept of information

  14. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Saraiva, Fabio Petersen; Costa, Patricia Grativol; Inomata, Daniela Lumi; Melo, Carlos Sergio Nascimento; Helal Junior, John; Nakashima, Yoshitaka

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. Introduction: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. Methods: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group) and with diffuse macular edema (case group). Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. Results: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. Discussion: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema. (author)

  15. Consistency of ocular coherence tomography fast macular thickness mapping in diabetic diffuse macular edema

    Saraiva, Fabio Petersen; Costa, Patricia Grativol; Inomata, Daniela Lumi; Melo, Carlos Sergio Nascimento; Helal Junior, John; Nakashima, Yoshitaka [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Oftalmologia]. E-mail: fabiopetersen@yahoo.com.br

    2007-07-01

    Objectives: To investigate optical coherence tomography consistency on foveal thickness, foveal volume, and macular volume measurements in patients with and without diffuse diabetic macular edema. Introduction: Optical coherence tomography represents an objective technique that provides cross-sectional tomographs of retinal structure in vivo. However, it is expected that poor fixation ability, as seen in diabetic macular edema, could alter its results. Several authors have discussed the reproducibility of optical coherence tomography, but only a few have addressed the topic with respect to diabetic maculopathy. Methods: The study recruited diabetic patients without clinically evident retinopathy (control group) and with diffuse macular edema (case group). Only one eye of each patient was evaluated. Five consecutive fast macular scans were taken using Ocular Coherence Tomography 3; the 6 mm macular map was chosen. The consistency in measurements of foveal thickness, foveal volume, and total macular volume for both groups was evaluated using the Pearson's coefficient of variation. The T-test for independent samples was used in order to compare measurements of both groups. Results: Each group consisted of 20 patients. All measurements had a coefficient of variation less than 10%. The most consistent parameter for both groups was the total macular volume. Discussion: Consistency in measurement is a mainstay of any test. A test is unreliable if its measurements can not be correctly repeated. We found a good index of consistency, even considering patients with an unstable gaze. Conclusions: Optical coherence tomography is a consistent method for diabetic subjects with diffuse macular edema. (author)

  16. ChalkBoard: Mapping Functions to Polygons

    Matlage, Kevin; Gill, Andy

    ChalkBoard is a domain specific language for describing images. The ChalkBoard language is uncompromisingly functional and encourages the use of modern functional idioms. ChalkBoard uses off-the-shelf graphics cards to speed up rendering of functional descriptions. In this paper, we describe the design of the core ChalkBoard language, and the architecture of our static image generation accelerator.

  17. A new mapping function in table-mounted eye tracker

    Tong, Qinqin; Hua, Xiao; Qiu, Jian; Luo, Kaiqing; Peng, Li; Han, Peng

    2018-01-01

    Eye tracker is a new apparatus of human-computer interaction, which has caught much attention in recent years. Eye tracking technology is to obtain the current subject's "visual attention (gaze)" direction by using mechanical, electronic, optical, image processing and other means of detection. While the mapping function is one of the key technology of the image processing, and is also the determination of the accuracy of the whole eye tracker system. In this paper, we present a new mapping model based on the relationship among the eyes, the camera and the screen that the eye gazed. Firstly, according to the geometrical relationship among the eyes, the camera and the screen, the framework of mapping function between the pupil center and the screen coordinate is constructed. Secondly, in order to simplify the vectors inversion of the mapping function, the coordinate of the eyes, the camera and screen was modeled by the coaxial model systems. In order to verify the mapping function, corresponding experiment was implemented. It is also compared with the traditional quadratic polynomial function. And the results show that our approach can improve the accuracy of the determination of the gazing point. Comparing with other methods, this mapping function is simple and valid.

  18. Detecting Buried Archaeological Remains by the Use of Geophysical Data Processing with 'Diffusion Maps' Methodology

    Eppelbaum, Lev

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical methods are prompt, non-invasive and low-cost tool for quantitative delineation of buried archaeological targets. However, taking into account the complexity of geological-archaeological media, some unfavourable environments and known ambiguity of geophysical data analysis, a single geophysical method examination might be insufficient (Khesin and Eppelbaum, 1997). Besides this, it is well-known that the majority of inverse-problem solutions in geophysics are ill-posed (e.g., Zhdanov, 2002), which means, according to Hadamard (1902), that the solution does not exist, or is not unique, or is not a continuous function of observed geophysical data (when small perturbations in the observations will cause arbitrary mistakes in the solution). This fact has a wide application for informational, probabilistic and wavelet methodologies in archaeological geophysics (Eppelbaum, 2014a). The goal of the modern geophysical data examination is to detect the geophysical signatures of buried targets at noisy areas via the analysis of some physical parameters with a minimal number of false alarms and miss-detections (Eppelbaum et al., 2011; Eppelbaum, 2014b). The proposed wavelet approach to recognition of archaeological targets (AT) by the examination of geophysical method integration consists of advanced processing of each geophysical method and nonconventional integration of different geophysical methods between themselves. The recently developed technique of diffusion clustering combined with the abovementioned wavelet methods was utilized to integrate the geophysical data and detect existing irregularities. The approach is based on the wavelet packet techniques applied as to the geophysical images (or graphs) versus coordinates. For such an analysis may be utilized practically all geophysical methods (magnetic, gravity, seismic, GPR, ERT, self-potential, etc.). On the first stage of the proposed investigation a few tens of typical physical-archaeological models (PAM

  19. Diffusion of responsibility attenuates altruistic punishment: A functional magnetic resonance imaging effective connectivity study.

    Feng, Chunliang; Deshpande, Gopikrishna; Liu, Chao; Gu, Ruolei; Luo, Yue-Jia; Krueger, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Humans altruistically punish violators of social norms to enforce cooperation and pro-social behaviors. However, such altruistic behaviors diminish when others are present, due to a diffusion of responsibility. We investigated the neural signatures underlying the modulations of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment, conjoining a third-party punishment task with event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging and multivariate Granger causality mapping. In our study, participants acted as impartial third-party decision-makers and decided how to punish norm violations under two different social contexts: alone (i.e., full responsibility) or in the presence of putative other third-party decision makers (i.e., diffused responsibility). Our behavioral results demonstrated that the diffusion of responsibility served as a mediator of context-dependent punishment. In the presence of putative others, participants who felt less responsible also punished less severely in response to norm violations. Our neural results revealed that underlying this behavioral effect was a network of interconnected brain regions. For unfair relative to fair splits, the presence of others led to attenuated responses in brain regions implicated in signaling norm violations (e.g., AI) and to increased responses in brain regions implicated in calculating values of norm violations (e.g., vmPFC, precuneus) and mentalizing about others (dmPFC). The dmPFC acted as the driver of the punishment network, modulating target regions, such as AI, vmPFC, and precuneus, to adjust altruistic punishment behavior. Our results uncovered the neural basis of the influence of diffusion of responsibility on altruistic punishment and highlighted the role of the mentalizing network in this important phenomenon. Hum Brain Mapp 37:663-677, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. MR relaxometry in chronic liver diseases: Comparison of T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted imaging for assessing cirrhosis diagnosis and severity

    Cassinotto, Christophe, E-mail: christophe.cassinotto@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); INSERM U1053, Université Bordeaux, Bordeaux (France); Feldis, Matthieu, E-mail: matthieu.feldis@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Vergniol, Julien, E-mail: julien.vergniol@chu-bordeaux.fr [Centre D’investigation de la Fibrose Hépatique, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Mouries, Amaury, E-mail: amaury.mouries@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); Cochet, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.cochet@chu-bordeaux.fr [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Imaging, Hôpital Haut-Lévêque, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire et Université de Bordeaux, 1 Avenue de Magellan, 33604 Pessac (France); and others

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • The use of MR to classify cirrhosis in different stages is a new interesting field. • We compared liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging. • MR relaxometry using liver T1 mapping is accurate for the diagnosis of cirrhosis. • Liver T1 mapping shows that values increase with the severity of cirrhosis. • Diffusion-weighted imaging is less accurate than T1 mapping while T2 mapping is not reliable. - Abstract: Background: MR relaxometry has been extensively studied in the field of cardiac diseases, but its contribution to liver imaging is unclear. We aimed to compare liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for assessing the diagnosis and severity of cirrhosis. Methods: We prospectively included 129 patients with normal (n = 40) and cirrhotic livers (n = 89) from May to September 2014. Non-enhanced liver T1 mapping, splenic T2 mapping, and liver and splenic DWI were measured and compared for assessing cirrhosis severity using Child-Pugh score, MELD score, and presence or not of large esophageal varices (EVs) and liver stiffness measurements using Fibroscan{sup ®} as reference. Results: Liver T1 mapping was the only variable demonstrating significant differences between normal patients (500 ± 79 ms), Child-Pugh A patients (574 ± 84 ms) and Child-Pugh B/C patients (690 ± 147 ms; all p-values <0.00001). Liver T1 mapping had a significant correlation with Child-Pugh score (Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.46), MEDL score (0.30), and liver stiffness measurement (0.52). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of liver T1 mapping for the diagnosis of cirrhosis (O.85; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.77–0.91), Child-Pugh B/C cirrhosis (0.87; 95%CI, 0.76–0.93), and large EVs (0.75; 95%CI, 0.63–0.83) were greater than that of spleen T2 mapping, liver and spleen DWI (all p-values < 0.01). Conclusion: Liver T1 mapping is a promising new diagnostic

  1. MR relaxometry in chronic liver diseases: Comparison of T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted imaging for assessing cirrhosis diagnosis and severity

    Cassinotto, Christophe; Feldis, Matthieu; Vergniol, Julien; Mouries, Amaury; Cochet, Hubert

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The use of MR to classify cirrhosis in different stages is a new interesting field. • We compared liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping and diffusion-weighted imaging. • MR relaxometry using liver T1 mapping is accurate for the diagnosis of cirrhosis. • Liver T1 mapping shows that values increase with the severity of cirrhosis. • Diffusion-weighted imaging is less accurate than T1 mapping while T2 mapping is not reliable. - Abstract: Background: MR relaxometry has been extensively studied in the field of cardiac diseases, but its contribution to liver imaging is unclear. We aimed to compare liver and spleen T1 mapping, T2 mapping, and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) for assessing the diagnosis and severity of cirrhosis. Methods: We prospectively included 129 patients with normal (n = 40) and cirrhotic livers (n = 89) from May to September 2014. Non-enhanced liver T1 mapping, splenic T2 mapping, and liver and splenic DWI were measured and compared for assessing cirrhosis severity using Child-Pugh score, MELD score, and presence or not of large esophageal varices (EVs) and liver stiffness measurements using Fibroscan ® as reference. Results: Liver T1 mapping was the only variable demonstrating significant differences between normal patients (500 ± 79 ms), Child-Pugh A patients (574 ± 84 ms) and Child-Pugh B/C patients (690 ± 147 ms; all p-values <0.00001). Liver T1 mapping had a significant correlation with Child-Pugh score (Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.46), MEDL score (0.30), and liver stiffness measurement (0.52). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of liver T1 mapping for the diagnosis of cirrhosis (O.85; 95% confidence intervals (CI), 0.77–0.91), Child-Pugh B/C cirrhosis (0.87; 95%CI, 0.76–0.93), and large EVs (0.75; 95%CI, 0.63–0.83) were greater than that of spleen T2 mapping, liver and spleen DWI (all p-values < 0.01). Conclusion: Liver T1 mapping is a promising new diagnostic tool for

  2. Two-dimensional finite element neutron diffusion analysis using hierarchic shape functions

    Carpenter, D.C.

    1997-01-01

    Recent advances have been made in the use of p-type finite element method (FEM) for structural and fluid dynamics problems that hold promise for reactor physics problems. These advances include using hierarchic shape functions, element-by-element iterative solvers and more powerful mapping techniques. Use of the hierarchic shape functions allows greater flexibility and efficiency in implementing energy-dependent flux expansions and incorporating localized refinement of the solution space. The irregular matrices generated by the p-type FEM can be solved efficiently using element-by-element conjugate gradient iterative solvers. These solvers do not require storage of either the global or local stiffness matrices and can be highly vectorized. Mapping techniques based on blending function interpolation allow exact representation of curved boundaries using coarse element grids. These features were implemented in a developmental two-dimensional neutron diffusion program based on the use of hierarchic shape functions (FEM2DH). Several aspects in the effective use of p-type analysis were explored. Two choices of elemental preconditioning were examined--the proper selection of the polynomial shape functions and the proper number of functions to use. Of the five shape function polynomials tested, the integral Legendre functions were the most effective. The serendipity set of functions is preferable over the full tensor product set. Two global preconditioners were also examined--simple diagonal and incomplete Cholesky. The full effectiveness of the finite element methodology was demonstrated on a two-region, two-group cylindrical problem but solved in the x-y coordinate space, using a non-structured element grid. The exact, analytic eigenvalue solution was achieved with FEM2DH using various combinations of element grids and flux expansions

  3. One-way hash function construction based on chaotic map network

    Yang Huaqian; Wong, K.-W.; Liao Xiaofeng; Wang Yong; Yang Degang

    2009-01-01

    A novel chaotic hash algorithm based on a network structure formed by 16 chaotic maps is proposed. The original message is first padded with zeros to make the length a multiple of four. Then it is divided into a number of blocks each contains 4 bytes. In the hashing process, the blocks are mixed together by the chaotic map network since the initial value and the control parameter of each tent map are dynamically determined by the output of its neighbors. To enhance the confusion and diffusion effect, the cipher block chaining (CBC) mode is adopted in the algorithm. Theoretic analyses and numerical simulations both show that the proposed hash algorithm possesses good statistical properties, strong collision resistance and high flexibility, as required by practical keyed hash functions.

  4. Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring during Glioma Surgery

    SAITO, Taiichi; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; MARUYAMA, Takashi; TAMURA, Manabu; NITTA, Masayuki; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Glioma surgery represents a significant advance with respect to improving resection rates using new surgical techniques, including intraoperative functional mapping, monitoring, and imaging. Functional mapping under awake craniotomy can be used to detect individual eloquent tissues of speech and/or motor functions in order to prevent unexpected deficits and promote extensive resection. In addition, monitoring the patient’s neurological findings during resection is also very useful for maximizing the removal rate and minimizing deficits by alarming that the touched area is close to eloquent regions and fibers. Assessing several types of evoked potentials, including motor evoked potentials (MEPs), sensory evoked potentials (SEPs) and visual evoked potentials (VEPs), is also helpful for performing surgical monitoring in patients under general anesthesia (GA). We herein review the utility of intraoperative mapping and monitoring the assessment of neurological findings, with a particular focus on speech and the motor function, in patients undergoing glioma surgery. PMID:25744346

  5. Control of spatio-temporal on-off intermittency in random driving diffusively coupled map lattices

    Ziabakhsh Deilami, M.; Rahmani Cherati, Z.; Jahed Motlagh, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose feedback methods for controlling spatio-temporal on-off intermittency which is an aperiodic switching between an 'off' state and an 'on' state. Diffusively coupled map lattice with spatially non-uniform random driving is used for showing spatio-temporal on-off intermittency. For this purpose, we apply three different feedbacks. First, we use a linear feedback which is a simple method but has a long transient time. To overcome this problem, two nonlinear feedbacks based on prediction strategy are proposed. An important advantage of the methods is that the feedback signal is vanished when control is realized. Simulation results show that all methods have suppressed the chaotic behavior.

  6. Mapping remodeling of thalamocortical projections in the living reeler mouse brain by diffusion tractography

    Harsan, Laura-Adela; Dávid, Csaba; Reisert, Marco; Schnell, Susanne; Hennig, Jürgen; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; Staiger, Jochen F.

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to accurately decipher in vivo the entire brain circuitry (connectome) at a microscopic level. Currently, the only methodology providing a global noninvasive window into structural brain connectivity is diffusion tractography. The extent to which the reconstructed pathways reflect realistic neuronal networks depends, however, on data acquisition and postprocessing factors. Through a unique combination of approaches, we designed and evaluated herein a framework for reliable fiber tracking and mapping of the living mouse brain connectome. One important wiring scheme, connecting gray matter regions and passing fiber-crossing areas, was closely examined: the lemniscal thalamocortical (TC) pathway. We quantitatively validated the TC projections inferred from in vivo tractography with correlative histological axonal tracing in the same wild-type and reeler mutant mice. We demonstrated noninvasively that changes in patterning of the cortical sheet, such as highly disorganized cortical lamination in reeler, led to spectacular compensatory remodeling of the TC pathway. PMID:23610438

  7. Mapping the Diffusion Potential of a Reconstructed Au(111) Surface at Nanometer Scale with 2D Molecular Gas

    Yan Shi-Chao; Xie Nan; Gong Hui-Qi; Guo Yang; Shan Xin-Yan; Lu Xing-Hua; Sun Qian

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption and diffusion behaviors of benzene molecules on an Au(111) surface are investigated by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. A herringbone surface reconstruction of the Au(111) surface is imaged with atomic resolution, and significantly different behaviors are observed for benzene molecules adsorbed on step edges and terraces. The electric field induced modification in the molecular diffusion potential is revealed with a 2D molecular gas model, and a new method is developed to map the diffusion potential over the reconstructed Au(111) surface at the nanometer scale. (condensed matter: structure, mechanical and thermal properties)

  8. Cerebral activity mapped by functional MRI

    Bruening, R.; Danek, A.; Wu, R.H.; Berchtenbreiter, C.; Reiser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a method to noninvasively measure the changes in cerebral activation during sensitive, cognitive or motor activity. fMRI detects activity by subtraction of states of activity and rest. During activity the signal is increased presumably due to a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin in the capillary and venous structures. Using a full field visual stimulation by flashlight goggles, a signal increase of 3% was detected in the primary visual cortex (V1). Different sequences and postprocessing algorythms will be discussed. Data from the primary cortical areas suggest a high reproducability of the experiments. Successfull experiments highly depend on cooperation of subjects. Despite success in experiments fMRI still has to be established for clinical purposes. (orig.) [de

  9. In vivo inflammation mapping of periodontal disease based on diffuse reflectance spectral imaging: a clinical study

    Prasanth, Chandra Sekhar; Betsy, Joseph; Jayanthi, Jayaraj L.; Nisha, Unni G.; Prasantila, Janam; Subhash, Narayanan

    2013-02-01

    Since conventional techniques using periodontal probes have inherent drawbacks in the diagnosis of different grades of gingival inflammation, development of noninvasive screening devices becomes significant. Diffuse reflectance (DR) spectra recorded with white light illumination is utilized to detect periodontal inflammation from the oxygenated hemoglobin absorption ratio R620/R575. A multispectral imaging system is utilized to record narrow-band DR images at 575 and 620 nm from the anterior sextant of the gingivia of 15 healthy volunteers and 25 patients (N=40). An experienced periodontist assesses the level of gingival inflammation at each site through periodontal probing and assigns diagnosis as healthy, mild, moderate, or severe inflammation. The DR image ratio R620/R575 computed for each pixel (8-μm resolution) from the monochrome images is pseudo-color-mapped to identify gingival inflammation sites. The DR image ratio values at each site are compared with clinical diagnosis to estimate the specificity and sensitivity of the DR imaging technique in inflammation mapping. The high diagnostic accuracy is utilized to detect underlying inflammation in six patients with a previous history of periodontitis.

  10. Functional mapping imprinted quantitative trait loci underlying developmental characteristics

    Li Gengxin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic imprinting, a phenomenon referring to nonequivalent expression of alleles depending on their parental origins, has been widely observed in nature. It has been shown recently that the epigenetic modification of an imprinted gene can be detected through a genetic mapping approach. Such an approach is developed based on traditional quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping focusing on single trait analysis. Recent studies have shown that most imprinted genes in mammals play an important role in controlling embryonic growth and post-natal development. For a developmental character such as growth, current approach is less efficient in dissecting the dynamic genetic effect of imprinted genes during individual ontology. Results Functional mapping has been emerging as a powerful framework for mapping quantitative trait loci underlying complex traits showing developmental characteristics. To understand the genetic architecture of dynamic imprinted traits, we propose a mapping strategy by integrating the functional mapping approach with genomic imprinting. We demonstrate the approach through mapping imprinted QTL controlling growth trajectories in an inbred F2 population. The statistical behavior of the approach is shown through simulation studies, in which the parameters can be estimated with reasonable precision under different simulation scenarios. The utility of the approach is illustrated through real data analysis in an F2 family derived from LG/J and SM/J mouse stains. Three maternally imprinted QTLs are identified as regulating the growth trajectory of mouse body weight. Conclusion The functional iQTL mapping approach developed here provides a quantitative and testable framework for assessing the interplay between imprinted genes and a developmental process, and will have important implications for elucidating the genetic architecture of imprinted traits.

  11. Histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps for differentiating primary CNS lymphomas from tumefactive demyelinating lesions.

    Lu, Shan Shan; Kim, Sang Joon; Kim, Namkug; Kim, Ho Sung; Choi, Choong Gon; Lim, Young Min

    2015-04-01

    This study intended to investigate the usefulness of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for discriminating primary CNS lymphomas (PCNSLs), especially atypical PCNSLs, from tumefactive demyelinating lesions (TDLs). Forty-seven patients with PCNSLs and 18 with TDLs were enrolled in our study. Hyperintense lesions seen on T2-weighted images were defined as ROIs after ADC maps were registered to the corresponding T2-weighted image. ADC histograms were calculated from the ROIs containing the entire lesion on every section and on a voxel-by-voxel basis. The ADC histogram parameters were compared among all PCNSLs and TDLs as well as between the subgroup of atypical PCNSLs and TDLs. ROC curves were constructed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the histogram parameters and to determine the optimum thresholds. The differences between the PCNSLs and TDLs were found in the minimum ADC values (ADCmin) and in the 5th and 10th percentiles (ADC5% and ADC10%) of the cumulative ADC histograms. However, no statistical significance was found in the mean ADC value or in the ADC value concerning the mode, kurtosis, and skewness. The ADCmin, ADC5%, and ADC10% were also lower in atypical PCNSLs than in TDLs. ADCmin was the best indicator for discriminating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs, with a threshold of 556×10(-6) mm2/s (sensitivity, 81.3 %; specificity, 88.9%). Histogram analysis of ADC maps may help to discriminate PCNSLs from TDLs and may be particularly useful in differentiating atypical PCNSLs from TDLs.

  12. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging and ADC mapping in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules

    Khizer, A.T.; Slehria, A.U.R.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the diagnostic accuracy of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) mapping in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules by taking histopathology as the gold standard. Study Design:Across-sectional analytical study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Radiology at Combined Military Hospital (CMH), Lahore, from August 2012 to July 2013. Methodology: Thirty-five patients, who were referred to radiology department of CMH, Lahore, for ultrasound or Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of thyroid gland, fulfilling the inclusion and exclusion criteria, were included in the study. They were evaluated on 1.5 Tesla MRI machine with T1- and T2-weighted imaging as well as fat-suppressed technique. DWI was done using b-values of 0 and 1000 s/mm2 and ADC values were calculated for the thyroid nodules. All of these patients were subjected to ultrasound guided core biopsy and histopathology results were correlated with ADC values. Results: The benign nodules showed facilitated diffusion while malignant nodules showed restricted diffusion. T-test was used to assess the difference in mean ADC values between benign and malignant nodules. The mean ADC value of the malignant thyroid nodules (0.94 ± 0.16 x 10/sup -3/mm2/s) was significantly lower than that of the benign thyroid nodules (1.93 ±0.13 x 10/sup -3/mm2/s) (p-value < 0.05). ADC value of 1.6 x 10/sup -3/mm2/s was used as a cut-off, for differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and diagnostic accuracy of DWI and ADC values in differentiating benign from malignant thyroid nodules were 93%, 95%, 93%, 95% and 92.3%, respectively. Conclusion: DWI is a non-invasive diagnostic tool for characterization and differentiation between benign and malignant thyroid nodules. It not only decreases the burden of unnecessary surgeries when pre-operative FNAC and biopsy are inconclusive, but is also helpful in reaching a

  13. Degradation nonuniformity in the solar diffuser bidirectional reflectance distribution function.

    Sun, Junqiang; Chu, Mike; Wang, Menghua

    2016-08-01

    The assumption of angular dependence stability of the solar diffuser (SD) throughout degradation is critical to the on-orbit calibration of the reflective solar bands (RSBs) in many satellite sensors. Recent evidence has pointed to the contrary, and in this work, we present a thorough investigative effort into the angular dependence of the SD degradation for the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite and for the twin Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard Terra and Aqua spacecrafts. One common key step in the RSB calibration is the use of the SD degradation performance measured by an accompanying solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) as a valid substitute for the SD degradation factor in the direction of the RSB view. If SD degradations between these two respective directions do not maintain the same relative relationship over time, then the unmitigated use of the SDSM-measured SD degradation factor in the RSB calibration calculation will generate bias, and consequently, long-term drift in derived science products. We exploit the available history of the on-orbit calibration events to examine the response of the SDSM and the RSB detectors to the incident illumination reflecting off SD versus solar declination angle and show that the angular dependency, particularly at short wavelengths, evolves with respect to time. The generalized and the decisive conclusion is that the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of the SD degrades nonuniformly with respect to both incident and outgoing directions. Thus, the SDSM-based measurements provide SD degradation factors that are biased relative to the RSB view direction with respect to the SD. The analysis also reveals additional interesting phenomena, for example, the sharp behavioral change in the evolving angular dependence observed in Terra MODIS and SNPP VIIRS. For SNPP VIIRS the mitigation for this

  14. Hash function based on piecewise nonlinear chaotic map

    Akhavan, A.; Samsudin, A.; Akhshani, A.

    2009-01-01

    Chaos-based cryptography appeared recently in the early 1990s as an original application of nonlinear dynamics in the chaotic regime. In this paper, an algorithm for one-way hash function construction based on piecewise nonlinear chaotic map with a variant probability parameter is proposed. Also the proposed algorithm is an attempt to present a new chaotic hash function based on multithreaded programming. In this chaotic scheme, the message is connected to the chaotic map using probability parameter and other parameters of chaotic map such as control parameter and initial condition, so that the generated hash value is highly sensitive to the message. Simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm presented several interesting features, such as high flexibility, good statistical properties, high key sensitivity and message sensitivity. These properties make the scheme a suitable choice for practical applications.

  15. Cytoarchitecture, probability maps and functions of the human frontal pole.

    Bludau, S; Eickhoff, S B; Mohlberg, H; Caspers, S; Laird, A R; Fox, P T; Schleicher, A; Zilles, K; Amunts, K

    2014-06-01

    The frontal pole has more expanded than any other part in the human brain as compared to our ancestors. It plays an important role for specifically human behavior and cognitive abilities, e.g. action selection (Kovach et al., 2012). Evidence about divergent functions of its medial and lateral part has been provided, both in the healthy brain and in psychiatric disorders. The anatomical correlates of such functional segregation, however, are still unknown due to a lack of stereotaxic, microstructural maps obtained in a representative sample of brains. Here we show that the human frontopolar cortex consists of two cytoarchitectonically and functionally distinct areas: lateral frontopolar area 1 (Fp1) and medial frontopolar area 2 (Fp2). Based on observer-independent mapping in serial, cell-body stained sections of 10 brains, three-dimensional, probabilistic maps of areas Fp1 and Fp2 were created. They show, for each position of the reference space, the probability with which each area was found in a particular voxel. Applying these maps as seed regions for a meta-analysis revealed that Fp1 and Fp2 differentially contribute to functional networks: Fp1 was involved in cognition, working memory and perception, whereas Fp2 was part of brain networks underlying affective processing and social cognition. The present study thus disclosed cortical correlates of a functional segregation of the human frontopolar cortex. The probabilistic maps provide a sound anatomical basis for interpreting neuroimaging data in the living human brain, and open new perspectives for analyzing structure-function relationships in the prefrontal cortex. The new data will also serve as a starting point for further comparative studies between human and non-human primate brains. This allows finding similarities and differences in the organizational principles of the frontal lobe during evolution as neurobiological basis for our behavior and cognitive abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All

  16. Diffusion tensor imaging and T2 mapping in early denervated skeletal muscle in rats.

    Ha, Dong-Ho; Choi, Sunseob; Kang, Eun-Ju; Park, Hwan Tae

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the temporal changes of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) indices, T2 values, and visual signal intensity on various fat suppression techniques in the early state of denervated skeletal muscle in a rat model. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee approval was obtained. Sciatic nerves of eight rats were transected for irreversible neurotmesis model. We examined normal lower leg and denervated muscles at 3 days, 1 week, and 2 weeks on a 3 Tesla MR. fractional anisotropy (FA), mean apparent diffusion coefficient (mADC), and T2 values were measured by using DTI and T2 mapping scan. We subjectively classified the signal intensity change on various fat suppression images into the following three grades: negative, suspicious, and definite change. Wilcoxon-sign rank test and Kruskal-Wallis test were used for the comparison of FA, mADC, T2 values. McNemar's test was used for comparing signal intensity change among fat suppression techniques. FA values of denervated muscles at 3 days (0.35 ± 0.06), 1 week (0.29 ± 0.04), and 2 weeks (0.34 ± 0.05) were significantly (P  0.05) change. T2 values were significantly increased at 1 week (38.11 ± 6.42 ms, P = 0.017) and markedly increased at 2 weeks (46.53 ± 5.17 ms, P = 0.012). The grade of visual signal intensity change on chemical shift selective fat saturation, STIR and IDEAL images were identical in all cases (P = 1.000). FA and T2 values can demonstrate the early temporal changes in denervated rat skeletal muscle. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Functional MRI language mapping in pre-surgical epilepsy patients ...

    Background. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is commonly applied to study the neural substrates of language in clinical research and for neurosurgical planning. fMRI language mapping is used to assess language lateralisation, or determine hemispheric dominance, and to localise regions of the brain ...

  18. Molecules in motion: influences of diffusion on metabolic structure and function in skeletal muscle.

    Kinsey, Stephen T; Locke, Bruce R; Dillaman, Richard M

    2011-01-15

    Metabolic processes are often represented as a group of metabolites that interact through enzymatic reactions, thus forming a network of linked biochemical pathways. Implicit in this view is that diffusion of metabolites to and from enzymes is very fast compared with reaction rates, and metabolic fluxes are therefore almost exclusively dictated by catalytic properties. However, diffusion may exert greater control over the rates of reactions through: (1) an increase in reaction rates; (2) an increase in diffusion distances; or (3) a decrease in the relevant diffusion coefficients. It is therefore not surprising that skeletal muscle fibers have long been the focus of reaction-diffusion analyses because they have high and variable rates of ATP turnover, long diffusion distances, and hindered metabolite diffusion due to an abundance of intracellular barriers. Examination of the diversity of skeletal muscle fiber designs found in animals provides insights into the role that diffusion plays in governing both rates of metabolic fluxes and cellular organization. Experimental measurements of metabolic fluxes, diffusion distances and diffusion coefficients, coupled with reaction-diffusion mathematical models in a range of muscle types has started to reveal some general principles guiding muscle structure and metabolic function. Foremost among these is that metabolic processes in muscles do, in fact, appear to be largely reaction controlled and are not greatly limited by diffusion. However, the influence of diffusion is apparent in patterns of fiber growth and metabolic organization that appear to result from selective pressure to maintain reaction control of metabolism in muscle.

  19. Topological characteristics of multi-valued maps and Lipschitzian functionals

    Klimov, V S

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the operator inclusion O element of F(x)+N Q (x), where F is a multi-valued map of monotonic type from a reflexive space V to its conjugate V * and N Q is the cone normal to the closed set Q, which, generally speaking, is not convex. To estimate the number of solutions of this inclusion we introduce topological characteristics of multi-valued maps and Lipschitzian functionals that have the properties of additivity and homotopy invariance. We prove some infinite-dimensional versions of the Poincare-Hopf theorem

  20. ON RANDOM ITERATED FUNCTION SYSTEMS WITH GREYSCALE MAPS

    Matthew Demers

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the theory of Iterated Function Systems (IFSs it is known that one can find an IFS with greyscale maps (IFSM to approximate any target signal or image with arbitrary precision, and a systematic approach for doing so was described. In this paper, we extend these ideas to the framework of random IFSM operators. We consider the situation where one has many noisy observations of a particular target signal and show that the greyscale map parameters for each individual observation inherit the noise distribution of the observation. We provide illustrative examples.

  1. An optimal strategy for functional mapping of dynamic trait loci.

    Jin, Tianbo; Li, Jiahan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Xiaojing; Yang, Runqing; Wu, Rongling

    2010-02-01

    As an emerging powerful approach for mapping quantitative trait loci (QTLs) responsible for dynamic traits, functional mapping models the time-dependent mean vector with biologically meaningful equations and are likely to generate biologically relevant and interpretable results. Given the autocorrelation nature of a dynamic trait, functional mapping needs the implementation of the models for the structure of the covariance matrix. In this article, we have provided a comprehensive set of approaches for modelling the covariance structure and incorporated each of these approaches into the framework of functional mapping. The Bayesian information criterion (BIC) values are used as a model selection criterion to choose the optimal combination of the submodels for the mean vector and covariance structure. In an example for leaf age growth from a rice molecular genetic project, the best submodel combination was found between the Gaussian model for the correlation structure, power equation of order 1 for the variance and the power curve for the mean vector. Under this combination, several significant QTLs for leaf age growth trajectories were detected on different chromosomes. Our model can be well used to study the genetic architecture of dynamic traits of agricultural values.

  2. Toward uniform implementation of parametric map Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine standard in multisite quantitative diffusion imaging studies.

    Malyarenko, Dariya; Fedorov, Andriy; Bell, Laura; Prah, Melissa; Hectors, Stefanie; Arlinghaus, Lori; Muzi, Mark; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Jacobs, Michael; Fung, Maggie; Shukla-Dave, Amita; McManus, Kevin; Boss, Michael; Taouli, Bachir; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Quarles, Christopher Chad; Schmainda, Kathleen; Chenevert, Thomas L; Newitt, David C

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports on results of a multisite collaborative project launched by the MRI subgroup of Quantitative Imaging Network to assess current capability and provide future guidelines for generating a standard parametric diffusion map Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) in clinical trials that utilize quantitative diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Participating sites used a multivendor DWI DICOM dataset of a single phantom to generate parametric maps (PMs) of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on two models. The results were evaluated for numerical consistency among models and true phantom ADC values, as well as for consistency of metadata with attributes required by the DICOM standards. This analysis identified missing metadata descriptive of the sources for detected numerical discrepancies among ADC models. Instead of the DICOM PM object, all sites stored ADC maps as DICOM MR objects, generally lacking designated attributes and coded terms for quantitative DWI modeling. Source-image reference, model parameters, ADC units and scale, deemed important for numerical consistency, were either missing or stored using nonstandard conventions. Guided by the identified limitations, the DICOM PM standard has been amended to include coded terms for the relevant diffusion models. Open-source software has been developed to support conversion of site-specific formats into the standard representation.

  3. The systematization of information: functional clothes through the mind map

    Eliete Auxiliadora Assunção Ourives

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, if checks the evolution in women's clothing design aiming at the well-being, comfort and quality of life. However, women still complain of discomfort of breast movement during physical activities carried out in factory floors and sporting activities, among other activities. This discomfort, according to the women, increases during the menstrual period. Therefore, to structure the information on the subject is important, because it will suit the functional clothing designs for these activities. The mind map is a tool suitable for this because assists the organization process of thought and understanding of the information about a particular subject. With that, this work aims to structure information for project requirements with a focus on functional female clothing. The method of research is descriptive and exploratory character. In the end, this work presented project guidelines of functional guidelines female clothing through the process of analysis the mind map.

  4. Patterns of accentuated grey-white differentiation on diffusion-weighted imaging or the apparent diffusion coefficient maps in comatose survivors after global brain injury

    Kim, E.; Sohn, C.-H.; Chang, K.-H.; Chang, H.-W.; Lee, D.H.

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To determine what disease entities show accentuated grey-white differentiation of the cerebral hemisphere on diffusion-weighted images (DWI) or apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps, and whether there is a correlation between the different patterns and the cause of the brain injury. Methods and materials: The DWI and ADC maps of 19 patients with global brain injury were reviewed and evaluated to investigate whether there was a correlation between the different patterns seen on the DWI and ADC maps and the cause of global brain injury. The ADC values were measured for quantitative analysis. Results: There were three different patterns of ADC decrease: a predominant ADC decrease in only the cerebral cortex (n = 8; pattern I); an ADC decrease in both the cerebral cortex and white matter (WM) and a predominant decrease in the WM (n = 9; pattern II); and a predominant ADC decrease in only the WM (n = 3; pattern III). Conclusion: Pattern I is cerebral cortical injury, suggesting cortical laminar necrosis in hypoxic brain injury. Pattern II is cerebral cortical and WM injury, frequently seen in brain death, while pattern 3 is mainly WM injury, especially found in hypoglycaemic brain injury. It is likely that pattern I is decorticate injury and pattern II is decerebrate injury in hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.Patterns I and II are found in severe hypoxic brain injury, and pattern II is frequently shown in brain death, whereas pattern III was found in severe hypoglycaemic injury.

  5. Functional imaging of parotid glands: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation

    Habermann, C.R.; Cramer, M.C.; Gossrau, P.; Adam, G. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Graessner, J. [Siemens AG, Hamburg (Germany). Medical Solutions; Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Oto-, Rhino-, Laryngology; Fiehler, J. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Department of Neuroradiology; Schoder, V. [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Institute for Medical Biometry and Epidemiology

    2004-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DW) echo-planar imaging (EPI) for measuring different functional conditions of the parotid gland and to compare different measurement approaches. Materials and Methods: Parotid glands of 27 healthy volunteers were examined with a DW EPI sequence (TR 1,500 msec, TE 77 msec, field-of-view 250 x 250 mm, pixel size 2.10 x 1.95 mm, section thickness 5 mm) before and after oral stimulation with commercially available lemon juice. The b factors used were 0, 500, and 1,000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain) and evaluated with a manually placed circular region of interest (ROI) containing 100-200 pixel. Additional ROIs including the entire parotid gland were placed on either side. The results of both measurements were compared, using the Student's t test based on the median ADC values for each person. A two-tailed p-value of less than.05 was determined to indicate statistical significance. To compare both measurement approaches, the Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) was calculated. Results: Diffusion-weighted echo-planar MR imaging successfully visualized the parotid gland of all volunteers. In a first step, the median ADC value per person was computed. Using ROIs of 100-200 pixels, the mean was calculated to be 1.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands prior to simulation. After stimulation, the mean ADC was measured at 1.15 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.11 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec for both parotid glands. Evaluating the entire parotid gland, the ADC was 1.12 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.08 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec prior to simulation, whereas the ADC increased to 1.18 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec{+-}0.09 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/sec after simulation with lemon juice. For both types of measurements, the increase in ADC after

  6. Stochasticity in the Josephson map

    Nomura, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.H.; Filippov, A.T.

    1996-04-01

    The Josephson map describes nonlinear dynamics of systems characterized by standard map with the uniform external bias superposed. The intricate structures of the phase space portrait of the Josephson map are examined on the basis of the tangent map associated with the Josephson map. Numerical observation of the stochastic diffusion in the Josephson map is examined in comparison with the renormalized diffusion coefficient calculated by the method of characteristic function. The global stochasticity of the Josephson map occurs at the values of far smaller stochastic parameter than the case of the standard map. (author)

  7. Functional evaluation of hydronephrosis by diffusion-weighted MR imaging: Relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient and split glomerular filtration rate

    Toyoshima, S.; Noguchi, K.; Seto, H.; Shimizu, M.; Watanabe, N.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the relationship between apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging and split renal function determined by renal scintigraphy in patients with hydronephrosis. Material and Methods: Diffusion-weighted imaging on a 1.5 T MR unit and renal scintigraphy were performed in 36 patients with hydronephrosis (45 hydronephrotic kidneys, 21 non-hydronephrotic kidneys). ADC values of the individual kidneys were measured by diffusion-weighted MR imaging. Split renal function (glomerular filtration rate (GFR)) was determined by renal scintigraphy using 99m Tc-DTPA. The relationship between ADC values and split GFR was examined in 66 kidneys. The hydronephrotic kidneys were further classified into three groups (severe renal dysfunction, GFR 25 ml/min, n=28), and mean values for ADCs were calculated. Results: In hydronephrotic kidneys, there was a moderate positive correlation between ADC values and split GFR (R2=0.56). On the other hand, in non-hydronephrotic kidneys, poor correlation between ADC values and split GFR was observed (R2=0.08). The mean values for ADCs of the dysfunctioning hydronephrotic kidneys (severe renal dysfunction, 1.32x10 -3 ±0.18x10 -3 mm 2 /s; moderate renal dysfunction, 1.38x10 -3 ±0.10x10 -3 mm2/s) were significantly lower than that of the normal functioning hydronephrotic kidneys (1.63x10 -3 ±0.12±10 -3 mm 2 /s). Conclusion: These results indicated that measurement of ADC values by diffusion-weighted MR imaging has a potential value in the evaluation of the functional status of hydronephrotic kidneys

  8. Spatial Mapping of Structural and Connectional Imaging Data for the Developing Human Brain with Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    Ouyang, Austin; Jeon, Tina; Sunkin, Susan M.; Pletikos, Mihovil; Sedmak, Goran; Sestan, Nenad; Lein, Ed S.; Huang, Hao

    2014-01-01

    During human brain development from fetal stage to adulthood, the white matter (WM) tracts undergo dramatic changes. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a widely used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality, offers insight into the dynamic changes of WM fibers as these fibers can be noninvasively traced and three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed with DTI tractography. The DTI and conventional T1 weighted MRI images also provide sufficient cortical anatomical details for mapping the cortical regions of interests (ROIs). In this paper, we described basic concepts and methods of DTI techniques that can be used to trace major WM tracts noninvasively from fetal brain of 14 postconceptional weeks (pcw) to adult brain. We applied these techniques to acquire DTI data and trace, reconstruct and visualize major WM tracts during development. After categorizing major WM fiber bundles into five unique functional tract groups, namely limbic, brain stem, projection, commissural and association tracts, we revealed formation and maturation of these 3D reconstructed WM tracts of the developing human brain. The structural and connectional imaging data offered by DTI provides the anatomical backbone of transcriptional atlas of the developing human brain. PMID:25448302

  9. Spatial mapping of structural and connectional imaging data for the developing human brain with diffusion tensor imaging.

    Ouyang, Austin; Jeon, Tina; Sunkin, Susan M; Pletikos, Mihovil; Sedmak, Goran; Sestan, Nenad; Lein, Ed S; Huang, Hao

    2015-02-01

    During human brain development from fetal stage to adulthood, the white matter (WM) tracts undergo dramatic changes. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a widely used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modality, offers insight into the dynamic changes of WM fibers as these fibers can be noninvasively traced and three-dimensionally (3D) reconstructed with DTI tractography. The DTI and conventional T1 weighted MRI images also provide sufficient cortical anatomical details for mapping the cortical regions of interests (ROIs). In this paper, we described basic concepts and methods of DTI techniques that can be used to trace major WM tracts noninvasively from fetal brain of 14 postconceptional weeks (pcw) to adult brain. We applied these techniques to acquire DTI data and trace, reconstruct and visualize major WM tracts during development. After categorizing major WM fiber bundles into five unique functional tract groups, namely limbic, brain stem, projection, commissural and association tracts, we revealed formation and maturation of these 3D reconstructed WM tracts of the developing human brain. The structural and connectional imaging data offered by DTI provides the anatomical backbone of transcriptional atlas of the developing human brain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Intraoperative mapping of language functions: a longitudinal neurolinguistic analysis.

    Ilmberger, Josef; Ruge, Maximilian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Briegel, Josef; Reulen, Hans-Juergen; Tonn, Joerg-Christian

    2008-10-01

    This prospective longitudinally designed study was conducted to evaluate language functions pre- and postoperatively in patients who underwent microsurgical treatment of tumors in close proximity to or within language areas and to detect those patients at risk for a postoperative aphasic disturbance. Between 1991 and 2005, 153 awake craniotomies with subsequent cortical mapping of language functions were performed in 149 patients. Language functions were assessed using a standardized test battery. Risk factors were obtained from multivariate logistic regression models. Language mapping was able to be performed in all patients, and complete tumor resection was achieved in 48.4%. Within 21 days after surgery a new language deficit (aphasic disturbance) was observed in 41 (32%) of the 128 cases without preoperative deficits. There were a total of 60 cases involving postoperative aphasic disturbances, including cases both with and without preoperative disturbances. Risk factors for postoperative aphasic disturbance were preoperative aphasia (planguage-positive sites within the tumor (planguage disturbances. A total of 17.6% of all cases demonstrated new postoperative language disturbances after 7 months. Risk factors for persistent aphasic disturbance were increased age (>40 years, planguage-relevant areas intraoperatively, even when they are located within the tumor. New postoperative deficits resolve in the majority of patients, which may be a result of cortical mapping as well as functional reorganization.

  11. Decay of random correlation functions for unimodal maps

    Baladi, Viviane; Benedicks, Michael; Maume-Deschamps, Véronique

    2000-10-01

    Since the pioneering results of Jakobson and subsequent work by Benedicks-Carleson and others, it is known that quadratic maps tfa( χ) = a - χ2 admit a unique absolutely continuous invariant measure for a positive measure set of parameters a. For topologically mixing tfa, Young and Keller-Nowicki independently proved exponential decay of correlation functions for this a.c.i.m. and smooth observables. We consider random compositions of small perturbations tf + ωt, with tf = tfa or another unimodal map satisfying certain nonuniform hyperbolicity axioms, and ωt chosen independently and identically in [-ɛ, ɛ]. Baladi-Viana showed exponential mixing of the associated Markov chain, i.e., averaging over all random itineraries. We obtain stretched exponential bounds for the random correlation functions of Lipschitz observables for the sample measure μωof almost every itinerary.

  12. Measuring diffusion-relaxation correlation maps using non-uniform field gradients of single-sided NMR devices.

    Nogueira d'Eurydice, Marcel; Galvosas, Petrik

    2014-11-01

    Single-sided NMR systems are becoming a relevant tool in industry and laboratory environments due to their low cost, low maintenance and capacity to evaluate quantity and quality of hydrogen based materials. The performance of such devices has improved significantly over the last decade, providing increased field homogeneity, field strength and even controlled static field gradients. For a class of these devices, the configuration of the permanent magnets provides a linear variation of the magnetic field and can be used in diffusion measurements. However, magnet design depends directly on its application and, according to the purpose, the field homogeneity may significantly be compromised. This may prevent the determination of diffusion properties of fluids based on the natural inhomogeneity of the field using known techniques. This work introduces a new approach that extends the applicability of diffusion-editing CPMG experiments to NMR devices with highly inhomogeneous magnetic fields, which do not vary linearly in space. Herein, we propose a method to determine a custom diffusion kernel based on the gradient distribution, which can be seen as a signature of each NMR device. This new diffusion kernel is then utilised in the 2D inverse Laplace transform (2D ILT) in order to determine diffusion-relaxation correlation maps of homogeneous multi-phasic fluids. The experiments were performed using NMR MObile Lateral Explore (MOLE), which is a single-sided NMR device designed to maximise the volume at the sweet spot with enhanced depth penetration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A zeta function approach to the semiclassical quantization of maps

    Smilansky, Uzi.

    1993-11-01

    The quantum analogue of an area preserving map on a compact phase space is a unitary (evolution) operator which can be represented by a matrix of dimension L∝ℎ -1 . The semiclassical theory for spectrum of the evolution operator will be reviewed with special emphasize on developing a dynamical zeta function approach, similar to the one introduced recently for a semiclassical quantization of hamiltonian systems. (author)

  14. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis following tetralogy of Fallot repair: a T1 mapping cardiac magnetic resonance study

    Kozak, Marcelo F.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars; Redington, Andrew; Greiser, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Adverse ventricular remodeling after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair is associated with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The goal of this study was to measure post-contrast myocardial T1 in pediatric patients after TOF repair as surrogates of myocardial fibrosis. Children after TOF repair who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with T1 mapping using the modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence were included. In addition to routine volumetric and flow data, we measured post-contrast T1 values of the basal interventricular septum, the left ventricular (LV) lateral wall, and the inferior and anterior walls of the right ventricle (RV). Results were compared to data from age-matched healthy controls. The scans of 18 children who had undergone TOF repair and 12 healthy children were included. Post-contrast T1 values of the left ventricular lateral wall (443 ± 54 vs. 510 ± 77 ms, P = 0.0168) and of the right ventricular anterior wall (333 ± 62 vs. 392 ± 72 ms, P = 0.0423) were significantly shorter in children with TOF repair than in controls, suggesting a higher degree of fibrosis. In children with TOF repair, but not in controls, post-contrast T1 values were shorter in the right ventricle than the left ventricle and shorter in the anterior wall of the right ventricle than in the inferior segments. In the TOF group, post-contrast T1 values of the RV anterior wall correlated with the RV end-systolic volume indexed to body surface area (r = 0.54; r 2 = 0.30; P = 0.0238). In children who underwent tetralogy of Fallot repair the myocardium of both ventricles appears to bear an abnormally high fibrosis burden. (orig.)

  15. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis following tetralogy of Fallot repair: a T1 mapping cardiac magnetic resonance study

    Kozak, Marcelo F.; Yoo, Shi-Joon; Seed, Mike; Grosse-Wortmann, Lars [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics and Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto (Canada); Redington, Andrew [The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Labatt Family Heart Centre in the Department of Paediatrics, Toronto (Canada); Greiser, Andreas [Siemens AG Healthcare Sector, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Adverse ventricular remodeling after tetralogy of Fallot (TOF) repair is associated with diffuse myocardial fibrosis. The goal of this study was to measure post-contrast myocardial T1 in pediatric patients after TOF repair as surrogates of myocardial fibrosis. Children after TOF repair who underwent cardiac magnetic resonance imaging with T1 mapping using the modified look-locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequence were included. In addition to routine volumetric and flow data, we measured post-contrast T1 values of the basal interventricular septum, the left ventricular (LV) lateral wall, and the inferior and anterior walls of the right ventricle (RV). Results were compared to data from age-matched healthy controls. The scans of 18 children who had undergone TOF repair and 12 healthy children were included. Post-contrast T1 values of the left ventricular lateral wall (443 ± 54 vs. 510 ± 77 ms, P = 0.0168) and of the right ventricular anterior wall (333 ± 62 vs. 392 ± 72 ms, P = 0.0423) were significantly shorter in children with TOF repair than in controls, suggesting a higher degree of fibrosis. In children with TOF repair, but not in controls, post-contrast T1 values were shorter in the right ventricle than the left ventricle and shorter in the anterior wall of the right ventricle than in the inferior segments. In the TOF group, post-contrast T1 values of the RV anterior wall correlated with the RV end-systolic volume indexed to body surface area (r = 0.54; r{sup 2} = 0.30; P = 0.0238). In children who underwent tetralogy of Fallot repair the myocardium of both ventricles appears to bear an abnormally high fibrosis burden. (orig.)

  16. Exclusive many-particle diffusion in disordered media and correlation functions for random vertex models

    Schuetz, G.; Sandow, S.

    1993-05-01

    We consider systems of particles hopping stochastically on d-dimensional lattices with space-dependent probabilities. We map the master equation in a Fock space where the dynamics are given by a quantum Hamiltonian (continuous time) or a transfer matrix resp. (discrete time). We show that under certain conditions the time-dependent two-point density correlation function in N-particle steady state can be computed from the probability distribution of a single particle moving in the same environment. Focussing on exclusion models where the lattice site can be occupied by at most one particle we discuss as an example for such a stochastic process a generalized Heisenberg antiferromagnet where the strength of the spin-spin coupling in space-dependent. In discrete time one obtains for one dimensional systems the diagonal-to-diagonal transfer matrix of the two dimensional six vertex model with space dependent vertex weights. For a random distribution of the vertex weights one obtains a version of the random barrier model describing diffusion of particles in disordered media. We derive exact expressions for the average two-point density correlation function in the presence of weak, correlated disorder. (authors)

  17. Minkowski Functionals and Cluster Analysis for CMB Maps

    Novikov, D.; Feldman, Hume A.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    We suggest novel statistics for the CMB maps that are sensitive to non-Gaussian features. These statistics are natural generalizations of the geometrical and topological methods that have been already used in cosmology such as the cumulative distribution function and genus. We compute the distribution functions of the Partial Minkowski Functionals for the excursion set above or bellow a constant temperature threshold. Minkowski Functionals are additive and are translationally and rotationally invariant. Thus, they can be used for patchy and/or incomplete coverage. The technique is highly efficient computationally (it requires only O(N) operations, where N is the number of pixels per one threshold level). Further, the procedure makes it possible to split large data sets into smaller subsets. The full advantage of these statistics can be obtained only on very large data sets. We apply it to the 4-year DMR COBE data corrected for the Galaxy contamination as an illustration of the technique.

  18. Left Ventricular Electromechanical Mapping: A Case Study of Functional Assessment in Coronary Intervention

    Perin, Emerson C.; Silva, Guilherme V.; Sarmento-Leite, Rogerio

    2000-01-01

    Electromechanical mapping is a new diagnostic tool that can be used to identify viable myocardium. In the case reported here, the technique was used before intervention to map areas of viable myocardium; post-intervention mapping showed improved mechanical function of the revascularized areas. Electromechanical mapping offers the potential of assessing left ventricular function in the cardiac catheterization laboratory before and after interventional procedures.

  19. Dynamical zeta functions for piecewise monotone maps of the interval

    Ruelle, David

    2004-01-01

    Consider a space M, a map f:M\\to M, and a function g:M \\to {\\mathbb C}. The formal power series \\zeta (z) = \\exp \\sum ^\\infty _{m=1} \\frac {z^m}{m} \\sum _{x \\in \\mathrm {Fix}\\,f^m} \\prod ^{m-1}_{k=0} g (f^kx) yields an example of a dynamical zeta function. Such functions have unexpected analytic properties and interesting relations to the theory of dynamical systems, statistical mechanics, and the spectral theory of certain operators (transfer operators). The first part of this monograph presents a general introduction to this subject. The second part is a detailed study of the zeta functions associated with piecewise monotone maps of the interval [0,1]. In particular, Ruelle gives a proof of a generalized form of the Baladi-Keller theorem relating the poles of \\zeta (z) and the eigenvalues of the transfer operator. He also proves a theorem expressing the largest eigenvalue of the transfer operator in terms of the ergodic properties of (M,f,g).

  20. Functional brain imaging to investigate the higher brain dysfunction induced by diffuse brain injury

    Nariai, Tadashi; Inaji, Motoki; Ohno, Kikuo; Hiura, Mikio; Ishii, Kenji; Hosoda, Chihiro

    2011-01-01

    Higher brain dysfunction is the major problem of patients who recover from neurotrauma the prevents them from returning to their previous social life. Many such patients do not have focal brain damage detected with morphological imaging. We focused on studying the focal brain dysfunction that can be detected only with functional imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in relation to the score of various cognition batteries. Patients who complain of higher brain dysfunction without apparent morphological cortical damage were recruited for this study. Thirteen patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) or cerebral concussion was included. They underwent a PET study to image glucose metabolism by 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), and central benodiazepine receptor (cBZD-R) (marker of neuronal body) by 11 C-flumazenil, together with cognition measurement by WAIS-R, WMS-R, and WCST etc. PET data were compared with age matched normal controls using statistical parametric mapping (SPM)2. DAI patients had a significant decrease in glucose matabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the cingulated cortex than normal controls. Patients diagnosed with concussion because of shorter consciousness disturbance also had abnormal FDG uptake and cBZD-R distribution. Cognition test scores were variable among patients. Degree of decreased glucose metabolism and cBZD-R distribution in the dominant hemishphere corresponded well to the severity of cognitive disturbance. PET molecular imaging was useful to depict focal cortical dysfunction of neurotrauma patients even when morphological change was not apparent. This method may be promising to clarify the pathophysiology of higher brain dysfunction of patients with diffuse axonal injury or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. (author)

  1. Green's function method and its application to verification of diffusion models of GASFLOW code

    Xu, Z.; Travis, J.R.; Breitung, W.

    2007-07-01

    To validate the diffusion model and the aerosol particle model of the GASFLOW computer code, theoretical solutions of advection diffusion problems are developed by using the Green's function method. The work consists of a theory part and an application part. In the first part, the Green's functions of one-dimensional advection diffusion problems are solved in infinite, semi-infinite and finite domains with the Dirichlet, the Neumann and/or the Robin boundary conditions. Novel and effective image systems especially for the advection diffusion problems are made to find the Green's functions in a semi-infinite domain. Eigenfunction method is utilized to find the Green's functions in a bounded domain. In the case, key steps of a coordinate transform based on a concept of reversed time scale, a Laplace transform and an exponential transform are proposed to solve the Green's functions. Then the product rule of the multi-dimensional Green's functions is discussed in a Cartesian coordinate system. Based on the building blocks of one-dimensional Green's functions, the multi-dimensional Green's function solution can be constructed by applying the product rule. Green's function tables are summarized to facilitate the application of the Green's function. In the second part, the obtained Green's function solutions benchmark a series of validations to the diffusion model of gas species in continuous phase and the diffusion model of discrete aerosol particles in the GASFLOW code. Perfect agreements are obtained between the GASFLOW simulations and the Green's function solutions in case of the gas diffusion. Very good consistencies are found between the theoretical solutions of the advection diffusion equations and the numerical particle distributions in advective flows, when the drag force between the micron-sized particles and the conveying gas flow meets the Stokes' law about resistance. This situation is corresponding to a very small Reynolds number based on the particle

  2. Cortical fibers orientation mapping using in-vivo whole brain 7 T diffusion MRI

    Gulban, Omer F; De Martino, Federico; Vu, An T; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kamil; Lenglet, Christophe

    Diffusion MRI of the cortical gray matter is challenging because the micro-environment probed by water molecules is much more complex than within the white matter. High spatial and angular resolutions are therefore necessary to uncover anisotropic diffusion patterns and laminar structures, which

  3. Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a cylindrical diffuse interface

    Xue, Changfeng; Huang, Qiongwei; Deng, Shaozhong

    2015-12-01

    In a preceding paper [Comput. Phys. Commun. 184 (1): 51-59, 2013], we revisited the problem of calculating Coulomb Green's function and image potential near a planar diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity of the inhomogeneous medium changes continuously along one Cartesian direction in a transition layer between two dissimilar dielectric materials. In the present paper, we consider a cylindrical diffuse interface within which the dielectric permittivity changes continuously along the radial direction instead. First we propose a specific cylindrical diffuse interface model, termed the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model, that can admit analytical solution for the Green's function in terms of the modified Bessel functions. Then and more importantly we develop a robust numerical method for building Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models. The main idea of the numerical method is, after dividing a diffuse interface into multiple sublayers, to approximate the dielectric permittivity profile in each one of the sublayers by one of the quasi-harmonic functional form rather than simply by a constant value as one would normally do. Next we describe how to efficiently compute well-behaved ratios, products, and logarithmic derivatives of the modified Bessel functions so as to avoid direct evaluations of individual modified Bessel functions in our formulations. Finally we conduct numerical experiments to show the effectiveness of the quasi-harmonic diffuse interface model in overcoming the divergence of the image potential, to validate the numerical method in terms of its accuracy and convergence, and to demonstrate its capability for computing Green's functions for any cylindrical diffuse interface models.

  4. Reducing surgical levels by paraspinal mapping and diffusion tensor imaging techniques in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Chen, Hua-Biao; Wan, Qi; Xu, Qi-Feng; Chen, Yi; Bai, Bo

    2016-04-25

    Correlating symptoms and physical examination findings with surgical levels based on common imaging results is not reliable. In patients who have no concordance between radiological and clinical symptoms, the surgical levels determined by conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neurogenic examination (NE) may lead to a more extensive surgery and significant complications. We aimed to confirm that whether the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and paraspinal mapping (PM) techniques can further prevent the occurrence of false positives with conventional MRI, distinguish which are clinically relevant from levels of cauda equina and/or nerve root lesions based on MRI, and determine and reduce the decompression levels of lumbar spinal stenosis than MRI + NE, while ensuring or improving surgical outcomes. We compared the data between patients who underwent MRI + (PM or DTI) and patients who underwent conventional MRI + NE to determine levels of decompression for the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Outcome measures were assessed at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. One hundred fourteen patients (59 in the control group, 54 in the experimental group) underwent decompression. The levels of decompression determined by MRI + (PM or DTI) in the experimental group were significantly less than that determined by MRI + NE in the control group (p = 0.000). The surgical time, blood loss, and surgical transfusion were significantly less in the experimental group (p = 0.001, p = 0.011, p = 0.001, respectively). There were no differences in improvement of the visual analog scale back and leg pain (VAS-BP, VAS-LP) scores and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores at 2 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after operation between the experimental and control groups. MRI + (PM or DTI) showed clear benefits in determining decompression levels of lumbar spinal stenosis than MRI + NE. In patients with lumbar spinal

  5. Incoherent neutron scattering functions for random jump diffusion in bounded and infinite media

    Hall, P.L.; Ross, D.K.

    1981-01-01

    The incoherent neutron scattering function for unbounded jump diffusion is calculated from random walk theory assuming a gaussian distribution of jump lengths. The method is then applied to calculate the scattering function for spatially bounded random jumps in one dimension. The dependence on momentum transfer of the quasi-elastic energy broadenings predicted by this model and a previous model for bounded one-dimensional continuous diffusion are calculated and compared with the predictions of models for diffusion in unbounded media. The one-dimensional solutions can readily be generalized to three dimensions to provide a description of quasi-elastic scattering of neutrons by molecules undergoing localized random motions. (author)

  6. Deep-tissue temperature mapping by multi-illumination photoacoustic tomography aided by a diffusion optical model: a numerical study

    Zhou, Yuan; Tang, Eric; Luo, Jianwen; Yao, Junjie

    2018-01-01

    Temperature mapping during thermotherapy can help precisely control the heating process, both temporally and spatially, to efficiently kill the tumor cells and prevent the healthy tissues from heating damage. Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) has been used for noninvasive temperature mapping with high sensitivity, based on the linear correlation between the tissue's Grüneisen parameter and temperature. However, limited by the tissue's unknown optical properties and thus the optical fluence at depths beyond the optical diffusion limit, the reported PAT thermometry usually takes a ratiometric measurement at different temperatures and thus cannot provide absolute measurements. Moreover, ratiometric measurement over time at different temperatures has to assume that the tissue's optical properties do not change with temperatures, which is usually not valid due to the temperature-induced hemodynamic changes. We propose an optical-diffusion-model-enhanced PAT temperature mapping that can obtain the absolute temperature distribution in deep tissue, without the need of multiple measurements at different temperatures. Based on the initial acoustic pressure reconstructed from multi-illumination photoacoustic signals, both the local optical fluence and the optical parameters including absorption and scattering coefficients are first estimated by the optical-diffusion model, then the temperature distribution is obtained from the reconstructed Grüneisen parameters. We have developed a mathematic model for the multi-illumination PAT of absolute temperatures, and our two-dimensional numerical simulations have shown the feasibility of this new method. The proposed absolute temperature mapping method may set the technical foundation for better temperature control in deep tissue in thermotherapy.

  7. Functional imaging and assessment of the glucose diffusion rate in epithelial tissues in optical coherence tomography

    Larin, K V; Tuchin, V V

    2008-01-01

    Functional imaging, monitoring and quantitative description of glucose diffusion in epithelial and underlying stromal tissues in vivo and controlling of the optical properties of tissues are extremely important for many biomedical applications including the development of noninvasive or minimally invasive glucose sensors as well as for therapy and diagnostics of various diseases, such as cancer, diabetic retinopathy, and glaucoma. Recent progress in the development of a noninvasive molecular diffusion biosensor based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) is described. The diffusion of glucose was studied in several epithelial tissues both in vitro and in vivo. Because OCT provides depth-resolved imaging of tissues with high in-depth resolution, the glucose diffusion is described not only as a function of time but also as a function of depth. (special issue devoted to application of laser technologies in biophotonics and biomedical studies)

  8. Diffusion tensor trace mapping in normal adult brain using single-shot EPI technique: A methodological study of the aging brain

    Chen, Z.G.; Hindmarsh, T.; Li, T.Q.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify age-related changes of the average diffusion coefficient value in normal adult brain using orientation-independent diffusion tensor trace mapping and to address the methodological influences on diffusion quantification. Material and Methods: Fifty-four normal subjects (aged 20-79 years) were studied on a 1.5-T whole-body MR medical unit using a diffusion-weighted single-shot echo-planar imaging technique. Orientation-independent diffusion tensor trace maps were constructed for each subject using diffusion-weighted MR measurements in four different directions using a tetrahedral gradient combination pattern. The global average (including cerebral spinal fluid) and the tissue average of diffusion coefficients in adult brains were determined by analyzing the diffusion coefficient distribution histogram for the entire brain. Methodological influences on the measured diffusion coefficient were also investigated by comparing the results obtained using different experimental settings. Results: Both global and tissue averages of the diffusion coefficient are significantly correlated with age (p<0.03). The global average of the diffusion coefficient increases 3% per decade after the age of 40, whereas the increase in the tissue average of diffusion coefficient is about 1% per decade. Experimental settings for self-diffusion measurements, such as data acquisition methods and number of b-values, can slightly influence the statistical distribution histogram of the diffusion tensor trace and its average value. Conclusion: Increased average diffusion coefficient in adult brains with aging are consistent with findings regarding structural changes in the brain that have been associated with aging. The study also demonstrates that it is desirable to use the same experimental parameters for diffusion coefficient quantification when comparing between different subjects and groups of interest

  9. Comparison of Absolute Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) Values in ADC Maps Generated Across Different Postprocessing Software: Reproducibility in Endometrial Carcinoma.

    Ghosh, Adarsh; Singh, Tulika; Singla, Veenu; Bagga, Rashmi; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2017-12-01

    Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps are usually generated by builtin software provided by the MRI scanner vendors; however, various open-source postprocessing software packages are available for image manipulation and parametric map generation. The purpose of this study is to establish the reproducibility of absolute ADC values obtained using different postprocessing software programs. DW images with three b values were obtained with a 1.5-T MRI scanner, and the trace images were obtained. ADC maps were automatically generated by the in-line software provided by the vendor during image generation and were also separately generated on postprocessing software. These ADC maps were compared on the basis of ROIs using paired t test, Bland-Altman plot, mountain plot, and Passing-Bablok regression plot. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean ADC values obtained from the different postprocessing software programs when the same baseline trace DW images were used for the ADC map generation. For using ADC values as a quantitative cutoff for histologic characterization of tissues, standardization of the postprocessing algorithm is essential across processing software packages, especially in view of the implementation of vendor-neutral archiving.

  10. The Green’s functions for peridynamic non-local diffusion

    Wang, L. J.; Xu, J. F.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we develop the Green’s function method for the solution of the peridynamic non-local diffusion model in which the spatial gradient of the generalized potential in the classical theory is replaced by an integral of a generalized response function in a horizon. We first show that the general solutions of the peridynamic non-local diffusion model can be expressed as functionals of the corresponding Green’s functions for point sources, along with volume constraints for non-local diffusion. Then, we obtain the Green’s functions by the Fourier transform method for unsteady and steady diffusions in infinite domains. We also demonstrate that the peridynamic non-local solutions converge to the classical differential solutions when the non-local length approaches zero. Finally, the peridynamic analytical solutions are applied to an infinite plate heated by a Gauss source, and the predicted variations of temperature are compared with the classical local solutions. The peridynamic non-local diffusion model predicts a lower rate of variation of the field quantities than that of the classical theory, which is consistent with experimental observations. The developed method is applicable to general diffusion-type problems. PMID:27713658

  11. Analysis of the human brain in primary progressive multiple sclerosis with mapping of the spatial distributions using H-1 MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    Sijens, PE; Irwan, R; Potze, JH; Mostert, JP; De Keyser, J; Oudkerk, M

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (ppMS; n=4) patients and controls (n=4) were examined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to map choline (Cho), creatine and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion

  12. Functional magnetic resonance maps obtained by personal computer

    Gomez, F. j.; Manjon, J. V.; Robles, M.; Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R.; Molla, E.

    2001-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) is of special relevance in the analysis of certain types of brain activation. The present report describes the development of a simple software program for use with personal computers (PCs) that analyzes these images and provides functional activation maps. Activation maps are based on the temporal differences in oxyhemoglobin in tomographic images. To detect these differences, intensities registered repeatedly during brain control and activation are compared. The experiments were performed with a 1.5-Tesla MR unit. To verify the reliability of the program fMR studies were carried out in 4 healthy individuals (12 contiguous slices, 80 images per slice every 3.1 seconds for a total of 960 images). All the images were transferred to a PC and were processed pixel by pixel within each sequence to obtain an intensity/time curve. The statistical study of the results (Student's test and cross correlation analysis) made it possible to establish the activation of each pixel. The images were prepared using spatial filtering, temporal filtering, baseline correction, normalization and segmentation of the parenchyma. The postprocessing of the results involved the elimination of single pixels, superposition of an anatomical image of greater spatial resolution and anti-aliasing. The application (Xfun 1.0, Valencia, Spain) was developed in Microsoft Visual C++5.0 Developer Studio for Windows NT Workstation. As a representative example, the program took 8.2 seconds to calculate and present the results of the entire study (12 functional maps). In the motor and visual activation experiments, the activation corresponding to regions proximal to the central sulcus of the hemisphere contralateral to the hand that moved and in the occipital cortex were observed. While programs that calculate activation maps are available, the development of software for PCs running Microsoft Windows ensures several key features for its use on a daily basis: it is easy

  13. Comparison of CT perfusion summary maps to early diffusion-weighted images in suspected acute middle cerebral artery stroke

    Benson, John; Payabvash, Seyedmehdi [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Salazar, Pascal [Vital Images, A Division of Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN (United States); Jagadeesan, Bharathi; Palmer, Christopher S.; Truwit, Charles L. [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States); McKinney, Alexander M., E-mail: mckinrad@umn.edu [Hennepin County and University of Minnesota Medical Centers, Department of Radiology, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Objectives: To assess the accuracy and reliability of one vendor's (Vital Images, Toshiba Medical, Minnetonka, MN) automated CT perfusion (CTP) summary maps in identification and volume estimation of infarcted tissue in patients with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) distribution infarcts. Subjects and methods: From 1085 CTP examinations over 5.5 years, 43 diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI)-positive patients were included who underwent both CTP and DWI <12 h after symptom onset, with another 43 age-matched patients as controls (DWI-negative). Automated delay-corrected postprocessing software (DC-SVD) generated both infarct “core only” and “core + penumbra” CTP summary maps. Three reviewers independently tabulated Alberta Stroke Program Early CT scores (ASPECTS) of both CTP summary maps and coregistered DWI. Results: Of 86 included patients, 36 had DWI infarct volumes ≤70 ml, 7 had volumes >70 ml, and 43 were negative; the automated CTP “core only” map correctly classified each as >70 ml or ≤70 ml, while the “core + penumbra” map misclassified 4 as >70 ml. There were strong correlations between DWI volume with both summary map-based volumes: “core only” (r = 0.93), and “core + penumbra” (r = 0.77) (both p < 0.0001). Agreement between ASPECTS scores of infarct core on DWI with summary maps was 0.65–0.74 for “core only” map, and 0.61–0.65 for “core + penumbra” (both p < 0.0001). Using DWI-based ASPECTS scores as the standard, the accuracy of the CTP-based maps were 79.1–86.0% for the “core only” map, and 83.7–88.4% for “core + penumbra.” Conclusion: Automated CTP summary maps appear to be relatively accurate in both the detection of acute MCA distribution infarcts, and the discrimination of volumes using a 70 ml threshold.

  14. Variable-order fractional MSD function to describe the evolution of protein lateral diffusion ability in cell membranes

    Yin, Deshun; Qu, Pengfei

    2018-02-01

    Protein lateral diffusion is considered anomalous in the plasma membrane. And this diffusion is related to membrane microstructure. In order to better describe the property of protein lateral diffusion and find out the inner relationship between protein lateral diffusion and membrane microstructure, this article applies variable-order fractional mean square displacement (f-MSD) function for characterizing the anomalous diffusion. It is found that the variable order can reflect the evolution of diffusion ability. The results of numerical simulation demonstrate variable-order f-MSD function can predict the tendency of anomalous diffusion during the process of confined diffusion. It is also noted that protein lateral diffusion ability during the processes of confined and hop diffusion can be split into three parts. In addition, the comparative analyses reveal that the variable order is related to the confinement-domain size and microstructure of compartment boundary too.

  15. Prognostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging summation scores or apparent diffusion coefficient maps in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Cavalleri, Francesca; Todeschini, Alessandra [Azienda Unita Sanitaria Locale di Modena, Neuroradiology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Nuovo Ospedale Civile S. Agostino Estense di Modena, Modena (Italy); Lugli, Licia; Pugliese, Marisa; Della Casa, Elisa; Gallo, Claudio; Frassoldati, Rossella; Ferrari, Fabrizio [Modena University Hospital, Institute of Pediatrics and Neonatal Medicine and NICU, Modena (Italy); D' Amico, Roberto [University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Department of Clinical and Diagnostic Medicine and Public Health, Modena (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    The diagnostic and prognostic assessment of newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) comprises, among other tools, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To compare the ability of DWI and ADC maps in newborns with HIE to predict the neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Thirty-four term newborns with HIE admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Modena University Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were consecutively enrolled in the study. All newborns received EEG, conventional MRI and DWI within the first week of life. DWI was analyzed by means of summation (S) score and regional ADC measurements. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with a standard 1-4 scale and the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales - Revised (GMDS-R). When the outcome was evaluated with a standard 1-4 scale, the DWI S scores showed very high area under the curve (AUC) (0.89) whereas regional ADC measurements in specific subregions had relatively modest predictive value. The lentiform nucleus was the region with the highest AUC (0.78). When GMDS-R were considered, DWI S scores were good to excellent predictors for some GMDS-R subscales. The predictive value of ADC measurements was both region- and subscale-specific. In particular, ADC measurements in some regions (basal ganglia, white matter or rolandic cortex) were excellent predictors for specific GMDS-R with AUCs up to 0.93. DWI S scores showed the highest prognostic value for the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Regional ADC measurements in specific subregions proved to be highly prognostic for specific neurodevelopmental outcomes. (orig.)

  16. Prognostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging summation scores or apparent diffusion coefficient maps in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy

    Cavalleri, Francesca; Todeschini, Alessandra; Lugli, Licia; Pugliese, Marisa; Della Casa, Elisa; Gallo, Claudio; Frassoldati, Rossella; Ferrari, Fabrizio; D'Amico, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic assessment of newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) comprises, among other tools, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To compare the ability of DWI and ADC maps in newborns with HIE to predict the neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Thirty-four term newborns with HIE admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Modena University Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were consecutively enrolled in the study. All newborns received EEG, conventional MRI and DWI within the first week of life. DWI was analyzed by means of summation (S) score and regional ADC measurements. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with a standard 1-4 scale and the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales - Revised (GMDS-R). When the outcome was evaluated with a standard 1-4 scale, the DWI S scores showed very high area under the curve (AUC) (0.89) whereas regional ADC measurements in specific subregions had relatively modest predictive value. The lentiform nucleus was the region with the highest AUC (0.78). When GMDS-R were considered, DWI S scores were good to excellent predictors for some GMDS-R subscales. The predictive value of ADC measurements was both region- and subscale-specific. In particular, ADC measurements in some regions (basal ganglia, white matter or rolandic cortex) were excellent predictors for specific GMDS-R with AUCs up to 0.93. DWI S scores showed the highest prognostic value for the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Regional ADC measurements in specific subregions proved to be highly prognostic for specific neurodevelopmental outcomes. (orig.)

  17. Prognostic value of diffusion-weighted imaging summation scores or apparent diffusion coefficient maps in newborns with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy.

    Cavalleri, Francesca; Lugli, Licia; Pugliese, Marisa; D'Amico, Roberto; Todeschini, Alessandra; Della Casa, Elisa; Gallo, Claudio; Frassoldati, Rossella; Ferrari, Fabrizio

    2014-09-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic assessment of newborn infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) comprises, among other tools, diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. To compare the ability of DWI and ADC maps in newborns with HIE to predict the neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years of age. Thirty-four term newborns with HIE admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Modena University Hospital from 2004 to 2008 were consecutively enrolled in the study. All newborns received EEG, conventional MRI and DWI within the first week of life. DWI was analyzed by means of summation (S) score and regional ADC measurements. Neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed with a standard 1-4 scale and the Griffiths Mental Developmental Scales - Revised (GMDS-R). When the outcome was evaluated with a standard 1-4 scale, the DWI S scores showed very high area under the curve (AUC) (0.89) whereas regional ADC measurements in specific subregions had relatively modest predictive value. The lentiform nucleus was the region with the highest AUC (0.78). When GMDS-R were considered, DWI S scores were good to excellent predictors for some GMDS-R subscales. The predictive value of ADC measurements was both region- and subscale-specific. In particular, ADC measurements in some regions (basal ganglia, white matter or rolandic cortex) were excellent predictors for specific GMDS-R with AUCs up to 0.93. DWI S scores showed the highest prognostic value for the neurological outcome at 2 years of age. Regional ADC measurements in specific subregions proved to be highly prognostic for specific neurodevelopmental outcomes.

  18. The time dependent propensity function for acceleration of spatial stochastic simulation of reaction–diffusion systems

    Fu, Jin; Wu, Sheng; Li, Hong; Petzold, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    The inhomogeneous stochastic simulation algorithm (ISSA) is a fundamental method for spatial stochastic simulation. However, when diffusion events occur more frequently than reaction events, simulating the diffusion events by ISSA is quite costly. To reduce this cost, we propose to use the time dependent propensity function in each step. In this way we can avoid simulating individual diffusion events, and use the time interval between two adjacent reaction events as the simulation stepsize. We demonstrate that the new algorithm can achieve orders of magnitude efficiency gains over widely-used exact algorithms, scales well with increasing grid resolution, and maintains a high level of accuracy

  19. Histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging derived maps may distinguish between low and high grade gliomas before surgery.

    Qi, Xi-Xun; Shi, Da-Fa; Ren, Si-Xie; Zhang, Su-Ya; Li, Long; Li, Qing-Chang; Guan, Li-Ming

    2018-04-01

    To investigate the value of histogram analysis of diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) maps in the evaluation of glioma grading. A total of 39 glioma patients who underwent preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were classified into low-grade (13 cases) and high-grade (26 cases) glioma groups. Parametric DKI maps were derived, and histogram metrics between low- and high-grade gliomas were analysed. The optimum diagnostic thresholds of the parameters, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), sensitivity, and specificity were achieved using a receiver operating characteristic (ROC). Significant differences were observed not only in 12 metrics of histogram DKI parameters (PHistogram analysis of DKI may be more effective in glioma grading.

  20. PSA Model Improvement Using Maintenance Rule Function Mapping

    Seo, Mi Ro [KHNP-CRI, Nuclear Safety Laboratory, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    The Maintenance Rule (MR) program, in nature, is a performance-based program. Therefore, the risk information derived from the Probabilistic Safety Assessment model is introduced into the MR program during the Safety Significance determination and Performance Criteria selection processes. However, this process also facilitates the determination of the vulnerabilities in currently utilized PSA models and offers means of improving them. To find vulnerabilities in an existing PSA model, an initial review determines whether the safety-related MR functions are included in the PSA model. Because safety-related MR functions are related to accident prevention and mitigation, it is generally necessary for them to be included in the PSA model. In the process of determining the safety significance of each functions, quantitative risk importance levels are determined through a process known as PSA model basic event mapping to MR functions. During this process, it is common for some inadequate and overlooked models to be uncovered. In this paper, the PSA model and the MR program of Wolsong Unit 1 were used as references

  1. Shape functions for separable solutions to cross-field diffusion problems

    Luning, C.D.; Perry, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The shape function S(x), which arises in the study of nonlinear diffusion for cross-field diffusion in plasmas, satisfies the equation S''(x)+lambdaa(x)S/sup α/(x) = 0, 0 0. In the cases of physical interest a(x) possesses an integrable singularity at some point in (0,1) but is otherwise continuous. Existence of a positive solution to this problem is established

  2. Functional brain mapping using H215O positron emission tomography (I): statistical parametric mapping method

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the statistical methods to compose the functional brain map of human working memory and the principal factors that have an effect on the methods for localization. Repeated PET scans with successive four tasks, which consist of one control and three different activation tasks, were performed on six right-handed normal volunteers for 2 minutes after bolus injections of 925 MBq H 2 15 O at the intervals of 30 minutes. Image data were analyzed using SPM96 (Statistical Parametric Mapping) implemented with Matlab (Mathworks Inc., U.S.A.). Images from the same subject were spatially registered and were normalized using linear and nonlinear transformation methods. Significant difference between control and each activation state was estimated at every voxel based on the general linear model. Differences of global counts were removed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with global activity as covariate. Using the mean and variance for each condition which was adjusted using ANCOVA, t-statistics was performed on every voxel. To interpret the results more easily, t-values were transformed to the standard Gaussian distribution (Z-score). All the subjects carried out the activation and control tests successfully. Average rate of correct answers was 95%. The numbers of activated blobs were 4 for verbal memory I, 9 for verbal memory II, 9 for visual memory, and 6 for conjunctive activation of these three tasks. The verbal working memory activates predominantly left-sided structures, and the visual memory activates the right hemisphere. We conclude that rCBF PET imaging and statistical parametric mapping method were useful in the localization of the brain regions for verbal and visual working memory

  3. (3)He pO2 mapping is limited by delayed-ventilation and diffusion in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Marshall, Helen; Parra-Robles, Juan; Deppe, Martin H; Lipson, David A; Lawson, Rod; Wild, Jim M

    2014-03-01

    Lung pO2 mapping with (3)He MRI assumes that the sources of signal decay with time during a breath-hold are radiofrequency depolarization and oxygen-dependent T1 relaxation, but the method is sensitive to other sources of spatio-temporal signal change such as diffusion. The purpose of this work was to assess the use of (3)He pO2 mapping in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ten patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were scanned with a 3D single breath-hold pO2 mapping sequence. Images showed signal increasing over time in some lung regions due to delayed ventilation during breath-hold. Regions of physically unrealistic negative pO2 values were seen in all patients, and regional mean pO2 values of -0.3 bar were measured in the two patients most affected by delayed ventilation (where mean time to signal onset was 3-4 s). Movement of gas within the lungs during breath-hold causes regional changes in signal over time that are not related to oxygen concentration, leading to erroneous pO2 measurements using the linear oxygen-dependent signal decay model. These spatio-temporal sources of signal change cannot be reliably separated at present, making pO2 mapping using this methodology unreliable in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with significant bullous emphysema or delayed ventilation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Obtaining parton distribution functions from self-organizing maps

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.; Loitiere, Y.C.; Brogan, D.; Reynolds, P.

    2007-01-01

    We present an alternative algorithm to global fitting procedures to construct Parton Distribution Functions parametrizations. The proposed algorithm uses Self-Organizing Maps which at variance with the standard Neural Networks, are based on competitive-learning. Self-Organizing Maps generate a non-uniform projection from a high dimensional data space onto a low dimensional one (usually 1 or 2 dimensions) by clustering similar PDF representations together. The SOMs are trained on progressively narrower selections of data samples. The selection criterion is that of convergence towards a neighborhood of the experimental data. All available data sets on deep inelastic scattering in the kinematical region of 0.001 ≤ x ≤ 0.75, and 1 ≤ Q 2 ≤ 100 GeV 2 , with a cut on the final state invariant mass, W 2 ≥ 10 GeV 2 were implemented. The proposed fitting procedure, at variance with standard neural network approaches, allows for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling the user to directly control the data selection procedure at various stages of the process. (author)

  5. Existence of global solutions to reaction-diffusion systems via a Lyapunov functional

    Said Kouachi

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to construct polynomial functionals (according to solutions of the coupled reaction-diffusion equations which give $L^{p}$-bounds for solutions. When the reaction terms are sufficiently regular, using the well known regularizing effect, we deduce the existence of global solutions. These functionals are obtained independently of work done by Malham and Xin [11].

  6. The challenge of mapping the human connectome based on diffusion tractography

    Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Neher, Peter F; Houde, Jean-Christophe; Côté, Marc-Alexandre; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Zhong, Jidan; Chamberland, Maxime; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Ying-Chia; Ji, Qing; Reddick, Wilburn E; Glass, John O; Chen, David Qixiang; Feng, Yuanjing; Gao, Chengfeng; Wu, Ye; Ma, Jieyan; Renjie, H; Li, Qiang; Westin, Carl Fredrik; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; González, J Omar Ocegueda; Paquette, Michael; St-Jean, Samuel; Girard, Gabriel; Rheault, François; Sidhu, Jasmeen; Tax, Chantal M.W.; Guo, Fenghua; Mesri, Hamed Y.; Dávid, Szabolcs; Froeling, Martijn; Heemskerk, Anneriet M.; Leemans, Alexander; Boré, Arnaud; Pinsard, Basile; Bedetti, Christophe; Desrosiers, Matthieu; Brambati, Simona; Doyon, Julien; Sarica, Alessia; Vasta, Roberta; Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Yeatman, Jason; Khan, Ali R.; Hodges, Wes; Alexander, Simon; Romascano, David; Barakovic, Muhamed; Auría, Anna; Esteban, Oscar; Lemkaddem, Alia; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Cetingul, H Ertan; Odry, Benjamin L; Mailhe, Boris; Nadar, Mariappan S; Pizzagalli, Fabrizio; Prasad, Gautam; Villalon-Reina, Julio E; Galvis, Justin; Thompson, Paul M.; Requejo, Francisco De Santiago; Laguna, Pedro Luque; Lacerda, Luis Miguel; Barrett, Rachel; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Catani, Marco; Petit, Laurent; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Daducci, Alessandro; Dyrby, Tim B; Holland-Letz, Tim; Hilgetag, Claus C.; Stieltjes, Bram; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    Tractography based on non-invasive diffusion imaging is central to the study of human brain connectivity. To date, the approach has not been systematically validated in ground truth studies. Based on a simulated human brain data set with ground truth tracts, we organized an open international

  7. The challenge of mapping the human connectome based on diffusion tractography

    Maier-Hein, Klaus H.; Neher, Peter F.; Houde, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Tractography based on non-invasive diffusion imaging is central to the study of human brain connectivity. To date, the approach has not been systematically validated in ground truth studies. Based on a simulated human brain data set with ground truth tracts, we organized an open international tra...

  8. Estimating hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation for the compilation of solar radiation distribution maps

    Ueyama, H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for estimating hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation. The essence of the method is the estimation of two important factors related to solar radiation, atmospheric transmittance and a dimensionless parameter, using empirical and physical equations and data from general meteorological observation stations. An equation for atmospheric transmittance of direct solar radiation and a dimensionless parameter representing diffuse solar radiation are developed. The equation is based on multiple regression analysis and uses three parameters as explanatory variates: calculated hourly extraterrestrial solar radiation on a horizontal plane, observed hourly sunshine duration and hourly precipitation as observed at a local meteorological observatory. The dimensionless parameter for estimating a diffuse solar radiation is then determined by linear least squares using observed hourly solar radiation at a local meteorological observatory. The estimated root mean square error (RMSE) of hourly direct and diffuse solar radiation is about 0.0-0.2 MJ¥m(-2)¥h(-1) in each mean period. The RMSE of the ten-day and monthly means of these quantities is about 0.0-0.2 MJ¥m(-2)¥h(-1), based on comparisons with AMeDAS station data, located at a distance of 6 km

  9. Functional digital soil mapping for the prediction of available water capacity in Nigeria using legacy data

    Ugbaje, S.U.; Reuter, H.I.

    2013-01-01

    Soil information, particularly water storage capacity, is of utmost importance for assessing and managing land resources for sustainable land management. We investigated using digital soil mapping (DSM) and digital soil functional mapping (DSFM) procedures to predict available water capacity (AWC)

  10. A Whole-Tumor Histogram Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Maps for Differentiating Thymic Carcinoma from Lymphoma.

    Zhang, Wei; Zhou, Yue; Xu, Xiao-Quan; Kong, Ling-Yan; Xu, Hai; Yu, Tong-Fu; Shi, Hai-Bin; Feng, Qing

    2018-01-01

    To assess the performance of a whole-tumor histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps in differentiating thymic carcinoma from lymphoma, and compare it with that of a commonly used hot-spot region-of-interest (ROI)-based ADC measurement. Diffusion weighted imaging data of 15 patients with thymic carcinoma and 13 patients with lymphoma were retrospectively collected and processed with a mono-exponential model. ADC measurements were performed by using a histogram-based and hot-spot-ROI-based approach. In the histogram-based approach, the following parameters were generated: mean ADC (ADC mean ), median ADC (ADC median ), 10th and 90th percentile of ADC (ADC 10 and ADC 90 ), kurtosis, and skewness. The difference in ADCs between thymic carcinoma and lymphoma was compared using a t test. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were conducted to determine and compare the differentiating performance of ADCs. Lymphoma demonstrated significantly lower ADC mean , ADC median , ADC 10 , ADC 90 , and hot-spot-ROI-based mean ADC than those found in thymic carcinoma (all p values histogram analysis of ADC maps can improve the differentiating performance between thymic carcinoma and lymphoma.

  11. Evaluation of renal allograft function early after transplantation with diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Eisenberger, Ute; Frey, Felix J.; Thoeny, Harriet C.; Binser, Tobias; Boesch, Chris; Gugger, Mathias; Vermathen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    To determine the inter-patient variability of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) and concurrent micro-circulation contributions from diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) in renal allografts early after transplantation, and to obtain initial information on whether these measures are altered in histologically proven acute allograft rejection (AR). DW-MRI was performed in 15 renal allograft recipients 5-19 days after transplantation. Four patients presented with AR and one with acute tubular necrosis (ATN). Total ADC (ADC T ) was determined, which includes diffusion and micro-circulation contributions. Furthermore, diffusion and micro-circulation contributions were separated, yielding the ''perfusion fraction'' (F P ), and ''perfusion-free'' diffusion (ADC D ). Diffusion parameters in the ten allografts with stable function early after transplantation demonstrated low variabilities. Values for ADC T and ADC D were (x 10 -5 mm 2 /s) 228 ± 14 and 203 ± 9, respectively, in cortex and 226 ± 16 and 199 ± 9, respectively, in medulla. F P values were 18 ± 5% in cortex and 19 ± 5% in medulla. F P values were strongly reduced to less than 12% in cortex and medulla of renal transplants with AR and ATN. F P values correlated with creatinine clearance. DW-MRI allows reliable determination of diffusion and micro-circulation contributions in renal allografts shortly after transplantation; deviations in AR indicate potential clinical utility of this method to non-invasively monitor derangements in renal allografts. (orig.)

  12. Stochastic modeling and simulation of reaction-diffusion system with Hill function dynamics.

    Chen, Minghan; Li, Fei; Wang, Shuo; Cao, Young

    2017-03-14

    Stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems presents great challenges for spatiotemporal biological modeling and simulation. One widely used framework for stochastic simulation of reaction-diffusion systems is reaction diffusion master equation (RDME). Previous studies have discovered that for the RDME, when discretization size approaches zero, reaction time for bimolecular reactions in high dimensional domains tends to infinity. In this paper, we demonstrate that in the 1D domain, highly nonlinear reaction dynamics given by Hill function may also have dramatic change when discretization size is smaller than a critical value. Moreover, we discuss methods to avoid this problem: smoothing over space, fixed length smoothing over space and a hybrid method. Our analysis reveals that the switch-like Hill dynamics reduces to a linear function of discretization size when the discretization size is small enough. The three proposed methods could correctly (under certain precision) simulate Hill function dynamics in the microscopic RDME system.

  13. Soil water diffusivity as a function of water content and time

    Guerrini, I.A.

    1976-04-01

    The soil-water diffusivity has been studied as a function of water content and time. From the idea of studying the horizontal movement of water in swelling soils, a simple formulation has been achieved which allows for the diffusivity, water content dependency and time dependency, to be estimated, not only of this kind of soil, but for any other soil as well. It was observed that the internal rearrangement of soil particles is a more important phenomenon than swelling, being responsible for time dependency. The method 2γ is utilized, which makes it possible to simultaneously determine the water content and density, point by point, in a soil column. The diffusivity data thus obtained are compared to those obtained when time dependency is not considered. Finally, a new soil parameter, α, is introduced and the values obtained agrees with the internal rearrangment assumption and time dependency for diffusivity (Author) [pt

  14. MD 1407 - Landau Damping: Beam Transfer Functions and diffusion mechanisms

    Tambasco, Claudia; Boccardi, Andrea; Buffat, Xavier; Gasior, Marek; Lefevre, Thibaut; Levens, Tom; Pojer, Mirko; Salvachua Ferrando, Belen Maria; Solfaroli Camillocci, Matteo; Pieloni, Tatiana; Crouch, Matthew Paul; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In the 2012, 2015 and 2016 run several instabilities were developing at flat-top, during and at the end of the betatron squeeze where beam-beam interactions are present. The tune spread in the beams is therefore modified by the beam-beam long-range interactions and by other sources of spread. Studies of the stability area computed by evaluating the dispersion integral for different tune spreads couldn’t explain the observed instabilities during the squeeze and stable beams. The size of the stability area given by the computed dispersion integral depends on the transverse tune spread but its shape is defined by the particle distribution in the beams. Therefore any change of the particle distribution can lead to a deterioration of the Landau stability area. The Beam Transfer Functions (BTF) are direct measurements of the Stability Diagrams (SD). They are sensitive to particle distributions and contain information about the transverse tune spread in the beams. In this note are summarized the results of the BTF...

  15. Implicit functions and solution mappings a view from variational analysis

    Dontchev, Asen L

    2014-01-01

    The implicit function theorem is one of the most important theorems in analysis and its many variants are basic tools in partial differential equations and numerical analysis. This second edition of Implicit Functions and Solution Mappings presents an updated and more complete picture of the field by including solutions of problems that have been solved since the first edition was published, and places old and new results in a broader perspective. The purpose of this self-contained work is to provide a reference on the topic and to provide a unified collection of a number of results which are currently scattered throughout the literature. Updates to this edition include new sections in almost all chapters, new exercises and examples, updated commentaries to chapters and an enlarged index and references section. From reviews of the first edition: “The book commences with a helpful context-setting preface followed by six chapters. Each chapter starts with a useful preamble and concludes with a careful and ins...

  16. Is Intraoperative Diffusion tensor Imaging at 3.0T Comparable to Subcortical Corticospinal tract Mapping?

    Ostrý, S.; Belšan, T.; Otáhal, Jakub; Beneš, V.; Netuka, D.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 5 (2013), s. 797-807 ISSN 0148-396X Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : corticospinal tract * intraoperative tractography * intraoperative image distortion * motor -evoked potentials * subcortical mapping Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.031, year: 2013

  17. Enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation using the importance function

    Vagheian, Mehran; Vosoughi, Naser; Gharib, Morteza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation is proposed. • A seven-step algorithm is considered based on the importance function. • Mesh points are distributed through entire reactor core with respect to the importance function. • The results all proved that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient. - Abstract: Mesh point positions in Finite Difference Method (FDM) of discretization for the neutron diffusion equation can remarkably affect the averaged neutron fluxes as well as the effective multiplication factor. In this study, by aid of improving the mesh point positions, an enhanced finite difference scheme for the neutron diffusion equation is proposed based on the neutron importance function. In order to determine the neutron importance function, the adjoint (backward) neutron diffusion calculations are performed in the same procedure as for the forward calculations. Considering the neutron importance function, the mesh points can be improved through the entire reactor core. Accordingly, in regions with greater neutron importance, density of mesh elements is higher than that in regions with less importance. The forward calculations are then performed for both of the uniform and improved non-uniform mesh point distributions and the results (the neutron fluxes along with the corresponding eigenvalues) for the two cases are compared with each other. The results are benchmarked against the reference values (with fine meshes) for Kang and Rod Bundle BWR benchmark problems. These benchmark cases revealed that the improved non-uniform mesh point distribution is highly efficient.

  18. Mapping the Wigner distribution function of the Morse oscillator onto a semiclassical distribution function

    Bund, G W; Tijero, M C

    2004-01-01

    The mapping of the Wigner distribution function (WDF) for a given bound state onto a semiclassical distribution function (SDF) satisfying the Liouville equation introduced previously by us is applied to the ground state of the Morse oscillator. The purpose of the present work is to obtain values of the potential parameters represented by the number of levels in the case of the Morse oscillator, for which the SDF becomes a faithful approximation of the corresponding WDF. We find that for a Morse oscillator with one level only, the agreement between the WDF and the mapped SDF is very poor but for a Morse oscillator of ten levels it becomes satisfactory. We also discuss the limit ℎ → 0 for fixed potential parameters

  19. Causal electric charge diffusion and balance functions in relativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Kapusta, Joseph I.; Plumberg, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    We study the propagation and diffusion of electric charge fluctuations in high-energy heavy-ion collisions using the Cattaneo form for the dissipative part of the electric current. As opposed to the ordinary diffusion equation this form limits the speed at which charge can propagate. Including the noise term in the current, which arises uniquely from the fluctuation-dissipation theorem, we calculate the balance functions for charged hadrons in a simple 1+1-dimensional Bjorken hydrodynamical model. Limiting the speed of propagation of charge fluctuations increases the height and reduces the width of these balance functions when plotted versus rapidity. We also estimate the numerical value of the associated diffusion time constant from anti-de Sitter-space/conformal-field theory.

  20. Self-diffusion in MgO--a density functional study.

    Runevall, Odd; Sandberg, Nils

    2011-08-31

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study self-diffusion in magnesium oxide, a model material for a wide range of ionic compounds. Formation energies and entropies of Schottky defects and divacancies were obtained by means of total energy and phonon calculations in supercell configurations. Transition state theory was used to estimate defect migration rates, with migration energies taken from static calculations, and the corresponding frequency factors estimated from the phonon spectrum. In all static calculations we corrected for image effects using either a multipole expansion or an extrapolation to the low concentration limit. It is shown that both methods give similar results. The results for self-diffusion of Mg and O confirm the previously established picture, namely that in materials of nominal purity, Mg diffuses extrinsically by a single vacancy mechanism, while O diffuses intrinsically by a divacancy mechanism. Quantitatively, the current results are in very good agreement with experiments concerning O diffusion, while for Mg the absolute diffusion rate is generally underestimated by a factor of 5-10. The reason for this discrepancy is discussed.

  1. The impulse cutoff an entropy functional measure on trajectories of Markov diffusion process integrating in information path functional

    Lerner, Vladimir S.

    2012-01-01

    The impulses, cutting entropy functional (EF) measure on trajectories Markov diffusion process, integrate information path functional (IPF) composing discrete information Bits extracted from observing random process. Each cut brings memory of the cutting entropy, which provides both reduction of the process entropy and discrete unit of the cutting entropy a Bit. Consequently, information is memorized entropy cutting in random observations which process interactions. The origin of information ...

  2. Color image encryption using random transforms, phase retrieval, chaotic maps, and diffusion

    Annaby, M. H.; Rushdi, M. A.; Nehary, E. A.

    2018-04-01

    The recent tremendous proliferation of color imaging applications has been accompanied by growing research in data encryption to secure color images against adversary attacks. While recent color image encryption techniques perform reasonably well, they still exhibit vulnerabilities and deficiencies in terms of statistical security measures due to image data redundancy and inherent weaknesses. This paper proposes two encryption algorithms that largely treat these deficiencies and boost the security strength through novel integration of the random fractional Fourier transforms, phase retrieval algorithms, as well as chaotic scrambling and diffusion. We show through detailed experiments and statistical analysis that the proposed enhancements significantly improve security measures and immunity to attacks.

  3. Assessment of histological differentiation in gastric cancers using whole-volume histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps.

    Zhang, Yujuan; Chen, Jun; Liu, Song; Shi, Hua; Guan, Wenxian; Ji, Changfeng; Guo, Tingting; Zheng, Huanhuan; Guan, Yue; Ge, Yun; He, Jian; Zhou, Zhengyang; Yang, Xiaofeng; Liu, Tian

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the efficacy of histogram analysis of the entire tumor volume in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for differentiating between histological grades in gastric cancer. Seventy-eight patients with gastric cancer were enrolled in a retrospective 3.0T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study. ADC maps were obtained at two different b values (0 and 1000 sec/mm 2 ) for each patient. Tumors were delineated on each slice of the ADC maps, and a histogram for the entire tumor volume was subsequently generated. A series of histogram parameters (eg, skew and kurtosis) were calculated and correlated with the histological grade of the surgical specimen. The diagnostic performance of each parameter for distinguishing poorly from moderately well-differentiated gastric cancers was assessed by using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). There were significant differences in the 5 th , 10 th , 25 th , and 50 th percentiles, skew, and kurtosis between poorly and well-differentiated gastric cancers (P histogram parameters, including the 10 th percentile, skew, kurtosis, and max frequency; the correlation coefficients were 0.273, -0.361, -0.339, and -0.370, respectively. Among all the histogram parameters, the max frequency had the largest AUC value, which was 0.675. Histogram analysis of the ADC maps on the basis of the entire tumor volume can be useful in differentiating between histological grades for gastric cancer. 4 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;45:440-449. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  4. Light source distribution and scattering phase function influence light transport in diffuse multi-layered media

    Vaudelle, Fabrice; L'Huillier, Jean-Pierre; Askoura, Mohamed Lamine

    2017-06-01

    Red and near-Infrared light is often used as a useful diagnostic and imaging probe for highly scattering media such as biological tissues, fruits and vegetables. Part of diffusively reflected light gives interesting information related to the tissue subsurface, whereas light recorded at further distances may probe deeper into the interrogated turbid tissues. However, modelling diffusive events occurring at short source-detector distances requires to consider both the distribution of the light sources and the scattering phase functions. In this report, a modified Monte Carlo model is used to compute light transport in curved and multi-layered tissue samples which are covered with a thin and highly diffusing tissue layer. Different light source distributions (ballistic, diffuse or Lambertian) are tested with specific scattering phase functions (modified or not modified Henyey-Greenstein, Gegenbauer and Mie) to compute the amount of backscattered and transmitted light in apple and human skin structures. Comparisons between simulation results and experiments carried out with a multispectral imaging setup confirm the soundness of the theoretical strategy and may explain the role of the skin on light transport in whole and half-cut apples. Other computational results show that a Lambertian source distribution combined with a Henyey-Greenstein phase function provides a higher photon density in the stratum corneum than in the upper dermis layer. Furthermore, it is also shown that the scattering phase function may affect the shape and the magnitude of the Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution (BRDF) exhibited at the skin surface.

  5. Patterning functional materials using channel diffused plasma-etched self-assembled monolayer templates

    George, A.; Maijenburg, A.W.; Maas, M.G.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2011-01-01

    A simple and cost-effective methodology for large-area micrometer-scale patterning of a wide range of metallic and oxidic functional materials is presented. Self-assembled monolayers (SAM) of alkyl thiols on Au were micropatterned by channel-diffused oxygen plasma etching, a method in which selected

  6. Task-evoked brain functional magnetic susceptibility mapping by independent component analysis (χICA).

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

    2016-03-01

    Conventionally, independent component analysis (ICA) is performed on an fMRI magnitude dataset to analyze brain functional mapping (AICA). By solving the inverse problem of fMRI, we can reconstruct the brain magnetic susceptibility (χ) functional states. Upon the reconstructed χ dataspace, we propose an ICA-based brain functional χ mapping method (χICA) to extract task-evoked brain functional map. A complex division algorithm is applied to a timeseries of fMRI phase images to extract temporal phase changes (relative to an OFF-state snapshot). A computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) model is used to reconstruct a 4D brain χ response dataset. χICA is implemented by applying a spatial InfoMax ICA algorithm to the reconstructed 4D χ dataspace. With finger-tapping experiments on a 7T system, the χICA-extracted χ-depicted functional map is similar to the SPM-inferred functional χ map by a spatial correlation of 0.67 ± 0.05. In comparison, the AICA-extracted magnitude-depicted map is correlated with the SPM magnitude map by 0.81 ± 0.05. The understanding of the inferiority of χICA to AICA for task-evoked functional map is an ongoing research topic. For task-evoked brain functional mapping, we compare the data-driven ICA method with the task-correlated SPM method. In particular, we compare χICA with AICA for extracting task-correlated timecourses and functional maps. χICA can extract a χ-depicted task-evoked brain functional map from a reconstructed χ dataspace without the knowledge about brain hemodynamic responses. The χICA-extracted brain functional χ map reveals a bidirectional BOLD response pattern that is unavailable (or different) from AICA. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional methods and mappings of dissipative quantum systems

    Baur, H.

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of this work we extract the algebraic structure behind the method of the influence functional in the context of dissipative quantum mechanics. Special emphasis was put on the transition from a quantum mechanical description to a classical one, since it allows a deeper understanding of the measurement-process. This is tightly connected with the transition from a microscopic to a macroscopic world where the former one is described by the rules of quantum mechanics whereas the latter follows the rules of classical mechanics. In addition we show how the results of the influence functional method can be interpreted as a stochastical process, which in turn allows an easy comparison with the well known time development of a quantum mechanical system by use of the Schroedinger equation. In the following we examine the tight-binding approximation of models of which their hamiltionian shows discrete eigenstates in position space and where transitions between those states are suppressed so that propagation either is described by tunneling or by thermal activation. In the framework of dissipative quantum mechanics this leads to a tremendous simplification of the effective description of the system since instead of looking at the full history of all paths in the path integral description, we only have to look at all possible jump times and the possible corresponding set of weights for the jump direction, which is much easier to handle both analytically and numerically. In addition we deal with the mapping and the connection of dissipative quantum mechanical models with ones in quantum field theory and in particular models in statistical field theory. As an example we mention conformal invariance in two dimensions which always becomes relevant if a statistical system only has local interaction and is invariant under scaling. (orig.)

  8. Topographic Brain Mapping: A Window on Brain Function?

    Karniski, Walt M.

    1989-01-01

    The article reviews the method of topographic mapping of the brain's electrical activity. Multiple electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes and computerized analysis of the EEG signal are used to generate maps of frequency and voltage (evoked potential). This relatively new technique holds promise in the evaluation of children with behavioral and…

  9. Traveling waves in a diffusive predator-prey model with holling type-III functional response

    Li Wantong; Wu Shiliang

    2008-01-01

    We establish the existence of traveling wave solutions and small amplitude traveling wave train solutions for a reaction-diffusion system based on a predator-prey model with Holling type-III functional response. The analysis is in the three-dimensional phase space of the nonlinear ordinary differential equation system given by the diffusive predator-prey system in the traveling wave variable. The methods used to prove the results are the shooting argument, invariant manifold theory and the Hopf bifurcation theorem

  10. Finite element transport using Wachspress rational basis functions on quadrilaterals in diffusive regions

    Davidson, G.; Palmer, T.S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1975, Wachspress developed basis functions that can be constructed upon very general zone shapes, including convex polygons and polyhedra, as well as certain zone shapes with curved sides and faces. Additionally, Adams has recently shown that weight functions with certain properties will produce solutions with full-resolution. Wachspress rational functions possess those necessary properties. Here we present methods to construct and integrate Wachspress rational functions on quadrilaterals. We also present an asymptotic analysis of a discontinuous finite element discretization on quadrilaterals, and we present 3 numerical results that confirm the predictions of our analysis. In the first test problem, we showed that Wachspress rational functions could give robust solutions for a strongly heterogeneous problem with both orthogonal and skewed meshes. This strongly heterogenous problem contained thick, diffusive regions, and the discretization provided full-resolution solutions. In the second test problem, we confirmed our asymptotic analysis by demonstrating that the transport solution will converge to the diffusion solution as the problem is made increasingly thick and diffusive. In the third test problem, we demonstrated that bilinear discontinuous based transport and Wachspress rational function based transport converge in the one-mesh limit

  11. Chronic kidney disease: Pathological and functional evaluation with intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging.

    Mao, Wei; Zhou, Jianjun; Zeng, Mengsu; Ding, Yuqin; Qu, Lijie; Chen, Caizhong; Ding, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yaqiong; Fu, Caixia

    2018-05-01

    Because chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide problem, accurate pathological and functional evaluation is required for planning treatment and follow-up. Intravoxel incoherent motion diffusion-weighted imaging (IVIM-DWI) can assess both capillary perfusion and tissue diffusion and may be helpful in evaluating renal function and pathology. To evaluate functional and pathological alterations in CKD by applying IVIM-DWI. Prospective study. In all, 72 CKD patients who required renal biopsy and 20 healthy volunteers. 1.5T. All subjects underwent IVIM-DWI of the kidneys, and image analysis was performed by two radiologists. The mean values of true diffusion coefficient (D), pseudo diffusion coefficient (D*), and perfusion fraction (f) were acquired from renal parenchyma. Correlation between IVIM-DWI parameters and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage, were assessed. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), paired sample t-test and Spearman correlation analysis. The paired sample t-test revealed that IVIM-DWI parameters were significantly lower in medulla than cortex for both patients and controls (P Imaging 2018;47:1251-1259. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  12. Mapping of ApoE4 related white matter damage using diffusion MRI

    Tsao, Sinchai; Gajawelli, Niharika; Hwang, Darryl H.; Kriger, Stephen; Law, Meng; Chui, Helena; Weiner, Michael; Lepore, Natasha

    2014-04-01

    ApoliopoproteinE Ɛ4 (ApoE-Ɛ4) polymorphism is the most well known genetic risk factor for developing Alzheimers Disease. The exact mechanism through which ApoE 4 increases AD risk is not fully known, but may be related to decreased clearance and increased oligomerization of Aβ. By making measurements of white matter integrity via diffusion MR and correlating the metrics in a voxel-based statistical analysis with ApoE-Ɛ4 genotype (whilst controlling for vascular risk factor, gender, cognitive status and age) we are able to identify changes in white matter associated with carrying an ApoE Ɛ4 allele. We found potentially significant regions (Puncorrected cognitive decline via a pathway in dependent of normal aging and acute insults that can be measured by CDR and Framingham Coronary Risk Score (FCRS).

  13. The challenge of mapping the human connectome based on diffusion tractography.

    Maier-Hein, Klaus H; Neher, Peter F; Houde, Jean-Christophe; Côté, Marc-Alexandre; Garyfallidis, Eleftherios; Zhong, Jidan; Chamberland, Maxime; Yeh, Fang-Cheng; Lin, Ying-Chia; Ji, Qing; Reddick, Wilburn E; Glass, John O; Chen, David Qixiang; Feng, Yuanjing; Gao, Chengfeng; Wu, Ye; Ma, Jieyan; Renjie, H; Li, Qiang; Westin, Carl-Fredrik; Deslauriers-Gauthier, Samuel; González, J Omar Ocegueda; Paquette, Michael; St-Jean, Samuel; Girard, Gabriel; Rheault, François; Sidhu, Jasmeen; Tax, Chantal M W; Guo, Fenghua; Mesri, Hamed Y; Dávid, Szabolcs; Froeling, Martijn; Heemskerk, Anneriet M; Leemans, Alexander; Boré, Arnaud; Pinsard, Basile; Bedetti, Christophe; Desrosiers, Matthieu; Brambati, Simona; Doyon, Julien; Sarica, Alessia; Vasta, Roberta; Cerasa, Antonio; Quattrone, Aldo; Yeatman, Jason; Khan, Ali R; Hodges, Wes; Alexander, Simon; Romascano, David; Barakovic, Muhamed; Auría, Anna; Esteban, Oscar; Lemkaddem, Alia; Thiran, Jean-Philippe; Cetingul, H Ertan; Odry, Benjamin L; Mailhe, Boris; Nadar, Mariappan S; Pizzagalli, Fabrizio; Prasad, Gautam; Villalon-Reina, Julio E; Galvis, Justin; Thompson, Paul M; Requejo, Francisco De Santiago; Laguna, Pedro Luque; Lacerda, Luis Miguel; Barrett, Rachel; Dell'Acqua, Flavio; Catani, Marco; Petit, Laurent; Caruyer, Emmanuel; Daducci, Alessandro; Dyrby, Tim B; Holland-Letz, Tim; Hilgetag, Claus C; Stieltjes, Bram; Descoteaux, Maxime

    2017-11-07

    Tractography based on non-invasive diffusion imaging is central to the study of human brain connectivity. To date, the approach has not been systematically validated in ground truth studies. Based on a simulated human brain data set with ground truth tracts, we organized an open international tractography challenge, which resulted in 96 distinct submissions from 20 research groups. Here, we report the encouraging finding that most state-of-the-art algorithms produce tractograms containing 90% of the ground truth bundles (to at least some extent). However, the same tractograms contain many more invalid than valid bundles, and half of these invalid bundles occur systematically across research groups. Taken together, our results demonstrate and confirm fundamental ambiguities inherent in tract reconstruction based on orientation information alone, which need to be considered when interpreting tractography and connectivity results. Our approach provides a novel framework for estimating reliability of tractography and encourages innovation to address its current limitations.

  14. Real space mapping of ionic diffusion and electrochemical activity in energy storage and conversion materials

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Balke, Nina; Kumar, Amit; Dudney, Nancy J; Jesse, Stephen

    2014-05-06

    A method and system for probing mobile ion diffusivity and electrochemical reactivity on a nanometer length scale of a free electrochemically active surface includes a control module that biases the surface of the material. An electrical excitation signal is applied to the material and induces the movement of mobile ions. An SPM probe in contact with the surface of the material detects the displacement of mobile ions at the surface of the material. A detector measures an electromechanical strain response at the surface of the material based on the movement and reactions of the mobile ions. The use of an SPM tip to detect local deformations allows highly reproducible measurements in an ambient environment without visible changes in surface structure. The measurements illustrate effective spatial resolution comparable with defect spacing and well below characteristic grain sizes of the material.

  15. Evaluation of renal allograft function early after transplantation with diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Eisenberger, Ute; Frey, Felix J. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Nephrology and Hypertension, Bern (Switzerland); Thoeny, Harriet C. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology and Nuclear Medicine, Bern (Switzerland); Binser, Tobias; Boesch, Chris [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); Gugger, Mathias [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland); Vermathen, Peter [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Clinical Research, Bern (Switzerland); University Bern, Department of Clinical Research/AMSM, Pavillon 52, Inselspital, P.O. Box 35, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-06-15

    To determine the inter-patient variability of apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) and concurrent micro-circulation contributions from diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) in renal allografts early after transplantation, and to obtain initial information on whether these measures are altered in histologically proven acute allograft rejection (AR). DW-MRI was performed in 15 renal allograft recipients 5-19 days after transplantation. Four patients presented with AR and one with acute tubular necrosis (ATN). Total ADC (ADC{sub T}) was determined, which includes diffusion and micro-circulation contributions. Furthermore, diffusion and micro-circulation contributions were separated, yielding the ''perfusion fraction'' (F{sub P}), and ''perfusion-free'' diffusion (ADC{sub D}). Diffusion parameters in the ten allografts with stable function early after transplantation demonstrated low variabilities. Values for ADC{sub T} and ADC{sub D} were (x 10{sup -5} mm{sup 2}/s) 228 {+-} 14 and 203 {+-} 9, respectively, in cortex and 226 {+-} 16 and 199 {+-} 9, respectively, in medulla. F{sub P} values were 18 {+-} 5% in cortex and 19 {+-} 5% in medulla. F{sub P} values were strongly reduced to less than 12% in cortex and medulla of renal transplants with AR and ATN. F{sub P} values correlated with creatinine clearance. DW-MRI allows reliable determination of diffusion and micro-circulation contributions in renal allografts shortly after transplantation; deviations in AR indicate potential clinical utility of this method to non-invasively monitor derangements in renal allografts. (orig.)

  16. Modified polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function with diffuse scattering: surface parameter estimation

    Zhan, Hanyu; Voelz, David G.

    2016-12-01

    The polarimetric bidirectional reflectance distribution function (pBRDF) describes the relationships between incident and scattered Stokes parameters, but the familiar surface-only microfacet pBRDF cannot capture diffuse scattering contributions and depolarization phenomena. We propose a modified pBRDF model with a diffuse scattering component developed from the Kubelka-Munk and Le Hors et al. theories, and apply it in the development of a method to jointly estimate refractive index, slope variance, and diffuse scattering parameters from a series of Stokes parameter measurements of a surface. An application of the model and estimation approach to experimental data published by Priest and Meier shows improved correspondence with measurements of normalized Mueller matrix elements. By converting the Stokes/Mueller calculus formulation of the model to a degree of polarization (DOP) description, the estimation results of the parameters from measured DOP values are found to be consistent with a previous DOP model and results.

  17. Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes with identical spectral density but different probability density functions.

    Lei, Youming; Zheng, Fan

    2016-12-01

    Stochastic chaos induced by diffusion processes, with identical spectral density but different probability density functions (PDFs), is investigated in selected lightly damped Hamiltonian systems. The threshold amplitude of diffusion processes for the onset of chaos is derived by using the stochastic Melnikov method together with a mean-square criterion. Two quasi-Hamiltonian systems, namely, a damped single pendulum and damped Duffing oscillator perturbed by stochastic excitations, are used as illustrative examples. Four different cases of stochastic processes are taking as the driving excitations. It is shown that in such two systems the spectral density of diffusion processes completely determines the threshold amplitude for chaos, regardless of the shape of their PDFs, Gaussian or otherwise. Furthermore, the mean top Lyapunov exponent is employed to verify analytical results. The results obtained by numerical simulations are in accordance with the analytical results. This demonstrates that the stochastic Melnikov method is effective in predicting the onset of chaos in the quasi-Hamiltonian systems.

  18. Diffusion of interstitial oxygen in silicon and germanium: a hybrid functional study

    Colleoni, Davide; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    The minimum-energy paths for the diffusion of an interstitial O atom in silicon and germanium are studied through the nudged-elastic-band method and hybrid functional calculations. The reconsideration of the diffusion of O in silicon primarily serves the purpose of validating the procedure for studying the O diffusion in germanium. Our calculations show that the minimum energy path goes through an asymmetric transition state in both silicon and germanium. The stability of these transition states is found to be enhanced by the generation of unpaired electrons in the highest occupied single-particle states. Calculated energy barriers are 2.54 and 2.14 eV for Si and Ge, in very good agreement with corresponding experimental values of 2.53 and 2.08 eV, respectively. (paper)

  19. Axial diffusivity changes in the motor pathway above stroke foci and functional recovery after subcortical infarction.

    Liu, Gang; Peng, Kangqiang; Dang, Chao; Tan, Shuangquan; Chen, Hongbing; Xie, Chuanmiao; Xing, Shihui; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2018-01-01

    Secondary degeneration of the fiber tract of the motor pathway below infarct foci and functional recovery after stroke have been well demonstrated, but the role of the fiber tract above stroke foci remains unclear. This study aimed to investigate diffusion changes in motor fibers above the lesion and identify predictors of motor improvement within 12 weeks after subcortical infarction. Diffusion tensor imaging and the Fugl-Meyer (FM) scale were conducted 1, 4, and 12 weeks (W) after a subcortical infarct. Proportional recovery model residuals were used to assign patients to proportional recovery and poor recovery groups. Region of interest analysis was used to assess diffusion changes in the motor pathway above and below a stroke lesion. Multivariable linear regression was employed to identify predictors of motor improvement within 12 weeks after stroke. Axial diffusivity (AD) in the underlying white matter of the ipsilesional primary motor area (PMA) and cerebral peduncle (CP) in both proportional and poor recovery groups was lower at W1 compared to the controls and values in the contralesional PMA and CP (all P motor improvement within 12 weeks after stroke in patients with proportional or poor recovery. Increases of AD in the motor pathway above stroke foci may be associated with motor recovery after subcortical infarction. Early measurement of diffusion metrics in the ipsilesional non-ischemic motor pathway has limited value in predicting future motor improvement patterns (proportional or poor recovery).

  20. Functional evaluation of the kidney by diffusion-weighted MR imaging

    Hasegawa, Taro; Hasegawa, Norio; Irie, Takeo; Fukuda, Kunihiko

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and diffuse renal disease by diffusion-weighted echo planar magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (EPI). Ten volunteers, seven patients with chronic renal failure and eighteen recipients of renal transplants were examined with diffusion-weighted EPI. We compared renal function (serum creatinine level) with provided ADC value. The average ADC values were 2.63 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec for the whole kidney, 2.67 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec for the cortex and 2.61 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec for the medulla in normal kidneys. ADC values in the whole kidney, the cortex and the medulla in chronic renal failure were significantly lower than those for normal kidneys. In renal transplantation kidneys, the ADC values in the cortex were significantly lower than those for normal kidney. There was a linear correlation between ADC value and serum creatinine level. Our results show that diffusion-weighted MR imaging may be useful to identify renal dysfunction. (author)

  1. Mapping brain structure and function: cellular resolution, global perspective.

    Zupanc, Günther K H

    2017-04-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the brain requires analysis, although from a global perspective, with cellular, and even subcellular, resolution. An important step towards this goal involves the establishment of three-dimensional high-resolution brain maps, incorporating brain-wide information about the cells and their connections, as well as the chemical architecture. The progress made in such anatomical brain mapping in recent years has been paralleled by the development of physiological techniques that enable investigators to generate global neural activity maps, also with cellular resolution, while simultaneously recording the organism's behavioral activity. Combination of the high-resolution anatomical and physiological maps, followed by theoretical systems analysis of the deduced network, will offer unprecedented opportunities for a better understanding of how the brain, as a whole, processes sensory information and generates behavior.

  2. Mapping cortical haemodynamics during neonatal seizures using diffuse optical tomography: A case study

    Harsimrat Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seizures in the newborn brain represent a major challenge to neonatal medicine. Neonatal seizures are poorly classified, under-diagnosed, difficult to treat and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcome. Video-EEG is the current gold-standard approach for seizure detection and monitoring. Interpreting neonatal EEG requires expertise and the impact of seizures on the developing brain remains poorly understood. In this case study we present the first ever images of the haemodynamic impact of seizures on the human infant brain, obtained using simultaneous diffuse optical tomography (DOT and video-EEG with whole-scalp coverage. Seven discrete periods of ictal electrographic activity were observed during a 60 minute recording of an infant with hypoxic–ischaemic encephalopathy. The resulting DOT images show a remarkably consistent, high-amplitude, biphasic pattern of changes in cortical blood volume and oxygenation in response to each electrographic event. While there is spatial variation across the cortex, the dominant haemodynamic response to seizure activity consists of an initial increase in cortical blood volume prior to a large and extended decrease typically lasting several minutes. This case study demonstrates the wealth of physiologically and clinically relevant information that DOT–EEG techniques can yield. The consistency and scale of the haemodynamic responses observed here also suggest that DOT–EEG has the potential to provide improved detection of neonatal seizures.

  3. Atypical manifestations of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: findings on diffusion imaging and ADC mapping

    Ahn, K.J.; You, W.J.; Jeong, S.L.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, B.S.; Lee, J.H.; Hahn, S.T. [Dept. of Radiology, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea); Yang, D.W.; Son, Y.M. [Dept. of Neurology, The Catholic Univ. of Korea, St. Mary' s Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2004-12-01

    Typically, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) involves the parieto-occipital lobes. When regions of the brain other than the parieto-occipital lobes are predominantly involved, the syndrome can be called atypical RPLS. The purpose of this study is to find radiological and pathophysiological features of atypical RPLS by using diffusion-weighted imaging (D-WI). We retrospectively reviewed seven patients (two with eclampsia, one with cyclosporine neurotoxicity, and four with hypertensive encephalopathy) with atypical MR manifestations of RPLS. Changes in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2-WI) and D-WI, and ADC ratio, were analyzed. In patients with atypical manifestation of RPLS, high signal intensities on T2-WI were noted in the frontal lobe, basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem, and subcortical white matter in regions other than the parieto-occipital lobes. These areas of increased signal intensities on T2-WI showed increased ADC values, representing vasogenic edema in all seven patients. This result should be very useful in differentiating atypical RPLS from other metabolic brain disorders that affect the same sites with cytotoxic edema. (orig.)

  4. Atypical manifestations of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: findings on diffusion imaging and ADC mapping

    Ahn, K.J.; You, W.J.; Jeong, S.L.; Lee, J.W.; Kim, B.S.; Lee, J.H.; Hahn, S.T.; Yang, D.W.; Son, Y.M.

    2004-01-01

    Typically, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) involves the parieto-occipital lobes. When regions of the brain other than the parieto-occipital lobes are predominantly involved, the syndrome can be called atypical RPLS. The purpose of this study is to find radiological and pathophysiological features of atypical RPLS by using diffusion-weighted imaging (D-WI). We retrospectively reviewed seven patients (two with eclampsia, one with cyclosporine neurotoxicity, and four with hypertensive encephalopathy) with atypical MR manifestations of RPLS. Changes in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging (T2-WI) and D-WI, and ADC ratio, were analyzed. In patients with atypical manifestation of RPLS, high signal intensities on T2-WI were noted in the frontal lobe, basal ganglia, thalamus, brainstem, and subcortical white matter in regions other than the parieto-occipital lobes. These areas of increased signal intensities on T2-WI showed increased ADC values, representing vasogenic edema in all seven patients. This result should be very useful in differentiating atypical RPLS from other metabolic brain disorders that affect the same sites with cytotoxic edema. (orig.)

  5. Multi-mode Li diffusion in natural zircons: Evidence for diffusion in the presence of step-function concentration boundaries

    Tang, Ming; Rudnick, Roberta L.; McDonough, William F.; Bose, Maitrayee; Goreva, Yulia

    2017-09-01

    Micron- to submicron-scale observations of Li distribution and Li isotope composition profiles can be used to infer the mechanisms of Li diffusion in natural zircon. Extreme fractionation (20-30‰) within each single crystal studied here confirms that Li diffusion commonly occurs in zircon. Sharp Li concentration gradients frequently seen in zircons suggest that the effective diffusivity of Li is significantly slower than experimentally determined (Cherniak and Watson, 2010; Trail et al., 2016), otherwise the crystallization/metamorphic heating of these zircons would have to be unrealistically fast (years to tens of years). Charge coupling with REE and Y has been suggested as a mechanism that may considerably reduce Li diffusivity in zircon (Ushikubo et al., 2008; Bouvier et al., 2012). We show that Li diffused in the direction of decreasing Li/Y ratio and increasing Li concentration (uphill diffusion) in one of the zircons, demonstrating charge coupling with REE and Y. Quantitative modeling reveals that Li may diffuse in at least two modes in natural zircons: one being slow and possibly coupled with REE+Y, and the other one being fast and not coupled with REE+Y. The partitioning of Li between these two modes during its diffusion may depend on the pre-diffusion substitution mechanism of REE and Y in the zircon lattice. Based on our results, sharp Li concentration gradients are not indicative of limited diffusion, and can be preserved at temperatures >700 °C on geologic timescales. Finally, large δ7 Li variations observed in the Hadean Jack Hills zircons may record kinetic fractionation, rather than a record of ancient intense weathering in the granite source materials.

  6. Study on fitness functions of genetic algorithm for dynamically correcting nuclide atmospheric diffusion model

    Ji Zhilong; Ma Yuanwei; Wang Dezhong

    2014-01-01

    Background: In radioactive nuclides atmospheric diffusion models, the empirical dispersion coefficients were deduced under certain experiment conditions, whose difference with nuclear accident conditions is a source of deviation. A better estimation of the radioactive nuclide's actual dispersion process could be done by correcting dispersion coefficients with observation data, and Genetic Algorithm (GA) is an appropriate method for this correction procedure. Purpose: This study is to analyze the fitness functions' influence on the correction procedure and the forecast ability of diffusion model. Methods: GA, coupled with Lagrange dispersion model, was used in a numerical simulation to compare 4 fitness functions' impact on the correction result. Results: In the numerical simulation, the fitness function with observation deviation taken into consideration stands out when significant deviation exists in the observed data. After performing the correction procedure on the Kincaid experiment data, a significant boost was observed in the diffusion model's forecast ability. Conclusion: As the result shows, in order to improve dispersion models' forecast ability using GA, observation data should be given different weight in the fitness function corresponding to their error. (authors)

  7. Functional Maps of Mechanosensory Features in the Drosophila Brain.

    Patella, Paola; Wilson, Rachel I

    2018-04-09

    Johnston's organ is the largest mechanosensory organ in Drosophila. It contributes to hearing, touch, vestibular sensing, proprioception, and wind sensing. In this study, we used in vivo 2-photon calcium imaging and unsupervised image segmentation to map the tuning properties of Johnston's organ neurons (JONs) at the site where their axons enter the brain. We then applied the same methodology to study two key brain regions that process signals from JONs: the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) and the wedge, which is downstream of the AMMC. First, we identified a diversity of JON response types that tile frequency space and form a rough tonotopic map. Some JON response types are direction selective; others are specialized to encode amplitude modulations over a specific range (dynamic range fractionation). Next, we discovered that both the AMMC and the wedge contain a tonotopic map, with a significant increase in tonotopy-and a narrowing of frequency tuning-at the level of the wedge. Whereas the AMMC tonotopic map is unilateral, the wedge tonotopic map is bilateral. Finally, we identified a subregion of the AMMC/wedge that responds preferentially to the coherent rotation of the two mechanical organs in the same angular direction, indicative of oriented steady air flow (directional wind). Together, these maps reveal the broad organization of the primary and secondary mechanosensory regions of the brain. They provide a framework for future efforts to identify the specific cell types and mechanisms that underlie the hierarchical re-mapping of mechanosensory information in this system. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Determination of aluminium and beryllium by diffuse reflectance spectrometry with the use of chromaticity functions

    Ivanov, V.M.; Ershova, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    Immobilized Eriochrome Cyanine R was used for the direct trace determination of aluminium and beryllium by diffuse reflectance spectrometry. Anion exchanger AV-17, silica gel Silochrom C-120, Chromaton N-Super, silica gel C 18 , and cellulose were examined as supports. Optimal sorption conditions were found. The dependence of chromaticity functions (chromaticity coordinates, lightness, color saturation, yellowness, and whiteness) on different factors was studied. Advantages of the use of chromaticity functions rather than the diffuse reflectance coefficient were demonstrated. A method is developed for the separate determination of aluminium and beryllium using cellulose as the support; the method was used for the analysis of real samples and tested with standard samples. When solution samples of 50 and 100 ml were used, the determination limit was 0.004 μg/ml for aluminium and 0.0002 μg/ml for beryllium, respectively [ru

  9. The out of equilibrium response function in sub-diffusive systems

    Gradenigo, G; Puglisi, A; Sarracino, A; Vulpiani, A; Villamaina, D

    2012-01-01

    We study the Einstein relation between spontaneous fluctuations and the response to an external perturbation for the comb model and the single file, which are examples of systems with sub-diffusive transport properties. The relevance of nonequilibrium conditions is investigated: when a stationary current (in the form of a drift or an energy flux) is present, the Einstein relation breaks down. In the case of the comb model, a general relation - appearing in the recent literature - between the response function and an unperturbed suitable correlation function allows us to explain the obtained results. This suggests that the relevant ingredient in breaking the Einstein formula, for stationary regimes, is not anomalous diffusion but the presence of currents driving the system out of equilibrium.

  10. Taking potential probability function maps to the local scale and matching them with land use maps

    Garg, Saryu; Sinha, Vinayak; Sinha, Baerbel

    2013-04-01

    Source-Receptor models have been developed using different methods. Residence-time weighted concentration back trajectory analysis and Potential Source Contribution Function (PSCF) are the two most popular techniques for identification of potential sources of a substance in a defined geographical area. Both techniques use back trajectories calculated using global models and assign values of probability/concentration to various locations in an area. These values represent the probability of threshold exceedances / the average concentration measured at the receptor in air masses with a certain residence time over a source area. Both techniques, however, have only been applied to regional and long-range transport phenomena due to inherent limitation with respect to both spatial accuracy and temporal resolution of the of back trajectory calculations. Employing the above mentioned concepts of residence time weighted concentration back-trajectory analysis and PSCF, we developed a source-receptor model capable of identifying local and regional sources of air pollutants like Particulate Matter (PM), NOx, SO2 and VOCs. We use 1 to 30 minute averages of concentration values and wind direction and speed from a single receptor site or from multiple receptor sites to trace the air mass back in time. The model code assumes all the atmospheric transport to be Lagrangian and linearly extrapolates air masses reaching the receptor location, backwards in time for a fixed number of steps. We restrict the model run to the lifetime of the chemical species under consideration. For long lived species the model run is limited to 180 trees/gridsquare); moderate concentrations for agricultural lands with low tree density (1.5-2.5 ppbv for 250 μg/m3 for traffic hotspots in Chandigarh City are observed. Based on the validation against the land use maps, the model appears to do an excellent job in source apportionment and identifying emission hotspots. Acknowledgement: We thank the IISER

  11. Spectral and geometrical variation of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of diffuse reflectance standards.

    Ferrero, Alejandro; Rabal, Ana María; Campos, Joaquín; Pons, Alicia; Hernanz, María Luisa

    2012-12-20

    A study on the variation of the spectral bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of four diffuse reflectance standards (matte ceramic, BaSO(4), Spectralon, and white Russian opal glass) is accomplished through this work. Spectral BRDF measurements were carried out and, using principal components analysis, its spectral and geometrical variation respect to a reference geometry was assessed from the experimental data. Several descriptors were defined in order to compare the spectral BRDF variation of the four materials.

  12. Graphical function mapping as a new way to explore cause-and-effect chains

    Evans, Mary Anne

    2016-01-01

    Graphical function mapping provides a simple method for improving communication within interdisciplinary research teams and between scientists and nonscientists. This article introduces graphical function mapping using two examples and discusses its usefulness. Function mapping projects the outcome of one function into another to show the combined effect. Using this mathematical property in a simpler, even cartoon-like, graphical way allows the rapid combination of multiple information sources (models, empirical data, expert judgment, and guesses) in an intuitive visual to promote further discussion, scenario development, and clear communication.

  13. Application of computer-generated functional (parametric) maps in radionuclide renography

    Agress, H. Jr.; Levenson, S.M.; Gelfand, M.J.; Green, M.V.; Bailey, J.J.; Johnston, G.S.

    1975-01-01

    A functional (parametric) map is a single visual display of regional dynamic phenomena which facilitates interpretation of the nature of focal abnormalities in renal function. Methods for producing several kinds of functional maps based on computer calculations of radionuclide scan data are briefly described. Three abnormal cases are presented to illustrate the use of functional maps to separate focal lesions and to specify the dynamic nature of the abnormalities in a way which is difficult to achieve with conventional sequential renal scans and renograms alone

  14. Dynamical zeta functions and dynamical determinants for hyperbolic maps a functional approach

    Baladi, Viviane

    2018-01-01

    The spectra of transfer operators associated to dynamical systems, when acting on suitable Banach spaces, contain key information about the ergodic properties of the systems. Focusing on expanding and hyperbolic maps, this book gives a self-contained account on the relation between zeroes of dynamical determinants, poles of dynamical zeta functions, and the discrete spectra of the transfer operators. In the hyperbolic case, the first key step consists in constructing a suitable Banach space of anisotropic distributions. The first part of the book is devoted to the easier case of expanding endomorphisms, showing how the (isotropic) function spaces relevant there can be studied via Paley–Littlewood decompositions, and allowing easier access to the construction of the anisotropic spaces which is performed in the second part. This is the first book describing the use of anisotropic spaces in dynamics. Aimed at researchers and graduate students, it presents results and techniques developed since the beginning of...

  15. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu [Nagasaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1999-05-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  16. Presurgical mapping with functional MRI. Comparative study with transcranial magnetic stimulation and intraoperative mapping

    Kaminogo, Makio; Morikawa, Minoru; Ishimaru, Hideki; Ochi, Makoto; Onizuka, Masanori; Shirakawa, Yasushi; Takahashi, Haruki; Shibata, Shobu

    1999-01-01

    The thumb movement was evoked by transcranical magnetic stimulation (TCS) for the mapping of the motor cortex. After the placement of the marker determined by TCS on the scalp, fMRI under motor tasks consisting of repetitive grasping was performed. For motor cortex activation, an axial oblique plane to maximize gray matter sampling in the rolandic cortex was employed in order to compare these different mapping techniques more precisely. Sixteen patients with brain tumors were included in this study. In nine patients, fMRI disclosed activation in one restricted gyrus or in the localized area around one restricted sulcus. Of these nine patients, preoperative TCS mapping corresponded closely with fMRI in six, while in the remaining three, the TCS marker fell between 1 and 2 cm apart from the fMRI-activated area. However, in these three patients, intraoperative electrocortical stimulation corresponded with the preoperative mapping with fMRI. In six patients, contiguous two gyri were activated by motor tasks. The TCS marker was disclosed on one of the two activated gyri. Of these six patients, the position of the TCS marker and fMRI-activated site corresponded with each other in four cases. They were found on the same gyrus but there was 1.0-2.0 cm distance between them in two cases. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential was monitored in two of these six cases. They corresponded well with the mapping by fMRI and TCS together. In only one patient, no significant activation area was obtained by fMRI because of excessive head motion during motor tasks. The TCS maker in this patients was identical with intraoperative electro-cortical stimulation mapping. (K.H.)

  17. Thalamic diffusion differences related to cognitive function in white matter lesions.

    Fernández-Andújar, Marina; Soriano-Raya, Juan José; Miralbell, Júlia; López-Cancio, Elena; Cáceres, Cynthia; Bargalló, Núria; Barrios, Maite; Arenillas, Juan Francisco; Toran, Pere; Alzamora, Maite; Clemente, Imma; Dávalos, Antoni; Mataró, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Cerebral white matter lesions (WMLs) are related to cognitive deficits, probably due to a disruption of frontal-subcortical circuits. We explored thalamic diffusion differences related to white matter lesions (WMLs) and their association with cognitive function in middle-aged individuals. Ninety-six participants from the Barcelona-AsIA Neuropsychology Study were included. Participants were classified into groups based on low grade and high grade of periventricular hyperintensities (PVHs) and deep white matter hyperintensities (DWMHs). Tract-Based Spatial Statistics was used to study thalamic diffusion differences between groups. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values in significant areas were calculated for each subject and correlated with cognitive performance. Participants with high-grade PVHs and DWMHs showed lower FA thalamic values compared to those with low-grade PVHs and DWMHs, respectively. Decreased FA thalamic values in high-grade DWMHs, but not high-grade PVH, were related to lower levels of performance in psychomotor speed, verbal fluency, and visuospatial skills. Thalamic diffusion differences are related to lower cognitive function only in participants with high-grade DWMHs. These results support the hypothesis that fronto-subcortical disruption is associated with cognitive function only in DWMHs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Radiation turbulence interactions in pulverized coal flames: Chaotic map models of soot fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames. Quarterly report, October 1995--December 1995

    McDonough, J.M.; Menguc, M.P.; Mukerji, S.; Swabb, S.; Manickavasagam, S.; Ghosal, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, we introduce a methodology to characterize soot volume fraction fluctuations in turbulent diffusion flames via chaotic maps. The approach is based on the hypothesis that the fluctuations of properties in turbulent flames is deterministic in nature, rather than statistical. Out objective is to develop models to mimic these fluctuations. The models will be used eventually in comprehensive algorithms to study the true physics of turbulent flames and the interaction of turbulence with radiation. To this extent, we measured the time series of soot scattering coefficient in an ethylene diffusion flame from light scattering experiments. Following this, corresponding power spectra and delay maps were calculated. It was shown that if the data were averaged, the characteristics of the fluctuations were almost completely washed out. The psds from experiments were successfully modeled using a series of logistic maps.

  19. Functions needed for mapping Ethernet to SONET/SDH

    Defined mapping of the SONET payload to SONET channels. SONET/SDH channels are either higher-order or lower order virtual tributaries (eg., VT's or STS-n's); Capacity of one or more channels can be allocated; When multiple VTs are allocated, they need not be contiguous. Contiguity restriction lacks flexibility and is ...

  20. Cloning, expression and functional analysis of MAP30 from ...

    use

    2011-12-07

    Dec 7, 2011 ... gene was cloned and expressed and the induction of the recombinant MAP30 protein on .... RNA reverse transcription was carried out by RevertAidTM First ... volume of Premix Ex Taq™ (Takara Bio Inc, Japan), PCR cycling.

  1. Intrinsic functional brain mapping in reconstructed 4D magnetic susceptibility (χ) data space.

    Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince

    2015-02-15

    By solving an inverse problem of T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for a dynamic fMRI study, we reconstruct a 4D magnetic susceptibility source (χ) data space for intrinsic functional mapping. A 4D phase dataset is calculated from a 4D complex fMRI dataset. The background field and phase wrapping effect are removed by a Laplacian technique. A 3D χ source map is reconstructed from a 3D phase image by a computed inverse MRI (CIMRI) scheme. A 4D χ data space is reconstructed by repeating the 3D χ source reconstruction for each time point. A functional map is calculated by a temporal correlation between voxel signals in the 4D χ space and the timecourse of the task paradigm. With a finger-tapping experiment, we obtain two 3D functional mappings in the 4D magnitude data space and in the reconstructed 4D χ data space. We find that the χ-based functional mapping reveals co-occurrence of bidirectional responses in a 3D activation map that is different from the conventional magnitude-based mapping. The χ-based functional mapping can also be achieved by a 3D deconvolution of a phase activation map. Based on a subject experimental comparison, we show that the 4D χ tomography method could produce a similar χ activation map as obtained by the 3D deconvolution method. By removing the dipole effect and other fMRI technological contaminations, 4D χ tomography provides a 4D χ data space that allows a more direct and truthful functional mapping of a brain activity. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Assessment of tropospheric delay mapping function models in Egypt: Using PTD database model

    Abdelfatah, M. A.; Mousa, Ashraf E.; El-Fiky, Gamal S.

    2018-06-01

    For space geodetic measurements, estimates of tropospheric delays are highly correlated with site coordinates and receiver clock biases. Thus, it is important to use the most accurate models for the tropospheric delay to reduce errors in the estimates of the other parameters. Both the zenith delay value and mapping function should be assigned correctly to reduce such errors. Several mapping function models can treat the troposphere slant delay. The recent models were not evaluated for the Egyptian local climate conditions. An assessment of these models is needed to choose the most suitable one. The goal of this paper is to test the quality of global mapping function which provides high consistency with precise troposphere delay (PTD) mapping functions. The PTD model is derived from radiosonde data using ray tracing, which consider in this paper as true value. The PTD mapping functions were compared, with three recent total mapping functions model and another three separate dry and wet mapping function model. The results of the research indicate that models are very close up to zenith angle 80°. Saastamoinen and 1/cos z model are behind accuracy. Niell model is better than VMF model. The model of Black and Eisner is a good model. The results also indicate that the geometric range error has insignificant effect on slant delay and the fluctuation of azimuth anti-symmetric is about 1%.

  3. Jigsaw puzzle metasurface for multiple functions: polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion.

    Zhao, Yi; Cao, Xiangyu; Gao, Jun; Liu, Xiao; Li, Sijia

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrate a simple reconfigurable metasurface with multiple functions. Anisotropic tiles are investigated and manufactured as fundamental elements. Then, the tiles are combined in a certain sequence to construct a metasurface. Each of the tiles can be adjusted independently which is like a jigsaw puzzle and the whole metasurface can achieve diverse functions by different layouts. For demonstration purposes, we realize polarization conversion, anomalous reflection and diffusion by a jigsaw puzzle metasurface with 6 × 6 pieces of anisotropic tile. Simulated and measured results prove that our method offers a simple and effective strategy for metasurface design.

  4. A Radiation Chemistry Code Based on the Greens Functions of the Diffusion Equation

    Plante, Ianik; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation produces several radiolytic species such as.OH, e-aq, and H. when interacting with biological matter. Following their creation, radiolytic species diffuse and chemically react with biological molecules such as DNA. Despite years of research, many questions on the DNA damage by ionizing radiation remains, notably on the indirect effect, i.e. the damage resulting from the reactions of the radiolytic species with DNA. To simulate DNA damage by ionizing radiation, we are developing a step-by-step radiation chemistry code that is based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation (GFDE), which is able to follow the trajectories of all particles and their reactions with time. In the recent years, simulations based on the GFDE have been used extensively in biochemistry, notably to simulate biochemical networks in time and space and are often used as the "gold standard" to validate diffusion-reaction theories. The exact GFDE for partially diffusion-controlled reactions is difficult to use because of its complex form. Therefore, the radial Green's function, which is much simpler, is often used. Hence, much effort has been devoted to the sampling of the radial Green's functions, for which we have developed a sampling algorithm This algorithm only yields the inter-particle distance vector length after a time step; the sampling of the deviation angle of the inter-particle vector is not taken into consideration. In this work, we show that the radial distribution is predicted by the exact radial Green's function. We also use a technique developed by Clifford et al. to generate the inter-particle vector deviation angles, knowing the inter-particle vector length before and after a time step. The results are compared with those predicted by the exact GFDE and by the analytical angular functions for free diffusion. This first step in the creation of the radiation chemistry code should help the understanding of the contribution of the indirect effect in the

  5. Diffusion Geometry Unravels the Emergence of Functional Clusters in Collective Phenomena

    De Domenico, Manlio

    2017-04-01

    Collective phenomena emerge from the interaction of natural or artificial units with a complex organization. The interplay between structural patterns and dynamics might induce functional clusters that, in general, are different from topological ones. In biological systems, like the human brain, the overall functionality is often favored by the interplay between connectivity and synchronization dynamics, with functional clusters that do not coincide with anatomical modules in most cases. In social, sociotechnical, and engineering systems, the quest for consensus favors the emergence of clusters. Despite the unquestionable evidence for mesoscale organization of many complex systems and the heterogeneity of their interconnectivity, a way to predict and identify the emergence of functional modules in collective phenomena continues to elude us. Here, we propose an approach based on random walk dynamics to define the diffusion distance between any pair of units in a networked system. Such a metric allows us to exploit the underlying diffusion geometry to provide a unifying framework for the intimate relationship between metastable synchronization, consensus, and random search dynamics in complex networks, pinpointing the functional mesoscale organization of synthetic and biological systems.

  6. Support functions and the integration of set-valued mappings

    Goodman, G.S.

    1976-01-01

    l. Definition of support functions; 2. Characteristic properties of support functions; 3. Examples of support functions; 4. Directional derivatives of support functions; 5. Further properties of h(y*; x*); 6. Extremal faces and their support functions; 7. The fundamental equations in Rsup(n); 8. Consequences of the fundamental equations in Rsup(n); 9. Extreme points; 10. Theorem of Kudo; 11. Comments on Kudo's theorem. (author)

  7. On the Averaging of Cardiac Diffusion Tensor MRI Data: The Effect of Distance Function Selection

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) Metrics were judged by quantitative –rather than qualitative– criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the “swelling effect” occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration. PMID:27754986

  8. On the averaging of cardiac diffusion tensor MRI data: the effect of distance function selection

    Giannakidis, Archontis; Melkus, Gerd; Yang, Guang; Gullberg, Grant T.

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI) allows a unique insight into the microstructure of highly-directional tissues. The selection of the most proper distance function for the space of diffusion tensors is crucial in enhancing the clinical application of this imaging modality. Both linear and nonlinear metrics have been proposed in the literature over the years. The debate on the most appropriate DT-MRI distance function is still ongoing. In this paper, we presented a framework to compare the Euclidean, affine-invariant Riemannian and log-Euclidean metrics using actual high-resolution DT-MRI rat heart data. We employed temporal averaging at the diffusion tensor level of three consecutive and identically-acquired DT-MRI datasets from each of five rat hearts as a means to rectify the background noise-induced loss of myocyte directional regularity. This procedure is applied here for the first time in the context of tensor distance function selection. When compared with previous studies that used a different concrete application to juxtapose the various DT-MRI distance functions, this work is unique in that it combined the following: (i) metrics were judged by quantitative—rather than qualitative—criteria, (ii) the comparison tools were non-biased, (iii) a longitudinal comparison operation was used on a same-voxel basis. The statistical analyses of the comparison showed that the three DT-MRI distance functions tend to provide equivalent results. Hence, we came to the conclusion that the tensor manifold for cardiac DT-MRI studies is a curved space of almost zero curvature. The signal to noise ratio dependence of the operations was investigated through simulations. Finally, the ‘swelling effect’ occurrence following Euclidean averaging was found to be too unimportant to be worth consideration.

  9. A new diffusion nodal method based on analytic basis function expansion

    Noh, J.M.; Cho, N.Z.

    1993-01-01

    The transverse integration procedure commonly used in most advanced nodal methods results in some limitations. The first is that the transverse leakage term that appears in the transverse integration procedure must be appropriately approximated. In most advanced nodal methods, this term is expanded in a quadratic polynomial. The second arises when reconstructing the pinwise flux distribution within a node. The available one-dimensional flux shapes from nodal calculation in each spatial direction cannot be used directly in the flux reconstruction. Finally, the transverse leakage defined for a hexagonal node becomes so complicated as not to be easily handled and contains nonphysical singular terms. In this paper, a new nodal method called the analytic function expansion nodal (AFEN) method is described for both the rectangular geometry and the hexagonal geometry in order to overcome these limitations. This method does not solve the transverse-integrated one-dimensional diffusion equations but instead solves directly the original multidimensional diffusion equation within a node. This is a accomplished by expanding the solution (or the intranodal homogeneous flux distribution) in terms of nonseparable analytic basis functions satisfying the diffusion equation at any point in the node

  10. FADTTSter: accelerating hypothesis testing with functional analysis of diffusion tensor tract statistics

    Noel, Jean; Prieto, Juan C.; Styner, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Functional Analysis of Diffusion Tensor Tract Statistics (FADTTS) is a toolbox for analysis of white matter (WM) fiber tracts. It allows associating diffusion properties along major WM bundles with a set of covariates of interest, such as age, diagnostic status and gender, and the structure of the variability of these WM tract properties. However, to use this toolbox, a user must have an intermediate knowledge in scripting languages (MATLAB). FADTTSter was created to overcome this issue and make the statistical analysis accessible to any non-technical researcher. FADTTSter is actively being used by researchers at the University of North Carolina. FADTTSter guides non-technical users through a series of steps including quality control of subjects and fibers in order to setup the necessary parameters to run FADTTS. Additionally, FADTTSter implements interactive charts for FADTTS' outputs. This interactive chart enhances the researcher experience and facilitates the analysis of the results. FADTTSter's motivation is to improve usability and provide a new analysis tool to the community that complements FADTTS. Ultimately, by enabling FADTTS to a broader audience, FADTTSter seeks to accelerate hypothesis testing in neuroimaging studies involving heterogeneous clinical data and diffusion tensor imaging. This work is submitted to the Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging conference. The source code of this application is available in NITRC.

  11. Static Mapping of Functional Programs: An Example in Signal Processing

    Jack B. Dennis

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Complex signal-processing problems are naturally described by compositions of program modules that process streams of data. In this article we discuss how such compositions may be analyzed and mapped onto multiprocessor computers to effectively exploit the massive parallelism of these applications. The methods are illustrated with an example of signal processing for an optical surveillance problem. Program transformation and analysis are used to construct a program description tree that represents the given computation as an acyclic interconnection of stream-processing modules. Each module may be mapped to a set of threads run on a group of processing elements of a target multiprocessor. Performance is considered for two forms of multiprocessor architecture, one based on conventional DSP technology and the other on a multithreaded-processing element design.

  12. Local thermodynamic mapping for effective liquid density-functional theory

    Kyrlidis, Agathagelos; Brown, Robert A.

    1992-01-01

    The structural-mapping approximation introduced by Lutsko and Baus (1990) in the generalized effective-liquid approximation is extended to include a local thermodynamic mapping based on a spatially dependent effective density for approximating the solid phase in terms of the uniform liquid. This latter approximation, called the local generalized effective-liquid approximation (LGELA) yields excellent predictions for the free energy of hard-sphere solids and for the conditions of coexistence of a hard-sphere fcc solid with a liquid. Moreover, the predicted free energy remains single valued for calculations with more loosely packed crystalline structures, such as the diamond lattice. The spatial dependence of the weighted density makes the LGELA useful in the study of inhomogeneous solids.

  13. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Morioka, T.; Fujii, K.; Fukui, M.; Mizushima, A.; Matsumoto, S.; Hasuo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Tobimatsu, S.

    1995-01-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  14. Functional mapping of the sensorimotor cortex: combined use of magnetoencephalography, functional MRI, and motor evoked potentials

    Morioka, T. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fujii, K. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Fukui, M. [Dept. of Neurosurgery, Neurological Inst., Kyshu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Mizushima, A. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Matsumoto, S. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Hasuo, K. [Dept. of Radiology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Yamamoto, T. [Dept. of Otolaryngology, Kyushu Univ. Fukuoka (Japan); Tobimatsu, S. [Dept. of Clinical Neurophysiology, Neurological Inst., Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan)

    1995-10-01

    Combined use of magnetoencephalography (MEG), functional magnetic resonance imaging (f-MRI), and motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was carried out on one patient in an attempt to localise precisely a structural lesion to the central sulcus. A small cyst in the right frontoparietal region was thought to be the cause of generalised seizures in an otherwise asymptomatic woman. First the primary sensory cortex was identified with magnetic source imaging (MSI) of somatosensory evoked magnetic fields using MEG and MRI. Second, the motor area of the hand was identified using f-MRI during handsqueezing. Then transcranial magnetic stimulation localised the hand motor area on the scalp, which was mapped onto the MRI. There was a good agreement between MSI, f-MRI and MEP as to the location of the sensorimotor cortex and its relationship to the lesion. Multimodality mapping techniques may thus prove useful in the precise localisation of cortical lesions, and in the preoperative determination of the best treatment for peri-rolandic lesions. (orig.)

  15. Mapping momentum-dependent electron-phonon coupling and nonequilibrium phonon dynamics with ultrafast electron diffuse scattering

    Stern, Mark J.; René de Cotret, Laurent P.; Otto, Martin R.; Chatelain, Robert P.; Boisvert, Jean-Philippe; Sutton, Mark; Siwick, Bradley J.

    2018-04-01

    Despite their fundamental role in determining material properties, detailed momentum-dependent information on the strength of electron-phonon and phonon-phonon coupling (EPC and PPC, respectively) across the entire Brillouin zone has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate that ultrafast electron diffuse scattering (UEDS) directly provides such information. By exploiting symmetry-based selection rules and time resolution, scattering from different phonon branches can be distinguished even without energy resolution. Using graphite as a model system, we show that UEDS patterns map the relative EPC and PPC strength through their profound sensitivity to photoinduced changes in phonon populations. We measure strong EPC to the K -point TO phonon of A1' symmetry (K -A1' ) and along the entire TO branch between Γ -K , not only to the Γ -E2 g phonon. We also determine that the subsequent phonon relaxation of these strongly coupled optical phonons involve three stages: decay via several identifiable channels to TA and LA phonons (1 -2 ps), intraband thermalization of the non-equilibrium TA/LA phonon populations (30 -40 ps) and interband relaxation of the TA/LA modes (115 ps). Combining UEDS with ultrafast angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy will yield a complete picture of the dynamics within and between electron and phonon subsystems, helping to unravel complex phases in which the intertwined nature of these systems has a strong influence on emergent properties.

  16. Diffusion trajectory of self-propagating innovations interacting with institutions-incorporation of multi-factors learning function to model PV diffusion in Japan

    Nagamatsu, Akira; Watanabe, Chihiro; Shum, Kwok L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper first proposes a modeling framework to study diffusion of innovations which exhibit strong interaction with the institution systems across which they diffuse. A unique character of such generic innovation is that specific applications are continually developed during its diffusion. This self-propagation in continual applications generation, which is dependent upon the cumulative installed base of the technological innovation, can be modeled to lead to a dynamic changing carrying capacity in an otherwise simple logistic diffusion curve. The cumulative installed base is dependent upon the price of technology and the cost learning dynamics. This paper utilizes a multi-factors learning function to represent such learning dynamics. Empirical estimates from our model are compared with those from other logistics curve formulations and are shown to better fit the annual PV production data during the past quarter century in the case of Japan. The very fact that the potential of this class of innovation can be leveraged only if it interacts closely with the institution highlights the importance of institutional determinants of adoption and diffusion of such innovations like PV. We therefore attempt to put forward an institutional framework, based on viewing PV as a technology platform, to consider PV diffusion beyond mathematical and empirical modeling. Some future research directions are also proposed. (author)

  17. The development and mapping of functional markers in Fragaria and their transferability and potential for mapping in other genera.

    Sargent, D J; Rys, A; Nier, S; Simpson, D W; Tobutt, K R

    2007-01-01

    We have developed 46 primer pairs from exon sequences flanking polymorphic introns of 23 Fragaria gene sequences and one Malus sequence deposited in the EMBL database. Sequencing of a set of the PCR products amplified with the novel primer pairs in diploid Fragaria showed the products to be homologous to the sequences from which the primers were originally designed. By scoring the segregation of the 24 genes in two diploid Fragaria progenies FV x FN (F. vesca x F. nubicola F(2)) and 815 x 903BC (F. vesca x F. viridis BC(1)) 29 genetic loci at discrete positions on the seven linkage groups previously characterised could be mapped, bringing to 35 the total number of known function genes mapped in Fragaria. Twenty primer pairs, representing 14 genes, amplified a product of the expected size in both Malus and Prunus. To demonstrate the applicability of these gene-specific loci to comparative mapping in Rosaceae, five markers that displayed clear polymorphism between the parents of a Malus and a Prunus mapping population were selected. The markers were then scored and mapped in at least one of the two additional progenies.

  18. Spectral function and quark diffusion constant in non-critical holographic QCD

    Bu Yanyan, E-mail: yybu@itp.ac.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100190 (China); Yang Jinmin, E-mail: jmyang@itp.ac.cn [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Academia Sinica, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2012-02-11

    Motivated by recent studies of intersecting D-brane systems in critical string theory and phenomenological AdS/QCD models, we present a detailed analysis for the vector and scalar fluctuations in a non-critical holographic QCD model in the high temperature phase, i.e., the chiral symmetric phase. This model is described by N{sub f} pairs of D4 and D4{sup Macron} probe branes in a non-critical AdS{sub 6} black hole background. Focusing on the hydrodynamic as well as the high frequency limit, we analytically obtain spectral functions for vector and scalar modes on the flavor probe. Then we extract the light quark diffusion constant for flavor current using three different methods and find that different methods give the same results. We also compute the heavy quark diffusion constant for comparison with the light quark case.

  19. Functional and morphological changes in the pharynx in achalasia and in diffuse esophageal spasm

    Hannig, C.; Wuttge-Hannig, A.; Amon, K.; Feussner, H.

    1989-08-01

    Since the pharynx and the esophagus are a functional unit, functional radiodiagnosis has to be directed at pharyngo-esophageal interaction. Among our collective of 73 patients suffering from achalasia or diffuse esophageal spasm, we were able to recognize a substantially increased incidence of morphological or functional pharyngeal disorders by means of cineradiography. The functional alterations in particular were often not revealed by conventional fluoroscopy. High-speed cineradiography, with its high temporal and spatial resolution, turned out to be a valuable tool in analysis of the origin of pharyngeal dysphagia. Manometry correlated very well with the radiologic findings in tubular esophagus, but proved unreliable in the detection of alterations of the upper esophageal sphincter region, because of problems inherent in the method. Furthermore, membranous stenosis (webs), lateral or dorsal diverticula, and asymmetry of the pharynx were observed strikingly often. (orig.).

  20. Prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function using diffusion tensor tractography in acute hemiparetic stroke patients.

    Imura, Takeshi; Nagasawa, Yuki; Inagawa, Tetsuji; Imada, Naoki; Izumi, Hiroaki; Emoto, Katsuya; Tani, Itaru; Yamasaki, Hiroyuki; Ota, Yuichiro; Oki, Shuichi; Maeda, Tadanori; Araki, Osamu

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The efficacy of diffusion tensor imaging in the prediction of motor outcomes and activities of daily living function remains unclear. We evaluated the most appropriate diffusion tensor parameters and methodology to determine whether the region of interest- or tractography-based method was more useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Diffusion tensor imaging data within 10 days after stroke onset were collected and analyzed for 25 patients. The corticospinal tract was analyzed. Fractional anisotropy, number of fibers, and apparent diffusion coefficient were used as diffusion tensor parameters. Motor outcomes and activities of daily living function were evaluated on the same day as diffusion tensor imaging and at 1 month post-onset. [Results] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract significantly correlated with the motor outcome and activities of daily living function within 10 days post-onset and at 1 month post-onset. Tthere were no significant correlations between other diffusion tensor parameters and motor outcomes or activities of daily living function. [Conclusion] The fractional anisotropy value of the affected corticospinal tract obtained using the tractography-based method was useful for predicting motor outcomes and activities of daily living function in stroke patients.

  1. Comparative mapping reveals similar linkage of functional genes to ...

    genes between O. sativa and B. napus may have consistent function and control similar traits, which may be ..... acea chromosomes reveals islands of conserved organization. ... 1998 Conserved structure and function of the Arabidopsis flow-.

  2. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    Radiolytic species are formed approximately 1 ps after the passage of ionizing radiation through matter. After their formation, they diffuse and chemically react with other radiolytic species and neighboring biological molecules, leading to various oxidative damage. Therefore, the simulation of radiation chemistry is of considerable importance to understand how radiolytic species damage biological molecules [1]. The step-by-step simulation of chemical reactions is difficult, because the radiolytic species are distributed non-homogeneously in the medium. Consequently, computational approaches based on Green functions for diffusion-influenced reactions should be used [2]. Recently, Green functions for more complex type of reactions have been published [3-4]. We have developed exact random variate generators of these Green functions [5], which will allow us to use them in radiation chemistry codes. Moreover, simulating chemistry using the Green functions is which is computationally very demanding, because the probabilities of reactions between each pair of particles should be evaluated at each timestep [2]. This kind of problem is well adapted for General Purpose Graphic Processing Units (GPGPU), which can handle a large number of similar calculations simultaneously. These new developments will allow us to include more complex reactions in chemistry codes, and to improve the calculation time. This code should be of importance to link radiation track structure simulations and DNA damage models.

  3. Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging and direct electrical stimulation - brain mapping methods

    Minkin, K.; Tanova, R.; Busarski, A.; Penkov, M.; Penev, L.; Hadjidekov, V.

    2009-01-01

    Modern neurosurgery requires accurate preoperative and intraoperative localization of brain pathologies but also of brain functions. The presence of individual variations in healthy subjects and the shift of brain functions in brain diseases provoke the introduction of various methods for brain mapping. The aim of this paper was to analyze the most widespread methods for brain mapping: Wada-test, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and intraoperative direct electrical stimulation (DES). This study included 4 patients with preoperative brain mapping using Wada-test and fMRI. Intraoperative mapping with DES during awake craniotomy was performed in one case. The histopathological diagnosis was low-grade glioma in 2 cases, cortical dysplasia (1 patient) and arteriovenous malformation (1 patient). The brain mapping permits total lesion resection in three of four patients. There was no new postoperative deficit despite surgery near or within functional brain areas. Brain plasticity provoking shift of eloquent areas from their usual locations was observed in two cases. The brain mapping methods allow surgery in eloquent brain areas recognized in the past as 'forbidden areas'. Each method has advantages and disadvantages. The precise location of brain functions and pathologies frequently requires combination of different brain mapping methods. (authors)

  4. A global genetic interaction network maps a wiring diagram of cellular function.

    Costanzo, Michael; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Koch, Elizabeth N; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Pons, Carles; Tan, Guihong; Wang, Wen; Usaj, Matej; Hanchard, Julia; Lee, Susan D; Pelechano, Vicent; Styles, Erin B; Billmann, Maximilian; van Leeuwen, Jolanda; van Dyk, Nydia; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Kuzmin, Elena; Nelson, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S; Srikumar, Tharan; Bahr, Sondra; Chen, Yiqun; Deshpande, Raamesh; Kurat, Christoph F; Li, Sheena C; Li, Zhijian; Usaj, Mojca Mattiazzi; Okada, Hiroki; Pascoe, Natasha; San Luis, Bryan-Joseph; Sharifpoor, Sara; Shuteriqi, Emira; Simpkins, Scott W; Snider, Jamie; Suresh, Harsha Garadi; Tan, Yizhao; Zhu, Hongwei; Malod-Dognin, Noel; Janjic, Vuk; Przulj, Natasa; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Stagljar, Igor; Xia, Tian; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian; Boutros, Michael; Steinmetz, Lars M; Moore, Claire L; Rosebrock, Adam P; Caudy, Amy A; Myers, Chad L; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2016-09-23

    We generated a global genetic interaction network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, constructing more than 23 million double mutants, identifying about 550,000 negative and about 350,000 positive genetic interactions. This comprehensive network maps genetic interactions for essential gene pairs, highlighting essential genes as densely connected hubs. Genetic interaction profiles enabled assembly of a hierarchical model of cell function, including modules corresponding to protein complexes and pathways, biological processes, and cellular compartments. Negative interactions connected functionally related genes, mapped core bioprocesses, and identified pleiotropic genes, whereas positive interactions often mapped general regulatory connections among gene pairs, rather than shared functionality. The global network illustrates how coherent sets of genetic interactions connect protein complex and pathway modules to map a functional wiring diagram of the cell. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Empirical evaluation of mapping functions for navigation in virtual reality using phones with integrated sensors

    Benzina, Amal; Dey, Arindam; Toennis, Marcus; Klinker, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    interaction technique (separability). This paper examines, how many DOF are needed to perform the travel task as easy and comfortable as possible. It also investigates different mapping functions between the user's actions on the mobile phone and the viewpoint

  6. A global interaction network maps a wiring diagram of cellular function

    Costanzo, Michael; VanderSluis, Benjamin; Koch, Elizabeth N.; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Pons, Carles; Tan, Guihong; Wang, Wen; Usaj, Matej; Hanchard, Julia; Lee, Susan D.; Pelechano, Vicent; Styles, Erin B.; Billmann, Maximilian; van Leeuwen, Jolanda; van Dyk, Nydia; Lin, Zhen-Yuan; Kuzmin, Elena; Nelson, Justin; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Srikumar, Tharan; Bahr, Sondra; Chen, Yiqun; Deshpande, Raamesh; Kurat, Christoph F.; Li, Sheena C.; Li, Zhijian; Usaj, Mojca Mattiazzi; Okada, Hiroki; Pascoe, Natasha; Luis, Bryan-Joseph San; Sharifpoor, Sara; Shuteriqi, Emira; Simpkins, Scott W.; Snider, Jamie; Suresh, Harsha Garadi; Tan, Yizhao; Zhu, Hongwei; Malod-Dognin, Noel; Janjic, Vuk; Przulj, Natasa; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Stagljar, Igor; Xia, Tian; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Raught, Brian; Boutros, Michael; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Moore, Claire L.; Rosebrock, Adam P.; Caudy, Amy A.; Myers, Chad L.; Andrews, Brenda; Boone, Charles

    2017-01-01

    We generated a global genetic interaction network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, constructing over 23 million double mutants, identifying ~550,000 negative and ~350,000 positive genetic interactions. This comprehensive network maps genetic interactions for essential gene pairs, highlighting essential genes as densely connected hubs. Genetic interaction profiles enabled assembly of a hierarchical model of cell function, including modules corresponding to protein complexes and pathways, biological processes, and cellular compartments. Negative interactions connected functionally related genes, mapped core bioprocesses, and identified pleiotropic genes, whereas positive interactions often mapped general regulatory connections among gene pairs, rather than shared functionality. The global network illustrates how coherent sets of genetic interactions connect protein complex and pathway modules to map a functional wiring diagram of the cell. PMID:27708008

  7. Pyridine adsorption and diffusion on Pt(111) investigated with density functional theory

    Kolsbjerg, Esben L.; Groves, Michael N.; Hammer, Bjørk

    2016-01-01

    The adsorption, diffusion, and dissociation of pyridine, C 5 H 5 N, on Pt(111) are investigated with van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. An elaborate search for local minima in the adsorption potential energy landscape reveals that the intact pyridine adsorbs with the aromatic ring parallel to the surface. Piecewise interconnections of the local minima in the energy landscape reveal that the most favourable diffusion path for pyridine has a barrier of 0.53 eV. In the preferred path, the pyridine remains parallel to the surface while performing small single rotational steps with a carbon-carbon double bond hinged above a single Pt atom. The origin of the diffusion pathway is discussed in terms of the C 2 –Pt π-bond being stronger than the corresponding CN–Pt π-bond. The energy barrier and reaction enthalpy for dehydrogenation of adsorbed pyridine into an adsorbed, upright bound α-pyridyl species are calculated to 0.71 eV and 0.18 eV, respectively (both zero-point energy corrected). The calculations are used to rationalize previous experimental observations from the literature for pyridine on Pt(111).

  8. Diffusion of hydrogen into and through γ-iron by density functional theory

    Chohan, Urslaan K.; Koehler, Sven P. K.; Jimenez-Melero, Enrique

    2018-06-01

    This study is concerned with the early stages of hydrogen embrittlement on an atomistic scale. We employed density functional theory to investigate hydrogen diffusion through the (100), (110) and (111) surfaces of γ-Fe. The preferred adsorption sites and respective energies for hydrogen adsorption were established for each plane, as well as a minimum energy pathway for diffusion. The H atoms adsorb on the (100), (110) and (111) surfaces with energies of ∼4.06 eV, ∼3.92 eV and ∼4.05 eV, respectively. The barriers for bulk-like diffusion for the (100), (110) and (111) surfaces are ∼0.6 eV, ∼0.5 eV and ∼0.7 eV, respectively. We compared these calculated barriers with previously obtained experimental data in an Arrhenius plot, which indicates good agreement between experimentally measured and theoretically predicted activation energies. Texturing austenitic steels such that the (111) surfaces of grains are preferentially exposed at the cleavage planes may be a possibility to reduce hydrogen embrittlement.

  9. Mapping the game landscape: Locating genres using functional classification

    Dahlskog, Steve; Kamstrup, Andreas; Aarseth, Espen J.

    2009-01-01

    Are typical computer game genres still valid descriptors and useful for describing game structure and game content? Games have changed from simple to complex and from single function to multi function. By identifying structural differences in game elements we develop a more nuanced model to categ......Are typical computer game genres still valid descriptors and useful for describing game structure and game content? Games have changed from simple to complex and from single function to multi function. By identifying structural differences in game elements we develop a more nuanced model...

  10. Density functional theory prediction for diffusion of lithium on boron-doped graphene surface

    Gao Shuanghong; Ren Zhaoyu; Wan Lijuan; Zheng Jiming; Guo Ping; Zhou Yixuan

    2011-01-01

    The density functional theory (DFT) investigation shows that graphene has changed from semimetal to semiconductor with the increasing number of doped boron atoms. Lithium and boron atoms acted as charge contributors and recipients, which attracted to each other. Further investigations show that, the potential barrier for lithium diffusion on boron-doped graphene is higher than that of intrinsic graphene. The potential barrier is up to 0.22 eV when six boron atoms doped (B 6 C 26 ), which is the lowest potential barrier in all the doped graphene. The potential barrier is dramatically affected by the surface structure of graphene.

  11. Stability in a diffusive food chain model with Michaelis-Menten functional response

    Lin, Zhigui; Pedersen, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with the behavior of positive solutions to a reaction-diffusion system with homogeneous Neumann boundary conditions describing a three species food chain. A sufficient condition for the local asymptotical stability is given by linearization and also a sufficient condition...... for the global asymptotical stability is given by a Lyapunov function. Our result shows that the equilibrium solution is globally asymptotically stable if the net birth rate of the first species is big enough and the net death rate of the third species is neither too big nor too small. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All...

  12. The relationship between functional magnetic resonance imaging activation, diffusion tensor imaging, and training effects.

    Farrar, Danielle; Budson, Andrew E

    2017-04-01

    While the relationship between diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measurements and training effects is explored by Voelker et al. (this issue), a cursory discussion of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measurements categorizes increased activation with findings of greater white matter integrity. Evidence of the relationship between fMRI activation and white matter integrity is conflicting, as is the relationship between fMRI activation and training effects. An examination of the changes in fMRI activation in response to training is helpful, but the relationship between DTI and fMRI activation, particularly in the context of white matter changes, must be examined further before general conclusions can be drawn.

  13. VMF3/GPT3: refined discrete and empirical troposphere mapping functions

    Landskron, Daniel; Böhm, Johannes

    2018-04-01

    Incorrect modeling of troposphere delays is one of the major error sources for space geodetic techniques such as Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) or Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). Over the years, many approaches have been devised which aim at mapping the delay of radio waves from zenith direction down to the observed elevation angle, so-called mapping functions. This paper contains a new approach intended to refine the currently most important discrete mapping function, the Vienna Mapping Functions 1 (VMF1), which is successively referred to as Vienna Mapping Functions 3 (VMF3). It is designed in such a way as to eliminate shortcomings in the empirical coefficients b and c and in the tuning for the specific elevation angle of 3°. Ray-traced delays of the ray-tracer RADIATE serve as the basis for the calculation of new mapping function coefficients. Comparisons of modeled slant delays demonstrate the ability of VMF3 to approximate the underlying ray-traced delays more accurately than VMF1 does, in particular at low elevation angles. In other words, when requiring highest precision, VMF3 is to be preferable to VMF1. Aside from revising the discrete form of mapping functions, we also present a new empirical model named Global Pressure and Temperature 3 (GPT3) on a 5°× 5° as well as a 1°× 1° global grid, which is generally based on the same data. Its main components are hydrostatic and wet empirical mapping function coefficients derived from special averaging techniques of the respective (discrete) VMF3 data. In addition, GPT3 also contains a set of meteorological quantities which are adopted as they stand from their predecessor, Global Pressure and Temperature 2 wet. Thus, GPT3 represents a very comprehensive troposphere model which can be used for a series of geodetic as well as meteorological and climatological purposes and is fully consistent with VMF3.

  14. Enough positive rate of paraspinal mapping and diffusion tensor imaging with levels which should be decompressed in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Chen, Hua-Biao; Zhong, Zhi-Wei; Li, Chun-Sheng; Bai, Bo

    2016-07-01

    In lumbar spinal stenosis, correlating symptoms and physical examination findings with decompression levels based on common imaging is not reliable. Paraspinal mapping (PM) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) may be possible to prevent the false positive occurrences with MRI and show clear benefits to reduce the decompression levels of lumbar spinal stenosis than conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) + neurogenic examination (NE). However, they must have enough positive rate with levels which should be decompressed at first. The study aimed to confirm that the positive of DTI and PM is enough in levels which should be decompressed in lumbar spinal stenosis. The study analyzed the positive of DTI and PM as well as compared the preoperation scores to the postoperation scores, which were assessed preoperatively and at 2 weeks, 3 months 6 months, and 12 months postoperatively. 96 patients underwent the single level decompression surgery. The positive rate among PM, DTI, and (PM or DTI) was 76%, 98%, 100%, respectively. All post-operative Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), visual analog scale for back pain (VAS-BP) and visual analog scale for leg pain (VAS-LP) scores at 2 weeks postoperatively were measured improvement than the preoperative ODI, VAS-BP and VAS-LP scores with statistically significance (p-value = 0.000, p-value = 0.000, p-value = 0.000, respectively). In degenetive lumbar spinal stenosis, the positive rate of (DTI or PM) is enough in levels which should be decompressed, thence using the PM and DTI to determine decompression levels will not miss the level which should be operated. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Concepts of soil mapping as a basis for the assessment of soil functions

    Baumgarten, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Soil mapping systems in Europe have been designed mainly as a tool for the description of soil characteristics from a morphogenetic viewpoint. Contrasting to the American or FAO system, the soil development has been in the main focus of European systems. Nevertheless , recent developments in soil science stress the importance of the functions of soils with respect to the ecosystems. As soil mapping systems usually offer a sound and extensive database, the deduction of soil functions from "classic" mapping parameters can be used for local and regional assessments. According to the used pedo-transfer functions and mapping systems, tailored approaches can be chosen for different applications. In Austria, a system mainly for spatial planning purposes has been developed that will be presented and illustrated by means of best practice examples.

  16. Diffusion and ADC-map images detect ongoing demyelination on subcortical white matter in an adult metachromatic leukodystrophy patient with autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis

    Miura, Akiko; Kumabe, Yuri; Kimura, En; Yamashita, Satoshi; Ueda, Akihiko; Hirano, Teruyuki; Uchino, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Adult-onset metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) often shows schizophrenia- or encephalopathy-like symptoms at an early stage, such as behavioural abnormalities, cognitive impairment, mood disorders and hallucinations. The authors report the case of an adult woman with MLD who had been given antipsychotic medication for schizophrenia. In the differential diagnosis, screening of auto-antibodies was important for ruling out other encephalopathies as she had a euthyroid Hashimoto thyroiditis. Diagnosis was based the results of MRI, nerve conduction velocity, sensory evoked potential, motor evoked potential, lysosomal enzyme activity and gene analysis studies. Brain MRI showed diffuse demyelination spreading from the deep white matter to subcortical area as high signals at the edges of these lesions in diffusion and apparent diffusion coefficient-map images with the U-fibres conserved. The authors diagnosed adult-onset MLD coexisting with euthyroid autoimmune Hashimoto thyroiditis. PMID:22798296

  17. Calibrated work function mapping by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    Fernández Garrillo, Pablo A.; Grévin, Benjamin; Chevalier, Nicolas; Borowik, Łukasz

    2018-04-01

    We propose and demonstrate the implementation of an alternative work function tip calibration procedure for Kelvin probe force microscopy under ultrahigh vacuum, using monocrystalline metallic materials with known crystallographic orientation as reference samples, instead of the often used highly oriented pyrolytic graphite calibration sample. The implementation of this protocol allows the acquisition of absolute and reproducible work function values, with an improved uncertainty with respect to unprepared highly oriented pyrolytic graphite-based protocols. The developed protocol allows the local investigation of absolute work function values over nanostructured samples and can be implemented in electronic structures and devices characterization as demonstrated over a nanostructured semiconductor sample presenting Al0.7Ga0.3As and GaAs layers with variable thickness. Additionally, using our protocol we find that the work function of annealed highly oriented pyrolytic graphite is equal to 4.6 ± 0.03 eV.

  18. Rapid mapping of protein functional epitopes by combinatorial alanine scanning

    Weiss, GA; Watanabe, CK; Zhong, A; Goddard, A; Sidhu, SS

    2000-01-01

    A combinatorial alanine-scanning strategy was used to determine simultaneously the functional contributions of 19 side chains buried at the interface between human growth hormone and the extracellular domain of its receptor. A phage-displayed protein library was constructed in which the 19 side chains were preferentially allowed to vary only as the wild type or alanine. The library pool was subjected to binding selections to isolate functional clones, and DNA sequencing was used to determine ...

  19. The diffusion coefficient as a function of energy for usual moderators; Le coefficient de diffusion en fonction de l'energie des thermaliseurs usuels

    Cadilhac, M; Livolant, M; Pillard, D; Soule, J -L [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1966-07-01

    After a review of the definition of the energy function to be taken for the diffusion coefficient used in calculations of reactor cells, in the elementary theory of diffusion, various possible approximations of this function are given. These approximations are shown to be accurate enough for practical uses. Methods for the direct calculations of these approximations for the currently used 'normal' models (methods avoiding the calculation of differential cross sections) are described; these methods are applied to several usual moderators at various temperatures according to different models. (authors) [French] On rappelle la definition de la fonction de l'energie que l'on doit prendre pour le coefficient de diffusion dans les calculs de cellule de reacteur en theorie elementaire de la diffusion. Puis on indique diverses approximations possibles de cette fonction. On montre que ces approximations ont en pratique une precision suffisante. Enfin on decrit des methodes de calcul direct de ces approximations pour les modeles 'normaux' couramment employes (methodes qui evitent d'avoir a calculer les sections efficaces differentielles), et on les applique a plusieurs thermaliseurs usuels a differentes temperatures (selon differents modeles). (auteurs)

  20. Mapping the Mayo-Portland adaptability inventory to the international classification of functioning, disability and health.

    Lexell, Jan; Malec, James F; Jacobsson, Lars J

    2012-01-01

    To examine the contents of the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Inventory (MPAI-4) by mapping it to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Each of the 30 scoreable items in the MPAI-4 was mapped to the most precise ICF categories. All 30 items could be mapped to components and categories in the ICF. A total of 88 meaningful concepts were identified. There were, on average, 2.9 meaningful concepts per item, and 65% of all concepts could be mapped. Items in the Ability and Adjustment subscales mapped to categories in both the Body Functions and Activity/Participation components of the ICF, whereas all except 1 in the Participation subscale were to categories in the Activity/Participation component. The items could also be mapped to 34 (13%) of the 258 Environmental Factors in the ICF. This mapping provides better definition through more concrete examples (as listed in the ICF) of the types of body functions, activities, and participation indicators that are represented by the 30 scoreable MPAI-4 items. This may assist users throughout the world in understanding the intent of each item, and support further development and the possibility to report results in the form of an ICF categorical profile, making it universally interpretable.

  1. Extraction of thermal Green's function using diffuse fields: a passive approach applied to thermography

    Capriotti, Margherita; Sternini, Simone; Lanza di Scalea, Francesco; Mariani, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    In the field of non-destructive evaluation, defect detection and visualization can be performed exploiting different techniques relying either on an active or a passive approach. In the following paper the passive technique is investigated due to its numerous advantages and its application to thermography is explored. In previous works, it has been shown that it is possible to reconstruct the Green's function between any pair of points of a sensing grid by using noise originated from diffuse fields in acoustic environments. The extraction of the Green's function can be achieved by cross-correlating these random recorded waves. Averaging, filtering and length of the measured signals play an important role in this process. This concept is here applied in an NDE perspective utilizing thermal fluctuations present on structural materials. Temperature variations interacting with thermal properties of the specimen allow for the characterization of the material and its health condition. The exploitation of the thermographic image resolution as a dense grid of sensors constitutes the basic idea underlying passive thermography. Particular attention will be placed on the creation of a proper diffuse thermal field, studying the number, placement and excitation signal of heat sources. Results from numerical simulations will be presented to assess the capabilities and performances of the passive thermal technique devoted to defect detection and imaging of structural components.

  2. Diffusion tensor tractography of language functional areas and fiber pathways in normal human brain

    Sun Xuejin; Dai Jianping; Chen Hongyan; Gao Peiyi; Ai Lin; Tian Shengyong; Pang Ruilin

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the fiber pathways of Broca area to the other functional brain areas with diffusion tensor imaging and fiber tracking. Methods: Conventionality MRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and fiber tracking were performed using 3.0 T MRI in 20 healthy person. The fiber bundles and tracts were analyzed in Broca area and contralateral normal area. Results: The left-side fiber bundles were 428 and the right-side were 416 in B45 area, there were no statistically significant differences between both sides (t=0.216, P>0.05). The left-side fiber bundles were 432 and the right-side were 344 in B44 area,there were statistically significant (t=2.314, P 0.05). Differences of the arcuate fascicule between both sides were not statistically significant (t=-0.465, P>0.05), the mean FA on the left was higher than the right (t=1.912, P<0.05). DTI and fiber tracking exhibited that the fiber bundles from Broca area were distributed superoanteriorly to the lateral foreside of the frontal lobe, lateroinferiorly to the occipital lobe through external capsule, and went down through globus pallidus and internal capsule. Conclusion: The fiber tracts bewteen Broca area and other brain areas were the fundamental structures for performing language function of the human brain. (authors)

  3. Physiologic abnormalities of cardiac function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Steen, V.D.; Uretsky, B.F.; Owens, G.R.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    To investigate cardiopulmonary function in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, we studied 26 patients with maximal exercise and redistribution thallium scans, rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography, pulmonary-function testing, and chest roentgenography. Although only 6 patients had clinical evidence of cardiac involvement, 20 had abnormal thallium scans, including 10 with reversible exercise-induced defects and 18 with fixed defects (8 had both). Seven of the 10 patients who had exercise-induced defects and underwent cardiac catheterization had normal coronary angiograms. Mean resting left ventricular ejection fraction and mean resting right ventricular ejection fraction were lower in patients with post-exercise left ventricular thallium defect scores above the median (59 +/- 13 per cent vs. 69 +/- 6 per cent, and 36 +/- 12 per cent vs. 47 +/- 7 per cent, respectively). The authors conclude that in progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of myocardial perfusion are common and appear to be due to a disturbance of the myocardial microcirculation. Both right and left ventricular dysfunction appear to be related to this circulatory disturbance, suggesting ischemically mediated injury

  4. Towards real-time diffuse optical tomography for imaging brain functions cooperated with Kalman estimator

    Wang, Bingyuan; Zhang, Yao; Liu, Dongyuan; Ding, Xuemei; Dan, Mai; Pan, Tiantian; Wang, Yihan; Li, Jiao; Zhou, Zhongxing; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is a non-invasive neuroimaging method to monitor the cerebral hemodynamic through the optical changes measured at the scalp surface. It has played a more and more important role in psychology and medical imaging communities. Real-time imaging of brain function using NIRS makes it possible to explore some sophisticated human brain functions unexplored before. Kalman estimator has been frequently used in combination with modified Beer-Lamber Law (MBLL) based optical topology (OT), for real-time brain function imaging. However, the spatial resolution of the OT is low, hampering the application of OT in exploring some complicated brain functions. In this paper, we develop a real-time imaging method combining diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and Kalman estimator, much improving the spatial resolution. Instead of only presenting one spatially distributed image indicating the changes of the absorption coefficients at each time point during the recording process, one real-time updated image using the Kalman estimator is provided. Its each voxel represents the amplitude of the hemodynamic response function (HRF) associated with this voxel. We evaluate this method using some simulation experiments, demonstrating that this method can obtain more reliable spatial resolution images. Furthermore, a statistical analysis is also conducted to help to decide whether a voxel in the field of view is activated or not.

  5. Parallel keyed hash function construction based on chaotic maps

    Xiao Di; Liao Xiaofeng; Deng Shaojiang

    2008-01-01

    Recently, a variety of chaos-based hash functions have been proposed. Nevertheless, none of them works efficiently in parallel computing environment. In this Letter, an algorithm for parallel keyed hash function construction is proposed, whose structure can ensure the uniform sensitivity of hash value to the message. By means of the mechanism of both changeable-parameter and self-synchronization, the keystream establishes a close relation with the algorithm key, the content and the order of each message block. The entire message is modulated into the chaotic iteration orbit, and the coarse-graining trajectory is extracted as the hash value. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation indicate that the proposed algorithm can satisfy the performance requirements of hash function. It is simple, efficient, practicable, and reliable. These properties make it a good choice for hash on parallel computing platform

  6. A Visual Interface Diagram For Mapping Functions In Integrated Products

    Ingerslev, Mattias; Oliver Jespersen, Mikkel; Göhler, Simon Moritz

    2015-01-01

    In product development there is a recognized tendency towards increased functionality for each new product generation. This leads to more integrated and complex products, with the risk of development delays and quality issues as a consequence of lacking overview and transparency. The work described...... of visualizing relations between parts and functions in highly integrated mechanical products. The result is an interface diagram that supports design teams in communication, decision making and design management. The diagram gives the designer an overview of the couplings and dependencies within a product...... in this article has been conducted in collaboration with Novo Nordisk on the insulin injection device FlexTouch® as case product. The FlexTouch® reflects the characteristics of an integrated product with several functions shared between a relatively low number of parts. In this article we present a novel way...

  7. Independent value added by diffusion MRI for prediction of cognitive function in older adults

    Julia A Scott

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether white matter microstructure measured by diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI provides independent information about baseline level or change in executive function (EF or memory (MEM in older adults with and without cognitive impairment. Longitudinal data was acquired from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI study from phases GO and 2 (2009–2015. ADNI participants included were diagnosed as cognitively normal (n = 46, early mild cognitive impairment (MCI (n = 48, late MCI (n = 29, and dementia (n = 39 at baseline. We modeled the association between dMRI-based global white matter mean diffusivity (MD and baseline level and change in EF and MEM composite scores, in models controlling for baseline bilateral hippocampal volume, regional cerebral FDG PET metabolism and global cerebral AV45 PET uptake. EF and MEM composite scores were measured at baseline, 6, 12, 24 and 36 months. In the baseline late MCI and dementia groups, greater global MD was associated with lesser baseline EF, but not EF change nor MEM baseline or change. As expected, lesser hippocampal volume and lesser FDG PET metabolism was associated with greater rates of EF and MEM decline. In ADNI-GO/2 participants, white matter integrity provided independent information about current executive function, but was not sensitive to future cognitive change. Since individuals experiencing executive function declines progress to dementia more rapidly than those with only memory impairment, better biomarkers of future executive function decline are needed.

  8. Utility of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient maps obtained using 3.0T MRI for distinguishing uterine carcinosarcoma from endometrial carcinoma.

    Takahashi, Masahiro; Kozawa, Eito; Tanisaka, Megumi; Hasegawa, Kousei; Yasuda, Masanori; Sakai, Fumikazu

    2016-06-01

    We explored the role of histogram analysis of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps for discriminating uterine carcinosarcoma and endometrial carcinoma. We retrospectively evaluated findings in 13 patients with uterine carcinosarcoma and 50 patients with endometrial carcinoma who underwent diffusion-weighted imaging (b = 0, 500, 1000 s/mm(2) ) at 3T with acquisition of corresponding ADC maps. We derived histogram data from regions of interest drawn on all slices of the ADC maps in which tumor was visualized, excluding areas of necrosis and hemorrhage in the tumor. We used the Mann-Whitney test to evaluate the capacity of histogram parameters (mean ADC value, 5th to 95th percentiles, skewness, kurtosis) to discriminate uterine carcinosarcoma and endometrial carcinoma and analyzed the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to determine the optimum threshold value for each parameter and its corresponding sensitivity and specificity. Carcinosarcomas demonstrated significantly higher mean vales of ADC, 95th, 90th, 75th, 50th, 25th percentiles and kurtosis than endometrial carcinomas (P Histogram analysis of ADC maps might be helpful for discriminating uterine carcinosarcomas and endometrial carcinomas. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:1301-1307. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Mapping Language Function in the Brain: A Review of the Recent Literature.

    Crafton, Robert E.; Kido, Elissa

    2000-01-01

    Considers the potential importance of brain study for composition instruction, briefly describes functional imaging techniques, and reviews the findings of recent brain-mapping studies investigating the neurocognitive systems involved in language function. Presents a review of the recent literature and considers the possible implications of this…

  10. Dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces: A density functional theory study

    Han, Zongying [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Union Research Center of Fuel Cell, School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen, Haipeng [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Zhou, Shixue, E-mail: zhoushixue66@163.com [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China)

    2017-02-01

    Highlights: • Clarify the effect of vacancy defect on H{sub 2} dissociation on Mg (0001) surface. • Demonstrate the effects of vacancy defect on H atom diffusion. • Reveal the minimum energy diffusion path of H atom from magnesium surface into bulk. - Abstract: First-principles calculations with the density functional theory (DFT) have been carried out to study dissociation and diffusion of hydrogen on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces. Results show that energy barriers of 1.42 eV and 1.28 eV require to be overcome for H{sub 2} dissociation on defect-free and vacancy defective Mg (0001) surfaces respectively, indicating that reactivity of Mg (0001) surface is moderately increased due to vacancy defect. Besides, the existence of vacancy defect changes the preferential H atom diffusion entrance to the subsurface and reduces the diffusion energy barrier. An interesting remark is that the minimum energy diffusion path of H atom from magnesium surface into bulk is a spiral channel formed by staggered octahedral and tetrahedral interstitials. The diffusion barriers computed for H atom penetration from the surface into inner-layers are all less than 0.70 eV, which is much smaller than the activation energy for H{sub 2} dissociation on the Mg (0001) surface. This suggests that H{sub 2} dissociation is more likely than H diffusion to be rate-limiting step for magnesium hydrogenation.

  11. Risk predicting of macropore flow using pedotransfer functions, textural maps and modeling

    Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Børgesen, Christen Duus; Lægdsmand, Mette

    2011-01-01

    of this study were first to develop pedotransfer functions (PTFs) predicting near-saturated [k(−1)] and saturated (Ks) hydraulic conductivity using simple soil parameters as predictors and second to use this information and a newly developed rasterbased soil property map of Denmark to identify risk areas...... modeling were used to construct a new map dividing Denmark into risk categories for macropore flow. This map can be combined with other tools to identify areas where there is a high risk of contaminants leaching out of the root zone....

  12. Cognitive functions, electroencephalographic and diffusion tensor imaging changes in children with active idiopathic epilepsy.

    A Yassine, Imane; M Eldeeb, Waleed; A Gad, Khaled; A Ashour, Yossri; A Yassine, Inas; O Hosny, Ahmed

    2018-07-01

    Neurocognitive impairment represents one of the most common comorbidities occurring in children with idiopathic epilepsy. Diagnosis of the idiopathic form of epilepsy requires the absence of any macrostructural abnormality in the conventional MRI. Though changes can be seen at the microstructural level imaged using advanced techniques such as the Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). The aim of this work is to study the correlation between the microstructural white matter DTI findings, the electroencephalographic changes and the cognitive dysfunction in children with active idiopathic epilepsy. A comparative cross-sectional study, included 60 children with epilepsy based on the Stanford-Binet 5th Edition Scores was conducted. Patients were equally assigned to normal cognitive function or cognitive dysfunction groups. The history of the epileptic condition was gathered via personal interviews. All patients underwent brain Electroencephalography (EEG) and DTI, which was analyzed using FSL. The Fractional Anisotropy (FA) was significantly higher whereas the Mean Diffusivity (MD) was significantly lower in the normal cognitive function group than in the cognitive dysfunction group. This altered microstructure was related to the degree of the cognitive performance of the studied children with epilepsy. The microstructural alterations of the neural fibers in children with epilepsy and cognitive dysfunction were significantly related to the younger age of onset of epilepsy, the poor control of the clinical seizures, and the use of multiple antiepileptic medications. Children with epilepsy and normal cognitive functions differ in white matter integrity, measured using DTI, compared with children with cognitive dysfunction. These changes have important cognitive consequences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asymmetric neighborhood functions accelerate ordering process of self-organizing maps

    Ota, Kaiichiro; Aoki, Takaaki; Kurata, Koji; Aoyagi, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    A self-organizing map (SOM) algorithm can generate a topographic map from a high-dimensional stimulus space to a low-dimensional array of units. Because a topographic map preserves neighborhood relationships between the stimuli, the SOM can be applied to certain types of information processing such as data visualization. During the learning process, however, topological defects frequently emerge in the map. The presence of defects tends to drastically slow down the formation of a globally ordered topographic map. To remove such topological defects, it has been reported that an asymmetric neighborhood function is effective, but only in the simple case of mapping one-dimensional stimuli to a chain of units. In this paper, we demonstrate that even when high-dimensional stimuli are used, the asymmetric neighborhood function is effective for both artificial and real-world data. Our results suggest that applying the asymmetric neighborhood function to the SOM algorithm improves the reliability of the algorithm. In addition, it enables processing of complicated, high-dimensional data by using this algorithm.

  14. Characteristics of the probability function for three random-walk models of reaction--diffusion processes

    Musho, M.K.; Kozak, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    A method is presented for calculating exactly the relative width (sigma 2 )/sup 1/2// , the skewness γ 1 , and the kurtosis γ 2 characterizing the probability distribution function for three random-walk models of diffusion-controlled processes. For processes in which a diffusing coreactant A reacts irreversibly with a target molecule B situated at a reaction center, three models are considered. The first is the traditional one of an unbiased, nearest-neighbor random walk on a d-dimensional periodic/confining lattice with traps; the second involves the consideration of unbiased, non-nearest-neigh bor (i.e., variable-step length) walks on the same d-dimensional lattice; and, the third deals with the case of a biased, nearest-neighbor walk on a d-dimensional lattice (wherein a walker experiences a potential centered at the deep trap site of the lattice). Our method, which has been described in detail elsewhere [P.A. Politowicz and J. J. Kozak, Phys. Rev. B 28, 5549 (1983)] is based on the use of group theoretic arguments within the framework of the theory of finite Markov processes

  15. Mapping for the management of diffuse pollution risks related to agricultural plant protection practices: case of the Etang de l'Or catchment area in France.

    Mghirbi, Oussama; Bord, Jean-Paul; Le Grusse, Philippe; Mandart, Elisabeth; Fabre, Jacques

    2018-03-08

    Faced with health, environmental, and socio-economic issues related to the heavy use of pesticides, diffuse phytosanitary pollution becomes a major concern shared by all the field actors. These actors, namely the farmers and territorial managers, have expressed the need to implement decision support tools for the territorial management of diffuse pollution resulting from the plant protection practices and their impacts. To meet these steadily increasing requests, a cartographic analysis approach was implemented based on GIS which allows the spatialization of the diffuse pollution impacts related to plant protection practices on the Etang de l'Or catchment area in the South of France. Risk mapping represents a support-decision tool that enables the different field actors to identify and locate vulnerable areas, so as to determine action plans and agri-environmental measures depending on the context of the natural environment. This work shows that mapping is helpful for managing risks related to the use of pesticides in agriculture by employing indicators of pressure (TFI) and risk on the applicator's health (IRSA) and on the environment (IRTE). These indicators were designed to assess the impact of plant protection practices at various spatial scales (field, farm, etc.). The cartographic analysis of risks related to plant protection practices shows that diffuse pollution is unequally located in the North (known for its abundant garrigues and vineyards) and in the South of the Etang de l'Or catchment area (the Mauguio-Lunel agricultural plain known for its diversified cropping systems). This spatial inequity is essentially related to land use and agricultural production system. Indeed, the agricultural lands cover about 60% of the total catchment area. Consequently, this cartographic analysis helps the territorial actors with the implementation of strategies for managing risks of diffuse pollution related to pesticides use in agriculture, based on environmental and

  16. Pituitary and adrenal involvement in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, with recovery of their function after chemotherapy

    Nakashima, Yasuhiro; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Abe, Ichiro; Matsuda, Yayoi; Miyata, Noriyuki; Ohno, Hirofumi; Ikeda, Motohiko; Matsushima, Takamitsu; Nomura, Masatoshi; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-01

    Background Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma sometimes involves the endocrine organs, but involvement of both the pituitary and adrenal glands is extremely rare. Involvement of these structures can lead to hypopituitarism and adrenal insufficiency, and subsequent recovery of their function is rarely seen. The present report describes an extremely rare case of pituitary and adrenal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma presenting with hypopituitarism and adrenal insufficiency with subsequent recovery of p...

  17. Mittag-Leffler functions as solutions of relaxation-oscillation and diffusion-wave fractional order equation

    Sandev, D. Trivche

    2010-01-01

    The fractional calculus basis, Mittag-Leffler functions, various relaxation-oscillation and diffusion-wave fractional order equation and systems of fractional order equations are considered in this thesis. To solve these fractional order equations analytical methods, such as the Laplace transform method and method of separation of variables are employed. Some applications of the fractional calculus are considered, particularly physical system with anomalous diffusive behavior. (Author)

  18. Functional diffusion map: A noninvasive MRI biomarker for early stratification of clinical brain tumor response

    Moffat, Bradford A.; Chenevert, Thomas L.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Meyer, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy D.; Dong, Qian; Tsien, Christina; Mukherji, Suresh; Quint, Douglas J.; Gebarski, Stephen S.; Robertson, Patricia L.; Junck, Larry R.; Rehemtulla, Alnawaz; Ross, Brian D.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of radiation and chemotherapy efficacy for brain cancer patients is traditionally accomplished by measuring changes in tumor size several months after therapy has been administered. The ability to use noninvasive imaging during the early stages of fractionated therapy to determine whether a particular treatment will be effective would provide an opportunity to optimize individual patient management and avoid unnecessary systemic toxicity, expense, and treatment delays. We investiga...

  19. Effects of degeneracy and response function in a diffusion predator-prey model

    Li, Shanbing; Wu, Jianhua; Dong, Yaying

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we consider positive solutions of a diffusion predator-prey model with a degeneracy under the Dirichlet boundary conditions. We first obtain sufficient conditions of the existence of positive solutions by the Leray-Schauder degree theory, and then analyze the limiting behavior of positive solutions as the growth rate of the predator goes to infinity and the conversion rates of the predator goes to zero, respectively. It is shown that these results for Holling II response function (i.e. m  >  0) reveal interesting contrast with that for the classical Lotka-Volterra predator-prey model (i.e. m  =  0).

  20. Electron Distribution Functions in the Diffusion Region of Asymmetric Magnetic Reconnection

    Bessho, N.; Chen, L.-J.; Hesse, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study electron distribution functions in a diffusion region of antiparallel asymmetric reconnection by means of particle-in-cell simulations and analytical theory. At the electron stagnation point, the electron distribution comprises a crescent-shaped population and a core component. The crescent-shaped distribution is due to electrons coming from the magnetosheath toward the stagnation point and accelerated mainly by electric field normal to the current sheet. Only a part of magnetosheath electrons can reach the stagnation point and form the crescent-shaped distribution that has a boundary of a parabolic curve. The penetration length of magnetosheath electrons into the magnetosphere is derived. We expect that satellite observations can detect crescent-shaped electron distributions during magnetopause reconnection.

  1. Determination of distribution function of refraction index and anion diffusion depth in porous alumina photonic crystals

    H. Kaviani

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available   Band structure of porous alumina photonic crystal in the Γ X direction was calculated using order-N method . In a comparison of calculated results with experimental data of reflective and absorptive index, the variation of refractive index of alumina in the external region of oxide layer, around the pores were studied. A Gaussian distribution function was adopted for phosphate anions in the external oxide layer and the variation of refractive index and diffusion depth were determined. The structure of the first four bands was calculated using the obtained distribution of refractive index in the external oxide layer for both TE and TM mode. This results show a narrow full band gap in the TM mode.

  2. MR velocity mapping measurement of renal artery blood flow in patients with impaired kidney function

    Cortsen, M; Petersen, L.J.; Stahlberg, F

    1996-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) was measured in 9 patients with chronic impaired kidney function using MR velocity mapping and compared to PAH clearance and 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. An image plane suitable for flow measurement perpendicular to the renal arteries was chosen from 2-dimensional MR angiography....... MR velocity mapping was performed in both renal arteries using an ECG-triggered gradient echo pulse sequence previously validated in normal volunteers. Effective renal plasma flow was calculated from the clearance rate of PAH during constant infusion and the split of renal function was evaluated...... by 99mTc-DTPA scintigraphy. A reduction of RBF was found, and there was a significant correlation between PAH clearance multiplied by 1/(1-hematocrit) and RBF determined by MR velocity mapping. Furthermore, a significant correlation between the distribution of renal function and the percent distribution...

  3. Improving the security of a parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps

    Xiao Di, E-mail: xiaodi_cqu@hotmail.co [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Liao Xiaofeng [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang Yong [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)] [College of Economy and Management, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

    2009-11-23

    In this Letter, we analyze the cause of vulnerability of the original parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps in detail, and then propose the corresponding enhancement measures. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation indicate that the modified hash function is more secure than the original one. At the same time, it can keep the parallel merit and satisfy the other performance requirements of hash function.

  4. Improving the security of a parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps

    Xiao Di; Liao Xiaofeng; Wang Yong

    2009-01-01

    In this Letter, we analyze the cause of vulnerability of the original parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps in detail, and then propose the corresponding enhancement measures. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation indicate that the modified hash function is more secure than the original one. At the same time, it can keep the parallel merit and satisfy the other performance requirements of hash function.

  5. Chronic kidney disease: pathological and functional assessment with diffusion tensor imaging at 3T MR

    Liu, Zhiling; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Rong; Zhen, Junhui

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate pathological and functional changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T. There were fifty-one patients with CKD who required biopsy and 19 healthy volunteers who were examined using DTI at 3 T. The mean values of fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained from the renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla). Correlations between imaging results and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage (glomerular lesion and tubulointerstitial injury), were evaluated. The renal cortical FA was significantly lower than the medullary in both normal and affected kidneys (p < 0.001). The parenchymal FA was significantly lower in patients than healthy controls, regardless of whether eGFR was reduced. There were positive correlations between eGFR and FA (cortex, r = 0.689, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = 0.696, p = 0.000), and between eGFR and ADC (cortex, r = 0.310, p = 0.017; and medulla, r = 0.356, p = 0.010). Negative correlations were found between FA and the glomerular lesion (cortex, r = -0.499, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.530, p = 0.000), and between FA and tubulointerstitial injury (cortex, r = -0.631, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.724, p = 0.000). DTI is valuable for noninvasive assessment of renal function and pathology in patients with CKD. A decrease in FA could identify the glomerular lesions, tubulointerstitial injuries, and eGFR. (orig.)

  6. Chronic kidney disease: pathological and functional assessment with diffusion tensor imaging at 3T MR

    Liu, Zhiling; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Shifeng; Yuan, Xianshun; Liu, Qingwei [Shandong University, Department of Radiology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Xu, Ying; Wang, Rong [Shandong University, Department of Nephrology, Provincial Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan (China); Zhen, Junhui [Shandong University, Department of Pathology, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2014-10-11

    Our objective was to evaluate pathological and functional changes in chronic kidney disease (CKD) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) at 3 T. There were fifty-one patients with CKD who required biopsy and 19 healthy volunteers who were examined using DTI at 3 T. The mean values of fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) were obtained from the renal parenchyma (cortex and medulla). Correlations between imaging results and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), as well as pathological damage (glomerular lesion and tubulointerstitial injury), were evaluated. The renal cortical FA was significantly lower than the medullary in both normal and affected kidneys (p < 0.001). The parenchymal FA was significantly lower in patients than healthy controls, regardless of whether eGFR was reduced. There were positive correlations between eGFR and FA (cortex, r = 0.689, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = 0.696, p = 0.000), and between eGFR and ADC (cortex, r = 0.310, p = 0.017; and medulla, r = 0.356, p = 0.010). Negative correlations were found between FA and the glomerular lesion (cortex, r = -0.499, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.530, p = 0.000), and between FA and tubulointerstitial injury (cortex, r = -0.631, p = 0.000; and medulla, r = -0.724, p = 0.000). DTI is valuable for noninvasive assessment of renal function and pathology in patients with CKD. A decrease in FA could identify the glomerular lesions, tubulointerstitial injuries, and eGFR. (orig.)

  7. Green functions and Langevin equations for nonlinear diffusion equations: A comment on ‘Markov processes, Hurst exponents, and nonlinear diffusion equations’ by Bassler et al.

    Frank, T. D.

    2008-02-01

    We discuss two central claims made in the study by Bassler et al. [K.E. Bassler, G.H. Gunaratne, J.L. McCauley, Physica A 369 (2006) 343]. Bassler et al. claimed that Green functions and Langevin equations cannot be defined for nonlinear diffusion equations. In addition, they claimed that nonlinear diffusion equations are linear partial differential equations disguised as nonlinear ones. We review bottom-up and top-down approaches that have been used in the literature to derive Green functions for nonlinear diffusion equations and, in doing so, show that the first claim needs to be revised. We show that the second claim as well needs to be revised. To this end, we point out similarities and differences between non-autonomous linear Fokker-Planck equations and autonomous nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations. In this context, we raise the question whether Bassler et al.’s approach to financial markets is physically plausible because it necessitates the introduction of external traders and causes. Such external entities can easily be eliminated when taking self-organization principles and concepts of nonextensive thermostatistics into account and modeling financial processes by means of nonlinear Fokker-Planck equations.

  8. Resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation for functional mapping after aborted awake craniotomy

    Batra, Prag; Bandt, S. Kathleen; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Awake craniotomy is currently the gold standard for aggressive tumor resections in eloquent cortex. However, a significant subset of patients is unable to tolerate this procedure, particularly the very young or old or those with psychiatric comorbidities, cardiopulmonary comorbidities, or obesity, among other conditions. In these cases, typical alternative procedures include biopsy alone or subtotal resection, both of which are associated with diminished surgical outcomes. Case Description: Here, we report the successful use of a preoperatively obtained resting state functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software in order to perform functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy due to loss of airway. Conclusion: Resting state functional connectivity MRI integrated with intraoperative neuronavigation software can provide an alternative option for functional cortical mapping in the setting of an aborted awake craniotomy. PMID:26958419

  9. Time domain functional NIRS imaging for human brain mapping.

    Torricelli, Alessandro; Contini, Davide; Pifferi, Antonio; Caffini, Matteo; Re, Rebecca; Zucchelli, Lucia; Spinelli, Lorenzo

    2014-01-15

    This review is aimed at presenting the state-of-the-art of time domain (TD) functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). We first introduce the physical principles, the basics of modeling and data analysis. Basic instrumentation components (light sources, detection techniques, and delivery and collection systems) of a TD fNIRS system are described. A survey of past, existing and next generation TD fNIRS systems used for research and clinical studies is presented. Performance assessment of TD fNIRS systems and standardization issues are also discussed. Main strengths and weakness of TD fNIRS are highlighted, also in comparison with continuous wave (CW) fNIRS. Issues like quantification of the hemodynamic response, penetration depth, depth selectivity, spatial resolution and contrast-to-noise ratio are critically examined, with the help of experimental results performed on phantoms or in vivo. Finally we give an account on the technological developments that would pave the way for a broader use of TD fNIRS in the neuroimaging community. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. IClinfMRI Software for Integrating Functional MRI Techniques in Presurgical Mapping and Clinical Studies.

    Hsu, Ai-Ling; Hou, Ping; Johnson, Jason M; Wu, Changwei W; Noll, Kyle R; Prabhu, Sujit S; Ferguson, Sherise D; Kumar, Vinodh A; Schomer, Donald F; Hazle, John D; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Liu, Ho-Ling

    2018-01-01

    Task-evoked and resting-state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques have been applied to the clinical management of neurological diseases, exemplified by presurgical localization of eloquent cortex, to assist neurosurgeons in maximizing resection while preserving brain functions. In addition, recent studies have recommended incorporating cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) imaging into clinical fMRI to evaluate the risk of lesion-induced neurovascular uncoupling (NVU). Although each of these imaging techniques possesses its own advantage for presurgical mapping, a specialized clinical software that integrates the three complementary techniques and promptly outputs the analyzed results to radiology and surgical navigation systems in a clinical format is still lacking. We developed the Integrated fMRI for Clinical Research (IClinfMRI) software to facilitate these needs. Beyond the independent processing of task-fMRI, rs-fMRI, and CVR mapping, IClinfMRI encompasses three unique functions: (1) supporting the interactive rs-fMRI mapping while visualizing task-fMRI results (or results from published meta-analysis) as a guidance map, (2) indicating/visualizing the NVU potential on analyzed fMRI maps, and (3) exporting these advanced mapping results in a Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) format that are ready to export to a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and a surgical navigation system. In summary, IClinfMRI has the merits of efficiently translating and integrating state-of-the-art imaging techniques for presurgical functional mapping and clinical fMRI studies.

  11. Biochar and enhanced phosphate capture: Mapping mechanisms to functional properties.

    Shepherd, Jessica G; Joseph, Stephen; Sohi, Saran P; Heal, Kate V

    2017-07-01

    A multi-technique analysis was performed on a range of biochar materials derived from secondary organic resources and aimed at sustainable recovery and re-use of wastewater phosphorus (P). Our purpose was to identify mechanisms of P capture in biochar and thereby inform its future optimisation as a sustainable P fertiliser. The biochar feedstock comprised pellets of anaerobically digested sewage sludge (PAD) or pellets of the same blended in the ratio 9:1 with ochre sourced from minewater treatment (POCAD), components which have limited alternative economic value. In the present study the feedstocks were pyrolysed at two highest treatment temperatures of 450 and 550 °C. Each of the resulting biochars were repeatedly exposed to a 20 mg l -1 PO 4 -P solution, to produce a parallel set of P-exposed biochars. Biochar exterior and/or interior surfaces were quantitatively characterised using laser-ablation (LA)-ICP-MS, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray. The results highlighted the general importance of Fe minerals in P capture. XPS analysis of POCAD550 indicated lower oxidation state Fe2p3 bonding compared to POCAD450, and LA-ICP-MS indicated stronger covariation of Fe and S, even after P exposure. This suggests that low-solubility Fe/S compounds are formed during pyrolysis, are affected by process parameters and impact on P capture. Other data suggested capture roles for aluminium, calcium and silicon. Overall, our analyses suggest that a range of mechanisms for P capture are concurrently active in biochar. We highlighted the potential to manipulate these through choice of form and composition of feedstock as well as pyrolysis processing, so that biochar may be increasingly tailored towards specific functionality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional brain mapping using H215O positron emission tomography (II): mapping of human working memory

    Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Sang Kun; Nam, Hyun Woo; Kim, Seok Ki; Park, Kwang Suk; Jeong, Jae Min; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul

    1998-01-01

    To localize and compare the neural basis of verbal and visual human working memory, we performed functional activation study using H 2 15 O PET. Repeated H 2 15 O PET scans with one control and three different activation tasks were performed on six right-handed normal volunteers. Each activation task was composed of 13 matching trials. On each trial, four targets, a fixation dot and a prove were presented sequentially and subject's tasks was to press a response button to indicate whether or not the prove was one of the previous targets. Short meaningful Korean words, simple drawings and monochromic pictures of human faces were used as matching objects for verbal or visual memory. All the images were spatially normalized and the differences between control and activation states were statistically analyzed using SPM96. Statistical analysis of verbal memory activation with short words showed activation in the left Broca's area, premotor cortex, cerebellum and right cingulate gyrus. In verbal memory with simple drawing, activation was shown in the larger regions including where activated with short words and left superior temporal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, prefrontal cortex, anterior portion of right superior temporal gyrus and right infero-lateral frontal cortex. On the other hand, the visual memory task activated predominantly right-sided structures, especially inferior frontal cortex, supplementary motor cortex and superior parietal cortex. The results are consistent with the hypothesis of the laterality and dissociation of the verbal and visual working memory from the invasive electrophysiological studies and emphasize the pivotal role of frontal cortex and cingulate gyrus in working memory system

  13. Effects of pair correlation functions on intermolecular nuclear relaxation by translational and rotational diffusion in liquids

    Fries, P.

    1978-01-01

    In order to study the intermolecular relaxation due to magnetic dipolar interactions, we calculate the spectral densities resulting from random translational and rotational motions of spherical molecules carrying off-centre spins. The relative translational motion is treated in the frame-work of a general diffusion equation (the Smoluchowski equation) which takes into account the existence of effective forces between the molecules. This model implies a pair correlation function. i.e. a non unifom relative distribution of the molecules. The analytical calculations are carried out by taking correctly into account the hard sphere boundary conditions for the molecules. Explicit numerical calculations of the spectral densities are performed using finite difference methods and the pair correlation function of Verlet and Weiss obtained by computer experiments. The resulting calculations allow one to interpret the relaxation exhibited by benzene and some of its monohalogen derivatives which has been measured by Jonas et al. at various pressures. The effects of pair correlation and eccentricity contribute to a noticeable enhancement of the spectral densities, especially as the frequency increases. The translational correlation times calculated from the Stokes formula and those deduced from intermolecular relaxation studies are compared. It is shown that in order to distinguish which of the dynamical models is appropriate, measurements must be made as a function of frequency [fr

  14. Can diffusion tensor imaging predict the functional outcome of supra-tentorial stroke?

    Maeda, Takahiro; Ishizaki, Ken-ichi; Yura, Shigeki

    2005-01-01

    We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to assess wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract after the onset of supra-tentorial stroke, and correlation of the extent of Wallerian degeneration with the motor function at 3 months after stroke. Twenty eight patients with supra-tentorial acute stroke were examined, two weeks and one month after stroke by DTI. We measured fractional anisotropy (FA) of affected side/unaffected side (FA ratio) in the cerebral peduncle. We used modified Rankin Scale (mRS) for assessment of motor function at 3 months after stroke. FA ratio was significantly reduced at 2 weeks after stroke (0.833±0.146) compared to on admission (0.979±0.0797). But no significant change of FA ratio was seen between two weeks and one month after stroke in 7 cases examined (0.758±0.183 vs. 0.754±0.183). In all patients in whom the FA ratio was under 0.8 at 2 weeks after stroke, motor function showed poor recovery (mRS 4 and 5) at 3 months after stroke. When FA ratio was over 0.8 at 2 weeks after stroke, motor function at 3 months after stroke showed good recovery (mRS 0 to 3) expect for three elderly patients. With the use of DTI, Wallerian degeneration could be detected in the corticospinal tracts at midbrain level during the early phase of supra-tentorial stroke. We conclude that DTI may be useful for early prediction of motor function prognosis in patients with supra-tentorial acute stroke. (author)

  15. Structure-Function Network Mapping and Its Assessment via Persistent Homology

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between brain structure and function is a fundamental problem in network neuroscience. This work deals with the general method of structure-function mapping at the whole-brain level. We formulate the problem as a topological mapping of structure-function connectivity via matrix function, and find a stable solution by exploiting a regularization procedure to cope with large matrices. We introduce a novel measure of network similarity based on persistent homology for assessing the quality of the network mapping, which enables a detailed comparison of network topological changes across all possible thresholds, rather than just at a single, arbitrary threshold that may not be optimal. We demonstrate that our approach can uncover the direct and indirect structural paths for predicting functional connectivity, and our network similarity measure outperforms other currently available methods. We systematically validate our approach with (1) a comparison of regularized vs. non-regularized procedures, (2) a null model of the degree-preserving random rewired structural matrix, (3) different network types (binary vs. weighted matrices), and (4) different brain parcellation schemes (low vs. high resolutions). Finally, we evaluate the scalability of our method with relatively large matrices (2514x2514) of structural and functional connectivity obtained from 12 healthy human subjects measured non-invasively while at rest. Our results reveal a nonlinear structure-function relationship, suggesting that the resting-state functional connectivity depends on direct structural connections, as well as relatively parsimonious indirect connections via polysynaptic pathways. PMID:28046127

  16. Clinical team functioning and IT innovation: a study of the diffusion of a point-of-care online evidence system.

    Gosling, A Sophie; Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the association between clinical team functioning and diffusion (awareness, use, and impact) of a 24-hour online evidence retrieval system. To examine the relationships between clinical team characteristics and the adoption of the online evidence system. 18 clinical teams, consisting of 180 clinicians from three Australian hospitals, were identified and studied. Teams were categorized as small ( 15). Clinical team functioning was assessed using the Team Climate Inventory (TCI). Awareness, use, and impact of an online evidence retrieval system were measured using a self-administered questionnaire. The relationships between TCI scores and awareness, use, and impact were examined using t-tests and one-way ANOVAs. Chi square analyses were used to examine differences between small and large teams. RESULTS were interpreted within a diffusion of innovations framework. Clinical team functioning was not related to awareness or use of the online evidence retrieval system. However, clinical team functioning was significantly associated with the impact of online evidence in terms of reported experience of improved patient care following system use. Clinicians in small teams ( 15) teams. Team functioning had the greatest impact on the fourth stage of innovation diffusion, the effective use of online evidence for clinical care. This supports Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory, to the effect that different types of communication about an innovation are important at different stages in the diffusion process. Members of small teams were more aware of the system than members of large teams. Team functioning is amenable to improvement through interventions. The findings suggest that the role of team climate in the diffusion of information systems is a promising area for future research.

  17. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping

    Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    Purpose To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. Methods A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Results Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. Conclusions The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization. PMID:29351339

  18. Brain functional BOLD perturbation modelling for forward fMRI and inverse mapping.

    Chen, Zikuan; Robinson, Jennifer; Calhoun, Vince

    2018-01-01

    To computationally separate dynamic brain functional BOLD responses from static background in a brain functional activity for forward fMRI signal analysis and inverse mapping. A brain functional activity is represented in terms of magnetic source by a perturbation model: χ = χ0 +δχ, with δχ for BOLD magnetic perturbations and χ0 for background. A brain fMRI experiment produces a timeseries of complex-valued images (T2* images), whereby we extract the BOLD phase signals (denoted by δP) by a complex division. By solving an inverse problem, we reconstruct the BOLD δχ dataset from the δP dataset, and the brain χ distribution from a (unwrapped) T2* phase image. Given a 4D dataset of task BOLD fMRI, we implement brain functional mapping by temporal correlation analysis. Through a high-field (7T) and high-resolution (0.5mm in plane) task fMRI experiment, we demonstrated in detail the BOLD perturbation model for fMRI phase signal separation (P + δP) and reconstructing intrinsic brain magnetic source (χ and δχ). We also provided to a low-field (3T) and low-resolution (2mm) task fMRI experiment in support of single-subject fMRI study. Our experiments show that the δχ-depicted functional map reveals bidirectional BOLD χ perturbations during the task performance. The BOLD perturbation model allows us to separate fMRI phase signal (by complex division) and to perform inverse mapping for pure BOLD δχ reconstruction for intrinsic functional χ mapping. The full brain χ reconstruction (from unwrapped fMRI phase) provides a new brain tissue image that allows to scrutinize the brain tissue idiosyncrasy for the pure BOLD δχ response through an automatic function/structure co-localization.

  19. Hopf bifurcation in a reaction-diffusive two-species model with nonlocal delay effect and general functional response

    Han, Renji; Dai, Binxiang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • We model general two-dimensional reaction-diffusion with nonlocal delay. • The existence of unique positive steady state is studied. • The bilinear form for the proposed system is given. • The existence, direction of Hopf bifurcation are given by symmetry method. - Abstract: A nonlocal delayed reaction-diffusive two-species model with Dirichlet boundary condition and general functional response is investigated in this paper. Based on the Lyapunov–Schmidt reduction, the existence, bifurcation direction and stability of Hopf bifurcating periodic orbits near the positive spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution are obtained, where the time delay is taken as the bifurcation parameter. Moreover, the general results are applied to a diffusive Lotka–Volterra type food-limited population model with nonlocal delay effect, and it is found that diffusion and nonlocal delay can also affect the other dynamic behavior of the system by numerical experiments.

  20. Novel in silico multivariate mapping of intrinsic and anticorrelated connectivity to neurocognitive functional maps supports the maturational hypothesis of ADHD.

    de Lacy, Nina; Kodish, Ian; Rachakonda, Srinivas; Calhoun, Vince D

    2018-04-22

    From childhood to adolescence, strengthened coupling in frontal, striatal and parieto-temporal regions associated with cognitive control, and increased anticorrelation between task-positive and task-negative circuits, subserve the reshaping of behavior. ADHD is a common condition peaking in adolescence and regressing in adulthood, with a wide variety of cognitive control deficits. Alternate hypotheses of ADHD emphasize lagging circuitry refinement versus categorical differences in network function. However, quantifying the individual circuit contributions to behavioral findings, and relative roles of maturational versus categorical effects, is challenging in vivo or in meta-analyses using task-based paradigms within the same pipeline, given the multiplicity of neurobehavioral functions implicated. To address this, we analyzed 46 positively-correlated and anticorrelated circuits in a multivariate model in resting-state data from 504 age- and gender-matched youth, and created a novel in silico method to map individual quantified effects to reverse inference maps of 8 neurocognitive functions consistently implicated in ADHD, as well as dopamine and hyperactivity. We identified only age- and gender-related effects in intrinsic connectivity, and found that maturational refinement of circuits in youth with ADHD occupied 3-10x more brain locations than in typical development, with the footprint, effect size and contribution of individual circuits varying substantially. Our analysis supports the maturational hypothesis of ADHD, suggesting lagging connectivity reorganization within specific subnetworks of fronto-parietal control, ventral attention, cingulo-opercular, temporo-limbic and cerebellar sub-networks contribute across neurocognitive findings present in this complex condition. We present the first analysis of anti-correlated connectivity in ADHD and suggest new directions for exploring residual and non-responsive symptoms. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Functional brain mapping using H{sub 2}{sup 15}O positron emission tomography (I): statistical parametric mapping method

    Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [College of Medicine, Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-08-01

    We investigated the statistical methods to compose the functional brain map of human working memory and the principal factors that have an effect on the methods for localization. Repeated PET scans with successive four tasks, which consist of one control and three different activation tasks, were performed on six right-handed normal volunteers for 2 minutes after bolus injections of 925 MBq H{sub 2}{sup 15}O at the intervals of 30 minutes. Image data were analyzed using SPM96 (Statistical Parametric Mapping) implemented with Matlab (Mathworks Inc., U.S.A.). Images from the same subject were spatially registered and were normalized using linear and nonlinear transformation methods. Significant difference between control and each activation state was estimated at every voxel based on the general linear model. Differences of global counts were removed using analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with global activity as covariate. Using the mean and variance for each condition which was adjusted using ANCOVA, t-statistics was performed on every voxel. To interpret the results more easily, t-values were transformed to the standard Gaussian distribution (Z-score). All the subjects carried out the activation and control tests successfully. Average rate of correct answers was 95%. The numbers of activated blobs were 4 for verbal memory I, 9 for verbal memory II, 9 for visual memory, and 6 for conjunctive activation of these three tasks. The verbal working memory activates predominantly left-sided structures, and the visual memory activates the right hemisphere. We conclude that rCBF PET imaging and statistical parametric mapping method were useful in the localization of the brain regions for verbal and visual working memory.

  2. Diffusion parameter mapping with the combined intravoxel incoherent motion and kurtosis model using artificial neural networks at 3 T.

    Bertleff, Marco; Domsch, Sebastian; Weingärtner, Sebastian; Zapp, Jascha; O'Brien, Kieran; Barth, Markus; Schad, Lothar R

    2017-12-01

    Artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used for voxel-wise parameter estimation with the combined intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) and kurtosis model facilitating robust diffusion parameter mapping in the human brain. The proposed ANN approach was compared with conventional least-squares regression (LSR) and state-of-the-art multi-step fitting (LSR-MS) in Monte-Carlo simulations and in vivo in terms of estimation accuracy and precision, number of outliers and sensitivity in the distinction between grey (GM) and white (WM) matter. Both the proposed ANN approach and LSR-MS yielded visually increased parameter map quality. Estimations of all parameters (perfusion fraction f, diffusion coefficient D, pseudo-diffusion coefficient D*, kurtosis K) were in good agreement with the literature using ANN, whereas LSR-MS resulted in D* overestimation and LSR yielded increased values for f and D*, as well as decreased values for K. Using ANN, outliers were reduced for the parameters f (ANN, 1%; LSR-MS, 19%; LSR, 8%), D* (ANN, 21%; LSR-MS, 25%; LSR, 23%) and K (ANN, 0%; LSR-MS, 0%; LSR, 15%). Moreover, ANN enabled significant distinction between GM and WM based on all parameters, whereas LSR facilitated this distinction only based on D and LSR-MS on f, D and K. Overall, the proposed ANN approach was found to be superior to conventional LSR, posing a powerful alternative to the state-of-the-art method LSR-MS with several advantages in the estimation of IVIM-kurtosis parameters, which might facilitate increased applicability of enhanced diffusion models at clinical scan times. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Active Interaction Mapping as a tool to elucidate hierarchical functions of biological processes.

    Farré, Jean-Claude; Kramer, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Subramani, Suresh

    2017-07-03

    Increasingly, various 'omics data are contributing significantly to our understanding of novel biological processes, but it has not been possible to iteratively elucidate hierarchical functions in complex phenomena. We describe a general systems biology approach called Active Interaction Mapping (AI-MAP), which elucidates the hierarchy of functions for any biological process. Existing and new 'omics data sets can be iteratively added to create and improve hierarchical models which enhance our understanding of particular biological processes. The best datatypes to further improve an AI-MAP model are predicted computationally. We applied this approach to our understanding of general and selective autophagy, which are conserved in most eukaryotes, setting the stage for the broader application to other cellular processes of interest. In the particular application to autophagy-related processes, we uncovered and validated new autophagy and autophagy-related processes, expanded known autophagy processes with new components, integrated known non-autophagic processes with autophagy and predict other unexplored connections.

  4. Altered structure-function relations of semantic processing in youths with high-functioning autism: a combined diffusion and functional MRI study.

    Lo, Yu-Chun; Chou, Tai-Li; Fan, Li-Ying; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Chiu, Yen-Nan; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2013-12-01

    Deficits in language and communication are among the core symptoms of autism, a common neurodevelopmental disorder with long-term impairment. Despite the striking nature of the autistic language impairment, knowledge about its corresponding alterations in the brain is still evolving. We hypothesized that the dual stream language network is altered in autism, and that this alteration could be revealed by changes in the relationships between microstructural integrity and functional activation. The study recruited 20 right-handed male youths with autism and 20 carefully matched individually, typically developing (TD) youths. Microstructural integrity of the left dorsal and left ventral pathways responsible for language processing and the functional activation of the connected brain regions were investigated by using diffusion spectrum imaging and functional magnetic resonance imaging of a semantic task, respectively. Youths with autism had significantly poorer language function, and lower functional activation in left dorsal and left ventral regions of the language network, compared with TD youths. The TD group showed a significant correlation of the functional activation of the left dorsal region with microstructural integrity of the left ventral pathway, whereas the autism group showed a significant correlation of the functional activation of the left ventral region with microstructural integrity of the left dorsal pathway, and moreover verbal comprehension index was correlated with microstructural integrity of the left ventral pathway. These altered structure-function relationships in autism suggest possible involvement of the dual pathways in supporting deficient semantic processing. © 2013 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. In vivo, noninvasive functional measurements of bone sarcoma using diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging

    Peterson, Hannah M.; Hoang, Bang H.; Geller, David; Yang, Rui; Gorlick, Richard; Berger, Jeremy; Tingling, Janet; Roth, Michael; Gill, Jonathon; Roblyer, Darren

    2017-12-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopic imaging (DOSI) is an emerging near-infrared imaging technique that noninvasively measures quantitative functional information in thick tissue. This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using DOSI to measure optical contrast from bone sarcomas. These tumors are rare and pose technical and practical challenges for DOSI measurements due to the varied anatomic locations and tissue depths of presentation. Six subjects were enrolled in the study. One subject was unable to be measured due to tissue contact sensitivity. For the five remaining subjects, the signal-to-noise ratio, imaging depth, optical properties, and quantitative tissue concentrations of oxyhemoglobin, deoxyhemoglobin, water, and lipids from tumor and contralateral normal tissues were assessed. Statistical differences between tumor and contralateral normal tissue were found in chromophore concentrations and optical properties for four subjects. Low signal-to-noise was encountered during several subject's measurements, suggesting increased detector sensitivity will help to optimize DOSI for this patient population going forward. This study demonstrates that DOSI is capable of measuring optical properties and obtaining functional information in bone sarcomas. In the future, DOSI may provide a means to stratify treatment groups and monitor chemotherapy response for this disease.

  6. Resting-state functional connectivity assessed with two diffuse optical tomographic systems.

    Niu, Haijing; Khadka, Sabin; Tian, Fenghua; Lin, Zi-Jing; Lu, Chunming; Zhu, Chaozhe; Liu, Hanli

    2011-04-01

    Functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) is recently utilized as a new approach to assess resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC) in the human brain. For any new technique or new methodology, it is necessary to be able to replicate similar experiments using different instruments in order to establish its liability and reproducibility. We apply two different diffuse optical tomographic (DOT) systems (i.e., DYNOT and CW5), with various probe arrangements to evaluate RSFC in the sensorimotor cortex by utilizing a previously published experimental protocol and seed-based correlation analysis. Our results exhibit similar spatial patterns and strengths in RSFC between the bilateral motor cortexes. The consistent observations are obtained from both DYNOT and CW5 systems, and are also in good agreement with the previous fNIRS study. Overall, we demonstrate that the fNIRS-based RSFC is reproducible by various DOT imaging systems among different research groups, enhancing the confidence of neuroscience researchers and clinicians to utilize fNIRS for future applications.

  7. Longitudinal, transcranial measurement of functional activation in the rat brain by diffuse correlation spectroscopy.

    Blanco, Igor; Zirak, Peyman; Dragojević, Tanja; Castellvi, Clara; Durduran, Turgut; Justicia, Carles

    2017-10-01

    Neural activity is an important biomarker for the presence of neurodegenerative diseases, cerebrovascular alterations, and brain trauma; furthermore, it is a surrogate marker for treatment effects. These pathologies may occur and evolve in a long time-period, thus, noninvasive, transcutaneous techniques are necessary to allow a longitudinal follow-up. In the present work, we have customized noninvasive, transcutaneous, diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) to localize changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) induced by neural activity. We were able to detect changes in CBF in the somatosensory cortex by using a model of electrical forepaw stimulation in rats. The suitability of DCS measurements for longitudinal monitoring was demonstrated by performing multiple sessions with the same animals at different ages (from 6 to 18 months). In addition, functional DCS has been cross-validated by comparison with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the same animals in a subset of the time-points. The overall results obtained with transcutaneous DCS demonstrates that it can be utilized in longitudinal studies safely and reproducibly to locate changes in CBF induced by neural activity in the small animal brain.

  8. Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo and density functional calculations of the structural stability of bilayer arsenene

    Kadioglu, Yelda; Santana, Juan A.; Özaydin, H. Duygu; Ersan, Fatih; Aktürk, O. Üzengi; Aktürk, Ethem; Reboredo, Fernando A.

    2018-06-01

    We have studied the structural stability of monolayer and bilayer arsenene (As) in the buckled (b) and washboard (w) phases with diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. DMC yields cohesive energies of 2.826(2) eV/atom for monolayer b-As and 2.792(3) eV/atom for w-As. In the case of bilayer As, DMC and DFT predict that AA-stacking is the more stable form of b-As, while AB is the most stable form of w-As. The DMC layer-layer binding energies for b-As-AA and w-As-AB are 30(1) and 53(1) meV/atom, respectively. The interlayer separations were estimated with DMC at 3.521(1) Å for b-As-AA and 3.145(1) Å for w-As-AB. A comparison of DMC and DFT results shows that the van der Waals density functional method yields energetic properties of arsenene close to DMC, while the DFT + D3 method closely reproduced the geometric properties from DMC. The electronic properties of monolayer and bilayer arsenene were explored with various DFT methods. The bandgap values vary significantly with the DFT method, but the results are generally qualitatively consistent. We expect the present work to be useful for future experiments attempting to prepare multilayer arsenene and for further development of DFT methods for weakly bonded systems.

  9. Predicting postnatal renal function of prenatally detected posterior urethral valves using fetal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient determination.

    Faure, Alice; Panait, Nicoleta; Panuel, Michel; Alessandrini, Pierre; D'Ercole, Claude; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Merrot, Thierry

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of fetal diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) determination to predict postnatal renal function (nadir creatinine at 1 year and eGFR) of men with posterior urethral valves (PUV). Between 2003 and 2014, 11 MRI were performed on fetuses (between 28 and 32 weeks) in whom second trimester sonography suggested severe bilateral urinary tract anomalies, suspected of PUV. The ADC of the 11 fetuses ranged from 1.3 to 2.86 mm 2  s -1 (median = 1.79 mm 2  s -1 , normal range for fetal kidney: 1.1-1.8). Two pregnancies with ADC > 2.6 mm 2  s -1 were interrupted; the autopsy confirmed PUV and Potter syndrome. For the remaining nine babies, the follow-up was 5.4 years (0.8-10). Four children with abnormal ADC (1.8-2.3) had chronic kidney disease. The remaining five cases with normal nadir creatinine and eGFR had normal ADC. One case with unilateral elevated ADC had a poor ipsilateral renal function on dimercaptosuccinic acid scan. Here, it seems that diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging with ADC determination could be useful in accurately evaluating fetal kidneys in PUV and predicting renal function. It may be an additional, non-invasive method when biologic and sonographic findings are inconclusive, especially in the case of oligohydramnios. Further studies are needed to confirm our data. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Determination of thermal diffusivity of dental enamel and dentin as a function of temperature, using infrared thermography

    Pereira, Thiago Martini

    2009-01-01

    In this work it was developed a software that calculates automatically, the thermal diffusivity value as a function of temperature in materials. The infrared thermography technique was used for data acquisition of temperature distribution as a function of time. These data were used to adjust a temperature function obtained from the homogeneous heat equation with specific boundary conditions. For that, an infrared camera (detecting from 8 μm to 9 μm) was calibrated to detect temperature ranging from 185 degree C up to 1300 degree C at an acquisition rate of 300 Hz. It was used, 10 samples of dental enamel and 10 samples of dentin, with 4 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm, which were obtained from bovine lower incisor teeth. These samples were irradiated with an Er:Cr:YSGG pulsed laser (λ = 2,78 μm). The resulting temperature was recorded 2 s prior, 10 s during irradiation and continuing for 2 more seconds after it. After each irradiation, all obtained thermal images were processed in the software, creating a file with the data of thermal diffusivity as a function of temperature. Another file with the thermal diffusivity values was also calculated after each laser pulse. The mean result of thermal diffusivity obtained for dental enamel was 0,0084 ± 0,001 cm2/s for the temperature interval of 220-550 degree C. The mean value for thermal diffusivity obtained for dentin was 0,0015 0,0004 cm2/s in temperatures up to 360 degree C; however, this value increases for higher temperatures. According to these results, it was possible to conclude that the use of infrared thermography, associated with the software developed in this work, is an efficient method to determine the thermal diffusivity values as a function of temperature in different materials. (author)

  11. Automatic transfer function design for medical visualization using visibility distributions and projective color mapping.

    Cai, Lile; Tay, Wei-Liang; Nguyen, Binh P; Chui, Chee-Kong; Ong, Sim-Heng

    2013-01-01

    Transfer functions play a key role in volume rendering of medical data, but transfer function manipulation is unintuitive and can be time-consuming; achieving an optimal visualization of patient anatomy or pathology is difficult. To overcome this problem, we present a system for automatic transfer function design based on visibility distribution and projective color mapping. Instead of assigning opacity directly based on voxel intensity and gradient magnitude, the opacity transfer function is automatically derived by matching the observed visibility distribution to a target visibility distribution. An automatic color assignment scheme based on projective mapping is proposed to assign colors that allow for the visual discrimination of different structures, while also reflecting the degree of similarity between them. When our method was tested on several medical volumetric datasets, the key structures within the volume were clearly visualized with minimal user intervention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A concept mapping study on perpetuating factors of functional somatic symptoms from clinicians' perspective

    Janssens, Karin A. M.; Houtveen, Jan H.; Tak, Lineke M.; Bonvanie, Irma J.; Scholtalbers, Anna; van Gils, Anne; Geenenc, Rinie; Rosmalen, Judith G. M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this concept mapping study was to identify the structure and alleged importance of perpetuating factors of functional somatic symptoms (FSS) from the perspective of professionals. Further, we examined to which extent these factors have been addressed in scientific literature.

  13. Mappings for Special Functions on Cantor Sets and Special Integral Transforms via Local Fractional Operators

    Yang Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mappings for some special functions on Cantor sets are investigated. Meanwhile, we apply the local fractional Fourier series, Fourier transforms, and Laplace transforms to solve three local fractional differential equations, and the corresponding nondifferentiable solutions were presented.

  14. Functional magnetic resonance imaging mapping of the motor cortex in patients with cerebral tumors

    Mueller, W.M.; Zerrin Yetkin, F.; Hammeke, T.A.

    1997-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine the usefulness of functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI) to map cerebral functions in patients with frontal or parietal tumors. Methods. Charts and images of patients with cerebral tumors or vascular malformations who underwent FMRI with an echo-planar technique were reviewed. The FMRI maps of motor (11 patients), tactile sensory (12 patients) and language tasks (4 patients) were obtained. The location of the FMRI activation and the positive responses to intraoperative cortical stimulation were compared. The reliability of the paradigms for mapping the rolandic cortex was evaluated. Results. Rolandic cortex was activated by tactile tasks in hall 12 patients and by motor tasks in 10 of 11 patients. Language tasks elicited activation in each of the four patients. Activation was obtained within edematous brain and adjacent to tumors. FMRI in three cases with intraoperative electro-cortical mapping results showed activation for a language, tactile, or motor task within the same gyrus in which stimulation elicited a related motor, sensory, or language function. In patients with >2 cm between the margin of the tumor, as revealed by magnetic resonance imaging, and the activation, no decline in motor function occurred from surgical resection. Conclusions. FMRI of tactile, motor, and language tasks is feasible in patients with cerebral tumors. FMRI shows promise as a means of determining the risk of a postoperative motor deficit from surgical resection of frontal or parietal tumors. (authors)

  15. Towards industry strength mapping of AUTOSAR automotive functionality on multicore architectures

    Avasalcai, Cosmin Florin; Budhrani, Dhanesh; Pop, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The automotive electronic architectures have moved from federated architectures, where one function is implemented in one ECU (Electronic Control Unit), to distributed architectures, consisting of several multicore ECUs. In addition, multicore ECUs are being adopted because of better performance,...... engineer in the mapping task. We have successfully evaluated AUTOMAP on several realistic use cases from Volvo Trucks....

  16. The Distortion Theorems for Harmonic Mappings with Analytic Parts Convex or Starlike Functions of Order β

    Mengkun Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Some sharp estimates of coefficients, distortion, and growth for harmonic mappings with analytic parts convex or starlike functions of order β are obtained. We also give area estimates and covering theorems. Our main results generalise those of Klimek and Michalski.

  17. Metabolic mapping of functional activity in human subjects with the [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose technique

    Greenberg, J.H.; Reivich, M.; Alavi, A.

    1981-01-01

    The 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose technique was used to measure regional cerebral glucose utilization by human subjects during functional activation. Normal male volunteers subjected to one or more sensory stimuli exhibited focal increases in glucose metabolism in response to the stimulus. These results demonstrate that the technique is capable of providing functional maps in vivo related to both body region and submodality of sensory information in the human brain

  18. Invertebrate diversity classification using self-organizing map neural network: with some special topological functions

    WenJun Zhang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In present study we used self-organizing map (SOM neural network to conduct the non-supervisory clustering of invertebrate orders in rice field. Four topological functions, i.e., cossintopf, sincostopf, acossintopf, and expsintopf, established on the template in toolbox of Matlab, were used in SOM neural network learning. Results showed that clusters were different when using different topological functions because different topological functions will generate different spatial structure of neurons in neural network. We may chose these functions and results based on comparison with the practical situation.

  19. Two-state random walk model of lattice diffusion - 1. Self-correlation function

    Balakrishnan, V.; Venkataraman, G.

    1981-01-01

    Diffusion with interruptions (arising from localized oscillations, or traps, or mixing between jump diffusion and fluid-like diffusion, etc.) is a very general phenomenon. Its manifestations range from superionic conductance to the behaviour of hydrogen in metals. Based on a continuous-time random walk approach, we present a comprehensive two-state random walk model for the diffusion of a particle on a lattice, incorporating arbitrary holding-time distributions for both localized residence at the sites and inter-site flights, and also the correct first-waiting-time distributions. A synthesis is thus achieved of the two extremes of jump diffusion (zero flight time) and fluid-like diffusion (zero residence time). Various earlier models emerge as special cases of our theory. Among the noteworthy results obtained are: closed-form solutions (in d dimensions, and with arbitrary directional bias) for temporarily uncorrelated jump diffusion and for the fluid diffusion counterpart; a compact, general formula for the mean square displacement; the effects of a continuous spectrum of time scales in the holding-time distributions, etc. The dynamic mobility and the structure factor for 'oscillatory diffusion' are taken up in part 2. (author)

  20. A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of directed functional connectivity maps.

    Beltz, Adriene M; Molenaar, Peter C M

    2015-01-01

    A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of neural directed functional connectivity maps is rare. This is striking because models that require sequential independence among residuals are regularly implemented. The aim of the current study was (a) to apply to directed functional connectivity maps of functional magnetic resonance imaging data an a posteriori model validation procedure (i.e., white noise tests of one-step-ahead prediction errors combined with decision criteria for revising the maps based upon Lagrange Multiplier tests), and (b) to demonstrate how the procedure applies to single-subject simulated, single-subject task-related, and multi-subject resting state data. Directed functional connectivity was determined by the unified structural equation model family of approaches in order to map contemporaneous and first order lagged connections among brain regions at the group- and individual-levels while incorporating external input, then white noise tests were run. Findings revealed that the validation procedure successfully detected unmodeled sequential dependencies among residuals and recovered higher order (greater than one) simulated connections, and that the procedure can accommodate task-related input. Findings also revealed that lags greater than one were present in resting state data: With a group-level network that contained only contemporaneous and first order connections, 44% of subjects required second order, individual-level connections in order to obtain maps with white noise residuals. Results have broad methodological relevance (e.g., temporal validation is necessary after directed functional connectivity analyses because the presence of unmodeled higher order sequential dependencies may bias parameter estimates) and substantive implications (e.g., higher order lags may be common in resting state data).

  1. A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of directed functional connectivity maps

    Adriene M. Beltz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A posteriori model validation for the temporal order of neural directed functional connectivity maps is rare. This is striking because models that require sequential independence among residuals are regularly implemented. The aim of the current study was (a to apply to directed functional connectivity maps of functional magnetic resonance imaging data an a posteriori model validation procedure (i.e., white noise tests of one-step-ahead prediction errors combined with decision criteria for revising the maps based upon Lagrange Multiplier tests, and (b to demonstrate how the procedure applies to single-subject simulated, single-subject task-related, and multi-subject resting state data. Directed functional connectivity was determined by the unified structural equation model family of approaches in order to map contemporaneous and first order lagged connections among brain regions at the group- and individual-levels while incorporating external input, then white noise tests were run. Findings revealed that the validation procedure successfully detected unmodeled sequential dependencies among residuals and recovered higher order (greater than one simulated connections, and that the procedure can accommodate task-related input. Findings also revealed that lags greater than one were present in resting state data: With a group-level network that contained only contemporaneous and first order connections, 44% of subjects required second order, individual-level connections in order to obtain maps with white noise residuals. Results have broad methodological relevance (e.g., temporal validation is necessary after directed functional connectivity analyses because the presence of unmodeled higher order sequential dependencies may bias parameter estimates and substantive implications (e.g., higher order lags may be common in resting state data.

  2. Effects of Field-Map Distortion Correction on Resting State Functional Connectivity MRI

    Hiroki Togo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic field inhomogeneities cause geometric distortions of echo planar images used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. To reduce this problem, distortion correction (DC with field map is widely used for both task and resting-state fMRI (rs-fMRI. Although DC with field map has been reported to improve the quality of task fMRI, little is known about its effects on rs-fMRI. Here, we tested the influence of field-map DC on rs-fMRI results using two rs-fMRI datasets derived from 40 healthy subjects: one with DC (DC+ and the other without correction (DC−. Independent component analysis followed by the dual regression approach was used for evaluation of resting-state functional connectivity networks (RSN. We also obtained the ratio of low-frequency to high-frequency signal power (0.01–0.1 Hz and above 0.1 Hz, respectively; LFHF ratio to assess the quality of rs-fMRI signals. For comparison of RSN between DC+ and DC− datasets, the default mode network showed more robust functional connectivity in the DC+ dataset than the DC− dataset. Basal ganglia RSN showed some decreases in functional connectivity primarily in white matter, indicating imperfect registration/normalization without DC. Supplementary seed-based and simulation analyses supported the utility of DC. Furthermore, we found a higher LFHF ratio after field map correction in the anterior cingulate cortex, posterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and cerebellum. In conclusion, field map DC improved detection of functional connectivity derived from low-frequency rs-fMRI signals. We encourage researchers to include a DC step in the preprocessing pipeline of rs-fMRI analysis.

  3. Combination of diffusion tensor and functional magnetic resonance imaging during recovery from the vegetative state

    Fernández-Espejo Davinia

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rate of recovery from the vegetative state (VS is low. Currently, little is known of the mechanisms and cerebral changes that accompany those relatively rare cases of good recovery. Here, we combined functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI to study the evolution of one VS patient at one month post-ictus and again twelve months later when he had recovered consciousness. Methods fMRI was used to investigate cortical responses to passive language stimulation as well as task-induced deactivations related to the default-mode network. DTI was used to assess the integrity of the global white matter and the arcuate fasciculus. We also performed a neuropsychological assessment at the time of the second MRI examination in order to characterize the profile of cognitive deficits. Results fMRI analysis revealed anatomically appropriate activation to speech in both the first and the second scans but a reduced pattern of task-induced deactivations in the first scan. In the second scan, following the recovery of consciousness, this pattern became more similar to that classically described for the default-mode network. DTI analysis revealed relative preservation of the arcuate fasciculus and of the global normal-appearing white matter at both time points. The neuropsychological assessment revealed recovery of receptive linguistic functioning by 12-months post-ictus. Conclusions These results suggest that the combination of different structural and functional imaging modalities may provide a powerful means for assessing the mechanisms involved in the recovery from the VS.

  4. Functional and structural mapping of human cerebral cortex: solutions are in the surfaces

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.; Joshi, S.; Miller, M. I.

    1998-01-01

    The human cerebral cortex is notorious for the depth and irregularity of its convolutions and for its variability from one individual to the next. These complexities of cortical geography have been a chronic impediment to studies of functional specialization in the cortex. In this report, we discuss ways to compensate for the convolutions by using a combination of strategies whose common denominator involves explicit reconstructions of the cortical surface. Surface-based visualization involves reconstructing cortical surfaces and displaying them, along with associated experimental data, in various complementary formats (including three-dimensional native configurations, two-dimensional slices, extensively smoothed surfaces, ellipsoidal representations, and cortical flat maps). Generating these representations for the cortex of the Visible Man leads to a surface-based atlas that has important advantages over conventional stereotaxic atlases as a substrate for displaying and analyzing large amounts of experimental data. We illustrate this by showing the relationship between functionally specialized regions and topographically organized areas in human visual cortex. Surface-based warping allows data to be mapped from individual hemispheres to a surface-based atlas while respecting surface topology, improving registration of identifiable landmarks, and minimizing unwanted distortions. Surface-based warping also can aid in comparisons between species, which we illustrate by warping a macaque flat map to match the shape of a human flat map. Collectively, these approaches will allow more refined analyses of commonalities as well as individual differences in the functional organization of primate cerebral cortex.

  5. Correlation factor, velocity autocorrelation function and frequency-dependent tracer diffusion coefficient

    Beijeren, H. van; Kehr, K.W.

    1986-01-01

    The correlation factor, defined as the ratio between the tracer diffusion coefficient in lattice gases and the diffusion coefficient for a corresponding uncorrelated random walk, is known to assume a very simple form under certain conditions. A simple derivation of this is given with the aid of

  6. Accurate protein structure annotation through competitive diffusion of enzymatic functions over a network of local evolutionary similarities.

    Eric Venner

    Full Text Available High-throughput Structural Genomics yields many new protein structures without known molecular function. This study aims to uncover these missing annotations by globally comparing select functional residues across the structural proteome. First, Evolutionary Trace Annotation, or ETA, identifies which proteins have local evolutionary and structural features in common; next, these proteins are linked together into a proteomic network of ETA similarities; then, starting from proteins with known functions, competing functional labels diffuse link-by-link over the entire network. Every node is thus assigned a likelihood z-score for every function, and the most significant one at each node wins and defines its annotation. In high-throughput controls, this competitive diffusion process recovered enzyme activity annotations with 99% and 97% accuracy at half-coverage for the third and fourth Enzyme Commission (EC levels, respectively. This corresponds to false positive rates 4-fold lower than nearest-neighbor and 5-fold lower than sequence-based annotations. In practice, experimental validation of the predicted carboxylesterase activity in a protein from Staphylococcus aureus illustrated the effectiveness of this approach in the context of an increasingly drug-resistant microbe. This study further links molecular function to a small number of evolutionarily important residues recognizable by Evolutionary Tracing and it points to the specificity and sensitivity of functional annotation by competitive global network diffusion. A web server is at http://mammoth.bcm.tmc.edu/networks.

  7. Mapping of control functions of critical systems by reachability analysis in a network of communicating automata

    Lemattre, Thibault

    2013-01-01

    The design of operational control architectures is a very important step of the design of energy production systems. This step consists in mapping the functional architecture of the system onto its hardware architecture while respecting capacity and safety constraints, i.e. in allocating control functions to a set of controllers while respecting these constraints. The work presented in this thesis presents: i) a formalization of the data and constraints of the function allocation problem; ii) a mapping method, by reachability analysis, based on a request/response mechanism in a network of communicating automata with integer variables; iii) a comparison between this method and a resolution method by integer linear programming. The results of this work have been validated on examples of actual size and open the way to the coupling between reachability analysis and integer linear programming for the resolution of satisfaction problems for non-linear constraint systems. (author)

  8. Mapping of brain function with positron emission tomography for pathophysiological analysis of neurological disorders

    Nariai, Tadashi

    2001-01-01

    The role of PET is discussed mainly through author's clinical experience in patients with brain lesions from the view of mapping of brain function. Procedure for PET concept in clinical practice is summarized. PET using tracers like [ 15 O]water and [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose for mapping of the function has been used in combination with MRI, MEG (magnetoencephalography), SPECT and other imaging means for morphological identification. Actual those images before and after surgery are presented in cases of epilepsy, moyamoya disease, stegnosis of cervical artery, arteriovenous malformation and oligodendroglioma. Images of [ 11 C]flumazenil in epilepsies are also presented to show the neurological dysfunctions. PET evaluation of neurological functions is concluded to become more important in parallel with the advancement of therapeutics. (K.H.)

  9. The Schroeder functional equation and its relation to the invariant measures of chaotic maps

    Luevano, Jose-Ruben; Pina, Eduardo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show that the invariant measure for a class of one-dimensional chaotic maps, T(x), is an extended solution of the Schroeder functional equation, q(T(x)) = λq(x), induced by them. Hence, we give a unified treatment of a collection of exactly solved examples worked out in the current literature. In particular, we show that these examples belong to a class of functions introduced by Mira (see the text). Moreover, as a new example, we compute the invariant densities for a class of rational maps having the Weierstrass p function as an invariant one. Also, we study the relation between that equation and the well-known Frobenius-Perron and Koopman's operators

  10. Morphological and functional MRI, MRS, perfusion and diffusion changes after radiosurgery of brain metastasis

    Kang, Tae Wook; Kim, Sung Tae; Byun, Hong Sik; Jeon, Pyoung; Kim, Keonha; Kim, Hyungjin; Lee, Jung II

    2009-01-01

    Radiosurgery is a noninvasive procedure where spatially accurate and highly conformal doses of radiation are targeted at brain lesions with an ablative intent. Recently, radiosurgery has been established as an effective technique for local treatment of brain metastasis. After radiosurgery, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays an important role in the assessment of the therapeutic response and of any complications. The therapeutic approach depends on the imaging findings obtained after radiosurgery, which have a role in the decision making to perform additional invasive modalities (repeat resection, biopsy) to obtain a definite diagnosis and to improve the survival of patients. Conventional MR imaging findings are mainly based on morphological alterations of tumors. However, there are variable imaging findings of radiation-induced changes including radiation necrosis in the brain. Radiologists are sometimes confused by radiation-induced injuries, including radiation necrosis, that are seen on conventional MR imaging. The pattern of abnormal enhancement on follow-up conventional MR imaging closely mimics that of a recurrent brain metastasis. So, classifying newly developed abnormal enhancing lesions in follow-up of treated brain metastasis with correct diagnosis is one of the key goals in neuro-oncologic imaging. To overcome limitations of the use of morphology-based conventional MR imaging, several physiological-based functional MR imaging methods have been used, namely diffusion-weighted imaging, perfusion MR imaging, and proton MR spectroscopy, for the detection of hemodynamic, metabolic, and cellular alterations. These imaging modalities provide additional information to allow clinicians to make proper decisions regarding patient treatment.

  11. Examination of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Genova, Helen M; Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Deluca, John; Das, Abhijit; Binder, Allison; Arjunan, Aparna; Chiaravalloti, Nancy; Wylie, Glenn

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the neural correlates of cognitive fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis (MS), looking specifically at the relationship between self-reported fatigue and objective measures of cognitive fatigue. In Experiment 1, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to examine where in the brain BOLD activity covaried with "state" fatigue, assessed during performance of a task designed to induce cognitive fatigue while in the scanner. In Experiment 2, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to examine where in the brain white matter damage correlated with increased "trait" fatigue in individuals with MS, assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS) completed outside the scanning session. During the cognitively fatiguing task, the MS group had increased brain activity associated with fatigue in the caudate as compared with HCs. DTI findings revealed that reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior internal capsule was associated with increased self-reported fatigue on the FSS. Results are discussed in terms of identifying a "fatigue-network" in MS.

  12. Examination of cognitive fatigue in multiple sclerosis using functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tensor imaging.

    Helen M Genova

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the neural correlates of cognitive fatigue in Multiple Sclerosis (MS, looking specifically at the relationship between self-reported fatigue and objective measures of cognitive fatigue. In Experiment 1, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI was used to examine where in the brain BOLD activity covaried with "state" fatigue, assessed during performance of a task designed to induce cognitive fatigue while in the scanner. In Experiment 2, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI was used to examine where in the brain white matter damage correlated with increased "trait" fatigue in individuals with MS, assessed by the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS completed outside the scanning session. During the cognitively fatiguing task, the MS group had increased brain activity associated with fatigue in the caudate as compared with HCs. DTI findings revealed that reduced fractional anisotropy in the anterior internal capsule was associated with increased self-reported fatigue on the FSS. Results are discussed in terms of identifying a "fatigue-network" in MS.

  13. Master stability functions reveal diffusion-driven pattern formation in networks

    Brechtel, Andreas; Gramlich, Philipp; Ritterskamp, Daniel; Drossel, Barbara; Gross, Thilo

    2018-03-01

    We study diffusion-driven pattern formation in networks of networks, a class of multilayer systems, where different layers have the same topology, but different internal dynamics. Agents are assumed to disperse within a layer by undergoing random walks, while they can be created or destroyed by reactions between or within a layer. We show that the stability of homogeneous steady states can be analyzed with a master stability function approach that reveals a deep analogy between pattern formation in networks and pattern formation in continuous space. For illustration, we consider a generalized model of ecological meta-food webs. This fairly complex model describes the dispersal of many different species across a region consisting of a network of individual habitats while subject to realistic, nonlinear predator-prey interactions. In this example, the method reveals the intricate dependence of the dynamics on the spatial structure. The ability of the proposed approach to deal with this fairly complex system highlights it as a promising tool for ecology and other applications.

  14. Functional MRI procedures in the diagnosis of brain tumors. Perfusion- and diffusion-weighted imaging

    Hartmann, M.; Heiland, S.; Sartor, K.

    2002-01-01

    Despite the increased diagnostic accuracy of contrast material enhanced MR imaging, specification and grading of brain tumors are still only approximate at best: neither morphology, nor relaxation times or contrast material enhancement reliably predict tumor histology or tumor grade. As histology and tumor grade strongly influence which therapy concept is chosen, a more precise diagnosis is mandatory. With diffusion- and perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI, PWI) it is now possible to obtain important information regarding the cellular matrix and the relative regional cerebral blood volume (rrCBV) of brain tumors, which cannot be obtained with standard MR techniques. These dynamic-functional imaging techniques are very useful in the preoperative diagnosis of gliomas, lymphomas, and metastases, as well as in the differentiation of these neoplastic lesions from abscesses, atypical ischemic infarctions, and tumor-like manifestations of demyelinating disease. Additionally, they appear suitable for determining glioma grade and regions of active tumor growth which should be the target of stereotactic biopsy and therapy. After therapy these techniques are helpful to better assess the tumor response to therapy, possible therapy failure and therapy complications such as radiation necrosis. (orig.) [de

  15. Noninvasive measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels for adjustment of diffusion capacity measured during pulmonary function testing.

    Mahoney, Anne M; Stimpson, Claudia L; Scott, Karen L; Hampson, Neil B

    2007-12-01

    The diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide (D(LCO)) is commonly measured during pulmonary function testing (PFT). Although adjustment of the measured D(LCO) for an elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin level is recommended, carboxyhemoglobin is not routinely measured, which may reduce the accuracy of D(LCO) measurements. We sought to assess the utility of routine carboxyhemoglobin measurement and subsequent D(LCO) correction in patients referred for PFT. We retrospectively reviewed 100 consecutive PFT results, including D(LCO) assessment. We used a pulse CO-oximeter (recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration) to noninvasively measure baseline carboxyhemoglobin (S(pCO)). We used simple descriptive statistics to compare the S(pCO) values. In subjects with elevated S(pCO) (> 2%) we adjusted the percent-of-predicted D(LCO). Interpretation of D(LCO) was categorized according to the American Thoracic Society classification scheme for respiratory impairment. The self-reported smokers had higher average S(pCO) than did self-reported nonsmokers (1.6% vs 3.5%, p carboxyhemoglobin is easy to perform during PFT. When precise measurement of D(LCO) is important, noninvasive measurement of carboxyhemoglobin may be of value. If routine S(pCO) measurement is considered, the highest yield is among current smokers.

  16. Conservative diffusions

    Carlen, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    In Nelson's stochastic mechanics, quantum phenomena are described in terms of diffusions instead of wave functions. These diffusions are formally given by stochastic differential equations with extremely singular coefficients. Using PDE methods, we prove the existence of solutions. This reult provides a rigorous basis for stochastic mechanics. (orig.)

  17. Mapping SAGE questionnaire to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).

    Raggi, Alberto; Quintas, Rui; Russo, Emanuela; Martinuzzi, Andrea; Costardi, Daniela; Frisoni, Giovanni Battista; Franco, Maria Grazia; Andreotti, Alessandra; Ojala, Matti; Peña, Sebastián; Perales, Jaime; Chatterji, Somnath; Miret, Marta; Tobiasz-Adamczyk, Beata; Koskinen, Seppo; Frattura, Lucilla; Leonardi, Matilde

    2014-01-01

    The collaborative research on ageing in Europe protocol was based on that of the World Health Organization Study on global AGEing and adult health (SAGE) project that investigated the relationship between health and well-being and provided a set of instruments that can be used across countries to monitor health and health-related outcomes of older populations as well as the strategies for addressing issues concerning the ageing process. To evaluate the degree to which SAGE protocol covered the spectrum of disability given the scope of the World Health Organization International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), a mapping exercise was performed with SAGE protocol. Results show that the SAGE protocol covers ICF domains in a non-uniform way, with environmental factors categories being underrepresented, whereas mental, cardiovascular, sensory functions and mobility were overrepresented. To overcome this partial coverage of ICF functioning categories, new assessment instruments have been developed. PRACTITIONER MESSAGE: Mapping exercises are valid procedures to understand the extent to which a survey protocol covers the spectrum of functioning. The mapping exercise with SAGE protocol shows that it provides only a partial representation of body functions and activities and participation domains, and the coverage of environmental factors is poor. New instruments are therefore needed for researchers to properly understand the health and disability of ageing populations. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Functional imaging of submandibular glands: diffusion-weighted echo-planar MRI before and after stimulation; Diffusionsgewichtete MRT zur Funktionsdiagnostik der Glandula submandibularis

    Arndt, C.; Cramer, M.C.; Weiss, F.; Kaul, M.G.; Adam, G.; Habermann, C.R. [Zentrum fuer Bildgebende Diagnostik und Intervention, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Graessner, J. [Siemens Medical Solutions (Germany); Petersen, K. [Zentrum fuer Psychosoziale Medizin, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany); Reitmeier, F.; Jaehne, M. [Kopf und Hautzentrum, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Hals-, Nasen- und Ohrenheilkunde, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of diffusion-weighted (DWI) echo-planar imaging (EPI) to depict the submandibular glands and to measure different functional conditions. Materials and Methods: Twenty-seven healthy volunteers were examined. Diffusion weighted sequence was performed prior to stimulation. Exactly 30 seconds after a commercially available lemon juice was given orally, the diffusion weighted sequence was repeated. All examinations were performed by using a 1.5-T superconducting system with a 30 mT/m maximum gradient capability and maximum slew rate of 125 mT/m/sec (Magnetom Symphony, Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). The lower part of the circularly polarized (CP) head coil and a standard two-element CP neck array coil were used. The flexibility of the neck array coil allowed positioning the N1 element (upper part of the coil) right next to the submandibular gland. The axial diffusion-weighted EPI (echo planar imaging) sequence was performed using a matrix of 119 x 128, a field of view of 250 x 250 mm (pixel size 2.1 x 1.95 mm), a section thickness of 5 mm with an interslice gap of 1 mm. The b factors used were 0 sec/mm{sup 2}, 500 sec/mm{sup 2} and 1000 sec/mm{sup 2}. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were digitally transferred to MRIcro (Chris Rorden, University of Nottingham, Great Britain). After detecting the submandibular glands a region of interest (ROI) was placed manually exactly within the boarder of both submandibular glands, excluding the external carotid artery on ADC maps. These procedures were performed on all ADC slices the submandibular glands could be differentiated in before and after oral stimulation. For statistical comparison of results, a student's t-test was performed with an overall two-tailed significance level of p=0.05. Results: The visualization of the submandibular glands using the diffusion-weighted EPI sequence was possible in all of the 27 volunteers. Prior to oral stimulation an ADC of 1.31 x 10{sup -3

  19. Correlation function analysis of the COBE differential microwave radiometer sky maps

    Lineweaver, Charles Howe [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Space Sciences Lab.

    1994-08-01

    The Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) aboard the COBE satellite has detected anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. A two-point correlation function analysis which helped lead to this discovery is presented in detail. The results of a correlation function analysis of the two year DMR data set is presented. The first and second year data sets are compared and found to be reasonably consistent. The positive correlation for separation angles less than ~20° is robust to Galactic latitude cuts and is very stable from year to year. The Galactic latitude cut independence of the correlation function is strong evidence that the signal is not Galactic in origin. The statistical significance of the structure seen in the correlation function of the first, second and two year maps is respectively > 9σ, > 10σ and > 18σ above the noise. The noise in the DMR sky maps is correlated at a low level. The structure of the pixel temperature covariance matrix is given. The noise covariance matrix of a DMR sky map is diagonal to an accuracy of better than 1%. For a given sky pixel, the dominant noise covariance occurs with the ring of pixels at an angular separation of 60° due to the 60° separation of the DMR horns. The mean covariance of 60° is 0.45%$+0.18\\atop{-0.14}$ of the mean variance. The noise properties of the DMR maps are thus well approximated by the noise properties of maps made by a single-beam experiment. Previously published DMR results are not significantly affected by correlated noise.

  20. RF-Based Location Using Interpolation Functions to Reduce Fingerprint Mapping

    Ezpeleta, Santiago; Claver, José M.; Pérez-Solano, Juan J.; Martí, José V.

    2015-01-01

    Indoor RF-based localization using fingerprint mapping requires an initial training step, which represents a time consuming process. This location methodology needs a database conformed with RSSI (Radio Signal Strength Indicator) measures from the communication transceivers taken at specific locations within the localization area. But, the real world localization environment is dynamic and it is necessary to rebuild the fingerprint database when some environmental changes are made. This paper explores the use of different interpolation functions to complete the fingerprint mapping needed to achieve the sought accuracy, thereby reducing the effort in the training step. Also, different distributions of test maps and reference points have been evaluated, showing the validity of this proposal and necessary trade-offs. Results reported show that the same or similar localization accuracy can be achieved even when only 50% of the initial fingerprint reference points are taken. PMID:26516862

  1. Nonarticular tenderness and functional status in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis.

    Mader, Reuven; Novofastovski, Irina; Rosner, Ehud; Adawi, Muhammad; Herer, Paula; Buskila, Dan

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the degree of nonarticular tenderness and functional status in patients with diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH). We assessed these variables' correlation with their clinical, radiographic, and constitutional measurements and with metabolic syndrome (MS). Eighty-seven patients with DISH were compared with 65 controls without DISH. Examination of nonarticular tenderness was performed by thumb palpation. Tenderness was scored for the 18 fibromyalgia tender points (TP), and 4 control points. Nonarticular tenderness was expressed by the number of TP and by the total tenderness score (TTS). The Short Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ II) was administered to all participants. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from all patients. Patients were classified as having MS by both the National Cholesterol Education Program and World Health Organization definitions. There was a statistically significant difference in TTS between controls and patients with DISH. The mean tenderness of many individual TP was significantly higher in the DISH group compared with the control group. TP counts, TTS, and body mass index (BMI) positively correlated with the HAQ II. There was a linear trend in intensity of T-spine bony bridges (BB) and the total number of TP as well as many individual TP. Patients with DISH were more likely to be affected by MS. No correlation was found between TP count, TTS, and MS. Patients with DISH have a lower pain threshold than patients who do not have DISH. TP count and TTS correlate with the functional status, BMI, waist circumference, and high-grade BB. No correlation was observed between pain threshold and MS.

  2. Apocrustacyanin C(1) crystals grown in space and on earth using vapour-diffusion geometry: protein structure refinements and electron-density map comparisons.

    Habash, Jarjis; Boggon, Titus J; Raftery, James; Chayen, Naomi E; Zagalsky, Peter F; Helliwell, John R

    2003-07-01

    Models of apocrustacyanin C(1) were refined against X-ray data recorded on Bending Magnet 14 at the ESRF to resolutions of 1.85 and 2 A from a space-grown and an earth-grown crystal, respectively, both using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The space crystals were grown in the APCF on the NASA Space Shuttle. The microgravity crystal growth showed a cyclic nature attributed to Marangoni convection, thus reducing the benefits of the microgravity environment, as reported previously [Chayen et al. (1996), Q. Rev. Biophys. 29, 227-278]. A subsequent mosaicity evaluation, also reported previously, showed only a partial improvement in the space-grown crystals over the earth-grown crystals [Snell et al. (1997), Acta Cryst. D53, 231-239], contrary to the case for lysozyme crystals grown in space with liquid-liquid diffusion, i.e. without any major motion during growth [Snell et al. (1995), Acta Cryst. D52, 1099-1102]. In this paper, apocrustacyanin C(1) electron-density maps from the two refined models are now compared. It is concluded that the electron-density maps of the protein and the bound waters are found to be better overall for the structures of apocrustacyanin C(1) studied from the space-grown crystal compared with those from the earth-grown crystal, even though both crystals were grown using vapour-diffusion crystal-growth geometry. The improved residues are on the surface of the protein, with two involved in or nearby crystal lattice-forming interactions, thus linking an improved crystal-growth mechanism to the molecular level. The structural comparison procedures developed should themselves be valuable for evaluating crystal-growth procedures in the future.

  3. Perturbed invariant subspaces and approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for nonlinear diffusion-convection equations with weak source

    Xia, Ya-Rong; Zhang, Shun-Li; Xin, Xiang-Peng

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we propose the concept of the perturbed invariant subspaces (PISs), and study the approximate generalized functional variable separation solution for the nonlinear diffusion-convection equation with weak source by the approximate generalized conditional symmetries (AGCSs) related to the PISs. Complete classification of the perturbed equations which admit the approximate generalized functional separable solutions (AGFSSs) is obtained. As a consequence, some AGFSSs to the resulting equations are explicitly constructed by way of examples.

  4. Hidden Markov event sequence models: toward unsupervised functional MRI brain mapping.

    Faisan, Sylvain; Thoraval, Laurent; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Foucher, Jack R; Metz-Lutz, Marie-Noëlle; Heitz, Fabrice

    2005-01-01

    Most methods used in functional MRI (fMRI) brain mapping require restrictive assumptions about the shape and timing of the fMRI signal in activated voxels. Consequently, fMRI data may be partially and misleadingly characterized, leading to suboptimal or invalid inference. To limit these assumptions and to capture the broad range of possible activation patterns, a novel statistical fMRI brain mapping method is proposed. It relies on hidden semi-Markov event sequence models (HSMESMs), a special class of hidden Markov models (HMMs) dedicated to the modeling and analysis of event-based random processes. Activation detection is formulated in terms of time coupling between (1) the observed sequence of hemodynamic response onset (HRO) events detected in the voxel's fMRI signal and (2) the "hidden" sequence of task-induced neural activation onset (NAO) events underlying the HROs. Both event sequences are modeled within a single HSMESM. The resulting brain activation model is trained to automatically detect neural activity embedded in the input fMRI data set under analysis. The data sets considered in this article are threefold: synthetic epoch-related, real epoch-related (auditory lexical processing task), and real event-related (oddball detection task) fMRI data sets. Synthetic data: Activation detection results demonstrate the superiority of the HSMESM mapping method with respect to a standard implementation of the statistical parametric mapping (SPM) approach. They are also very close, sometimes equivalent, to those obtained with an "ideal" implementation of SPM in which the activation patterns synthesized are reused for analysis. The HSMESM method appears clearly insensitive to timing variations of the hemodynamic response and exhibits low sensitivity to fluctuations of its shape (unsustained activation during task). Real epoch-related data: HSMESM activation detection results compete with those obtained with SPM, without requiring any prior definition of the expected

  5. The diffuse chemosensory system: exploring the iceberg toward the definition of functional roles.

    Sbarbati, Andrea; Bramanti, Placido; Benati, Donatella; Merigo, Flavia

    2010-05-01

    The diffuse chemosensory system (DCS) is an anatomical structure composed of solitary chemosensory cells (SCCs, also called solitary chemoreceptor cells), which have analogies with taste cells but are not aggregated in buds. The concept of DCS has been advanced, after the discovery that cells similar to gustatory elements are present in several organs. The elements forming the DCS share common morphological and biochemical characteristics with the taste cells located in taste buds of the oro-pharyngeal cavity but they are localized in internal organs. In particular, they may express molecules of the chemoreceptorial cascade (e.g. trans-membrane taste receptors, the G-protein alpha-gustducin, PLCbeta2, TRPM5). This article will focus on the mammalian DCS in apparatuses of endodermic origin (i.e. digestive and respiratory systems), which is composed of an enormous number of sensory elements and presents a multiplicity of morphological aspects. Recent research has provided an adequate description of these elements, but the functional role for the DCS in these apparatuses is unknown. The initial findings led to the definition of a DCS structured like an iceberg, with a mysterious "submerged" portion localized in the distal part of endodermic apparatuses. Recent work has focussed on the discovery of this submerged portion, which now appears less puzzling. However, the functional roles of the different cytotypes belonging to the DCS are not well known. Recent studies linked chemosensation of the intraluminal content to local control of absorptive and secretory (exocrine and endocrine) processes. Control of the microbial population and detection of irritants seem to be other possible functions of the DCS. In the light of these new findings, the DCS might be thought to be involved in a wide range of diseases of both the respiratory (e.g. asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis) and digestive apparatuses (absorptive or secretive diseases, dysmicrobism

  6. Mapping closure for probability distribution function in low frequency magnetized plasma turbulence

    Das, A.; Kaw, P.

    1995-01-01

    Recent numerical studies on the Hasegawa--Mima equation and its variants describing low frequency magnetized plasma turbulence indicate that the potential fluctuations have a Gaussian character whereas the vorticity exhibits non-Gaussian features. A theoretical interpretation for this observation using the recently developed mapping closure technique [Chen, Chen, and Kraichnan, Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 2657 (1989)] has been provided here. It has been shown that non-Gaussian statistics for the vorticity arises because of a competition between nonlinear straining and diffusive damping whereas the Gaussianity of the statistics of φ arises because the only significant nonlinearity is associated with divergence free convection, which produces no strain terms. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Moho map of South America from receiver functions and surface waves

    Lloyd, Simon; van der Lee, Suzan; FrançA, George Sand; AssumpçãO, Marcelo; Feng, Mei

    2010-11-01

    We estimate crustal structure and thickness of South America north of roughly 40°S. To this end, we analyzed receiver functions from 20 relatively new temporary broadband seismic stations deployed across eastern Brazil. In the analysis we include teleseismic and some regional events, particularly for stations that recorded few suitable earthquakes. We first estimate crustal thickness and average Poisson's ratio using two different stacking methods. We then combine the new crustal constraints with results from previous receiver function studies. To interpolate the crustal thickness between the station locations, we jointly invert these Moho point constraints, Rayleigh wave group velocities, and regional S and Rayleigh waveforms for a continuous map of Moho depth. The new tomographic Moho map suggests that Moho depth and Moho relief vary slightly with age within the Precambrian crust. Whether or not a positive correlation between crustal thickness and geologic age is derived from the pre-interpolation point constraints depends strongly on the selected subset of receiver functions. This implies that using only pre-interpolation point constraints (receiver functions) inadequately samples the spatial variation in geologic age. The new Moho map also reveals an anomalously deep Moho beneath the oldest core of the Amazonian Craton.

  8. Intra-operative multi-site stimulation: Expanding methodology for cortical brain mapping of language functions.

    Gonen, Tal; Gazit, Tomer; Korn, Akiva; Kirschner, Adi; Perry, Daniella; Hendler, Talma; Ram, Zvi

    2017-01-01

    Direct cortical stimulation (DCS) is considered the gold-standard for functional cortical mapping during awake surgery for brain tumor resection. DCS is performed by stimulating one local cortical area at a time. We present a feasibility study using an intra-operative technique aimed at improving our ability to map brain functions which rely on activity in distributed cortical regions. Following standard DCS, Multi-Site Stimulation (MSS) was performed in 15 patients by applying simultaneous cortical stimulations at multiple locations. Language functioning was chosen as a case-cognitive domain due to its relatively well-known cortical organization. MSS, performed at sites that did not produce disruption when applied in a single stimulation point, revealed additional language dysfunction in 73% of the patients. Functional regions identified by this technique were presumed to be significant to language circuitry and were spared during surgery. No new neurological deficits were observed in any of the patients following surgery. Though the neuro-electrical effects of MSS need further investigation, this feasibility study may provide a first step towards sophistication of intra-operative cortical mapping.

  9. Mapping diffuse interstellar bands in the local ISM on small scales via MUSE 3D spectroscopy. A pilot study based on globular cluster NGC 6397

    Wendt, Martin; Husser, Tim-Oliver; Kamann, Sebastian; Monreal-Ibero, Ana; Richter, Philipp; Brinchmann, Jarle; Dreizler, Stefan; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2017-11-01

    Context. We map the interstellar medium (ISM) including the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) in absorption toward the globular cluster NGC 6397 using VLT/MUSE. Assuming the absorbers are located at the rim of the Local Bubble we trace structures on the order of mpc (milliparsec, a few thousand AU). Aims: We aimed to demonstrate the feasibility to map variations of DIBs on small scales with MUSE. The sightlines defined by binned stellar spectra are separated by only a few arcseconds and we probe the absorption within a physically connected region. Methods: This analysis utilized the fitting residuals of individual stellar spectra of NGC 6397 member stars and analyzed lines from neutral species and several DIBs in Voronoi-binned composite spectra with high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N). Results: This pilot study demonstrates the power of MUSE for mapping the local ISM on very small scales which provides a new window for ISM observations. We detect small scale variations in Na I and K I as well as in several DIBs within few arcseconds, or mpc with regard to the Local Bubble. We verify the suitability of the MUSE 3D spectrograph for such measurements and gain new insights by probing a single physical absorber with multiple sight lines.

  10. An automatic measuring system for mapping of spectral and angular dependence of direct and diffuse solar radiation; Et automatisk maalesystem for kartlegging av vinkel- og spektralfordeling av direkte og diffus solstraaling

    Grandum, Oddbjoern

    1997-12-31

    In optimizing solar systems, it is necessary to know the spectral and angular dependence of the radiation. The general nonlinear character of most solar energy systems accentuates this. This thesis describes a spectroradiometer that will measure both the direct component of the solar radiation and the angular dependence of the diffuse component. Radiation from a selected part of the sky is transported through a movable set of tube sections on to a stationary set of three monochromators with detectors. The beam transport system may effectively be looked upon as a single long tube aimed at a particular spot in the sky. The half value of the effective opening angle is 1.3{sup o} for diffuse radiation and 2.8{sup o} for direct radiation. The whole measurement process is controlled and operated by a PC and normally runs without manual attention. The instrument is built into a caravan. The thesis describes in detail the experimental apparatus, calibration and measurement accuracies. To map the diffuse radiation, one divides the sky into 26 sectors of equal solid angle. A complete measurement cycle is then made at a random point within each sector. These measurements are modelled by fitting to spherical harmonics, enforcing symmetry around the solar direction and the horizontal plane. The direct radiation is measured separately. Also the circumsolar sector is given special treatment. The measurements are routinely checked against global radiation measured in parallel by a standard pyranometer, and direct solar radiation by a pyrheliometer. An extensive improvement programme is being planned for the instrument, including the use of a photomultiplier tube to measure the UV part of the spectrum, a diode array for the 400-1100 nm range, and use of a Ge diode for the 1000-1900 nm range. 78 refs., 90 figs., 31 tabs.

  11. Virtual brain mapping: Meta-analysis and visualization in functional neuroimaging

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    Results from functional neuroimaging such as positron emission tomography and functional magnetic resonance are often reported as sets of 3-dimensional coordinates in Talairach stereotactic space. By utilizing data collected in the BrainMap database and from our own small XML database we can...... data matrix. By conditioning on elements in the databases other than the coordinate data, e.g., anatomical labels associated with many coordinates we can make conditional novelty detection identifying outliers in the database that might be errorneous entries or seldom occuring patterns. In the Brain......Map database we found errors, e.g., stemming from confusion of centimeters and millimeters during entering and errors in the original article. Conditional probability density modeling also enables generation of probabilistic atlases and automatic probabilistic anatomical labeling of new coordinates...

  12. One-way Hash function construction based on the chaotic map with changeable-parameter

    Xiao Di; Liao Xiaofeng; Deng Shaojiang

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for one-way Hash function construction based on the chaotic map with changeable-parameter is proposed in this paper. A piecewise linear chaotic map with changeable-parameter P is chosen, and cipher block chaining mode (CBC) is introduced to ensure that the parameter P in each iteration is dynamically decided by the last-time iteration value and the corresponding message bit in different positions. The final Hash value is obtained by means of the linear transform on the iteration sequence. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation indicate that our algorithm can satisfy all the performance requirements of Hash function in an efficient and flexible manner. It is practicable and reliable, with high potential to be adopted for E-commerce

  13. Beyond the usual mapping functions in GPS, VLBI and Deep Space tracking.

    Barriot, Jean-Pierre; Serafini, Jonathan; Sichoix, Lydie

    2014-05-01

    We describe here a new algorithm to model the water contents of the atmosphere (including ZWD) from GPS slant wet delays relative to a single receiver. We first make the assumption that the water vapor contents are mainly governed by a scale height (exponential law), and secondly that the departures from this decaying exponential can be mapped as a set of low degree 3D Zernike functions (w.r.t. space) and Tchebyshev polynomials (w.r.t. time.) We compare this new algorithm with previous algorithms known as mapping functions in GPS, VLBI and Deep Space tracking and give an example with data acquired over a one day time span at the Geodesy Observatory of Tahiti.

  14. One-way Hash function construction based on the chaotic map with changeable-parameter

    Xiao Di [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China) and College of Mechanical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)]. E-mail: xiaodi_cqu@hotmail.com; Liao Xiaofeng [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)]. E-mail: xfliao@cqu.edu.cn; Deng Shaojiang [College of Computer Science and Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2005-04-01

    An algorithm for one-way Hash function construction based on the chaotic map with changeable-parameter is proposed in this paper. A piecewise linear chaotic map with changeable-parameter P is chosen, and cipher block chaining mode (CBC) is introduced to ensure that the parameter P in each iteration is dynamically decided by the last-time iteration value and the corresponding message bit in different positions. The final Hash value is obtained by means of the linear transform on the iteration sequence. Theoretical analysis and computer simulation indicate that our algorithm can satisfy all the performance requirements of Hash function in an efficient and flexible manner. It is practicable and reliable, with high potential to be adopted for E-commerce.

  15. Density functional theory study of the mechanism of Li diffusion in rutile RuO2

    Jung, Jongboo; Cho, Maenghyo; Zhou, Min

    2014-01-01

    First-principle calculations are carried out to study the diffusion of Li ions in rutile structure RuO 2 , a material for positive electrodes in rechargeable Li ion batteries. The calculations focus on migration pathways and energy barriers for diffusion in Li-poor and Li-rich phases using the Nudged Elastic Band Method. Diffusion coefficients estimated based on calculated energy barriers are in good agreement with experimental values reported in the literature. The results confirm the anisotropic nature of diffusion of Li ions in one-dimensional c channels along the [001] crystalline direction of rutile RuO 2 and show that Li diffusion in the Li-poor phase is faster than in the Li-rich phase. The findings of fast Li diffusion and feasible Li insertion at low temperatures in the host rutile RuO 2 suggest this material is a good ionic conductor for Li transport. The finding also suggests possible means for enhancing the performance of RuO 2 -based electrode materials

  16. Functional alterations of V1 cortex in patients with primary open angle glaucoma using functional MRI retinotopic mapping

    Shi Linping; Cai Ping; Li Changying; Li Xueqin; Xie Bing; Li Sha; Liu Ting; Chen Xing; Shi Yanshu; Wang Jian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the functional changes of visual cortex (V1) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) by fMRI retinotopic mapping technology. Methods: Fifteen POAG patients and 15 healthy volunteers underwent stimulations with fMRI retinotopic mapping stimulus and contrast-reversing checkerboard patterns stimulus on a Siemens Trio 3.0 T MRI whole-body scanner for functional data collection. Comparisons of V1 fMRI responses between the glaucomatous eyes and the healthy eyes of the patients were carried out using paired samples t-test, while independent samples t-test was used to compare V1 fMRI responses and activations between the healthy eyes of patients and the age-, gender- and side- matched eyes of normal people. Differences of V1 cortical functions and visual functions were analyzed by linear correlation analysis when the glaucomatous and the healthy eyes were simulated individually., Results: (1) V1 fMRI responses of the individually stimulated glaucomatous eyes [(1.24±0.72)%] were weaker than those of the healthy eyes [(2.18±0.93)%] (t=4.757, P 0.05). (2) Differences of V1 cortical functions were negatively correlated with those of visual functions in the individually stimulated glaucomatous and healthy eyes (r=-0.887, P< 0.01). (3) The activated area indexes of V1 cortexes in the healthy eyes from patients (0.72±0.12) were lower than those in the matched eyes of normal people (0.85±0.09) (t=-3.801, P<0.01) . Conclusion: Cortical function impairment was in accordance with visual function impairment in glaucoma. Located and quantified measurement with fMRI retinotopic mapping was a useful method for clinical follow-up and evaluation of functional alteration of glaucomatous visual cortex, and a potentially useful means of studying trans-synaptic degeneration of visual pathways of in vivo glaucoma. (authors)

  17. On an application of conformal maps to inequalities for rational functions

    Dubinin, V N

    2002-01-01

    Using classical properties of conformal maps, we get new exact inequalities for rational functions with prescribed poles. In particular, we prove a new Bernstein-type inequality, an inequality for Blaschke products and a theorem that generalizes the Turan inequality for polynomials. The estimates obtained strengthen some familiar inequalities of Videnskii and Rusak. They are also related to recent results of Borwein, Erdelyi, Li, Mohapatra, Rodriguez, Aziz and others

  18. Cryptanalysis on a parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps

    Guo Wei; Wang Xiaoming; He Dake; Cao Yang

    2009-01-01

    This Letter analyzes the security of a novel parallel keyed hash function based on chaotic maps, proposed by Xiao et al. to improve the efficiency in parallel computing environment. We show how to devise forgery attacks on Xiao's scheme with differential cryptanalysis and give the experiment results of two kinds of forgery attacks firstly. Furthermore, we discuss the problem of weak keys in the scheme and demonstrate how to utilize weak keys to construct collision.

  19. A mathematical framework for functional mapping of complex phenotypes using delay differential equations.

    Fu, Guifang; Wang, Zhong; Li, Jiahan; Wu, Rongling

    2011-11-21

    All biological phenomena occurring at different levels of organization from cells to organisms can be modeled as a dynamic system, in which the underlying components interact dynamically to comprehend its biological function. Such a systems modeling approach facilitates the use of biochemically and biophysically detailed mathematical models to describe and quantify "living cells," leading to an in-depth and precise understanding of the behavior, development and function of a biological system. Here, we illustrate how this approach can be used to map genes or quantitative trait loci (QTLs) that control a complex trait using the example of the circadian rhythm system which has been at the forefront of analytical mathematical modeling for many years. We integrate a system of biologically meaningful delay differential equations (DDEs) into functional mapping, a statistical model designed to map dynamic QTLs involved in biological processes. The DDEs model the ability of circadian rhythm to generate autonomously sustained oscillations with a period close to 24h, in terms of time-varying mRNA and protein abundances. By incorporating the Runge-Kutta fourth order algorithm within the likelihood-based context of functional mapping, we estimated the genetic parameters that define the periodic pattern of QTL effects on time-varying mRNA and protein abundances and their dynamic association as well as the linkage disequilibrium of the QTL and a marker. We prove theorems about how to choose appropriate parameters to guarantee periodic oscillations. We further used simulation studies to investigate how a QTL influences the period and the amplitude of circadian oscillations through changing model parameters. The model provides a quantitative framework for assessing the interplay between genetic effects of QTLs and rhythmic responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Oscillations and concentrations generated by A-free mappings and weak lower semicontinuity of integral functionals

    Fonseca, I.; Kružík, Martin

    Roč.16, č. 2 (2010), s. 472-502 ISSN 1262-3377 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA1075402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : oscillations * concentrations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.084, year: 2009 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2009/MTR/kruzik-oscillations and concentrations generated by a-free mappings and weak lower semicontinuity of integral functionals.pdf

  1. Functional Topography of Human Corpus Callosum: An fMRI Mapping Study

    Fabri, Mara; Polonara, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a topographical map of the corpus callosum (CC) has emerged from human lesion studies and from electrophysiological and anatomical tracing investigations in other mammals. Over the last few years a rising number of researchers have been reporting functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) activation in white matter, particularly the CC. In this study the scope for describing CC topography with fMRI was explored by evoking activation through simple sensory stimulation and moto...

  2. PyCCF: Python Cross Correlation Function for reverberation mapping studies

    Sun, Mouyuan; Grier, C. J.; Peterson, B. M.

    2018-05-01

    PyCCF emulates a Fortran program written by B. Peterson for use with reverberation mapping. The code cross correlates two light curves that are unevenly sampled using linear interpolation and measures the peak and centroid of the cross-correlation function. In addition, it is possible to run Monto Carlo iterations using flux randomization and random subset selection (RSS) to produce cross-correlation centroid distributions to estimate the uncertainties in the cross correlation results.

  3. A NON-PARAMETRIC APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN THE TRANSFER FUNCTION IN REVERBERATION MAPPING

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min; Bai, Jin-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei stem from a spatially extended region (broad-line region, BLR) that is composed of discrete clouds and photoionized by the central ionizing continuum. The temporal behaviors of these emission lines are blurred echoes of continuum variations (i.e., reverberation mapping, RM) and directly reflect the structures and kinematic information of BLRs through the so-called transfer function (also known as the velocity-delay map). Based on the previous works of Rybicki and Press and Zu et al., we develop an extended, non-parametric approach to determine the transfer function for RM data, in which the transfer function is expressed as a sum of a family of relatively displaced Gaussian response functions. Therefore, arbitrary shapes of transfer functions associated with complicated BLR geometry can be seamlessly included, enabling us to relax the presumption of a specified transfer function frequently adopted in previous studies and to let it be determined by observation data. We formulate our approach in a previously well-established framework that incorporates the statistical modeling of continuum variations as a damped random walk process and takes into account long-term secular variations which are irrelevant to RM signals. The application to RM data shows the fidelity of our approach.

  4. A NON-PARAMETRIC APPROACH TO CONSTRAIN THE TRANSFER FUNCTION IN REVERBERATION MAPPING

    Li, Yan-Rong; Wang, Jian-Min [Key Laboratory for Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19B Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Bai, Jin-Ming, E-mail: liyanrong@mail.ihep.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2016-11-10

    Broad emission lines of active galactic nuclei stem from a spatially extended region (broad-line region, BLR) that is composed of discrete clouds and photoionized by the central ionizing continuum. The temporal behaviors of these emission lines are blurred echoes of continuum variations (i.e., reverberation mapping, RM) and directly reflect the structures and kinematic information of BLRs through the so-called transfer function (also known as the velocity-delay map). Based on the previous works of Rybicki and Press and Zu et al., we develop an extended, non-parametric approach to determine the transfer function for RM data, in which the transfer function is expressed as a sum of a family of relatively displaced Gaussian response functions. Therefore, arbitrary shapes of transfer functions associated with complicated BLR geometry can be seamlessly included, enabling us to relax the presumption of a specified transfer function frequently adopted in previous studies and to let it be determined by observation data. We formulate our approach in a previously well-established framework that incorporates the statistical modeling of continuum variations as a damped random walk process and takes into account long-term secular variations which are irrelevant to RM signals. The application to RM data shows the fidelity of our approach.

  5. Regional Quantitative Cover Mapping of Tundra Plant Functional Types in Arctic Alaska

    Matthew J. Macander

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem maps are foundational tools that support multi-disciplinary study design and applications including wildlife habitat assessment, monitoring and Earth-system modeling. Here, we present continuous-field cover maps for tundra plant functional types (PFTs across ~125,000 km2 of Alaska’s North Slope at 30-m resolution. To develop maps, we collected a field-based training dataset using a point-intercept sampling method at 225 plots spanning bioclimatic and geomorphic gradients. We stratified vegetation by nine PFTs (e.g., low deciduous shrub, dwarf evergreen shrub, sedge, lichen and summarized measurements of the PFTs, open water, bare ground and litter using the cover metrics total cover (areal cover including the understory and top cover (uppermost canopy or ground cover. We then developed 73 spectral predictors derived from Landsat satellite observations (surface reflectance composites for ~15-day periods from May–August and five gridded environmental predictors (e.g., summer temperature, climatological snow-free date to model cover of PFTs using the random forest data-mining algorithm. Model performance tended to be best for canopy-forming PFTs, particularly deciduous shrubs. Our assessment of predictor importance indicated that models for low-statured PFTs were improved through the use of seasonal composites from early and late in the growing season, particularly when similar PFTs were aggregated together (e.g., total deciduous shrub, herbaceous. Continuous-field maps have many advantages over traditional thematic maps, and the methods described here are well-suited to support periodic map updates in tandem with future field and Landsat observations.

  6. Novel techniques of real-time blood flow and functional mapping: technical note.

    Kamada, Kyousuke; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Saito, Masato; Tamura, Yukie; Anei, Ryogo; Kapeller, Christoph; Hayashi, Hideaki; Prueckl, Robert; Guger, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    There are two main approaches to intraoperative monitoring in neurosurgery. One approach is related to fluorescent phenomena and the other is related to oscillatory neuronal activity. We developed novel techniques to visualize blood flow (BF) conditions in real time, based on indocyanine green videography (ICG-VG) and the electrophysiological phenomenon of high gamma activity (HGA). We investigated the use of ICG-VG in four patients with moyamoya disease and two with arteriovenous malformation (AVM), and we investigated the use of real-time HGA mapping in four patients with brain tumors who underwent lesion resection with awake craniotomy. Real-time data processing of ICG-VG was based on perfusion imaging, which generated parameters including arrival time (AT), mean transit time (MTT), and BF of brain surface vessels. During awake craniotomy, we analyzed the frequency components of brain oscillation and performed real-time HGA mapping to identify functional areas. Processed results were projected on a wireless monitor linked to the operating microscope. After revascularization for moyamoya disease, AT and BF were significantly shortened and increased, respectively, suggesting hyperperfusion. Real-time fusion images on the wireless monitor provided anatomical, BF, and functional information simultaneously, and allowed the resection of AVMs under the microscope. Real-time HGA mapping during awake craniotomy rapidly indicated the eloquent areas of motor and language function and significantly shortened the operation time. These novel techniques, which we introduced might improve the reliability of intraoperative monitoring and enable the development of rational and objective surgical strategies.

  7. Modeling of stochastic broadening in a poloidally diverted discharge with piecewise analytic symplectic mapping flux functions

    Punjabi, Alkesh; Ali, Halima; Evans, Todd; Boozer, Allen

    2008-01-01

    A highly accurate calculation of the magnetic field line Hamiltonian in DIII-D [J. L. Luxon and L. E. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8, 441 (1985)] is made from piecewise analytic equilibrium fit data for shot 115467 3000 ms. The safety factor calculated from this Hamiltonian has a logarithmic singularity at an ideal separatrix. The logarithmic region inside the ideal separatrix contains 2.5% of toroidal flux inside the separatrix. The logarithmic region is symmetric about the separatrix. An area-preserving map for the field line trajectories is obtained in magnetic coordinates from the Hamiltonian equations of motion for the lines and a canonical transformation. This map is used to calculate trajectories of magnetic field lines in DIII-D. The field line Hamiltonian in DIII-D is used as the generating function for the map and to calculate stochastic broadening from field-errors and spatial noise near the separatrix. A very negligible amount (0.03%) of magnetic flux is lost from inside the separatrix due to these nonaxisymmetric fields. It is quite easy to add magnetic perturbations to generating functions and calculate trajectories for maps in magnetic coordinates. However, it is not possible to integrate across the separatrix. It is also difficult to find the physical position corresponding to magnetic coordinates. For open field lines, periodicity in the poloidal angle is assumed, which is not satisfactory. The goal of this paper is to demonstrate the efficacy of the symplectic mapping approach rather than using realistic DIII-D parameters or modeling specific experimental results

  8. Mapping the changed hubs and corresponding functional connectivity in idiopathic restless legs syndrome.

    Liu, Chunyan; Wang, Jiaojian; Hou, Yue; Qi, Zhigang; Wang, Li; Zhan, Shuqin; Wang, Rong; Wang, Yuping

    2018-05-01

    The hubs of the brain network play a key role in integrating and transferring information between different functional modules. However, whether the changed pattern in functional network hubs contributes to the onset of leg discomfort symptoms in restless legs syndrome (RLS) patients remains unclear. Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and graph theory methods, we investigated whether alterations of hubs can be detected in RLS. First, we constructed the whole-brain voxelwise functional connectivity and calculated a functional connectivity strength (FCS) map in each of 16 drug-naive idiopathic RLS patients and 26 gender- and age-matched healthy control (HC) subjects. Next, a two-sample t test was applied to compare the FCS maps between HC and RLS patients, and to identify significant changes in FCS in RLS patients. To further elucidate the corresponding changes in the functional connectivity patterns of the aberrant hubs in RLS patients, whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity analyses for the hub areas were performed. The hub analysis revealed decreased FCS in the cuneus, fusiform gyrus, paracentral lobe, and precuneus, and increased FCS in the superior frontal gyrus and thalamus in idiopathic drug-naive RLS patients. Subsequent functional connectivity analyses revealed decreased functional connectivity in sensorimotor and visual processing networks and increased functional connectivity in the affective cognitive network and cerebellar-thalamic circuit. Furthermore, the mean FCS value in the superior frontal gyrus was significantly correlated with Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale scores in RLS patients, and the mean FCS value in the fusiform gyrus was significantly correlated with Hamilton Depression Rating Scale scores. These findings may provide novel insight into the pathophysiology of RLS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose-response functions and corrosion mapping for a small geographical area

    Haagenrud, S.E.; Henriksen, J.F.; Gram, F.

    1985-01-01

    Detailed corrosion and environmental measurements have been used to develop dose response (D/R) functions for carbon steel, zinc, copper, and aluminum for a 26 x 31 km urban/rural area with approximately homogeneous climate. The D/R functions, expressed in terms of SO 2 and time of wetness, were of the same type for all four metals. The SO 2 contribution to the total corrosion dominates in the centers of towns and around an industrial plant. Corrosion maps for the whole area were established

  10. The investigation of the stochastization mechanisms of the beam generators using the method of functional map

    Bliokh, Yu.P.; Fajnberg, Ya.B.; Lyubarskij, M.G.; Podobinskij, V.O.

    1994-01-01

    Certain distributed dynamical systems describing the well-known beam generators of UHF oscillations are organized very simple: the nonlinear functional, which determines the current state of the system with respect to its behaviour in the past, is represented as a composition of the linear functional and the nonlinear finite-dimensional map. This property made it possible to find the mechanisms of auto modulation and stochastization of the signals from beam generators and to define corresponding range of parameters values. 12 refs., 6 figs

  11. Application of statistical parametric mapping in PET and SPECT brain functional imaging

    Guo Wanhua

    2002-01-01

    Regional of interest (ROI) is the method regularly used to analyze brain functional imaging. But, due to its obvious shortcomings such as subjectivity and poor reproducibility, precise analyzing the brain function was seriously limited. Therefore, statistical parametric mapping (SPM) as an automatic analyze software was developed based on voxel or pixel to resolve this problem. Using numerous mathematical models, it can be used to statistically assess the whole brain pixel. Present review introduces its main principle, modular composition and practical application. It can be concluded, with development of neuroscience, the SPM software will be used more widely in relative field, like neurobiology, cognition and neuropharmacology

  12. Rapid and low-invasive functional brain mapping by realtime visualization of high gamma activity for awake craniotomy.

    Kamada, K; Ogawa, H; Kapeller, C; Prueckl, R; Guger, C

    2014-01-01

    For neurosurgery with an awake craniotomy, the critical issue is to set aside enough time to identify eloquent cortices by electrocortical stimulation (ECS). High gamma activity (HGA) ranging between 80 and 120 Hz on electrocorticogram (ECoG) is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing. In this report, we used realtime HGA mapping and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for rapid and reliable identification of motor and language functions. Three patients with intra-axial tumors in their dominant hemisphere underwent preoperative fMRI and lesion resection with an awake craniotomy. All patients showed significant fMRI activation evoked by motor and language tasks. After the craniotomy, we recorded ECoG activity by placing subdural grids directly on the exposed brain surface. Each patient performed motor and language tasks and demonstrated realtime HGA dynamics in hand motor areas and parts of the inferior frontal gyrus. Sensitivity and specificity of HGA mapping were 100% compared to ECS mapping in the frontal lobe, which suggested HGA mapping precisely indicated eloquent cortices. The investigation times of HGA mapping was significantly shorter than that of ECS mapping. Specificities of the motor and language-fMRI, however, did not reach 85%. The results of HGA mapping was mostly consistent with those of ECS mapping, although fMRI tended to overestimate functional areas. This novel technique enables rapid and accurate functional mapping.

  13. On Attribute Thresholding and Data Mapping Functions in a Supervised Connected Component Segmentation Framework

    Christoff Fourie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Search-centric, sample supervised image segmentation has been demonstrated as a viable general approach applicable within the context of remote sensing image analysis. Such an approach casts the controlling parameters of image processing—generating segments—as a multidimensional search problem resolvable via efficient search methods. In this work, this general approach is analyzed in the context of connected component segmentation. A specific formulation of connected component labeling, based on quasi-flat zones, allows for the addition of arbitrary segment attributes to contribute to the nature of the output. This is in addition to core tunable parameters controlling the basic nature of connected components. Additional tunable constituents may also be introduced into such a framework, allowing flexibility in the definition of connected component connectivity, either directly via defining connectivity differently or via additional processes such as data mapping functions. The relative merits of these two additional constituents, namely the addition of tunable attributes and data mapping functions, are contrasted in a general remote sensing image analysis setting. Interestingly, tunable attributes in such a context, conjectured to be safely useful in general settings, were found detrimental under cross-validated conditions. This is in addition to this constituent’s requiring substantially greater computing time. Casting connectivity definitions as a searchable component, here via the utilization of data mapping functions, proved more beneficial and robust in this context. The results suggest that further investigations into such a general framework could benefit more from focusing on the aspects of data mapping and modifiable connectivity as opposed to the utility of thresholding various geometric and spectral attributes.

  14. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in children following near-total pancreatectomy for diffuse congenital hyperinsulinism.

    Arya, Ved Bhushan; Senniappan, Senthil; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Alam, Syeda; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. International referral centre for the management of CHI. Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012. Near-total pancreatectomy. Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1) pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72%) had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1insufficiency was observed in 22 (49%) patients. No statistically significant difference in weight and height standard deviation score (SDS) was found between untreated subclinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients and treated clinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients. The outcome of diffuse CHI patients after near-total pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation.

  15. Functional MRI mapping of visual function and selective attention for performance assessment and presurgical planning using conjunctive visual search.

    Parker, Jason G; Zalusky, Eric J; Kirbas, Cemil

    2014-03-01

    Accurate mapping of visual function and selective attention using fMRI is important in the study of human performance as well as in presurgical treatment planning of lesions in or near visual centers of the brain. Conjunctive visual search (CVS) is a useful tool for mapping visual function during fMRI because of its greater activation extent compared with high-capacity parallel search processes. The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate a CVS that was capable of generating consistent activation in the basic and higher level visual areas of the brain by using a high number of distractors as well as an optimized contrast condition. Images from 10 healthy volunteers were analyzed and brain regions of greatest activation and deactivation were determined using a nonbiased decomposition of the results at the hemisphere, lobe, and gyrus levels. The results were quantified in terms of activation and deactivation extent and mean z-statistic. The proposed CVS was found to generate robust activation of the occipital lobe, as well as regions in the middle frontal gyrus associated with coordinating eye movements and in regions of the insula associated with task-level control and focal attention. As expected, the task demonstrated deactivation patterns commonly implicated in the default-mode network. Further deactivation was noted in the posterior region of the cerebellum, most likely associated with the formation of optimal search strategy. We believe the task will be useful in studies of visual and selective attention in the neuroscience community as well as in mapping visual function in clinical fMRI.

  16. Apparent diffusion coefficient maps obtained from high b value diffusion-weighted imaging in the preoperative evaluation of gliomas at 3T: comparison with standard b value diffusion-weighted imaging

    Zeng, Qiang; Ling, Chenhan; Zhang, Jianmin [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Dong, Fei; Jiang, Biao [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Shi, Feina [Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Department of Neurology, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China)

    2017-12-15

    To assess whether ADC maps obtained from high b value DWI were more valuable in preoperatively evaluating the grade, Ki-67 index and outcome of gliomas. Sixty-three patients with gliomas, who underwent preoperative multi b value DWI at 3 T, were enrolled. The ADC{sub 1000}, ADC{sub 2000} and ADC{sub 3000} maps were generated. Receiver operating characteristic analyses were conducted to determine the area under the curve (AUC) in differentiating high-grade gliomas (HGG) from low-grade gliomas (LGG). Pearson correlation coefficients (R value) were calculated to investigate the correlation between parameters with the Ki-67 proliferation index. Survival analysis was conducted by using Cox regression. The AUC of the mean ADC{sub 1000} value (0.820) was lower than that of the mean ADC{sub 2000} value (0.847) and mean ADC{sub 3000} value (0.875) in differentiating HGG from LGG. The R value of the mean ADC{sub 1000} value (-0.499) was less negative than that of the mean ADC{sub 2000} value (-0.530) and mean ADC{sub 3000} value (-0.567). The mean ADC{sub 3000} value was an independent prognosis factor for gliomas (p = 0.008), while the mean ADC{sub 1000} and ADC{sub 2000} values were not. ADC maps obtained from high b value DWI might be a better imaging biomarker in the preoperative evaluation of gliomas. (orig.)

  17. An Intracranial Electroencephalography (iEEG Brain Function Mapping Tool with an Application to Epilepsy Surgery Evaluation

    Yinghua eWang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Object: Before epilepsy surgeries, intracranial electroencephalography (iEEG is often employed in function mapping and epileptogenic foci localization. Although the implanted electrodes provide crucial information for epileptogenic zone resection, a convenient clinical tool for electrode position registration and brain function mapping visualization is still lacking. In this study, we developed a Brain Function Mapping (BFM Tool, which facilitates electrode position registration and brain function mapping visualization, with an application to epilepsy surgeries.Methods: The BFM Tool mainly utilizes electrode location registration and function mapping based on pre-defined brain models from other software. In addition, the electrode node and mapping properties, such as the node size/color, edge color / thickness, mapping method, can be adjusted easily using the setting panel. Moreover, users may manually import / export location and connectivity data to generate figures for further application. The role of this software is demonstrated by a clinical study of language area localization.Results: The BFM Tool helps clinical doctors and researchers visualize implanted electrodes and brain functions in an easy, quick and flexible manner.Conclusions: Our tool provides convenient electrode registration, easy brain function visualization, and has good performance. It is clinical-oriented and is easy to deploy and use. The BFM tool is suitable for epilepsy and other clinical iEEG applications.

  18. Genetic Interaction Maps in Escherichia coli Reveal Functional Crosstalk among Cell Envelope Biogenesis Pathways

    Vlasblom, James; Gagarinova, Alla; Phanse, Sadhna; Graham, Chris; Yousif, Fouad; Ding, Huiming; Xiong, Xuejian; Nazarians-Armavil, Anaies; Alamgir, Md; Ali, Mehrab; Pogoutse, Oxana; Pe'er, Asaf; Arnold, Roland; Michaut, Magali; Parkinson, John; Golshani, Ashkan; Whitfield, Chris; Wodak, Shoshana J.; Moreno-Hagelsieb, Gabriel; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Emili, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium) and prototrophic (minimal medium) culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among >235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens) and an important target. PMID:22125496

  19. Genetic interaction maps in Escherichia coli reveal functional crosstalk among cell envelope biogenesis pathways.

    Mohan Babu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available As the interface between a microbe and its environment, the bacterial cell envelope has broad biological and clinical significance. While numerous biosynthesis genes and pathways have been identified and studied in isolation, how these intersect functionally to ensure envelope integrity during adaptive responses to environmental challenge remains unclear. To this end, we performed high-density synthetic genetic screens to generate quantitative functional association maps encompassing virtually the entire cell envelope biosynthetic machinery of Escherichia coli under both auxotrophic (rich medium and prototrophic (minimal medium culture conditions. The differential patterns of genetic interactions detected among > 235,000 digenic mutant combinations tested reveal unexpected condition-specific functional crosstalk and genetic backup mechanisms that ensure stress-resistant envelope assembly and maintenance. These networks also provide insights into the global systems connectivity and dynamic functional reorganization of a universal bacterial structure that is both broadly conserved among eubacteria (including pathogens and an important target.

  20. Diffusion Tensor Fractional Anisotropy in the Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus Correlates with Functional Independence Measure Cognition Scores in Patients with Cerebral Infarction.

    Koyama, Tetsuo; Domen, Kazuhisa

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between fiber tract degeneration measured by diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI) and outcome of patients after cerebral infarction. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were generated by DTI in patients 14-21 days after the first infarction and were analyzed by tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Mean FA values within the corticospinal tract (CST) and the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) were extracted from individual TBSS data. Relationships between FA ratios (rFAs, lesioned to non-lesioned hemisphere) and outcomes assessed by Brunnstrom stage (BRS) and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) motor and cognition scores were examined using Spearman's rank correlation test. Forty patients (21 left and 19 right hemisphere lesions) were entered into an analytical database. BRS ranged from 1 to 6 (median, 5) for shoulder, elbow, or forearm; from 2 to 6 (median, 4.5) for hand or finger; and from 3 to 6 (median, 5) for lower extremity. FIM motor ranged from 51 to 91 (median, 79.5), and FIM cognition ranged from 16 to 35 (median, 29). rFA values in the CST ranged from .692 to 1.053 (median, .933), and those in the SLF ranged from .778 to 1.076 (median, .965). Mann-Whitney U test (P cognition scores (r = .409, P cognitive function and extremity function, respectively. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. FMAP: Functional Mapping and Analysis Pipeline for metagenomics and metatranscriptomics studies.

    Kim, Jiwoong; Kim, Min Soo; Koh, Andrew Y; Xie, Yang; Zhan, Xiaowei

    2016-10-10

    Given the lack of a complete and comprehensive library of microbial reference genomes, determining the functional profile of diverse microbial communities is challenging. The available functional analysis pipelines lack several key features: (i) an integrated alignment tool, (ii) operon-level analysis, and (iii) the ability to process large datasets. Here we introduce our open-sourced, stand-alone functional analysis pipeline for analyzing whole metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing data, FMAP (Functional Mapping and Analysis Pipeline). FMAP performs alignment, gene family abundance calculations, and statistical analysis (three levels of analyses are provided: differentially-abundant genes, operons and pathways). The resulting output can be easily visualized with heatmaps and functional pathway diagrams. FMAP functional predictions are consistent with currently available functional analysis pipelines. FMAP is a comprehensive tool for providing functional analysis of metagenomic/metatranscriptomic sequencing data. With the added features of integrated alignment, operon-level analysis, and the ability to process large datasets, FMAP will be a valuable addition to the currently available functional analysis toolbox. We believe that this software will be of great value to the wider biology and bioinformatics communities.

  2. On the possibility of obtaining non-diffused proximity functions from cloud-chamber data: Pt. 2

    Zaider, M.

    1988-01-01

    Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods are applied to an inversion problem which consists of unfolding diffusion from proximity functions calculated from cloud-chamber data. The solution appears to be relatively insensitive to statistical errors in the data (an important feature) given the limited number of tracks normally available from cloud-chamber measurements. It is the first time, to our knowledge, that such methods are applied to microdosimetry. (author)

  3. The generalized Airy diffusion equation

    Frank M. Cholewinski

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of a generalized Airy diffusion equation and an associated nonlinear partial differential equation are obtained. Trigonometric type functions are derived for a third order generalized radial Euler type operator. An associated complex variable theory and generalized Cauchy-Euler equations are obtained. Further, it is shown that the Airy expansions can be mapped onto the Bessel Calculus of Bochner, Cholewinski and Haimo.

  4. Mapping cell-specific functional connections in the mouse brain using ChR2-evoked hemodynamics (Conference Presentation)

    Bauer, Adam Q.; Kraft, Andrew; Baxter, Grant A.; Bruchas, Michael; Lee, Jin-Moo; Culver, Joseph P.

    2017-02-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has transformed our understanding of the brain's functional organization. However, mapping subunits of a functional network using hemoglobin alone presents several disadvantages. Evoked and spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations reflect ensemble activity from several populations of neurons making it difficult to discern excitatory vs inhibitory network activity. Still, blood-based methods of brain mapping remain powerful because hemoglobin provides endogenous contrast in all mammalian brains. To add greater specificity to hemoglobin assays, we integrated optical intrinsic signal(OIS) imaging with optogenetic stimulation to create an Opto-OIS mapping tool that combines the cell-specificity of optogenetics with label-free, hemoglobin imaging. Before mapping, titrated photostimuli determined which stimulus parameters elicited linear hemodynamic responses in the cortex. Optimized stimuli were then scanned over the left hemisphere to create a set of optogenetically-defined effective connectivity (Opto-EC) maps. For many sites investigated, Opto-EC maps exhibited higher spatial specificity than those determined using spontaneous hemodynamic fluctuations. For example, resting-state functional connectivity (RS-FC) patterns exhibited widespread ipsilateral connectivity while Opto-EC maps contained distinct short- and long-range constellations of ipsilateral connectivity. Further, RS-FC maps were usually symmetric about midline while Opto-EC maps displayed more heterogeneous contralateral homotopic connectivity. Both Opto-EC and RS-FC patterns were compared to mouse connectivity data from the Allen Institute. Unlike RS-FC maps, Thy1-based maps collected in awake, behaving mice closely recapitulated the connectivity structure derived using ex vivo anatomical tracer methods. Opto-OIS mapping could be a powerful tool for understanding cellular and molecular contributions to network dynamics and processing in the mouse brain.

  5. Analysis of the human brain in primary progressive multiple sclerosis with mapping of the spatial distributions using 1H MR spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging

    Sijens, Paul E.; Irwan, Roy; Potze, Jan Hendrik; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Mostert, Jop P.; Keyser, Jacques de

    2005-01-01

    Primary progressive multiple sclerosis (ppMS; n=4) patients and controls (n=4) were examined by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to map choline (Cho), creatine and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), the fractional anisotropy (FA) and the apparent diffusion constant (ADC). After chemical shift imaging (point-resolved spectroscopy, repetition time/echo time 1,500 ms/135 ms) of a supraventricular volume of interest of 8 x 8 x 2 cm 3 (64 voxels) MRS peak areas were matched to the results of DTI for the corresponding volume elements. Mean FA and NAA values were reduced in the ppMS patients (P<0.01, both) and the ADC increased (P<0.02). The spatial distribution of NAA showed strong correlation to ADC in both ppMS patients and controls (r =-0.74 and r= -0.70; P<0.00001, both), and weaker correlations to FA (r=0.49 and r=0.41; P<0.00001, all). FA and ADC also correlated significantly with Cho in patients and controls (P<0.00001, all). The relationship of Cho and NAA to the ADC and the FA and thus to the content of neuronal structures suggests that these metabolite signals essentially originate from axons (NAA) and the myelin sheath (Cho). This is of interest in view of previous reports in which Cho increases were associated with demyelination and the subsequent breakdown of neurons. (orig.)

  6. Oxygen self-diffusion mechanisms in monoclinic Zr O2 revealed and quantified by density functional theory, random walk analysis, and kinetic Monte Carlo calculations

    Yang, Jing; Youssef, Mostafa; Yildiz, Bilge

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we quantify oxygen self-diffusion in monoclinic-phase zirconium oxide as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure. A migration barrier of each type of oxygen defect was obtained by first-principles calculations. Random walk theory was used to quantify the diffusivities of oxygen interstitials by using the calculated migration barriers. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate diffusivities of oxygen vacancies by distinguishing the threefold- and fourfold-coordinated lattice oxygen. By combining the equilibrium defect concentrations obtained in our previous work together with the herein calculated diffusivity of each defect species, we present the resulting oxygen self-diffusion coefficients and the corresponding atomistically resolved transport mechanisms. The predicted effective migration barriers and diffusion prefactors are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally reported values. This work provides insights into oxygen diffusion engineering in Zr O2 -related devices and parametrization for continuum transport modeling.

  7. Implementing Functional Preoperative Mapping in the Clinical Routine of a Neurosurgical Department: Technical Note.

    Sollmann, Nico; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-07-01

    Navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS) is increasingly being used for mapping of various brain functions and in nTMS-based tractography in neurosurgical departments worldwide. When a department begins using nTMS data in the clinical workflow, smooth integration into the hospital's existing infrastructure is mandatory. Standardized approaches for this beyond the mapping or tractography procedures themselves have not yet been described. To create an effective workflow for neurosurgical nTMS mapping, we present the findings of our 7 years of experience and progressive integration into the clinical routine. After indication for mapping is made, the workflow starts with patient admission and includes all preoperative steps until tumor resection. Importantly, only standard software and devices were used, enabling new centers to easily integrate data derived from nTMS mapping and nTMS-based tractography into their hospital's infrastructure. Registration of the patient, appointment planning, and documentation of results of the nTMS procedures within the hospital information system (HIS) can be achieved by a novel tailored software mask. As another important part of the workflow, nTMS data are imported into the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) via PACS integrator software. In addition, for surgical planning including nTMS-based tractography, nTMS data can be effectively included in surgical neuronavigation software. Optimized integration of nTMS data can be achieved using a standardized workflow. The seamless integration and availability of nTMS data are crucial to the acceptance of these data in the clinical routine. This optimized workflow can serve as a guide for centers beginning to use nTMS data in patient care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. What Happens Inside a Fuel Cell? Developing an Experimental Functional Map of Fuel Cell Performance

    Brett, Daniel J. L.

    2010-08-20

    Fuel cell performance is determined by the complex interplay of mass transport, energy transfer and electrochemical processes. The convolution of these processes leads to spatial heterogeneity in the way that fuel cells perform, particularly due to reactant consumption, water management and the design of fluid-flow plates. It is therefore unlikely that any bulk measurement made on a fuel cell will accurately represent performance at all parts of the cell. The ability to make spatially resolved measurements in a fuel cell provides one of the most useful ways in which to monitor and optimise performance. This Minireview explores a range of in situ techniques being used to study fuel cells and describes the use of novel experimental techniques that the authors have used to develop an \\'experimental functional map\\' of fuel cell performance. These techniques include the mapping of current density, electrochemical impedance, electrolyte conductivity, contact resistance and CO poisoning distribution within working PEFCs, as well as mapping the flow of reactant in gas channels using laser Doppler anemometry (LDA). For the high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), temperature mapping, reference electrode placement and the use of Raman spectroscopy are described along with methods to map the microstructural features of electrodes. The combination of these techniques, applied across a range of fuel cell operating conditions, allows a unique picture of the internal workings of fuel cells to be obtained and have been used to validate both numerical and analytical models. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH& Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Communicating Hydrocephalus Associated with Small- to Medium-Sized Vestibular Schwannomas: Clinical Significance of the Tumor Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Map.

    Taniguchi, Masaaki; Nakai, Tomoaki; Kohta, Masaaki; Kimura, Hidehito; Kohmura, Eiji

    2016-10-01

    The etiology of hydrocephalus associated with the small- to medium-sized vestibular schwannomas is still controversial. We investigated tumor-specific factors related to the association of hydrocephalus with small- to medium-sized vestibular schwannomas. Among the 77 patients with vestibular schwannoma smaller than 30 mm, 9 patients demonstrated associated communicating hydrocephalus. Patient medical records, radiologic data, and histopathologic specimens were reviewed retrospectively. The age of the patients, and size, mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value, and histologic features of the tumors were compared with those of patients without hydrocephalus. The symptoms related to hydrocephalus improved in all patients after tumor removal. Both the mean size and ADC values exhibited a statistically significant difference between the tumors with and without hydrocephalus (P hydrocephalus. The increased tumor ADC value was considered to be the result of degenerative change and suggested the involvement of protein sloughing in the etiology of the associated hydrocephalus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Convergence Analysis of Micro-Lesions (CAML: An approach to mapping of diffuse lesions from carotid revascularization

    Allyson C. Rosen

    Full Text Available Carotid revascularization (endarterectomy, stenting prevents stroke; however, procedure-related embolization is common and results in small brain lesions easily identified by diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI. A crucial barrier to understanding the clinical significance of these lesions has been the lack of a statistical approach to identify vulnerable brain areas. The problem is that the lesions are small, numerous, and non-overlapping. Here we address this problem with a new method, the Convergence Analysis of Micro-Lesions (CAML technique, an extension of the Anatomic Likelihood Analysis (ALE. The method combines manual lesion tracing, constraints based on known lesion patterns, and convergence analysis to represent regions vulnerable to lesions as probabilistic brain atlases. Two studies were conducted over the course of 12 years in an active, vascular surgery clinic. An analysis in an initial group of 126 patients at 1.5 T MRI was cross-validated in a second group of 80 patients at 3T MRI. In CAML, lesions were manually defined and center points identified. Brains were aligned according to side of surgery since this factor powerfully determines lesion distribution. A convergence based analysis, was performed on each of these groups. Results indicated the most consistent region of vulnerability was in motor and premotor cortex regions. Smaller regions common to both groups included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial parietal regions. Vulnerability of motor cortex is consistent with previous work showing changes in hand dexterity associated with these procedures. The consistency of CAML also demonstrates the feasibility of this new approach to characterize small, diffuse, non-overlapping lesions in patients with multifocal pathologies. Keywords: Embolization, DWI, ALE

  11. New Angle on the Parton Distribution Functions: Self-Organizing Maps

    Honkanen, H.; Liuti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Neural network (NN) algorithms have been recently applied to construct Parton Distribution Function (PDF) parametrizations, providing an alternative to standard global fitting procedures. Here we explore a novel technique using Self-Organizing Maps (SOMs). SOMs are a class of clustering algorithms based on competitive learning among spatially-ordered neurons. We train our SOMs with stochastically generated PDF samples. On every optimization iteration the PDFs are clustered on the SOM according to a user-defined feature and the most promising candidates are used as a seed for the subsequent iteration using the topology of the map to guide the PDF generating process. Our goal is a fitting procedure that, at variance with the standard neural network approaches, will allow for an increased control of the systematic bias by enabling user interaction in the various stages of the process.

  12. Intraoperative mapping during repeat awake craniotomy reveals the functional plasticity of adult cortex.

    Southwell, Derek G; Hervey-Jumper, Shawn L; Perry, David W; Berger, Mitchel S

    2016-05-01

    OBJECT To avoid iatrogenic injury during the removal of intrinsic cerebral neoplasms such as gliomas, direct electrical stimulation (DES) is used to identify cortical and subcortical white matter pathways critical for language, motor, and sensory function. When a patient undergoes more than 1 brain tumor resection as in the case of tumor recurrence, the use of DES provides an unusual opportunity to examine brain plasticity in the setting of neurological disease. METHODS The authors examined 561 consecutive cases in which patients underwent DES mapping during surgery forglioma resection. "Positive" and "negative" sites-discrete cortical regions where electrical stimulation did (positive) or did not (negative) produce transient sensory, motor, or language disturbance-were identified prior to tumor resection and documented by intraoperative photography for categorization into functional maps. In this group of 561 patients, 18 were identified who underwent repeat surgery in which 1 or more stimulation sites overlapped with those tested during the initial surgery. The authors compared intraoperative sensory, motor, or language mapping results between initial and repeat surgeries, and evaluated the clinical outcomes for these patients. RESULTS A total of 117 sites were tested for sensory (7 sites, 6.0%), motor (9 sites, 7.7%), or language (101 sites, 86.3%) function during both initial and repeat surgeries. The mean interval between surgical procedures was 4.1 years. During initial surgeries, 95 (81.2%) of 117 sites were found to be negative and 22 (18.8%) of 117 sites were found to be positive. During repeat surgeries, 103 (88.0%) of 117 sites were negative and 14 (12.0%) of 117 were positive. Of the 95 sites that were negative at the initial surgery, 94 (98.9%) were also negative at the repeat surgery, while 1 (1.1%) site was found to be positive. Of the 22 sites that were initially positive, 13 (59.1%) remained positive at repeat surgery, while 9 (40.9%) had become

  13. Effect of rotational diffusion in an orientational potential well on the point spread function of electric dipole emitters.

    Stallinga, Sjoerd

    2015-02-01

    A study is presented of the point spread function (PSF) of electric dipole emitters that go through a series of absorption-emission cycles while the dipole orientation is changing due to rotational diffusion within the constraint of an orientational potential well. An analytical expression for the PSF is derived valid for arbitrary orientational potential wells in the limit of image acquisition times much larger than the rotational relaxation time. This framework is used to study the effects of the direction of incidence, polarization, and degree of coherence of the illumination. In the limit of fast rotational diffusion on the scale of the fluorescence lifetime the illumination influences only the PSF height, not its shape. In the limit of slow rotational diffusion on the scale of the fluorescence lifetime there is a significant effect on the PSF shape as well, provided the illumination is (partially) coherent. For oblique incidence, illumination asymmetries can arise in the PSF that give rise to position offsets in localization based on Gaussian spot fitting. These asymmetries persist in the limit of free diffusion in a zero orientational potential well.

  14. Fine-Mapping of Common Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Tumor Risk Identified Potential Functional Variants.

    Mengmeng Du

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified many common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs associated with colorectal cancer risk. These SNPs may tag correlated variants with biological importance. Fine-mapping around GWAS loci can facilitate detection of functional candidates and additional independent risk variants. We analyzed 11,900 cases and 14,311 controls in the Genetics and Epidemiology of Colorectal Cancer Consortium and the Colon Cancer Family Registry. To fine-map genomic regions containing all known common risk variants, we imputed high-density genetic data from the 1000 Genomes Project. We tested single-variant associations with colorectal tumor risk for all variants spanning genomic regions 250-kb upstream or downstream of 31 GWAS-identified SNPs (index SNPs. We queried the University of California, Santa Cruz Genome Browser to examine evidence for biological function. Index SNPs did not show the strongest association signals with colorectal tumor risk in their respective genomic regions. Bioinformatics analysis of SNPs showing smaller P-values in each region revealed 21 functional candidates in 12 loci (5q31.1, 8q24, 11q13.4, 11q23, 12p13.32, 12q24.21, 14q22.2, 15q13, 18q21, 19q13.1, 20p12.3, and 20q13.33. We did not observe evidence of additional independent association signals in GWAS-identified regions. Our results support the utility of integrating data from comprehensive fine-mapping with expanding publicly available genomic databases to help clarify GWAS associations and identify functional candidates that warrant more onerous laboratory follow-up. Such efforts may aid the eventual discovery of disease-causing variant(s.

  15. Empirical evaluation of mapping functions for navigation in virtual reality using phones with integrated sensors

    Benzina, Amal

    2012-01-01

    Mobile phones provide an interesting all-in-one alternative for 3D input devices in virtual environments. Mobile phones are becoming touch sensitive and spatially aware, and they are now part of our daily activities. We present Phone-Based Motion Control, a novel one-handed travel technique for a virtual environment. The technique benefits from the touch capability offered by growing number of mobile phones to change viewpoint translation in virtual environments, while the orientation of the viewpoint is controlled by built-in sensors in the mobile phone. The travel interaction separates translation (touch based translation control) and rotation (steer based rotation control), putting each set of degrees of freedom (DOF) to a separate interaction technique (separability). This paper examines, how many DOF are needed to perform the travel task as easy and comfortable as possible. It also investigates different mapping functions between the user\\'s actions on the mobile phone and the viewpoint change in the virtual environment. Therefore, four techniques are implemented: rotate by heading, rotate by roll, rotate by roll with fixed horizon and a merged rotation. Each technique has either 4 or 5 DOF and different mappings between phone and viewpoint coordinates in the virtual environment. We perform an extensive user study to explore different aspects related to the travel techniques in terms of DOF and mapping functions. Results of the user evaluation show that 4 DOF techniques seem to perform better the travel task. Even though, the results were not statistically decisive in favor of the usage of the mobile roll to control the viewpoint heading in the virtual environment despite the good results, there is a clear tendency from the users to prefer the mobile roll as the desired mapping. Copyright 2012 ACM.

  16. Potential use and challenges of functional connectivity mapping in intractable epilepsy

    Robert Todd Constable

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the use of resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data to assess functional connectivity in the human brain for surgical planning in intractable epilepsy. This approach has the potential to predict outcomes for a given surgical procedure based on the pre-surgical functional organization of the brain. Functional connectivity can also identify cortical regions that are organized differently in epilepsy patients either as a direct function of the disease or through indirect compensatory responses. Functional connectivity mapping can also potentially help identify epileptogenic tissue, whether this is a single focal location or a network of seizure-generating tissues and this information can assist in guiding the implantation of electrodes for invasive monitoring. This review covers the basics of connectivity analysis and discusses particular issues associated with analyzing such data. These issues include how to define nodes, as well as differences between connectivity analyses of individual nodes, groups of nodes, and whole-brain assessment at the voxel level. The need for arbitrary thresholds in some connectivity analyses is discussed and a solution to this problem is reviewed. Overall, functional connectivity analysis is becoming an important tool for assessing functional brain organization in surgical planning in epilepsy.

  17. Evans functions and bifurcations of nonlinear waves of some nonlinear reaction diffusion equations

    Zhang, Linghai

    2017-10-01

    The main purposes of this paper are to accomplish the existence, stability, instability and bifurcation of the nonlinear waves of the nonlinear system of reaction diffusion equations ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ] - w, wt = ε (u - γw) and to establish the existence, stability, instability and bifurcation of the nonlinear waves of the nonlinear scalar reaction diffusion equation ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ], under different conditions on the model constants. To establish the bifurcation for the system, we will study the existence and instability of a standing pulse solution if 0 1; the existence and instability of two standing wave fronts if 2 (1 + αγ) θ = αβγ and 0 traveling wave front as well as the existence and instability of a standing pulse solution if 0 traveling wave front as well as the existence and instability of an upside down standing pulse solution if 0 traveling wave back of the nonlinear scalar reaction diffusion equation ut =uxx + α [ βH (u - θ) - u ] -w0, where w0 = α (β - 2 θ) > 0 is a positive constant, if 0 motivation to study the existence, stability, instability and bifurcations of the nonlinear waves is to study the existence and stability/instability of infinitely many fast/slow multiple traveling pulse solutions of the nonlinear system of reaction diffusion equations. The existence and stability of infinitely many fast multiple traveling pulse solutions are of great interests in mathematical neuroscience.

  18. Diffusion kinetics in aluminium–gold bond contacts from first-principles density functional calculations

    Ulrich, C. M.; Hashibon, A.; Svoboda, Jiří; Elsässer, C.; Helm, D.; Riedel, H.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 20 (2011), s. 7634-7644 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/1784 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Bonding * Diffusion * Intermetallic compounds Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 3.755, year: 2011

  19. Genetic and Functional Drivers of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma

    Reddy, Anupama; Zhang, Jenny; Davis, Nicholas S

    2017-01-01

    Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common form of blood cancer and is characterized by a striking degree of genetic and clinical heterogeneity. This heterogeneity poses a major barrier to understanding the genetic basis of the disease and its response to therapy. Here, we performed...

  20. Pancreatic Endocrine and Exocrine Function in Children following Near-Total Pancreatectomy for Diffuse Congenital Hyperinsulinism

    Arya, Ved Bhushan; Senniappan, Senthil; Demirbilek, Huseyin; Alam, Syeda; Flanagan, Sarah E.; Ellard, Sian; Hussain, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Context Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI), the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Setting International referral centre for the management of CHI. Patients Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012. Intervention Near-total pancreatectomy. Main Outcome Measures Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1) pancreatic exocrine insufficiency. Results Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72%) had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation. PMID:24840042

  1. Uncertainty indication in soil function maps - transparent and easy-to-use information to support sustainable use of soil resources

    Greiner, Lucie; Nussbaum, Madlene; Papritz, Andreas; Zimmermann, Stephan; Gubler, Andreas; Grêt-Regamey, Adrienne; Keller, Armin

    2018-05-01

    Spatial information on soil function fulfillment (SFF) is increasingly being used to inform decision-making in spatial planning programs to support sustainable use of soil resources. Soil function maps visualize soils abilities to fulfill their functions, e.g., regulating water and nutrient flows, providing habitats, and supporting biomass production based on soil properties. Such information must be reliable for informed and transparent decision-making in spatial planning programs. In this study, we add to the transparency of soil function maps by (1) indicating uncertainties arising from the prediction of soil properties generated by digital soil mapping (DSM) that are used for soil function assessment (SFA) and (2) showing the response of different SFA methods to the propagation of uncertainties through the assessment. For a study area of 170 km2 in the Swiss Plateau, we map 10 static soil sub-functions for agricultural soils for a spatial resolution of 20 × 20 m together with their uncertainties. Mapping the 10 soil sub-functions using simple ordinal assessment scales reveals pronounced spatial patterns with a high variability of SFF scores across the region, linked to the inherent properties of the soils and terrain attributes and climate conditions. Uncertainties in soil properties propagated through SFA methods generally lead to substantial uncertainty in the mapped soil sub-functions. We propose two types of uncertainty maps that can be readily understood by stakeholders. Cumulative distribution functions of SFF scores indicate that SFA methods respond differently to the propagated uncertainty of soil properties. Even where methods are comparable on the level of complexity and assessment scale, their comparability in view of uncertainty propagation might be different. We conclude that comparable uncertainty indications in soil function maps are relevant to enable informed and transparent decisions on the sustainable use of soil resources.

  2. Diffusion tensor optical coherence tomography

    Marks, Daniel L.; Blackmon, Richard L.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2018-01-01

    In situ measurements of diffusive particle transport provide insight into tissue architecture, drug delivery, and cellular function. Analogous to diffusion-tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DT-MRI), where the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules is mapped on the millimeter scale to elucidate the fibrous structure of tissue, here we propose diffusion-tensor optical coherence tomography (DT-OCT) for measuring directional diffusivity and flow of optically scattering particles within tissue. Because DT-OCT is sensitive to the sub-resolution motion of Brownian particles as they are constrained by tissue macromolecules, it has the potential to quantify nanoporous anisotropic tissue structure at micrometer resolution as relevant to extracellular matrices, neurons, and capillaries. Here we derive the principles of DT-OCT, relating the detected optical signal from a minimum of six probe beams with the six unique diffusion tensor and three flow vector components. The optimal geometry of the probe beams is determined given a finite numerical aperture, and a high-speed hardware implementation is proposed. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations are employed to assess the ability of the proposed DT-OCT system to quantify anisotropic diffusion of nanoparticles in a collagen matrix, an extracellular constituent that is known to become highly aligned during tumor development.

  3. Seventh Graders' Academic Achievement, Creativity, and Ability to Construct a Cross-Domain Concept Map--A Brain Function Perspective

    Yeh, Yu-Chu

    2004-01-01

    This study proposes an interactive model of "cross-domain" concept mapping with an emphasis on brain functions, and it further investigates the relationships between academic achievement, creative thinking, and cross-domain concept mapping. Sixty-nine seventh graders participated in this study which employed two 50-minute instructional…

  4. Effects of a Story Map on Accelerated Reader Postreading Test Scores in Students with High-Functioning Autism

    Stringfield, Suzanne Griggs; Luscre, Deanna; Gast, David L.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, three elementary-aged boys with high-functioning autism (HFA) were taught to use a graphic organizer called a Story Map as a postreading tool during language arts instruction. Students learned to accurately complete the Story Map. The effect of the intervention on story recall was assessed within the context of a multiple-baseline…

  5. Pancreatic endocrine and exocrine function in children following near-total pancreatectomy for diffuse congenital hyperinsulinism.

    Ved Bhushan Arya

    Full Text Available Congenital hyperinsulinism (CHI, the commonest cause of persistent hypoglycaemia, has two main histological subtypes: diffuse and focal. Diffuse CHI, if medically unresponsive, is managed with near-total pancreatectomy. Post-pancreatectomy, in addition to persistent hypoglycaemia, there is a very high risk of diabetes mellitus and pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.International referral centre for the management of CHI.Medically unresponsive diffuse CHI patients managed with near-total pancreatectomy between 1994 and 2012.Near-total pancreatectomy.Persistent hypoglycaemia post near-total pancreatectomy, insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, clinical and biochemical (faecal elastase 1 pancreatic exocrine insufficiency.Of more than 300 patients with CHI managed during this time period, 45 children had medically unresponsive diffuse disease and were managed with near-total pancreatectomy. After near-total pancreatectomy, 60% of children had persistent hypoglycaemia requiring medical interventions. The incidence of insulin dependent diabetes mellitus was 96% at 11 years after surgery. Thirty-two patients (72% had biochemical evidence of severe pancreatic exocrine insufficiency (Faecal elastase 1<100 µg/g. Clinical exocrine insufficiency was observed in 22 (49% patients. No statistically significant difference in weight and height standard deviation score (SDS was found between untreated subclinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients and treated clinical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency patients.The outcome of diffuse CHI patients after near-total pancreatectomy is very unsatisfactory. The incidence of persistent hypoglycaemia and insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus is very high. The presence of clinical rather than biochemical pancreatic exocrine insufficiency should inform decisions about pancreatic enzyme supplementation.

  6. Diffusion tensor MR imaging in the assessment of cognitive functions in children with periventricular leukomalacia

    Wang Shanshan; Fan Guoguang; Wang Ci; Zhou Jieqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the values of diffusion tensor MR imaging (DTI)and fiber tractography (FT) in the assessment of cognitive functions in children with periventricular leukomalacia (PVL), to facilitate to understand the mechanism of PVL children's cognitive functions. Methods: Forty six children with PVL and 16 age-matched volunteer were recruited. Developmental quotient (DQ) of all cases was recorded. According to the DQ scores, patients were divided into 3 groups:mild in 11 patients, moderate in 19, and severe in 16. DTI was performed in all cases and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were be calculated.Non-paired t test was used to compare the FA values of major white matter fibers between patients group and controls group. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the FA values among 4 groups. Results: Compared with controls, all 46 patients with PVL showed a significant mean FA reduction in left corticospinal tract (CST) (0.476 ±0.064 vs.0.531 ±0.064), bilateral anterior limb of internal capsula (ICAL) (left 0.357 ±0.050 vs. 0.405 ±0.081, right 0.370 ±0.040 vs. 0.405 ±0.036), posterior limb of internal capsule (ICPL) (left 0.483 ±0.044 vs. 0.546 ±0.091, right 0.485 ±0.046 vs. 0.547 ±0.083), arcuate fasciculus (AF) (left 0.367 ± 0.069 vs. 0.433 ± 0.097, right 0.363 ± 0.064 vs. 0.421 ±0.091), posterior thalamic radiation (PTR) (left 0.390 ± 0.059 vs. 0.459 ± 0.067, right 0.382 ± 0.047 vs. 0.446 ± 0.064), anterior CG (ACG) (left 0.362 ± 0.056 vs. 0.423 ± 0.057, right 0.345 ± 0.056 vs. 0.417 ± 0.080), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) (left 0.323 ± 0.050 vs. 0.426 ±0.102, right 0.341 ± 0.056 vs. 0.416 ± 0.092) and splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC) (0.535 ±0.090 vs. 0.606 ±0.060) (t=2.037-3.745, P<0.05). The severity of cognitive impairment is company with decrease of the FA values of all fibers. The FA values of bilateral CST, ICAL, ICPL, left AF, bilateral PTR, ACG, SLF and SCC were significantly different among different

  7. HAM-5 functions as a MAP kinase scaffold during cell fusion in Neurospora crassa.

    Wilfried Jonkers

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell fusion in genetically identical Neurospora crassa germlings and in hyphae is a highly regulated process involving the activation of a conserved MAP kinase cascade that includes NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2. During chemotrophic growth in germlings, the MAP kinase cascade members localize to conidial anastomosis tube (CAT tips every ∼8 minutes, perfectly out of phase with another protein that is recruited to the tip: SOFT, a recently identified scaffold for the MAK-1 MAP kinase pathway in Sordaria macrospora. How the MAK-2 oscillation process is initiated, maintained and what proteins regulate the MAP kinase cascade is currently unclear. A global phosphoproteomics approach using an allele of mak-2 (mak-2Q100G that can be specifically inhibited by the ATP analog 1NM-PP1 was utilized to identify MAK-2 kinase targets in germlings that were potentially involved in this process. One such putative target was HAM-5, a protein of unknown biochemical function. Previously, Δham-5 mutants were shown to be deficient for hyphal fusion. Here we show that HAM-5-GFP co-localized with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2 and oscillated with identical dynamics from the cytoplasm to CAT tips during chemotropic interactions. In the Δmak-2 strain, HAM-5-GFP localized to punctate complexes that did not oscillate, but still localized to the germling tip, suggesting that MAK-2 activity influences HAM-5 function/localization. However, MAK-2-GFP showed cytoplasmic and nuclear localization in a Δham-5 strain and did not localize to puncta. Via co-immunoprecipitation experiments, HAM-5 was shown to physically interact with NRC-1, MEK-2 and MAK-2, suggesting that it functions as a scaffold/transport hub for the MAP kinase cascade members for oscillation and chemotropic interactions during germling and hyphal fusion in N. crassa. The identification of HAM-5 as a scaffold-like protein will help to link the activation of MAK-2 cascade to upstream factors and proteins involved in this

  8. Diffusion-Based Density-Equalizing Maps: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Visualizing Homicide Rates and Other Georeferenced Statistical Data

    Mazzitello, Karina I.; Candia, Julián

    2012-12-01

    In every country, public and private agencies allocate extensive funding to collect large-scale statistical data, which in turn are studied and analyzed in order to determine local, regional, national, and international policies regarding all aspects relevant to the welfare of society. One important aspect of that process is the visualization of statistical data with embedded geographical information, which most often relies on archaic methods such as maps colored according to graded scales. In this work, we apply nonstandard visualization techniques based on physical principles. We illustrate the method with recent statistics on homicide rates in Brazil and their correlation to other publicly available data. This physics-based approach provides a novel tool that can be used by interdisciplinary teams investigating statistics and model projections in a variety of fields such as economics and gross domestic product research, public health and epidemiology, sociodemographics, political science, business and marketing, and many others.

  9. A factor analysis of Functional Independence and Functional Assessment Measure scores among focal and diffuse brain injury patients: The importance of bi-factor models.

    Gunn, Sarah; Burgess, Gerald H; Maltby, John

    2018-04-28

    To explore the factor structure of the UK Functional Independence Measure and Functional Assessment Measure (FIM+FAM) among focal and diffuse acquired brain injury patients. Criterion standard. An NHS acute acquired brain injury inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Referred sample of 447 adults (835 cases after exclusions) admitted for inpatient treatment following an acquired brain injury significant enough to justify intensive inpatient neurorehabilitation. Not applicable. Functional Independence Measure and Functional Assessment Measure. Exploratory Factor Analysis suggested a two-factor structure to FIM+FAM scores, among both focal-proximate and diffuse-proximate acquired brain injury aetiologies. Confirmatory Factor Analysis suggested a three-factor bi-factor structure presented the best fit of the FIM+FAM score data across both aetiologies. However, across both analyses, a convergence was found towards a general factor, demonstrated by high correlations between factors in the Exploratory Factor Analysis, and by a general factor explaining the majority of the variance in scores on Confirmatory Factor Analysis. Our findings suggested that although factors describing specific functional domains can be derived from FIM+FAM item scores, there is a convergence towards a single factor describing overall functioning. This single factor informs the specific group factors (e.g. motor, psychosocial and communication function) following brain injury. Further research into the comparative value of the general and group factors as evaluative/prognostic measures is indicated. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Non-invasive mapping of calculation function by repetitive navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    Maurer, Stefanie; Tanigawa, Noriko; Sollmann, Nico; Hauck, Theresa; Ille, Sebastian; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2016-11-01

    Concerning calculation function, studies have already reported on localizing computational function in patients and volunteers by functional magnetic resonance imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, the development of accurate repetitive navigated TMS (rTMS) with a considerably higher spatial resolution opens a new field in cognitive neuroscience. This study was therefore designed to evaluate the feasibility of rTMS for locating cortical calculation function in healthy volunteers, and to establish this technique for future scientific applications as well as preoperative mapping in brain tumor patients. Twenty healthy subjects underwent rTMS calculation mapping using 5 Hz/10 pulses. Fifty-two previously determined cortical spots of the whole hemispheres were stimulated on both sides. The subjects were instructed to perform the calculation task composed of 80 simple arithmetic operations while rTMS pulses were applied. The highest error rate (80 %) for all errors of all subjects was observed in the right ventral precentral gyrus. Concerning division task, a 45 % error rate was achieved in the left middle frontal gyrus. The subtraction task showed its highest error rate (40 %) in the right angular gyrus (anG). In the addition task a 35 % error rate was observed in the left anterior superior temporal gyrus. Lastly, the multiplication task induced a maximum error rate of 30 % in the left anG. rTMS seems feasible as a way to locate cortical calculation function. Besides language function, the cortical localizations are well in accordance with the current literature for other modalities or lesion studies.

  11. Integrating functional data to prioritize causal variants in statistical fine-mapping studies.

    Gleb Kichaev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Standard statistical approaches for prioritization of variants for functional testing in fine-mapping studies either use marginal association statistics or estimate posterior probabilities for variants to be causal under simplifying assumptions. Here, we present a probabilistic framework that integrates association strength with functional genomic annotation data to improve accuracy in selecting plausible causal variants for functional validation. A key feature of our approach is that it empirically estimates the contribution of each functional annotation to the trait of interest directly from summary association statistics while allowing for multiple causal variants at any risk locus. We devise efficient algorithms that estimate the parameters of our model across all risk loci to further increase performance. Using simulations starting from the 1000 Genomes data, we find that our framework consistently outperforms the current state-of-the-art fine-mapping methods, reducing the number of variants that need to be selected to capture 90% of the causal variants from an average of 13.3 to 10.4 SNPs per locus (as compared to the next-best performing strategy. Furthermore, we introduce a cost-to-benefit optimization framework for determining the number of variants to be followed up in functional assays and assess its performance using real and simulation data. We validate our findings using a large scale meta-analysis of four blood lipids traits and find that the relative probability for causality is increased for variants in exons and transcription start sites and decreased in repressed genomic regions at the risk loci of these traits. Using these highly predictive, trait-specific functional annotations, we estimate causality probabilities across all traits and variants, reducing the size of the 90% confidence set from an average of 17.5 to 13.5 variants per locus in this data.

  12. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke

    Melissa Zavaglia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA, to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS. The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a ‘map of stroke’.

  13. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke.

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a 'map of stroke'.

  14. Mapping causal functional contributions derived from the clinical assessment of brain damage after stroke

    Zavaglia, Melissa; Forkert, Nils D.; Cheng, Bastian; Gerloff, Christian; Thomalla, Götz; Hilgetag, Claus C.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion analysis reveals causal contributions of brain regions to mental functions, aiding the understanding of normal brain function as well as rehabilitation of brain-damaged patients. We applied a novel lesion inference technique based on game theory, Multi-perturbation Shapley value Analysis (MSA), to a large clinical lesion dataset. We used MSA to analyze the lesion patterns of 148 acute stroke patients together with their neurological deficits, as assessed by the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS). The results revealed regional functional contributions to essential behavioral and cognitive functions as reflected in the NIHSS, particularly by subcortical structures. There were also side specific differences of functional contributions between the right and left hemispheric brain regions which may reflect the dominance of the left hemispheric syndrome aphasia in the NIHSS. Comparison of MSA to established lesion inference methods demonstrated the feasibility of the approach for analyzing clinical data and indicated its capability for objectively inferring functional contributions from multiple injured, potentially interacting sites, at the cost of having to predict the outcome of unknown lesion configurations. The analysis of regional functional contributions to neurological symptoms measured by the NIHSS contributes to the interpretation of this widely used standardized stroke scale in clinical practice as well as clinical trials and provides a first approximation of a ‘map of stroke’. PMID:26448908

  15. New MRI technologies. Diffusion MRI and its application to functional neuroimaging and analyses of white matter integrity

    Kobayashi, Tetsuo

    2010-01-01

    Described is the technological aspect of MRI, MR diffusion-weighted imaging (MR-DWI), principles of its measurement and application for imaging the cerebral function and for aiding the quantitative diagnosis of brain diseases. The author explains the principle of MR imaging process; diffusion properties of water molecules, MR-DWI based on them and DW-fMRI of the brain; MR-diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI), its analysis and color acquisition, and tracking of white matter nerve fibers; analysis of white matter lesions by the tracking; and the new tracking method at the chiasm of nerve fascicles. The usual fMRI reflects the blood oxygen level depending (BOLD) signals whereas recently attracted DW-fMRI, the volume changes of nerve cells concomitant to nerve activation accompanying apparent changes of water diffusion coefficients in and out of cells which occur faster than BOLD signs, resulting in higher resolution of time and space. However, DWI requires the higher intensity of static magnetic field like 3T. MR-DTI acquires the anisotropic diffusion of water molecules using MR-DWI technique with application of 6 or more motion probing gradients, thus makes it possible to track the running directions of nerve fibers and capillary vessels, and is proposed to be a useful mean of specific fiber tracking in the white matter when displayed by 3 different colors exhibiting the directions like the right/left (x axis, red), anterior/posterior (y, green) and upper/lower (z, blue) sides of head. Recently, MR-DWI and MR-DTI have been found usable for pathogenic studies of brain diseases such as dementia. Tensor anisotropy is apparently lowered at the chiasm of nerve fascicles, the cause of tracking error, for which authors have developed a new method using the similarity of directional vector, not of tensor, before and behind the chiasm. As exemplified, MRI technology is further advancing even at present. (T.T.)

  16. Consistency of different tropospheric models and mapping functions for precise GNSS processing

    Graffigna, Victoria; Hernández-Pajares, Manuel; García-Rigo, Alberto; Gende, Mauricio

    2017-04-01

    The TOmographic Model of the IONospheric electron content (TOMION) software implements a simultaneous precise geodetic and ionospheric modeling, which can be used to test new approaches for real-time precise GNSS modeling (positioning, ionospheric and tropospheric delays, clock errors, among others). In this work, the software is used to estimate the Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) emulating real time and its performance is evaluated through a comparative analysis with a built-in GIPSY estimation and IGS final troposphere product, exemplified in a two-day experiment performed in East Australia. Furthermore, the troposphere mapping function was upgraded from Niell to Vienna approach. On a first scenario, only forward processing was activated and the coordinates of the Wide Area GNSS network were loosely constrained, without fixing the carrier phase ambiguities, for both reference and rover receivers. On a second one, precise point positioning (PPP) was implemented, iterating for a fixed coordinates set for the second day. Comparisons between TOMION, IGS and GIPSY estimates have been performed and for the first one, IGS clocks and orbits were considered. The agreement with GIPSY results seems to be 10 times better than with the IGS final ZTD product, despite having considered IGS products for the computations. Hence, the subsequent analysis was carried out with respect to the GIPSY computations. The estimates show a typical bias of 2cm for the first strategy and of 7mm for PPP, in the worst cases. Moreover, Vienna mapping function showed in general a fairly better agreement than Niell one for both strategies. The RMS values' were found to be around 1cm for all studied situations, with a slightly fitter performance for the Niell one. Further improvement could be achieved for such estimations with coefficients for the Vienna mapping function calculated from raytracing as well as integrating meteorological comparative parameters.

  17. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    Chaudhary, Kapil; Kumaran, S Senthil; Chandra, Sarat P; Wadhawan, Ashima Nehra; Tripathi, Manjari

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery). In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle frontal gyrus (MFG), and superior temporal gyrus (STG), during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease

  18. Mapping of cognitive functions in chronic intractable epilepsy: Role of fMRI

    Kapil Chaudhary

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, a non-invasive technique with high spatial resolution and blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD contrast, has been applied to localize and map cognitive functions in the clinical condition of chronic intractable epilepsy. Purpose: fMRI was used to map the language and memory network in patients of chronic intractable epilepsy pre- and post-surgery. Materials and Methods: After obtaining approval from the institutional ethics committee, six patients with intractable epilepsy with an equal number of age-matched controls were recruited in the study. A 1.5 T MR scanner with 12-channel head coil, integrated with audio-visual fMRI accessories was used. Echo planar imaging sequence was used for BOLD studies. There were two sessions in TLE (pre- and post-surgery. Results: In TLE patients, BOLD activation increased post-surgery in comparison of pre-surgery in inferior frontal gyrus (IFG, middle frontal gyrus (MFG, and superior temporal gyrus (STG, during semantic lexical, judgment, comprehension, and semantic memory tasks. Conclusion: Functional MRI is useful to study the basic concepts related to language and memory lateralization in TLE and guide surgeons for preservation of important brain areas during ATLR. This will help in understanding future directions for the diagnosis and treatment of such disease.

  19. Tin-phthalocyanine adsorption and diffusion on Cu and Au (111) surfaces: A density functional theory study

    Qin, Dan; Ge, Xu-Jin; Lü, Jing-Tao

    2018-05-01

    Through density functional theory based calculations, we study the adsorption and diffusion of tin phthalocyanine (SnPc) molecule on Au(111) and Cu(111) surfaces. SnPc has two conformers with Sn pointing to the vacuum (Sn-up) and substrate (Sn-down), respectively. The binding energies of the two conformers with different adsorption sites on the two surfaces, including top, bridge, fcc, hcp, are calculated and compared. It is found that the SnPc molecule binds stronger on Cu(111) surface, with binding energy about 1 eV larger than that on Au(111). Only the bridge and top adsorption sites are stable on Cu(111), while all the four adsorption sites are stable on Au(111), with small diffusion barriers between them. Moreover, the flipping barrier from Sn-up to Sn-down conformer is of the same magnitude on the two metal surfaces. These results are consistent with a recent experiment [Zhang, et al., Angew. Chem., 56, 11769 (2017)], which shows that conformation change from Sn-up to Sn-down on Cu(111) surface can be induced by a C60-functionalized STM tip, while similar change is difficult to realize on Au(111), due to smaller diffusion barrier on Au(111).

  20. Self Organizing Maps to efficiently cluster and functionally interpret protein conformational ensembles

    Fabio Stella

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An approach that combines Self-Organizing maps, hierarchical clustering and network components is presented, aimed at comparing protein conformational ensembles obtained from multiple Molecular Dynamic simulations. As a first result the original ensembles can be summarized by using only the representative conformations of the clusters obtained. In addition the network components analysis allows to discover and interpret the dynamic behavior of the conformations won by each neuron. The results showed the ability of this approach to efficiently derive a functional interpretation of the protein dynamics described by the original conformational ensemble, highlighting its potential as a support for protein engineering.

  1. Application of magnetic resonance to the mapping of cerebral cortex functions

    Carrero-Gonzalez, B.; Esteban, F.; Fernandez-Valle, M.E.; Santisteban, C.; Ruiz-Cabello, J.; Cortijo, M.

    1996-01-01

    Our aim is to utilize magnetic resonance for mapping brain function. This a recent application of MR that takes advantage of its noninvasive character and higher spatial resolution than other techniques (such as PET,EEG and MEG), which is increasing the vast number of its applications. It is our interest to show a brain map is made, employing conventional methods clinically available with two simple cases very known by this and other techniques. Rapid acquisitions were acquired with a gradient-echo pulse sequence. The analysis of these images was done off-line with IDL-Based home developed software to produce activation maps in visual (through a screen located at certain fixed distance) and motor cortex (Induced by self-paced finger tapping). Our results, with a motor and photic stimulations, reliably produced significant signal increase in the areas of interest. However, many issues are still open; new advances in image analysis, computation and in MR techniques may help to answer these, and broad the number of clinical applications. (Author) 29 refs

  2. Calibration and Validation of Tundra Plant Functional Type Fractional Cover Mapping

    Macander, M. J.; Nelson, P.; Frost, G. V., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    Fractional cover maps are being developed for selected tundra plant functional types (PFTs) across >500,000 sq. km of arctic Alaska and adjacent Canada at 30 m resolution. Training and validation data include a field-based training dataset based on point-intercept sampling method at hundreds of plots spanning bioclimatic and geomorphic gradients. We also compiled 50 blocks of 1-5 cm resolution RGB image mosaics in Alaska (White Mountains, North Slope, and Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta) and the Yukon Territory. The mosaics and associated surface and canopy height models were developed using a consumer drone and structure from motion processing. We summarized both the in situ measurements and drone imagery to determine cover of two PFTs: Low and Tall Deciduous Shrub, and Light Fruticose/Foliose Lichen. We applied these data to train 2 m (limited extent) and 30 m (wall to wall) maps of PFT fractional cover for shrubs and lichen. Predictors for 2 m models were commercial satellite imagery such as WorldView-2 and Worldview-3, analyzed on the ABoVE Science Cloud. Predictors for 30 m models were primarily reflectance composites and spectral metrics developed from Landsat imagery, using Google Earth Engine. We compared the performance of models developed from the in situ and drone-derived training data and identify best practices to improve the performance and efficiency of arctic PFT fractional cover mapping.

  3. Validity of apparent diffusion coefficient hyperpolarized 3He-MRI using MSCT and pulmonary function tests as references

    Diaz, Sandra; Casselbrant, Ingrid; Piitulainen, Eeva

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements from hyperpolarized (HP) helium ((3)He)-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with quantitative data from multislice Computed Tomography (CT) (MSCT) of the whole lungs and pulmonary function tests (PFT). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty......-seven subjects, 22 with established emphysema and 5 with preclinical emphysema defined by PFT criteria, were examined with HP (3)He-MRI and MSCT. Mean age was 55 (+/-12) years, 18 female and 9 male. Mean ADC from (3)He-MRI was compared with emphysema index (EI), 15th percentile and mean lung density (MLD) values...... from MSCT. Both mean ADC and MSCT data were compared to PFT, especially percent of predicted diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (%predicted DLCO), using Pearson's correlation test. RESULTS: Mean ADC and standard deviation values were 0.392+/-0.119 cm(2)/s for the established emphysema group and 0...

  4. Feasibility of Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessing Functional Recovery in Rats with Olfactory Ensheathing Cell Transplantation After Contusive Spinal Cord Injury (SCI).

    Gu, Mengchao; Gao, Zhengchao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhao, Feng; Guo, Lei; Liu, Jiantao; He, Xijing

    2017-06-17

    BACKGROUND Olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation is a promising treatment for spinal cord injury. Diffusion tensor imaging has been applied to assess various kinds of spinal cord injury. However, it has rarely been used to evaluate the beneficial effects of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation. This study aimed to explore the feasibility of diffusion tensor imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery in rats with olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury. MATERIAL AND METHODS Immunofluorescence staining was performed to determine the purity of olfactory ensheathing cells. Rats received cell transplantation at week 1 after injury. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was used to assess the functional recovery. Magnetic resonance imaging was applied weekly, including diffusion tensor imaging. Diffusion tensor tractography was reconstructed to visualize the repair process. RESULTS The results showed that olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation increased the functional and histological recovery and restrained the secondary injury process after the initial spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy values in rats with cell transplantation were significantly higher than those in the control group, while the apparent diffusion coefficient values were significantly lower. Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan score was positively and linearly correlated with fractional anisotropy value, and it was negatively and linearly correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient value. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that diffusion tensor imaging parameters are sensitive biomarker indices for olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation interventions, and diffusion tensor imaging scan can reflect the functional recovery promoted by the olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation after contusive spinal cord injury.

  5. Neuroimaging Cerebrovascular Function and Diffuse Axonal Injury after Traumatic Brain Injury and Response to Sildenafil Treatment

    2016-04-05

    n=4, FPI+sildenafil n=3). No significant main effect of either injury or treatment was observed (data not shown). Water Maze Animals in all groups...spent in prior quadrant on trial one of test day revealed no significant main effect of either injury or treatment . 41 Figure 15. Water ...injury with sildenafil treatment (each pɘ.0001). Error bars represent SEM. 50 Analysis of mean diffusivity in grey matter ROIs

  6. Myocardial function and perfusion in the CREST syndrome variant of progressive systemic sclerosis. Exercise radionuclide evaluation and comparison with diffuse scleroderma

    Follansbee, W.P.; Curtiss, E.I.; Medsger, T.A. Jr.; Owens, G.R.; Steen, V.D.; Rodnan, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    Myocardial function and perfusion were evaluated in 22 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with the CREST syndrome using exercise and radionuclide techniques, pulmonary function testing, and chest roentgenography. The results were compared with a similar study of 26 patients with progressive systemic sclerosis with diffuse scleroderma. The prevalence of thallium perfusion abnormalities was similar in the groups with CREST syndrome and diffuse scleroderma, (64 percent versus 77 percent), but the defects were significantly smaller in the CREST syndrome (p less than 0.01). Reperfusion thallium defects in the absence of extramural coronary artery disease were seen in 38 percent of patients with diffuse scleroderma. This finding was not seen in any of the patients with the CREST syndrome. In diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of both right and left ventricular function were related to larger thallium perfusion defects. In the CREST syndrome, abnormalities of left ventricular function were minor, were seen only during exercise, and were unrelated to thallium perfusion defects. Abnormal resting right ventricular function was seen in 36 percent of the patients with the CREST syndrome and was associated with an isolated decrease in diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide. It is concluded that the cardiac manifestations of the CREST syndrome are distinct from those found in diffuse scleroderma. Unlike diffuse scleroderma, abnormalities of left ventricular function in the CREST syndrome are minor and are unrelated to abnormalities of coronary perfusion. Right ventricular dysfunction in the CREST syndrome appears to be primarily related to pulmonary vascular disease

  7. Assessing liver function in patients with HBV-related HCC: a comparison of T{sub 1} mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging with DWI

    Ding, Ying; Rao, Sheng-Xiang; Chen, Caizhong; Li, Renchen; Zeng, Meng-Su [Zhongshan Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, 180 Fenglin Road, Xuhui District, Shanghai (China)

    2015-05-01

    To compare the potential of T{sub 1} mapping on gadoxetic acid (Gd-EOB-DTPA)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessing liver function in patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). One hundred consecutive patients with known HBV-related HCCs were included. T{sub 1} relaxation time and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of the liver were measured, and the reduction rate of T{sub 1} relaxation time (∇%) was calculated. T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements were compared with ADC values according to the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score. Hepatobiliary phase (HBP) and ∇% of T{sub 1} relaxation time measurements showed significant correlations with MELD score (rho = 0.571, p < 0.0001; rho = -0.573, p < 0.0001, respectively). HBP and ∇% of T{sub 1} relaxation time were significantly different between good (MELD ≤8) and poor liver function (MELD ≥9) (p < 0.0001 for both). Areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs) of T{sub 1} relaxation time for HBP (AUC 0.84) and ∇% (AUC 0.82) were significantly better than for ADC (AUC 0.53; p < 0.0001). T{sub 1} mapping on Gd-EOB-DTPA-enhanced MRI showed promise for evaluating liver function in patients with HBV-related HCC, while DWI was not reliable. HBP T{sub 1} relaxation time measurement was equally accurate as ∇% measurement. (orig.)

  8. Functional mapping of language networks in the normal brain using a word-association task

    Ghosh, Shantanu; Basu, Amrita; Kumaran, Senthil S; Khushu, Subash

    2010-01-01

    Language functions are known to be affected in diverse neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumors. Because language networks are extensive, interpretation of functional data depends on the task completed during evaluation. The aim was to map the hemodynamic consequences of word association using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in normal human subjects. Ten healthy subjects underwent fMRI scanning with a postlexical access semantic association task vs lexical processing task. The fMRI protocol involved a T2*-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) sequence (TR 4523 ms, TE 64 ms, flip angle 90°) with alternate baseline and activation blocks. A total of 78 scans were taken (interscan interval = 3 s) with a total imaging time of 587 s. Functional data were processed in Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM2) with 8-mm Gaussian kernel by convolving the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal with an hemodynamic response function estimated by general linear method to generate SPM{t} and SPM{F} maps. Single subject analysis of the functional data (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001) revealed extensive activation in the frontal lobes, with overlaps among middle frontal gyrus (MFG), superior, and inferior frontal gyri. BOLD activity was also found in the medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus (MOG), anterior fusiform gyrus, superior and inferior parietal lobules, and to a smaller extent, the thalamus and right anterior cerebellum. Group analysis (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001) revealed neural recruitment of bilateral lingual gyri, left MFG, bilateral MOG, left superior occipital gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, bilateral thalami, and right cerebellar areas. Group data analysis revealed a cerebellar–occipital–fusiform–thalamic network centered around bilateral lingual gyri for word association, thereby indicating how these areas facilitate language comprehension by activating a semantic

  9. Functional mapping of language networks in the normal brain using a word-association task

    Ghosh Shantanu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Language functions are known to be affected in diverse neurological conditions, including ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and brain tumors. Because language networks are extensive, interpretation of functional data depends on the task completed during evaluation. Aim: The aim was to map the hemodynamic consequences of word association using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI in normal human subjects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects underwent fMRI scanning with a postlexical access semantic association task vs lexical processing task. The fMRI protocol involved a T2FNx01-weighted gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI sequence (TR 4523 ms, TE 64 ms, flip angle 90º with alternate baseline and activation blocks. A total of 78 scans were taken (interscan interval = 3 s with a total imaging time of 587 s. Functional data were processed in Statistical Parametric Mapping software (SPM2 with 8-mm Gaussian kernel by convolving the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD signal with an hemodynamic response function estimated by general linear method to generate SPM{t} and SPM{F} maps. Results: Single subject analysis of the functional data (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001 revealed extensive activation in the frontal lobes, with overlaps among middle frontal gyrus (MFG, superior, and inferior frontal gyri. BOLD activity was also found in the medial frontal gyrus, middle occipital gyrus (MOG, anterior fusiform gyrus, superior and inferior parietal lobules, and to a smaller extent, the thalamus and right anterior cerebellum. Group analysis (FWE-corrected, P≤0.001 revealed neural recruitment of bilateral lingual gyri, left MFG, bilateral MOG, left superior occipital gyrus, left fusiform gyrus, bilateral thalami, and right cerebellar areas. Conclusions: Group data analysis revealed a cerebellar-occipital-fusiform-thalamic network centered around bilateral lingual gyri for word association, thereby indicating how these

  10. Soil Functional Mapping: A Geospatial Framework for Scaling Soil Carbon Cycling

    Lawrence, C. R.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change is dramatically altering biogeochemical cycles in most terrestrial ecosystems, particularly the cycles of water and carbon (C). These changes will affect myriad ecosystem processes of importance, including plant productivity, C exports to aquatic systems, and terrestrial C storage. Soil C storage represents a critical feedback to climate change as soils store more C than the atmosphere and aboveground plant biomass combined. While we know plant and soil C cycling are strongly coupled with soil moisture, substantial unknowns remain regarding how these relationships can be scaled up from soil profiles to ecosystems. This greatly limits our ability to build a process-based understanding of the controls on and consequences of climate change at regional scales. In an effort to address this limitation we: (1) describe an approach to classifying soils that is based on underlying differences in soil functional characteristics and (2) examine the utility of this approach as a scaling tool that honors the underlying soil processes. First, geospatial datasets are analyzed in the context of our current understanding of soil C and water cycling in order to predict soil functional units that can be mapped at the scale of ecosystems or watersheds. Next, the integrity of each soil functional unit is evaluated using available soil C data and mapping units are refined as needed. Finally, targeted sampling is conducted to further differentiate functional units or fill in any data gaps that are identified. Completion of this workflow provides new geospatial datasets that are based on specific soil functions, in this case the coupling of soil C and water cycling, and are well suited for integration with regional-scale soil models. Preliminary results from this effort highlight the advantages of a scaling approach that balances theory, measurement, and modeling.

  11. Language and motor function thresholds during pediatric extra-operative electrical cortical stimulation brain mapping.

    Zea Vera, Alonso; Aungaroon, Gewalin; Horn, Paul S; Byars, Anna W; Greiner, Hansel M; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Arthur, Todd M; Crone, Nathan E; Holland, Katherine D; Mangano, Francesco T; Arya, Ravindra

    2017-10-01

    To examine current thresholds and their determinants for language and motor mapping with extra-operative electrical cortical stimulation (ECS). ECS electrocorticograph recordings were reviewed to determine functional thresholds. Predictors of functional thresholds were found with multivariable analyses. In 122 patients (age 11.9±5.4years), average minimum, frontal, and temporal language thresholds were 7.4 (± 3.0), 7.8 (± 3.0), and 7.4 (± 3.1) mA respectively. Average minimum, face, upper and lower extremity motor thresholds were 5.4 (± 2.8), 6.1 (± 2.8), 4.9 (± 2.3), and 5.3 (± 3.3) mA respectively. Functional and after-discharge (AD)/seizure thresholds were significantly related. Minimum, frontal, and temporal language thresholds were higher than AD thresholds at all ages. Minimum motor threshold was higher than minimum AD threshold up to 8.0years of age, face motor threshold was higher than frontal AD threshold up to 11.8years age, and lower subsequently. UE motor thresholds remained below frontal AD thresholds throughout the age range. Functional thresholds are frequently above AD thresholds in younger children. These findings raise concerns about safety and neurophysiologic validity of ECS mapping. Functional and AD/seizure thresholds relationships suggest individual differences in cortical excitability which cannot be explained by clinical variables. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. An integrative architecture for general intelligence and executive function revealed by lesion mapping

    Colom, Roberto; Solomon, Jeffrey; Krueger, Frank; Forbes, Chad; Grafman, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Although cognitive neuroscience has made remarkable progress in understanding the involvement of the prefrontal cortex in executive control, the broader functional networks that support high-level cognition and give rise to general intelligence remain to be well characterized. Here, we investigated the neural substrates of the general factor of intelligence (g) and executive function in 182 patients with focal brain damage using voxel-based lesion–symptom mapping. The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System were used to derive measures of g and executive function, respectively. Impaired performance on these measures was associated with damage to a distributed network of left lateralized brain areas, including regions of frontal and parietal cortex and white matter association tracts, which bind these areas into a coordinated system. The observed findings support an integrative framework for understanding the architecture of general intelligence and executive function, supporting their reliance upon a shared fronto-parietal network for the integration and control of cognitive representations and making specific recommendations for the application of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and Delis–Kaplan Executive Function System to the study of high-level cognition in health and disease. PMID:22396393

  13. Combining anatomical, diffusion, and resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging for individual classification of mild and moderate Alzheimer's disease

    Tijn M. Schouten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is sensitive to structural and functional changes in the brain caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD, and can therefore be used to help in diagnosing the disease. Improving classification of AD patients based on MRI scans might help to identify AD earlier in the disease's progress, which may be key in developing treatments for AD. In this study we used an elastic net classifier based on several measures derived from the MRI scans of mild to moderate AD patients (N=77 from the prospective registry on dementia study and controls (N=173 from the Austrian Stroke Prevention Family Study. We based our classification on measures from anatomical MRI, diffusion weighted MRI and resting state functional MRI. Our unimodal classification performance ranged from an area under the curve (AUC of 0.760 (full correlations between functional networks to 0.909 (grey matter density. When combining measures from multiple modalities in a stepwise manner, the classification performance improved to an AUC of 0.952. This optimal combination consisted of grey matter density, white matter density, fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, and sparse partial correlations between functional networks. Classification performance for mild AD as well as moderate AD also improved when using this multimodal combination. We conclude that different MRI modalities provide complementary information for classifying AD. Moreover, combining multiple modalities can substantially improve classification performance over unimodal classification.

  14. WE-AB-202-12: Voxel-Wise Analysis of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient and Perfusion Maps in Multi-Parametric MRI of Prostate Cancer

    Engstroem, K; Casares-Magaz, O; Muren, L; Roervik, J; Andersen, E

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multi-parametric MRI (mp-MRI) is being introduced in radiotherapy (RT) of prostate cancer, including for tumour delineation in focal boosting strategies. We recently developed an image-based tumour control probability model, based on cell density distributions derived from apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps. Beyond tumour volume and cell densities, tumour hypoxia is also an important determinant of RT response. Since tissue perfusion from mp-MRI has been related to hypoxia we have explored the patterns of ADC and perfusion maps, and the relations between them, inside and outside prostate index lesions. Methods: ADC and perfusion maps from 20 prostate cancer patients were used, with the prostate and index lesion delineated by a dedicated uro-radiologist. To reduce noise, the maps were averaged over a 3×3×3 voxel cube. Associations between different ADC and perfusion histogram parameters within the prostate, inside and outside the index lesion, were evaluated with the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. In the voxel-wise analysis, scatter plots of ADC vs perfusion were analysed for voxels in the prostate, inside and outside of the index lesion, again with the associations quantified with the Pearson’s correlation coefficient. Results: Overall ADC was lower inside the index lesion than in the normal prostate as opposed to ktrans that was higher inside the index lesion than outside. In the histogram analysis, the minimum ktrans was significantly correlated with the maximum ADC (Pearson=0.47; p=0.03). At the voxel level, 15 of the 20 cases had a statistically significant inverse correlation between ADC and perfusion inside the index lesion; ten of the cases had a Pearson < −0.4. Conclusion: The minimum value of ktrans across the tumour was correlated to the maximum ADC. However, on the voxel level, the ‘local’ ktrans in the index lesion is inversely (i.e. negatively) correlated to the ‘local’ ADC in most patients. Research agreement with

  15. Functional magnetic resonance maps obtained by personal computer; Mapas de resonancia magnetica funcional obtenidos con PC

    Gomez, F. j.; Manjon, J. V.; Robles, M. [Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain); Marti-Bonmati, L.; Dosda, R. [Cinica Quiron. Valencia (Spain); Molla, E. [Universidad de Valencia (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    Functional magnetic resonance (fMR) is of special relevance in the analysis of certain types of brain activation. The present report describes the development of a simple software program for use with personal computers (PCs) that analyzes these images and provides functional activation maps. Activation maps are based on the temporal differences in oxyhemoglobin in tomographic images. To detect these differences, intensities registered repeatedly during brain control and activation are compared. The experiments were performed with a 1.5-Tesla MR unit. To verify the reliability of the program fMR studies were carried out in 4 healthy individuals (12 contiguous slices, 80 images per slice every 3.1 seconds for a total of 960 images). All the images were transferred to a PC and were processed pixel by pixel within each sequence to obtain an intensity/time curve. The statistical study of the results (Student's test and cross correlation analysis) made it possible to establish the activation of each pixel. The images were prepared using spatial filtering, temporal filtering, baseline correction, normalization and segmentation of the parenchyma. The postprocessing of the results involved the elimination of single pixels, superposition of an anatomical image of greater spatial resolution and anti-aliasing. The application (Xfun 1.0, Valencia, Spain) was developed in Microsoft Visual C++5.0 Developer Studio for Windows NT Workstation. As a representative example, the program took 8.2 seconds to calculate and present the results of the entire study (12 functional maps). In the motor and visual activation experiments, the activation corresponding to regions proximal to the central sulcus of the hemisphere contralateral to the hand that moved and in the occipital cortex were observed. While programs that calculate activation maps are available, the development of software for PCs running Microsoft Windows ensures several key features for its use on a daily basis: it is

  16. Understanding deterministic diffusion by correlated random walks

    Klages, R.; Korabel, N.

    2002-01-01

    Low-dimensional periodic arrays of scatterers with a moving point particle are ideal models for studying deterministic diffusion. For such systems the diffusion coefficient is typically an irregular function under variation of a control parameter. Here we propose a systematic scheme of how to approximate deterministic diffusion coefficients of this kind in terms of correlated random walks. We apply this approach to two simple examples which are a one-dimensional map on the line and the periodic Lorentz gas. Starting from suitable Green-Kubo formulae we evaluate hierarchies of approximations for their parameter-dependent diffusion coefficients. These approximations converge exactly yielding a straightforward interpretation of the structure of these irregular diffusion coefficients in terms of dynamical correlations. (author)

  17. Body-centred map in parietal eye fields - functional MRI study

    Brotchie, P.; Chen, D.Y.; Bradley, W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In order for us to interact with our environment we need to know where objects are around us, relative to our body. In monkeys, a body-centred map of visual space is known to exist within the parietal eye fields. This map is formed by the modulation of neuronal activity by eye and head position (Brotchie et al, Nature 1995; Synder et al, Nature 1998). In humans no map of body centred space has been demonstrated. By using functional MRI we have localised a region along the intraparietal sulcus which has properties similar to the parietal eye fields of monkeys (Brotchie et al, ISMRM, 2000). The aim of this study was to determine if activity in this region is modulated by head position, consistent with a body centered representation of visual space. Functional MRI was performed on 6 subjects performing simple visually guided saccades using a 1.5 Tesla GE Echospeed scanner. 10 scans were performed on the 6 subjects at left and right body orientations. Regions of interest were selected around the intraparietal sulcus proper (IPSP) of both hemispheres and voxels with BOLD signal which correlated with the paradigm (r>0.35) were selected for further analysis. Comparisons of percentage signal change were made between the left and right IPSP using Student t test. Of the 10 MRI examinations, 6 demonstrated statistically significant differences in the amount of signal change between left and right IPSP. In each of these 6 cases, the signal change was greater within the IPSP contralateral to the direction of head position relative to the body. This indicates a modulation of activity within the IPSP related to head position, most likely reflecting modulation of the underlying neuronal activity and suggests the existence of a body-centred encoding of space within the parietal eye fields of humans. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Associations of electrocardiographic P-wave characteristics with left atrial function, and diffuse left ventricular fibrosis defined by cardiac magnetic resonance: The PRIMERI Study.

    Tiffany Win, Theingi; Ambale Venkatesh, Bharath; Volpe, Gustavo J; Mewton, Nathan; Rizzi, Patricia; Sharma, Ravi K; Strauss, David G; Lima, Joao A; Tereshchenko, Larisa G

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal P-terminal force in lead V1 (PTFV1) is associated with an increased risk of heart failure, stroke, atrial fibrillation, and death. Our goal was to explore associations of left ventricular (LV) diffuse fibrosis with left atrial (LA) function and electrocardiographic (ECG) measures of LA electrical activity. Patients without atrial fibrillation (n = 91; mean age 59.5 years; 61.5% men; 65.9% white) with structural heart disease (spatial QRS-T angle ≥105° and/or Selvester QRS score ≥5 on ECG) but LV ejection fraction >35% underwent clinical evaluation, cardiac magnetic resonance, and resting ECG. LA function indices were obtained by multimodality tissue tracking using 2- and 4-chamber long-axis images. T1 mapping and late gadolinium enhancement were used to assess diffuse LV fibrosis and presence of scar. P-prime in V1 amplitude (PPaV1) and duration (PPdV1), averaged P-wave-duration, PR interval, and P-wave axis were automatically measured using 12 SLTM algorithm. PTFV1 was calculated as a product of PPaV1 and PPdV1. In linear regression after adjustment for demographic characteristics, body mass index, maximum LA volume index, presence of scar, and LV mass index, each decile increase in LV interstitial fibrosis was associated with 0.76 mV*ms increase in negative abnormal PTFV1 (95% confidence interval [CI] -1.42 to -0.09; P = .025), 15.3 ms prolongation of PPdV1 (95% CI 6.9 to 23.8; P = .001) and 5.4 ms prolongation of averaged P-duration (95% CI 0.9-10.0; P = .020). LV fibrosis did not affect LA function. PPaV1 and PTFV1 were associated with an increase in LA volumes and decrease in LA emptying fraction and LA reservoir function. LV interstitial fibrosis is associated with abnormal PTFV1, prolonged PPdV1, and P-duration, but does not affect LA function. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Neurotransmitter Specific, Cellular-Resolution Functional Brain Mapping Using Receptor Coated Nanoparticles: Assessment of the Possibility

    Forati, Ebrahim; Sabouni, Abas; Ray, Supriyo; Head, Brian; Schoen, Christian; Sievenpiper, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Receptor coated resonant nanoparticles and quantum dots are proposed to provide a cellular-level resolution image of neural activities inside the brain. The functionalized nanoparticles and quantum dots in this approach will selectively bind to different neurotransmitters in the extra-synaptic regions of neurons. This allows us to detect neural activities in real time by monitoring the nanoparticles and quantum dots optically. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) with two different geometries (sphere and rod) and quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes were studied along with three different neurotransmitters: dopamine, gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), and glycine. The absorption/emission spectra of GNPs and QDs before and after binding of neurotransmitters and their corresponding receptors are reported. The results using QDs and nanorods with diameter 25nm and aspect rations larger than three were promising for the development of the proposed functional brain mapping approach. PMID:26717196

  20. Mapping of functional activity in brain with 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose

    Alavi, A.; Reivich, M.; Greenberg, J.

    1981-01-01

    The efficacy of using the 18 F-fluoro-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-DG) for measuring regional cerebral glucose utilization in man during functional activation is demonstrated. Normal male volunteers subjected to sensory stimuli (visual, auditory, tactile) exhibited focal increases in glucose metabolism in response to the stimulus. Unilateral visual hemifield stimulation caused the contralateral striate cortex to become more active metabolically than the striate cortex ipsilateral to the stimulated hemifield. Similarly, stroking of the fingers and hand of one arm with a brush produced an increase in metabolism in the contralateral postcentral gyrus compared to the homologous ipsilateral region. The auditory stimulus, which consisted of monaural listening to either a meaningful or nonmeaningful story, caused an increase in glucose metabolism in the right temporal cortex independent of which ear was stimulated. These results demonstrate that the 18 F-DG technique is capable of providing functional maps in vivo in the human brain

  1. Nonparametric modeling of longitudinal covariance structure in functional mapping of quantitative trait loci.

    Yap, John Stephen; Fan, Jianqing; Wu, Rongling

    2009-12-01

    Estimation of the covariance structure of longitudinal processes is a fundamental prerequisite for the practical deployment of functional mapping designed to study the genetic regulation and network of quantitative variation in dynamic complex traits. We present a nonparametric approach for estimating the covariance structure of a quantitative trait measured repeatedly at a series of time points. Specifically, we adopt Huang et al.'s (2006, Biometrika 93, 85-98) approach of invoking the modified Cholesky decomposition and converting the problem into modeling a sequence of regressions of responses. A regularized covariance estimator is obtained using a normal penalized likelihood with an L(2) penalty. This approach, embedded within a mixture likelihood framework, leads to enhanced accuracy, precision, and flexibility of functional mapping while preserving its biological relevance. Simulation studies are performed to reveal the statistical properties and advantages of the proposed method. A real example from a mouse genome project is analyzed to illustrate the utilization of the methodology. The new method will provide a useful tool for genome-wide scanning for the existence and distribution of quantitative trait loci underlying a dynamic trait important to agriculture, biology, and health sciences.

  2. A computational approach for functional mapping of quantitative trait loci that regulate thermal performance curves.

    John Stephen Yap

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Whether and how thermal reaction norm is under genetic control is fundamental to understand the mechanistic basis of adaptation to novel thermal environments. However, the genetic study of thermal reaction norm is difficult because it is often expressed as a continuous function or curve. Here we derive a statistical model for dissecting thermal performance curves into individual quantitative trait loci (QTL with the aid of a genetic linkage map. The model is constructed within the maximum likelihood context and implemented with the EM algorithm. It integrates the biological principle of responses to temperature into a framework for genetic mapping through rigorous mathematical functions established to describe the pattern and shape of thermal reaction norms. The biological advantages of the model lie in the decomposition of the genetic causes for thermal reaction norm into its biologically interpretable modes, such as hotter-colder, faster-slower and generalist-specialist, as well as the formulation of a series of hypotheses at the interface between genetic actions/interactions and temperature-dependent sensitivity. The model is also meritorious in statistics because the precision of parameter estimation and power of QTLdetection can be increased by modeling the mean-covariance structure with a small set of parameters. The results from simulation studies suggest that the model displays favorable statistical properties and can be robust in practical genetic applications. The model provides a conceptual platform for testing many ecologically relevant hypotheses regarding organismic adaptation within the Eco-Devo paradigm.

  3. Evaluation of connectivity map-discovered celastrol as a radiosensitizing agent in a murine lung carcinoma model: Feasibility study of diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Hong Young Jun

    Full Text Available This study was designed to identify potential radiosensitizing (RS agents for combined radio- and chemotherapy in a murine model of human lung carcinoma, and to evaluate the in vivo effect of the RS agents using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI. Radioresistance-associated genes in A549 and H460 cells were isolated on the basis of their gene expression profiles. Celastrol was selected as a candidate RS by using connectivity mapping, and its efficacy in lung cancer radiotherapy was tested. Mice inoculated with A549 carcinoma cells were treated with single ionizing radiation (SIR, single celastrol (SC, or celastrol-combined ionizing radiation (CCIR. Changes in radiosensitization over time were assessed using DW-MRI before and at 3, 6, and 12 days after therapy initiation. The tumors were stained with hematoxylin and eosin at 6 and 12 days after therapy. The percentage change in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC value in the CCIR group was significantly higher than that in the SC and SIR group on the 12th day (Mann-Whitney U-test, p = 0.05; Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.05. A significant correlation (Spearman's rho correlation coefficient of 0.713, p = 0.001 was observed between the mean percentage tumor necrotic area and the mean ADC values after therapy initiation. These results suggest that the novel radiosensitizing agent celastrol has therapeutic effects when combined with ionizing radiation (IR, thereby maximizing the therapeutic effect of radiation in non-small cell lung carcinoma. In addition, DW-MRI is a useful noninvasive tool to monitor the effects of RS agents by assessing cellularity changes and sequential therapeutic responses.

  4. Mapping the Pareto optimal design space for a functionally deimmunized biotherapeutic candidate.

    Salvat, Regina S; Parker, Andrew S; Choi, Yoonjoo; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity of biotherapeutics can bottleneck development pipelines and poses a barrier to widespread clinical application. As a result, there is a growing need for improved deimmunization technologies. We have recently described algorithms that simultaneously optimize proteins for both reduced T cell epitope content and high-level function. In silico analysis of this dual objective design space reveals that there is no single global optimum with respect to protein deimmunization. Instead, mutagenic epitope deletion yields a spectrum of designs that exhibit tradeoffs between immunogenic potential and molecular function. The leading edge of this design space is the Pareto frontier, i.e. the undominated variants for which no other single design exhibits better performance in both criteria. Here, the Pareto frontier of a therapeutic enzyme has been designed, constructed, and evaluated experimentally. Various measures of protein performance were found to map a functional sequence space that correlated well with computational predictions. These results represent the first systematic and rigorous assessment of the functional penalty that must be paid for pursuing progressively more deimmunized biotherapeutic candidates. Given this capacity to rapidly assess and design for tradeoffs between protein immunogenicity and functionality, these algorithms may prove useful in augmenting, accelerating, and de-risking experimental deimmunization efforts.

  5. Convergence to Equilibrium in Energy-Reaction-Diffusion Systems Using Vector-Valued Functional Inequalities

    Mielke, Alexander; Mittnenzweig, Markus

    2018-04-01

    We discuss how the recently developed energy dissipation methods for reaction diffusion systems can be generalized to the non-isothermal case. For this, we use concave entropies in terms of the densities of the species and the internal energy, where the importance is that the equilibrium densities may depend on the internal energy. Using the log-Sobolev estimate and variants for lower-order entropies as well as estimates for the entropy production of the nonlinear reactions, we give two methods to estimate the relative entropy by the total entropy production, namely a somewhat restrictive convexity method, which provides explicit decay rates, and a very general, but weaker compactness method.

  6. Rapid and minimum invasive functional brain mapping by real-time visualization of high gamma activity during awake craniotomy.

    Ogawa, Hiroshi; Kamada, Kyousuke; Kapeller, Christoph; Hiroshima, Satoru; Prueckl, Robert; Guger, Christoph

    2014-11-01

    Electrocortical stimulation (ECS) is the gold standard for functional brain mapping during an awake craniotomy. The critical issue is to set aside enough time to identify eloquent cortices by ECS. High gamma activity (HGA) ranging between 80 and 120 Hz on electrocorticogram is assumed to reflect localized cortical processing. In this report, we used real-time HGA mapping and functional neuronavigation integrated with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for rapid and reliable identification of motor and language functions. Four patients with intra-axial tumors in their dominant hemisphere underwent preoperative fMRI and lesion resection with an awake craniotomy. All patients showed significant fMRI activation evoked by motor and language tasks. During the craniotomy, we recorded electrocorticogram activity by placing subdural grids directly on the exposed brain surface. Each patient performed motor and language tasks and demonstrated real-time HGA dynamics in hand motor areas and parts of the inferior frontal gyrus. Sensitivity and specificity of HGA mapping were 100% compared with ECS mapping in the frontal lobe, which suggested HGA mapping precisely indicated eloquent cortices. We found different HGA dynamics of language tasks in frontal and temporal regions. Specificities of the motor and language-fMRI did not reach 85%. The results of HGA mapping was mostly consistent with those of ECS mapping, although fMRI tended to overestimate functional areas. This novel technique enables rapid and accurate identification of motor and frontal language areas. Furthermore, real-time HGA mapping sheds light on underlying physiological mechanisms related to human brain functions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional imaging of the human brain using a modular, fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system.

    Chitnis, Danial; Cooper, Robert J; Dempsey, Laura; Powell, Samuel; Quaggia, Simone; Highton, David; Elwell, Clare; Hebden, Jeremy C; Everdell, Nicholas L

    2016-10-01

    We present the first three-dimensional, functional images of the human brain to be obtained using a fibre-less, high-density diffuse optical tomography system. Our technology consists of independent, miniaturized, silicone-encapsulated DOT modules that can be placed directly on the scalp. Four of these modules were arranged to provide up to 128, dual-wavelength measurement channels over a scalp area of approximately 60 × 65 mm 2 . Using a series of motor-cortex stimulation experiments, we demonstrate that this system can obtain high-quality, continuous-wave measurements at source-detector separations ranging from 14 to 55 mm in adults, in the presence of hair. We identify robust haemodynamic response functions in 5 out of 5 subjects, and present diffuse optical tomography images that depict functional haemodynamic responses that are well-localized in all three dimensions at both the individual and group levels. This prototype modular system paves the way for a new generation of wearable, wireless, high-density optical neuroimaging technologies.

  8. Initial experience of functional imaging of upper urinary tract neoplasm by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging

    Yoshida, Soichiro; Masuda, Hitoshi; Saito, Kazutaka; Kawakami, Satoru; Kihara, Kazunori; Ishii, Chikako

    2008-01-01

    Diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides functional information widely used in the diagnosis of acute cerebral stroke. We reported our initial experience of this imaging technique of upper urinary tract (UUT) urothelial carcinoma (UC). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was carried out in 10 consecutive patients with suspected UUT UC. With conventional imaging, seven were diagnosed as having renal pelvic tumors and two were highly suspected of having UUT UC. These nine patients were diagnosed histopathologically as having renal pelvic UC by subsequent operation. The last patient was confirmed as experiencing benign stenosis. DW MRI was obtained with a 1.5-T MR imager without a breath-holding sequence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of renal parenchyma, dilated collecting system, and tumor were calculated. The differences were analyzed using Wilcoxon t-test. On DW MRI, all nine tumors showed hyperintensity with negligible urinary intensity. Two cases of highly suspected UUT UC with unclear conventional MRI had high signal intensity and contrast. The case of benign stenosis had negative DW MRI. The median (range) ADC value of the tumor (0.803 [0.412-0.958] x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) was significantly lower than those of the dilated collecting system (2.19 [1.42-2.40] x 10 -3 ) and renal parenchyma (1.28 [0.922-1.45] x 10 -3 , respectively (P<0.01 and P<0.01). This is the first report on the application of DW MRI for a series of UUT UC. With this technique, a clear demonstration of UUT UC could be obtained. Moreover, this imaging technique is potentially useful to identify small lesions if they have a low diffusion coefficient. (author)

  9. Step-by-Step Simulation of Radiation of Radiation Chemistry Using Green Functions for Diffusion-Influenced Reactions

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The irradiation of biological systems leads to the formation of radiolytic species such as H(raised dot), (raised dot)OH, H2, H2O2, e(sup -)(sub aq), etc.[1]. These species react with neighboring molecules, which result in damage in biological molecules such as DNA. Radiation chemistry is there for every important to understand the radiobiological consequences of radiation[2]. In this work, we discuss an approach based on the exact Green Functions for diffusion-influenced reactions which may be used to simulate radiation chemistry and eventually extended to study more complex systems, including DNA.

  10. Experience gained with the application of the MODIS diffusion model compared with the ATMOS Gauss-function-based model

    Mueller, A.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of the Gauss-function-based models doubtlessly consists in their proven propagation parameter sets and empirical stack plume rise formulas and in their easy matchability and handability. However, grid models based on trace matter transport equation are more convincing concerning their fundamental principle. Grid models of the MODIS type are to acquire a practical applicability comparable to Gauss models by developing techniques allowing to consider the vertical self-movement of the plumes in grid models and to secure improved diffusion co-efficient determination. (orig./PW) [de

  11. Diffusion weighted MR imaging of acute Wernicke's encephalopathy

    Chung, Tae-Ick; Kim, Joong-Seok; Park, Soung-Kyeong; Kim, Beum-Saeng; Ahn, Kook-Jin; Yang, Dong-Won

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of Wernicke's encephalopathy in which diffusion-weighted MR images demonstrated symmetrical hyperintense lesions in the paraventricular area of the third ventricles and medial thalami. Apparent diffusion coefficient mapping showed isointensity in the aforementioned areas. Diffusion-weighted MR images may provide evidence of vasogenic edema associated with thiamine deficiency, proven in the histopathology of experimental animals. In addition, diffusion-weighted MRI has many advantages over T2 or FLARE-weighted brain MRI in detecting structural and functional abnormalities in Wernicke's encephalopathy

  12. Probabilistic maps of the white matter tracts with known associated functions on the neonatal brain atlas: Application to evaluate longitudinal developmental trajectories in term-born and preterm-born infants.

    Akazawa, Kentaro; Chang, Linda; Yamakawa, Robyn; Hayama, Sara; Buchthal, Steven; Alicata, Daniel; Andres, Tamara; Castillo, Deborrah; Oishi, Kumiko; Skranes, Jon; Ernst, Thomas; Oishi, Kenichi

    2016-03-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been widely used to investigate the development of the neonatal and infant brain, and deviations related to various diseases or medical conditions like preterm birth. In this study, we created a probabilistic map of fiber pathways with known associated functions, on a published neonatal multimodal atlas. The pathways-of-interest include the superficial white matter (SWM) fibers just beneath the specific cytoarchitectonically defined cortical areas, which were difficult to evaluate with existing DTI analysis methods. The Jülich cytoarchitectonic atlas was applied to define cortical areas related to specific brain functions, and the Dynamic Programming (DP) method was applied to delineate the white matter pathways traversing through the SWM. Probabilistic maps were created for pathways related to motor, somatosensory, auditory, visual, and limbic functions, as well as major white matter tracts, such as the corpus callosum, the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and the middle cerebellar peduncle, by delineating these structures in eleven healthy term-born neonates. In order to characterize maturation-related changes in diffusivity measures of these pathways, the probabilistic maps were then applied to DTIs of 49 healthy infants who were longitudinally scanned at three time-points, approximately five weeks apart. First, we investigated the normal developmental pattern based on 19 term-born infants. Next, we analyzed 30 preterm-born infants to identify developmental patterns related to preterm birth. Last, we investigated the difference in diffusion measures between these groups to evaluate the effects of preterm birth on the development of these functional pathways. Term-born and preterm-born infants both demonstrated a time-dependent decrease in diffusivity, indicating postnatal maturation in these pathways, with laterality seen in the corticospinal tract and the optic radiation. The comparison between term- and preterm

  13. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Self-Organising Maps

    Stella Fabio

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. Results The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. Conclusions The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to

  14. Conformational and functional analysis of molecular dynamics trajectories by Self-Organising Maps

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are powerful tools to investigate the conformational dynamics of proteins that is often a critical element of their function. Identification of functionally relevant conformations is generally done clustering the large ensemble of structures that are generated. Recently, Self-Organising Maps (SOMs) were reported performing more accurately and providing more consistent results than traditional clustering algorithms in various data mining problems. We present a novel strategy to analyse and compare conformational ensembles of protein domains using a two-level approach that combines SOMs and hierarchical clustering. Results The conformational dynamics of the α-spectrin SH3 protein domain and six single mutants were analysed by MD simulations. The Cα's Cartesian coordinates of conformations sampled in the essential space were used as input data vectors for SOM training, then complete linkage clustering was performed on the SOM prototype vectors. A specific protocol to optimize a SOM for structural ensembles was proposed: the optimal SOM was selected by means of a Taguchi experimental design plan applied to different data sets, and the optimal sampling rate of the MD trajectory was selected. The proposed two-level approach was applied to single trajectories of the SH3 domain independently as well as to groups of them at the same time. The results demonstrated the potential of this approach in the analysis of large ensembles of molecular structures: the possibility of producing a topological mapping of the conformational space in a simple 2D visualisation, as well as of effectively highlighting differences in the conformational dynamics directly related to biological functions. Conclusions The use of a two-level approach combining SOMs and hierarchical clustering for conformational analysis of structural ensembles of proteins was proposed. It can easily be extended to other study cases and to conformational ensembles from

  15. Rank-shaping regularization of exponential spectral analysis for application to functional parametric mapping

    Turkheimer, Federico E; Hinz, Rainer; Gunn, Roger N; Aston, John A D; Gunn, Steve R; Cunningham, Vincent J

    2003-01-01

    Compartmental models are widely used for the mathematical modelling of dynamic studies acquired with positron emission tomography (PET). The numerical problem involves the estimation of a sum of decaying real exponentials convolved with an input function. In exponential spectral analysis (SA), the nonlinear estimation of the exponential functions is replaced by the linear estimation of the coefficients of a predefined set of exponential basis functions. This set-up guarantees fast estimation and attainment of the global optimum. SA, however, is hampered by high sensitivity to noise and, because of the positivity constraints implemented in the algorithm, cannot be extended to reference region modelling. In this paper, SA limitations are addressed by a new rank-shaping (RS) estimator that defines an appropriate regularization over an unconstrained least-squares solution obtained through singular value decomposition of the exponential base. Shrinkage parameters are conditioned on the expected signal-to-noise ratio. Through application to simulated and real datasets, it is shown that RS ameliorates and extends SA properties in the case of the production of functional parametric maps from PET studies

  16. Effects of the Thyroid Status Correction on the Functional State of Digestive System in Children with Diffuse Nontoxic Goiter

    M.Ye. Mamenko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the effects of the diffuse non-toxic goiter treatment on the functional state of the digestive system in children. Materials and methods. The screening survey was based on lunior comprehensive schools (695 children aged 5–11 years: questioning of families, anthropometry and examination of children, detection of ioduria, palpation of the thyroid gland. In-depth examination of children with goiter (n = 88: ultrasonography of the thyroid gland and the digestive system, determination of levels of thyroid stimulating hormone, free thyroxine, serotonin, melatonin, vasoactive intestinal peptide. Results. The high incidence of non-toxic diffuse goiter (25.8 %, associated with a reduction in functional activity of the thyroid gland to the minimum thyroid dysfunction (42.0 % and subclinical hypothyroidism (10.2 %, was detected in school-aged children. The presence of goiter leads to a static increase of the chances for functional gastrointestinal disorders developing (odds ratio 2.33, p = 0.000, mainly due to the hypokinetic conditions. The administration of potassium iodide preparations leads to the decreasing in goiter rate in high compliance up to the 27.3 % and to the normalization of the functional state of the pituitary-thyroid system (thyroid stimulating hormone — 1.66 mIU/L, that is associated with increased level of serotonin (6.14 ng/ml and vasoactive intestinal peptide (117.86 ng/ml and decreased melatonin concentration (2.5 pmol/l. In children who consistently for six months received preparations of potassium iodide, along with the normalization of thyroid status we noted the decrease of the frequency of complaints from the digestive system. Conclusions. The treatment of diffuse nontoxic goiter by potassium iodide preparations allows to achieve reduction of thyroid size and to normalize functional activity of thyroid-pituitary system. Increase in the functional activity of the pituitary-thyroid system helps reduce the

  17. Mode coupling theory analysis of electrolyte solutions: Time dependent diffusion, intermediate scattering function, and ion solvation dynamics.

    Roy, Susmita; Yashonath, Subramanian; Bagchi, Biman

    2015-03-28

    A self-consistent mode coupling theory (MCT) with microscopic inputs of equilibrium pair correlation functions is developed to analyze electrolyte dynamics. We apply the theory to calculate concentration dependence of (i) time dependent ion diffusion, (ii) intermediate scattering function of the constituent ions, and (iii) ion solvation dynamics in electrolyte solution. Brownian dynamics with implicit water molecules and molecular dynamics method with explicit water are used to check the theoretical predictions. The time dependence of ionic self-diffusion coefficient and the corresponding intermediate scattering function evaluated from our MCT approach show quantitative agreement with early experimental and present Brownian dynamic simulation results. With increasing concentration, the dispersion of electrolyte friction is found to occur at increasingly higher frequency, due to the faster relaxation of the ion atmosphere. The wave number dependence of intermediate scattering function, F(k, t), exhibits markedly different relaxation dynamics at different length scales. At small wave numbers, we find the emergence of a step-like relaxation, indicating the presence of both fast and slow time scales in the system. Such behavior allows an intriguing analogy with temperature dependent relaxation dynamics of supercooled liquids. We find that solvation dynamics of a tagged ion exhibits a power law decay at long times-the decay can also be fitted to a stretched exponential form. The emergence of the power law in solvation dynamics has been tested by carrying out long Brownian dynamics simulations with varying ionic concentrations. The solvation time correlation and ion-ion intermediate scattering function indeed exhibit highly interesting, non-trivial dynamical behavior at intermediate to longer times that require further experimental and theoretical studies.

  18. Cross-Population Joint Analysis of eQTLs: Fine Mapping and Functional Annotation

    Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Mapping expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has been shown as a powerful tool to uncover the genetic underpinnings of many complex traits at molecular level. In this paper, we present an integrative analysis approach that leverages eQTL data collected from multiple population groups. In particular, our approach effectively identifies multiple independent cis-eQTL signals that are consistent across populations, accounting for population heterogeneity in allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium patterns. Furthermore, by integrating genomic annotations, our analysis framework enables high-resolution functional analysis of eQTLs. We applied our statistical approach to analyze the GEUVADIS data consisting of samples from five population groups. From this analysis, we concluded that i) jointly analysis across population groups greatly improves the power of eQTL discovery and the resolution of fine mapping of causal eQTL ii) many genes harbor multiple independent eQTLs in their cis regions iii) genetic variants that disrupt transcription factor binding are significantly enriched in eQTLs (p-value = 4.93 × 10-22). PMID:25906321

  19. Correlation between language function and the left arcuate fasciculus detected by diffusion tensor imaging tractography after brain tumor surgery.

    Hayashi, Yutaka; Kinoshita, Masashi; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hamada, Jun-ichiro

    2012-11-01

    Disturbance of the arcuate fasciculus in the dominant hemisphere is thought to be associated with language-processing disorders, including conduction aphasia. Although the arcuate fasciculus can be visualized in vivo with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography, its involvement in functional processes associated with language has not been shown dynamically using DTI tractography. In the present study, to clarify the participation of the arcuate fasciculus in language functions, postoperative changes in the arcuate fasciculus detected by DTI tractography were evaluated chronologically in relation to postoperative changes in language function after brain tumor surgery. Preoperative and postoperative arcuate fasciculus area and language function were examined in 7 right-handed patients with a brain tumor in the left hemisphere located in proximity to part of the arcuate fasciculus. The arcuate fasciculus was depicted, and its area was calculated using DTI tractography. Language functions were measured using the Western Aphasia Battery (WAB). After tumor resection, visualization of the arcuate fasciculus was increased in 5 of the 7 patients, and the total WAB score improved in 6 of the 7 patients. The relative ratio of postoperative visualized area of the arcuate fasciculus to preoperative visualized area of the arcuate fasciculus was increased in association with an improvement in postoperative language function (p = 0.0039). The role of the left arcuate fasciculus in language functions can be evaluated chronologically in vivo by DTI tractography after brain tumor surgery. Because increased postoperative visualization of the fasciculus was significantly associated with postoperative improvement in language functions, the arcuate fasciculus may play an important role in language function, as previously thought. In addition, postoperative changes in the arcuate fasciculus detected by DTI tractography could represent a predicting factor for postoperative language

  20. Relationships between the integrity and function of lumbar nerve roots as assessed by diffusion tensor imaging and neurophysiology

    Chiou, S.Y.; Strutton, P.H. [Imperial College London, The Nick Davey Laboratory, Division of Surgery, Human Performance Group, Department of Surgery and Cancer, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Hellyer, P.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College London, Department of Bioengineering, London (United Kingdom); Sharp, D.J. [Imperial College London, Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Division of Brain Sciences, London (United Kingdom); Newbould, R.D. [Imanova, Ltd, London (United Kingdom); Patel, M.C. [Charing Cross Hospital, Imaging Department, Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2017-09-15

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has shown promise in the measurement of peripheral nerve integrity, although the optimal way to apply the technique for the study of lumbar spinal nerves is unclear. The aims of this study are to use an improved DTI acquisition to investigate lumbar nerve root integrity and correlate this with functional measures using neurophysiology. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent 3 T DTI of the L5/S1 area. Regions of interest were applied to L5 and S1 nerve roots, and DTI metrics (fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity) were derived. Neurophysiological measures were obtained from muscles innervated by L5/S1 nerves; these included the slope of motor-evoked potential input-output curves, F-wave latency, maximal motor response, and central and peripheral motor conduction times. DTI metrics were similar between the left and right sides and between vertebral levels. Conversely, significant differences in DTI measures were seen along the course of the nerves. Regression analyses revealed that DTI metrics of the L5 nerve correlated with neurophysiological measures from the muscle innervated by it. The current findings suggest that DTI has the potential to be used for assessing lumbar spinal nerve integrity and that parameters derived from DTI provide quantitative information which reflects their function. (orig.)

  1. S-Boxes Based on Affine Mapping and Orbit of Power Function

    Khan, Mubashar; Azam, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    The demand of data security against computational attacks such as algebraic, differential, linear and interpolation attacks has been increased as a result of rapid advancement in the field of computation. It is, therefore, necessary to develop such cryptosystems which can resist current cryptanalysis and more computational attacks in future. In this paper, we present a multiple S-boxes scheme based on affine mapping and orbit of the power function used in Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). The proposed technique results in 256 different S-boxes named as orbital S-boxes. Rigorous tests and comparisons are performed to analyse the cryptographic strength of each of the orbital S-boxes. Furthermore, gray scale images are encrypted by using multiple orbital S-boxes. Results and simulations show that the encryption strength of the orbital S-boxes against computational attacks is better than that of the existing S-boxes.

  2. Radial Basis Function (RBF Interpolation and Investigating its Impact on Rainfall Duration Mapping

    Hassan Derakhshan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The missing data in database must be reproduced primarily by appropriate interpolation techniques. Radial basis function (RBF interpolators can play a significant role in data completion of precipitation mapping. Five RBF techniques were engaged to be employed in compensating the missing data in event-wised dataset of Upper Paramatta River Catchment in the western suburbs of Sydney, Australia. The related shape parameter, C, of RBFs was optimized for first event of database during a cross-validation process. The Normalized mean square error (NMSE, percent average estimation error (PAEE and coefficient of determination (R2 were the statistics used as validation tools. Results showed that the multiquadric RBF technique with the least error, best suits compensation of the related database.

  3. Glioma surgery with intraoperative mapping-balancing the onco-functional choice.

    Brennum, Jannick; Engelmann, Christina M; Thomsen, Johanne Asperud; Skjøth-Rasmussen, Jane

    2018-05-01

    Balancing survival versus risk of inducing functional deficits is a challenge when resecting gliomas in or near eloquent areas. Our objectives were to assess deficits prior to and at 6 and 12 months after awake craniotomies with cortical and subcortical mapping in patients with suspected grade 2 gliomas in eloquent areas. We analyzed whether pre- and intraoperative factors were linked to an increased risk of postoperative deficits. Retrospective study of 92 consecutive patients operated between January 2010 and June 2014. All deficits reported by any healthcare professional and KPS-score preoperatively, immediately postoperatively (day 1-10), at 6 months and 12 months, were analyzed. A decrease in neurological and or cognitive function was common in the first days after surgery, with a significant improvement at 6 months after surgery and further improvement at 12 months. Immediately after surgery, 33% of the patients had severe deficits compared to 2% prior to surgery; this improved to 9% at 6 months and 3% at 12 months. However, at 12 months, 18% of the patients had new or worsened minor or moderate deficits and only 10% had no deficits compared to 39% prior to surgery. There were only minor changes in KPS. None of the recorded pre/intraoperative factors were found significantly to influence the risk of moderate/severe late postoperative deficits. A significant amount of the patients in this study experienced new or worsened neurological and or cognitive deficits during follow-up. We found a higher frequency of deficits than normally reported. This is due to the inclusion of mild deficits, the use of patient-reported data, and our focus on cognitive deficits. Our study indicates that the impact of awake craniotomy with mapping on patient outcome is larger than expected. This in no way negates the use of the technique.

  4. Strategy of Surgical Resection for Glioma Based on Intraoperative Functional Mapping and Monitoring

    TAMURA, Manabu; MURAGAKI, Yoshihiro; SAITO, Taiichi; MARUYAMA, Takashi; NITTA, Masayuki; TSUZUKI, Shunsuke; ISEKI, Hiroshi; OKADA, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of papers have pointed out the relationship between aggressive resection of gliomas and survival prognosis. For maximum resection, the current concept of surgical decision-making is in “information-guided surgery” using multimodal intraoperative information. With this, anatomical information from intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and navigation, functional information from brain mapping and monitoring, and histopathological information must all be taken into account in the new perspective for innovative minimally invasive surgical treatment of glioma. Intraoperative neurofunctional information such as neurophysiological functional monitoring takes the most important part in the process to acquire objective visual data during tumor removal and to integrate these findings as digitized data for intraoperative surgical decision-making. Moreover, the analysis of qualitative data and threshold-setting for quantitative data raise difficult issues in the interpretation and processing of each data type, such as determination of motor evoked potential (MEP) decline, underestimation in tractography, and judgments of patient response for neurofunctional mapping and monitoring during awake craniotomy. Neurofunctional diagnosis of false-positives in these situations may affect the extent of resection, while false-negatives influence intra- and postoperative complication rates. Additionally, even though the various intraoperative visualized data from multiple sources contribute significantly to the reliability of surgical decisions when the information is integrated and provided, it is not uncommon for individual pieces of information to convey opposing suggestions. Such conflicting pieces of information facilitate higher-order decision-making that is dependent on the policies of the facility and the priorities of the patient, as well as the availability of the histopathological characteristics from resected tissue. PMID:26185825

  5. Towards mapping the brain connectome in depression: functional connectivity by perfusion SPECT.

    Gardner, Ann; Åstrand, Disa; Öberg, Johanna; Jacobsson, Hans; Jonsson, Cathrine; Larsson, Stig; Pagani, Marco

    2014-08-30

    Several studies have demonstrated altered brain functional connectivity in the resting state in depression. However, no study has investigated interregional networking in patients with persistent depressive disorder (PDD). The aim of this study was to assess differences in brain perfusion distribution and connectivity between large groups of patients and healthy controls. Participants comprised 91 patients with PDD and 65 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Resting state perfusion was investigated by single photon emission computed tomography, and group differences were assessed by Statistical Parametric Mapping. Brain connectivity was explored through a voxel-wise interregional correlation analysis using as covariate of interest the normalized values of clusters of voxels in which perfusion differences were found in group analysis. Significantly increased regional brain perfusion distribution covering a large part of the cerebellum was observed in patients as compared with controls. Patients showed a significant negative functional connectivity between the cerebellar cluster and caudate, bilaterally. This study demonstrated inverse relative perfusion between the cerebellum and the caudate in PDD. Functional uncoupling may be associated with a dysregulation between the role of the cerebellum in action control and of the caudate in action selection, initiation and decision making in the patients. The potential impact of the resting state condition and the possibility of mitochondrial impairment are discussed. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Functional mapping of hospitals by diagnosis-dominant case-mix analysis

    Horiguchi Hiromasa

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Principles and methods for the allocation of healthcare resources among healthcare providers have long been health policy research issues in many countries. Healthcare reforms including the development of a new case-mix system, Diagnosis Procedure Combination (DPC, and the introduction of a DPC-based payment system are currently underway in Japan, and a methodology for adequately assessing the functions of healthcare providers is needed to determine healthcare resource allocations. Methods By two-dimensional mapping of the rarity and complexity of diagnoses for patients receiving treatment, we were able to quantitatively demonstrate differences in the functions of different healthcare service provider groups. Results On average, inpatients had diseases that were 3.6-times rarer than those seen in outpatients, while major teaching hospitals treated inpatients with diseases 3.0-times rarer on average than those seen at small hospitals. Conclusion We created and evaluated a new indicator for DPC, the diagnosis-dominant case-mix system developed in Japan, whereby the system was used to assess the functions of healthcare service providers. The results suggest that it is possible to apply the case-mix system to the integrated evaluation of outpatient and inpatient healthcare services and to the appropriate allocation of healthcare resources among health service providers.

  7. Probabilistic diffusion tractography of the optic radiations and visual function in preterm infants at term equivalent age.

    Bassi, Laura; Ricci, Daniela; Volzone, Anna; Allsop, Joanna M; Srinivasan, Latha; Pai, Aakash; Ribes, Carmen; Ramenghi, Luca A; Mercuri, Eugenio; Mosca, Fabio; Edwards, A David; Cowan, Frances M; Rutherford, Mary A; Counsell, Serena J

    2008-02-01

    Children born prematurely have a high incidence of visual disorders which cannot always be explained by focal retinal or brain lesions. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that visual function in preterm infants is related to the microstructural development of white matter in the optic radiations. We used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with probabilistic diffusion tractography to delineate the optic radiations at term equivalent age and compared the fractional anisotropy (FA) to a contemporaneous evaluation of visual function. Thirty-seven preterm infants (19 male) born at median (range) 28(+4) (24(+1)-32(+3)) weeks gestational age, were examined at a post-menstrual age of 42 (39(+6)-43) weeks. MRI and DTI were acquired on a 3 Tesla MR system with DTI obtained in 15 non-collinear directions with a b value of 750 s/mm(2). Tracts were generated from a seed mask placed in the white matter lateral to the lateral geniculate nucleus and mean FA values of these tracts were determined. Visual assessment was performed using a battery of nine items assessing different aspects of visual abilities. Ten infants had evidence of cerebral lesions on conventional MRI. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that the visual assessment score was independently correlated with FA values, but not gestational age at birth, post-menstrual age at scan or the presence of lesions on conventional MRI. The occurrence of mild retinopathy of prematurity did not affect the FA measures or visual scores. We then performed a secondary analysis using tract-based spatial statistics to determine whether global brain white matter development was related to visual function and found that only FA in the optic radiations was correlated with visual assessment score. Our results suggest that in preterm infants at term equivalent age visual function is directly related to the development of white matter in the optic radiations.

  8. Cingulum correlates of cognitive functions in patients with mild cognitive impairment and early Alzheimer's disease: a diffusion spectrum imaging study.

    Lin, Yi-Cheng; Shih, Yao-Chia; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Chu, Yu-Hsiu; Wu, Meng-Tien; Chen, Ta-Fu; Tang, Pei-Fang; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2014-05-01

    Diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) of MRI can detect neural fiber tract changes. We investigated integrity of cingulum bundle (CB) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and early Alzheimer's disease (EAD) using DSI tractography and explored its relationship with cognitive functions. We recruited 8 patients with MCI, 9 with EAD and 15 healthy controls (HC). All subjects received a battery of neuropsychological tests to access their executive, memory and language functions. We used a 3.0-tesla MRI scanner to obtain T1- and T2-weighted images for anatomy and used a pulsed gradient twice-refocused spin-echo diffusion echo-planar imaging sequence to acquire DSI. Patients with EAD performed significantly poorer than the HC on most tests in executive and memory functions. Significantly smaller general fractional anisotropy (GFA) values were found in the posterior and inferior segments of left CB and of the anterior segment of right CB of the EAD compared with those of the HC. Spearman's correlation on the patient groups showed that GFA values of the posterior segment of the left CB were significantly negatively associated with the time used to complete Color Trails Test Part II and positively correlated with performance of the logical memory and visual reproduction. GFA values of inferior segment of bilateral CB were positively associated with the performance of visual recognition. DSI tractography demonstrates significant preferential degeneration of the CB on the left side in patients with EAD. The location-specific degeneration is associated with corresponding declines in both executive and memory functions.

  9. Motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Jin Hyun Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI studies regarding pediatric patients with motor dysfunction have confirmed the correlation between DTI parameters of the injured corticospinal tract and the severity of motor dysfunction. There is also evidence that DTI parameters can help predict the prognosis of motor function of patients with cerebral palsy. But few studies are reported on the DTI parameters that can reflect the motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment. In the present study, 36 pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were included. Before and after rehabilitation treatment, DTI was used to measure the fiber number (FN, fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC of bilateral corticospinal tracts. Functional Level of Hemiplegia scale (FxL was used to assess the therapeutic effect of rehabilitative therapy on clinical hemiplegia. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the statistical interrelationship between the change amount of DTI parameters and FxL. DTI findings obtained at the initial and follow-up evaluations demonstrated that more affected corticospinal tract yielded significantly decreased FN and FA values and significantly increased ADC value compared to the less affected corticospinal tract. Correlation analysis results showed that the change amount of FxL was positively correlated to FN and FA values, and the correlation to FN was stronger than the correlation to FA. The results suggest that FN and FA values can be used to evaluate the motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment and FN is of more significance for evaluation.

  10. NEREC, an effective brain mapping protocol for combined language and long-term memory functions.

    Perrone-Bertolotti, Marcela; Girard, Cléa; Cousin, Emilie; Vidal, Juan Ricardo; Pichat, Cédric; Kahane, Philippe; Baciu, Monica

    2015-12-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy can induce functional plasticity in temporoparietal networks involved in language and long-term memory processing. Previous studies in healthy subjects have revealed the relative difficulty for this network to respond effectively across different experimental designs, as compared to more reactive regions such as frontal lobes. For a protocol to be optimal for clinical use, it has to first show robust effects in a healthy cohort. In this study, we developed a novel experimental paradigm entitled NEREC, which is able to reveal the robust participation of temporoparietal networks in a uniquely combined language and memory task, validated in an fMRI study with healthy subjects. Concretely, NEREC is composed of two runs: (a) an intermixed language-memory task (confrontation naming associated with encoding in nonverbal items, NE) to map language (i.e., word retrieval and lexico-semantic processes) combined with simultaneous long-term verbal memory encoding (NE items named but also explicitly memorized) and (b) a memory retrieval task of items encoded during NE (word recognition, REC) intermixed with new items. Word recognition is based on both perceptual-semantic familiarity (feeling of 'know') and accessing stored memory representations (remembering). In order to maximize the remembering and recruitment of medial temporal lobe structures, we increased REC difficulty by changing the modality of stimulus presentation (from nonverbal during NE to verbal during REC). We report that (a) temporoparietal activation during NE was attributable to both lexico-semantic (language) and memory (episodic encoding and semantic retrieval) processes; that (b) encoding activated the left hippocampus, bilateral fusiform, and bilateral inferior temporal gyri; and that (c) task recognition (recollection) activated the right hippocampus and bilateral but predominant left fusiform gyrus. The novelty of this protocol consists of (a) combining two tasks in one (language

  11. Intrasurgical mapping of complex motor function in the superior frontal gyrus.

    Martino, J; Gabarrós, A; Deus, J; Juncadella, M; Acebes, J J; Torres, A; Pujol, J

    2011-04-14

    A lesion to the superior frontal gyrus (SFG) has been associated with long-lasting deficits in complex motor functions. The aim of this study was to analyze the functional role of the SFG by means of electrical cortical stimulation. Direct intraoperative electrical stimulation was used in a group of 21 subjects with lesions within or close to the SFG while they performed three motor tasks that require high skills or bimanual synergy. The results were compared to functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Ninety-four of the 98 (94.9%) labels identified were located on the convexity surface of the SFG and only four (4.1%) labels were located on the middle surface of the SFG. Areas of blockage of the three tasks were identified in six of the 12 (50%) hemispheres with lesions that had infiltrated the SFG, compared to all 10 of the 10 hemispheres (100%) with lesions that spared the SFG. The difference between these two proportions was statistically significant (P=0.015). fMRI activation was mainly located on the medial aspect of the SFG. We show that the convexity surface of the SFG has an important role in bilateral control of complex movements and in bimanual coordination. The infiltration of the posterior part of the SFG by a lesion disturbs some of the complex hand motor functions, which may be assumed by the contralesional homologous area. Finally, the current study emphasizes the discrepancies between fMRI and intraoperative electrical stimulation maps in complex hand motor function. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Application of a disease-specific mapping function to estimate utility gains with effective treatment of schizophrenia

    Rupnow Marcia FT

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most tools for estimating utilities use clinical trial data from general health status models, such as the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36. A disease-specific model may be more appropriate. The objective of this study was to apply a disease-specific utility mapping function for schizophrenia to data from a large, 1-year, open-label study of long-acting risperidone and to compare its performance with an SF-36-based utility mapping function. Methods Patients with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder by DSM-IV criteria received 25, 50, or 75 mg long-acting risperidone every 2 weeks for 12 months. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS and SF-36 were used to assess efficacy and health-related quality of life. Movement disorder severity was measured using the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS; data concerning other common adverse effects (orthostatic hypotension, weight gain were collected. Transforms were applied to estimate utilities. Results A total of 474 patients completed the study. Long-acting risperidone treatment was associated with a utility gain of 0.051 using the disease-specific function. The estimated gain using an SF-36-based mapping function was smaller: 0.0285. Estimates of gains were only weakly correlated (r = 0.2. Because of differences in scaling and variance, the requisite sample size for a randomized trial to confirm observed effects is much smaller for the disease-specific mapping function (156 versus 672 total subjects. Conclusion Application of a disease-specific mapping function was feasible. Differences in scaling and precision suggest the clinically based mapping function has greater power than the SF-36-based measure to detect differences in utility.

  13. Feasibility of 3.0 T diffusion-weighted nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of functional recovery of rats with complete spinal cord injury

    Duo Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging is a sensitive way to reflect axonal necrosis and degeneration, glial cell regeneration and demyelination following spinal cord injury, and to display microstructure changes in the spinal cord in vivo. Diffusion tensor imaging technology is a sensitive method to diagnose spinal cord injury fiber tractography visualizes the white matter fibers, and directly displays the structural integrity and resultant damage of the fiber bundle. At present, diffusion tensor imaging is restricted to brain examinations, and is rarely applied in the evaluation of spinal cord injury. This study aimed to explore the fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient of diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging and the feasibility of diffusion tensor tractography in the evaluation of complete spinal cord injury in rats. The results showed that the average combined scores were obviously decreased after spinal cord transection in rats, and then began to increase over time. The fractional anisotropy scores after spinal cord transection in rats were significantly lower than those in normal rats (P <0.05 the apparent diffusion coefficient was significantly increased compared with the normal group (P < 0.05. Following spinal cord transection, fractional anisotropy scores were negatively correlated with apparent diffusion coefficient values (r = -0.856, P < 0.01, and positively correlated with the average combined scores (r = 0.943, P < 0.01, while apparent diffusion coefficient values had a negative correlation with the average combined scores (r = -0.949, P < 0.01. Experimental findings suggest that, as a non-invasive examination, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging can provide qualitative and quantitative information about spinal cord injury. The fractional anisotropy score and apparent diffusion coefficient have a good correlation with the average combined scores, which reflect functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

  14. Mapping Plant Functional Groups in Subalpine Grassland of the Greater Caucasus

    Anja Magiera

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant functional groups—in our case grass, herbs, and legumes—and their spatial distribution can provide information on key ecosystem functions such as species richness, nitrogen fixation, and erosion control. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of plant functional groups provides valuable information for grassland management. This study described and mapped the distribution of grass, herb, and legume coverage of the subalpine grassland in the high-mountain Kazbegi region, Greater Caucasus, Georgia. To test the applicability of new sensors, we compared the predictive power of simulated hyperspectral canopy reflectance, simulated multispectral reflectance, simulated vegetation indices, and topographic variables for modeling plant functional groups. The tested grassland showed characteristic differences in species richness; in grass, herb, and legume coverage; and in connected structural properties such as yield. Grass (Hordeum brevisubulatum was dominant in biomass-rich hay meadows. Herb-rich grassland featured the highest species richness and evenness, whereas legume-rich grassland was accompanied by a high coverage of open soil and showed dominance of a single species, Astragalus captiosus. The best model fits were achieved with a combination of reflectance, vegetation indices, and topographic variables as predictors. Random forest models for grass, herb, and legume coverage explained 36%, 25%, and 37% of the respective variance, and their root mean square errors varied between 12–15%. Hyperspectral and multispectral reflectance as predictors resulted in similar models. Because multispectral data are more easily available and often have a higher spatial resolution, we suggest using multispectral parameters enhanced by vegetation indices and topographic parameters for modeling grass, herb, and legume coverage. However, overall model fits were merely moderate, and further testing, including stronger gradients and the addition of

  15. On a novel iterative method to compute polynomial approximations to Bessel functions of the first kind and its connection to the solution of fractional diffusion/diffusion-wave problems

    Yuste, Santos Bravo; Abad, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    We present an iterative method to obtain approximations to Bessel functions of the first kind J p (x) (p > -1) via the repeated application of an integral operator to an initial seed function f 0 (x). The class of seed functions f 0 (x) leading to sets of increasingly accurate approximations f n (x) is considerably large and includes any polynomial. When the operator is applied once to a polynomial of degree s, it yields a polynomial of degree s + 2, and so the iteration of this operator generates sets of increasingly better polynomial approximations of increasing degree. We focus on the set of polynomial approximations generated from the seed function f 0 (x) = 1. This set of polynomials is useful not only for the computation of J p (x) but also from a physical point of view, as it describes the long-time decay modes of certain fractional diffusion and diffusion-wave problems.

  16. Computational Diffusion Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based on Time-Dependent Bloch NMR Flow Equation and Bessel Functions.

    Awojoyogbe, Bamidele O; Dada, Michael O; Onwu, Samuel O; Ige, Taofeeq A; Akinwande, Ninuola I

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) uses a powerful magnetic field along with radio waves and a computer to produce highly detailed "slice-by-slice" pictures of virtually all internal structures of matter. The results enable physicians to examine parts of the body in minute detail and identify diseases in ways that are not possible with other techniques. For example, MRI is one of the few imaging tools that can see through bones, making it an excellent tool for examining the brain and other soft tissues. Pulsed-field gradient experiments provide a straightforward means of obtaining information on the translational motion of nuclear spins. However, the interpretation of the data is complicated by the effects of restricting geometries as in the case of most cancerous tissues and the mathematical concept required to account for this becomes very difficult. Most diffusion magnetic resonance techniques are based on the Stejskal-Tanner formulation usually derived from the Bloch-Torrey partial differential equation by including additional terms to accommodate the diffusion effect. Despite the early success of this technique, it has been shown that it has important limitations, the most of which occurs when there is orientation heterogeneity of the fibers in the voxel of interest (VOI). Overcoming this difficulty requires the specification of diffusion coefficients as function of spatial coordinate(s) and such a phenomenon is an indication of non-uniform compartmental conditions which can be analyzed accurately by solving the time-dependent Bloch NMR flow equation analytically. In this study, a mathematical formulation of magnetic resonance flow sequence in restricted geometry is developed based on a general second order partial differential equation derived directly from the fundamental Bloch NMR flow equations. The NMR signal is obtained completely in terms of NMR experimental parameters. The process is described based on Bessel functions and properties that can make it

  17. Functional Redundancy of ERK1 and ERK2 MAP Kinases during Development

    Christophe Frémin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ERK1 and ERK2 are the effector kinases of the ERK1/2 MAP-kinase signaling pathway, which plays a central role in transducing signals controlling cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Deregulated activity of the ERK1/2 pathway is linked to a group of developmental syndromes and contributes to the pathogenesis of various human diseases. One fundamental question that remains unaddressed is whether ERK1 and ERK2 have evolved unique physiological functions or whether they are used redundantly to reach a threshold of global ERK activity. Here, we show that the extent of development of the mouse placenta and embryo bearing different combinations of Erk1 and Erk2 alleles is strictly correlated with total ERK1/2 activity. We further demonstrate that transgenic expression of ERK1 fully rescues the embryonic and placental developmental defects associated with the loss of ERK2. We conclude that ERK1 and ERK2 exert redundant functions in mouse development.

  18. Seeing the whole picture: A comprehensive imaging approach to functional mapping of circuits in behaving zebrafish.

    Feierstein, C E; Portugues, R; Orger, M B

    2015-06-18

    In recent years, the zebrafish has emerged as an appealing model system to tackle questions relating to the neural circuit basis of behavior. This can be attributed not just to the growing use of genetically tractable model organisms, but also in large part to the rapid advances in optical techniques for neuroscience, which are ideally suited for application to the small, transparent brain of the larval fish. Many characteristic features of vertebrate brains, from gross anatomy down to particular circuit motifs and cell-types, as well as conserved behaviors, can be found in zebrafish even just a few days post fertilization, and, at this early stage, the physical size of the brain makes it possible to analyze neural activity in a comprehensive fashion. In a recent study, we used a systematic and unbiased imaging method to record the pattern of activity dynamics throughout the whole brain of larval zebrafish during a simple visual behavior, the optokinetic response (OKR). This approach revealed the broadly distributed network of neurons that were active during the behavior and provided insights into the fine-scale functional architecture in the brain, inter-individual variability, and the spatial distribution of behaviorally relevant signals. Combined with mapping anatomical and functional connectivity, targeted electrophysiological recordings, and genetic labeling of specific populations, this comprehensive approach in zebrafish provides an unparalleled opportunity to study complete circuits in a behaving vertebrate animal. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Functional cine MR imaging for the detection and mapping of intraabdominal adhesions: method and surgical correlation

    Buhmann-Kirchhoff, Sonja; Reiser, Maximilian; Lienemann, Andreas [University Hospital Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Lang, Reinhold; Steitz, Heinrich O.; Jauch, Karl W. [University Hospital Munich-Grosshadern, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany); Kirchhoff, Chlodwig [University Hospital Munich-Innenstadt, Department of Surgery, Munich (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pr