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Sample records for functional cystic fibrosis

  1. Left ventricular diastolic function in patients with advanced cystic fibrosis.

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    Koelling, Todd M; Dec, G William; Ginns, Leo C; Semigran, Marc J

    2003-05-01

    To assess left ventricular systolic and diastolic function in adult patients with cystic fibrosis using radionuclide ventriculography. Although myocardial fibrosis has been described in autopsy specimens of patients with cystic fibrosis, the possibility that myocardial dysfunction may occur during life in adult patients with cystic fibrosis has not been explored. To assess the possibility of cardiac dysfunction occurring in cystic fibrosis, we studied 40 patients with advanced cystic fibrosis with first-pass radionuclide ventriculography and compared them to 9 patients with advanced bronchiectasis and 18 normal control subjects. Indexes of right ventricular systolic function were similarly impaired in patients with cystic fibrosis and patients with bronchiectasis. Left ventricular ejection fraction of patients with cystic fibrosis, patients with bronchiectasis, and normal control subjects did not differ. Fractional left ventricular filling at 50% of diastole, an index of diastolic function, was significantly lower in patients with cystic fibrosis (54 +/- 13%, mean +/- SD) in comparison to patients with bronchiectasis (66 +/- 4%, p = 0.009) or normal control subjects (69 +/- 14, p = 0.0002). The contribution of atrial systole to total diastolic left ventricular filling was greater in patients with cystic fibrosis (38 +/- 18%) than in patients with bronchiectasis (21 +/- 4%, p = 0.01) or normal control subjects (25 +/- 12%, p = 0.01). Patients with advanced cystic fibrosis demonstrate impaired left ventricular distensibility when compared to normal control subjects and patients with bronchiectasis. Patients with cystic fibrosis may be at risk of heart failure due to right ventricular dysfunction or left ventricular diastolic dysfunction.

  2. Cystic Fibrosis Research

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    ... please turn Javascript on. Feature: Steady Advances Against Cystic Fibrosis Cystic Fibrosis Research Past Issues / Fall 2012 Table of Contents "Remarkable strides in cystic fibrosis research over the past two decades have culminated ...

  3. Cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radlović Nedeljko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease caused by a defect in the expression of CFTR protein, i.e. chloride channel present in the apical membrane of respiratory, digestive, reproductive and sweat glands epithelium. It primarily occurs in the Caucasians, while being considerably or exceptionally rare in persons of other races. Absence, deficit or structural and functional abnormalities of CFTR protein lead to mucosal hyperconcentration in the respiratory, digestive and reproductive systems and malabsorption of chloride and sodium in the sweat glands. Thus, the clinical features of patients’ with CF are predominated by respiratory, digestive and reproductive disorders, as well as the tendency to dehydration in the condition of increased sweating. Beside genotype variations, the degree of disease manifestation is also essentially influenced by various exogenous factors, such as the frequency and severity of respiratory infections, the level of aero-pollution, quality of immunoprophylaxis, patients’ nutritional condition and other. Chloride concentration of over 60 mmol/L in sweat, a high level of immunoreactive chymotrypsinogen in blood and the verification of homozygous mutation of CFTR gene are the basic methods in the diagnostics of the disease. CF belongs to the group of severe and complex chronic diseases, and therefore requires multidisciplinary therapeutic approach. Owing to the improvement of healthcare provision, most patients with CF now survive into adulthood. In addition, their quality of life is also considerably improved.

  4. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis?

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    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Cystic Fibrosis? A defect in the CFTR gene causes cystic ... in the severity of the disease. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Inherited? Every person inherits two CFTR genes—one ...

  5. Learning about Cystic Fibrosis

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    ... Testing for Cystic Fibrosis Consensus Development Conference Statement Learning About Cystic Fibrosis What do we know about ... and treatment information. Hosted by the Dolan DNA Learning Center at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. What is ...

  6. Cystic fibrosis: case report

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    Park, Si Hyun; Lee, Hyun Ju; Kim, Ji Hye; Park, Chol Heui [Gachon Medical School, Inchon (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive genetic disease. Among Caucasians, it is the most common cause of pulmonary insufficiency during the first three decades of life. The prevalence of cystic fibrosis varies according to ethnic origin: it is common among Caucasians but rare among Asians. We report a case in which cystic fibrosis with bronchiectasis and hyperaeration was revealed by high-resolution CT, and mutation of the cystic fibrosis conductance transmembrane regulator gene (CFTR) by DNA analysis.

  7. Self-Efficacy, Pulmonary Function, Perceived Health and Global Quality of Life of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

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    Wahl, Astrid K.; Rustoen ,Tone; Hanestad, Berit R.; Gjengedal, Eva; Moum, Torbjorn

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the extent that pulmonary function is related to perceived health status and global quality of life in adults suffering from cystic fibrosis, and the extent that self-efficacy modifies these relationships. Our sample comprised 86 adults (48% female; mean age, 29 years; age range, 18-54 years) with cystic fibrosis, recruited…

  8. A functional CFTR assay using primary cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.F.; Wiegerinck, C.L.; de Jonge, H.R.; Bronsveld, I.; Janssens, H.M.; de Winter-de Groot, K.M.; Brandsma, A.M.; de Jong, N.W.; Bijvelds, M.J.; Scholte, B.J.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.; van den Brink, S.; Clevers, H.; van der Ent, C.K.; Middendorp, S.; Beekman, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    We recently established conditions allowing for long-term expansion of epithelial organoids from intestine, recapitulating essential features of the in vivo tissue architecture. Here we apply this technology to study primary intestinal organoids of people suffering from cystic fibrosis, a disease ca

  9. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated?

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    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Cystic Fibrosis Treated? Cystic fibrosis (CF) has no cure. However, ... help oral pancreatic enzymes work better. Treatments for Cystic Fibrosis Complications A common complication of CF is diabetes . ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: cystic fibrosis

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    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions cystic fibrosis cystic fibrosis Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterized by the buildup ...

  11. Body composition and pulmonary function in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saba eSheikh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lower body mass index (BMI is associated with worse pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF. Hypothesis: Lean body mass (LBM is more strongly associated with pulmonary function than BMI is.Methods: Anthropometrics, body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry, and pulmonary function were determined in pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF youth. Sex and age-adjusted Z-scores (BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, FMI-Z were generated for CF and controls. 1 Associations of BMI-Z with LBMI-Z and FMI-Z and 2 age-adjusted associations of BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, and FMI-Z with FEV1%-predicted were tested. Results: 208 PI-CF subjects had lower BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, FMI-Z compared to 390 controls. BMI-Z was associated with lower LBMI-Z (pConclusions: In PI-CF youth, deficits in LBM were apparent. At lower BMI percentiles, BMI may not accurately depict LBM in PI-CF. In under-nourished PI-CF youth this preservation of FM in preference to LBM is relevant since LBMI-Z, but not FMI-Z, is positively associated with FEV1%-predicted. LBMI is more strongly associated with lung function compared to BMI, especially in the undernourished child and adolescent with PI-CF.

  12. Neonatal cystic fibrosis screening test

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    Cystic fibrosis screening - neonatal; Immunoreactive trypsinogen; IRT test; CF - screening ... Cystic fibrosis is a disease passed down through families. CF causes thick, sticky mucus to build up in ...

  13. Structure and function of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Morales

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a lethal autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Mutations in the CFTR gene may result in a defective processing of its protein and alter the function and regulation of this channel. Mutations are associated with different symptoms, including pancreatic insufficiency, bile duct obstruction, infertility in males, high sweat Cl-, intestinal obstruction, nasal polyp formation, chronic sinusitis, mucus dehydration, and chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus lung infection, responsible for 90% of the mortality of CF patients. The gene responsible for the cellular defect in CF was cloned in 1989 and its protein product CFTR is activated by an increase of intracellular cAMP. The CFTR contains two membrane domains, each with six transmembrane domain segments, two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs, and a cytoplasmic domain. In this review we discuss the studies that have correlated the role of each CFTR domain in the protein function as a chloride channel and as a regulator of the outwardly rectifying Cl- channels (ORCCs.

  14. Association of growth and nutritional parameters with pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis: a literature review.

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    Mauch, Renan Marrichi; Kmit, Arthur Henrique Pezzo; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2016-12-01

    To review the literature addressing the relationship of growth and nutritional parameters with pulmonary function in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. A collection of articles published in the last 15 years in English, Portuguese and Spanish was made by research in electronic databases - PubMed, Cochrane, Medline, Lilacs and Scielo - using the keywords cystic fibrosis, growth, nutrition, pulmonary function in varied combinations. Articles that addressed the long term association of growth and nutritional parameters, with an emphasis on growth, with pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis, were included, and we excluded those that addressing only the relationship between nutritional parameters and cystic fibrosis and those in which the aim was to describe the disease. Seven studies were included, with a total of 12,455 patients. Six studies reported relationship between growth parameters and lung function, including one study addressing the association of growth parameters, solely, with lung function, and all the seven studies reported relationship between nutritional parameters and lung function. The review suggests that the severity of the lung disease, determined by spirometry, is associated with body growth and nutritional status in cystic fibrosis. Thus, the intervention in these parameters can lead to the better prognosis and life expectancy for cystic fibrosis patients. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Association of growth and nutritional parameters with pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis: a literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Renan Marrichi; Kmit, Arthur Henrique Pezzo; Marson, Fernando Augusto de Lima; Levy, Carlos Emilio; Barros-Filho, Antonio de Azevedo; Ribeiro, José Dirceu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To review the literature addressing the relationship of growth and nutritional parameters with pulmonary function in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. Data source: A collection of articles published in the last 15 years in English, Portuguese and Spanish was made by research in electronic databases - PubMed, Cochrane, Medline, Lilacs and Scielo - using the keywords cystic fibrosis, growth, nutrition, pulmonary function in varied combinations. Articles that addressed the long term association of growth and nutritional parameters, with an emphasis on growth, with pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis, were included, and we excluded those that addressing only the relationship between nutritional parameters and cystic fibrosis and those in which the aim was to describe the disease. Data synthesis: Seven studies were included, with a total of 12,455 patients. Six studies reported relationship between growth parameters and lung function, including one study addressing the association of growth parameters, solely, with lung function, and all the seven studies reported relationship between nutritional parameters and lung function. Conclusions: The review suggests that the severity of the lung disease, determined by spirometry, is associated with body growth and nutritional status in cystic fibrosis. Thus, the intervention in these parameters can lead to the better prognosis and life expectancy for cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:27181343

  16. Nutritional Issues in Cystic Fibrosis.

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    Solomon, Missale; Bozic, Molly; Mascarenhas, Maria R

    2016-03-01

    The importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients with cystic fibrosis has been well known for the past 3 decades. Achieving normal growth and maintaining optimal nutrition is associated with improved lung function. Comprehensive and consistent nutritional assessments at regular intervals can identify those at risk of nutritional failure and uncover micronutrient deficiencies contributing to malnutrition. Management of malnutrition in cystic fibrosis should follow a stepwise approach to determine the causes and comorbidities and to develop a nutritional plan. Nutritional management is crucial at every stage in a person's life with cystic fibrosis and remains a cornerstone of management.

  17. Body Composition and Pulmonary Function in Cystic Fibrosis

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    Sheikh, Saba; Zemel, Babette S.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Rubenstein, Ronald C.; Kelly, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Background: Lower body mass index (BMI) is associated with worse pulmonary function in cystic fibrosis (CF). Hypothesis: lean body mass (LBM) is more strongly associated with pulmonary function than BMI is. Methods: Anthropometrics, body composition by dual x-ray absorptiometry, and pulmonary function were determined in pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF) youth. Sex and age-adjusted Z-scores (BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, FMI-Z) were generated for CF and controls. (1) Associations of BMI-Z with LBMI-Z and FMI-Z and (2) age-adjusted associations of BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, and FMI-Z with FEV1%-predicted were tested. Results: Two hundred eight PI-CF subjects had lower BMI-Z, LBMI-Z, and FMI-Z compared to 390 controls. BMI-Z was associated with lower LBMI-Z (p < 0.0001) in PI-CF. In females, LBMI-Z and BMI-Z were positively associated with FEV1%-predicted; this relationship did not persist for FMI-Z after adjustment for LBMI-Z. In males, only LBMI-Z and BMI-Z were associated with FEV1%-predicted. Conclusion: In PI-CF youth, deficits in LBM were apparent. At lower BMI percentiles, BMI may not accurately depict LBM in PI-CF. In under-nourished PI-CF youth, this preservation of FM in preference to LBM is relevant since LBMI-Z, but not FMI-Z, is positively associated with FEV1%-predicted. Lean body mass index is more strongly associated with lung function compared to BMI, especially in the under-nourished child and adolescent with PI-CF. PMID:24783186

  18. [News in cystic fibrosis].

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    Delaisi, B

    2013-08-01

    The improvement over the last two decades in the treatment of cystic fibrosis led to an increase in life expectancy approaching 40 years at birth. Logically, the population of adult patients has been increasing and is currently 50% of patients followed in France. These therapeutic advances have justified the establishment in 2003 of a generalized neonatal screening for cystic fibrosis. The latest data of this screening show an incidence of CF of 1/5359 live births, far below the incidence of 1/2500 which was widely accepted twenty years ago. The performance of this screening is currently based on the dosage of trypsin immuno reactive, followed in case of exceeding the threshold of a search of the 30 most common mutations, can detect around 96% of 150 to 200 CF cases every year. Therefore, the possibility of a false negative of the screening cannot be excluded and evocative symptoms of cystic fibrosis, even for children born after 2003, will lead to prescribe a sweat test. While treatments available so far goal consequences of cystic fibrosis, a new therapeutic class to correct the functional defect of the mutated protein, called CFTR modulators, is emerging. Ivacaftor, leader of this new class, belonging to the category of "CFTR potentiator" got its access on the market in September 2012 for patients carrying the G551D mutation. New other molecules, named "CFTR correctors" which can have synergistic effect with ivacaftor and concern patients carrying the most common mutation--DF 508--are under development. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. Hallmarks of therapeutic management of the cystic fibrosis functional landscape.

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    Amaral, Margarida D; Balch, William E

    2015-11-01

    The cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein does not operate in isolation, rather in a dynamic network of interacting components that impact its synthesis, folding, stability, intracellular location and function, referred to herein as the 'CFTR Functional Landscape (CFFL)'. For the prominent F508del mutation, many of these interactors are deeply connected to a protein fold management system, the proteostasis network (PN). However, CF encompasses an additional 2000 CFTR variants distributed along its entire coding sequence (referred to as CFTR2), and each variant contributes a differential liability to PN management of CFTR and to a protein 'social network' (SN) that directs the probability of the (patho)physiologic events that impact ion transport in each cell, tissue and patient in health and disease. Recognition of the importance of the PN and SN in driving the unique patient CFFL leading to disease highlights the importance of precision medicine in therapeutic management of disease progression. We take the view herein that it is not CFTR, rather the PN/SN, and their impact on the CFFL, that are the key physiologic forces driving onset and clinical progression of CF. We posit that a deep understanding of each patients PN/SN gained by merging genomic, proteomic (mass spectrometry (MS)), and high-content microscopy (HCM) technologies in the context of novel network learning algorithms will lead to a paradigm shift in CF clinical management. This should allow for generation of new classes of patient specific PN/SN directed therapeutics for personalized management of the CFFL in the clinic.

  20. [Lung physiotherapy in cystic fibrosis].

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    Gursli, S; Haanaes, O C

    1991-02-28

    This article is intended as a brief practical guide for physicians and physiotherapists concerned with the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Physiotherapeutic techniques for the treatment of chest diseases have been developed and modified as advances have taken place in the medical management of cystic fibrosis. The article describes forced expiratory technique, positive expiratory pressure, postural drainage, autogenic drainage and other techniques. Patients with cystic fibrosis live longer and have a better quality of life than ever before, but progressive deterioration of lung function will always be their most serious problem. Physical activity and chest physiotherapy are essential parts of all treatment regimens for cystic fibrosis. It is important to realize that the physiotherapist is a very important member of the team which includes nurses, physicians-and the patient.

  1. Human amnion epithelial cells induced to express functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

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    Sean V Murphy

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis, an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in a gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, remains a leading cause of childhood respiratory morbidity and mortality. The respiratory consequences of cystic fibrosis include the generation of thick, tenacious mucus that impairs lung clearance, predisposing the individual to repeated and persistent infections, progressive lung damage and shortened lifespan. Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis. With this in mind, we investigated the ability of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs to express functional CFTR. We found that hAECs formed 3-dimensional structures and expressed the CFTR gene and protein after culture in Small Airway Growth Medium (SAGM. We also observed a polarized CFTR distribution on the membrane of hAECs cultured in SAGM, similar to that observed in polarized airway cells in vivo. Further, hAECs induced to express CFTR possessed functional iodide/chloride (I(-/Cl(- ion channels that were inhibited by the CFTR-inhibitor CFTR-172, indicating the presence of functional CFTR ion channels. These data suggest that hAECs may be a promising source for the development of a cellular therapy for cystic fibrosis.

  2. [Cystic fibrosis in 2008].

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    Durieu, I; Josserand, R Nove

    2008-11-01

    To describe the epidemiological, physiopathological, clinical and therapeutic knowledge concerning cystic fibrosis (CF). Important modifications in the health organization of the care concerning this orphan disease have been implemented in France. The life expectancy has dramatically increased, as well as the knowledge concerning the pathological structure and function of the CFTR gene and protein. This will lead to the development of emerging drug treatments for this lethal disease. The life expectancy is predicted to exceed 40 years for children born in the 2000s. As a result, there has been a tremendous growth of the adult population that reached 40% of the overall approximately 5000 patients included in the CF French registry (Observatoire National de la Mucoviscidose). Lung disease remains the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The characteristic phenotypic presentation associates bronchial and rhinosinusal symptoms, pancreatic insufficiency and liver disease. Bronchial damage leads to progressive chronic respiratory insufficiency. Diabetes mellitus and osteoporosis frequently appears in adulthood. Neonatal screening has been implemented in France since 2002. It will prevent delayed diagnosis and its deleterious consequences. Some atypical cases of CF presenting only with one or two organ system involvement can be diagnosed in adulthood. Isolated chronic rhinosinusitis, bronchiectasis, congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens, recurrent pancreatitis, allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and some case of cholangitis may so revealed late form of cystic fibrosis. The health care is organized in cystic fibrosis centres. Despite gene discovery, treatment still remains symptomatic, based on intensive pulmonary and nutritional treatments. Challenges for new treatments are to correct the basic defect, either by gene therapy or by pharmacological modulation of the abnormal physiological processes.

  3. Cyanide levels found in infected cystic fibrosis sputum inhibit airway ciliary function.

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    Nair, Chandrika; Shoemark, Amelia; Chan, Mario; Ollosson, Sarah; Dixon, Mellissa; Hogg, Claire; Alton, Eric W F W; Davies, Jane C; Williams, Huw D

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported cyanide at concentrations of up to 150 μM in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a negative correlation with lung function. Our aim was to investigate possible mechanisms for this association, focusing on the effect of pathophysiologically relevant cyanide levels on human respiratory cell function. Ciliary beat frequency measurements were performed on nasal brushings and nasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures obtained from healthy volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients. Potassium cyanide decreased ciliary beat frequency in healthy nasal brushings (n = 6) after 60 min (150 μM: 47% fall, pcyanide as a key component inhibiting the ciliary beat frequency. If cyanide production similarly impairs mucocilliary clearance in vivo, it could explain the link with increased disease severity observed in cystic fibrosis patients with detectable cyanide in their airway. ©ERS 2014.

  4. Serum-surfactant SP-D correlates inversely to lung function in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Holmskov, Uffe; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF) affects the lungs causing infections and inflammation. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an innate defense lectin primarily secreted in the lungs. We investigated the influence of the SP-D Met11Thr polymorphism on CF lung function; and serum SP-D as a marker for CF...

  5. Serum retinol levels and pulmonary function in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, J. W.; Broos, N.; Stellato, R. K.; Arets, H. G M; van der Ent, C. K.; Houwen, R. H J; Arets, HGM

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that higher serum retinol levels could have protective effects on pulmonary function (PF) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). However, serum retinol levels will be transiently decreased during pulmonary exacerbation. Therefore, the extent of chronic pulmonary inf

  6. Lactate in cystic fibrosis sputum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensel, Tobias; Stotz, Martin; Borneff-Lipp, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic therapy is thought to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) by decreasing neutrophil-derived inflammation. We investigated the origin and clinical significance of lactate in the chronically inflamed CF lung. Methods Lactate was measured in sputa of 18 exacerbated ...

  7. Restoring Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function Reduces Airway Bacteria and Inflammation in People with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Lung Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisert, Katherine B; Heltshe, Sonya L; Pope, Christopher; Jorth, Peter; Wu, Xia; Edwards, Rachael M; Radey, Matthew; Accurso, Frank J; Wolter, Daniel J; Cooke, Gordon; Adam, Ryan J; Carter, Suzanne; Grogan, Brenda; Launspach, Janice L; Donnelly, Seamas C; Gallagher, Charles G; Bruce, James E; Stoltz, David A; Welsh, Michael J; Hoffman, Lucas R; McKone, Edward F; Singh, Pradeep K

    2017-06-15

    Previous work indicates that ivacaftor improves cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) activity and lung function in people with cystic fibrosis and G551D-CFTR mutations but does not reduce density of bacteria or markers of inflammation in the airway. These findings raise the possibility that infection and inflammation may progress independently of CFTR activity once cystic fibrosis lung disease is established. To better understand the relationship between CFTR activity, airway microbiology and inflammation, and lung function in subjects with cystic fibrosis and chronic airway infections. We studied 12 subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations and chronic airway infections before and after ivacaftor. We measured lung function, sputum bacterial content, and inflammation, and obtained chest computed tomography scans. Ivacaftor produced rapid decreases in sputum Pseudomonas aeruginosa density that began within 48 hours and continued in the first year of treatment. However, no subject eradicated their infecting P. aeruginosa strain, and after the first year P. aeruginosa densities rebounded. Sputum total bacterial concentrations also decreased, but less than P. aeruginosa. Sputum inflammatory measures decreased significantly in the first week of treatment and continued to decline over 2 years. Computed tomography scans obtained before and 1 year after ivacaftor treatment revealed that ivacaftor decreased airway mucous plugging. Ivacaftor caused marked reductions in sputum P. aeruginosa density and airway inflammation and produced modest improvements in radiographic lung disease in subjects with G551D-CFTR mutations. However, P. aeruginosa airway infection persisted. Thus, measures that control infection may be required to realize the full benefits of CFTR-targeting treatments.

  8. Effects of flutter and PEP mask physiotherapy on symptoms and lung function in children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. van Winden; A. Visser (Adriaan); P.J. Sterk (Peter); S. Beckers; J.C. de Jongste (Johan); W.C.J. Hop (Wim)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractRecently, the flutter was introduced as a new device to improve sputum expectoration. Preliminary data suggested a significant improvement in expectoration and lung function during flutter treatment in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The aim of the prese

  9. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

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    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by

  10. Cystic fibrosis. Diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ortigosa

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is one of the most frequent inherited mortal diseases in Caucasian population. Dysfunction in exocrine glands is described in CF patients, with severe pancreatic insufficiency and chronic lung disease. CF is inherited as an autosomal recessive disorder. More than 1000 disease-associated mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene have been described. DF508 mutation is the most common mutation in the CF gen. Diagnosis in CF is based on clinical and laboratory tests findings. Meconial ileus, CF in other relatives, chronic lung disease, congenital absence of the vas deferens with azoospermia are among other clinical findings, main criteria in CF patients. Two positive results in sweat chloride test , or demonstration in nasal epithelial ionic transport alteration (nasal potential difference and identification of two CF mutations in the patient are laboratory findings in CF.

  11. Heart involvement in cystic fibrosis: A specific cystic fibrosis-related myocardial changes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labombarda, Fabien; Saloux, Eric; Brouard, Jacques; Bergot, Emmanuel; Milliez, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a complex multi-systemic chronic disease characterized by progressive organ dysfunction with development of fibrosis, possibly affecting the heart. Over the last four decades pathological, experimental, and clinical evidence points towards the existence of a specific myocardial involvement in cystic fibrosis. Multi-modality cardiac imaging, especially recent echocardiographic techniques, evidenced diastolic and/or systolic ventricular dysfunction in cystic fibrosis leading to the concept of a cystic fibrosis-related cardiomyopathy. Hypoxemia and inflammation are among the most important factors for heart involvement in cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator was found to be involved in the regulation of cardiomyocyte contraction and may also account for cystic fibrosis-related myocardial dysfunction. This review, mainly focused on echocardiographic studies, seeks to synthesize the existing literature for and against the existence of heart involvement in cystic fibrosis, its mechanisms and prognostic implications. Careful investigation of the heart function may be helpful for risk stratification and therapeutic decisions in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  12. Targeted Correction and Restored Function of the CFTR Gene in Cystic Fibrosis Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Crane

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently developed reprogramming and genome editing technologies make possible the derivation of corrected patient-specific pluripotent stem cell sources—potentially useful for the development of new therapeutic approaches. Starting with skin fibroblasts from patients diagnosed with cystic fibrosis, we derived and characterized induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC lines. We then utilized zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs, designed to target the endogenous CFTR gene, to mediate correction of the inherited genetic mutation in these patient-derived lines via homology-directed repair (HDR. We observed an exquisitely sensitive, homology-dependent preference for targeting one CFTR allele versus the other. The corrected cystic fibrosis iPSCs, when induced to differentiate in vitro, expressed the corrected CFTR gene; importantly, CFTR correction resulted in restored expression of the mature CFTR glycoprotein and restoration of CFTR chloride channel function in iPSC-derived epithelial cells.

  13. Molecular Diagnosis of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deignan, Joshua L; Grody, Wayne W

    2016-01-01

    This unit describes a recommended approach to identifying causal genetic variants in an individual suspected of having cystic fibrosis. An introduction to the genetics and clinical presentation of cystic fibrosis is initially presented, followed by a description of the two main strategies used in the molecular diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: (1) an initial targeted variant panel used to detect only the most common cystic fibrosis-causing variants in the CFTR gene, and (2) sequencing of the entire coding region of the CFTR gene to detect additional rare causal CFTR variants. Finally, the unit concludes with a discussion regarding the analytic and clinical validity of these approaches.

  14. Magnetomotive optical coherence elastography for relating lung structure and function in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, Raghav K.; Carpenter, Jerome; Superfine, Richard; Randell, Scott H.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic defect in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and is the most common life-limiting genetic condition affecting the Caucasian population. It is an autosomal recessive, monogenic inherited disorder characterized by failure of airway host defense against bacterial infection, which results in bronchiectasis, the breakdown of airway wall extracellular matrix (ECM). In this study, we show that the in vitro models consisting of human tracheo-bronchial-epithelial (hBE) cells grown on porous supports with embedded magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) at an air-liquid interface are suitable for long term, non-invasive assessment of ECM remodeling using magnetomotive optical coherence elastography (MMOCE). The morphology of ex vivo CF and normal lung tissues using OCT and correlative study with histology is also examined. We also demonstrate a quantitative measure of normal and CF airway elasticity using MMOCE. The improved understanding of pathologic changes in CF lung structure and function and the novel method of longitudinal in vitro ECM assessment demonstrated in this study may lead to new in vivo imaging and elastography methods to monitor disease progression and treatment in cystic fibrosis.

  15. Cystic fibrosis and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Eliot S

    2014-09-01

    Sleep disturbances are frequently observed in cystic fibrosis (CF). The resultant sleep fragmentation, short sleep duration, and gas-exchange abnormalities are postulated to contribute to the neurocognitive, cardiovascular, and metabolic abnormalities associated with CF. There are no outcomes data to establish the optimal procedure for screening and treating CF patients for sleep-related respiratory abnormalities. Therapy with supplemental oxygen and bilevel ventilation are widely considered to be effective in the short term, but there are few evidence-based data to support long-term improvements in morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Profile of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. El-Falaki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available It was generally believed that Cystic fibrosis (CF is rare among Arabs; however, the few studies available from Egypt and other Arabic countries suggested the presence of many undiagnosed patients. The aim of the present study was to determine the frequency of CF patients out of the referred cases in a single referral hospital in Egypt. A total of 100 patients clinically suspected of having CF were recruited from the CF clinic of the Allergy and Pulmonology Unit, Children’s Hospital, Cairo University, Egypt, throughout a 2 year period. Sweat chloride testing was done for all patients using the Wescor macroduct system for collection of sweat. Quantitative analysis for chloride was then done by the thiocyanate colorimetric method. Patients positive for sweat chloride (⩾60 mmol/L were tested for the ΔF508 mutation using primer specific PCR for cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene. Thirty-six patients (36% had a positive sweat chloride test. The main clinical presentations in patients were chronic cough in 32 (88.9%, failure to thrive in 27 (75%, steatorrhea in 24 (66.7%, and hepatobiliary involvement in 5 (13.9%. Positive consanguinity was reported in 50% of CF patients. Thirty-two patients were screened for ΔF508 mutation. Positive ΔF508 mutation was detected in 22 (68.8% patients, 8 (25% were homozygous, 14 (43.8% were heterozygous, and 10 (31.3% tested were negative. CF was diagnosed in more than third of patients suspected of having the disease on clinical grounds. This high frequency of CF among referred patients indicates that a high index of suspicion and an increasing availability of diagnostic tests lead to the identification of a higher number of affected individuals.

  17. Sleep quality and daytime function in adults with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancey, D R; Tullis, E D; Heslegrave, R; Thornley, K; Hanly, P J

    2002-03-01

    It was hypothesized that adult cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with severe lung disease have impaired daytime function related to nocturnal hypoxaemia and sleep disruption. Nineteen CF patients (forced expiratory volume in one second 28+/-7% predicted) and 10 healthy subjects completed sleep diaries, overnight polysomnography (PSG), and assessment of daytime sleepiness and neurocognitive function. CF patients tended to report more awakenings (0.7+/-0.5 versus 0.3+/-0.2 x h(-1), p=0.08), and PSG revealed reduced sleep efficiency (71+/-25 versus 93+/-4%, p=0.004) and a higher frequency of awakenings (4.2+/-2.7 versus 2.4+/-1.4 x h(-1), p=0.06). Mean arterial oxygen saturation during sleep was lower in CF patients (84.4+/-6.8 versus 94.3+/-1.5%, pefficiency (regression coefficient (r)=0.57, p=0.014). CF patients had short sleep latency on the multiple sleep latency test (6.7+/-3 min). The CF group reported lower levels of activation and happiness and greater levels of fatigue (pefficiency (r=0.47, p=10.05). Objective neurocognitive performance was also impaired in CF patients, reflected by lower throughput for simple addition/subtraction, serial reaction and colour-word conflict. The authors concluded that adult cystic fibrosis patients with severe lung disease have impaired neurocognitive function and daytime sleepiness, which is partly related to chronic sleep loss and nocturnal hypoxaemia.

  18. Comparing the harmful effects of nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Taylor-Robinson, David; Waldmann, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To better understand the relative effects of infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria and Gram negative bacteria on lung function decline in cystic fibrosis, we assessed the impact of each infection in a Danish setting. METHODS: Longitudinal registry study of 432 patients with cystic...... fibrosis contributing 53,771 lung function measures between 1974 and 2014. We used a mixed effects model with longitudinally structured correlation, while adjusting for clinically important covariates. RESULTS: Infections with a significant impact on rate of decline in %FEV1 were Mycobacterium abscessus...

  19. Characterization of mitochondrial function in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlante, Anna; Favia, Maria; Bobba, Antonella; Guerra, Lorenzo; Casavola, Valeria; Reshkin, Stephan Joel

    2016-06-01

    Evidence supporting the occurrence of oxidative stress in Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is well established and the literature suggests that oxidative stress is inseparably linked to mitochondrial dysfunction. Here, we have characterized mitochondrial function, in particular as it regards the steps of oxidative phosphorylation and ROS production, in airway cells either homozygous for the F508del-CFTR allele or stably expressing wt-CFTR. We find that oxygen consumption, ΔΨ generation, adenine nucleotide translocator-dependent ADP/ATP exchange and both mitochondrial Complex I and IV activities are impaired in CF cells, while both mitochondrial ROS production and membrane lipid peroxidation increase. Importantly, treatment of CF cells with the small molecules VX-809 and 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin, which act as "correctors" for F508del CFTR by rescuing the F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion, while having no effect per sè on mitochondrial function in wt-CFTR cells, significantly improved all the above mitochondrial parameters towards values found in the airway cells expressing wt-CFTR. This novel study on mitochondrial bioenergetics provides a springboard for future research to further understand the molecular mechanisms responsible for the involvement of mitochondria in CF and identify the proteins primarily responsible for the F508del-CFTR-dependent mitochondrial impairment and thus reveal potential novel targets for CF therapy.

  20. Alveolar inflammation in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulrich, Martina; Worlitzsch, Dieter; Viglio, Simona

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In infected lungs of the cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, opportunistic pathogens and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR) contribute to chronic airway inflammation that is characterized by neutrophil/macrophage infiltration, cytokine release...... accumulated in type II alveolar epithelial cells, lacking CFTR. P. aeruginosa organisms were rarely present in inflamed alveoli. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic inflammation and remodeling is present in alveolar tissues of the CF lung and needs to be addressed by anti-inflammatory therapies....

  1. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Cystic Fibrosis? The signs and symptoms of cystic fibrosis (CF) ... respiratory, digestive, or reproductive systems of the body. Cystic Fibrosis Figure A shows the organs that cystic fibrosis ...

  2. Relationship between body balance, lung function, nutritional status and functional capacity in adults with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T. S. Penafortes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF is a hereditary condition in which lung disease affects all patients. In addition to pulmonary involvement, the multisystemic components of CF cause significant physical limitations. However, the impact of lung function on balance control in CF has not been studied. OBJECTIVE: To assess body balance in adults with CF and to test its possible associations with lung function, nutritional status, and functional capacity. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study in which 14 adults with CF underwent pulmonary function testing (spirometry, body plethysmography, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity (DLco, respiratory muscle strength, 6-min walking distance (6MWD, Berg balance scale (BBS, nutritional analysis (body mass index and bioelectrical impedance, and stabilometry. Body balance was quantified using stabilometry; all participants performed the following two trials: opened base, eyes open (OBEO; closed base, eyes closed (CBEC. RESULTS: In stabilometry, the median for the lateral range and anterior-posterior range in the CBEC trial was 0.10 (0.08-0.11 and 0.13 (0.11-0.22, respectively (p<0.05. The maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP correlated inversely with the lateral standard deviation (ρ=–0.61; p<0.05 as the DLco correlated positively with the anterior-posterior range (ρ=0.54; p<0.05. There were significant relationships between body composition indexes and almost all stabilometric variables measured. There were no relationships of the BBS and 6MWD with the stabilometric variables. CONCLUSIONS: In adults with CF, imbalance occurs mainly in the anterior-posterior direction and is especially associated with body composition.

  3. [Cystic fibrosis and other channelopathies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, A; Saussereau, E

    2012-05-01

    Mutations in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene, CFTR, are responsible for cystic fibrosis, CF, a channelopathie. CFTR protein is a multifunctional protein with a main function of Cl(-) channel. CFTR is expressed in epithelia (upper airways, intestine, pancreas etc.). In the first part of this revue, we describe the main properties of CFTR underlying that it is not only a Cl(-) channel protein but also a multifunctional protein. We present a hypothesis which postulates that CFTR is a hub protein interacting with more than 140 proteins, and through these interactions regulates a number of functions which are abnormal in CF (ion transport, inflammation etc.). In the second part of the revue we briefly present a selection of other epithelial channelopathies due to mutations in genes of other Cl(-) or cation channels. Of note, these channels either interacts with CFTR or are considered as alternative channels in CF, and, as such, are targets for pharmacotherapies. We want to leave the reader with a message that to investigate channalopathies, to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying channels'activity, allow not only to better understand basic mechanisms of channel regulation but in fine, to propose new targets for pharmacotherapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Using Cystic Fibrosis Therapies for Non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElMaraachli, Wael; Conrad, Douglas J; Wang, Angela C C

    2016-03-01

    Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis (NCFB) is an increasingly prevalent disease that places a significant burden on patients and health systems globally. Although many of the therapies used to treat NCFB were originally developed as cystic fibrosis (CF) therapies, not all of them have been demonstrated to be efficacious in NCFB and some may even be harmful. This article explores the evidence for which therapeutic strategies used to treat CF have been translated into the care of NCFB. The conclusion is that therapies for adult NCFB cannot be simply extrapolated from CF clinical trials, and in some instances, doing so may actually result in harm.

  5. Genetics of Cystic Fibrosis: Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Marie E

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common life-shortening autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). Almost 2000 variants in the CFTR gene have been identified. The mutational classes are based on the functional consequences on CFTR. New therapies are being developed to target mutant CFTR and restore CFTR function. Understanding specific CF genotypes is essential for providing state-of-the art care to patients. In addition to the variation in CFTR genotype, there are several modifier genes that contribute to the respiratory phenotype.

  6. Chronic pulmonary infection with Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalbøge, C S; Hansen, C R; Pressler, T;

    2011-01-01

    Background The clinical consequences of chronic Stenotrophomonas maltophilia infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patient are still unclear. Method All patients treated in the Copenhagen CF centre (N=278) from 1 January 2008 to 31 December 2009 were included. Each patient chronically infected with S...

  7. Cystic Fibrosis (CF): Chloride Sweat Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test KidsHealth > For Parents > Cystic Fibrosis (CF) Chloride Sweat Test Print A A A ... It Is A chloride sweat test helps diagnose cystic fibrosis (CF) , an inherited disorder that makes kids sick ...

  8. What's it Like to Have Cystic Fibrosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Cystic Fibrosis KidsHealth > For Kids > Cystic Fibrosis Print A A A What's in this article? ... with a condition she's known all her life — cystic fibrosis (say: SIS-tik fi-BRO-sus). Her parents ...

  9. Diagnosis of Adult Patients with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick, Jerry A; Nichols, David P

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis (CF) is being made with increasing frequency in adults. Patients with CF diagnosed in adulthood typically present with respiratory complaints, and often have recurrent or chronic airway infection. At the time of initial presentation individuals may appear to have clinical manifestation limited to a single organ, but with subclinical involvement of the respiratory tract. Adult-diagnosed patients have a good response to CF center care, and newly available cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor-modulating therapies are promising for the treatment of residual function mutation, thus increasing the importance of the diagnosis in adults with unexplained bronchiectasis.

  10. A monomer is the minimum functional unit required for channel and ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramjeesingh, M; Li, C; Kogan, I; Wang, Y; Huan, L J; Bear, C E

    2001-09-04

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) normally functions as a phosphorylation-regulated chloride channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells, and lack of this function is the primary cause for the fatal disease cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies showed that purified, reconstituted CFTR can function as a chloride channel and, further, that its intrinsic ATPase activity is required to regulate opening and closing of the channel gate. However, these previous studies did not identify the quaternary structure required to mediate conduction and catalysis. Our present studies show that CFTR molecules may self-associate in CHO and Sf9 membranes, as complexes close to the predicted size of CFTR dimers can be captured by chemical cross-linking reagents and detected using nondissociative PAGE. However, CFTR function does not require a multimeric complex for function as we determined that purified, reconstituted CFTR monomers are sufficient to mediate regulated chloride conduction and ATPase activity.

  11. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik U; Lanng, Susanne; Pressler, Tania

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cystic fibrosis (CF)-related diabetes has been regarded as a mild form of diabetes with a low risk of severe diabetes complications. The prevalence of CF-related diabetes increases with age, resulting in a 50% prevalence of diabetes at age 30 years. We sought to investigate whether...... microvascular complications in CF-related diabetes appear with a relevant frequency. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Thirty-eight patients aged 30 (range 18-55) years with CF-related diabetes for 20 (0-31) years were screened for diabetes complications. Because of chronic pulmonary infections, the majority...... of diabetic retinopathy was found in patients with insulin-treated CF-related diabetes, stressing the need for a regular screening program as in type 1 diabetes. Severely impaired kidney function was common in lung transplant patients, probably secondary to cyclosporine treatment....

  12. Pharmacological Correction of Cystic Fibrosis: Molecular Mechanisms at the Plasma Membrane to Augment Mutant CFTR Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Kavisha; Naren, Anjaparavanda P

    2016-01-01

    In the late 1980s, a loss-of-function mutation in the gene encoding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was identified to be the primary cause of cystic fibrosis (CF); a fatal multiple-organ disorder that mostly affects Caucasians. To date, approximately 2000 genetic mutations have been identified in the CFTR gene (http://www.genet.sickkids.on.ca/cftr/app). The most common cause of morbidity and mortality in persons with CF is a progressive deterioration in lung function leading ultimately to respiratory collapse. The median life expectancy of CF patients currently is estimated to be 39 years in the US. The most prevalent CFTR mutation, F508del, accounts for 70% of CF cases and causes a processing defect in the protein leading to premature endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) and reduced F508del-CFTR delivery to the cell surface. A CF corrector is defined as a chemical chaperone that increases cell-surface levels of F508del-CFTR. A series of CF correctors have been developed, and VX-809 (lumacaftor) has been cited as the most effective symptomatic CF corrector to date. VX-809 improves the function of the mutant protein by approximately 15% in in vitro culture systems. However, this effect did not completely translate clinically, with only a marginal improvement observed in lung function of the F508del-homozygous patients undergoing the therapy. New studies revealed that even after successful ER retrieval, rescued F508del-CFTR (rF508del-CFTR) once at the cell surface does not function properly, exhibiting poor stability and channel gating and structural abnormalities. This becomes further complicated by the existence of genes termed CFTR modifiers, which can alter CFTR function to be additionally defective and exacerbate the CF phenotype while also alternatively suggested be potentially targeted to improve F508del-CFTR functional outcome. It is necessary to understand the biology of F508del-CFTR post

  13. Lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adler, Frederick R; Aurora, Paul; Barker, David H; Barr, Mark L; Blackwell, Laura S; Bosma, Otto H; Brown, Samuel; Cox, D R; Jensen, Judy L; Kurland, Geoffrey; Nossent, George D; Quittner, Alexandra L; Robinson, Walter M; Romero, Sandy L; Spencer, Helen; Sweet, Stuart C; van der Bij, Wim; Vermeulen, J; Verschuuren, Erik A M; Vrijlandt, Elianne J L E; Walsh, William; Woo, Marlyn S; Liou, Theodore G

    2009-01-01

    Lung transplantation is a complex, high-risk, potentially life-saving therapy for the end-stage lung disease of cystic fibrosis (CF). The decision to pursue transplantation involves comparing the likelihood of survival with and without transplantation as well as assessing the effect of wait-listing

  14. Pseudomembranous colitis in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakumar, Prasad

    2013-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may require frequent courses of antibiotics and repeated hospital admissions. Although children with CF have high carriage rate for C.difficile, they rarely develop colitis. Pseudomembranous colitis is more common in adult post lung transplant CF patients. Although rare, paseudomembranous colitis should be considered in CF patients presenting with abdominal symptoms even in the absence of diarrhoea.

  15. Cystic fibrosis - nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in recipes. Add marshmallows to fruit or hot chocolate. Add raisins, dates, or chopped nuts and brown ... AP, Quinton H. Evidence-based practice recommendations for nutrition-related management of children and adults with cystic ...

  16. Inhalation of antibiotics in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Brimicombe, R W; Hodson, M E; Heijerman, H G; Bakker, W

    Aerosol administration of antipseudomonal antibiotics is commonly used in cystic fibrosis. However, its contribution to the improvement of lung function, infection and quality of life is not well-established. All articles published from 1965 until the present time concerning the inhalation of

  17. Inhalation of antibiotics in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J; Brimicombe, R W; Hodson, M E; Heijerman, H G; Bakker, W

    1995-01-01

    Aerosol administration of antipseudomonal antibiotics is commonly used in cystic fibrosis. However, its contribution to the improvement of lung function, infection and quality of life is not well-established. All articles published from 1965 until the present time concerning the inhalation of antibi

  18. Intestinal organoids as model for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in adult stem cell culture technology have enabled long-term in vitro expansion of intestinal organoids or ‘mini-guts’. In this thesis, we used the organoid model to develop a novel assay to measure function of CFTR, the protein mutated in subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF). This met

  19. Gastrointestinal manifestations in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggermont, E

    1996-08-01

    CFTR, or cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the gene product that is defective in cystic fibrosis, is present in the apical membrane of the epithelial cells from the stomach to the colon. In the foregut, the clinical manifestations are not directly related to the primary defect of the CFTR chloride channel. The most troublesome complaints and symptoms originate from the oesophagus as peptic oesophagitis or oesophageal varices. In the small intestinal wall, the clinical expression of CF depends largely on the decreased secretion of fluid and chloride ions, the increased permeability of the paracellular space between adjacent enterocytes and the sticky mucous cover over the enterocytes. As a rule, the brush border enzyme activities are normal and there is some enhanced active transport as shown for glucose and alanine. The results of continuous enteral feeding of CF patients clearly show that the small intestinal mucosa, in the daily situation, is not functioning at maximal capacity. Although CFTR expression in the colon is lower, the large intestine may be the site of several serious complications such as rectal prolapse, meconium ileus equivalent, intussusception, volvulus and silent appendicitis. In recent years colonic strictures, after the use of high-dose pancreatic enzymes, are being increasingly reported; the condition has recently been called CF fibrosing colonopathy. The CF gastrointestinal content itself differs mainly from the normal condition by the lower acidity in the foregut and the accretion of mucins and proteins, eventually resulting in intestinal obstruction, in the ileum and colon. Better understanding of the CF gastrointestinal phenotype may contribute to improvement of the overall wellbeing of these patients.

  20. Lack of correlation between pulmonary disease and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator dysfunction in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleveland Robert H

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Mutations in both alleles of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene result in the disease cystic fibrosis, which usually manifests as chronic sinopulmonary disease, pancreatic insufficiency, elevated sodium chloride loss in sweat, infertility among men due to agenesis of the vas deferens and other symptoms including liver disease. Case presentation We describe a pair of African-American brothers, aged 21 and 27, with cystic fibrosis. They were homozygous for a rare frameshift mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator 3791delC, which would be expected to cause significant morbidity. Although 80% of cystic fibrosis patients are colonized with Pseudomonas aeruginosa by eight years of age, the older brother had no serum opsonic antibody titer to P. aeruginosa by age 13 and therefore would have failed to mount an effective antibody response to the alginate (mucoid polysaccharide capsule of P. aeruginosa. He was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until 24 years of age. Similarly, the younger brother was not colonized with P. aeruginosa until age 20 and had no significant lung disease. Conclusion Despite a prevailing idea in cystic fibrosis research that the amount of functional cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator predicts clinical status, our results indicated that respiratory disease severity in cystic fibrosis exhibits phenotypic heterogeneity. If this heterogeneity is, in part, genetic, it is most likely derived from genes outside the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator locus.

  1. Higher Mobility Scores in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis Are Associated with Better Lung Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesha Thobani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine whether mobility and physical activity were associated with lung function in adults with cystic fibrosis (CF. Design. This was a prospective cohort observational study in an urban, academic, specialized care center. Participants were ambulatory, nonhospitalized adults with CF. Main Outcome Measures. Mobility was assessed monthly by the Life-Space Assessment (LSA questionnaire and quarterly by pedometer. Lung function was assessed by spirometry. Results. Twenty-seven subjects participated. Subjects recorded mean pedometer steps of 20,213 ± 11,331 over three days and FEV1% predicted of 77.48% ± 22.60% over one year. The LSA score at enrollment was correlated with initial pedometer steps (r=0.42 and P=0.03, and mean LSA score over one year was correlated with mean number of steps (r=0.51 and P=0.007. LSA mobility and pedometer scores were correlated with FEV1% predicted at enrollment and throughout the study. Conclusions. Mobility and physical activity measured by LSA questionnaire and pedometer are positively associated with lung function in adults with CF. This study confirms the importance of mobility and physical activity and supports the utility of a simple office-based questionnaire as a measure of mobility in adults with CF.

  2. Genotype-phenotype correlation and functional studies in patients with cystic fibrosis bearing CFTR complex alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlizzi, Vito; Castaldo, Giuseppe; Salvatore, Donatello; Lucarelli, Marco; Raia, Valeria; Angioni, Adriano; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Cirilli, Natalia; Casciaro, Rosaria; Colombo, Carla; Di Lullo, Antonella Miriam; Elce, Ausilia; Iacotucci, Paola; Comegna, Marika; Scorza, Manuela; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Perfetti, Anna; Cimino, Roberta; Quattrucci, Serena; Seia, Manuela; Sofia, Valentina Maria; Zarrilli, Federica; Amato, Felice

    2017-04-01

    The effect of complex alleles in cystic fibrosis (CF) is poorly defined for the lack of functional studies. To describe the genotype-phenotype correlation and the results of either in vitro and ex vivo studies performed on nasal epithelial cells (NEC) in a cohort of patients with CF carrying cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) complex alleles. We studied 70 homozygous, compound heterozygous or heterozygous for CFTR mutations: p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn], n=8; p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del], n=5; p.[Arg117Leu;Leu997Phe], n=6; c.[1210-34TG[12];1210-12T[5];2930C>T], n=3; p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn], n=4; p.Asp1270Asn, n=2; p.Ile148Thr, n=6; p.Leu997Phe, n=36. In 39 patients, we analysed the CFTR gating activity on NEC in comparison with patients with CF (n=8) and carriers (n=4). Finally, we analysed in vitro the p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] complex allele. The p.[Ile148Thr;Ile1023_Val1024del] caused severe CF in five compound heterozygous with a class I-II mutation. Their CFTR activity on NEC was comparable with patients with two class I-II mutations (mean 7.3% vs 6.9%). The p.[Arg74Trp;Asp1270Asn] and the p.Asp1270Asn have scarce functional effects, while p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] caused mild CF in four of five subjects carrying a class I-II mutation in trans, or CFTR-related disorders (CFTR-RD) in three having in trans a class IV-V mutation. The p.[Arg74Trp;Val201Met;Asp1270Asn] causes significantly (pT] and a class I-II mutation had mild CF or CFTR-RD (gating activity: 18.5-19.0%). The effect of complex alleles partially depends on the mutation in trans. Although larger studies are necessary, the CFTR activity on NEC is a rapid contributory tool to classify patients with CFTR dysfunction. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation

    OpenAIRE

    De Stefano, Daniela; Villella, Valeria R.; Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Sepe, Angela; Gregorio, Fabiola De; Salvadori, Laura; Grassia, Rosa; Leone, Carlo A; Rosa, Giuseppe De; Maria C Maiuri; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Guido, Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Zolin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in CftrF508del homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-app...

  4. High resolution CT in children with cystic fibrosis: correlation with pulmonary functions and radiographic scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirkazik, Figen Basaran E-mail: demirkaz@dialup.ankara.edu.tr; Ariyuerek, O. Macit; Oezcelik, Ugur; Goecmen, Ayhan; Hassanabad, Hossein K.; Kiper, Nural

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To compare the high resolution CT (HRCT) scores of the Bhalla system with pulmonary function tests and radiographic and clinical points of the Shwachman-Kulczycki clinical scoring system. Methods: HRCT of the chest was obtained in 40 children to assess the role of HRCT in evaluating bronchopulmonary pathology in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). The HRCT severity scores of the Bhalla system were compared with chest radiographic and clinical points of the Shwachman-Kulczycki scoring system and pulmonary function tests. Only 14 of the patients older than 6 years cooperated with spirometry. Results: HRCT scores correlated well with radiographic points (r=0.80, P<0.0001) and clinical points (r=0.67, P<0.0001) of the Shwachman-Kulczycki system, FVC (r=0.71 P=0.004) and FEV{sub 1} (r=0.66, P=0.01). Although radiographic points correlated significantly with FVC (r=0.61, P=0.02) and FEV{sub 1} (r=0.56, P=0.04), HRCT provides a more precise scoring than the chest X-ray. Conclusion: The HRCT scoring system may provide a sensitive method of monitoring pulmonary disease status and may replace the radiographic scoring in the Shwachman-Kulczycki system. It may be helpful especially in follow-up of small children too young to cooperate with spirometry.

  5. Nutrient Status of Adults with Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    GORDON, CATHERINE M.; ANDERSON, ELLEN J.; HERLYN, KAREN; HUBBARD, JANE L.; PIZZO, ANGELA; GELBARD, RONDI; LAPEY, ALLEN; MERKEL, PETER A.

    2011-01-01

    Nutrition is thought to influence disease status in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This cross-sectional study sought to evaluate nutrient intake and anthropometric data from 64 adult outpatients with cystic fibrosis. Nutrient intake from food and supplements was compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes for 16 nutrients and outcomes influenced by nutritional status. Attention was given to vitamin D and calcium given potential skeletal implications due to cystic fibrosis. Measurements included weight, height, body composition, pulmonary function, and serum metabolic parameters. Participants were interviewed about dietary intake, supplement use, pulmonary function, sunlight exposure, and pain. The participants’ mean body mass index (±standard deviation) was 21.8±4.9 and pulmonary function tests were normal. Seventy-eight percent used pancreatic enzyme replacement for malabsorption. Vitamin D deficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D (25OHD)<37.5 nmol/L] was common: 25 (39%) were deficient despite adequate vitamin D intake. Lipid profiles were normal in the majority, even though total and saturated fat consumption represented 33.0% and 16.8% of energy intake, respectively. Reported protein intake represented 16.9% of total energy intake (range 10%–25%). For several nutrients, including vitamin D and calcium, intake from food and supplements in many participants exceeded recommended Tolerable Upper Intake Levels. Among adults with cystic fibrosis, vitamin D deficiency was common despite reported adequate intake, and lipid profiles were normal despite a relatively high fat intake. Mean protein consumption was adequate, but the range of intake was concerning, as both inadequate or excessive intake may have deleterious skeletal effects. These findings call into question the applicability of established nutrient thresholds for patients with cystic fibrosis. PMID:18060897

  6. Fifteen-year follow-up of pulmonary function in individuals heterozygous for the cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Nordestgaard, B G; Lange, P;

    2001-01-01

    In a cross-sectional study, we previously showed that cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion (DeltaF508) heterozygosity may be overrepresented among individuals with asthma.......In a cross-sectional study, we previously showed that cystic fibrosis phenylalanine-508 deletion (DeltaF508) heterozygosity may be overrepresented among individuals with asthma....

  7. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganin, Patrizia; Fiscarelli, Ersilia Vita; Tuccio, Vanessa; Chiancianesi, Manuela; Bacci, Giovanni; Morelli, Patrizia; Dolce, Daniela; Dalmastri, Claudia; De Alessandri, Alessandra; Lucidi, Vincenzina; Taccetti, Giovanni; Mengoni, Alessio; Bevivino, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S) versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD). Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1). Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs) no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe) were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good candidates for the

  8. Changes in cystic fibrosis airway microbial community associated with a severe decline in lung function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Paganin

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a genetic disease resulting in chronic polymicrobial infections of the airways and progressive decline in lung function. To gain insight into the underlying causes of severe lung diseases, we aimed at comparing the airway microbiota detected in sputum of CF patients with stable lung function (S versus those with a substantial decline in lung function (SD. Microbiota composition was investigated by using culture-based and culture-independent methods, and by performing multivariate and statistical analyses. Culture-based methods identified some microbial species associated with a worse lung function, i.e. Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Rothia mucilaginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Candida albicans, but only the presence of S. pneumoniae and R. mucilaginosa was found to be associated with increased severe decline in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1. Terminal-Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis revealed a higher bacterial diversity than that detected by culture-based methods. Molecular signatures with a statistically significant odds ratio for SD status were detected, and classified as Pseudomonas, Burkholderia and Shewanella, while for other Terminal Restriction Fragments (T-RFs no species assignation was achieved. The analysis of T-RFLP data using ecological biodiversity indices showed reduced Evenness in SD patients compared to S ones, suggesting an impaired ecology of the bacterial community in SD patients. Statistically significant differences of the ecological biodiversity indices among the three sub-groups of FEV1 (normal/mild vs moderate vs severe were also found, suggesting that the patients with moderate lung disease experienced changes in the airway assembly of taxa. Overall, changes in CF airway microbial community associated with a severe lung function decline were detected, allowing us to define some discriminatory species as well as some discriminatory T-RFs that represent good

  9. Recommendations for quality improvement in genetic testing for cystic fibrosis European Concerted Action on Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dequeker, E; Cuppens, H; Dodge, J; Estivill, [No Value; Goossens, M; Pignatti, PF; Scheffer, H; Schwartz, M; Schwarz, M; Tummler, B; Cassiman, JJ

    These recommendations for quality improvement of cystic fibrosis genetic diagnostic testing provide general guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of cystic fibrosis in patients/individuals. General strategies for testing as well as guidelines for laboratory procedures, internal and external

  10. [Historical compilation of cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common life-shortening recessively inherited disorder in the Caucasian population. The genetic mutation that most frequently provokes cystic fibrosis (ΔF508) appeared at least 53,000years ago. For many centuries, the disease was thought to be related to witchcraft and the "evil eye" and it was only in 1938 that Dorothy H. Andersen characterized this disorder and suspected its genetic origin. The present article reviews the pathological discoveries and diagnostic and therapeutic advances made in the last 75 years. The review ends with some considerations for the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  11. Variation in lung function is associated with worse clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; Pinto, Leonardo Araujo; Marostica, Paulo José Cauduro; Donadio, Márcio Vinícius Fagundes

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the variation in lung function over one year is associated with worse clinical outcomes, as well as with a decline in lung function in the following years, in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a retrospective study involving CF patients (4-19 years of age), evaluated over a three-year period. We evaluated demographic characteristics, chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection, antibiotic use, hospitalization, six-minute walk distance (6MWD), and lung function. The inclusion criterion was having undergone pulmonary function testing at least three times in the first year and at least once in each of the next two years. RESULTS: We evaluated 35 CF patients. The variation in FEV1 in the first year (ΔFEV1) was greater among those who, in the third year, showed reduced FEV1, had a below-average 6MWD, or were hospitalized than among those with normal FEV1, normal 6MWD, or no hospital admissions, in that same year (p < 0.05), although no such difference was found for antibiotic use in the third year. Subjects showing a ΔFEV1 ≥ 10% also showed a greater decline in FEV1 over the two subsequent years (p = 0.04). The ΔFEV1 also showed an inverse correlation with absolute FEV1 in the third year (r = −0.340, p = 0.04) and with the rate of FEV1 decline (r = −0.52, p = 0.001). Linear regression identified ΔFEV1 as a predictor of FEV1 decline (coefficient of determination, 0.27). CONCLUSIONS: Significant variation in lung function over one year seems to be associated with a higher subsequent rate of FEV1 decline and worse clinical outcomes in CF patients. Short-term ΔFEV1 might prove useful as a predictor of CF progression in clinical practice. PMID:26785959

  12. Cystic fibrosis from the gastroenterologist's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooi, Chee Y; Durie, Peter R

    2016-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting, recessive disease caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Increased survival outcomes and the multisystem nature of the disease, including the involvement of hepatobiliary and gastrointestinal tracts, now require the need for more extensive knowledge and expertise in cystic fibrosis among gastroenterologists. Manifestations are either a direct consequence of the primary defect in cystic fibrosis or a secondary complication of the disease or therapy. Adult patients with cystic fibrosis also have an increased risk of malignancy in the gastrointestinal and pancreatico-biliary tracts compared with the general population. Novel treatments that target the basic defects in the CFTR protein have emerged, but to date not much is known about their effects on the gastrointestinal and hepatobiliary systems. The introduction of such therapies has provided new opportunities for the application of intestinal endpoints in clinical trials and the understanding of underlying disease mechanisms that affect the gut in cystic fibrosis.

  13. Cystic fibrosis: a clinical view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Carlo; Assael, Baroukh M

    2017-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), a monogenic disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene on chromosome 7, is complex and greatly variable in clinical expression. Airways, pancreas, male genital system, intestine, liver, bone, and kidney are involved. The lack of CFTR or its impaired function causes fat malabsorption and chronic pulmonary infections leading to bronchiectasis and progressive lung damage. Previously considered lethal in infancy and childhood, CF has now attained median survivals of 50 years of age, mainly thanks to the early diagnosis through neonatal screening, recognition of mild forms, and an aggressive therapeutic attitude. Classical treatment includes pancreatic enzyme replacement, respiratory physiotherapy, mucolitics, and aggressive antibiotic therapy. A significant proportion of patients with severe symptoms still requires lung or, less frequently, liver transplantation. The great number of mutations and their diverse effects on the CFTR protein account only partially for CF clinical variability, and modifier genes have a role in modulating the clinical expression of the disease. Despite the increasing understanding of CFTR functioning, several aspects of CF need still to be clarified, e.g., the worse outcome in females, the risk of malignancies, the pathophysiology, and best treatment of comorbidities, such as CF-related diabetes or CF-related bone disorder. Research is focusing on new drugs restoring CFTR function, some already available and with good clinical impact, others showing promising preliminary results that need to be confirmed in phase III clinical trials.

  14. Pyrosequencing Unveils Cystic Fibrosis Lung Microbiome Differences Associated with a Severe Lung Function Decline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Bacci

    Full Text Available Chronic airway infection is a hallmark feature of cystic fibrosis (CF disease. In the present study, sputum samples from CF patients were collected and characterized by 16S rRNA gene-targeted approach, to assess how lung microbiota composition changes following a severe decline in lung function. In particular, we compared the airway microbiota of two groups of patients with CF, i.e. patients with a substantial decline in their lung function (SD and patients with a stable lung function (S. The two groups showed a different bacterial composition, with SD patients reporting a more heterogeneous community than the S ones. Pseudomonas was the dominant genus in both S and SD patients followed by Staphylococcus and Prevotella. Other than the classical CF pathogens and the most commonly identified non-classical genera in CF, we found the presence of the unusual anaerobic genus Sneathia. Moreover, the oligotyping analysis revealed the presence of other minor genera described in CF, highlighting the polymicrobial nature of CF infection. Finally, the analysis of correlation and anti-correlation networks showed the presence of antagonism and ecological independence between members of Pseudomonas genus and the rest of CF airways microbiota, with S patients showing a more interconnected community in S patients than in SD ones. This population structure suggests a higher resilience of S microbiota with respect to SD, which in turn may hinder the potential adverse impact of aggressive pathogens (e.g. Pseudomonas. In conclusion, our findings shed a new light on CF airway microbiota ecology, improving current knowledge about its composition and polymicrobial interactions in patients with CF.

  15. Function and expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator after small intestinal transplantation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penghong Song

    Full Text Available The secretion function of intestinal graft is one of the most important factors for successful intestinal transplantation. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR mediates HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in intestinal epithelial cells. In this study, we made investigation on the expression and function of CFTR in an experimental model of murine small intestinal transplantation. Heterotopic intestinal transplantations were performed in syngeneic mice. The mRNA and protein expressions of CFTR were analyzed by real time PCR and western blot. Murine intestinal mucosal HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions were examined in vitro in Ussing chambers by the pH stat and short circuit current (I(sc techniques. The results showed that forskolin, an activator of CFTR, stimulated jejunal mucosal epithelial HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in mice, but forskolin-stimulated HCO3(- and Cl(- secretions in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice after heterotopic jejunal transplantation were markedly decreased, compared with controls (P<0.001. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CFTR in donor and recipient jejunal mucosae of mice were also markedly lower than those in controls (P<0.001, and the mRNA and protein expression levels of tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα were markedly increased in donor jejunal mucosae of mice (P<0.001, compared with controls. Further experiments showed that TNFα down-regulated the expression of CFTR mRNA in murine jejunal mucosa. In conclusion, after intestinal transplantation, the function of CFTR was impaired, and its mRNA and protein expressions were down-regulated, which may be induced by TNFα.

  16. Functional expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in rat oviduct epithelium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minhui Chen; Jianyang Du; Weijian Jiang; Wulin Zuo; Fang Wang; Manhui Li; Zhongluan Wu; Hsiaochang Chan; Wenliang Zhou

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the functional expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFFR) with electrophysiological and molecular technique in rat oviduct epithelium. In whole-cell patch clamp,oviduct epithelial cells responded to 100 μM 8-bromo-adenosine 3',5'-cycfic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP) with a rise in inward current in Gap-free mode, which was inhibited successively by 5 μM CFTR(inh)-172, a CFTR specific inhibitor, and 1 mM diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC), the CI- channel blocker. The cAMP-activated current exhibited a linear current-voltage (I-V) relationship and time- and voltage-independent characteristics. The reversal potentials of the cAMP-activated currents in symmetrical CI- solutions were close to the CI- equilibrium, 0.5±0.2 mV (n=4). When CI- concentration in the bath solution was changed from 140mM to 70 mM and a pipette solution containing 140 mM CI-was used, the reversal potential shifted to a value close to the new equilibrium for Ci-, 20±0.6 mV (n=4), as compared with the theoretic value of 18.7 mV. In addition, mRNA expression of CFTR was also detected in rat oviduct epithelium. Western blot analysis showed that CFTR protein is found in the oviduct throughout the cycle with maximal expression at estrus, and immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that CFYR is located at the apical membrane of the epithelial cells. These results showed that the cAMP-activatod CI- current in the oviduct epithelium was characteristic of CFTR, which provided direct evidence for the functional expression of CFTR in the rat oviduct epithelium. CFTR may play a role in modulating fluid transport in the oviduct.

  17. The Sociology and Entrenchment. A Cystic Fibrosis Test for Everyone?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Lene; Stemerding, Dirk

    1994-01-01

    Socialmedicine, genetic screening, cystic fibrosis, ethics, political regulation, sociology of technology......Socialmedicine, genetic screening, cystic fibrosis, ethics, political regulation, sociology of technology...

  18. Assessing time to pulmonary function benefit following antibiotic treatment of acute cystic fibrosis exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Riordan Mary A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a life-shortening genetic disease in which ~80% of deaths result from loss of lung function linked to inflammation due to chronic bacterial infection (principally Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Pulmonary exacerbations (intermittent episodes during which symptoms of lung infection increase and lung function decreases can cause substantial resource utilization, morbidity, and irreversible loss of lung function. Intravenous antibiotic treatment to reduce exacerbation symptoms is standard management practice. However, no prospective studies have identified an optimal antibiotic treatment duration and this lack of objective data has been identified as an area of concern and interest. Methods We have retrospectively analyzed pulmonary function response data (as forced expiratory volume in one second; FEV1 from a previous blinded controlled CF exacerbation management study of intravenous ceftazidime/tobramycin and meropenem/tobramycin in which spirometry was conducted daily to assess the time course of pulmonary function response. Results Ninety-five patients in the study received antibiotics for at least 4 days and were included in our analyses. Patients received antibiotics for an average of 12.6 days (median = 13, SD = 3.2 days, with a range of 4 to 27 days. No significant differences were observed in mean or median treatment durations as functions of either treatment group or baseline lung disease stage. Average time from initiation of antibiotic treatment to highest observed FEV1 was 8.7 days (median = 10, SD = 4.0 days, with a range of zero to 19 days. Patients were treated an average of 3.9 days beyond the day of peak FEV1 (median = 3, SD = 3.8 days, with 89 patients (93.7% experiencing their peak FEV1 improvement within 13 days. There were no differences in mean or median times to peak FEV1 as a function of treatment group, although the magnitude of FEV1 improvement differed between groups. Conclusions Our

  19. Functional Interactions of HCO3- with Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray MA

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator- (CFTR-mediated Cl(- transport is associated with cystic fibrosis (CF. CFTR is also required for HCO(3(- transport in many tissues such as the lungs, gastro-intestinal tract, and pancreas, although the exact role CFTR plays is uncertain. Given the importance of CFTR in HCO(3(- transport by so many CF-affected organ systems, it is perhaps surprising that relatively little is known about the interactions of HCO(3(- ions with CFTR. We have used patch clamp recordings from native pancreatic duct cells to study HCO(3(- permeation and interaction with CFTR. Ion selectivity studies shows that CFTR is between 3-5 times more selective for Cl(- over HCO(3(-. In addition, extracellular HCO(3(- has a novel inhibitory effect on cAMP-stimulated CFTR currents carried by Cl(-. The block by HCO(3(- was rapid, relatively independent of voltage and occurred over the physiological range of HCO(3(- concentrations. These data show that luminal HCO(3(- acts as a potent regulator of CFTR, and suggests that inhibition involves an external anion-binding site on the channel. This work has implications not only for elucidating mechanisms of HCO(3(- transport in epithelia, but also for approaches used to treat CF.

  20. Outcome in cystic fibrosis liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowland, Marion

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) does not affect mortality or morbidity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). The importance of gender and age in outcome in CF makes selection of an appropriate comparison group central to the interpretation of any differences in mortality and morbidity in patients with CFLD.

  1. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta;

    2014-01-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful...

  2. HOME CARE IN CYSTIC-FIBROSIS PATIENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANAALDEREN, WMC; MANNES, GPM; BOSMA, ES; ROORDA, RJ; HEYMANS, HSA

    1995-01-01

    Intravenous antibiotics and enteral tube feeding at home for the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations and underweight condition in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have become tools that are used in many cystic fibrosis centres, The experience with home care programmes from different countries is quite

  3. Self-management education for cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Savage, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    Self-management education may help patients with cystic fibrosis and their families to choose, monitor and adjust treatment requirements for their illness, and also to manage the effects of illness on their lives. Although self-management education interventions have been developed for cystic fibrosis, no previous systematic review of the evidence of effectiveness of these interventions has been conducted.

  4. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy in adult cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGrath, D S

    2012-02-03

    Two female patients with Cystic Fibrosis, attending the Adult Regional Cystic Fibrosis centre at the Cork University Hospital, were investigated for upper abdominal pain and found to have gallstones at ultrasonography. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed successfully and, without complication, in both patients.

  5. Inflammation in Achromobacter xylosoxidans infected cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, C. R.; Pressler, T.; Nielsen, K. G.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection may cause conspicuous chronic pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients similar to Pseudomonas aeruginosa and the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc). Evolution in lung function was compared in chronically infected patients. Cytokine...

  6. Changes in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Microbiota at Pulmonary Exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Carmody, Lisa A.; Zhao, Jiangchao; Patrick D. Schloss; Petrosino, Joseph F.; Murray, Susan; Young, Vincent B.; Jun Z Li; LiPuma, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: In persons with cystic fibrosis (CF), repeated exacerbations of pulmonary symptoms are associated with a progressive decline in lung function. Changes in the airway microbiota around the time of exacerbations are not well understood.

  7. Early bronchiectasis in cystic fibrosis detected by surveillance CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Naveen; Linnane, Barry; Ranganathan, Sarath

    2010-08-01

    There is emerging evidence that cystic fibrosis lung disease begins early in infancy. Newborn screening allows early detection and surveillance of pulmonary disease and the possibility of early intervention in this life-shortening condition. We report two children with cystic fibrosis who underwent a comprehensive assessment from diagnosis that included measurement of lung function, limited-slice high-resolution CT and BAL performed annually. Early aggressive surveillance enabled significant lung disease and bronchiectasis to be detected during the first few years of life and led to a change in management, highlighting a clinical role for CT scanning during the preschool years in children with cystic fibrosis.

  8. Endocrine Disorders in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackman, Scott M; Tangpricha, Vin

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently complicated by endocrine disorders. Diabetes can be expected to affect most with CF and pancreatic insufficiency and varies widely in age of onset, but early identification and treatment improve morbidity and mortality. Short stature can be exacerbated by relative delay of puberty and by use of inhaled corticosteroids. Bone disease in CF causes fragility fractures and should be assessed by monitoring bone mineral density and optimizing vitamin D status. Detecting and managing endocrine complications in CF can reduce morbidity and mortality in CF. These complications can be expected to become more common as the CF population ages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis with CFTR Modulators].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tümmler, B

    2016-05-01

    Personalized medicine promises that medical decisions, practices and products are tailored to the individual patient. Cystic fibrosis, an inherited disorder of chloride and bicarbonate transport in exocrine glands, is the first successful example of customized drug development for mutation-specific therapy. There are two classes of CFTR modulators: potentiators that increase the activity of CFTR at the cell surface, and correctors that either promote the read-through of nonsense mutations or facilitate the translation, folding, maturation and trafficking of mutant CFTR to the cell surface. The potentiator ivacaftor and the corrector lumacaftor are approved in Germany for the treatment of people with cystic fibrosis who carry a gating mutation such as p.Gly551Asp or who are homozygous for the most common mutation p.Phe508del, respectively. This report provides an overview of the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, the population genetics of CFTR mutations in Germany and the bioassays to assess CFTR function in humans together with the major achievements of preclinical research and clinical trials to bring CFTR modulators to the clinic. Some practical information on the use of ivacaftor and lumacaftor in daily practice and an update on pitfalls, challenges and novel strategies of bench-to-bedside development of CFTR modulators are also provided.

  10. Serial lung function and responsiveness in cystic fibrosis during early childhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim G; Pressler, Tacjana; Klug, Bent

    2004-01-01

    In a 4-year prospective study, we evaluated specific airway resistance (sRaw) by whole-body plethysmography, respiratory resistance by the interrupter technique, and respiratory resistance and reactance at 5 Hz by the impulse oscillation technique combined with measurement of responsiveness...... to bronchodilators and cold air in 30 children (mean [range] age 5.7 [2 to 8] years) with cystic fibrosis (CF). Spirometry was done at school age. Mean sRaw was consistently abnormal: the mean z score (SD) was 2.52 (2.02) (p ...) for FEV(1) at first satisfactory measurement, at a mean age (range) of 6.1 (4.9-7.5) years was -1.2 (1.2) and was further reduced to -1.85 (1.2) 4 years from inclusion at a mean age (range) of 9.9 (6.8-12) years. Neither respiratory resistance by the interrupter technique nor the impulse oscillation...

  11. Cystic Fibrosis: Brazilian ENT Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Sih

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most published studies about Cystic Fibrosis (CF are European or North American. There are still few publications about the characteristics of fibrocystic populations in developing countries. The incidence of cystic fibrosis (CF in Brazil varies among different regions (1 : 10,000 in Minas Gerais, 1 : 9,500 in Paraná, 1 : 8,700 in Santa Catarina, and 1 : 1600 in Rio Grande do Sul. The prevalence of the DF508 mutation also varies according to population: 33% in Sao Paulo, 49% in Rio Grande do Sul, 27% in Santa Catarina, and 52% in Minas Gerais. Cough and nasal obstruction are the most common symptoms. The variation in nasal polyposis prevalence may be explained by population genotypic characteristics in a country that spans a continent. Findings on nasal endoscopy and computed tomography (CT have better correlation than do this information compared with surgical and clinical history. Microbiologic studies suggest a high level of early contamination of the airways. Sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL occurs in these patients as a result of ototoxic antibiotics. The data compiled in this paper is useful, but also lead to the general agreement that more research would be welcome due to the unique characteristics of this country.

  12. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes: a distinct condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Megías, Marta; González Albarrán, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians, affecting approximately one out of every 2,000 births. Survival of patients with cystic fibrosis has significantly improved due to advances in respiratory and nutritional care, and their current average life expectancy is 30-40 years. Development of cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a comorbidity that increases with age and may reach a prevalence up to 50% in adults. Its development is associated to impaired lung function and nutritional status, and early diagnosis and treatment are therefore essential to improve quality of life and performance status. Insulin therapy for diabetes and other early carbohydrate metabolism disorders may improve lung function and nutritional status of patients with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. miR-16 rescues F508del-CFTR function in native cystic fibrosis epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P; Bhattacharyya, S; Peters, K W; Glover, M L; Sen, A; Cox, R T; Kundu, S; Caohuy, H; Frizzell, R A; Pollard, H B; Biswas, R

    2015-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is due to mutations in the CFTR gene, which prevents correct folding, trafficking and function of the mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The dysfunctional effect of CFTR mutations, principally the F508del-CFTR mutant, is further manifested by hypersecretion of the pro-inflammatory chemokine interleukin-8 into the airway lumen, which further contributes to morbidity and mortality. We have hypothesized that microRNA (miR)-based therapeutics could rescue the dysfunctional consequences of mutant CFTR. Here we report that a miR-16 mimic can effectively rescue F508del-CFTR protein function in airway cell lines and primary cultures, of differentiated human bronchial epithelia from F508del homozygotes, which express mutant CFTR endogenously. We also identify two other miRs, miR-1 and miR-302a, which are also active. Although miR-16 is expressed at basal comparable levels in CF and control cells, miR-1 and miR-302a are undetectable. When miR mimics are expressed in CF lung or pancreatic cells, the expression of the F508del-CFTR protein is significantly increased. Importantly, miR-16 promotes functional rescue of the cyclic AMP-activated apical F508del-CFTR chloride channel in primary lung epithelial cells from CF patients. We interpret these findings to suggest that these miRs may constitute novel targets for CF therapy.

  14. Effects of Autogenic Drainage on Sputum Recovery and Pulmonary Function in People with Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Kimbly; Osterling, Kristin; Gilbert, Robert; Dechman, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effects of short- and long-term use of autogenic drainage (AD) on pulmonary function and sputum recovery in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials in which participants were people with CF who use AD as their sole airway clearance technique. Searches in 4 databases and secondary sources using 5 key terms yielded 735 articles, of which 58 contained the terms autogenic drainage and cystic fibrosis. Ultimately, 4 studies, 2 of which were long term, were included. All measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and found no change. The long-term studies were underpowered to detect change in FEV1; however, the short-term studies found a clinically significant sputum yield (≥4 g). AD has been shown to produce clinically significant sputum yields in a limited number of investigations. The effect of AD on the function of the pulmonary system remains uncertain, and questions have emerged regarding the appropriateness of FEV1 as a valid measure of airway clearance from peripheral lung regions. Further consideration should be given to the use of FEV1 as a primary measure of the effect of AD.

  15. Effects of Autogenic Drainage on Sputum Recovery and Pulmonary Function in People with Cystic Fibrosis: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterling, Kristin; Gilbert, Robert; Dechman, Gail

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To determine the effects of short- and long-term use of autogenic drainage (AD) on pulmonary function and sputum recovery in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Methods: The authors conducted a systematic review of randomized and quasi-randomized clinical trials in which participants were people with CF who use AD as their sole airway clearance technique. Results: Searches in 4 databases and secondary sources using 5 key terms yielded 735 articles, of which 58 contained the terms autogenic drainage and cystic fibrosis. Ultimately, 4 studies, 2 of which were long term, were included. All measured forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and found no change. The long-term studies were underpowered to detect change in FEV1; however, the short-term studies found a clinically significant sputum yield (≥4 g). Conclusion: AD has been shown to produce clinically significant sputum yields in a limited number of investigations. The effect of AD on the function of the pulmonary system remains uncertain, and questions have emerged regarding the appropriateness of FEV1 as a valid measure of airway clearance from peripheral lung regions. Further consideration should be given to the use of FEV1 as a primary measure of the effect of AD. PMID:27504031

  16. Vitamin D deficiency as a risk factor for cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in the Scandinavian Cystic Fibrosis Nutritional Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pincikova, T; Nilsson, Kristine Kahr; Moen, I E;

    2011-01-01

    Many cystic fibrosis patients are vitamin D-insufficient. Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is a major complication of cystic fibrosis. The literature suggests that vitamin D might possess certain glucose-lowering properties. We aimed to assess the relationship between vitamin D and cystic fibrosis...

  17. Oral calorie supplements for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Rosalind L; Rayner, Oli

    2017-05-04

    Poor nutrition occurs frequently in people with cystic fibrosis and is associated with other adverse outcomes. Oral calorie supplements are used to increase total daily calorie intake and improve weight gain. However, they are expensive and there are concerns they may reduce the amount of food eaten and not improve overall energy intake. This is an update of a previously published review. To establish whether in people with cystic fibrosis, oral calorie supplements: increase daily calorie intake; and improve overall nutritional intake, nutritional indices, lung function, survival and quality of life. To assess adverse effects associated with using these supplements. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register comprising references from comprehensive electronic database searches, handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings. We contacted companies marketing oral calorie supplements.Last search: 18 October 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing use of oral calorie supplements for at least one month to increase calorie intake with no specific intervention or additional nutritional advice in people with cystic fibrosis. We independently selected the included trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. We contacted the authors of included trials and obtained additional information for two trials. We identified 21 trials and included three, reporting results from 131 participants lasting between three months and one year. Two trials compared supplements to additional nutritional advice and one to no intervention. Two of the included trials recruited only children. In one trial the risk of bias was low across all domains, in a second trial the risk of bias was largely unclear and in the third mainly low. Blinding of participants was unclear in two of the trials. Also, in one trial the clinical condition of groups appeared to be unevenly balanced at baseline and in another trial there were

  18. Respiratory bacterial infections in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Hansen, Christine R; Høiby, Niels

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial respiratory infections are the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains the main pathogen in adults, but other Gram-negative bacteria such as Achromobacter xylosoxidans and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia as well...

  19. Pathohistological changes in fetuses with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đolai Matilda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cystic fibrosis or mucoviscidosis is a genetically caused disease. The intensity of disease and histopathological changes grow throughout the life. According to the literature, pathological changes characteristic of cystic fibrosis become noticeable around the sixth month of life. Case Report. After amniocentesis of a 5-lunar month-old fetus had been done, which confirmed cystic fibrosis, the Ethics Commission approved the preterm labor. The autopsy and histopathological analysis demonstrated the existence of typical histopathological changes in the pancreas and intestines. Discussion. In the late fetal period or during the period around the delivery, cystic fibrosis is usually manifested as meconial cap with or without obstruction of the intestinal lumen. Morphological changes in the exocrine glands usually develop only after birth. In this case, the existence of meconial obstruction, as well as the typical acidofil content in the secretory ducts and acini of the pancreas was confirmed, which is unusual for the fetal age of five months.

  20. Nutrition in Cystic Fibrosis: Macro- and Micronutrients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, Johanna Hermiena

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening autosomal recessive inherited disease in Caucasians, and is characterized by progressive lung disease, pancreatic insufficiency, malnutrition, hepatobiliary disease and elevated sweat electrolyte levels. The increased survival of CF patients d

  1. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified ...

  2. Reactive-oxygen-species-mediated P. aeruginosa killing is functional in human cystic fibrosis macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noemi Cifani

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most common pathogen for chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. About 80% of adult CF patients have chronic P. aeruginosa infection, which accounts for much of the morbidity and most of the mortality. Both bacterial genetic adaptations and defective innate immune responses contribute to the bacteria persistence. It is well accepted that CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR dysfunction impairs the airways-epithelium-mediated lung defence; however, other innate immune cells also appear to be affected, such as neutrophils and macrophages, which thus contribute to this infectious pathology in the CF lung. In macrophages, the absence of CFTR has been linked to defective P. aeruginosa killing, increased pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion, and reduced reactive oxygen species (ROS production. To learn more about macrophage dysfunction in CF patients, we investigated the generation of the oxidative burst and its impact on bacterial killing in CF macrophages isolated from peripheral blood or lung parenchyma of CF patients, after P. aeruginosa infection. Our data demonstrate that CF macrophages show an oxidative response of similar intensity to that of non-CF macrophages. Intracellular ROS are recognized as one of the earliest microbicidal mechanisms against engulfed pathogens that are activated by macrophages. Accordingly, NADPH inhibition resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular bacteria survival in CF and non-CF macrophages, both as monocyte-derived macrophages and as lung macrophages. These data strongly suggest that the contribution of ROS to P. aeruginosa killing is not affected by CFTR mutations.

  3. Enteral tube feeding for individuals with cystic fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation evidence-informed guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Hempstead, Sarah E; McDonald, Catherine M; Powers, Scott W; Wooldridge, Jamie; Blair, Shaina; Freedman, Steven; Harrington, Elaine; Murphy, Peter J; Palmer, Lena; Schrader, Amy E; Shiel, Kyle; Sullivan, Jillian; Wallentine, Melissa; Marshall, Bruce C; Leonard, Amanda Radmer

    2016-11-01

    Nutrition is integral to the care of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Better nutritional status is associated with improved pulmonary function. In some individuals with CF, enteral tube feeding can be useful in achieving optimal nutritional status. Current nutrition guidelines do not include detailed recommendations for enteral tube feeding. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation convened an expert panel to develop enteral tube feeding recommendations based on a systematic review of the evidence and expert opinion. These guidelines address when to consider enteral tube feeding, assessment of confounding causes of poor nutrition in CF, preparation of the patient for placement of the enteral feeding tube, management of the tube after placement and education about enteral feeding. These recommendations are intended to guide the CF care team, individuals with CF, and their families through the enteral tube feeding process.

  4. Recommendations for quality improvement in genetic testing for cystic fibrosis European Concerted Action on Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dequeker, E; Cuppens, H; Dodge, J; Estivill, [No Value; Goossens, M; Pignatti, PF; Scheffer, H; Schwartz, M; Schwarz, M; Tummler, B; Cassiman, JJ

    2000-01-01

    These recommendations for quality improvement of cystic fibrosis genetic diagnostic testing provide general guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of cystic fibrosis in patients/individuals. General strategies for testing as well as guidelines for laboratory procedures, internal and external q

  5. Recommendations for quality improvement in genetic testing for cystic fibrosis European Concerted Action on Cystic Fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dequeker, E; Cuppens, H; Dodge, J; Estivill, [No Value; Goossens, M; Pignatti, PF; Scheffer, H; Schwartz, M; Schwarz, M; Tummler, B; Cassiman, JJ

    2000-01-01

    These recommendations for quality improvement of cystic fibrosis genetic diagnostic testing provide general guidelines for the molecular genetic testing of cystic fibrosis in patients/individuals. General strategies for testing as well as guidelines for laboratory procedures, internal and external q

  6. Cystic Fibrosis and the Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reznikov, Leah R

    2017-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a life-shortening autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is an anion channel that conducts bicarbonate and chloride across cell membranes. Although defective anion transport across epithelial cells is accepted as the basic defect in CF, many of the features observed in people with CF and organs affected by CF are modulated by the nervous system. This is of interest because CFTR expression has been reported in both the peripheral and central nervous systems, and it is well known that the transport of anions, such as chloride, greatly modulates neuronal excitability. Thus it is predicted that in CF, lack of CFTR in the nervous system affects neuronal function. Consistent with this prediction, several nervous system abnormalities and nervous system disorders have been described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. The goal of this special feature article is to highlight the expression and function of CFTR in the nervous system. Special emphasis is placed on nervous system abnormalities described in people with CF and in animal models of CF. Finally, features of CF that may be modulated by or attributed to faulty nervous system function are discussed. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Eltgol Acutelly Improves Airway Clearance and Reduces Static Pulmonary Volumes in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Moço, Vanessa Joaquim Ribeiro; Cavalcanti de Souza, Felipe; Silveira de Menezes, Sara Lúcia

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Chest physical therapy techniques are essential in order to reduce the frequency of recurrent pulmonary infections that progressively affect lung function in cystic fibrosis patients. Recently, ELTGOL...

  8. Male fertility in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2011-04-05

    Infertility rates among males with cystic fibrosis (CF) approximate 97%. No information is currently available within Ireland determining an understanding of fertility issues and the best methods of information provision to this specialized group. This study aimed to determine understanding and preferred approaches to information provision on fertility issues to Irish CF males. A Descriptive Study utilizing prospective coded questionnaires was mailed to a male CF cohort (n=50). Sections included demographics, fertility knowledge & investigation. Response rate was 16\\/50 (32%). All were aware that CF affected their fertility. More than two-thirds (n=11) were able to provide explanations whilst only one-third (n=5) provided the correct explanation. Significant numbers stated thoughts of marriage and a future family. Half have discussed fertility with a healthcare professional (HCP). Mean age of discussion was 21.9 years. One third preferred an earlier discussion. The commonest first source for information was written material which was also the preferred source. Three-quarters requested further information preferring again, written material. Significant gaps in sex education of Irish CF males exist. Discussion should be initiated by HCPs and centre-directed written material devised to address deficiencies.

  9. [Nutrition, cystic fibrosis and the digestive tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; Olveira, Casilda

    2008-05-01

    The prevalence of hyponutrition in cystic fibrosis is high although it may vary according to the different studies. Detection of hyponutrition should be done by combining different methods, depending on their availability. However, the simplest and most validated criterion is to measure at each visit the weight (and height in children) in order to calculate the body mass index and categorizing hyponutrition according to absolute criteria: in adults colon disease may also condition malnourishment. In patients with cystic fibrosis, a usual high-fat diet providing 120%-150% of the recommended calories is advised. If the nutritional goals are not achieved or maintained with diet modifications, artificial supplements may be added, although the recommendation for their use has not been endorsed by solid scientific evidences. The most frequently used preparations usually are polymeric or hypercaloric. The indications for enteral (through a tube, especially gastrostomy) or parenteral nutritional support are similar to those used in other pathologies. Dietary and nutritional control should be included in a multidisciplinary program allowing the improvement of the functional capacity and the quality of life and reducing, at least from a theoretical viewpoint, the morbimortality associated to malnourishment in these patients.

  10. NEONATAL JAUNDICE – A RARE FORM OF CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Milivojevič

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive disorder that results in damage to organs containing secretory epithelial cells. It predominantly affects respiratory tract and pancreatic function. While hepatobiliary system is frequently affected in older children with cystic fibrosis, in neonatal period jaundice caused by cystic fibrosis is a rare condition. Two cases were identified in the last ten years (1988–98 in the Department of Pediatrics University Medical Centre Ljubljana.Patients and methods. We present two patients with neonatal jaundice as one of the rare features of cystic fibrosis. Laboratory evidences of cholestasis and liver involvement were present in both cases. In the first case, an improvement of a liver disease occured spontaneously and in the second case the resolution of clinical and laboratory evidence of liver disease followed after she had been treated with ursodeoxycholic acid.Conclusions. Neonatal jaundice and cholestasis can be caused by cystic fibrosis. The treatment is conservative with ursodeoxycholic acid. Only in the cases when the disease is not improving conservatively, the surgical procedure can be considered.

  11. Living with Cystic Fibrosis: A Guide for the Young Adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Atlanta, GA.

    Intended for the young adult with cystic fibrosis, the booklet provides information on dealing with problems and on advances in treatment and detection related to the disease. Addressed are the following topics: description of cystic fibrosis; inheritance of cystic fibrosis; early diagnosis; friends, careers, and other matters; treatment;…

  12. 78 FR 26681 - Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... ADMINISTRATION RIN 0960-AF58 Medical Criteria for Evaluating Cystic Fibrosis AGENCY: Social Security....04 to evaluate claims involving cystic fibrosis in adults and children under titles II and XVI of the... information on the disability program. 2. Information for individuals with cystic fibrosis who apply...

  13. Ataluren for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoseyov, David; Cohen-Cymberknoh, Malena; Wilschanski, Michael

    2016-02-24

    Alleles causing diseases that carry premature termination codons (PTCs) will cause premature cessation of translation, leading to loss of function and consequent disease. Recently, a novel agent, Ataluren, was developed through a high throughput screening program. Ataluren is orally bioavailable and was shown to be effective in Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Phase I and II studies established the safety and dosing regimens for Ataluren. The results of a short study showed modest improvements in pulmonary function and a reduction in quantitative cough assessment. There was improvement in nasal potential difference and nasal epithelial CFTR protein. In a phase III trial this effect was not observed in patients that were concomitantly treated with tobramycin inhalation. Following these positive findings, a multinational Phase III placebo-controlled efficacy trial is currently underway.

  14. Cystic fibrosis and pregnancy: counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoriadis, Charalampos; Tympa, Aliki; Theodoraki, Kassiani

    2015-03-01

    The progress in research of in vitro fertilization and fetal-maternal medicine allows more women and men, with fertility problems due to cystic fibrosis, to have a baby. In the majority of cases, pregnancy in women with cystic fibrosis results in favorable maternal and fetal outcomes. However, the incidence of preterm delivery, intrauterine growth restriction, caesarean section and deterioration of the maternal health are increased. Pre-pregnancy counseling is a crucial component of overall obstetric care, especially in women with poor pulmonary function. Additionally, closer monitoring during pregnancy with a multidisciplinary approach is required. The value of serial ultrasound scans and fetal Doppler assessment is important for the control of maternal and fetal wellbeing, as well as for the definition of the appropriate timing of delivery. In this article, clinical issues of pregnant women with cystic fibrosis are reviewed; counseling, obstetrical management and perinatal outcomes are being discussed.

  15. Night blindness in a teenager with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roddy, Marie Frances

    2011-12-01

    This article describes the case of a 16-year-old boy with cystic fibrosis who presented with difficulty seeing in the dark. He had a history of bowel surgery at birth, and he developed cystic fibrosis liver disease and osteopenia during his teenage years. He always had good lung function. When his serum vitamin A level was checked, it was undetectable in sample. He was diagnosed with night blindness and commenced on high-dose vitamin A. His symptoms resolved within 3 days. However, it took over 1 year for his vitamin A level to return to normal. This case emphasizes the importance of monitoring vitamin levels in cystic fibrosis to detect deficiency and prevent long-term consequences, and it highlights the challenges encountered during the course of night blindness treatment.

  16. The cystic fibrosis of exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilschanski, Michael; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein is highly expressed in the pancreatic duct epithelia and permits anions and water to enter the ductal lumen. This results in an increased volume of alkaline fluid allowing the highly concentrated proteins secreted by the acinar...... cells to remain in a soluble state. This work will expound on the pathophysiology and pathology caused by the malfunctioning CFTR protein with special reference to ion transport and acid-base abnormalities both in humans and animal models. We will also discuss the relationship between cystic fibrosis...

  17. Non-invasive ventilation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Fidelma; Bradley, Judy M; Piper, Amanda J

    2017-02-20

    other domains. One single intervention trial had a low risk of bias for the randomisation procedure with the remaining trials judged to have an unclear risk of bias. Most trials had a low risk of bias with regard to incomplete outcome data and selective reporting.Six trials (151 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation for airway clearance compared with an alternative chest physiotherapy method such as the active cycle of breathing techniques or positive expiratory pressure. Three trials used nasal masks, one used a nasal mask or mouthpiece and one trial used a face mask and in one trial it is unclear. Three of the trials reported on one of the review's primary outcome measures (quality of life). Results for the reviews secondary outcomes showed that airway clearance may be easier with non-invasive ventilation and people with cystic fibrosis may prefer it. We were unable to find any evidence that non-invasive ventilation increases sputum expectoration, but it did improve some lung function parameters.Three trials (27 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation for overnight ventilatory support compared to oxygen or room air using nasal masks (two trials) and nasal masks or full face masks (one trial). Trials reported on two of the review's primary outcomes (quality of life and symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing). Results for the reviews secondary outcome measures showed that they measured lung function, gas exchange, adherence to treatment and preference, and nocturnal transcutaneous carbon dioxide. Due to the small numbers of participants and statistical issues, there were discrepancies in the results between the RevMan and the original trial analyses. No clear differences were found between non-invasive ventilation compared with oxygen or room air except for exercise performance, which significantly improved with non-invasive ventilation compared to room air over six weeks.One trial (13 participants) evaluated non-invasive ventilation on exercise

  18. Influenza vaccination in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patria, Maria Francesca; Longhi, Benedetta; Esposito, Susanna

    2013-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an inherited autosomal recessive disease characterized by progressive pulmonary damage and respiratory failure. It is known that bacterial infections play a critical role in the development of significant lung damage, whereas the role of respiratory viruses in CF pulmonary exacerbations and the relationship between viral infections and the progression of lung damage are uncertain. Health authorities throughout the world recommend influenza vaccination for CF patients. The aim of this review is to analyze the impact of seasonal and pandemic influenza on CF patients and data concerning influenza vaccination in order to assess the current situation and identify areas for future study. As data are limited, further well-constructed clinical studies of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on the main clinical outcome measures of pulmonary function and nutritional status in patients with CF are required.

  19. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intesti

  20. Modified Chrispin-Norman chest radiography score for cystic fibrosis: observer agreement and correlation with lung function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jong, P.A. de; Achterberg, J.A.; Kessels, O.A.M.; Beek, F.J. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Ginneken, B. van; Hogeweg, L. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Terheggen-Lagro, S.W.J. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-04-15

    To test observer agreement and two strategies for possible improvement (consensus meeting and reference images) for the modified Chrispin-Norman score for children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Before and after a consensus meeting and after developing reference images three observers scored sets of 25 chest radiographs from children with CF. Observer agreement was tested for line, ring, mottled and large soft shadows, for overinflation and for the composite modified Chrispin-Norman score. Correlation with lung function was assessed. Before the consensus meeting agreement between observers 1 and 2 was moderate-good, but with observer 3 agreement was poor-fair. Scores correlated significantly with spirometry for observers 1 and 2 (-0.72function, but agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score did not improve further. Consensus meetings and reference images improve among-observer agreement for the modified Chrispin-Norman score, but good agreement was not achieved among all observers for the modified Chrispin-Norman score and for bronchial line and ring shadows. (orig.)

  1. Barriers to adherence in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2012-01-01

    Danish patients with cystic fibrosis aged 14 to 25 years and their parents. Conclusions: The present study showed that the majority of adolescents with CF and their parents experienced barriers to treatment adherence. Patients and parents agreed that the three most common barriers encountered lack...

  2. Nutritional assessment in children with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Optimal nutrition, including consuming 35–40% of calories (kcal) as fat, is a vital part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF), and involves accurate assessment of dietary intake. We compared 3 methods of nutritional assessment in 8– to 14-year-old children (n=20) with CF: 1) a 24-h Dietary Reca...

  3. Zinc supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) leads to malabsorption of macro- and micronutrients. Symptomatic zinc deficiency has been reported in CF but little is known about zinc homeostasis in children with CF. Zinc supplementation (Zn suppl) is increasingly common in children with CF but it is not without theoretcial r...

  4. Craniofacial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellsing, E; Brattström, V; Strandvik, B

    1992-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary metabolic disorder with clinical symptoms of abnormal mucus production. This blocks the airways, gives pancreatic insufficiency, and increases sweat electrolytes. The progressive respiratory disease often leads to respiratory insufficiency and cor pulmonale. The aim of the present investigation was to examine the facial morphology in children with cystic fibrosis. The sample comprised 11 children with cystic fibrosis, who were divided in two groups, one with gastrointestinal disorders and the other with predominantly respiratory insufficiency. Eleven healthy children with normal occlusions were selected as controls. Lateral skull radiographs obtained in natural head posture were digitized, and linear and angular variables for the different groups calculated and compared statistically. The cystic fibrosis group showed open bite, decreased posterior facial height, increased mandibular and craniocervical inclination. Additionally, within the CF-group, the children with respiratory insufficiency differed more from the controls than the children with gastrointestinal disorders. Despite the small number of subjects, the facial morphology of the CF children showed a similar pattern to that of children with nasal respiratory obstruction due to enlarged adenoids or tonsils.

  5. Cystic fibrosis : terminology and diagnostic algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boeck, K; Wilschanski, M; Castellani, C; Taylor, C; Cuppens, H; Dodge, J; Sinaasappel, M

    2006-01-01

    There is great heterogeneity in the clinical manifestations of cystic fibrosis (CF). Some patients may have all the classical manifestations of CF from infancy and have a relatively poor prognosis, while others have much milder or even atypical disease manifestations and still carry mutations on eac

  6. Psychosocial problems in children with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, V; Thastum, M; Schiøtz, P O

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To compare the well-being of children (7-14 years) with cystic fibrosis (CF) (n = 43) with the well-being of healthy controls (n = 1121). METHODS: The self-report questionnaire Beck Youth Inventories (BYI) was used to study depression, anxiety, anger, disruptive behaviour and self...

  7. Systematic review of N-acetylcysteine in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestijn, YCM; Brand, PLP

    1999-01-01

    A systematic review was carried out to evaluate whether the use of N-acetylcysteine to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis is supported by published evidence. Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched and the reference lists of all retrieved papers and of relevant chapters of

  8. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, W.; van Aalderen, W.M.C.; Kraan, J.; Koeter, G.H.; van der Schans, C.P.

    Little information is available about the effects of inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study the effects of inspiratory-threshold loading in patients with CF on strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, pulmonary function, exercise capacity, dyspnoea

  9. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, W.; van Aalderen, W.M.C.; Kraan, J.; Koeter, G.H.; van der Schans, C.P.

    2001-01-01

    Little information is available about the effects of inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study the effects of inspiratory-threshold loading in patients with CF on strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, pulmonary function, exercise capacity, dyspnoea

  10. Systematic review of N-acetylcysteine in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestijn, YCM; Brand, PLP

    1999-01-01

    A systematic review was carried out to evaluate whether the use of N-acetylcysteine to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis is supported by published evidence. Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched and the reference lists of all retrieved papers and of relevant chapters of

  11. Systematic review of N-acetylcysteine in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijvestijn, YCM; Brand, PLP

    A systematic review was carried out to evaluate whether the use of N-acetylcysteine to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis is supported by published evidence. Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched and the reference lists of all retrieved papers and of relevant chapters of

  12. Variation in lung function as a marker of adherence to oral and inhaled medication in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Helen; Shaw, Nicola; Denman, Sarah; Pollard, Kim; Wynne, Sarah; Peckham, Daniel Gavin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise adherence in an adult population with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to investigate if variation in lung function was a predictor of adherence to treatment.The adherence of patients aged ≥16 years from an adult CF centre was measured by medication possession ratio (MPR) and self-report. Patients were assigned to one of three adherence categories (coefficient variation measures for forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), weight and C-reactive protein concentration, measured from 6 months and 12 months before baseline.MPR data for 106 of 249 patients (mean age 29.8±9.2 years) was retrieved, indicating a mean adherence of 63%. The coefficient of variation for FEV1 was inversely related to adherence and was a univariate predictor of adherence (6 months: OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.87-0.98, p=0.005; 12 months: OR 0.94, 95% CI 0.93-0.99, p=0.03) and remained significant in the final models. The coefficient of variation of weight and C-reactive protein were not predictive of adherence.The coefficient of variation of FEV1 was identified as an objective predictor of adherence. Further evaluation of this potential marker of adherence is now required. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  13. Trimethylangelicin promotes the functional rescue of mutant F508del CFTR protein in cystic fibrosis airway cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favia, Maria; Mancini, Maria T; Bezzerri, Valentino; Guerra, Lorenzo; Laselva, Onofrio; Abbattiscianni, Anna C; Debellis, Lucantonio; Reshkin, Stephan J; Gambari, Roberto; Cabrini, Giulio; Casavola, Valeria

    2014-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) carrying the F508del mutation is retained in endoplasmic reticulum and fails to traffic to the cell surface where it functions as a protein kinase A (PKA)-activated chloride channel. Pharmacological correctors that rescue the trafficking of F508del CFTR may overcome this defect; however, the rescued F508del CFTR still displays reduced chloride permeability. Therefore, a combined administration of correctors and potentiators of the gating defect is ideal. We recently found that 4,6,4'-trimethylangelicin (TMA), besides inhibiting the expression of the IL-8 gene in airway cells in which the inflammatory response was challenged with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also potentiates the cAMP/PKA-dependent activation of wild-type CFTR or F508del CFTR that has been restored to the plasma membrane. Here, we demonstrate that long preincubation with nanomolar concentrations of TMA is able to effectively rescue both F508del CFTR-dependent chloride secretion and F508del CFTR cell surface expression in both primary or secondary airway cell monolayers homozygous for F508del mutation. The correction effect of TMA seems to be selective for CFTR and persisted for 24 h after washout. Altogether, the results suggest that TMA, besides its anti-inflammatory and potentiator activities, also displays corrector properties.

  14. The mitochondrial complex I activity is reduced in cells with impaired cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel G Valdivieso

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a frequent and lethal autosomal recessive disease. It results from different possible mutations in the CFTR gene, which encodes the CFTR chloride channel. We have previously studied the differential expression of genes in CF and CF corrected cell lines, and found a reduced expression of MTND4 in CF cells. MTND4 is a mitochondrial gene encoding the MTND4 subunit of the mitochondrial Complex I (mCx-I. Since this subunit is essential for the assembly and activity of mCx-I, we have now studied whether the activity of this complex was also affected in CF cells. By using Blue Native-PAGE, the in-gel activity (IGA of the mCx-I was found reduced in CFDE and IB3-1 cells (CF cell lines compared with CFDE/6RepCFTR and S9 cells, respectively (CFDE and IB3-1 cells ectopically expressing wild-type CFTR. Moreover, colon carcinoma T84 and Caco-2 cells, which express wt-CFTR, either treated with CFTR inhibitors (glibenclamide, CFTR(inh-172 or GlyH101 or transfected with a CFTR-specific shRNAi, showed a significant reduction on the IGA of mCx-I. The reduction of the mCx-I activity caused by CFTR inhibition under physiological or pathological conditions may have a profound impact on mitochondrial functions of CF and non-CF cells.

  15. Modifying Factors of Cystic Fibrosis Disease: Residual Chloride Secrefion, Genefic Background and Epigenetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Bronsveld (Inez)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive disease caused by genetic lesions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. This CFTR gene was cloned in 1989,1-3 and located to the long arm of chromosome 7 (7q3L2). lt encodes the CFTR protein that functions a

  16. Intestinal organoids and personalized medicine in cystic fibrosis : A successful patient-oriented research collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordhoek, Jacquelien; Gulmans, Vincent; van der Ent, Kors; Beekman, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review New therapeutics have been introduced for cystic fibrosis that modulate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function in a mutation-specific fashion. Despite CFTR genotype-based stratification of treatments, treatment efficacy is variable between study partici

  17. Characterizing responses to CFTR-modulating drugs using rectal organoids derived from subjects with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Berkers, Gitte; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; de Jonge, Hugo R; Janssens, Hettie M; Bronsveld, Inez; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E S; Houwen, Roderick H J; Vleggaar, Frank P; Escher, Johanna C; de Rijke, Yolanda B; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Clevers, Hans; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subjects with cystic fibrosis (CF) who may benefit from cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)-modulating drugs is time-consuming, costly, and especially challenging for individuals with rare uncharacterized CFTR mutations. We studied CFTR function and responses to tw

  18. The K+ channel opener 1-EBIO potentiates residual function of mutant CFTR in rectal biopsies from cystic fibrosis patients.

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    Eva K Roth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The identification of strategies to improve mutant CFTR function remains a key priority in the development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF. Previous studies demonstrated that the K⁺ channel opener 1-ethyl-2-benzimidazolone (1-EBIO potentiates CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in cultured cells and mouse colon. However, the effects of 1-EBIO on wild-type and mutant CFTR function in native human colonic tissues remain unknown. METHODS: We studied the effects of 1-EBIO on CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in rectal biopsies from 47 CF patients carrying a wide spectrum of CFTR mutations and 57 age-matched controls. Rectal tissues were mounted in perfused micro-Ussing chambers and the effects of 1-EBIO were compared in control tissues, CF tissues expressing residual CFTR function and CF tissues with no detectable Cl⁻ secretion. RESULTS: Studies in control tissues demonstrate that 1-EBIO activated CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ secretion in the absence of cAMP-mediated stimulation and potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion by 39.2±6.7% (P<0.001 via activation of basolateral Ca²⁺-activated and clotrimazole-sensitive KCNN4 K⁺ channels. In CF specimens, 1-EBIO potentiated cAMP-induced Cl⁻ secretion in tissues with residual CFTR function by 44.4±11.5% (P<0.001, but had no effect on tissues lacking CFTR-mediated Cl⁻ conductance. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that 1-EBIO potentiates Cl⁻secretion in native CF tissues expressing CFTR mutants with residual Cl⁻ channel function by activation of basolateral KCNN4 K⁺ channels that increase the driving force for luminal Cl⁻ exit. This mechanism may augment effects of CFTR correctors and potentiators that increase the number and/or activity of mutant CFTR channels at the cell surface and suggests KCNN4 as a therapeutic target for CF.

  19. Mycobacterium chimaera pulmonary infection complicating cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolain Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacterium chimaera is a recently described species within the Mycobacterium avium complex. Its pathogenicity in respiratory tract infection remains disputed. It has never been isolated during cystic fibrosis respiratory tract infection. Case presentation An 11-year-old boy of Asian ethnicity who was born on Réunion Island presented to our hospital with cystic fibrosis after a decline in his respiratory function over the course of seven years. We found that the decline in his respiratory function was correlated with the persistent presence of a Mycobacterium avium complex organism further identified as M. chimaera. Conclusion Using sequencing-based methods of identification, we observed that M. chimaera organisms contributed equally to respiratory tract infections in patients with cystic fibrosis when compared with M. avium subsp. hominissuis isolates. We believe that M. chimaera should be regarded as an emerging opportunistic respiratory pathogen in patients with cystic fibrosis, including young children, and that its detection warrants long-lasting appropriate anti-mycobacterial treatment to eradicate it.

  20. New and emerging targeted therapies for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Bradley S; Rowe, Steven M

    2016-03-30

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenic autosomal recessive disorder that affects about 70,000 people worldwide. The clinical manifestations of the disease are caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. The discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989 has led to a sophisticated understanding of how thousands of mutations in the CFTR gene affect the structure and function of the CFTR protein. Much progress has been made over the past decade with the development of orally bioavailable small molecule drugs that target defective CFTR proteins caused by specific mutations. Furthermore, there is considerable optimism about the prospect of gene replacement or editing therapies to correct all mutations in cystic fibrosis. The recent approvals of ivacaftor and lumacaftor represent the genesis of a new era of precision medicine in the treatment of this condition. These drugs are having a positive impact on the lives of people with cystic fibrosis and are potentially disease modifying. This review provides an update on advances in our understanding of the structure and function of the CFTR, with a focus on state of the art targeted drugs that are in development.

  1. Global Analysis of the Fungal Microbiome in Cystic Fibrosis Patients Reveals Loss of Function of the Transcriptional Repressor Nrg1 as a Mechanism of Pathogen Adaptation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Hu Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The microbiome shapes diverse facets of human biology and disease, with the importance of fungi only beginning to be appreciated. Microbial communities infiltrate diverse anatomical sites as with the respiratory tract of healthy humans and those with diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where chronic colonization and infection lead to clinical decline. Although fungi are frequently recovered from cystic fibrosis patient sputum samples and have been associated with deterioration of lung function, understanding of species and population dynamics remains in its infancy. Here, we coupled high-throughput sequencing of the ribosomal RNA internal transcribed spacer 1 (ITS1 with phenotypic and genotypic analyses of fungi from 89 sputum samples from 28 cystic fibrosis patients. Fungal communities defined by sequencing were concordant with those defined by culture-based analyses of 1,603 isolates from the same samples. Different patients harbored distinct fungal communities. There were detectable trends, however, including colonization with Candida and Aspergillus species, which was not perturbed by clinical exacerbation or treatment. We identified considerable inter- and intra-species phenotypic variation in traits important for host adaptation, including antifungal drug resistance and morphogenesis. While variation in drug resistance was largely between species, striking variation in morphogenesis emerged within Candida species. Filamentation was uncoupled from inducing cues in 28 Candida isolates recovered from six patients. The filamentous isolates were resistant to the filamentation-repressive effects of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, implicating inter-kingdom interactions as the selective force. Genome sequencing revealed that all but one of the filamentous isolates harbored mutations in the transcriptional repressor NRG1; such mutations were necessary and sufficient for the filamentous phenotype. Six independent nrg1 mutations arose in Candida isolates from

  2. Long-term impact of liver transplantation on respiratory function and nutritional status in children and adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowman, J K; Watson, D; Loganathan, S; Gunson, B K; Hodson, J; Mirza, D F; Clarke, J; Lloyd, C; Honeybourne, D; Whitehouse, J L; Nash, E F; Kelly, D; van Mourik, I; Newsome, P N

    2012-04-01

    Early liver transplant (LT) has been advocated for patients with cystic fibrosis liver disease (CFLD) and evidence of deterioration in nutritional state and respiratory function to prevent further decline. However, the impact of single LT on long-term respiratory function and nutritional status has not been adequately addressed. We performed a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 40 (21 adult/19 pediatric) patients with CFLD transplanted between 1987 and 2009 with median follow-up of 47.8 months (range 4-180). One and five-year actuarial survival rates were 85%/64% for adult and 90%/85% for pediatric LT cohorts, respectively. Lung function remained stable until 4 years (FEV(1) % predicted; pretransplant 48.4% vs. 45.9%, 4 years posttransplant) but declined by 5 years (42.4%). Up to 4 years posttransplant mean annual decline in FEV(1) % was lower (0.74%; p = 0.04) compared with the predicted 3% annual decline in CF patients with comorbidity including diabetes. Number of courses of intravenous antibiotics was reduced following LT, from 3.9/year pretransplant to 1.1/year, 5 years posttransplant. Body mass index was preserved posttransplant; 18.0 kg/m(2) (range 15-24.3) pretransplant versus 19.6 kg/m(2) (range 16.4-22.7) 5 years posttransplant. In conclusion, LT is an effective treatment for selected patients with cirrhosis due to CFLD, stabilizing aspects of long-term lung function and preserving nutritional status.

  3. Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stefano, Daniela; Villella, Valeria R; Esposito, Speranza; Tosco, Antonella; Sepe, Angela; De Gregorio, Fabiola; Salvadori, Laura; Grassia, Rosa; Leone, Carlo A; De Rosa, Giuseppe; Maiuri, Maria C; Pettoello-Mantovani, Massimo; Guido, Stefano; Bossi, Anna; Zolin, Anna; Venerando, Andrea; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Mehta, Anil; Bona, Gianni; Kroemer, Guido; Maiuri, Luigi; Raia, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-approved drug. Here, we report that oral treatment with cysteamine greatly reduces the mortality rate and improves the phenotype of newborn mice bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation. Cysteamine was also able to increase the plasma membrane expression of the F508del-CFTR protein in nasal epithelial cells from F508del homozygous CF patients, and these effects persisted for 24 h after cysteamine withdrawal. Importantly, this cysteamine effect after washout was further sustained by the sequential administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, both in vivo, in mice, and in vitro, in primary epithelial cells from CF patients. In a pilot clinical trial involving 10 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients, the combination of cysteamine and EGCG restored BECN1, reduced SQSTM1 levels and improved CFTR function from nasal epithelial cells in vivo, correlating with a decrease of chloride concentrations in sweat, as well as with a reduction of the abundance of TNF/TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) and CXCL8 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 8) transcripts in nasal brushing and TNF and CXCL8 protein levels in the sputum. Altogether, these results suggest that optimal schedules of cysteamine plus EGCG might be used for the treatment of CF caused by the F508del-CFTR mutation.

  4. Pseudomonas infection and mucociliary and absorptive clearance in the cystic fibrosis lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Landon W; Myerburg, Michael M; Weiner, Daniel J; Markovetz, Matthew R; Parker, Robert S; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Weber, Lawrence; Czachowski, Michael R; Lacy, Ryan T; Pilewski, Joseph M; Corcoran, Timothy E

    2016-05-01

    Airway surface liquid hyperabsorption and mucus accumulation are key elements of cystic fibrosis lung disease that can be assessed in vivo using functional imaging methods. In this study we evaluated experimental factors affecting measurements of mucociliary clearance (MCC) and small-molecule absorption (ABS) and patient factors associated with abnormal absorption and mucus clearance.Our imaging technique utilises two radiopharmaceutical probes delivered by inhalation. Measurement repeatability was assessed in 10 adult cystic fibrosis subjects. Experimental factors were assessed in 29 adult and paediatric cystic fibrosis subjects (51 scans). Patient factors were assessed in a subgroup with optimal aerosol deposition (37 scans; 24 subjects). Paediatric subjects (n=9) underwent initial and 2-year follow-up scans. Control subjects from a previously reported study are included for comparison.High rates of central aerosol deposition influenced measurements of ABS and, to a lesser extent, MCC. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis was only detectable in subjects with previous Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Cystic fibrosis subjects without P. aeruginosa had similar MCC to control subjects. Cystic fibrosis subjects had consistently higher ABS rates.We conclude that the primary experimental factor affecting MCC/ABS measurements is central deposition percentage. Depressed MCC in cystic fibrosis is associated with P. aeruginosa infection. ABS is consistently increased in cystic fibrosis.

  5. Epidemiological evaluation regarding the role of cystic fibrosis as a risk factor for child malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florescu, Laura; Paduraru, Dana Teodora Anton; Mîndru, Dana Elena; Temneanu, Oana Raluea; Petrariu, F D; Matei, Mioara Calipsoana

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common monogenic autosomal recessive disorder with progressive chronic evolution which is potentially lethal. Poor growth is a characteristic of children suffering from cystic fibrosis. A poor nutritional status is an independent risk factor for inadequate survival in cystic fibrosis and is associated with disease complications. The appropriate nutritional management is an important part of the treatment so that the patient with cystic fibrosis can achieve normal growth and development and maintain the best possible health status. A balanced diet supplemented with snacks high in fat and calories is necessary to increase the caloric intake in children with cystic fibrosis. Children with cystic fibrosis have higher caloric needs than healthy children of the same age and sex. Malnutrition in CF is multifactorial. Cystic fibrosis is a complex multisystem disorder affecting mainly the gastrointestinal tract and respiratory system. In the past, malnutrition was an inevitable consequence of disease progression, leading to poor growth, impaired respiratory muscle function, decreased exercise tolerance and immunological impairment. A positive association between body weight and height and survival has been widely reported. The energy requirements of patients with CF vary widely and generally increase with age and disease severity. Cystic fibrosis remains a paediatric disorder which is often underdiagnosed but which, if therapeutically managed properly (by means of drug therapy as well as by appropriate physiotherapy techniques), can lead to improved quality of life and, thus, to a bigger life expectancy.

  6. Inflammation and its genesis in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, David P; Chmiel, James F

    2015-10-01

    The host inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease has long been recognized as a central pathological feature and an important therapeutic target. Indeed, many believe that bronchiectasis results largely from the oxidative and proteolytic damage comprised within an exuberant airway inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils. In this review, we address the longstanding argument of whether or not the inflammatory response is directly attributable to impairment of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator or only secondary to airway obstruction and chronic bacterial infection and challenge the importance of this distinction in the context of therapy. We also review the centrality of neutrophils in CF lung pathophysiology and highlight more recent data that suggest the importance of other cell types and signaling beyond NF-κB activation. We discuss how protease and redox imbalance are critical factors in CF airway inflammation and end by reviewing some of the more promising therapeutic approaches now under development.

  7. Cystic fibrosis lung disease in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vender, Robert L

    2008-04-01

    As the longevity of all patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) continues to increase (median 2005 survival=36.8 years), more adult patients will be receiving their medical care from nonpediatric adult-care providers. Cystic fibrosis remains a fatal disease, with more than 80% of patients dying after the age of 18 years, and most deaths resulting from pulmonary disease. The changing epidemiology requires adult-care providers to become knowledgeable and competent in the clinical management of adults with CF. Physicians must understand the influence of specific genotype on phenotypic disease presentation and severity, the pathogenic factors determining lung disease onset and progression, the impact of comorbid disease factors such as CF-related diabetes and malnutrition upon lung disease severity, and the currently approved or standard accepted therapies used for chronic management of CF lung disease. This knowledge is critical to help alleviate morbidity and improve mortality for the rapidly expanding population of adults with CF.

  8. Cystic fibrosis Delta F508 heterozygotes, smoking, and reproduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Wittrup, H H

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasian populations. It remains a puzzle how this disease is maintained at such a remarkably high incidence, however, it could be due to a reproductive advantage in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. We tested this hypot......Cystic fibrosis is the most common fatal autosomal recessive disease affecting Caucasian populations. It remains a puzzle how this disease is maintained at such a remarkably high incidence, however, it could be due to a reproductive advantage in cystic fibrosis heterozygotes. We tested.......001). In conclusion, overall these results do not support a reproductive advantage for cystic fibrosis DeltaF508 heterozygotes. However, the data cannot totally exclude the possibility that nonsmoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience a reproductive advantage while smoking DeltaF508 heterozygotes experience...... the opposite, a reproductive disadvantage. Accordingly, the data suggest a previously undocumented role of smoking on fecundity among cystic fibrosis heterozygotes....

  9. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including 10 with >3 positive samples (versus 3 patients for M. avium complex). The M. abscessus isolates from 14 patients were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis: each of the 14 patients harbored a unique strain, ruling out a common environmental reservoir or person-to-person transmission. Water samples collected in the cystic fibrosis center were negative for M. abscessus. This major mycobacterial pathogen in children and teenagers with cystic fibrosis does not appear to be acquired nosocomially. PMID:14720400

  10. Intestinal Bicarbonate Secretion in Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke LL

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene-targeted disruption of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in mice results in an intestinal disease phenotype that is remarkably similar to bowel disease in cystic fibrosis patients. In the intestinal segment downstream from the stomach (i.e., the duodenum, CFTR plays an important role in bicarbonate secretion that protects the epithelium from acidic gastric effluent. In this report, we examine the role of CFTR in cAMP-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in the murine duodenum and the mechanisms of acid-base transport that are revealed in CFTR knockout (CF mice. Ion substitution, channel blocker and pH stat studies comparing duodena from wild-type and CF mice indicate that CFTR mediates a HCO(3(- conductance across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the presence of a favorable cell-to-lumen HCO(3(- gradient, the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- current accounts for about 80% of stimulated HCO(3(- secretion. Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to acidic pH reveals another role of CFTR in facilitating HCO(3(- secretion via an electroneutral, 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2' disulfonic acid (DIDS sensitive Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange process. In CF duodenum, other apical membrane acid-base transporters retain function, thereby affording limited control of transepithelial pH. Activity of a Cl(--dependent anion exchanger provides near-constant HCO(3(- secretion in CF intestine, but under basal conditions the magnitude of secretion is lessened by simultaneous activity of a Na(+/H(+ exchanger (NHE. During cAMP stimulation of CF duodenum, a small increase in net base secretion is measured but the change results from cAMP inhibition of NHE activity rather than increased HCO(3(- secretion. Interestingly, a small inward current that is sensitive to the anion channel blocker, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropyl amino-benzoate (NPPB, is also activated during cAMP stimulation of the CFTR-null intestine but the identity of the current is yet to be

  11. Mammalian osmolytes and S-nitrosoglutathione promote Delta F508 cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein maturation and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Marybeth; Fischer, Horst; Roux, Jeremie; Santos, Bento C; Gullans, Steven R; Yancey, Paul H; Welch, William J

    2003-09-12

    In cystic fibrosis, the absence of functional CFTR results in thick mucous secretions in the lung and intestines, as well as pancreatic deficiency. Although expressed at high levels in the kidney, mutations in CFTR result in little or no apparent kidney dysfunction. In an effort to understand this phenomenon, we analyzed Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function in kidney cells under conditions that are common to the kidney, namely osmotic stress. Kidney cells were grown in culture and adapted to 250 mM NaCl and 250 mM urea. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of lysates from kidney cells adapted to these conditions identified an increase in the cellular osmolytes glycerophosphorylcholine, myo-inositol, sorbitol, and taurine. In contrast to isoosmotic conditions, hyperosmotic stress led to the proper folding and processing of Delta F508 CFTR. Furthermore, three of the cellular osmolytes, when added individually to cells, proved effective in promoting the proper folding and processing of the Delta F508 CFTR protein in both epithelial and fibroblast cells. Whole-cell patch clamping of osmolyte-treated cells showed that Delta F508 CFTR had trafficked to the plasma membrane and was activated by forskolin. Encouraged by these findings, we looked at other features common to the kidney that may impact Delta F508 maturation and function. Interestingly, a small molecule, S-nitrosoglutathione, which is a substrate for gamma glutamyltranspeptidase, an abundant enzyme in the kidney, likewise promoted Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function. S-Nitrosoglutathione-corrected Delta F508 CFTR exhibited a shorter half-life as compared with wild type CFTR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of a small molecule approach as a therapeutic treatment in promoting Delta F508 CFTR maturation and function and suggest that an additional treatment may be required to stabilize Delta F508 CFTR protein once present at the plasma membrane. Finally, our observations may help to

  12. "Cystic fibrotics could survive cholera, choleraics could survive cystic fibrosis"; hypothesis that explores new horizons in treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, Arsalan

    2015-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis, the most common inherited disease of white population, is a disease of CFTR channels, in which mucosal function of many organs especially respiratory tract is impaired. Decreased mucociliary clearance and accumulation of mucus in airways facilitates colonization of infectious microorganisms, followed by infection. Following chronic infection, persistent inflammation ensues, which results in airway remodeling and deterioration of mucociliary clearance and result in a vicious cycle. Here, it is hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) could ameliorate symptoms of cystic fibrosis as CT could dilute the thickened mucus, improve mucociliary clearance and alleviate airway obstruction. CT strengthens immunity of airway mucosa and it could attenuates bacterial growth and reduce persistency of infection. CT also modulates cellular immune response and it could decrease airway inflammation, hinder airway remodeling and prevent respiratory deterioration. Thereby it is hypothesized that CT could target and ameliorate many of pathophysiologic steps of the disease and it explores new horizons in treatment of CF. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Therapeutic advances in cystic fibrosis in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durupt, S; Mazur, S; Reix, P

    2016-02-01

    Twenty-five years after the cystic fibrosis (CF) gene identification, this discovery actually begins to benefit to patients. Increasing our knowledge on CFTR biology, as well as technical progress made in order to screen for new drugs have made therapeutic strategies move an important step forward. It is likely that in the forthcoming years, the panel of molecules available for CF patients will be larger, with new activators and potentiators. The disease by itself may consequently change in its natural history. CF is an example of the so-called personalized medicine, aiming to fit treatment according to patient's genetic background. Ongoing clinical trials may enlarge the actually limited eligible number of CF patients for new drugs such as ivacaftor. Beyond this exciting and promising new therapeutic approach, one may not push symptomatic treatments on the side. Improvements have been made for inhaled antibiotics administration, aiming to simplify patient's life; clinical trials using new molecules able to liquefy mucus or with anti-inflammatory properties are actually underway. One important next step in the care for CF will be to design and conduct early intervention trials in CF infants. Newborn screening program have been widely implanted around the word, and cohorts studies have shown that both functional and structural abnormalities occurred very early, making the therapeutic window of opportunity tight. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Viruses in cystic fibrosis patients' airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, Lisa; Le Berre, Rozenn; Pilorgé, Léa; Payan, Christopher; Héry-Arnaud, Geneviève; Vallet, Sophie

    2017-11-01

    Although bacteria have historically been considered to play a major role in cystic fibrosis (CF) airway damage, a strong impact of respiratory viral infections (RVI) is also now recognized. Emerging evidence confirms that respiratory viruses are associated with deterioration of pulmonary function and exacerbation and facilitation of bacterial colonization in CF patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge on respiratory viruses in CF airways, to discuss the resulting inflammation and RVI response, to determine how to detect the viruses, and to assess their clinical consequences, prevalence, and interactions with bacteria. The most predominant are Rhinoviruses (RVs), significantly associated with CF exacerbation. Molecular techniques, and especially multiplex PCR, help to diagnose viral infections, and the coming rise of metagenomics will extend knowledge of viral populations in the complex ecosystem of CF airways. Prophylaxis and vaccination are currently available only for Respiratory syncytial and Influenza virus (IV), but antiviral molecules are being tested to improve CF patients' care. All the points raised in this review highlight the importance of taking account of RVIs and their potential impact on the CF airway ecosystem.

  15. Vitamin K status in cystic fibrosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrycja Krzyżanowska

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin K belongs to the family of fat-soluble vitamins and plays an important role in hemostasis, bone metabolism and may affect cerebral sphingolipid synthesis. It is a cofactor necessary for posttranslational γ-carboxylation of glutamyl residues in selected proteins such as the osteocalcin, and procoagulation factors II, VII, IX, X. Vitamin K deficient individuals appear to have more undercarboxylated proteins, which are functionally defective. The vitamin K deficiency has been frequently documented in patients with cystic fibrosis. The main possible causes of this deficiency include: fat malabsorption due to pancreatic exocrine insufficiency, cholestatic or  noncholestatic liver disease, reduced production of vitamin K by colonic flora related to chronic antibiotic treatments, bowel resections and increased mucous accumulation in the bowel. CF patients are more prone to osteopenia, caused by chronic vitamin K shortage, than to coagulopathy. Despite available evidence, which strongly suggests that all CF patients are at risk for developing vitamin K deficiency, its supplementation doses have not been established. Recent recommendations from Europe and the UK have suggested varied doses ranging from 0.3 mg/day to 10 mg/week. Further studies, both cross sectional and longitudinal interventional, are still required to determine routine and therapeutic supplementation doses.

  16. Asthma and cystic fibrosis: A tangled web.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kent, Brian D

    2014-03-01

    Successfully diagnosing concomitant asthma in people with cystic fibrosis (CF) is a challenging proposition, and the utility of conventional diagnostic criteria of asthma in CF populations remains uncertain. Nonetheless, the accurate identification of individuals with CF and asthma allows appropriate tailoring of therapy, and should reduce the unnecessary use of asthma medication in broader CF cohorts. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic challenge posed by asthma in CF, both in terms of clinical evaluation, and of interpretation of pulmonary function testing and non-invasive markers of airway inflammation. We also examine how the role of cross-sectional thoracic imaging in CF and asthma can assist in the diagnosis of asthma in these patients. Finally, we critically appraise the evidence base behind the use of asthma medications in CF populations, with a particular focus on the use of inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators. As shall be discussed, the gaps in the current literature make further high-quality research in this field imperative. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2014; 49:205-213. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Correctors and Potentiators Rescue Function of the Truncated W1282X-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) Translation Product*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggie, Peter M.; Phuan, Puay-Wah; Tan, Joseph-Anthony; Xu, Haijin; Avramescu, Radu G.; Perdomo, Doranda; Zlock, Lorna; Nielson, Dennis W.; Finkbeiner, Walter E.; Lukacs, Gergely L.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2017-01-01

    W1282X is the fifth most common cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) mutation that causes cystic fibrosis. Here, we investigated the utility of a small molecule corrector/potentiator strategy, as used for ΔF508-CFTR, to produce functional rescue of the truncated translation product of the W1282X mutation, CFTR1281, without the need for read-through. In transfected cell systems, certain potentiators and correctors, including VX-809 and VX-770, increased CFTR1281 activity. To identify novel correctors and potentiators with potentially greater efficacy on CFTR1281, functional screens were done of ∼30,000 synthetic small molecules and drugs/nutraceuticals in CFTR1281-transfected cells. Corrector scaffolds of 1-arylpyrazole-4-arylsulfonyl-piperazine and spiro-piperidine-quinazolinone classes were identified with up to ∼5-fold greater efficacy than VX-809, some of which were selective for CFTR1281, whereas others also corrected ΔF508-CFTR. Several novel potentiator scaffolds were identified with efficacy comparable with VX-770; remarkably, a phenylsulfonamide-pyrrolopyridine acted synergistically with VX-770 to increase CFTR1281 function ∼8-fold over that of VX-770 alone, normalizing CFTR1281 channel activity to that of wild type CFTR. Corrector and potentiator combinations were tested in primary cultures and conditionally reprogrammed cells generated from nasal brushings from one W1282X homozygous subject. Although robust chloride conductance was seen with correctors and potentiators in homozygous ΔF508 cells, increased chloride conductance was not found in W1282X cells despite the presence of adequate transcript levels. Notwithstanding the negative data in W1282X cells from one human subject, we speculate that corrector and potentiator combinations may have therapeutic efficacy in cystic fibrosis caused by the W1282X mutation, although additional studies are needed on human cells from W1282X subjects. PMID:27895116

  18. Mechanisms of CFTR functional variants that impair regulated bicarbonate permeation and increase risk for pancreatitis but not for cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica LaRusch

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available CFTR is a dynamically regulated anion channel. Intracellular WNK1-SPAK activation causes CFTR to change permeability and conductance characteristics from a chloride-preferring to bicarbonate-preferring channel through unknown mechanisms. Two severe CFTR mutations (CFTRsev cause complete loss of CFTR function and result in cystic fibrosis (CF, a severe genetic disorder affecting sweat glands, nasal sinuses, lungs, pancreas, liver, intestines, and male reproductive system. We hypothesize that those CFTR mutations that disrupt the WNK1-SPAK activation mechanisms cause a selective, bicarbonate defect in channel function (CFTRBD affecting organs that utilize CFTR for bicarbonate secretion (e.g. the pancreas, nasal sinus, vas deferens but do not cause typical CF. To understand the structural and functional requirements of the CFTR bicarbonate-preferring channel, we (a screened 984 well-phenotyped pancreatitis cases for candidate CFTRBD mutations from among 81 previously described CFTR variants; (b conducted electrophysiology studies on clones of variants found in pancreatitis but not CF; (c computationally constructed a new, complete structural model of CFTR for molecular dynamics simulation of wild-type and mutant variants; and (d tested the newly defined CFTRBD variants for disease in non-pancreas organs utilizing CFTR for bicarbonate secretion. Nine variants (CFTR R74Q, R75Q, R117H, R170H, L967S, L997F, D1152H, S1235R, and D1270N not associated with typical CF were associated with pancreatitis (OR 1.5, p = 0.002. Clones expressed in HEK 293T cells had normal chloride but not bicarbonate permeability and conductance with WNK1-SPAK activation. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest physical restriction of the CFTR channel and altered dynamic channel regulation. Comparing pancreatitis patients and controls, CFTRBD increased risk for rhinosinusitis (OR 2.3, p<0.005 and male infertility (OR 395, p<<0.0001. WNK1-SPAK pathway-activated increases in

  19. Antioxidant supplementation for lung disease in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Lykkesfeldt, Jens

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Airway infection leads to progressive damage of the lungs in cystic fibrosis and oxidative stress has been implicated in the etiology. Supplementation of antioxidant micronutrients (vitamin E, vitamin C, ß-carotene and selenium) or glutathione may therefore potentially help maintain...... an oxidant-antioxidant balance. Current literature suggests a relationship between oxidative status and lung function. OBJECTIVES: To synthesize existing knowledge of the effect of antioxidants such as vitamin C, vitamin E, ß-carotene, selenium and glutathione in cystic fibrosis lung disease. SEARCH METHODS...... COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. We contacted trial investigators to obtain missing information. Primary outcomes are lung function and quality of life; secondary outcomes are oxidative stress...

  20. Evidence for a Cystic Fibrosis Enteropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlou P M Adriaanse

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested the existence of enteropathy in cystic fibrosis (CF, which may contribute to intestinal function impairment, a poor nutritional status and decline in lung function. This study evaluated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF and studied its associations with nutritional status, CF-related morbidities such as impaired lung function and diabetes, and medication use.Sixty-eight CF patients and 107 controls were studied. Levels of serum intestinal-fatty acid binding protein (I-FABP, a specific marker for enterocyte damage, were retrospectively determined. The faecal intestinal inflammation marker calprotectin was prospectively studied. Nutritional status, lung function (FEV1, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI, CF-related diabetes (CFRD and use of proton pump inhibitors (PPI were obtained from the medical charts.Serum I-FABP levels were elevated in CF patients as compared with controls (p<0.001, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in children (r-.734, p<0.05. Faecal calprotectin level was elevated in 93% of CF patients, and correlated negatively with FEV1 predicted value in adults (r-.484, p<0.05. No correlation was found between calprotectin levels in faeces and sputum. Faecal calprotectin level was significantly associated with the presence of CFRD, EPI, and PPI use.This study demonstrated enterocyte damage and intestinal inflammation in CF patients, and provides evidence for an inverse correlation between enteropathy and lung function. The presented associations of enteropathy with important CF-related morbidities further emphasize the clinical relevance.

  1. Inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    De Jong, W; van Aalderen, W.M.C.; Kraan, J.; Koeter, G. H.; van der Schans, C. P.

    2001-01-01

    Little information is available about the effects of inspiratory muscle training in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In this study the effects of inspiratory-threshold loading in patients with CF on strength and endurance of the inspiratory muscles, pulmonary function, exercise capacity, dyspnoea and fatigue were evaluated. Sixteen patients were assigned to one of two groups using the minimization method: eight patients in the training group and eight patients in the control group. The tra...

  2. [Italian Cystic Fibrosis Register - Report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amato, Annalisa; Ferrigno, Luigina; Salvatore, Marco; Toccaceli, Virgilia

    2016-01-01

    The Italian National CF Registry (INCFR) is based on the official agreement between the clinicians of the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis and the researchers of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (National Center for Rare Diseases; National Center for Epidemiology, Surveillance and Health Care Promotion). OBJECTIVES The main aim of INCFR is to contribute to the improvement in CF patients health care and clinical management through: i. the estimates of CF prevalence and incidence in Italy; ii. the analyses of medium and long term clinical and epidemiological trends of the disesase; iii. the identification of the main health care needs at regional and national level to contribute to the Health Care programmes and to the distribution of resources. MATERIALS AND METHODS Analyses and results described in the present Report are referred to patients in charge to the Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis in 2010. Data were sent by Centers by means of a specific software (Camilla, Ibis Informatica). The Italian National Referral Centers for Cystic Fibrosis sent a total of 5,271 individual records; 1,112 records were excluded from the analyses due to restricted inclusion criteria. The total number of patients included in INCFR for analyses is 4,159. RESULTS INCFR database includes all prevalent cases at 1th January 2010 as well as all new diagnoses done in 2010. The present Report has been organized into 9 sections. 1. Demography: estimated 2010 CF prevalence was 7/100,000 residents in Italy; 52% of the patients were male, CF distribution showed higher frequency in patients aged 7 to 35 years. In 2010, 48.9% of the patients were more than 18 years old. 2. Diagnoses: most of the CF patients were diagnosed before two years of age (66.7%); a significant percentage of patients (11.4%) was diagnosed in adult-age. 3. New diagnoses (2010): new diagnoses were 168. Sixty-five percent of them was diagnosed before the second year of age and 17%in

  3. In silico search for modifier genes associated with pancreatic and liver disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génin, Emmanuelle; Férec, Claude

    2017-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis is the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in the white population, affecting among other organs, the lung, the pancreas and the liver. Whereas Cystic Fibrosis is a monogenic disease, many studies reveal a very complex relationship between genotype and clinical phenotype. Indeed, the broad phenotypic spectrum observed in Cystic Fibrosis is far from being explained by obvious genotype-phenotype correlations and it is admitted that Cystic Fibrosis disease is the result of multiple factors, including effects of the environment as well as modifier genes. Our objective was to highlight new modifier genes with potential implications in the lung, pancreatic and liver outcomes of the disease. For this purpose we performed a system biology approach which combined, database mining, literature mining, gene expression study and network analysis as well as pathway enrichment analysis and protein-protein interactions. We found that IFI16, CCNE2 and IGFBP2 are potential modifiers in the altered lung function in Cystic Fibrosis. We also found that EPHX1, HLA-DQA1, HLA-DQB1, DSP and SLC33A1, GPNMB, NCF2, RASGRP1, LGALS3 and PTPN13, are potential modifiers in pancreas and liver, respectively. Associated pathways indicate that immune system is likely involved and that Ubiquitin C is probably a central node, linking Cystic Fibrosis to liver and pancreatic disease. We highlight here new modifier genes with potential implications in Cystic Fibrosis. Nevertheless, our in silico analysis requires functional analysis to give our results a physiological relevance. PMID:28339466

  4. An official American Thoracic Society workshop report: optimal lung function tests for monitoring cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and recurrent wheezing in children less than 6 years of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Margaret; Allen, Julian; Arets, Bert H G M; Aurora, Paul; Beydon, Nicole; Calogero, Claudia; Castile, Robert G; Davis, Stephanie D; Fuchs, Susanne; Gappa, Monika; Gustaffson, Per M; Hall, Graham L; Jones, Marcus H; Kirkby, Jane C; Kraemer, Richard; Lombardi, Enrico; Lum, Sooky; Mayer, Oscar H; Merkus, Peter; Nielsen, Kim G; Oliver, Cara; Oostveen, Ellie; Ranganathan, Sarath; Ren, Clement L; Robinson, Paul D; Seddon, Paul C; Sly, Peter D; Sockrider, Marianna M; Sonnappa, Samatha; Stocks, Janet; Subbarao, Padmaja; Tepper, Robert S; Vilozni, Daphna

    2013-04-01

    Although pulmonary function testing plays a key role in the diagnosis and management of chronic pulmonary conditions in children under 6 years of age, objective physiologic assessment is limited in the clinical care of infants and children less than 6 years old, due to the challenges of measuring lung function in this age range. Ongoing research in lung function testing in infants, toddlers, and preschoolers has resulted in techniques that show promise as safe, feasible, and potentially clinically useful tests. Official American Thoracic Society workshops were convened in 2009 and 2010 to review six lung function tests based on a comprehensive review of the literature (infant raised-volume rapid thoracic compression and plethysmography, preschool spirometry, specific airway resistance, forced oscillation, the interrupter technique, and multiple-breath washout). In these proceedings, the current state of the art for each of these tests is reviewed as it applies to the clinical management of infants and children under 6 years of age with cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and recurrent wheeze, using a standardized format that allows easy comparison between the measures. Although insufficient evidence exists to recommend incorporation of these tests into the routine diagnostic evaluation and clinical monitoring of infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or recurrent wheeze, they may be valuable tools with which to address specific concerns, such as ongoing symptoms or monitoring response to treatment, and as outcome measures in clinical research studies.

  5. Co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis and celiac disease in Scandinavian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, Gjermund; Olesen, Hanne Vebert; Giljam, Marita

    2009-01-01

    Background: The co-morbidity of cystic fibrosis (CF) and celiac disease (CD) has been reported sporadically since the 1960s. To our knowledge, this is the first time a systematic screening is performed in a large cohort of CF patients. Methods: Transglutaminase-IgA (TGA), endomysium-IgA (EMA...

  6. Non-invasive ventilation used as an adjunct to airway clearance treatments improves lung function during an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffany J Dwyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Question: During an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, is non-invasive ventilation beneficial as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen? Design: Randomised controlled trial with concealed allocation and intention-to-treat analysis. Participants: Forty adults with moderate to severe cystic fibrosis lung disease and who were admitted to hospital for an acute exacerbation. Intervention: Comprehensive inpatient care (control group compared to the same care with the addition of non-invasive ventilation during airway clearance treatments from Day 2 of admission until discharge (experimental group. Outcome measures: Lung function and subjective symptom severity were measured daily. Fatigue was measured at admission and discharge on the Schwartz Fatigue Scale from 7 (no fatigue to 63 (worst fatigue points. Quality of life and exercise capacity were also measured at admission and discharge. Length of admission and time to next hospital admission were recorded. Results: Analysed as the primary outcome, the experimental group had a greater rate of improvement in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 than the control group, but this was not statistically significant (MD 0.13% predicted per day, 95% CI –0.03 to 0.28. However, the experimental group had a significantly higher FEV1 at discharge than the control group (MD 4.2% predicted, 95% CI 0.1 to 8.3. The experimental group reported significantly lower levels of fatigue on the Schwartz fatigue scale at discharge than the control group (MD 6 points, 95% CI 1 to 11. There was no significant difference between the experimental and control groups in subjective symptom severity, quality of life, exercise capacity, length of hospital admission or time to next hospital admission. Conclusion: Among people hospitalised for an acute exacerbation of cystic fibrosis, the use of non-invasive ventilation as an adjunct to the airway clearance regimen significantly improves FEV1 and fatigue. Trial

  7. Impaired Pancreatic Ductal Bicarbonate Secretion in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleimani M

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with cystic fibrosis demonstrate a defect in HCO(3(- secretion by their pancreatic duct cells. However, attempts toward understanding or correcting this defect have been hampered by a lack of knowledge regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms mediating HCO(3(- transport in these cells. Recent functional and molecular studies indicate a major role for a basolateral electrogenically-driven Na(+:HCO(3(- cotransporter (NBC1 in mediating the transport of HCO(3(- into the duct cells. The HCO(3(- exits at the lumen predominantly via two recently discovered apical HCO(3(- transporters. cAMP, which mediates the stimulatory effect of secretin on pancreatic ductal HCO(3(- secretion, potentiates the basolateral Na(+:HCO(3(- cotransporter due to generation of a favorable electrogenic gradient as a result of membrane depolarization by Cl(--secreting cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. Two apical HCO(3(- transporters drive the secretion of bicarbonate into the pancreatic duct lumen. Molecular and functional studies indicate that CFTR upregulates the expression of these two apical HCO(3(- transporters. In addition, CFTR may also upregulate the expression of certain water channels and facilitate the secretion of fluid into the duct lumen. In brief, current research suggests that the defect in pancreatic HCO(3(- secretion in patients with cystic fibrosis is multifactorial and involves the alteration in the function/expression of transporters at the basolateral and luminal membrane domains of the duct cells.

  8. Left ventricular and aortic dysfunction in cystic fibrosis mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellers, Zachary M; Kovacs, Attila; Weinheimer, Carla J; Best, Philip M

    2013-09-01

    Left ventricular (LV) abnormalities have been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF); however, it remains unclear if loss of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function causes heart defects independent of lung disease. Using gut-corrected F508del CFTR mutant mice (ΔF508), which do not develop human lung disease, we examined in vivo heart and aortic function via 2D transthoracic echocardiography and LV catheterization. ΔF508 mouse hearts showed LV concentric remodeling along with enhanced inotropy (increased +dP/dt, fractional shortening, decreased isovolumetric contraction time) and greater lusitropy (-dP/dt, Tau). Aortas displayed increased stiffness and altered diastolic flow. β-adrenergic stimulation revealed diminished cardiac reserve (attenuated +dP/dt,-dP/dt, LV pressure). In a mouse model of CF, CFTR mutation leads to LV remodeling with alteration of cardiac and aortic functions in the absence of lung disease. As CF patients live longer, more active lives, their risk for cardiovascular disease should be considered. Copyright © 2012 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. New microbicidal functions of tracheal glands: defective anti-infectious response to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Bastonero

    Full Text Available Tracheal glands (TG may play a specific role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF, a disease due to mutations in the cftr gene and characterized by airway inflammation and Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. We compared the gene expression of wild-type TG cells and TG cells with the cftr DeltaF508 mutation (CF-TG cells using microarrays covering the whole human genome. In the absence of infection, CF-TG cells constitutively exhibited an inflammatory signature, including genes that encode molecules such as IL-1alpha, IL-beta, IL-32, TNFSF14, LIF, CXCL1 and PLAU. In response to P. aeruginosa, genes associated with IFN-gamma response to infection (CXCL10, IL-24, IFNgammaR2 and other mediators of anti-infectious responses (CSF2, MMP1, MMP3, TLR2, S100 calcium-binding proteins A were markedly up-regulated in wild-type TG cells. This microbicidal signature was silent in CF-TG cells. The deficiency of genes associated with IFN-gamma response was accompanied by the defective membrane expression of IFNgammaR2 and altered response of CF-TG cells to exogenous IFN-gamma. In addition, CF-TG cells were unable to secrete CXCL10, IL-24 and S100A8/S100A9 in response to P. aeruginosa. The differences between wild-type TG and CF-TG cells were due to the cftr mutation since gene expression was similar in wild-type TG cells and CF-TG cells transfected with a plasmid containing a functional cftr gene. Finally, we reported an altered sphingolipid metabolism in CF-TG cells, which may account for their inflammatory signature. This first comprehensive analysis of gene expression in TG cells proposes a protective role of wild-type TG against airborne pathogens and reveals an original program in which anti-infectious response was deficient in TG cells with a cftr mutation. This defective response may explain why host response does not contribute to protection against P. aeruginosa in CF.

  10. Severe Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection and loss of sputum bacterial diversity in an adult patient with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Nick P; Flight, William G

    2016-08-01

    Achromobacter spp. are emerging pathogens in the lungs of patients with cystic fibrosis. We report the case of an adult patient with cystic fibrosis and chronic A. xylosoxidans infection who experienced rapid, progressive clinical deterioration. Metagenomic analysis of the sputum revealed that the airway microbiota was almost entirely dominated by A. xylosoxidans. We review the impact of this organism on lung function and the airway microbiome in cystic fibrosis, and discuss the potential for cross-infection between patients.

  11. Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes in Children: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Roy J

    2016-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes mellitus (CFRD) is the most common endocrine complication of cystic fibrosis (CF), affecting more than 50% of patients by the 4th decade of life. CFRD is often preceded by worsening pulmonary status and nutritional decline. Treatment of CFRD is associated with improvements in body weight and pulmonary function and a reduction in pulmonary exacerbations. Because of the clinical significance of CFRD, diabetes screening with an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) is recommended annually for all patients with CF starting at age 10 years. The OGTT detects CFRD with greater sensitivity than random glucose or hemoglobin A1c testing. The first-line treatment for CFRD is insulin. The use of other treatments such as oral medications remains under study. [Pediatr Ann. 2016;45(9):e321-e326.].

  12. LUNG TRANSPLANTATION IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANNES, GPM; VANDERBIJ, W

    1995-01-01

    Worldwide more than 600 heart-lung or lung transplantations have been performed in patients with cystic fibrosis and end-stage respiratory disease. At the University Hospital in Groningen 10 patients with cystic fibrosis underwent bilateral sequential lung transplantation until April 1994. The 1-yea

  13. Model of mucociliary clearance in cystic fibrosis lungs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Kurbatova (Polina); N. Bessonov; V. Volpert; H.A.W.M. Tiddens (Harm); C. Cornu (Catherine); P. Nony; D. Caudri (Daan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractMucus clearance is a primary innate defense mechanism in the human airways. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. CF is characterized by dehydration of airway surface

  14. Microbiological surveillance in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Gualdi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infections in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF, are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Prevention, diagnosis and therapy in cystic fibrosis, lead to the necessary collaboration between clinical and laboratory to identify effective strategies and appropriate solutions to address the problems inherent isolation micro-organisms, antibiotic strategies, overcoming of bacterial resistance and other problems management of these patients. The task of the microbiology laboratory and research in quickly and accurately, the agents responsible for these infectious processes, in order to isolate them from material, identify and determine their sensitivity antibiotics. A microbiological surveillance on 34 patients (13 males and 21 females with CF and related to the “Support Services Provincial Trento for the treatment of cystic fibrosis “in the period July 2005 - August 2008, was carried out. 180 Gram positive and 278 of Gram negative bacteria as well as 235 fungi wre collected. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently organism found in patients with CF with an incidence of 23% on 156 strains isolated, Pseudomonas aeruginosa was collected 19% of all microorganisms isolated corresponding to 131 strains, Candida albicans is the yeast often isolated with a frequency 22% equal to 149 isolates, Aspergillus fumigatus was isolated at a rate of 8%. From the data we collected and processed has been noted that the local epidemiology of CF patients reflects as reported in the scientific literature and national international consulting, both as a type microorganisms that frequency also isolated compared to age groups. Considering the score of Bartlett as discriminating respiratory fitness of the material, it has been observed that only 32 samples over 327 total (10% would materials insignificant. It follows therefore that the time of sample collection, followed by personnel (physiotherapists dedicated to CF patients, represents a crucial step

  15. Fat absorption in cystic fibrosis mice is impeded by defective lipolysis and post-lipolytic events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijvelds, MJC; Bronsveld, [No Value; Havinga, R; Sinaasappel, M; de Jonge, HR; Verkade, HJ

    2005-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is frequently associated with progressive loss of exocrine pancreas function, leading to incomplete digestion and absorption of dietary fat. Supplementing patients with pancreatic lipase reduces fat excretion, but it does not completely correct fat malabsorption, indicating that

  16. Reproductive defects in patients of both sexes with cystic fibrosis: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, T W; Flux, M; Rennert, O M

    1985-01-01

    Current knowledge of reproductive duct function in both male and female cystic fibrosis patients is reviewed. Almost all male patients are sterile because of azoospermia. The mechanistic basis of the obstructive defect leading to pre- and post-natal destruction of selected portions of the sperm-conducting network remains unknown. Female cystic fibrosis patients are fertile. Pulmonary status appears to be the most important factor in determining pregnancy outcome. In contrast to earlier concerns about the normality of breast milk, breast milk composition of cystic fibrosis mothers is normal, and they can successfully breast feed their infants.

  17. Airway clearance therapy in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisi, Giovanna; Chetta, Alfredo

    2009-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening inherited disease affecting Caucasian people. In CF, the major feature of lung disease is the retention of mucus due to impaired clearance of abnormally viscous airway secretions. Airway clearance techniques (ACTs) may significantly improve mucociliary clearance and gas exchange, thereby being of clinical benefit in reducing pulmonary complications in CF patients. ACTs include conventional chest physiotherapy, active cycle of breathing techniques, autogenic drainage, positive expiratory pressure and high-frequency chest compression. In order to suit the needs of patients, families and care-givers, ACTs need to be individually and continuously adapted.

  18. [Cystic fibrosis: centers and care networks organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon, G

    2012-05-01

    More than 20 years after the gene discovery, without specific treatment, the observed improvement of the cystic fibrosis prognosis appears due to management's organization as well as early diagnosis (neonatal screening) or progress in symptomatic treatment. The CF Centers (CRCM) official recognition was a necessary step before generalization of routine neonatal screening (October, 2002). Actually French CF management relies on three levels of organization: CF centers, regional care networks and French CF Society, in close relationship with patients association (Vaincre la Mucoviscidose). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. [Measurement of pulmonary inflammation in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayon, M; Chiron, R; Abely, M

    2008-06-01

    Lung inflammation is a pivotal phenomenon in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis. Inflammation can be measured and quantified within a research perspective, as well as in daily clinical practice. In this review paper, the "Inflammation Task Force" of the "Société Française de Mucoviscidose" has reviewed the literature regarding the various techniques currently available (bronchoalveolar lavage, sputum analysis, nasal wash and brushing, exhaled breath condensates, carbon monoxide and nitric oxide, and systemic measurements (plasma and urine)). The interpretation of all these determinations in children and adults is also discussed.

  20. Mycobacterium abscessus and Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Pierre-Audigier, Catherine; Offredo, Catherine; Guillemot, Didier; Halley, Sophie; Akoua-Koffi, Chantal; Vincent, Véronique; Sivadon-Tardy, Valérie; Ferroni, Agnès; Berche, Patrick; Scheinmann, Pierre; Lenoir, Gérard; Gaillard, Jean-Louis

    2003-01-01

    We prospectively studied 298 patients with cystic fibrosis (mean age 11.3 years; range 2 months to 32 years; sex ratio, 0.47) for nontuberculous mycobacteria in respiratory samples from January 1, 1996, to December 31, 1999. Mycobacterium abscessus was by far the most prevalent nontuberculous mycobacterium: 15 patients (6 male, 9 female; mean age 11.9 years; range 2.5–22 years) had at least one positive sample for this microorganism (versus 6 patients positive for M. avium complex), including...

  1. Normal bone mineral density in cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hardin, D.; R. Arumugam; Seilheimer, D.; Leblanc, A.; Ellis, K.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Osteoporosis has been reported as a complication of cystic fibrosis (CF).
AIMS—To measure bone mineral density (BMD) in non-acutely ill adults and bone mineral content (BMC) in children with CF.
METHODS—We analysed data from 28 adults and 13 children with CF. Corticosteroid use was minimal for the year prior to study in both groups. Dual x ray absorptiometry was used to measure total body and regional bone mineral density in adults. In children, whole body BMC was...

  2. Vitamin K supplementation for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannath, Vanitha A; Thaker, Vidhu; Chang, Anne B; Price, Amy I

    2017-08-22

    Cystic fibrosis is a genetic disorder which can lead to multiorgan dysfunction. Malabsorption of fat and fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, K) may occur and can cause subclinical deficiencies of some of these vitamins. Vitamin K is known to play an important role in both blood coagulation and bone formation. Supplementation with vitamin K appears to be one way of addressing the deficiency, but there is very limited agreement on the appropriate dose and frequency of use of these supplements. This is an updated version of the review. To assess the effects of vitamin K supplementation in people with cystic fibrosis and to determine the optimal dose and route of administration of vitamin K for both routine and therapeutic use. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Most recent search: 30 January 2017. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials of all preparations of vitamin K used as a supplement compared to either no supplementation (or placebo) at any dose or route and for any duration, in children or adults diagnosed with cystic fibrosis (by sweat test or genetic testing). Two authors independently screened papers, extracted trial details and assessed their risk of bias. Two trials (total of 32 participants) each lasting one month were included in the review and were assessed as having a moderate risk of bias. One was a dose-ranging parallel group trial in children (aged 8 to 18 years); and the other (with an older cohort) had a cross-over design comparing supplements to no treatment, but no separate data were reported for the first intervention period. Neither of the trials addressed any of the primary outcomes (coagulation, bone formation and quality of life). Both trials reported the restoration of serum vitamin K and undercarboxylated osteocalcin

  3. CYSTIC FIBROSIS: MICROBIOLOGY AND HOST RESPONSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemanick, Edith T.

    2016-01-01

    THE EARLIEST DESCRIPTIONS OF LUNG DISEASE IN PEOPLE WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS (CF) DEMONSTRATED THE INVOLVEMENT OF THREE INTERACTING PATHOPHYSIOLOGICAL ELEMENTS IN CF AIRWAYS: MUCUS OBSTRUCTION, INFLAMMATION, AND INFECTION. OVER THE PAST 7 DECADES, OUR UNDERSTANDING OF CF RESPIRATORY MICROBIOLOGY AND INFLAMMATION HAS EVOLVED WITH THE INTRODUCTION OF NEW TREATMENTS, WITH INCREASED LONGEVITY, AND WITH INCREASINGLY SOPHISTICATED LABORATORY TECHNIQUES. IN THIS CHAPTER, WE WILL REVIEW THE CURRENT STATE OF UNDERSTANDING OF THE ROLES OF INFECTION AND INFLAMMATION AND THEIR ROLES IN DRIVING LUNG DISEASE. WE WILL ALSO DISCUSS HOW THIS CONSTANTLY EVOLVING INFORMATION IS USED TO INFORM CURRENT THERAPEUTIC STRATEGIES, MEASURES AND PREDICTORS OF DISEASE SEVERITY, AND RESEARCH PRIORITIES. PMID:27469179

  4. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, H.K.; Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. OBJECTIVES......: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH STRATEGY: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search May 2008) and PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic...... fibrosis (last search May 2008). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic fibrosis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The authors independently selected trials...

  5. New insights into cystic fibrosis-related diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Katie L; Moran, Antoinette

    2013-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) is the most common complication of cystic fibrosis. It is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in adults and children. Adolescents with cystic fibrosis have a much higher prevalence of diabetes than any other similar age population. Glucose abnormalities that precede diabetes are even more common, especially in children younger than 10 years. The pathophysiology of glucose metabolic abnormalities is poorly understood, but insulin insufficiency is clearly the main component. Findings from animal studies have provided insight into the pathophysiology of CFRD, and imply that carbohydrate metabolic abnormalities might begin at much younger ages than was previously thought in patients with cystic fibrosis, and might be related to the basic cystic fibrosis chloride channel defect. In this Review we explore present knowledge of CFRD in children and adolescents, and new data that indicate that the pathophysiology of CFRD begins in very young patients.

  6. Asthma and COPD in cystic fibrosis intron-8 5T carriers. A population-based study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Lange, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    Carriers of cystic fibrosis intron-8 5T alleles with high exon-9 skipping could have increased annual lung function decline and increased risk for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).......Carriers of cystic fibrosis intron-8 5T alleles with high exon-9 skipping could have increased annual lung function decline and increased risk for asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)....

  7. Cystic Fibrosis in the African Diaspora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Cheryl; Pepper, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Identifying mutations that cause cystic fibrosis (CF) is important for making an early, unambiguous diagnosis, which, in turn, is linked to better health and a greater life expectancy. In patients of African descent, a molecular diagnosis is often confounded by the fact that the majority of investigations undertaken to identify causative mutations have been conducted on European populations, and CF-causing mutations tend to be population specific. We undertook a survey of published data with the aim of identifying causative CF mutations in patients of African descent in the Americas. We found that 1,584 chromosomes had been tested in only 6 countries, of which 876 alleles (55.3%) still remained unidentified. There were 59 mutations identified. Of those, 41 have been shown to cause CF, 17 have no associated functional studies, and one (R117H) is of varying clinical consequence. The most common mutations identified in the patients of African descent were: ΔF508 (29.4% identified in the United States, Colombia, Brazil, and Venezuela); 3120 + 1G>A (8.4% identified in Brazil, the United States, and Colombia); G85E (3.8% identified in Brazil); 1811 + 1.6kbA>G (3.7% identified in Colombia); and 1342 - 1G>C (3.1% identified in the United States). The majority of the mutations identified (81.4%) have been described in just one country. Our findings indicate that there is a need to fully characterize the spectrum of CF mutations in the diaspora to improve diagnostic accuracy for these patients and facilitate treatment.

  8. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy in the UK and Elsewhere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesenbach, Uta; Pytel, Kamila M; Alton, Eric W F W

    2015-05-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene was identified in 1989. This opened the door for the development of cystic fibrosis (CF) gene therapy, which has been actively pursued for the last 20 years. Although 26 clinical trials involving approximately 450 patients have been carried out, the vast majority of these trials were short and included small numbers of patients; they were not designed to assess clinical benefit, but to establish safety and proof-of-concept for gene transfer using molecular end points such as the detection of recombinant mRNA or correction of the ion transport defect. The only currently published trial designed and powered to assess clinical efficacy (defined as improvement in lung function) administered AAV2-CFTR to the lungs of patients with CF. The U.K. Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium completed, in the autumn of 2014, the first nonviral gene therapy trial designed to answer whether repeated nonviral gene transfer (12 doses over 12 months) can lead to clinical benefit. The demonstration that the molecular defect in CFTR can be corrected with small-molecule drugs, and the success of gene therapy in other monogenic diseases, is boosting interest in CF gene therapy. Developments are discussed here.

  9. [Cystic fibrosis: new treatments targeting the CFTR protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajac, I; Sermet-Gaudelus, I

    2013-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an autosomal recessive genetic disease due to mutations in the (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) CFTR gene. The CFTR protein is a chloride channel expressed at the surface of several epithelial cells. Defective function of the CFTR protein leads to a severe disease in which lung disease is the leading cause of death. Current treatments are symptomatic. Nevertheless, with specialist and holistic care in dedicated cystic fibrosis centres, the median survival has improved. But the average age of death remains 29 years. Innovative molecules aiming to correct the CFTR protein itself are under development. These will be personalised treatments depending on the genotype or the type of CFTR dysfunction. The first molecule, ivacaftor, has just been approved in Europe and the USA. Adults and children treated with ivacaftor in clinical trials had a 10% improvement in FEV1 that was maintained for more than a year. Although at present ivacaftor is approved for only a small percentage of patients, the therapeutic strategy of correcting CFTR protein has been proved a valid approach. Other molecules targeting other defects in the CFTR protein are under evaluation.

  10. Microbial Evaluation of Sputum of Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Reza Akbarizadeh

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystic fibrosis disease is a common hereditary autosomal recessive disorder in which loss of lung function caused by infectious factors is the most common cause of the patient’s death. In this study, the microbes in sputum of the cystic fibrosis patients have been studied during relapses of the disease.Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 129 sputum cultures of the patients with cystic fibrosis, who were hospitalized in Mofid Children's Hospital in Tehran during 2004-2009 with relapse of disease, were studied. The data were collected through census method and based on the information concerning (gender, age, type of germ and the appropriate antibiotics.Results: The most common germs in the sputum of these patients are Pseudomonas aeruginosa (approximately 36% and then respectively klebsiella (13%, Staphylococcus aureus (9.3% and Streptococcus pneumoniae (5.4%. Examination of antibiogram showed that these germs give an appropriate response to antibiotics such as Ceftazidime, vancomycin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin, azithromycin, rifampin and largely to aminoglycosides.Conclusion: Considering the more prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, combined therapy with ceftazidime or imipenem along with aminoglycoside and further treatment with oral azithromycin are recommended. More studies in this area are necessary.

  11. Personalized medicine for cystic fibrosis: establishing human model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Hongmei; Brazauskas, Karissa; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-10-01

    With over 1,500 identifiable mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene that result in distinct functional and phenotypical abnormalities, it is virtually impossible to perform randomized clinical trials to identify the best therapeutics for all patients. Therefore, a personalized medicine approach is essential. The only way to realistically accomplish this is through the development of improved in vitro human model systems. The lack of a readily available and infinite supply of human CFTR-expressing airway epithelial cells is a key bottleneck. We propose that a concerted two-pronged approach is necessary for patient-specific cystic fibrosis research to continue to prosper and realize its potential: (1) more effective culture and differentiation conditions for growing primary human airway and nasal epithelial cells and (2) the development of collective protocols for efficiently differentiating disease- and patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) into pure populations of adult epithelial cells. Ultimately, we need a personalized human model system for cystic fibrosis with the capacity for uncomplicated bankability, widespread availability, and universal applicability for patient-specific disease modeling, novel pharmacotherapy investigation and screening, and readily executable genetic modification. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. CFTR and Ca2+ signaling in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice eAntigny

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Among the diverse physiological functions exerted by calcium signaling in living cells, its role in the regulation of protein biogenesis and trafficking remains incompletely understood. In cystic fibrosis (CF disease the most common CFTR (Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator mutation, F508del-CFTR generates a misprocessed protein that is abnormally retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER compartment, rapidly degraded by the ubiquitine/proteasome pathway and hence absent at the plasma membrane of CF epithelial cells. Recent studies have demonstrated that intracellular calcium signals consequent to activation of apical G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs by different agonists are increased in CF airway epithelia. Moreover, the regulation of various intracellular calcium storage compartments, such as ER is also abnormal in CF cells. Although the molecular mechanism to explain this increase remains puzzling in epithelial cells, the F508del-CFTR mutation is proposed to be the origin of abnormal Ca2+ influx linking the calcium signaling to CFTR pathobiology. This article reviews the relationships between CFTR and calcium signaling in the context of the genetic disease cystic fibrosis.

  13. Anaesthesia for parturients with severe cystic fibrosis: a case series.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Deighan, M

    2014-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects 1 in 1600-2500 live births and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. It primarily involves the respiratory, gastrointestinal and reproductive tracts, with impaired clearance of, and obstruction by, increasingly viscous secretions. Severe respiratory disease, diabetes and gastro-oesophageal reflux may result. Improvements in medical management and survival of cystic fibrosis patients means more are committing to pregnancies. Although guidance for anaesthesia in this patient group is available, management and outcome data associated with more severe cases are sparse. Patients with severe cystic fibrosis require multidisciplinary input and should be managed in a tertiary referral centre. Close monitoring of respiratory function and preoperative optimisation during pregnancy are mandatory. The risk of preterm labour and delivery is increased. Pregnancy and delivery can be managed successfully, even in patients with FEV1 <40% predicted. Neuraxial anaesthesia and analgesia should be the technique of choice for delivery. Postoperative care should be carried out in a critical care setting with the provision of postoperative ventilation if necessary.

  14. Cystic fibrosis mortality trends in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellis, Gil; Cazes, Marie-Hélène; Parant, Alain; Gaimard, Maryse; Travers, Cécile; Le Roux, Evelyne; Ravilly, Sophie; Rault, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    In 1992 France set up a national cystic fibrosis observatory (Observatoire national de la mucoviscidose, ONM) to monitor the state of health of patients on an annual basis. Using the ONM data, this study estimates the main indicators for life expectancy and assesses the total number of cystic fibrosis patients. The data for the years 1994 to 2003 are divided into 3-year periods. Life tables are drawn up for these periods, from which mean and median lengths of life are determined. Using the most recent life table, the number of births in 2003 and the incidence of the disease, the total population of patients can be estimated, assuming a stationary population. In 2001-2003, life expectancy at birth of patients registered with the ONM was 39.1 years and median length of life was 36.4 years. These results, substantially better than those of 1994-1996, are linked to improved conditions of patient inclusion in the ONM database, to improvements in their healthcare, but also to the limitations of the life tables. Based on the 2003 data, the total theoretical number of patients is 6490, and coverage by the ONM database is thus 63.2%. These provisional results demonstrate the need to convert the ONM observatory into a registry providing exhaustive coverage of all patients.

  15. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required.

  16. Targeting ion channels in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, Marcus A; Galietta, Luis J V

    2015-09-01

    Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene cause a characteristic defect in epithelial ion transport that plays a central role in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF). Hence, pharmacological correction of this ion transport defect by targeting of mutant CFTR, or alternative ion channels that may compensate for CFTR dysfunction, has long been considered as an attractive approach to a causal therapy of this life-limiting disease. The recent introduction of the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor into the therapy of a subgroup of patients with specific CFTR mutations was a major milestone and enormous stimulus for seeking effective ion transport modulators for all patients with CF. In this review, we discuss recent breakthroughs and setbacks with CFTR modulators designed to rescue mutant CFTR including the common mutation F508del. Further, we examine the alternative chloride channels TMEM16A and SLC26A9, as well as the epithelial sodium channel ENaC as alternative targets in CF lung disease, which remains the major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with CF. Finally, we will focus on the hurdles that still need to be overcome to make effective ion transport modulation therapies available for all patients with CF irrespective of their CFTR genotype.

  17. Imaging the Abdominal Manifestations of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Gillespie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disease with a range of abdominal manifestations including those involving the liver, pancreas, and kidneys. Recent advances in management of the respiratory complications of the disease has led to a greater life expectancy in patients with CF. Subsequently, there is increasing focus on the impact of abdominal disease on quality of life and survival. Liver cirrhosis is the most important extrapulmonary cause of death in CF, yet significant challenges remain in the diagnosis of CF related liver disease. The capacity to predict those patients at risk of developing cirrhosis remains a significant challenge. We review representative abdominal imaging findings in patients with CF selected from the records of two academic health centres, with a view to increasing familiarity with the abdominal manifestations of the disease. We review their presentation and expected imaging findings, with a focus on the challenges facing diagnosis of the hepatic manifestations of the disease. An increased familiarity with these abdominal manifestations will facilitate timely diagnosis and management, which is paramount to further improving outcomes for patients with cystic fibrosis.

  18. [Vitamin E deficiency in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C; Polanco, I; Hernanz, A; Carrasco, S; Barea, I; Murga, M L; Arroba, M L; Codoceo, R

    1987-12-01

    Plasma vitamin E levels were measured by high performance liquid chromatography in 42 children with cystic fibrosis and were correlated with the following parameters: sex, age, time of follow-up, clinical evolution (Schwachman score), vitamin E/cholesterol and faecal fat excretion. All children in this study received oral alfa-tocoferol (50-100 mg daily) from the diagnosis. According to the vitamin E level patients were distributed in two groups. Group I: 27 patients (64.3%) with normal concentrations. Group II: 15 patients (35.7%) with decreases plasma levels but without clinical manifestations. Steatorrhea was present in all children except 4 patients from group I and one patient from group II. On the other hand, vitamin E/cholesterol was normal in 80% of patients with vitamin E deficiency (group II). We did not find any correlation between plasma vitamin E levels and the different clinical and biological parameters studied. Further studies should be carried out to throw more light on the mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of vitamin E deficiency in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  19. Global impact of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarida Redondo

    2016-09-01

    To understand variation in the aetiology, microbiology and burden of bronchiectasis and cystic fibrosis across different global healthcare systems.; Bronchiectasis is the term used to refer to dilatation of the bronchi that is usually permanent and is associated with a clinical syndrome of cough, sputum production and recurrent respiratory infections. It can be caused by a range of inherited and acquired disorders, or may be idiopathic in nature. The most well recognised inherited disorder in Western countries is cystic fibrosis (CF, an autosomal recessive condition that leads to progressive bronchiectasis, bacterial infection and premature mortality. Both bronchiectasis due to CF and bronchiectasis due to other conditions are placing an increasing burden on healthcare systems internationally. Treatments for CF are becoming more effective leading to more adult patients with complex healthcare needs. Bronchiectasis not due to CF is becoming increasingly recognised, particularly in the elderly population. Recognition is important and can lead to identification of the underlying cause, appropriate treatment and improved quality of life. The disease is highly diverse in its presentation, requiring all respiratory physicians to have knowledge of the different “bronchiectasis syndromes”. The most common aetiologies and presenting syndromes vary depending on geography, with nontuberculous mycobacterial disease predominating in some parts of North America, post-infectious and idiopathic disease predominating in Western Europe, and post-tuberculosis bronchiectasis dominating in South Asia and Eastern Europe. Ongoing global collaborative studies will greatly advance our understanding of the international impact of bronchiectasis and CF.

  20. Human Genome Project and cystic fibrosis--a symbiotic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstoi, L G; Smith, C L

    1999-11-01

    When Watson and Crick determined the structure of DNA in 1953, a biological revolution began. One result of this revolution is the Human Genome Project. The primary goal of this international project is to obtain the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome by the year 2005. Although molecular biologists and geneticists are most enthusiastic about the Human Genome Project, all areas of clinical medicine and fields of biology will be affected. Cystic fibrosis is the most common, inherited, lethal disease of white persons. In 1989, researchers located the cystic fibrosis gene on the long arm of chromosome 7 by a technique known as positional cloning. The most common mutation (a 3-base pair deletion) of the cystic fibrosis gene occurs in 70% of patients with cystic fibrosis. The knowledge gained from genetic research on cystic fibrosis will help researchers develop new therapies (e.g., gene) and improve standard therapies (e.g., pharmacologic) so that a patient's life span is increased and quality of life is improved. The purpose of this review is twofold. First, the article provides an overview of the Human Genome Project and its clinical significance in advancing interdisciplinary care for patients with cystic fibrosis. Second, the article includes a discussion of the genetic basis, pathophysiology, and management of cystic fibrosis.

  1. Effects of Pilates mat exercises on muscle strength and on pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Buarque Franco

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of Pilates mat exercises in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. METHODS: This was a clinical trial involving 19 CF patients recruited from either the CF Outpatient Clinic of the State University at Campinas Hospital de Clínicas or the Children's Institute of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas. All of the patients performed Pilates mat exercises for four months (one 60-min session per week. The variables studied (before and after the intervention were respiratory muscle strength, MIP, MEP, FVC, and FEV1. RESULTS: After the intervention, MIP was significantly higher in the male patients (p = 0.017, as were MIP and MEP in the female patients (p = 0.005 and p = 0.007, respectively. There were no significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention values of FVC or FEV1, neither in the sample as a whole nor among the patients of either gender. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that Pilates mat exercises have beneficial effects on respiratory muscle strength in CF patients.

  2. Effects of Pilates mat exercises on muscle strength and on pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Caroline Buarque; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando; Morcillo, André Moreno; Zambon, Mariana Porto; Almeida, Marina Buarque; Rozov, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To analyze the effects of Pilates mat exercises in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). METHODS: This was a clinical trial involving 19 CF patients recruited from either the CF Outpatient Clinic of the State University at Campinas Hospital de Clínicas or the Children's Institute of the University of São Paulo School of Medicine Hospital das Clínicas. All of the patients performed Pilates mat exercises for four months (one 60-min session per week). The variables studied (before and after the intervention) were respiratory muscle strength, MIP, MEP, FVC, and FEV1. RESULTS: After the intervention, MIP was significantly higher in the male patients (p = 0.017), as were MIP and MEP in the female patients (p = 0.005 and p = 0.007, respectively). There were no significant differences between the pre- and post-intervention values of FVC or FEV1, neither in the sample as a whole nor among the patients of either gender. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that Pilates mat exercises have beneficial effects on respiratory muscle strength in CF patients. PMID:25410840

  3. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt BZ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Béla Z Schmidt,1 Jérémy B Haaf,2 Teresinha Leal,2 Sabrina Noel,2 1Stem Cell Biology and Embryology, Department of Development and Regeneration, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, 2Louvain Center for Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium Abstract: Mutations of the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis (CF, the most common recessive monogenic disease worldwide. These mutations alter the synthesis, processing, function, or half-life of CFTR, the main chloride channel expressed in the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the airway, intestine, pancreas, and reproductive tract. Lung disease is the most critical manifestation of CF. It is characterized by airway obstruction, infection, and inflammation that lead to fatal tissue destruction. In spite of great advances in early and multidisciplinary medical care, and in our understanding of the pathophysiology, CF is still considerably reducing the life expectancy of patients. This review highlights the current development in pharmacological modulators of CFTR, which aim at rescuing the expression and/or function of mutated CFTR. While only Kalydeco® and Orkambi® are currently available to patients, many other families of CFTR modulators are undergoing preclinical and clinical investigations. Drug repositioning and personalized medicine are particularly detailed in this review as they represent the most promising strategies for restoring CFTR function in CF. Keywords: high-throughput screening, drug repositioning, personalized medicine, precision medicine, potentiators, correctors

  4. European Cystic Fibrosis Society Standards of Care: Quality Management in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Martin; Bertrand, Dominique Pougheon; Bignamini, Elisabetta; Corey, Mary; Dembski, Birgit; Goss, Christopher H; Pressler, Tanja; Rault, Gilles; Viviani, Laura; Elborn, J Stuart; Castellani, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Since the earliest days of cystic fibrosis (CF) treatment, patient data have been recorded and reviewed in order to identify the factors that lead to more favourable outcomes. Large data repositories, such as the US Cystic Fibrosis Registry, which was established in the 1960s, enabled successful treatments and patient outcomes to be recognized and improvement programmes to be implemented in specialist CF centres. Over the past decades, the greater volumes of data becoming available through Centre databases and patient registries led to the possibility of making comparisons between different therapies, approaches to care and indeed data recording. The quality of care for individuals with CF has become a focus at several levels: patient, centre, regional, national and international. This paper reviews the quality management and improvement issues at each of these levels with particular reference to indicators of health, the role of CF Centres, regional networks, national health policy, and international data registration and comparisons. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Autogenic Drainage in Children With Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corten, Lieselotte; Morrow, Brenda M

    2017-04-01

    Airway clearance is an essential part of the management of cystic fibrosis (CF) as it facilitates clearance of viscous pulmonary secretions. This review aimed to determine the effect of autogenic drainage (AD) and assisted autogenic drainage (AAD) compared with no, sham, or other types of airway clearance in children with CF. Two pediatric randomized cross-over trials were identified on the use of AD in children with CF; no studies were available on the use of AAD. In one study AD had a positive influence on the Huang score, and is preferred over postural drainage in this population. We could not determine the efficacy of AD and AAD in children with CF. We recommend the implementation of pediatric-specific randomized controlled trials with adequate sample sizes, appropriate clinical outcome measures, and analysis of adverse effects.

  6. Scoliosis in cystic fibrosis - an appraisal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paling, M.R.; Spasovsky-Chernick, M.

    1982-03-01

    An unusually high prevalence (10%) of scoliosis is described in a series of 151 patients aged four years and older with cystic fibrosis. The scolioses were of the late onset (juvenile and adolescent) type, being typically thoracic with the curve convex to the right, although there was no significant preference for either sex. No direct relationship was found between the spinal curvature and the severity or distribution of the lung disease, although the worse scolioses tended to occur in patients with relatively severe pulmonary involvement. There was no evidence of metabolic bone disease as a predisposing cause. Some indication of a familial tendency towards scoliosis was apparent, and a genetic or constitutional basis is postulated with an unknown precipitating factor.

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Ciofu, Oana; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The persistence of chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is due to biofilm-growing mucoid (alginate-producing) strains. A biofilm is a structured consortium of bacteria, embedded in a self-produced polymer matrix consisting of polysaccharide, protein...... and DNA. In CF lungs, the polysaccharide alginate is the major part of the P. aeruginosa biofilm matrix. Bacterial biofilms cause chronic infections because they show increased tolerance to antibiotics and resist phagocytosis, as well as other components of the innate and the adaptive immune system....... As a consequence, a pronounced antibody response develops, leading to immune complex-mediated chronic inflammation, dominated by polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The chronic inflammation is the major cause of the lung tissue damage in CF. Biofilm growth in CF lungs is associated with an increased frequency...

  8. Diabetes mellitus in childhood cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rauf, F

    2012-02-03

    Since 1984, five patients in the cystic fibrosis (CF) clinic at Cork Regional Hospital have developed diabetes mellitus (DM) and were treated with Insulin. None had received systemic corticosteroids but two had high calorie naso-gastric feeding regimes. Two died from lung disease. A fifteen year old boy developed bilateral cataracts. In nine other paediatric CF clinics in the Republic of Ireland (total: 420 patients), three patients have DM, two receiving Insulin. Abnormal glucose tolerance is becoming more common in CF as patients survive longer. The possible role of corticosteroid treatment and intensive carbohydrate feeding regimes in development of glucose intolerance must be considered. DM in CF differs from the usual childhood DM. Regular screening and early Insulin supplementation may be beneficial.

  9. Attitudes of potential providers toward preconceptual cystic fibrosis carrier screening.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppelaars, F.; Ader, H.J.; Cornel, M.C.; Henneman, L.; Hermens, R.P.M.G.; Wal, G. van der; Kate, L. ten

    2004-01-01

    To determine the attitudes of potential providers (general practitioners and Community Health Service workers) towards preconceptual cystic fibrosis (CF) carrier screening and to determine which factors are associated with a positive attitude. A survey was conducted among 200 general practitioners (

  10. Complementary and alternative medicine use in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangioppo, Sandra; Kalaci, Odion; Radhakrishnan, Arun; Fleischer, Erin; Itterman, Jennifer; Lyttle, Brian; Price, April; Radhakrishnan, Dhenuka

    2016-11-01

    To estimate the overall prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine use among children with cystic fibrosis, determine specific modalities used, predictors of use and subjective helpfulness or harm from individual modalities. Of 53 children attending the cystic fibrosis clinic in London, Ontario (100% recruitment), 79% had used complementary and alternative medicine. The most commonly used modalities were air purifiers, humidifiers, probiotics, and omega-3 fatty acids. Family complementary and alternative medicine use was the only independent predictor of overall use. The majority of patients perceived benefit from specific modalities for cystic fibrosis symptoms. Given the high frequency and number of modalities used and lack of patient and disease characteristics predicting use, we recommend that health care providers should routinely ask about complementary and alternative medicine among all pediatric cystic fibrosis patients and assist patients in understanding the potential benefits and risks to make informed decisions about its use. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. growth and nutrition in south african children with cystic fibrosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening genetic disease among Caucasian ... effective pancreatic enzyme replacement formulations has made it possible to ... That this deficit was nutritional in origin is supported by the similar ...

  12. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  13. Abdominal manifestations of cystic fibrosis in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudry, Gulraiz; Navarro, Oscar M.; Levine, Daniel S.; Oudjhane, Kamaldine [University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2006-03-15

    Pulmonary complications remain the main cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis, but the presenting symptoms in children are often related to gastrointestinal or pancreaticobiliary disease. Furthermore, abdominal manifestations are now seen throughout childhood, from infancy to adolescence. The child might present in the neonatal period with meconium ileus or its attendant complications. The older child might present with distal intestinal obstruction syndrome or colonic stricture secondary to high doses of pancreatic enzyme replacement. Less-common gastrointestinal manifestations include intussusception, duodenitis and fecal impaction of the appendix. Most children also show evidence of exocrine pancreatic deficiency. Radiologically, the combination of fat deposition and pancreatic fibrosis leads to varying CT and MR appearances. A higher than normal incidence of pancreatic cysts and calcification is also seen. Decreased transport of water and chloride also increases the viscosity of bile, with subsequent obstruction of the biliary ductules. If extensive, this can progress to obstructive cirrhosis, portal hypertension and esophageal varices. Diffuse fatty infiltration, hypersplenism and gallstones are also commonly seen in these patients. We present a pictorial review of the radiological appearance of these abdominal manifestations. The conditions are dealt with individually, together with typical appearances in various imaging modalities. (orig.)

  14. New insights into cystic fibrosis: molecular switches that regulate CFTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggino, William B; Stanton, Bruce A

    2006-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a Cl(-)-selective ion channel, is a prototypic member of the ATP-binding cassette transporter superfamily that is expressed in several organs. In these organs, CFTR assembles into large, dynamic macromolecular complexes that contain signalling molecules, kinases, transport proteins, PDZ-domain-containing proteins, myosin motors, Rab GTPases, and SNAREs. Understanding how these complexes regulate the intracellular trafficking and activity of CFTR provides a unique insight into the aetiology of cystic fibrosis and other diseases.

  15. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed.......Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....

  16. Increased PIVKA-II concentrations in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    OpenAIRE

    de Montalembert, M; Lenoir, G; Saint-Raymond, A.; Rey, J; Lefrère, J J

    1992-01-01

    Serum vitamin K concentrations and prothrombin induced by absence of vitamin K (PIVK-II) concentrations were assayed in 43 patients with cystic fibrosis. Twenty nine showed a normal PIVKA-II and vitamin K concentrations; 14 showed an increased PIVKA-II concentration, in one of whom serum vitamin K was decreased. Although their vitamin K concentrations were normal, some patients with cystic fibrosis still had an increased PIVKA-II. There was a significant correlation between PIVKA-II concentra...

  17. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Gates; L. Warnock; Dr. C.P. van der Schans

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. OBJECTIVES: To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic

  18. PECULIARITIES OF ENT-DAMAGE IN CHILDREN WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Martynova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional approach to cystic fibrosis patients treatment doesn’t involve upper respiratory tract assessment, though abnormal changes — consequences of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductivity regulator gene mutation- do affect nasal and paranasal mucosa to the same extent. Approximately half of cystic fibrosis patients suffer from chronic rhinosinusitis and/or nasal polyposis that worsens the clinical course of already severe disease. Chronic hyperplasia in paranasal cavities can be quite extensive, recurrent and can lead to destruction of osseous walls of the cavity and of nasal septum. Thus increasing the amount of hospital admissions and and their duration. Low awareness of ENT-specialists working in polyclinics and in hospitals of ENT-pathology in cystic fibrosis patients leads to belated diagnostics, excessive manipulations, ineffective treatment, including surgery. All these lays grounds to implication of the early screening diagnostic program and development of proper treatment methods of ENT-complications of cystic fibrosis — therapeutic as well as surgical, with strict specification of indications and contraindications. Key words: cystic fibrosis, chronic rhino sinusitis, nasal polyposis. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 49–53.

  19. Recent concepts on cystic fibrosis Fibrosis quística

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Parra

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available

    Up to date concepts on Cystic Fibrosis are summarized in this article; the following are included: Incidence, pathogenesis, prenatal and postnatal diagnosis, treatment, genetics and future perspectives. Criteria are given for suspecting the disease and emphasis is made on the fact that its frequency in Colombia may be higher than usually thought.

    En este artículo se actualizan algunos conceptos sobre la Fibrosis Quística y su manejo; se incluyen los siguientes: incidencia, patogénesis, bases para el diagnóstico incluyendo el prenatal, tratamiento, aspectos gen éticos y perspectivas futuras. Se hace énfasis en la necesidad de pensar más a menudo en la enfermedad pues su frecuencia en Colombia puede ser mayor de lo que usualmente se acepta.

  20. Role of Interaction and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase B in Regulation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Lee A; Kerbiriou, Mathieu; Taylor, Christopher J; Cozza, Giorgio; Lascu, Ioan; Postel, Edith H; Cassidy, Diane; Trouvé, Pascal; Mehta, Anil; Robson, Louise; Muimo, Richmond

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) and ATP-regulated chloride channel. Here, we demonstrate that nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B, NM23-H2) forms a functional complex with CFTR. In airway epithelia forskolin/IBMX significantly increases NDPK-B co-localisation with CFTR whereas PKA inhibitors attenuate complex formation. Furthermore, an NDPK-B derived peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent) disrupts the NDPK-B/CFTR complex in vitro (19-mers comprising amino acids 36-54 from NDPK-B or NDPK-A). Overlay (Far-Western) and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) analysis both demonstrate that NDPK-B binds CFTR within its first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, CFTR amino acids 351-727). Analysis of chloride currents reflective of CFTR or outwardly rectifying chloride channels (ORCC, DIDS-sensitive) showed that the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent) reduced both chloride conductances. Additionally, the NDPK-B (but not NDPK-A) peptide also attenuated acetylcholine-induced intestinal short circuit currents. In silico analysis of the NBD1/NDPK-B complex reveals an extended interaction surface between the two proteins. This binding zone is also target of the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide, thus confirming its capability to disrupt NDPK-B/CFTR complex. We propose that NDPK-B forms part of the complex that controls chloride currents in epithelia.

  1. Role of Interaction and Nucleoside Diphosphate Kinase B in Regulation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Function by cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee A Borthwick

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis results from mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA and ATP-regulated chloride channel. Here, we demonstrate that nucleoside diphosphate kinase B (NDPK-B, NM23-H2 forms a functional complex with CFTR. In airway epithelia forskolin/IBMX significantly increases NDPK-B co-localisation with CFTR whereas PKA inhibitors attenuate complex formation. Furthermore, an NDPK-B derived peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent disrupts the NDPK-B/CFTR complex in vitro (19-mers comprising amino acids 36-54 from NDPK-B or NDPK-A. Overlay (Far-Western and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR analysis both demonstrate that NDPK-B binds CFTR within its first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1, CFTR amino acids 351-727. Analysis of chloride currents reflective of CFTR or outwardly rectifying chloride channels (ORCC, DIDS-sensitive showed that the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide (but not its NDPK-A equivalent reduced both chloride conductances. Additionally, the NDPK-B (but not NDPK-A peptide also attenuated acetylcholine-induced intestinal short circuit currents. In silico analysis of the NBD1/NDPK-B complex reveals an extended interaction surface between the two proteins. This binding zone is also target of the 19-mer NDPK-B peptide, thus confirming its capability to disrupt NDPK-B/CFTR complex. We propose that NDPK-B forms part of the complex that controls chloride currents in epithelia.

  2. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF, but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened a panel of 19 experts to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM-PD in individuals with CF. PICO (population, intervention, comparison, outcome) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations, which were then modified to achieve consensus and subsequently circulated for public consultation within the USA and European CF communities. We have thus generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  3. The lower airway microbiota in early cystic fibrosis lung disease: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frayman, Katherine B; Armstrong, David S; Carzino, Rosemary; Ferkol, Thomas W; Grimwood, Keith; Storch, Gregory A; Teo, Shu Mei; Wylie, Kristine M; Ranganathan, Sarath C

    2017-03-09

    In infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, lower airway infection and inflammation are associated with adverse respiratory outcomes. However, the role of lower airway microbiota in the pathogenesis of early cystic fibrosis lung disease remains uncertain. To assess the development of the lower airway microbiota over time in infants and young children with cystic fibrosis, and to explore its association with airway inflammation and pulmonary function at age 6 years. Serial, semi-annual bronchoscopies and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) procedures were performed in infants newly diagnosed with cystic fibrosis following newborn screening. Quantitative microbiological cultures and inflammatory marker (interleukin 8 and neutrophil elastase) measurements were undertaken contemporaneously. 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing was conducted on stored BAL samples. Spirometry results recorded at 6 years of age were extracted from medical records. Ninety-five BAL samples provided 16S ribosomal RNA gene data. These were collected from 48 subjects aged 1.2-78.3 months, including longitudinal samples from 27 subjects and 13 before age 6 months. The lower airway microbiota varied, but diversity decreased with advancing age. Detection of recognised cystic fibrosis bacterial pathogens was associated with reduced microbial diversity and greater lower airway inflammation. There was no association between the lower airway microbiota and pulmonary function at age 6 years. In infants with cystic fibrosis, the lower airway microbiota is dynamic. Dominance of the microbiota by recognised cystic fibrosis bacterial pathogens is associated with increased lower airway inflammation, however early microbial diversity is not associated with pulmonary function at 6 years of age. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Cystic Fibrosis Heterozygote Resistance to Cholera Toxin in the Cystic Fibrosis Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Sherif E.; Brigman, Kristen N.; Koller, Beverly H.; Boucher, Richard C.; Stutts, M. Jackson

    1994-10-01

    The effect of the number of cystic fibrosis (CF) alleles on cholera toxin (CT)-induced intestinal secretion was examined in the CF mouse model. CF mice that expressed no CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein did not secrete fluid in response to CT. Heterozygotes expressed 50 percent of the normal amount of CFTR protein in the intestinal epithelium and secreted 50 percent of the normal fluid and chloride ion in response to CT. This correlation between CFTR protein and CT-induced chloride ion and fluid secretion suggests that CF heterozygotes might possess a selective advantage of resistance to cholera.

  5. Vaccines for preventing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Helle Krogh; Gøtzsche, Peter C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed. This is a......BACKGROUND: Chronic pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis results in progressive lung damage. Once colonisation of the lungs with Pseudomonas aeruginosa occurs, it is almost impossible to eradicate. Vaccines, aimed at reducing infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, have been developed....... This is an update of a previously published review. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effectiveness of vaccination against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register using the terms vaccines AND pseudomonas (last search 30...... March 2015). We previously searched PubMed using the terms vaccin* AND cystic fibrosis (last search 30 May 2013). SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials (published or unpublished) comparing Pseudomonas aeruginosa vaccines (oral, parenteral or intranasal) with control vaccines or no intervention in cystic...

  6. Decoding F508del Misfolding in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Robert Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The functional deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, a plasma membrane chloride channel, leads to the development of cystic fibrosis. The deletion of a phenylalanine at residue 508 (F508del is the most common cause of CFTR misfolding leading to the disease. The F508del misfolding originates in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1, which induces a global conformational change in CFTR through NBD1’s interactions with other domains. Such global misfolding produces a mutant chloride channel that is impaired in exocytic trafficking, peripheral stability, and channel gating. The nature and atomic details of F508del misfolding have been subject to extensive research during the past decade. Current data support a central role for NBD1 in F508del misfolding and rescue. Many cis-acting NBD1 second-site mutations rescue F508del misfolding in the context of full-length CFTR. While some of these mutations appear to specifically counteract the F508del-induced misfolding, others release certain inherent conformational constraints of the human wild-type CFTR. Several small-molecule correctors were recently found to act on key interdomain interfaces of F508del CFTR. Potential rational approaches have been proposed in an attempt to develop highly effective small molecule modulators that improve the cell surface functional expression of F508del CFTR.

  7. A millennial view of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodge, John A

    2015-01-01

    Although only identified as a distinct disease in the 1930s, it was soon apparent that Cystic Fibrosis (CF) had been present, but unrecognised, in European populations for many years - perhaps even centuries [1] . Within a decade of the early descriptions, the autosomal recessive nature of this genetic disease had been clarified, and its clinical features had been expanded. Secondary nutritional deficiencies complicated the underlying condition: the first clear description of CF as "a new disease", which included a speculation about its genetic basis (because there were 2 pairs of sibs in the case series) was published as Vitamin A deficiency in children [2]. The diagnosis was most often made at autopsy. When it was suspected in life, the diagnostic tests used included duodenal intubation to obtain fluid which would show impaired tryptic digestion of the coating of X-Ray film in CF children, and measurement of vitamin A in the blood. Some nutritional improvement could be expected with simple, rather inefficient pancreatic enzyme preparations, but it was not until mid-century that antibiotics began to treat pulmonary infections effectively. As a young doctor in the 1950s I soon became aware that the median age at death for affected children was about one year, and most died before reaching school age. .

  8. The genus Prevotella in cystic fibrosis airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Tyler R; Sibley, Christopher D; Parkins, Michael D; Rabin, Harvey R; Surette, Michael G

    2010-08-01

    Airway disease resulting from chronic bacterial colonization and consequential inflammation is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). Although traditionally considered to be due to only a few pathogens, recent re-examination of CF airway microbiology has revealed that polymicrobial communities that include many obligate anaerobes colonize lower airways. The purpose of this study was to examine Prevotella species in CF airways by quantitative culture and phenotypic characterization. Expectorated sputum was transferred to an anaerobic environment immediately following collection and examined by quantitative microbiology using a variety of culture media. Isolates were identified as facultative or obligate anaerobes and the later group was identified by 16S rRNA sequencing. Prevotella spp. represented the majority of isolates. Twelve different species of Prevotella were recovered from 16 patients with three species representing 65% of isolates. Multiple Prevotella species were often isolated from the same sputum sample. These isolates were biochemically characterized using Rapid ID 32A kits (BioMérieux), and for their ability to produce autoinducer-2 and beta-lactamases. Considerable phenotypic variability between isolates of the same species was observed. The quantity and composition of Prevotella species within a patients' airway microbiome varied over time. Our results suggest that the diversity and dynamics of Prevotella in CF airways may contribute to airway disease.

  9. Infertility Management in Men with Cystic Fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nikita Rawal; Rafit Gazvani; Roger Mountford

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multisystem autosomal recessive disorder. CF has a reported incidence of 1 in 2 500 and a carrier frequency of 1 in 25. It is caused by mutations in a gene located on the long arm of chromosome 7. With almost 50% of patients with CF now in the adult population, and a very high interest in future parenting (78% of men wanting children), there is an increasing need to be proactive in terms of advice about reproductive health. Discussion on reproduction should start in early adolescence and be regularly updated by medical staff. The recent advances in reproductive techniques have allowed the development of sperm aspiration coupled with intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Spermatozoa can be retrieved from either the epididymis or the testes. Genetic counselling is strongly recommended for both partners when congenital bilateral aplasia of vas deferens (CBA VD) is diagnosed as there is the inevitability of transmitting a mutated CFTR gene, and an increased risk of producing an affected child with serious long-term implications. Most treatment centres, with the introduction of ICSI, routinely screen all males with azoospermia caused by obstruction (other than that caused by vasectomy) or germ cell failure. Protocols usually involve screening for 28 relatively common CFTR mutations. Further advanced testing may be necessary up to a final detection level of approximately 98.5%. Before considering any assisted reproduction treatment, it is pertinent that CF patients receive medical and psychological counselling.

  10. Dermatoglyphic Patterns in Cystic Fibrosis Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezzati, Atefeh; Batoei, Fereshteh; Jafari, Seyed-Ali; Kiyani, Mohammad-Ali; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Ahanchian, Hamid; Tehranian, Shahrzad; Kianifar, Hamid-Reza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: It is believed that fingerprints and palm patterns may represent genetically determined congenital abnormalities in Cystic Fibrosis (CF). The main idea of this paper was to determine differences of fingerprints and palm patterns in CF and normal children. Methods: Forty-six CF children (27 males, 19 females) and 341 (113 males, 228 females) healthy individuals were recruited for this study. Fingerprint patterns, Total ridge count (TRC) of each finger, a-b ridge count, and atd angles of all participants were recorded. Asymmetry of the right and left hand for each value was determined and dissimilarity in fingerprint patterns between homologous fingers was compared using Chi-square analysis, Mann-Whitney U test and Fisher's exact test. Findings: There were significant differences in the mean TRC of the right digit IV (P=0.009), left digit III (P=0.02), left digit IV (P=0.03), and left digit V (P=0.03). Furthermore, we found significant differences in right atd angel (P=0.001), left atd angel (P=0.002), right a-b ridge (P=0.007) and left a-b ridge (P=0.001). In contrast, we found no significant differences in atd angle asymmetry, a-b ridge count asymmetry and pattern dissimilarity score between both groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Dermatoglyphic characteristics could be used as a supplementary diagnostic method in CF children. PMID:25793070

  11. Colonic Disorders in Adult Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh Chaun

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available By 1996, the median survival of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF in North America had increased to 31 years. With the markedly improved life expectancy, many CF patients are now adults. There is an associated increased risk of certain colonic disorders, and the emergence of other previously unrecognized disorders, in adult CF patients. The distal intestinal obstruction syndrome (DIOS, which is more common in older patients, is a frequent cause of abdominal pain. Intussusception may complicate DIOS; other differential diagnoses include appendiceal disease, volvolus, Crohn's disease, fibrosing colonopathy and colonic carcinoma. The diagnosis of acute appendicitis, although uncommon in patients with CF, is often delayed, and appendiceal abscess is a frequent complication. The prevalence of Crohn's disease in CF has been shown to be 17 times that of the general population. Right-sided microscopic colitis is a recently recognized entity in CF of uncertain clinical significance. Fibrosing colonopathy has been confined mostly to children with CF, attributed to the use of high strength pancreatic enzyme supplements, but it has been reported in three adults. Nine cases of carcinoma of the large intestine have been reported worldwide, associated with an apparent excess risk of digestive tract cancers in CF. Despite high carrier rates of Clostridium difficile in patients with CF, pseudomembranous colitis is distinctly rare, but severe cases complicated by toxic megacolon have been reported. In these patients, watery diarrhea is often absent. Adult CF patients with refractory or unexplained intestinal symptoms merit thorough investigations.

  12. The cystic fibrosis lower airways microbial metagenome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran Losada, Patricia; Chouvarine, Philippe; Dorda, Marie; Hedtfeld, Silke; Mielke, Samira; Schulz, Angela; Wiehlmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    Chronic airway infections determine most morbidity in people with cystic fibrosis (CF). Herein, we present unbiased quantitative data about the frequency and abundance of DNA viruses, archaea, bacteria, moulds and fungi in CF lower airways. Induced sputa were collected on several occasions from children, adolescents and adults with CF. Deep sputum metagenome sequencing identified, on average, approximately 10 DNA viruses or fungi and several hundred bacterial taxa. The metagenome of a CF patient was typically found to be made up of an individual signature of multiple, lowly abundant species superimposed by few disease-associated pathogens, such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, as major components. The host-associated signatures ranged from inconspicuous polymicrobial communities in healthy subjects to low-complexity microbiomes dominated by the typical CF pathogens in patients with advanced lung disease. The DNA virus community in CF lungs mainly consisted of phages and occasionally of human pathogens, such as adeno- and herpesviruses. The S. aureus and P. aeruginosa populations were composed of one major and numerous minor clone types. The rare clones constitute a low copy genetic resource that could rapidly expand as a response to habitat alterations, such as antimicrobial chemotherapy or invasion of novel microbes. PMID:27730195

  13. Lentiviral Vectors and Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, Stefano; Conese, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a chronic autosomic recessive syndrome, caused by mutations in the CF Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) gene, a chloride channel expressed on the apical side of the airway epithelial cells. The lack of CFTR activity brings a dysregulated exchange of ions and water through the airway epithelium, one of the main aspects of CF lung disease pathophysiology. Lentiviral (LV) vectors, of the Retroviridae family, show interesting properties for CF gene therapy, since they integrate into the host genome and allow long-lasting gene expression. Proof-of-principle that LV vectors can transduce the airway epithelium and correct the basic electrophysiological defect in CF mice has been given. Initial data also demonstrate that LV vectors can be repeatedly administered to the lung and do not give rise to a gross inflammatory process, although they can elicit a T cell-mediated response to the transgene. Future studies will clarify the efficacy and safety profile of LV vectors in new complex animal models with CF, such as ferrets and pigs. PMID:21994643

  14. Active cycle of breathing technique for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckoy, Naomi A; Wilson, Lisa M; Saldanha, Ian J; Odelola, Olaide A; Robinson, Karen A

    2016-07-05

    People with cystic fibrosis experience chronic airway infections as a result of mucus build up within the lungs. Repeated infections often cause lung damage and disease. Airway clearance therapies aim to improve mucus clearance, increase sputum production, and improve airway function. The active cycle of breathing technique (also known as ACBT) is an airway clearance method that uses a cycle of techniques to loosen airway secretions including breathing control, thoracic expansion exercises, and the forced expiration technique. This is an update of a previously published review. To compare the clinical effectiveness of the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also searched the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of last search: 25 April 2016. Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled clinical studies, including cross-over studies, comparing the active cycle of breathing technique with other airway clearance therapies in cystic fibrosis. Two review authors independently screened each article, abstracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each study. Our search identified 62 studies, of which 19 (440 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Five randomised controlled studies (192 participants) were included in the meta-analysis; three were of cross-over design. The 14 remaining studies were cross-over studies with inadequate reports for complete assessment. The study size ranged from seven to 65 participants. The age of the participants ranged from six to 63 years (mean age 22.33 years). In 13 studies, follow up lasted a single day. However, there were two long-term randomised controlled studies with follow up of one to three years. Most of the studies did not report on key quality items, and therefore, have an unclear risk of

  15. Targeting a genetic defect: cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator modulators in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Derichs

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by genetic mutations that affect the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR protein. These mutations can impact the synthesis and transfer of the CFTR protein to the apical membrane of epithelial cells, as well as influencing the gating or conductance of chloride and bicarbonate ions through the channel. CFTR dysfunction results in ionic imbalance of epithelial secretions in several organ systems, such as the pancreas, gastrointestinal tract, liver and the respiratory system. Since discovery of the CFTR gene in 1989, research has focussed on targeting the underlying genetic defect to identify a disease-modifying treatment for CF. Investigated management strategies have included gene therapy and the development of small molecules that target CFTR mutations, known as CFTR modulators. CFTR modulators are typically identified by high-throughput screening assays, followed by preclinical validation using cell culture systems. Recently, one such modulator, the CFTR potentiator ivacaftor, was approved as an oral therapy for CF patients with the G551D-CFTR mutation. The clinical development of ivacaftor not only represents a breakthrough in CF care but also serves as a noteworthy example of personalised medicine.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Aspergillus collected from cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Raquel; Ferreira, Jose A G; Moss, Richard B; Valente, Joana; Veríssimo, Cristina; Carolino, Elisabete; Clemons, Karl V; Everson, Cassie; Banaei, Niaz; Penner, John; Stevens, David A

    2015-07-01

    Aspergillus respiratory infection is a common complication in cystic fibrosis (CF) and is associated with loss of pulmonary function and allergic disease. Fifty-three Aspergillus isolates recovered from CF patients were identified to species by Internal Transcribed Spacer Region (ITS), β-tubulin, and calmodulin sequencing. Three species complexes (Terrei, Nigri, and Fumigati) were found. Identification to species level gave a single Aspergillus terreus sensu stricto, one Aspergillus niger sensu stricto and 51 Aspergillus fumigatus sensu stricto isolates. No cryptic species were found. To our knowledge, this is the first prospective study of Aspergillus species in CF using molecular methods. The paucity of non-A. fumigatus and of cryptic species of A. fumigatus suggests a special association of A. fumigatus sensu stricto with CF airways, indicating it likely displays unique characteristics making it suitable for chronic residence in that milieu. These findings could refine an epidemiologic and therapeutic approach geared to this pathogen. Copyright © 2014 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Lung transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: the Israeli experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prais, Dario; Raviv, Yael; Shitrit, David; Yellin, Alon; Sahar, Gideon; Bendayan, Danielle; Yahav, Yaacov; Efrati, Ori; Reichart, Nira; Blau, Hannah; Bakal, Ilana; Buchman, Gila; Saute, Milton; Vidne, Bernardo; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2006-06-01

    Lung transplantation is a well-established therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease in cystic fibrosis. Although it confers a clear survival advantage, outcome differs among centers according to local experience, patient selection, transplantation procedure, and postoperative care. To evaluate the national Israeli experience with lung transplantation in patients with CF. We reviewed the medical charts of all CF patients who underwent lung transplantation between January 1996 and June 2005 at the two Israeli centers that perform this procedure. Eighteen transplantations were performed in 17 patients. Mean patient age at transplantation was 25.3 +/- 9.1 years, and mean duration of follow-up in survivors (n=14) was 37.2 months (range 1-113 months). The actuarial survival rate was 88% at 1 year and 74% at 5 years. Pulmonary function, expressed as percent of predicted normal forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, improved from 22.4 +/- 8.1% to 76 +/- 16.8% at one year after transplantation. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome was diagnosed in 5 patients (29%), of whom 2 died and 2 are currently candidates for retransplantation. Median time to onset of BOS was 34.2 months (range 17-64 months). In Israel, the early and intermediate-term results of lung transplantation for cystic fibrosis are encouraging. BOS remains a major complication that threatens long-term outcome.

  18. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR in the kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORALES MARCELO M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR is a Cl- channel. Mutations of this transporter lead to a defect of chloride secretion by epithelial cells causing the Cystic Fibrosis disease (CF. In spite of the high expression of CFTR in the kidney, patients with CF do not show major renal dysfunction, but it is known that both the urinary excretion of drugs and the renal capacity to concentrate and dilute urine is deficient. CFTR mRNA is expressed in all nephron segments and its protein is involved with chloride secretion in the distal tubule, and the principal cells of the cortical (CCD and medullary (IMCD collecting ducts. Several studies have demonstrated that CFTR does not only transport Cl- but also secretes ATP and, thus, controls other conductances such as Na+ (ENaC and K+ (ROMK2 channels, especially in CCD. In the polycystic kidney the secretion of chloride through CFTR contributes to the cyst enlargement. This review is focused on the role of CFTR in the kidney and the implications of extracellular volume regulators, such as hormones, on its function and expression.

  19. Practical Guidelines: Lung Transplantation in Patients with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Hirche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are no European recommendations on issues specifically related to lung transplantation (LTX in cystic fibrosis (CF. The main goal of this paper is to provide CF care team members with clinically relevant CF-specific information on all aspects of LTX, highlighting areas of consensus and controversy throughout Europe. Bilateral lung transplantation has been shown to be an important therapeutic option for end-stage CF pulmonary disease. Transplant function and patient survival after transplantation are better than in most other indications for this procedure. Attention though has to be paid to pretransplant morbidity, time for referral, evaluation, indication, and contraindication in children and in adults. This review makes extensive use of specific evidence in the field of lung transplantation in CF patients and addresses all issues of practical importance. The requirements of pre-, peri-, and postoperative management are discussed in detail including bridging to transplant and postoperative complications, immune suppression, chronic allograft dysfunction, infection, and malignancies being the most important. Among the contributors to this guiding information are 19 members of the ECORN-CF project and other experts. The document is endorsed by the European Cystic Fibrosis Society and sponsored by the Christiane Herzog Foundation.

  20. Two Qatari siblings with cystic fibrosis and apparent mineralocorticoid excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Zahraldin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF and apparent mineralocorticoid excess (AME syndrome are both autosomal recessive disorders that result from mutations of specific identified genes for each condition. CF is caused by defects in the Cystic fibrosis trans membrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene which encodes for a protein that functions as a chloride channel and regulates the flow of other ions across the apical surface of epithelial cells. AME is due to the deficiency of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 enzyme (11βHSD2, which is responsible for the peripheral inactivation of cortisol to cortisone. Cortisol excess stimulates the mineralocoritoid receptors (MR resulting in intense sodium retention, hypokalemia and hypertension. We report on a consanguineous Arab family, in which two sibs inherited both CF and AME. Gene testing for AME revealed previously unreported mutation in the 11βHSD2 gene. This report draws attention to the importance of recognizing the possibility of two recessive disorders in the same child in complex consanguineous families. Moreover, it provides a unique opportunity to highlight the implications of the coexistence of two genetic disorders on patient care and genetic counseling of the family.

  1. A Metagenomic approach to characterize temperate bacteriophage populations from cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Adnan Tariq

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa, normally a soil commensal, is an important opportunistic pathogen in Cystic Fibrosis (CF and non-Cystic Fibrosis Bronchiectasis (nCFBR. Persistent infection correlates with accelerated decline in lung function and early mortality. The horizontal transfer of DNA by temperate bacteriophages can add gene function and selective advantages to their bacterial host within the constrained environment of the lower lung. In this study, we chemically induce temperate bacteriophages from clonal cultures of Pa and identify their mixed viral communities employing metagenomic approaches. We compared 92 temperate phage metagenomes stratified from these clinical backgrounds (47 CF and 45 nCFBR Pa isolates using MG-RAST and GeneWise2. KEGG analysis shows the complexity of temperate phage accessory gene carriage increases with duration and severity of the disease. Furthermore we identify the presence of Ig-like motifs within phage structural genes linked to bacterial adhesion and carbohydrate binding including Big_2, He_Pig and Fn3. This study provides the first clinical support to the proposed bacteriophage adherence to mucus (BAM model and the evolution of phages interacting at these mucosal surfaces over time.

  2. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis: executive summary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Floto, R.A.; Olivier, K.N.; Saiman, L.; Daley, C.L.; Herrmann, J.L.; Nick, J.A.; Noone, P.G.; Bilton, D.; Corris, P.; Gibson, R.L.; Hempstead, S.E.; Koetz, K.; Sabadosa, K.A.; Sermet-Gaudelus, I.; Smyth, A.R.; Ingen, J. van; Wallace, R.J.; Winthrop, K.L.; Marshall, B.C.; Haworth, C.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease, such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease (PD) caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the

  3. ∆F508 CFTR interactome remodelling promotes rescue of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, Sandra; Bamberger, Casimir; Calzolari, Diego; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Lavallée-Adam, Mathieu; Balch, William E; Yates, John R

    2015-12-24

    Deletion of phenylalanine 508 of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (∆F508 CFTR) is the major cause of cystic fibrosis, one of the most common inherited childhood diseases. The mutated CFTR anion channel is not fully glycosylated and shows minimal activity in bronchial epithelial cells of patients with cystic fibrosis. Low temperature or inhibition of histone deacetylases can partly rescue ∆F508 CFTR cellular processing defects and function. A favourable change of ∆F508 CFTR protein-protein interactions was proposed as a mechanism of rescue; however, CFTR interactome dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases are unknown. Here we report the first comprehensive analysis of the CFTR and ∆F508 CFTR interactome and its dynamics during temperature shift and inhibition of histone deacetylases. By using a novel deep proteomic analysis method, we identify 638 individual high-confidence CFTR interactors and discover a ∆F508 deletion-specific interactome, which is extensively remodelled upon rescue. Detailed analysis of the interactome remodelling identifies key novel interactors, whose loss promote ∆F508 CFTR channel function in primary cystic fibrosis epithelia or which are critical for CFTR biogenesis. Our results demonstrate that global remodelling of ∆F508 CFTR interactions is crucial for rescue, and provide comprehensive insight into the molecular disease mechanisms of cystic fibrosis caused by deletion of F508.

  4. Growing up with cystic fibrosis: achievement, life satisfaction, and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besier, Tanja; Goldbeck, Lutz

    2012-12-01

    Significant improvements in survival of patients with cystic fibrosis lead clinicians and researchers to focus on how patients can be enabled to lead as normal a life as possible throughout their entire life span. The study aimed at analyzing the vocational and social achievement, life satisfaction, and psychological well-being of adolescents and adults with cystic fibrosis. During a routine clinic visit, 670 German patients with cystic fibrosis (12-64 years, M = 23.1) completed questionnaires on their vocational and social achievement, life satisfaction, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Cross-sectional analyses were applied across four age-groups (12-20 years, 21-30 years, 31-40 years, and 41 years and older). Most patients with cystic fibrosis reached employment and independence from their parents during adulthood. Life satisfaction was negatively associated with age, with the largest difference between the second and third life decade. A strong negative association of anxious and depressive symptoms with life satisfaction was found. Lung function was significantly positively related to life satisfaction, even though this association was less pronounced. Most patients with cystic fibrosis achieve ordinary social and vocational development into adulthood. A favorable mental health status seems more important than pulmonary function to maintain a good satisfaction with life.

  5. A comparison of respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living and physical fitness in patients with cystic fibrosis and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, Hulya; Yatar, İlker; Calik-Kutukcu, Ebru; Aribas, Zeynep; Saglam, Melda; Vardar-Yagli, Naciye; Savci, Sema; Inal-Ince, Deniz; Ozcelik, Ugur; Kiper, Nural

    2015-01-01

    There are limited reports that compare muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, activities of daily living (ADL) and parameters of physical fitness of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with healthy peers in the literature. The purpose of this study was to assess and compare respiratory and peripheral muscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL and physical fitness in patients with CF and healthy subjects. Nineteen patients with CF (mean forced expiratory volume in one second-FEV1: 86.56±18.36%) and 20 healthy subjects were included in this study. Respiratory (maximal inspiratory pressure-MIP and maximal expiratory pressure-MEP) and peripheral muscle strength (quadriceps, shoulder abductors and hand grip strength) were evaluated. Functional exercise capacity was determined with 6min walk test (6MWT). ADL was assessed with Glittre ADL test and physical fitness was assessed with Munich fitness test (MFT). There were not any statistically significant difference in MIP, %MIP, MEP and %MEP values between two groups (p>0.05). %Peripheral muscle strength (% quadriceps and shoulder abductors strength), 6MWT distance and %6MWT distance were significantly lower in patients with CF than those of healthy subjects (pmuscle strength, functional exercise capacity, ADL performance and speed, coordination, endurance and power components of physical fitness are adversely affected in mild-severe patients with CF compared to healthy peers. Evaluations must be done in comprehensive manner in patients with CF with all stages.

  6. Sex Disparities in Effects of Cystic Fibrosis-Related Diabetes on Clinical Outcomes: A Matched Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J Miller

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD is an increasingly prevalent comorbidity factor for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. CFRD has been associated with an accelerated decline in clinical parameters and an increased mortality rate.

  7. DeltaF508 heterozygosity in cystic fibrosis and susceptibility to asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, A; Lange, P;

    1998-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a recessive disorder mainly characterised by lung disease. We tested the hypothesis that individuals heterozygous for the common cystic fibrosis deltaF508 mutation are at risk of obstructive pulmonary disease....

  8. Chest physiotherapy compared to no chest physiotherapy for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnock, Louise; Gates, Alison

    2015-12-21

    Chest physiotherapy is widely used in people with cystic fibrosis in order to clear mucus from the airways. This is an updated version of previously published reviews. To determine the effectiveness and acceptability of chest physiotherapy compared to no treatment or spontaneous cough alone to improve mucus clearance in cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register which comprises references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant journals and abstract books of conference proceedings.Date of the most recent search of the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register: 02 June 2015. Randomised or quasi-randomised clinical studies in which a form of chest physiotherapy (airway clearance technique) were taken for consideration in people with cystic fibrosis compared with either no physiotherapy treatment or spontaneous cough alone. Both authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the included studies. There was heterogeneity in the published outcomes, with variable reporting which meant pooling of the data for meta-analysis was not possible. The searches identified 157 studies, of which eight cross-over studies (data from 96 participants) met the inclusion criteria. There were differences between studies in the way that interventions were delivered, with several of the intervention groups combining more than one treatment modality. One included study looked at autogenic drainage, six considered conventional chest physiotherapy, three considered oscillating positive expiratory pressure, seven considered positive expiratory pressure and one considered high pressure positive expiratory pressure. Of the eight studies, six were single-treatment studies and in two, the treatment intervention was performed over two consecutive days (once daily in one, twice daily in the other). This enormous heterogeneity in the treatment

  9. Limited premature termination codon suppression by read-through agents in cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zomer-van Ommen, D D; Vijftigschild, L A W; Kruisselbrink, E; Vonk, A M; Dekkers, J F; Janssens, H M; de Winter-de Groot, K M; van der Ent, C K; Beekman, J M

    2016-03-01

    Premature termination codon read-through drugs offer opportunities for treatment of multiple rare genetic diseases including cystic fibrosis. We here analyzed the read-through efficacy of PTC124 and G418 using human cystic fibrosis intestinal organoids (E60X/4015delATTT, E60X/F508del, G542X/F508del, R1162X/F508del, W1282X/F508del and F508del/F508del). G418-mediated read-through induced only limited CFTR function, but functional restoration of CFTR by PTC124 could not be confirmed. These studies suggest that better read-through agents are needed for robust treatment of nonsense mutations in cystic fibrosis.

  10. Failure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Conduct ATP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M. M.; Quinton, P. M.; Haws, C.; Wine, J. J.; Grygorczyk, R.; Tabcharani, J. A.; Hanrahan, J. W.; Gunderson, K. L.; Kopito, R. R.

    1996-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is chloride ion channel regulated by protein kinase A and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). Loss of CFTR-mediated chloride ion conductance from the apical plasma membrane of epithelial cells is a primary physiological lesion in cystic fibrosis. CFTR has also been suggested to function as an ATP channel, although the size of the ATP anion is much larger than the estimated size of the CFTR pore. ATP was not conducted through CFTR in intact organs, polarized human lung cell lines, stably transfected mammalian cell lines, or planar lipid bilayers reconstituted with CFTR protein. These findings suggest that ATP permeation through the CFTR is unlikely to contribute to the normal function of CFTR or to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis.

  11. Draft genome sequences of four Achromobacter ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Elenice RA; Rocha, Géssica A; Ferreira, Alex G; Leão, Robson S; Albano, Rodolpho M; Marques, Elizabeth A

    2016-01-01

    Achromobacter species are being increasingly isolated from the respiratory tract of cystic fibrosis patients. Recent reports indicate that Achromobacter ruhlandii is a potential human pathogen in cystic fibrosis-related infections. Here we report the draft genome of four A. ruhlandii strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients in Brazil. This report describes A. ruhlandii as a potential opportunistic pathogen in cystic fibrosis and provides a framework to for additional enquires into potential virulence factors and resistance mechanisms within this species. PMID:27812598

  12. Phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by polymorphonuclear leukocytes and monocytes: effect of cystic fibrosis serum.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, M J; Demko, C A; Wood, R.E.; Sherman, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    It has been shown previously that serum from chronically infected patients with cystic fibrosis inhibits the phagocytosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by both normal and cystic fibrosis alveolar macrophages. In the present study, the ability of peripheral monocytes and polymorphonuclear leukocytes from normal volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients to phagocytize P. aeruginosa was shown not to be inhibited in the presence of serum from cystic fibrosis patients.

  13. Vaccine strategies against bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, V; Gaillard, J-L; Herrmann, J-L

    2016-02-01

    A large number of cystic fibrosis pathogens such as bacteria of the Burkholderia cepacia complex, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, or Mycobacterium abscessus are associated with complex therapeutic problems due to their inherent resistance to antibiotics. No vaccine is currently available against those pathogens. Vaccines are therefore crucial to combat these multidrug-resistant bacteria in specific clinical situations including cystic fibrosis. Various strategies may be considered to develop these vaccines. Similar virulence factors are expressed during the infection with various pathogens; they could thus be used as antigen to assess cross-protection. Many clinical trials are currently being conducted to try and develop a prophylactic treatment for patients presenting with cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis: 10-years experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadj Fredj, S; Ouali, F; Siala, H; Bibi, A; Othmani, R; Dakhlaoui, B; Zouari, F; Messaoud, T

    2015-06-01

    We present in this study our 10years experience in prenatal diagnosis of cystic fibrosis performed in the Tunisian population. Based on family history, 40 Tunisian couples were selected for prenatal diagnosis. Fetal DNA was isolated from amniotic fluid collected by transabdominal amniocentesis or from chronic villi by transcervical chorionic villus sampling. The genetic analysis for cystic fibrosis mutations was performed by denaturant gradient gel electrophoresis and denaturing high-pressure liquid phase chromatography. We performed microsatellites analysis by capillary electrophoresis in order to verify the absence of maternal cell contamination. Thirteen fetuses were affected, 21 were heterozygous carriers and 15 were healthy with two normal alleles of CFTR gene. Ten couples opted for therapeutic abortion. The microsatellites genotyping showed the absence of contamination of the fetal DNA by maternal DNA in 93.75%. Our diagnostic strategy provides rapid and reliable prenatal diagnosis at risk families of cystic fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypertonic saline in treatment of pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Reeves, Emer P

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of lung disease in cystic fibrosis is characterised by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. Mucus within the cystic fibrosis airways is enriched in negatively charged matrices composed of DNA released from colonizing bacteria or inflammatory cells, as well as F-actin and elevated concentrations of anionic glycosaminoglycans. Therapies acting against airway mucus in cystic fibrosis include aerosolized hypertonic saline. It has been shown that hypertonic saline possesses mucolytic properties and aids mucociliary clearance by restoring the liquid layer lining the airways. However, recent clinical and bench-top studies are beginning to broaden our view on the beneficial effects of hypertonic saline, which now extend to include anti-infective as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to discuss the described therapeutic benefits of hypertonic saline and specifically to identify novel models of hypertonic saline action independent of airway hydration.

  16. An atypical presentation of cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Deepak

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The presentation of cystic fibrosis is dependant upon which organs are affected. Common presentations include chronic respiratory infections and malabsorption. Patients with atypical disease tend to present late in childhood or as adults. Eye manifestations of cystic fibrosis are less well known. Case presentation A 14-year-old Caucasian boy presented with tiredness and difficulty seeing at night, over a period of 6 months. Good vision was only described in bright conditions. There was no history of jaundice, steatorrhea or diarrhoea. Conclusion This is the first reported case of newly diagnosed cystic fibrosis-related liver disease in a teenage boy, whose presenting symptom was night blindness secondary to vitamin A deficiency.

  17. Hypertonic Saline in Treatment of Pulmonary Disease in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer P. Reeves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of lung disease in cystic fibrosis is characterised by decreased airway surface liquid volume and subsequent failure of normal mucociliary clearance. Mucus within the cystic fibrosis airways is enriched in negatively charged matrices composed of DNA released from colonizing bacteria or inflammatory cells, as well as F-actin and elevated concentrations of anionic glycosaminoglycans. Therapies acting against airway mucus in cystic fibrosis include aerosolized hypertonic saline. It has been shown that hypertonic saline possesses mucolytic properties and aids mucociliary clearance by restoring the liquid layer lining the airways. However, recent clinical and bench-top studies are beginning to broaden our view on the beneficial effects of hypertonic saline, which now extend to include anti-infective as well as anti-inflammatory properties. This review aims to discuss the described therapeutic benefits of hypertonic saline and specifically to identify novel models of hypertonic saline action independent of airway hydration.

  18. Atomic Structure of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhe; Chen, Jue

    2016-12-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an anion channel evolved from the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family. In this study, we determined the structure of zebrafish CFTR in the absence of ATP by electron cryo-microscopy to 3.7 Å resolution. Human and zebrafish CFTR share 55% sequence identity, and 42 of the 46 cystic-fibrosis-causing missense mutational sites are identical. In CFTR, we observe a large anion conduction pathway lined by numerous positively charged residues. A single gate near the extracellular surface closes the channel. The regulatory domain, dephosphorylated, is located in the intracellular opening between the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs), preventing NBD dimerization and channel opening. The structure also reveals why many cystic-fibrosis-causing mutations would lead to defects either in folding, ion conduction, or gating and suggests new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Mechanisms of the noxious inflammatory cycle in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freyssinet Jean-Marie

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Multiple evidences indicate that inflammation is an event occurring prior to infection in patients with cystic fibrosis. The self-perpetuating inflammatory cycle may play a pathogenic part in this disease. The role of the NF-κB pathway in enhanced production of inflammatory mediators is well documented. The pathophysiologic mechanisms through which the intrinsic inflammatory response develops remain unclear. The unfolded mutated protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTRΔF508, accounting for this pathology, is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, induces a stress, and modifies calcium homeostasis. Furthermore, CFTR is implicated in the transport of glutathione, the major antioxidant element in cells. CFTR mutations can alter redox homeostasis and induce an oxidative stress. The disturbance of the redox balance may evoke NF-κB activation and, in addition, promote apoptosis. In this review, we examine the hypotheses of the integrated pathogenic processes leading to the intrinsic inflammatory response in cystic fibrosis.

  20. Comparative evaluation of chest radiography, low-field MRI, the Shwachman-Kulczycki score and pulmonary function tests in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anjorin, Angela; Vogl, Thomas J. [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Schmidt, Helga [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Posselt, Hans-Georg [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Clinics for Pediatry, Gastroenterology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Smaczny, Christina [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Medical Clinics I, Pneumology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ackermann, Hanns [Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Department of Biomathematics, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Deimling, Michael [Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen (Germany); Abolmaali, Nasreddin [Dresden University of Technology, OncoRay - Molecular Imaging, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Dresden (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parenchymal lung damage in patients suffering from cystic fibrosis (CF) can be equivalently quantified by the Chrispin-Norman (CN) scores determined with low-field magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and conventional chest radiography (CXR). Both scores were correlated with pulmonary function tests (PFT) and the Shwachman-Kulczycki method (SKM). To evaluate the comparability of MRI and CXR for different states of the disease, all scores were applied to patients divided into three age groups. Seventy-three CF patients (mean SKM score: 62 {+-} 8) with a median age (range) of 14 years (7-32) were included. The mean CN scores determined with both imaging methods were comparable (CXR: 12.1 {+-} 4.7; MRI: 12.0 {+-} 4.5) and showed high correlation (P < 0.05, R = 0.97). Only weak correlations were found between imaging, PFT, and SKM. Both imaging modalities revealed significantly more severe disease expression with age, while PFT and SKM failed to detect early signs of disease. We conclude that imaging of the lung in CF patients is capable of detecting subtle and early parenchymal destruction before lung function or clinical scoring is affected. Furthermore, low-field MRI revealed high consistency with chest radiography and may be used for a thorough follow-up while avoiding radiation exposure. (orig.)

  1. 21 CFR 866.5910 - Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Quality control material for cystic fibrosis... Test Systems § 866.5910 Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. (a) Identification. Quality control material for cystic fibrosis nucleic acid assays. A quality control material...

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  3. Dysregulated proinflammatory and fibrogenic phenotype of fibroblasts in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Huaux

    Full Text Available Morbi-mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF is mainly related to chronic lung infection and inflammation, uncontrolled tissue rearrangements and fibrosis, and yet the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. We evaluated inflammatory and fibrosis responses to bleomycin in F508del homozygous and wild-type mice, and phenotype of fibroblasts explanted from mouse lungs and skin. The effect of vardenafil, a cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor, was tested in vivo and in culture. Responses of proinflammatory and fibrotic markers to bleomycin were enhanced in lungs and skin of CF mice and were prevented by treatment with vardenafil. Purified lung and skin fibroblasts from CF mice proliferated and differentiated into myofibroblasts more prominently and displayed higher sensitivity to growth factors than those recovered from wild-type littermates. Under inflammatory stimulation, mRNA and protein expression of proinflammatory mediators were higher in CF than in wild-type fibroblasts, in which CFTR expression reached similar levels to those observed in other non-epithelial cells, such as macrophages. Increased proinflammatory responses in CF fibroblasts were reduced by half with submicromolar concentrations of vardenafil. Proinflammatory and fibrogenic functions of fibroblasts are upregulated in CF and are reduced by vardenafil. This study provides compelling new support for targeting cGMP signaling pathway in CF pharmacotherapy.

  4. Diminished concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Erik; Juul, A; Lanng, S;

    1995-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently accompanied by a catabolic condition with low body mass index caused by a number of disease complications. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is an anabolic hormone and an important marker of nutritional status, liver function, and linear growth. Available data...... on IGF-I in cystic fibrosis are sparse and conflicting. From 1990-3, 235 of our 240 patients (114 males, 121 females, median age 16.2 years, ranged 0.1-44.0 years) had IGF-I measured once by radioimmunoassay. IGF-I was significantly reduced compared with a healthy Scandinavian control population: mean...... = 0.28, p cystic fibrosis and play a part in their abnormal growth pattern....

  5. Paradoxical Embolization in an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil M Al Lawati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis patients with an implantable venous access device (IVAD and a patent foramen ovale (PFO are at an increased risk of developing paradoxical embolism. A 33-year-old patient who had a cerebrovascular accident in the above setting is described. She had been anticoagulated because she had thrombosis of the tip of the indwelling catheter, and her PFO was closed percutaneuosly followed by replacement of her IVAD. She made a full neurological recovery. Echocardiography and prophylactic closure of the PFO, when present, as primary prevention for paradoxical embolism may be warranted in cystic fibrosis patients before placement of an IVAD.

  6. [Isolation of Geosmithia argillacea in a cystic fibrosis patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labbé, F; Babchia, S; Evreux, F; Chenal, P

    2013-09-01

    We report the case of an 11-year-old child with cystic fibrosis where Geosmithia argillacea has been isolated from sputum. This is a filamentous fungus (mold) recently described as emergent infectious agent in cystic fibrosis patients. In our case, the presence of G. argillacea was not associated with clinical disorder. However, recent evidence shows that it can be responsible for very serious invasive infection, especially in chronic granulomatous disease and may be, after lung transplantation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. The Approach to Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwalkar, Jaideep S; Murray, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    There is a high prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in patients with cystic fibrosis and clear epidemiologic links between chronic infection and morbidity and mortality exist. Prevention and early identification of infection are critical, and stand to improve with the advent of new vaccines and laboratory methods. Once the organism is identified, a variety of treatment options are available. Aggressive use of antipseudomonal antibiotics is the standard of care for acute pulmonary exacerbations in cystic fibrosis, and providers must take into account specific patient characteristics when making treatment decisions related to antibiotic selection, route and duration of administration, and site of care.

  8. Microbial ecology and adaptation in cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lei; Jelsbak, Lars; Molin, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Chronic infections in the respiratory tracts of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are important to investigate, both from medical and from fundamental ecological points of view. Cystic fibrosis respiratory tracts can be described as natural environments harbouring persisting microbial communities...... constitute the selective forces that drive the evolution of the microbes after they migrate from the outer environment to human airways. Pseudomonas aeruginosa adapts to the new environment through genetic changes and exhibits a special lifestyle in chronic CF airways. Understanding the persistent...... colonization of microbial pathogens in CF patients in the context of ecology and evolution will expand our knowledge of the pathogenesis of chronic infections and improve therapeutic strategies....

  9. Creatinine clearance as predictor of tobramycin elimination in adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D.J.; Vinks, A.A.T.M.M.; Jacobs, F.; Heijerman, H.G.M.; Bakker, Wim

    1996-01-01

    Assessment of renal function and relating this parameter to aminoglycoside clearance is important for an appropriate individualization of dosage regimens in patients with impaired renal function. However, it has been suggested that in cystic fibrosis (CF), creatinine clearance (CrCl) is not a good p

  10. Airway Clearance Devices for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The purpose of this evidence-based analysis is to examine the safety and efficacy of airway clearance devices (ACDs) for cystic fibrosis and attempt to differentiate between devices, where possible, on grounds of clinical efficacy, quality of life, safety and/or patient preference. Background Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common, inherited, life-limiting disease that affects multiple systems of the human body. Respiratory dysfunction is the primary complication and leading cause of death due to CF. CF causes abnormal mucus secretion in the airways, leading to airway obstruction and mucus plugging, which in turn can lead to bacterial infection and further mucous production. Over time, this almost cyclical process contributes to severe airway damage and loss of respiratory function. Removal of airway secretions, termed airway clearance, is thus an integral component of the management of CF. A variety of methods are available for airway clearance, some requiring mechanical devices, others physical manipulation of the body (e.g. physiotherapy). Conventional chest physiotherapy (CCPT), through the assistance of a caregiver, is the current standard of care for achieving airway clearance, particularly in young patients up to the ages of six or seven. CF patients are, however, living much longer now than in decades past. The median age of survival in Canada has risen to 37.0 years for the period of 1998-2002 (5-year window), up from 22.8 years for the 5-year window ending in 1977. The prevalence has also risen accordingly, last recorded as 3,453 in Canada in 2002, up from 1,630 in 1977. With individuals living longer, there is a greater need for independent methods of airway clearance. Airway Clearance Devices There are at least three classes of airway clearance devices: positive expiratory pressure devices (PEP), airway oscillating devices (AOD; either handheld or stationary) and high frequency chest compression (HFCC)/mechanical percussion (MP

  11. Pancreatic changes in cystic fibrosis: CT and sonographic appearances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daneman, A. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario); Gaskin, K.; Martin, D.J.; Cutz, E.

    1983-10-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) and sonographic appearances of the late stages of pancreatic damage in three patients with cystic fibrosis are illustrated. All three had severe exocrine pancreatic insufficiency with steatorrhea. In two patients CT revealed complete fatty replacement of the entire pancreas. In the third, increased echogenicity of the pancreas on sonography and the inhomogeneous attenuation on CT were interpreted as being the result of a combination of fibrosis, fatty replacement, calcification, and probable cyst formation.

  12. A Roadmap to the Brittle Bones of Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini P. Gore

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disorder which despite advances in medical care continues to be a life-limiting and often fatal disease. With increase in life expectancy of the CF population, bone disease has emerged as a common complication. Unlike the osteoporosis seen in postmenopausal population, bone disease in CF begins at a young age and is associated with significant morbidity due to fractures, kyphosis, increased pain, and decreased lung function. The maintenance of bone health is essential for the CF population during their lives to prevent pain and fractures but also as they approach lung transplantation since severe bone disease can lead to exclusion from lung transplantation. Early recognition, prevention, and treatment are key to maintaining optimal bone health in CF patients and often require a multidisciplinary approach. This article will review the pathophysiology, current clinical practice guidelines, and potential future therapies for treating CF-related bone disease.

  13. Toll-like receptors as therapeutic targets in cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Greene, Catherine M

    2008-12-01

    Background: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that act as a first-line of defence in the innate immune response by recognising and responding to conserved molecular patterns in microbial factors and endogenous danger signals. Cystic fibrosis (CF)-affected airways represent a milieu potentially rich in TLR agonists and the chronic inflammatory phenotype evident in CF airway epithelial cells is probably due in large part to activation of TLRs. Objective\\/methods: To examine the prospects of developing novel therapies for CF by targeting TLRs. We outline the expression and function of TLRs and explore the therapeutic potential of naturally-occurring and synthetic TLR inhibitors for CF. Results\\/conclusion: Modulation of TLRs has therapeutic potential for the inflammatory lung manifestations of CF.

  14. Cumulative radiation exposure in children with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Reilly, R

    2010-02-01

    This retrospective study calculated the cumulative radiation dose for children with cystic fibrosis (CF) attending a tertiary CF centre. Information on 77 children with a mean age of 9.5 years, a follow up time of 658 person years and 1757 studies including 1485 chest radiographs, 215 abdominal radiographs and 57 computed tomography (CT) scans, of which 51 were thoracic CT scans, were analysed. The average cumulative radiation dose was 6.2 (0.04-25) mSv per CF patient. Cumulative radiation dose increased with increasing age and number of CT scans and was greater in children who presented with meconium ileus. No correlation was identified between cumulative radiation dose and either lung function or patient microbiology cultures. Radiation carries a risk of malignancy and children are particularly susceptible. Every effort must be made to avoid unnecessary radiation exposure in these patients whose life expectancy is increasing.

  15. Mucus Distribution Model in a Lung with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Zarei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive disease in Caucasians with a reported incidence of 1 in every 3200 live births. Most strikingly, CF is associated with early mortality. Host in flammatory responses result in airway mucus plugging, airway wall edema, and eventual destruction of airway wall support structure. Despite aggressive treatment, the median age of survival is approximately 38 years. This work is the first attempt to parameterize the distributions of mucus in a CF lung as a function of time. By default, the model makes arbitrary choices at each stage of the construction process, whereby the simplest choice is made. The model is sophisticated enough to fit the average CF patients' spirometric data over time and to identify several interesting parameters: probability of colonization, mucus volume growth rate, and scarring rate. Extensions of the model appropriate for describing the dynamics of single patient MRI data are also discussed.

  16. Fungal atopy in adult cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Henry, M

    2012-02-03

    This study set out to estimate the prevalence of atopy to a variety of common ubiquitous fungi, including A. fumigatus, in cystic fibrosis (CF), and to evaluate the investigations by which the diagnosis was made. Particular attention was paid to the usefulness of skin testing and immunoassays in detecting which patients had simple fungal atopy, and which patients were at high risk of developing allergic bronchopulmonary mycoses. This cross-sectional study included 21 adult CF patients and 20 matched controls. Serum samples were taken for the measurement of total serum IgE and specific serum IgE to nine common fungi. Immediate hypersensitivity skin prick testing to each of the fungi was also performed. Simple fungal atopy was described in subjects fulfilling the following criteria: total serum IgE > 100 KU l(-1) with specific radioimmunoassay > or = grade 1 to at least one fungus and a positive skin prick test (SPT) > or = 3 mm to the same fungus. \\'High risk\\' for developing allergic bronchopulmonary mycosis (ABPM) was described in subjects fulfilling the following criteria: total serum IgE > 200 KU l(-1) with specific radioimmunoassay > or = grade 2 to at least one fungus and a positive skin prick test (SPT) > or = 6 mm to the same fungus. The adult CF group had a significantly higher total SPT score (P=0.005) and mean total serum IgE (P<0.05) than controls. Forty-three percent of CF patients fulfilled the criteria for fungal atopy to at least a single fungus. Over half this group had an atopic tendency to more than one fungus. Nineteen percent of the CF group were at least \\'high risk\\' of developing ABPM. Skin prick testing is a better marker of fungal atopy and a better predictor of those adult CF patients at higher risk of developing ABPM than specific radioimmunoassay serum testing. There is a high prevalence of fungal atopy in the adult CF population. Total serum IgE and skin prick testing are good predictors of fungal atopy and help predict those at

  17. Cystic fibrosis, molecular genetics for all life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausilia Elce

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is the most frequent lethal autosomal recessive disorder among Caucasians (incidence: 1:2,500 newborn. In the last two decades CF prognosis considerably improved and many patients well survive into their adulthood. Furthermore, milder CF with a late onset was described. CF is a challenge for laboratory of molecular genetics that greatly contributes to the natural history of the disease since fetal age. Carrier screening and prenatal diagnosis, also by non-invasive analysis of maternal blood fetal DNA, are now available, and many labs offer preimplantation diagnosis. The major criticism in prenatal medicine is the lack of an effective multidisciplinary counseling that helps the couples to plan their reasoned reproductive choice. Most countries offer newborn screening that significantly reduce CF morbidity but different protocols based on blood trypsin, molecular analysis and sweat chloride cause a variable efficiency of the screening programs. Again, laboratory is crucial for CF diagnosis in symptomatic patients: sweat chloride is the diagnostic golden standard, but different methodologies and the lack of quality control in most labs reduce its effectiveness. Molecular analysis contributes to confirm diagnosis in symptomatic subjects; furthermore, it helps to predict the disease outcome on the basis of the mutation (genotype-phenotype correlation and mutations in a myriad of genes, inherited independently by CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, which may modulate the clinical expression of the disease in each single patient (modifier genes. More recently, the search of the CFTR mutations gained a role in selecting CF patients that may benefit from biological therapy based on correctors and potentiators that are effective in patients bearing specific mutations (personalized therapy. All such applications of molecular diagnostics confirm the “uniqueness” of each CF patient, offering to laboratory medicine the

  18. Association of the relative change in weight and body mass index with lung function in teenagers and adults with cystic fibrosis: Influence of gender and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Megías, Marta; Guisado Vasco, Pablo; González Albarrán, Olga; Lamas Ferreiro, Adelaida; Máiz Carro, Luis

    2015-11-01

    Nutritional status is a prognostic factor in cystic fibrosis. Prevention of nutritional impairment and weigh loss are major clinical objectives because they are associated with worsening of lung function and increased mortality. To identify a potential relationship of clinical nutrition parameters, and their relative changes, with lung function (FEV1%) in a cohort of adolescent and adult patients with CF. A retrospective analysis of 64 patients older than 14years. Weight, height, BMI, and lung function data were collected at a period of disease stability, both in the year of the first abnormal oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and in the previous year. Relative changes in weight and BMI, and their relationship with FEV1%, were determined by linear regression and ANOVA tests; influence of gender and diabetes was also assessed. Mean age of the series (28 females and 36 males) was 26.8years. Normal glucose tolerance (NGT) was found in 26.7%, while 18.3% had diabetes without impaired fasting glucose (CFRD without FPG). Mean BMI was 20.32, with a mean weight of 53.53kg; 32.8% had BMI<18.5, and only 4.7% were overweight. Overall, a positive relative change in weight (≥6%) was associated with an increase in FEV1% (9.31%), as compared to those with a greater weight loss (at least 2%), who had a 12.09% fall in FEV1. Patients with CFRD without FPG had poorer lung function if they had a negative relative change in weight by at least 2% as compared to NGT. In patients with CF, a relative weight gain is positively associated to FEV1%, while a relative weight loss of at least 2% has a significant negative impact on lung function. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. MRI in mucoviscidosis (cystic fibrosis); MRT bei Mukoviszidose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichinger, M.; Puderbach, M.; Kauczor, H.-U. [Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum (DKFZ), Abteilung Radiologie, Heidelberg (Germany); Heussel, C.-P. [Universitaetsklinikum Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Radiologie

    2006-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a multi-systemic disease with major impact on the lungs. Pulmonary manifestation is crucial for the prognosis and life expectancy of patients. Imaging modalities and lung function tests reflect the pulmonary status in these patients. The standard imaging modality for diagnosis and follow-up of pulmonary changes is chest x-ray. The gold standard for the detection of parenchymal lung changes remains high resolution computed tomography (HRCT), but this is not used routinely for CF-patients due to radiation exposure. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) used to be of no importance in monitoring cystic fibrosis lung disease, as shown in studies from the 1980s and early 1990s. The continuing improvement of MRI techniques, however, has allowed for an adequate application of this non-radiation method in diagnosing the major pulmonary findings in CF, in addition to the assessment of lung function. (orig.) [German] Die Lunge ist Hauptmanifestationsort der Mukoviszidose (zystischen Fibrose, CF) und entscheidend fuer Prognose und Lebenserwartung der Betroffenen. Bildgebende Verfahren spielen in der Diagnostik und Verlaufsbeurteilung der Lungenveraenderungen sowie dem Monitoring pulmonaler Komplikationen bei zystischer Fibrose eine wichtige Rolle. Obwohl die hochaufloesende Computertomographie (HRCT) als Goldstandard zur Beurteilung morphologischer Lungenveraenderungen bei zystischer Fibrose gilt, ist die Roentgenthoraxaufnahme aufgrund der geringeren Strahlenbelastung bei den meist jungen Patienten das derzeit eingesetzte Standardverfahren zur Diagnostik und Verlaufsbeurteilung. Die Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) spielte bislang in der Diagnostik und Verlaufsbeobachtung der zystischen Fibrose keine Rolle, da Arbeiten aus den 80er und fruehen 90er Jahren keinen sinnvollen Beitrag der MRT zeigen konnten. Durch die kontinuierliche Verbesserung der Technik ist es seit neuestem erstmals moeglich, die MRT als Alternative fuer die Lungenbildgebung bei zystischer

  20. L206W mutation of the cystic fibrosis gene, relatively frequent in French Canadians, is associated with atypical presentations of cystic fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rozen, R.; Ferreira-Rajabi, L.; Robb, L. [McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Over 400 mutations have been reported at this locus. Although severe forms of cystic fibrosis are usually associated with pancreatic insufficiency, pulmonary dysfunction, and elevated sweat chloride, there is a wide range of phenotypes, including congenital absence of the vas deferens, observed with some of the milder mutations. The L206W mutation, which was first identified in patients from South France, is relatively frequent in French Canadians from Quebec. In this report, we document the atypical form of cystic fibrosis associated with this mutation in a cohort of 7 French Canadian probands. 20 refs.

  1. Clinical pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs in cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Touw, D J

    The disposition of many drugs in cystic fibrosis is abnormal compared with healthy individuals. In general, changes include an increased volume of distribution expressed in liters per kg bodyweight for highly hydrophilic drugs such as aminoglycosides, and, to a lesser extent, for penicillins and

  2. Small Airways Disease in Cystic Fibrosis: Improving efficacy of treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Bos (Aukje)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstractCystic fibrosis (CF) is a severe hereditary and life-threatening disease in the Caucasian population, affecting 70,000 patients worldwide. In the 1950s, a child with CF would rarely live long enough to attend elementary school. Luckily, life expectancy has dramatically improved

  3. Transcellular sodium transport in cultured cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia exhibit raised transepithelial Na+ transport rates, as determined by open-circuit isotope fluxes and estimates of the amiloride-sensitive equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq). To study the contribution of apical and basolateral membrane paths to raised Na+ ...

  4. Cystic fibrosis heterozygotes do not have increased platelet activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, Inge; Michelson, Alan D.; Frelinger III, Andrew L.;

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: We have previously demonstrated platelet hyperreactivity in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Carriers of one CF m utation (heterozygotes) have been shown to have abnormalities related to the presence of only one-half the normal amount of CF transmembrane conductance regulator protein...

  5. Evolution and adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette

    of natural environments, the primary obstacle is re-sampling of the samepopulation over time, especially if the population is small.Nevertheless, it has been accomplished: Chronic airway infections of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have offered a unique view into the adaptationand evolution of Pseudomonas...

  6. Risk of asthma in heterozygous carriers for cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Orholm; Qayum, Sadaf; Bouchelouche, Pierre Nourdine;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a higher prevalence of asthma than the background population, however, it is unclear whether heterozygous CF carriers are susceptible to asthma. Given this, a meta-analysis is necessary to determine the veracity of the association of CF...

  7. Shifting paradigms of nontuberculous mycobacteria in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tania; Høiby, Niels;

    2014-01-01

    Important paradigms of pulmonary disease with nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are currently shifting based on an increasing attention within the field of cystic fibrosis (CF). These shifts are likely to benefit the management of all patients with pulmonary NTM, regardless of underlying pathology...

  8. Serodiagnosis of Mycobacterium abscessus complex infection in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, Tavs; Pressler, Tania; Taylor-Robinson, David;

    2015-01-01

    Early signs of pulmonary disease with Mycobacterium abscessus complex (MABSC) can be missed in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A serological method could help stratify patients according to risk. The objective of this study was to test the diagnostic accuracy of a novel method for investigating...

  9. Modular microfluidic system as a model of cystic fibrosis airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skolimowski, Maciej; Weiss Nielsen, Martin; Abeille, Fabien

    2012-01-01

    pumps, bubble traps, gas exchange chip, and cell culture chambers. We have successfully applied this system for studying the antibiotic therapy of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the bacteria mainly responsible for morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis, in different oxygen environments. Furthermore, we...

  10. Cystic fibrosis gene mutations: evaluation and assessment of disease severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallières E

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Emilie Vallières, Joseph Stuart ElbornCystic Fibrosis and Airways Microbiology Research Group, Queens University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: The cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR gene encodes an ion channel transporter, the CFTR protein. Since its identification in 1989, more than 1,900 sequence variants have been reported, resulting in a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Cystic fibrosis (CF is associated with many CFTR mutants and there is a continuum of disease severity observed. Recent advances in fundamental research have increased our understanding of the consequent molecular defect arising from CF mutations. This knowledge has resulted in the development of CF-specific therapies, targeting either the genetic or the molecular defect. CF care, previously focused on symptom control, is therefore moving toward a "stratified" or "precision" therapeutic approach. This review outlines normal CFTR physiology, the proposed pathologic mechanism underlying CF associated-lung injury, classification of CF mutations, and the CF-specific therapies recently approved or in clinical trials.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene mutations, disease severity, evaluation, assessment

  11. Diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, M; Koch, C; Reimert, C M;

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients may be difficult to establish because ABPA shares many characteristics with coexisting atopy or other lung infections in these patients. This study aimed to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity...

  12. Predictive 5-Year Survivorship Model of Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Theodore G.; Adler, Frederick R.; FitzSimmons, Stacey C.; Cahill, Barbara C.; Hibbs, Jonathan R.; Marshall, Bruce C.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to create a 5-year survivorship model to identify key clinical features of cystic fibrosis. Such a model could help researchers and clinicians to evaluate therapies, improve the design of prospective studies, monitor practice patterns, counsel individual patients, and determine the best candidates for lung transplantation. The authors used information from the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Patient Registry (CFFPR), which has collected longitudinal data on approximately 90% of cystic fibrosis patients diagnosed in the United States since 1986. They developed multivariate logistic regression models by using data on 5,820 patients randomly selected from 11,630 in the CFFPR in 1993. Models were tested for goodness of fit and were validated for the remaining 5,810 patients for 1993. The validated 5-year survivorship model included age, forced expiratory volume in 1 second as a percentage of predicted normal, gender, weight-for-age z score, pancreatic sufficiency, diabetes mellitus, Staphylococcus aureus infection, Burkerholderia cepacia infection, and annual number of acute pulmonary exacerbations. The model provides insights into the complex nature of cystic fibrosis and supplies a rigorous tool for clinical practice and research. PMID:11207152

  13. Students as Technicians: Screening Newborns for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusky, Sharon

    2014-01-01

    In this activity, freshman college students learn biotechnology techniques while playing the role of a laboratory technician. They perform simulations of three diagnostic tests used to screen newborns for cystic fibrosis. By performing an ELISA, a PCR analysis, and a conductivity test, students learn how biotechnology techniques can be used to…

  14. Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains in Norwegian cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluge, G; Ojeniyi, B; Høiby, N

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Typing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from Norwegian cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with chronic Pseudomonas lung infection in order to see whether cross-infection might have occurred. METHODS: Isolates from 60 patients were collected during the years 1994-98, and typed by pulsed...

  15. Phylogenetic and metabolic diversity of bacteria associated with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.; Guss, A. M.; Newton, I. L. G.; Klepac-Ceraj, V.; Lory, S.; Cavanaugh, C. M.

    2010-01-01

    In patients afflicted with cystic fibrosis (CF), morbidity and mortality are primarily associated with the adverse consequences of chronic microbial bronchial infections, which are thought to be caused by a few opportunistic pathogens. However, recent evidence suggests the presence of other microorg

  16. Risk of asthma in heterozygous carriers for cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Orholm; Qayum, Sadaf; Bouchelouche, Pierre Nourdine

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) have a higher prevalence of asthma than the background population, however, it is unclear whether heterozygous CF carriers are susceptible to asthma. Given this, a meta-analysis is necessary to determine the veracity of the association of CF...

  17. Transcellular sodium transport in cultured cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, Niels J.; Boucher, Richard C.

    1991-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelia exhibit raised transepithelial Na+ transport rates, as determined by open-circuit isotope fluxes and estimates of the amiloride-sensitive equivalent short-circuit current (Ieq). To study the contribution of apical and basolateral membrane paths to raised Na...

  18. Chronic rhinovirus infection in an adult with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flight, William G; Bright-Thomas, Rowland J; Tilston, Peter; Mutton, Kenneth J; Guiver, Malcolm; Webb, A Kevin; Jones, Andrew M

    2013-11-01

    Rhinovirus is a common cause of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis (CF) and is usually considered a self-limiting infection. We report a case of chronic infection with rhinovirus A type 33 in a 43-year-old male with CF which has persisted for over 2 years.

  19. THE METABOLIC EFFECTS OF PREGNANCY IN CYSTIC FIBROSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our purpose was to determine glucose tolerance in pregnant women with cystic fibrosis (CF) and to relate glucose tolerance to insulin sensitivity, hepatic glucose production, and protein turnover. We studied 8 CF women during pregnancy (CFPreg). Results were compared with those from 9 pregnant contr...

  20. Exercise and quality of life in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Anne Mette; Jacobsen, Ulla; Bregnballe, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    It was hypothesised that increased exercise capacity is related to improved quality of life (QoL) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A 12-week individually tailored unsupervised aerobic exercise programme was offered to 42 patients with CF. At the start and at the end of the exercise programm...

  1. US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus recommendations for the management of non-tuberculous mycobacteria in individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floto, R Andres; Olivier, Kenneth N; Saiman, Lisa; Daley, Charles L; Herrmann, Jean-Louis; Nick, Jerry A; Noone, Peadar G; Bilton, Diana; Corris, Paul; Gibson, Ronald L; Hempstead, Sarah E; Koetz, Karsten; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Smyth, Alan R; van Ingen, Jakko; Wallace, Richard J; Winthrop, Kevin L; Marshall, Bruce C; Haworth, Charles S

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are ubiquitous environmental organisms that can cause chronic pulmonary infection, particularly in individuals with pre-existing inflammatory lung disease such as cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary disease caused by NTM has emerged as a major threat to the health of individuals with CF but remains difficult to diagnose and problematic to treat. In response to this challenge, the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation (CFF) and the European Cystic Fibrosis Society (ECFS) convened an expert panel of specialists to develop consensus recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and management of NTM pulmonary disease in individuals with CF. Nineteen experts were invited to participate in the recommendation development process. Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome (PICO) methodology and systematic literature reviews were employed to inform draft recommendations. An anonymous voting process was used by the committee to reach consensus. All committee members were asked to rate each statement on a scale of: 0, completely disagree, to 9, completely agree; with 80% or more of scores between 7 and 9 being considered 'good' agreement. Additionally, the committee solicited feedback from the CF communities in the USA and Europe and considered the feedback in the development of the final recommendation statements. Three rounds of voting were conducted to achieve 80% consensus for each recommendation statement. Through this process, we have generated a series of pragmatic, evidence-based recommendations for the screening, investigation, diagnosis and treatment of NTM infection in individuals with CF as an initial step in optimising management for this challenging condition.

  2. Avidity of anti-P aeruginosa antibodies during chronic infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, O; Petersen, T D; Jensen, P

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In order to study the impact on the lung function of patients with cystic fibrosis of the avidity of antipseudomonal antibodies, the avidity of antibodies against the chromosomal beta-lactamase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (a beta ab) and against the 60-65 kDa heat shock protein of P aer...

  3. A case of failed eradication of cystic fibrosis-related sinus colonisation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Linnane, Barry

    2015-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a pathogen associated with cystic fibrosis that has potential to decrease lung function and cause respiratory failure. Paranasal sinuses are increasingly recognised as potential reservoirs for intermittent colonisation by P. aeruginosa. This case documents investigation and outcome of P. aeruginosa recurrence in a male paediatric patient over an eight year period.

  4. Respiratory muscle strength in stable adolescent and adult patients with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunnink, M A; Doeleman, W R; Trappenburg, J C A; de Vries, W R

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since available studies have provided conflicting results, this study investigated respiratory muscle function and its relationship with exercise capacity, degree of dyspnoea and leg discomfort, and quality of life in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF). METHODS: Using a cross-sectional d

  5. "No Time to Play": Perceptions toward Physical Activity in Youth with Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moola, Fiona; Faulkner, Guy E. J.; Schneiderman, Jane E.

    2012-01-01

    Although physical activity may reduce lung function decline in youth with cystic fibrosis (CF), most patients are inactive. Little is known about why youth with CF are inactive or how to facilitate physical activity. This study explored perceptions toward physical activity in 14 youth with CF at a Canadian Hospital. Qualitative interviews were…

  6. EFFECT OF POSITIVE EXPIRATORY PRESSURE BREATHING IN PATIENTS WITH CYSTIC-FIBROSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERSCHANS, CP; VANDERMARK, TW; DEVRIES, G; PIERS, DA; BEEKHUIS, H; DANKERTROELSE, JE; POSTMA, DS; KOETER, GH

    The effect of positive expiratory pressure breathing, alone and in combination with coughing, was investigated in eight patients with cystic fibrosis. Functional residual capacity and total lung capacity was measured with a body plethysmograph before, during, and immediately after breathing with

  7. Pharmacoeconomic review of recombinant human DNase in the management of cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlstra, Gerrit; Boersma, Cornelis; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Postma, Maarten J.

    2004-01-01

    For the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease I is widely used. Deoxyribonuclease I has a positive effect on lung function and the number of hospitalizations. Deoxyribonuclease I is currently administered by nebulization, which is an inefficient administrati

  8. The impact of newborn screening and earlier intervention on the clinical course of cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, F. Nicole; Fitzgerald, Dominic A.

    2012-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a life-limiting condition which is readily diagnosed in the vast majority of cases on newborn screening [NBS]. A diagnosis made on newborn screening translates into earlier initiation of therapies, improved growth, better lung function into the adult years and culminates in better

  9. Diminished concentrations of insulin-like growth factor I in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Erik; Juul, A; Lanng, S

    1995-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is frequently accompanied by a catabolic condition with low body mass index caused by a number of disease complications. Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) is an anabolic hormone and an important marker of nutritional status, liver function, and linear growth. Available data on ...

  10. The Short-Term Effect of Breathing Tasks Via an Incentive Spirometer on Lung Function Compared With Autogenic Drainage in Subjects With Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokol, Gil; Vilozni, Daphna; Hakimi, Ran; Lavie, Moran; Sarouk, Ifat; Bat-El Bar; Dagan, Adi; Ofek, Miryam; Efrati, Ori

    2015-12-01

    Forced expiration may assist secretion movement by manipulating airway dynamics in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Expiratory resistive breathing via a handheld incentive spirometer has the potential to control the expiratory flow via chosen resistances (1-8 mm) and thereby mobilize secretions and improve lung function. Our objective was to explore the short-term effect of using a resistive-breathing incentive spirometer on lung function in subjects with CF compared with the autogenic drainage technique. This was a retrospective study. Subjects with CF performed 30-45 min of either the resistive-breathing incentive spirometer (n = 40) or autogenic drainage (n = 32) technique on separate days. The spirometer encourages the patient to exhale as long as possible while maintaining a low lung volume. The autogenic drainage technique includes repetitive inspiratory and expiratory maneuvers at various tidal breathing magnitudes while exhalation is performed in a sighing manner. Spirometry was performed before and 20-30 min after the therapy. Use of a resistive-breathing incentive spirometer improved FVC and FEV1 by 5-42% in 26 subjects. The forced expiratory flow during the middle half of the FVC maneuver (FEF25-75%) improved by >20% in 9 (22%) subjects. FVC improved the most in subjects with an FEV1 of 40-60% of predicted. Improvements negatively correlated with baseline percent-of-predicted FVC values provided improvements were above 10% (r(2) = 0.28). Values improved in a single subjects using the autogenic drainage technique. These 2 techniques may allow lower thoracic pressures and assist in the prevention of central airway collapse. The resistive-breathing incentive spirometer is a self-administered simple method that may aid airway clearance and has the potential to improve lung function as measured by FVC, FEV1, and FEF25-75% in patients with CF. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  11. Nebulized and oral thiol derivatives for pulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Julian; Nash, Edward F; Ratjen, Felix; Tullis, Elizabeth; Stephenson, Anne

    2013-07-12

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited condition resulting in thickened, sticky respiratory secretions. Respiratory failure, due to recurrent pulmonary infection and inflammation, is the most common cause of mortality. Muco-active therapies (e.g. dornase alfa and nebulized hypertonic saline) may decrease sputum viscosity, increase airway clearance of sputum, reduce infection and inflammation and improve lung function. Thiol derivatives, either oral or nebulized, have shown benefit in other respiratory diseases. Their mode of action is likely to differ according to the route of administration. There are several thiol derivatives, and it is unclear which of these may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of nebulized and oral thiol derivatives in people with cystic fibrosis. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Trials Register, comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches, hand searches of relevant journals, abstract books and conference proceedings.Most recent search: 13 June 2013.We also conducted a PubMed search on 26 February 2013 for relevant published articles. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials comparing nebulized or oral thiol derivatives to placebo or another thiol derivative in people with cystic fibrosis. The authors independently assessed trials for inclusion, analysed risk of bias and extracted data. Searches identified 23 trials; nine trials (255 participants) are included, of these seven trials are more than 10 years old. Three trials of nebulized thiol derivatives were identified (one compared 20% N-acetylcysteine to 2% N-acetylcysteine; another compared sodium-2-mercaptoethane sulphonate to 7% hypertonic saline; and another compared glutathione to 4% hypertonic saline). Although generally well-tolerated with no significant adverse effects, there was no evidence of significant clinical benefit in our primary outcomes in participants receiving

  12. Antenatal testing for cystic fibrosis in Cuba, 1988-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, Teresa; López, Ixchel; Clark, Yulia; Piloto, Yaixa; González, Laura; Gómez, Manuel; García, Marileivis; Reyes, Lidice; Rodríguez, Fidel

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem autosomal recessive disease with wide variability in clinical severity. It is incurable and characterized by elevated and premature mortality, as well as poor quality of life. Its frequency, lethality and devastating impact on both the physical and psychological wellbeing of patients and their families, make it a serious health problem. Its frequency in Cuba is 1 in 9862 live births, where marked molecular heterogeneity of the CFTR gene makes molecular diagnosis difficult. Six mutations have been identified that together enable molecular characterization of only 55.5% of cystic fibrosis chromosomes. This paper presents national results of antenatal diagnostic testing, using direct and indirect methods, for detection of cystic fibrosis. OBJECTIVE Characterize the Cuban public health system's experience with antenatal molecular testing for cystic fibrosis from 1988 through 2011. METHODS A retrospective descriptive study was conducted with results of antenatal diagnostic testing of amniotic fluid, performed nationwide from 1988 through 2011, for 108 fetuses of couples with some risk of having children affected by cystic fibrosis, who requested testing. Polymerase chain reaction detected mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A, and markers XV2C and KM19. Data were analyzed using absolute frequencies and percentages, and presented in tables. RESULTS For 93 cases (86.1%), testing for cystic fibrosis was done using direct analysis of mutations p.F508del, p.G542X, p.R1162X, p.R334W, p.R553X and c.3120+1G>A; five cases (4.6%) were tested indirectly using markers XV2C/Taq I and KM19/Pst I; and 10 (9.3%) were tested using a combination of the two methods. A total of 72 diagnoses (66.7% of studies done) were concluded, of which there were 20 healthy fetuses, 16 affected, 27 carrier, and 9 who were either healthy or carriers of an unknown mutation. CONCLUSIONS Direct or indirect molecular study was

  13. Ataluren (PTC124) induces cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression and activity in children with nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet-Gaudelus, Isabelle; Boeck, Kris De; Casimir, Georges J; Vermeulen, François; Leal, Teresinha; Mogenet, Agnès; Roussel, Delphine; Fritsch, Janine; Hanssens, Laurence; Hirawat, Samit; Miller, Nilsen L; Constantine, Scott; Reha, Allen; Ajayi, Temitayo; Elfring, Gary L; Miller, Langdon L

    2010-11-15

    Nonsense (premature stop codon) mutations in mRNA for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) cause cystic fibrosis (CF) in approximately 10% of patients. Ataluren (PTC124) is an oral drug that permits ribosomes to readthrough premature stop codons in mRNA to produce functional protein. To evaluate ataluren activity, safety, and pharmacokinetics in children with nonsense mutation CF. Patients were assessed in two 28-day cycles, comprising 14 days on and 14 days off ataluren. Patients took ataluren three times per day (morning, midday, and evening) with randomization to the order of receiving a lower dose (4, 4, and 8 mg/kg) and a higher dose (10, 10, and 20 mg/kg) in the two cycles. The study enrolled 30 patients (16 male and 14 female, ages 6 through 18 yr) with a nonsense mutation in at least one allele of the CFTR gene, a classical CF phenotype, and abnormal baseline nasal epithelial chloride transport. Ataluren induced a nasal chloride transport response (at least a -5-mV improvement) or hyperpolarization (value more electrically negative than -5 mV) in 50% and 47% of patients, respectively, with more hyperpolarizations at the higher dose. Improvements were seen in seven of nine nonsense mutation genotypes represented. Ataluren significantly increased the proportion of nasal epithelial cells expressing apical full-length CFTR protein. Adverse events and laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and usually mild. Ataluren pharmacokinetics were similar to those in adults. In children with nonsense mutation CF, ataluren can induce functional CFTR production and is well tolerated.

  14. miR-17 overexpression in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells decreases interleukin-8 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglesby, Irene K; Vencken, Sebastian F; Agrawal, Raman; Gaughan, Kevin; Molloy, Kevin; Higgins, Gerard; McNally, Paul; McElvaney, Noel G; Mall, Marcus A; Greene, Catherine M

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 levels are higher than normal in cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, causing neutrophil infiltration and non-resolving inflammation. Overexpression of microRNAs that target IL-8 expression in airway epithelial cells may represent a therapeutic strategy for cystic fibrosis. IL-8 protein and mRNA were measured in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and bronchial brushings (n=20 per group). miRNAs decreased in the cystic fibrosis lung and predicted to target IL-8 mRNA were quantified in βENaC-transgenic, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr)-/- and wild-type mice, primary cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells and a range of cystic fibrosis versus non-cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cell lines or cells stimulated with lipopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas-conditioned medium or cystic fibrosis bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The effect of miRNA overexpression on IL-8 protein production was measured. miR-17 regulates IL-8 and its expression was decreased in adult cystic fibrosis bronchial brushings, βENaC-transgenic mice and bronchial epithelial cells chronically stimulated with Pseudomonas-conditioned medium. Overexpression of miR-17 inhibited basal and agonist-induced IL-8 protein production in F508del-CFTR homozygous CFTE29o(-) tracheal, CFBE41o(-) and/or IB3 bronchial epithelial cells. These results implicate defective CFTR, inflammation, neutrophilia and mucus overproduction in regulation of miR-17. Modulating miR-17 expression in cystic fibrosis bronchial epithelial cells may be a novel anti-inflammatory strategy for cystic fibrosis and other chronic inflammatory airway diseases.

  15. Impaired Functions of Macrophage from Cystic Fibrosis Patients: CD11b, TLR-5 Decrease and sCD14, Inflammatory Cytokines Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin-Le Jeune, Karin; Le Jeune, André; Jouneau, Stéphane; Belleguic, Chantal; Roux, Pierre-François; Jaguin, Marie; Dimanche-Boitre, Marie-Thérèse; Lecureur, Valérie; Leclercq, Caroline; Desrues, Benoît; Brinchault, Graziella; Gangneux, Jean-Pierre; Martin-Chouly, Corinne

    2013-01-01

    Background Early in life, cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are infected with microorganisms. The role of macrophages has largely been underestimated in literature, whereas the focus being mostly on neutrophils and epithelial cells. Macrophages may however play a significant role in the initiating stages of this disease, via an inability to act as a suppressor cell. Yet macrophage dysfunction may be the first step in cascade of events leading to chronic inflammation/infection in CF. Moreover, reports have suggested that CFTR contribute to altered inflammatory response in CF by modification of normal macrophage functions. Objectives In order to highlight possible intrinsic macrophage defects due to impaired CFTR, we have studied inflammatory cytokines secretions, recognition of pathogens and phagocytosis in peripheral blood monocyte-derived macrophages from stable adult CF patients and healthy subjects (non-CF). Results In CF macrophage supernatants, concentrations of sCD14, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10 were strongly raised. Furthermore expression of CD11b and TLR-5 were sorely decreased on CF macrophages. Beside, no difference was observed for mCD14, CD16, CD64, TLR-4 and TLR1/TLR-2 expressions. Moreover, a strong inhibition of phagocytosis was observed for CF macrophages. Elsewhere CFTR inhibition in non-CF macrophages also led to alterations of phagocytosis function as well as CD11b expression. Conclusions Altogether, these findings demonstrate excessive inflammation in CF macrophages, characterized by overproduction of sCD14 and inflammatory cytokines, with decreased expression of CD11b and TLR-5, and impaired phagocytosis. This leads to altered clearance of pathogens and non-resolution of infection by CF macrophages, thereby inducing an exaggerated pro-inflammatory response. PMID:24098711

  16. Ataluren and similar compounds (specific therapies for premature termination codon class I mutations) for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Aisha A; Higgins, Colin; Sinha, Ian P; Southern, Kevin W

    2017-01-19

    Cystic fibrosis is a common life-shortening genetic disorder in the Caucasian population (less common in other ethnic groups) caused by the mutation of a single gene that codes for the production of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. This protein coordinates the transport of salt (and bicarbonate) across cell surfaces and the mutation most notably affects the airways. In the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis, defective protein results in a dehydrated surface liquid and compromised mucociliary clearance. The resulting thick mucus makes the airway prone to chronic infection and inflammation, which consequently damages the structure of the airways, eventually leading to respiratory failure. Additionally, abnormalities in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein lead to other systemic complications including malnutrition, diabetes and subfertility.Five classes of mutation have been described, depending on the impact of the mutation on the processing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein in the cell. In class I mutations, the presence of premature termination codons prevents the production of any functional protein resulting in a severe cystic fibrosis phenotype. Advances in the understanding of the molecular genetics of cystic fibrosis has led to the development of novel mutation-specific therapies. Therapies targeting class I mutations (premature termination codons) aim to mask the abnormal gene sequence and enable the normal cellular mechanism to read through the mutation, potentially restoring the production of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein. This could in turn make salt transport in the cells function more normally and may decrease the chronic infection and inflammation that characterises lung disease in people with cystic fibrosis. To evaluate the benefits and harms of ataluren and similar compounds on clinically important outcomes in people with

  17. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use.

  18. Eltgol acutelly improves airway clearance and reduces static pulmonary volumes in adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Fernando Silva; Lopes, Agnaldo José; Moço, Vanessa Joaquim Ribeiro; Cavalcanti de Souza, Felipe; Silveira de Menezes, Sara Lúcia

    2014-06-01

    Chest physical therapy techniques are essential in order to reduce the frequency of recurrent pulmonary infections that progressively affect lung function in cystic fibrosis patients. Recently, ELTGOL (L'Expiration Lente Totale Glotte Ouverte en décubitus Latéral) emerged as an inexpensive and easy to perform therapeutic option. The aim of this study was to compare the acute effects of ELTGOL and the Flutter valve in stable adult patients with cystic fibrosis. [Subjects and Methods] This was a randomized, crossover study with a sample of cystic fibrosis outpatients. The subjects underwent two protocols (Flutter Valve and ELTGOL interventions, referred to as ELTGOL and FLUTTER) in a randomized order with a one-week washout interval between them. The main outcomes were pulmonary function variables and expectorated sputum dry weight. [Results] ELTGOL cleared 0.34 g more of secretions than FLUTTER (95% CI 0.11 to 0.57). When comparing the physiological effects of ELTGOL and FLUTTER, the first was superior in improving airway resistance (-0.51 cmH2O/L/s; 95% CI -0.88 to -0.14) and airway conductance (0.016 L/s/cmH2O; 95% CI 0.008 to 0.023). [Conclusion] ELTGOL promoted higher secretion removal and improvement in airway resistance and conductance than the Flutter valve. These techniques were equivalent in reducing the pulmonary hyperinflation and air trapping in cystic fibrosis patients.

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator inhibitors CFTR(inh)-172 and GlyH-101 target mitochondrial functions, independently of chloride channel inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Mairead; Trudel, Stephanie; Brouillard, Franck; Bouillaud, Frederick; Colas, Julien; Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Ollero, Mario; Edelman, Aleksander; Fritsch, Janine

    2010-04-01

    Two highly potent and selective cystic fibrosis (CF) transmembrane regulator (CFTR) inhibitors have been identified by high-throughput screening: the thiazolidinone CFTR(inh)-172 [3-[(3-trifluoromethyl)phenyl]-5-[(4-carboxyphenyl)methylene]- 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidinone] and the glycine hydrazide GlyH-101 [N-(2-naphthalenyl)-((3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene)glycine hydrazide]. Inhibition of the CFTR chloride channel by these compounds has been suggested to be of pharmacological interest in the treatment of secretory diarrheas and polycystic kidney disease. In addition, functional inhibition of CFTR by CFTR(inh)-172 has been proposed to be sufficient to mimic the CF inflammatory profile. In the present study, we investigated the effects of the two compounds on reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mitochondrial membrane potential in several cell lines: the CFTR-deficient human lung epithelial IB3-1 (expressing the heterozygous F508del/W1282X mutation), the isogenic CFTR-corrected C38, and HeLa and A549 as non-CFTR-expressing controls. Both inhibitors were able to induce a rapid increase in ROS levels and depolarize mitochondria in the four cell types, suggesting that these effects are independent of CFTR inhibition. In HeLa cells, these events were associated with a decrease in the rate of oxygen consumption, with GlyH-101 demonstrating a higher potency than CFTR(inh)-172. The impact of CFTR inhibitors on inflammatory parameters was also tested in HeLa cells. CFTR(inh)-172, but not GlyH-101, induced nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). CFTR(inh)-172 slightly decreased interleukin-8 secretion, whereas GlyH-101 induced a slight increase. These results support the conclusion that CFTR inhibitors may exert nonspecific effects regarding ROS production, mitochondrial failure, and activation of the NF-kappaB signaling pathway, independently of CFTR inhibition.

  20. Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cells Prevent Autoimmunity, but Induce Pulmonary Inflammation in Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nanna Siegmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Inflammation is a major and critical component of the lung pathology in the hereditary disease cystic fibrosis. The molecular mechanisms of chronic inflammation in cystic fibrosis require definition. Methods: We used several genetic mouse models to test a role of iNKT cells and ceramide in pulmonary inflammation of cystic fibrosis mice. Inflammation was determined by the pulmonary cytokine profil and the abundance of inflammatory cells in the lung. Results: Here we provide a new concept how inflammation in the lung of individuals with cystic fibrosis is initiated. We show that in cystic fibrosis mice the mutation in the Cftr gene provokes a significant up-regulation of iNKT cells in the lung. Accumulation of iNKT cells serves to control autoimmune disease, which is triggered by a ceramide-mediated induction of cell death in CF organs. Autoimmunity becomes in particular overt in cystic fibrosis mice lacking iNKT cells and although suppression of the autoimmune response by iNKT cells is beneficial, IL-17+ iNKT cells attract macrophages and neutrophils to CF lungs resulting in chronic inflammation. Genetic deletion of iNKT cells in cystic fibrosis mice prevents inflammation in CF lungs. Conclusion: Our data demonstrate an important function of iNKT cells in the chronic inflammation affecting cystic fibrosis lungs. iNKT cells suppress the auto-immune response induced by ceramide-mediated death of epithelial cells in CF lungs, but also induce a chronic pulmonary inflammation.

  1. Chest CT features of cystic fibrosis in Korea: Comparison with non-cystic fibrosis diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, So Yeon; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Tae Jung; Kim, Tae Sung [Dept. of Radiology, and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Min Jae [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Hyun Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a rare congenital disease in Korea, and its clinical and imaging findings are unclear. The objective of our study was to describe the clinical and CT features of CF in Korea and compare its features with those of other diseases mimicking CF. From November 1994 to December 2014, a presumptive diagnosis of CF was made in 23 patients based on clinical or radiological examination. After the exclusion of 10 patients without diagnostic confirmation, 13 patients were included in the study. A diagnosis of CF was made with the CF gene study. CT findings were evaluated for the presence and distribution of parenchymal abnormalities including bronchiectasis, tree-in-bud (TIB) pattern, mucus plugging, consolidation, and mosaic attenuation. Of the 13 patients, 7 (median age, 15 years) were confirmed as CF, 4 (median age, 19 years) had primary ciliary dyskinesia, 1 had bronchiectasis of unknown cause, and 1 had chronic asthma. CT of patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging in all patients, with upper lung predominance (57%). In CT of the non-CF patients, bilateral bronchiectasis, TIB pattern, mosaic attenuation, and mucus plugging were also predominant features, with lower lung predominance (50%). Korean patients with CF showed bilateral bronchiectasis, cellular bronchiolitis, mucus plugging, and mosaic attenuation, which overlapped with those of non-CF patients. CF gene study is recommended for the definitive diagnosis of CF in patients with these clinical and imaging features.

  2. Genotypes and phenotypes in cystic fibrosis and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator-related disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bombieri, Cristina; Seia, Manuela; Castellani, Carlo

    2015-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is characterized by remarkable variability in severity, rate of disease progression, and organ involvement. In spite of the considerable amount of data collected on the relationship between genotype and phenotype in CF, this is still a challenging matter of debate. Barriers to the interpretation of this connection are the large number of mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene, the difficulties in attributing several of them to a specific mode of dysfunction, and a limited number of the almost 2,000 mutations so far detected, which have been clinically annotated. In addition to that, the heterogeneity of clinical manifestations in individuals with the same CFTR genotypes indicates that disease severity is modulated by other genes and by environmental factors, of which the most relevant is possibly treatment in its aspects of appropriateness, early start in life, and adherence. The phenotype variability extends to conditions, named CFTR-related disorders, which are connected with CFTR dysfunction, but do not satisfy diagnostic criteria for CF. The current level of knowledge does not allow use of the CFTR genotype to predict individual outcome and cannot be used as an indicator of CF prognosis. This might change with the development of treatments targeting specific mutations and possibly capable of changing the natural history of the disease. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Cleavage of CXCR1 on neutrophils disables bacterial killing in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, Dominik; Latzin, Philipp; Hordijk, Peter; Marcos, Veronica; Rudolph, Carsten; Woischnik, Markus; Krauss-Etschmann, Susanne; Koller, Barbara; Reinhardt, Dietrich; Roscher, Adelbert A; Roos, Dirk; Griese, Matthias

    2007-12-01

    Interleukin-8 (IL-8) activates neutrophils via the chemokine receptors CXCR1 and CXCR2. However, the airways of individuals with cystic fibrosis are frequently colonized by bacterial pathogens, despite the presence of large numbers of neutrophils and IL-8. Here we show that IL-8 promotes bacterial killing by neutrophils through CXCR1 but not CXCR2. Unopposed proteolytic activity in the airways of individuals with cystic fibrosis cleaved CXCR1 on neutrophils and disabled their bacterial-killing capacity. These effects were protease concentration-dependent and also occurred to a lesser extent in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Receptor cleavage induced the release of glycosylated CXCR1 fragments that were capable of stimulating IL-8 production in bronchial epithelial cells via Toll-like receptor 2. In vivo inhibition of proteases by inhalation of alpha1-antitrypsin restored CXCR1 expression and improved bacterial killing in individuals with cystic fibrosis. The cleavage of CXCR1, the functional consequences of its cleavage, and the identification of soluble CXCR1 fragments that behave as bioactive components represent a new pathophysiologic mechanism in cystic fibrosis and other chronic lung diseases.

  4. Pathogen and autoantigen homologous regions within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein suggest an autoimmune treatable component of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J

    2011-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel provides the glutathione and hypochlorous acid necessary for bactericidal/viricidal actions. CFTR mutations block these effects, diminishing pathogen defence and allowing extracellular pathogen accumulation, where antibody encounter is likely. KEGG pathway analysis of the CFTR interactome shows that CFTR is involved in pathogen entry pathways and immune defence as well as in pathways relevant to comorbid conditions (diabetes, cardiomyopathies and sexual organ development). Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus infections decrease the lifespan of cystic fibrosis patients and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia colonization is increased. Autoantibodies, targeting myeloperoxidase, the bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein and calgranulin may further compromise pathogen defence. Short consensus sequences, within immunogenic extracellular regions of the CFTR protein, are homologous to proteins expressed by P. aeruginosa, S. aureus and S. maltophilia, and to several autoantigens, with a universal overlap between autoantigen/pathogen/CFTR consensi. Antibodies to pathogens are thus likely responsible for the creation of these autoantibodies, which, with pathogen antibodies, may target the CFTR protein acting as antagonists, further compromising its function. This creates a feedforward cycle, diminishing the function of the CFTR protein and increasing the probability of pathogen accumulation and antibody production at every turn. Interruption of this cycle by antibody adsorption or immunosuppressant therapy may be beneficial in cystic fibrosis.

  5. Activated MCTC mast cells infiltrate diseased lung areas in cystic fibrosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Löfdahl Claes-Göran

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although mast cells are regarded as important regulators of inflammation and tissue remodelling, their role in cystic fibrosis (CF and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF has remained less studied. This study investigates the densities and phenotypes of mast cell populations in multiple lung compartments from patients with CF, IPF and never smoking controls. Methods Small airways, pulmonary vessels, and lung parenchyma were subjected to detailed immunohistochemical analyses using lungs from patients with CF (20 lung regions; 5 patients, IPF (21 regions; 7 patients and controls (16 regions; 8 subjects. In each compartment the densities and distribution of MCT and MCTC mast cell populations were studied as well as the mast cell expression of IL-6 and TGF-β. Results In the alveolar parenchyma in lungs from patients with CF, MCTC numbers increased in areas showing cellular inflammation or fibrosis compared to controls. Apart from an altered balance between MCTC and MCT cells, mast cell in CF lungs showed elevated expression of IL-6. In CF, a decrease in total mast cell numbers was observed in small airways and pulmonary vessels. In patients with IPF, a significantly elevated MCTC density was present in fibrotic areas of the alveolar parenchyma with increased mast cell expression of TGF-β. The total mast cell density was unchanged in small airways and decreased in pulmonary vessels in IPF. Both the density, as well as the percentage, of MCTC correlated positively with the degree of fibrosis. The increased density of MCTC, as well as MCTC expression of TGF-β, correlated negatively with patient lung function. Conclusions The present study reveals that altered mast cell populations, with increased numbers of MCTC in diseased alveolar parenchyma, represents a significant component of the histopathology in CF and IPF. The mast cell alterations correlated to the degree of tissue remodelling and to lung function parameters. Further

  6. "Bong lung" in cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hauser Jenny

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Marijuana or "bong" lung has been recently described. Subjects typically develop large peripheral paraseptal lung bullae and are predisposed to spontaneous pneumothoraces. The underlying mechanism for bullae formation is uncertain, but probably relates to direct lung toxicity and repeated barotrauma as the smoker performs frequent valsalva manoeuvres in an attempt to derive a greater drug effect. Case presentation We describe a case of probable "bong lung" occurring in a 23-year-old Caucasian man with cystic fibrosis who had a history of recurrent pneumothoraces and unusual findings on sputum cytology. Conclusion Our case highlights the importance of questioning young adult cystic fibrosis patients about illicit drug use and the utility of sputum cytology and computed tomography scanning when patients present with pneumothoraces and deteriorations in clinical status.

  7. [Inhaled treatments in cystic fibrosis: what's new in 2013?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubus, J-C; Bassinet, L; Chedevergne, F; Delaisi, B; Desmazes-Dufeu, N; Reychler, G; Vecellio, L

    2014-04-01

    In the past few years some new inhaled drugs and inhalation devices have been proposed for the treatment of cystic fibrosis. Breath-controlled nebulizers allow increased pulmonary deposition, with a lower variability and a shorter delivery time. The new dry powder formulations of tobramycin, colistine and mannitol require a change in the inhalation technique which must be slow and deep. In the field of the inhaled mucolytic drugs, hypertonic saline and mannitol have an indication in some patients. With regard to antibiotics, dry-powder tobramycin and colistine can be substituted for the same drug delivered by nebulization. Nebulized aztreonam needs more studies to determine its place. These new treatments represent a definite advance for cystic fibrosis patients and need to be known by all practitioners. Their position in our therapeutic arsenal remains to be accurately defined. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. MicroRNA Expression in Cystic Fibrosis Airway Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M. Greene

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs have emerged as major regulators of the protein content of a cell. In the most part, miRs negatively regulate target mRNA expression, with sets of miRs predicted to regulate certain signaling pathways. The miR expression profile of endobronchial brushings is altered in people with cystic fibrosis (CF compared to those without CF. How this impacts on CF has important implications for our growing understanding of the pathophysiology of CF lung disease and the development of new therapeutics to treat its pulmonary manifestations. Herein we discuss the potential consequences of altered miR expression in CF airway epithelium particularly with respect to cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR expression, innate immunity and toll-like receptor signalling and explore how best to exploit these changes for therapeutic benefit.

  9. Multifunctional superparamagnetic nanoparticles for enhanced drug transport in cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijo, Leisha M.; Brandt, Yekaterina I.; Rivera, Antonio C.; Cook, Nathaniel C.; Plumley, John B.; Withers, Nathan J.; Kopciuch, Michael; Smolyakov, Gennady A.; Huber, Dale L.; Smyth, Hugh D.; Osinski, Marek

    2012-10-01

    Iron oxide colloidal nanoparticles (ferrofluids) are investigated for application in the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung infections, the leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. We investigate the use of iron oxide nanoparticles to increase the effectiveness of administering antibiotics through aerosol inhalation using two mechanisms: directed particle movement in the presence of an inhomogeneous static external magnetic field and magnetic hyperthermia. Magnetic hyperthermia is an effective method for decreasing the viscosity of the mucus and biofilm, thereby enhancing drug, immune cell, and antibody penetration to the affected area. Iron oxide nanoparticles of various sizes and morphologies were synthesized and tested for specific losses (heating power). Nanoparticles in the superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic size range exhibited excellent heating power. Additionally, iron oxide / zinc selenide core/shell nanoparticles were prepared, in order to enable imaging of the iron oxide nanoparticles. We also report on synthesis and characterization of MnSe/ZnSeS alloyed quantum dots.

  10. Cystic fibrosis school for 10-year-olds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Schiøtz, Peter Oluf

    2000-01-01

    on which they can make their own choices in order to improve their quality of life. In practical terms we make classes of 4-8 10-year-old children with CF. We give them 6 lessons of 3 hours. One lesson every second month. The lessons substitute a monthly visit. The psysiotherapist and the nurse teach...... give them a good basis on which they can make their own choices about how they want to live their lives with cystic fibrosis and with optimal quality of life.......Compliance or rather lack of compliance has always been a problem when treating patients with cystic fibrosis. The patients tend to drop the treatment more or less if the treatment gets too complicated or laboured. We have attempted a systematical education of our patients in a CF school...

  11. ATPase activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Ramjeesingh, M; Wang, W; Garami, E; Hewryk, M; Lee, D; Rommens, J M; Galley, K; Bear, C E

    1996-11-08

    The gene mutated in cystic fibrosis codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cyclic AMP-activated chloride channel thought to be critical for salt and water transport by epithelial cells. Plausible models exist to describe a role for ATP hydrolysis in CFTR channel activity; however, biochemical evidence that CFTR possesses intrinsic ATPase activity is lacking. In this study, we report the first measurements of the rate of ATP hydrolysis by purified, reconstituted CFTR. The mutation CFTRG551D resides within a motif conserved in many nucleotidases and is known to cause severe human disease. Following reconstitution the mutant protein exhibited both defective ATP hydrolysis and channel gating, providing direct evidence that CFTR utilizes ATP to gate its channel activity.

  12. Glycosylation and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glick Mary Catherine

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR has been known for the past 11 years to be a membrane glycoprotein with chloride channel activity. Only recently has the glycosylation of CFTR been examined in detail, by O'Riordan et al in Glycobiology. Using cells that overexpress wild-type (wtCFTR, the presence of polylactosamine was noted on the fully glycosylated form of CFTR. In the present commentary the results of that work are discussed in relation to the glycosylation phenotype of cystic fibrosis (CF, and the cellular localization and processing of ΔF508 CFTR. The significance of the glycosylation will be known when endogenous CFTR from primary human tissue is examined.

  13. Family structure and mothers' caregiving of children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayer, Debra; Ganong, Lawrence

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to examine differences in the experiences of mothers of children with cystic fibrosis who are in diverse family structures (first-marriage families, stepfamily households, single-parent households). In particular, mothers' perceptions of children's health, adherence to prescribed treatments, and help received from others were compared and predictors of treatment adherence were examined. Children's health and adherence to treatment regimens were not related to family structure. Mothers had the major responsibility for seeing that cystic fibrosis treatments were followed, regardless of family structure. Single mothers received less help than married and repartnered mothers. Married fathers helped with treatments more than nonresidential divorced fathers and stepfathers. Implications for nursing practice and suggestions for future research are offered.

  14. Exercise performance in cystic fibrosis before and after bilateral lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelberg, D A; Systrom, D M; Markowitz, D H; Zorb, S L; Wright, C; Wain, J C; Ginns, L C

    1998-11-01

    Lung transplantation improves pulmonary function and quality of life for patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis; however, a systematic evaluation of exercise performance in lung transplant recipients with cystic fibrosis has not been reported. Ten patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis performed incremental exercise testing before and after bilateral lung transplantation; their results were compared with those of 10 age-similar healthy volunteers. Breath-by-breath measurements of gas exchange and ventilation were obtained, arterial blood was sampled each minute, and cardiac output determined at rest and peak exercise by radionuclide ventriculography. The arterial-venous O2 content difference was derived by the Fick principle. After transplantation, peak O2 uptake improved (31% +/- 3% vs 45% +/- 4% predicted, P = .03) but was still reduced versus normal (100% +/- 8% predicted, p < .0001). Exercise was limited by pulmonary mechanics in all patients before transplantation but in only 2 after transplantation. Compared with control subjects, the lactate threshold occurred early, both before and after transplantation. Peak exercise cardiac output and arterial O2 content were not different from normal, either before or after transplantation. In contrast, the peak exercise arterial-venous O2 content difference was markedly reduced before and after transplantation versus normal (7.1 +/- 1.2 and 9.3 +/- 0.9 vs 17.1 +/- 1.2 mL/dL, p < or = .0001 for each) and without significant improvement. Exercise performance in patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis improves after lung transplantation but remains well below normal. Reduced systemic O2 extraction is an important factor limiting exercise in patients with cystic fibrosis after transplantation and may also contribute to the exercise limit before transplantation.

  15. Vitamin D and bone health in adults with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Linda L; Judd, Suzanne E; Shah, Reshma; Sanyal, Rupan; Ziegler, Thomas R; Tangpricha, Vin

    2008-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have chronic pancreatic insufficiency leading to malabsorption of fat-soluble vitamins, including vitamin D which can contribute to poor skeletal health and respiratory function. This study evaluated the prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency and its impact on bone and respiratory health in adults with CF. This was a retrospective study in which data were collected from medical records over a 2-year period. Data included patient demographics, lung function, biochemical data, bone mineral densities, X-rays and ascertainment of use of vitamin supplements. Data were collected from medical records at a single accredited CF Center. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] levels and bone mineral density studies were also collected. A total of 185 adults with CF were identified with a mean age of 29 +/- 9 years. The prevalence of vitamin D insufficiency [25(OH)D vitamin D supplementation was protective against vitamin D insufficiency whereas use of multivitamins was not. There was a small, but significant, positive association between serum 25(OH)D and FEV(1) per cent predicted after controlling for age, gender, BMI and race (R(2) = 0.30, P vitamin D insufficiency and poor skeletal health is high in the US CF population. Vitamin D status appears to be positively associated with lung function. Prospective studies to examine the impact of correction of vitamin D insufficiency on skeletal and lung health in adult CF are warranted.

  16. Proton MRI appearance of cystic fibrosis: Comparison to CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puderbach, Michael; Eichinger, Monika; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Gahr, Julie; Mueller, Frank-Michael [Childrens Hospital, University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Pulmonology, Cystic Fibrosis Center and Infectious Diseases, Heidelberg (Germany); Ley, Sebastian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); Childrens Hospital, University Heidelberg, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Tuengerthal, Siegfried; Schmaehl, Astrid [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Department of Radiology, Heidelberg (Germany); Fink, Christian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Munich, Medical Center Grosshadern, Institute of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plathow, Christian [Department of Radiology (E010), DKFZ, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiebel, Matthias [Thoraxklinik am Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Department of Pulmonology, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent inherited disorder leading to premature death in the Caucasian population. As life expectancy is limited by pulmonary complications, repeated imaging [chest X-ray, multislice high-resolution computed tomography (MS-HRCT)] is required in the follow-up. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lung parenchyma is a promising new diagnostic tool. Its value for imaging lung changes caused by CF compared with CT is demonstrated. MRI performs well when compared with CT, which serves as the gold standard. Its lack in spatial resolution is obvious, but advantages in contrast and functional assessment compensate for this limitation. Thus, MRI is a reasonable alternative for imaging the CF lung and should be introduced as a radiation-free modality for follow-up studies in CF patients. For further evaluation of the impact of MRI, systematic studies comparing MRI and conventional imaging modalities are necessary. Furthermore, the value of the additional functional MRI (fMRI) information has to be studied, and a scoring system for the morphological and functional aspect of MRI has to be established. (orig.)

  17. Increased Congregational Support for Parents of Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Szczesniak, Rhonda D.; Zou, Yuanshu; Wetzel, J. Denise; Krause, Neal; Grossoehme, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Positive health outcomes are related to adults’ religious congregational participation. For parents of children with chronic disease, structured daily care routines and or strict infection-control precautions may limit participation. For this exploratory study, we examined the relationship between congregational support and religious coping by parents of children with cystic fibrosis (CF) compared to parents for whom child health issues were not significant stressors. CF parents reported high...

  18. [Supporting the family after a diagnosis of cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courlet, Amélie; Dodane, Marie-Agnès; Garnier, Frédérique

    2015-01-01

    The diagnosis of cystic fibrosis can upset the relationship between parents and their baby. The announcement signals the disappearance of the "perfect child" and it can be associated with a feeling of guilt on the part of the parents. The child health nurse has a central role in supporting the family during this difficult period, in order to favour the parent-child bond. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Cystic Fibrosis%囊性纤维化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海潮

    2006-01-01

    囊性纤维化(Cystic Fibrosis,CF)的主要病生理改变为外分泌腺功能紊乱,可引起慢性肺部疾病、胰腺外分泌功能低下以及汗液氯化钠含量增高等特征性病变,好发于白种人.

  20. Emergence of respiratory Streptococcus agalactiae isolates in cystic fibrosis patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vera Eickel; Barbara Kahl; Beatrice Reinisch; Angelika Dübbers; Peter Küster; Claudia Brandt; Barbara Spellerberg

    2009-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae is a well-known pathogen for neonates and immunocompromized adults. Beyond the neonatal period, S. agalactiae is rarely found in the respiratory tract. During 2002-2008 we noticed S. agalactiae in respiratory secretions of 30/185 (16%) of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The median age of these patients was 3-6 years older than the median age CF patients not harboring S. agalactiae. To analyze, if the S. agalactiae isolates from CF patients were clonal, further characte...

  1. Care of the adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perino, B; Trevisan, A; Falchetti, A; Gaia, E; Petrarulo, M

    1993-12-01

    Although no therapeutic breakthrough has taken place, the life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has dramatically increased in the last 20 yrs. Nowadays, more than 80% of the patients outlive 18 yrs of age, with a mean survival age approaching 28 yrs. These favourable results are due mainly to early diagnosis and continuous treatment in specialized centres. The main therapeutic items are: prevention and early treatment of lung infections, mainly due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, drainage of bronchial secretions (postural drainage, forced expiratory techniques, positive-expiratory-pressure mask, autogenic drainage,...), substitutive therapy with pancreatic enzymes and hypercaloric diet. Thus cystic fibrosis is increasingly a disease which involves adults, with many related problems, which span from the difficulties of prescribing an effective antibiotic therapy in cases with multiple resistances, to combining the need for a long daily physiotherapy schedule with school or a working life. Sexual problems and related psychological troubles are an important issue in the management of cystic fibrosis in adult patients, and are accordingly treated.

  2. Transtracheal aspiration in pulmonary infection in children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, I; Fink, R

    1983-01-01

    Six transtracheal aspirations (TTA) and expectorated sputum specimens were collected from four children suffering from cystic fibrosis who had pulmonary infection. Specimens obtained from both sites were cultured for aerobic bacteria and TTA aspirates were also cultured for anaerobes. Differences in bacteria isolated in TTA and sputum aspirates were present in all instances. Six isolates were recovered in both sites (three Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Staphylococcus aureus and one Aspergillus flavus). Five aerobic isolates were recovered only in the expectorated sputum and not in TTA aspirations (two Klebsiella pneumoniae and one each of P. aeruginosa, Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis). Nine organisms were isolated only from the TTA (two each of Veillonella parvula and Alpha hemolytic streptococci, and one each of Bacteroides fragilis, B. melaninogenicus, Lactobacillus sp., Haemophilus influenzae and Gamma hemolytic streptococci). The recovery of anaerobic organisms from four of the six TTA specimens suggests a possible role for these organisms in the etiology of pulmonary infection in cystic fibrosis. We found TTA to be helpful in the bacterial diagnosis and management of pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis.

  3. Pulmonary bacterial pathogens in cystic fibrosis patients and antibiotic therapy: a tool for the health workers

    OpenAIRE

    Coutinho, Henrique Douglas M.; Falcão-Silva,Vivyanne S.; Gonçalves, Gregório Fernandes

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most common and best known genetic disease involving a defect in transepithelial Cl- transport by mutations in the CF gene on chromosome 7, which codes for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein (CFTR). The most serious symptoms are observed in the lungs, augmenting the risk of bacterial infection. The objective of this review was to describe the bacterial pathogens colonizing patients with cystic fibrosis. A systematic search was conducted usin...

  4. Birth distribution in cystic fibrosis in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean, Quebec, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daigneault, J; Aubin, G; Simard, F; De Braekeleer, M

    1991-09-01

    Although a seasonal trend in the birth distribution has been reported in cystic fibrosis (CF), this finding is still very controversial. The birth distribution of 113 patients with cystic fibrosis born in Saguenay-Lac-St-Jean (complete ascertainment) was analysed using two different statistical methods. Our results showed no monthly or seasonal birth variation. It is likely that a bias owing to incomplete ascertainment might explain why some previous studies found a seasonal trend in the birth distribution of cystic fibrosis.

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa antibiotic resistance in Australian cystic fibrosis centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel J; Ramsay, Kay A; Yerkovich, Stephanie T; Reid, David W; Wainwright, Claire E; Grimwood, Keith; Bell, Scott C; Kidd, Timothy J

    2016-02-01

    In cystic fibrosis (CF), chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is associated with increased morbidity, antibiotic treatments and mortality. By linking Australian CF registry data with a national microbiological data set, we examined the association between where treatment was delivered, its intensity and P. aeruginosa antibiotic resistance. Sputa were collected from paediatric and adult CF patients attending 18 Australian CF centres. P. aeruginosa antibiotic susceptibilities determined by local laboratories were correlated with clinical characteristics, treatment intensity and infection with strains commonly shared among Australian CF patients. Between-centre differences in treatment and antibiotic resistance were also compared. Large variations in antibiotic usage, maintenance treatment practices and multi-antibiotic resistant P. aeruginosa (MARPA) prevalence exist between Australian CF centres, although the overall proportions of MARPA isolates were similar in paediatric and adult centres (31% vs 35%, P = 0.29). Among paediatric centres, MARPA correlated with intravenous antibiotic usage and the Australian state where treatment was delivered, while azithromycin, reduced lung function and treating state predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. In adult centres, body mass index (BMI) and treating state were associated with MARPA, while intravenous antibiotic use was predicted by gender, BMI, dornase-alpha, azithromycin, lung function and treating state. In adults, P. aeruginosa strains AUST-01 and AUST-02 independently predicted intravenous antibiotic usage. Increased treatment intensity in paediatric centres and the Australian state where treatment was received are both associated with greater risk of MARPA, but not worse clinical outcomes. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  6. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein expression in the male excretory duct system during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcorelles, Pascale; Gillet, Danièle; Friocourt, Gaëlle; Ledé, Françoise; Samaison, Laura; Huguen, Geneviève; Ferec, Claude

    2012-03-01

    Sterility due to bilateral destruction in utero or in early infancy resulting in congenital absence of the vas deferens is the rule in male patients with cystic fibrosis. To understand the developmental pattern of this anomaly, the microscopic morphology of the male excretory system was analyzed during development and the expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was explored by immunohistochemistry. We observed that cystic fibrosis fetuses had no excretory ducts agenesis or obstruction until 22 weeks of gestation. However, a focal inflammatory pattern and mucinous plugs in the oldest cystic fibrosis case suggested a disruptive mechanism. Immunolabeling of cytoplasmic epithelial cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein was demonstrated in all cystic fibrosis and control cases with a similar pattern of expression of the protein between age-matched controls and cystic fibrosis cases. At midgestation, an apical intensification appeared in both cystic fibrosis and control cases and was stable during the remainder of fetal life. No gradient of intensity could be detected between the different segments of the excretory tract. These findings are different from those reported in adults. The absence of any morphologic anomaly until 22 weeks of gestation, the focal destruction of the epithelial structures during the second trimester, and the chronological pattern of expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are of interest for a better understanding of the pathophysiology of this disease.

  7. [Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database: An information system for storage and management of clinical and microbiological data of cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Claudia I; Palau, María J; Martina, Pablo; Achiary, Carlos; Achiary, Andrés; Bettiol, Marisa; Montanaro, Patricia; Cazzola, María L; Leguizamón, Mariana; Massillo, Cintia; Figoli, Cecilia; Valeiras, Brenda; Perez, Silvia; Rentería, Fernando; Diez, Graciela; Yantorno, Osvaldo M; Bosch, Alejandra

    2016-01-01

    The epidemiological and clinical management of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients suffering from acute pulmonary exacerbations or chronic lung infections demands continuous updating of medical and microbiological processes associated with the constant evolution of pathogens during host colonization. In order to monitor the dynamics of these processes, it is essential to have expert systems capable of storing and subsequently extracting the information generated from different studies of the patients and microorganisms isolated from them. In this work we have designed and developed an on-line database based on an information system that allows to store, manage and visualize data from clinical studies and microbiological analysis of bacteria obtained from the respiratory tract of patients suffering from cystic fibrosis. The information system, named Cystic Fibrosis Cloud database is available on the http://servoy.infocomsa.com/cfc_database site and is composed of a main database and a web-based interface, which uses Servoy's product architecture based on Java technology. Although the CFC database system can be implemented as a local program for private use in CF centers, it can also be used, updated and shared by different users who can access the stored information in a systematic, practical and safe manner. The implementation of the CFC database could have a significant impact on the monitoring of respiratory infections, the prevention of exacerbations, the detection of emerging organisms, and the adequacy of control strategies for lung infections in CF patients.

  8. Aztreonam lysine: a novel inhalational antibiotic for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkins, Michael D; Elborn, J Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Acquisition of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the most prevalent organism isolated from cystic fibrosis (CF) airways, is associated with an accelerated clinical deterioration and reduced survival. Strategies to chronically suppress P. aeruginosa infections in individuals with CF have evolved over the last four decades and now largely focus on regular administration of aerosolized antibiotics. Aztreonam lysine (AZLI; Cayston, Gilead Pharmaceuticals [Foster City, CA, USA]), a novel formulation of the monobactam aztreonam suitable for aerosol delivery has recently been developed. AZLI is administered as 75 mg three-times daily for 28 days in 'on/off' cycles using the Altera/eFlow electronic nebulizer (PARI Innovative Manufacturers [Midlothian, VA, USA]). In individuals with CF chronically infected with P. aeruginosa, AZLI improved healthcare-associated quality-of-life scores, pulmonary function and weight, prolonged time to requirement of antibacterial therapy for symptoms of pulmonary exacerbation and reduced P. aeruginosa sputum burdens. These outcomes were durable over 18 months of cycled use. AZLI has been demonstrated to be safe and effective, and expands available chronic maintenance therapies in CF.

  9. Nocturnal hypoxemia in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Terse Trindade Ramos

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of nocturnal hypoxemia and its association with pulmonary function, nutritional status, sleep macrostructure, and obstructive respiratory events during sleep in a population of clinically stable children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF.METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving 67 children and adolescents with CF between 2 and 14 years of age. All of the participants underwent polysomnography, and SpO2 was measured by pulse oximetry. We also evaluated the Shwachman-Kulczycki (S-K scores, spirometry findings, and nutritional status of the patients.RESULTS: The study involved 67 patients. The mean age of the patients was 8 years. The S-K scores differed significantly between the patients with and without nocturnal hypoxemia, which was defined as an SpO2 < 90% for more than 5% of the total sleep time (73.75 ± 6.29 vs. 86.38 ± 8.70; p < 0.01. Nocturnal hypoxemia correlated with the severity of lung disease, FEV1 (rs= −0.42; p = 0.01, FVC (rs= −0.46; p = 0.01, microarousal index (rs= 0.32; p = 0.01, and apnea-hypopnea index (rs = 0.56; p = 0.01.CONCLUSIONS: In this sample of patients with CF and mild-to-moderate lung disease, nocturnal oxygenation correlated with the S-K score, spirometry variables, sleep macrostructure variables, and the apnea-hypopnea index.

  10. Sleep-disordered breathing in patients with cystic fibrosis *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronezi, Jefferson; Carvalho, Ana Paula; Ricachinewsky, Claudio; Hoffmann, Anneliese; Kobayashi, Danielle Yuka; Piltcher, Otavio Bejzman; Silva, Fernando Antonio Abreu e; Martinez, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To test the hypothesis that disease severity in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is correlated with an increased risk of sleep apnea. Methods: A total of 34 CF patients underwent clinical and functional evaluation, as well as portable polysomnography, spirometry, and determination of IL-1β levels. Results: Mean apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), SpO2 on room air, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale score were 4.8 ± 2.6, 95.9 ± 1.9%, and 7.6 ± 3.8 points, respectively. Of the 34 patients, 19 were well-nourished, 6 were at nutritional risk, and 9 were malnourished. In the multivariate model to predict the AHI, the following variables remained significant: nutritional status (β = −0.386; p = 0.014); SpO2 (β = −0.453; p = 0.005), and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (β = 0.429; p = 0.006). The model explained 51% of the variation in the AHI. Conclusions: The major determinants of sleep apnea were nutritional status, SpO2, and daytime sleepiness. This knowledge not only provides an opportunity to define the clinical risk of having sleep apnea but also creates an avenue for the treatment and prevention of the disease. PMID:26398755

  11. The role for neutrophil extracellular traps in cystic fibrosis autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skopelja, Sladjana; Hamilton, B. JoNell; Jones, Jonathan D.; Yang, Mei-Ling; Mamula, Mark; Ashare, Alix; Gifford, Alex H.; Rigby, William F.C.

    2016-01-01

    While respiratory failure in cystic fibrosis (CF) frequently associates with chronic infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, no single factor predicts the extent of lung damage in CF. To elucidate other causes, we studied the autoantibody profile in CF and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, given the similar association of airway inflammation and autoimmunity in RA. Even though we observed that bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), carbamylated proteins, and citrullinated proteins all localized to the neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), which are implicated in the development of autoimmunity, our study demonstrates striking autoantibody specificity in CF. Particularly, CF patients developed anti-BPI autoantibodies but hardly any anti-citrullinated protein autoantibodies (ACPA). In contrast, ACPA-positive RA patients exhibited no reactivity with BPI. Interestingly, anti-carbamylated protein autoantibodies (ACarPA) were found in both cohorts but did not cross-react with BPI. Contrary to ACPA and ACarPA, anti-BPI autoantibodies recognized the BPI C-terminus in the absence of posttranslational modifications. In fact, we discovered that P. aeruginosa–mediated NET formation results in BPI cleavage by P. aeruginosa elastase, which suggests a novel mechanism in the development of autoimmunity to BPI. In accordance with this model, autoantibodies associated with presence of P. aeruginosa on sputum culture. Finally, our results provide a role for autoimmunity in CF disease severity, as autoantibody levels associate with diminished lung function. PMID:27777975

  12. Microstructural alterations of sputum in cystic fibrosis lung disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A.; Jung, James; Joseph, Andrea; Thaxton, Abigail L.; West, Natalie E.; Boyle, Michael P.; Hanes, Justin

    2016-01-01

    The stasis of mucus secretions in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients leads to recurrent infections and pulmonary exacerbations, resulting in decreased survival. Prior studies have assessed the biochemical and biophysical features of airway mucus in individuals with CF. However, these measurements are unable to probe mucus structure on microscopic length scales relevant to key players in the progression of CF-related lung disease, namely, viruses, bacteria, and neutrophils. In this study, we quantitatively determined sputum microstructure based on the diffusion of muco-inert nanoparticle probes in CF sputum and found that a reduction in sputum mesh pore size is characteristic of CF patients with reduced lung function, as indicated by measured FEV1. We also discovered that the effect of ex vivo treatment of CF sputum with rhDNase I (Pulmozyme) on microstructure is dependent upon the time interval between the most recent inhaled rhDNase I treatment and the sample collection. Microstructure of mucus may serve as a marker for the extent of CF lung disease and as a parameter for assessing the effectiveness of mucus-altering agents. PMID:27812540

  13. CFTR Modulators: Shedding Light on Precision Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-Pacheco, Miquéias

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-threatening monogenic disease afflicting Caucasian people. It affects the respiratory, gastrointestinal, glandular and reproductive systems. The major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF is the respiratory disorder caused by a vicious cycle of obstruction of the airways, inflammation and infection that leads to epithelial damage, tissue remodeling and end-stage lung disease. Over the past decades, life expectancy of CF patients has increased due to early diagnosis and improved treatments; however, these patients still present limited quality of life. Many attempts have been made to rescue CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) expression, function and stability, thereby overcoming the molecular basis of CF. Gene and protein variances caused by CFTR mutants lead to different CF phenotypes, which then require different treatments to quell the patients’ debilitating symptoms. In order to seek better approaches to treat CF patients and maximize therapeutic effects, CFTR mutants have been stratified into six groups (although several of these mutations present pleiotropic defects). The research with CFTR modulators (read-through agents, correctors, potentiators, stabilizers and amplifiers) has achieved remarkable progress, and these drugs are translating into pharmaceuticals and personalized treatments for CF patients. This review summarizes the main molecular and clinical features of CF, emphasizes the latest clinical trials using CFTR modulators, sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying these new and emerging treatments, and discusses the major breakthroughs and challenges to treating all CF patients. PMID:27656143

  14. Imaging of cystic fibrosis lung disease and clinical interpretation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wielpuetz, M.O.; Eichinger, M.; Kauczor, H.U. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Biederer, J. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Gross-Gerau Community Hospital (Germany). Radiologie Darmstadt; Wege, S. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Pulmonology and Respiratory Medicine; Stahl, M.; Sommerburg, O. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Mall, M.A. [Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Div. of Pediatric Pulmonology and Allergy and Cystic Fibrosis Center; Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Translational Pulmonology; Puderbach, M. [Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC) (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology with Nuclear Medicine; Hufeland Hospital, Bad Langensalza (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology

    2016-09-15

    Progressive lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) is the life-limiting factor of this autosomal recessive genetic disorder. Increasing implementation of CF newborn screening allows for a diagnosis even in pre-symptomatic stages. Improvements in therapy have led to a significant improvement in survival, the majority now being of adult age. Imaging provides detailed information on the regional distribution of CF lung disease, hence longitudinal imaging is recommended for disease monitoring in the clinical routine. Chest X-ray (CXR), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are now available as routine modalities, each with individual strengths and drawbacks, which need to be considered when choosing the optimal modality adapted to the clinical situation of the patient. CT stands out with the highest morphological detail and has often been a substitute for CXR for regular severity monitoring at specialized centers. Multidetector CT data can be post-processed with dedicated software for a detailed measurement of airway dimensions and bronchiectasis and potentially a more objective and precise grading of disease severity. However, changing to CT was inseparably accompanied by an increase in radiation exposure of CF patients, a young population with high sensitivity to ionizing radiation and lifetime accumulation of dose. MRI as a cross-sectional imaging modality free of ionizing radiation can depict morphological hallmarks of CF lung disease at lower spatial resolution but excels with comprehensive functional lung imaging, with time-resolved perfusion imaging currently being most valuable.

  15. Isolation of Pseudomonas cepacia in cystic fibrosis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth de Andrade Marques

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary infection on cystic fibrosis (CF patients are associated with a limited qualitative number of microorganisms. During the colonization process, Staphylococcus aureus usually preceedes Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This latter is at first non-mucoid, being replaced or associated to a mucoid morphotype which is rare in other diseases. In 1980, Pseudomonas cepacia appeared as an important agent in CF pulmonary infections with a mean frequency of about 6.1% isolations in different parts of the world. The primus colonization mainly occurs in the presence of pre-existent tissue lesions and the clinical progress of the disease is variable. In some patients it can be fulminant; in others it can cause a gradual and slow decrease in their pulmonary functions. The concern with this germ isolation is justified by its antibiotic multiple resistence and the possibility of direct transmission from a colonized patient to a non-colonized one. We reported the first case of P. cepacia infection in a CF patient in our area. The microbiological attendance to this patient had been made from 1986 to 1991 and the first positive culture appeared in 1988. The sensitivity profile showed that the primus colonization strain was sensitive to 9 of 17 tested antibiotics, however in the last culture the strain was resistent to all antibiotics. These data corroborate the need for monitoring the bacterial flora on CF patients respiratory system.

  16. Chronic ataluren (PTC124) treatment of nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschanski, M; Miller, L L; Shoseyov, D; Blau, H; Rivlin, J; Aviram, M; Cohen, M; Armoni, S; Yaakov, Y; Pugatsch, T; Pugatch, T; Cohen-Cymberknoh, M; Miller, N L; Reha, A; Northcutt, V J; Hirawat, S; Donnelly, K; Elfring, G L; Ajayi, T; Kerem, E

    2011-07-01

    In a subset of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), nonsense mutations (premature stop codons) disrupt production of full-length, functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Ataluren (PTC124) allows ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in mRNA. We evaluated drug activity and safety in patients with nonsense mutation CF who took ataluren three times daily (morning, midday and evening) for 12 weeks at either a lower dose (4, 4 and 8 mg·kg(-1)) or higher dose (10, 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1)). The study enrolled 19 patients (10 males and nine females aged 19-57 yrs; dose: lower 12, higher seven) with a classic CF phenotype, at least one CFTR nonsense mutation allele, and an abnormal nasal total chloride transport. Both ataluren doses were similarly active, improving total chloride transport with a combined mean change of -5.4 mV (pataluren administration produced time-dependent improvements in CFTR activity and clinical parameters with generally good tolerability.

  17. Interest of Colchicine for the Treatment of Cystic Fibrosis Patients. Preliminary Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Sermet-Gaudelus

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease is characterized by persistent inflammation. Antiinflammatory drugs, such as corticosteroids and ibuprofene, have proved to slow the decline of pulmonary function although their use is limited because of frequent adverse events. We hypothesized that colchicine could be an alternative treatment because of its antiinflammatory properties and upregulatory effect on cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR closely related proteins. We herein present results obtained in an open study of eight CF children treated with colchicine for at least 6 months. Clinical status was better in all patients and respiratory function tests significantly improved in five. Median duration of antibiotherapy decreased significantly. These preliminary results support our hypothesis of a beneficial effect of colchicine in CF patients and stress the need for a controlled therapeutic trial.

  18. Role of ATP binding and hydrolysis in the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taras Gout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The CFTR gene is unique within the ATP-binding cassette (ABC protein family, predominantly of transporters, by coding a chloride channel. The gating mechanism of ABC proteins has been characterized by the ATP Switch model in terms cycles of dimer formation and dissociation linked to ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. It would be of interest to assess the extent that Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR, a functional channel, fits the ATP Switch model for ABC transporters. Additional transporter mechanisms, namely those of Pgp and HlyB, are discussed for perspective. Literature search of databases selected key references in comparing and contrasting the gating mechanism. CFTR is a functional chloride channel facilitating transmembrane anion flow down electrochemical gradients. A dysfunctional CFTR protein results in cystic fibrosis, a fatal pleiotropic disease currently managed symptomatically. Understanding the gating mechanism will help target drug development aimed at alleviating and curing the disease.

  19. Plasma sCD14 as a Biomarker to Predict Pulmonary Exacerbations in Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Quon, Bradley S.; Ngan, David A.; Wilcox, Pearce G; S F Paul Man; Don D Sin

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: One in four cystic fibrosis (CF) patients diagnosed with a pulmonary exacerbation will not recover their baseline lung function despite standard treatment. This highlights the importance of preventing such events. Clinical decision-making can be improved through a simple blood test that predicts individuals at elevated short-term risk of an exacerbation. METHODS: We obtained plasma samples from 30 stable CF patients from the St. Paul's Hospital Adult CF Clinic (Vancouver, Canada)....

  20. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-01-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR ch...

  1. Inflammation and airway microbiota during cystic fibrosis pulmonary exacerbations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith T Zemanick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pulmonary exacerbations (PEx, frequently associated with airway infection and inflammation, are the leading cause of morbidity in cystic fibrosis (CF. Molecular microbiologic approaches detect complex microbiota from CF airway samples taken during PEx. The relationship between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function during CF PEx is not well understood. OBJECTIVE: To determine the relationships between airway microbiota, inflammation, and lung function in CF subjects treated for PEx. METHODS: Expectorated sputum and blood were collected and lung function testing performed in CF subjects during early (0-3d. and late treatment (>7d. for PEx. Sputum was analyzed by culture, pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons, and quantitative PCR for total and specific bacteria. Sputum IL-8 and neutrophil elastase (NE; and circulating C-reactive protein (CRP were measured. RESULTS: Thirty-seven sputum samples were collected from 21 CF subjects. At early treatment, lower diversity was associated with high relative abundance (RA of Pseudomonas (r = -0.67, p<0.001, decreased FEV(1% predicted (r = 0.49, p = 0.03 and increased CRP (r = -0.58, p = 0.01. In contrast to Pseudomonas, obligate and facultative anaerobic genera were associated with less inflammation and higher FEV₁. With treatment, Pseudomonas RA and P. aeruginosa by qPCR decreased while anaerobic genera showed marked variability in response. Change in RA of Prevotella was associated with more variability in FEV₁ response to treatment than Pseudomonas or Staphylococcus. CONCLUSIONS: Anaerobes identified from sputum by sequencing are associated with less inflammation and higher lung function compared to Pseudomonas at early exacerbation. CF PEx treatment results in variable changes of anaerobic genera suggesting the need for larger studies particularly of patients without traditional CF pathogens.

  2. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis in asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsen, Alan P; Slavin, Raymond G

    2011-01-01

    Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA) is a Th2 hypersensitivity lung disease in response to Aspergillus fumigatus that affects asthmatic and cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Sensitization to A. fumigatus is common in both atopic asthmatic and CF patients, yet only 1-2% of asthmatic and 7-9% of CF patients develop ABPA. ABPA is characterized by wheezing and pulmonary infiltrates which may lead to pulmonary fibrosis and/or bronchiectasis. The inflammatory response is characterized by Th2 responses to Aspergillus allergens, increased serum IgE and eosinophilia. A number of genetic risks have recently been identified in the development of ABPA. These include HLA-DR and HLA-DQ, IL-4 receptor alpha chain (IL-4RA) polymorphisms, IL-10-1082GA promoter polymorphisms, surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2) polymorphisms, and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR) mutations. The studies indicate that ABPA patients are genetically at risk to develop skewed and heightened Th2 responses to A. fumigatus antigens. These genetic risk studies and their consequences of elevated biologic markers may aid in identifying asthmatic and CF patients who are at risk to the development of ABPA. Furthermore, these studies suggest that immune modulation with medications such as anti-IgE, anti-IL-4 and/or IL-13 monoclonal antibodies may be helpful in the treatment of ABPA.

  3. Impaired Cell Volume Regulation in Intestinal Crypt Epithelia of Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, M. A.; O'Brien, J. A.; Sepulveda, F. V.; Ratcliff, R. A.; Evans, M. J.; Colledge, W. H.

    1995-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a disease characterized by abnormalities in the epithelia of the lungs, intestine, salivary and sweat glands, liver, and reproductive systems, often as a result of inadequate hydration of their secretions. The primary defect in cystic fibrosis is the altered activity of a cAMP-activated Cl^- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel. However, it is not clear how a defect in the CFTR Cl^- channel function leads to the observed pathological changes. Although much is known about the structural properties and regulation of the CFTR, little is known of its relationship to cellular functions other than the cAMP-dependent Cl^- secretion. Here we report that cell volume regulation after hypotonic challenge is also defective in intestinal crypt epithelial cells isolated from CFTR -/- mutant mice. Moreover, the impairment of the regulatory volume decrease in CFTR -/- crypts appears to be related to the inability of a K^+ conductance to provide a pathway for the exit of this cation during the volume adjustments. This provides evidence that the lack of CFTR protein may have additional consequences for the cellular function other than the abnormal cAMP-mediated Cl^- secretion.

  4. Management dilemma; a woman with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease presenting with colonic carcinoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lees Andrea N

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction There are increasing reports of bowel cancer in cystic fibrosis, suggesting a possible causal link. Individuals with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease present a high operative risk, limiting curative treatment options in early bowel malignancy. Case presentation We describe a 41-year-old Caucasian woman with cystic fibrosis and severe lung disease who had been considered for lung transplantation, who presented with rectal bleeding and was found to have a Stage I adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. After considerable discussion as to the operative risks, she underwent a laparoscopic resection and remains relatively well 1 year postoperatively with no recurrence. Conclusion We discuss the complexity of the management decisions for cystic fibrosis patients with severe lung disease and early stage colonic malignancy, particularly in the context of potential need for lung transplantation. The case demonstrates that cystic fibrosis patients with very severe lung function impairment may undergo laparoscopic abdominal surgical interventions without compromising postoperative airway clearance.

  5. DEATH BY VOLUNTARY CESSATION OF THERAPY BY NON-TERMINALLY ILL CYSTIC FIBROSIS PATIENTS - INTERNATIONAL SURVEY OF CLINICIANS

    OpenAIRE

    PISATURO, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Little is known about non-terminally ill cystic fibrosis (CF) patients who die by voluntary cessation of therapy. The current study was undertaken to provide an international snapshot of this problem. Methods: An online survey was distributed to the medical directors of the CF Centres affiliated with the US Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and Cystic Fibrosis Australia (with the inclusion of New Zealand); the same letter was sent to every clinician member of the European Cystic Fibrosis...

  6. Review of recombinant human deoxyribonuclease (rhDNase in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tacjana Pressler

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Tacjana PresslerCF Centre, Dept. of Pediatrics, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen DenmarkAbstract: The most important problem in cystic fibrosis (CF lung disease is chronic airway inflammation and infection, which starts early in life. To prevent severe lung damage, it is important to mobilize as much sputum as possible from the lung on a daily basis. RhDNase is an enzyme that breaks down DNA strands in airway secretions, hydrolyzes the DNA present in sputum/mucus of CF patients, reducing viscosity in the lungs and promoting secretion clearance. Several well performed trials have proven its efficacy in young CF patients with mild disease as well as in older patients with more advanced lung disease. Daily inhalation of this agent slows down lung function decline and decreases the frequency of respiratory exacerbations. The drug is well tolerated by most patients independent of the severity of lung disease.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, lung disease, recombinant human deoxyribonuclease

  7. Cl--Dependent HCO3- Transport by Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

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    Choi JY

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF affects the function of multiple organs. The inability to maintain luminal hydration of ducts leads to their plugging and destruction of the affected organs. An exacerbating problem is the acidic pH of the fluid produced by CF patients' secretory glands. This is best documented for pancreatic secretion. Alkaline fluid secretion requires vectorial transport of electrolytes and of HCO(3(-. The mechanism of HCO(3(- secretion by cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR expressing cells is not well understood. In the present communication we discuss results suggesting that CFTR itself can transport large amounts of HCO(3(- and that HCO(3(- transport by CFTR is mediated by a coupled, Cl(--dependent process that is different from a simple HCO(3(- conductance.

  8. Subclinical anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'connor, T M

    2012-02-03

    Patients with chronic hypoxaemia develop secondary polycythaemia that improves oxygen-carrying capacity. Therefore, normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in the presence of chronic arterial hypoxaemia in cystic fibrosis constitute \\'relative anaemia\\'. We sought to determine the cause of this relative anaemia in patients with cystic fibrosis. We studied haematological indices and oxygen saturation in healthy volunteers (n=17) and in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (n=15). Patients with cystic fibrosis had lower resting arterial oxygen saturation when compared with normal volunteers (P<0.0001), and exercise led to a greater reduction in arterial oxygen saturation (P<0.0001). However, haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis did not significantly differ from normal volunteers. Serum iron (P=0.002), transferrin (P=0.02), and total iron-binding capacity (P=0.01) were lower in patients with cystic fibrosis. There were no significant differences in serum ferritin, percentage iron saturation, serum erythropoietin or red cell volume between the groups. The data presented demonstrate a characteristic picture of anaemia of chronic disease in adult patients with cystic fibrosis, except for normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values. Normal haemoglobin and haematocrit values in patients with cystic fibrosis appear to represent a combination of the effects of arterial hypoxaemia promoting polycythaemia, counterbalanced by chronic inflammation promoting anaemia of chronic disease.

  9. Draft Genome Sequence of Triclosan-Resistant Cystic Fibrosis Isolate Achromobacter xylosoxidans CF304.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeukens, Julie; Freschi, Luca; Kukavica-Ibrulj, Irena; Nguyen, Dao; Levesque, Roger C

    2015-07-30

    Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an emerging opportunistic pathogen. Here, we present the genome sequence of cystic fibrosis isolate CF304. Assembly resulted in 29 contigs adding up to 6.3 Mbp. This is the second genome sequence for a cystic fibrosis isolate, and little is known about the genetic basis of pathogenicity in this organism.

  10. Cystic Fibrosis Survival Better in Canada Than in U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164055.html Cystic Fibrosis Survival Better in Canada Than in U.S. Canadians ... MONDAY, March 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- People with cystic fibrosis are living longer than ever, but those in ...

  11. Respiratory viral infections and interaction with bacteria in children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ewijk, E.

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorders in the Caucasian population. Mutations of the cystic fibrosis transregulator membrane gene cause the body to produce thick, sticky mucus. In the lungs this results in obstruction of the airways associated with chroni

  12. Cystic Fibrosis in a Female Infant with Cardiac, Ocular, and Musculoskeletal Anomalies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azhar Farooqui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF remains the most common hereditary disease in the western population. Its concomitant presence with other congenital abnormalities is a rare phenomenon with very little documentation. In this case report we describe a case of cystic fibrosis in a female infant with cardiac, ocular, and musculoskeletal abnormalities. A brief literature review is also provided.

  13. Cost of care of patients with cystic fibrosis in The Netherlands in 1990-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildhagen, MF; Verheij, JBGM; Hilderink, HBM; Kooij, L; Tijmstra, T; tenKate, LP; Gerritsen, J; Bakker, W; Habbema, JDF

    Background - Research on the cost of care of patients with cystic fibrosis is scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the costs using age-specific medical consumption from real patient data. Methods - The age-specific medical consumption of patients with cystic fibrosis in The Netherlands in

  14. Azithromycin reduces spontaneous and induced inflammation in ΔF508 cystic fibrosis mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Legssyer (Rachida); F. Huaux (François); J. Lebacq (Jean); M. Delos (Monique); E. Marbaix (Etienne); P. Lebecque (Patrick); D. Lison (Dominique); B.J. Scholte (Bob); P. Wallemacq (Pierre); T. Leal (Teresinha)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Inflammation plays a critical role in lung disease development and progression in cystic fibrosis. Azithromycin is used for the treatment of cystic fibrosis lung disease, although its mechanisms of action are poorly understood. We tested the hypothesis that azithromycin

  15. Critical Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulation(CFTR)in Female Reproduction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hsiao Chang CHAN

    2003-01-01

    @@ Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a cAMP-activated Cl- channel, mutations of which are responsible for defective Cl- and/or HCO-3 secretions seen in cystic fibrosis (CF), a common lethal genetic disease affecting most exocrine glands/organs, including the lungs, intestine, pancreas and reproductive tracts of both sexes.

  16. Optimal correction of distinct CFTR folding mutants in rectal cystic fibrosis organoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Johanna F; Gogorza Gondra, Ricardo A; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte M; Janssens, Hettie M; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Small-molecule therapies that restore defects in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gating (potentiators) or trafficking (correctors) are being developed for cystic fibrosis (CF) in a mutation-specific fashion. Options for pharmacological correction of CFTR-p.Phe508del (F508d

  17. Nutritional Assesment in Cystic Fibrosis Patients( Iran and Newzeland

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    V Moeeni

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Patients with Cystic Fibrosis have increased risk of malnutrition. Early detection of nutritional deterioration enables prompt intervention and correction. The aims of this project were to: - Define the nutritional status of CF patients in Iran and New Zealand -    Compare and contrast the MacDonald Nutritional Screening tool  with the Australasian guidelines for Nutrition in Cystic Fibrosis -    Validate these results in comparison with patient’s evaluation by their CF clinical team.   Materials and Methods: 69 CF patients (2-18 years were assessed during routine outpatient visits over one year. Anthropometric measurements were obtained. Both tools were applied for each patient and the results compared to their clinical evaluation (as gold standard with calculation of specificity and sensitivity. Results: Under-nutrition was more frequent in Iranian than NZ patients (39% versus 0%, p=0.0001, whereas over-nutrition was more prevalent in NZ children (9% versus 17%, p=0.05. At the first visit, MacDonald and Australasian guidelines were able to recognize 77% and 61% of under-nourished Iranian patients, respectively. The mean sensitivity and specificity for all visits for the MacDonald tool were 83% & 73% (Iran and 65% & 86% (NZ. Sensitivity and specificity for the Australasian guidelines were 79% & 79% (Iran and 70% & 90% (NZ. Conclusions: Both tools successfully recognised patients at risk of malnutrition. The MacDonald tool had comparable sensitivity and specificity to that described previously, especially in Iranian patients. This tool may be helpful in recognizing at risk CF patients, particularly in developing countries with fewer resources. Key words: Iran, Cystic Fibrosis Patient, Newzeland, Nutritional Assesment.

  18. Reduced Arylsulfatase B Activity in Leukocytes from Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Girish; Burke, Jenifer; Bhattacharyya, Sumit; Sharma, Neha; Katyal, Shivani; Park, R. Lucy; Tobacman, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    Summary The enzyme Arylsulfatase B (ARSB; N-acetylgalactosamine-4-sulfatase) removes 4-sulfate groups from chondroitin-4-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and is required for the degradation of these sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Since these GAGs accumulate in patients with Cystic Fibrosis (CF), we investigated the activity of ARSB in leukocytes of patients with CF, to consider if reduced activity of ARSB might contribute to the pathophysiology of CF. Previous cell-based experiments had demonstrated that when the deficiency of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) was corrected in bronchial epithelial cells, the ARSB activity increased significantly. De-identified, citrated blood samples were collected from 16 children with cystic fibrosis and 31 control subjects, seen in the Pediatric Clinic at Rush University Medical Center. Polymorphonuclear (PMN) and mononuclear cell (MC) populations were separated by density gradient, and blinded determinations of ARSB activity were performed using the exogenous substrate 4-methylumbilliferyl sulfate. Interleukin-6 was measured in the plasma samples by ELISA. ARSB activity was significantly less in the PMN and MC from the CF patients than controls (p<0.0001, unpaired t-test, two-tailed). Interleukin-6 levels in plasma were significantly greater in the CF population (p<0.001). Mean age, age range, and male:female ratio of CF patients and controls were similar, and no association of ARSB activity with age, gender, or CFTR genotype was evident. Since recombinant human ARSB is used successfully for replacement therapy in Mucopolysaccharidosis VI, it may be useful to restore ARSB activity to normal levels and increase degradation of sulfated GAGs in CF patients. PMID:22550062

  19. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burney, Tabinda J; Davies, Jane C

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion) outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford) is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational research in CF gene therapy.

  20. Transfer of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator to Human Cystic Fibrosis Cells Mediated by Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vituret, Cyrielle; Gallay, Kathy; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Ftaich, Najate; Matei, Constantin I; Archer, Fabienne; Ronfort, Corinne; Mornex, Jean-François; Chanson, Marc; Di Pietro, Attilio; Boulanger, Pierre; Hong, Saw See

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, resulting in a deficiency in chloride channel activity. In this study, extracellular vesicles (EVs), microvesicles, and exosomes were used as vehicles to deliver exogenous CFTR glycoprotein and its encoding mRNA (mRNA(GFP-CFTR)) to CF cells to correct the CFTR chloride channel function. We isolated microvesicles and exosomes from the culture medium of CFTR-positive Calu-3 cells, or from A549 cells transduced with an adenoviral vector overexpressing a GFP-tagged CFTR (GFP-CFTR). Both microvesicles and exosomes had the capacity to package and deliver the GFP-CFTR glycoprotein and mRNA(GFP-CFTR) to target cells in a dose-dependent manner. Homologous versus heterologous EV-to-cell transfer was studied, and it appeared that the cellular uptake of EVs was significantly more efficient in homologous transfer. The incubation of CF15 cells, a nasal epithelial cell line homozygous for the ΔF508 CFTR mutation, with microvesicles or exosomes loaded with GFP-CFTR resulted in the correction of the CFTR function in CF cells in a dose-dependent manner. A time-course analysis of EV-transduced CF cells suggested that CFTR transferred as mature glycoprotein was responsible for the CFTR-associated channel activity detected at early times posttransduction, whereas GFP-CFTR translated from exogenous mRNA(GFP-CFTR) was responsible for the CFTR function at later times. Collectively, this study showed the potential application of microvesicles and exosomes as vectors for CFTR transfer and functional correction of the genetic defect in human CF cells.

  1. Azithromycin maintenance therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis : A dose advice based on a review of pharmacokinetics, efficacy, and side effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilms, Erik B.; Touw, Daniel J.; Heijerman, Harry G.M.; Van Der Ent, Cornelis K.

    2012-01-01

    Azithromycin maintenance therapy results in improvement of respiratory function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). In azithromycin maintenance therapy, several dosing schemes are applied. In this review, we combine current knowledge about azithromycin pharmacokinetics with the dosing schedules u

  2. A pilot study comparing two physiotherapy techniques in patietnts with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Milne

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available The flutter is a simple hand held device designed to facilitate the mobilisation of excess bronchial secretions by means of oscillating positive pressure. Traditionally patients at the Johannesburg Hospital Cystic Fibrosis clinic used the active cycle of breathing technique as a means of facilitating secretion mobilisation and clearance. When the flutter became available in South Africa in 1999 many cystic fibrosis patients wanted to change to this technique. Minimal research has been conducted comparing these two techniques. The aim of this pilot study was therefore to determine which technique is more effective in the mobilisation of  secretions in cystic fibrosis patients. The pilot study was conducted on seven cystic fibrosis patients (mean age 28 years, range 16-42 years admitted to the Johannesburg Hospital for antibiotic therapy. The study lasted four days and consisted of two treatment days  separated by a washout day on which no physiotherapy was performed. Patients randomised into Group A performed the flutter technique on day two and the active cycle of breathing technique on day four. Group B performed the active cycle of breathing technique on day two and the flutter on day four. The techniques were performed twice a day for  15 minutes. The measurements taken were daily 24-hour sputum samples and daily lung function tests. A questionnaire to determine patient preference to a technique concluded the study.  The results showed no statistical difference between the two techniques with regard to sputum weight or lung function (p<0.05. The questionnaire indicated that on a whole, patients had no preference for a technique.

  3. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burney TJ

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Tabinda J Burney1,2, Jane C Davies1,2,31Department of Gene therapy, Imperial College London, 2UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium London, 3Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF, a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy involves the transfer of correct copies of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR DNA to the epithelial cells in the airways. The cloning of the CFTR gene in 1989 led to proof-of-principle studies of CFTR gene transfer in vitro and in animal models. The earliest clinical trials in CF patients were conducted in 1993 and used viral and non-viral gene transfer agents in both the nasal and bronchial airway epithelium. To date, studies have focused largely on molecular or bioelectric (chloride secretion outcome measures, many demonstrating evidence of CFTR expression, but few have attempted to achieve clinical efficacy. As CF is a lifelong disease, turnover of the airway epithelium necessitates repeat administration. To date, this has been difficult to achieve with viral gene transfer agents due to host recognition leading to loss of expression. The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium (Imperial College London, University of Edinburgh and University of Oxford is currently working on a large and ambitious program to establish the clinical benefits of CF gene therapy. Wave 1, which has reached the clinic, uses a non-viral vector. A single-dose safety trial is nearing completion and a multi-dose clinical trial is shortly due to start; this will be powered for clinically-relevant changes. Wave 2, more futuristically, will look at the potential of lentiviruses, which have long-lasting expression. This review will summarize the current status of translational

  4. Susceptibility of Candida albicans from Cystic Fibrosis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Moss, Richard B; Banaei, Niaz; Verissimo, Cristina; Stevens, David A

    2017-04-18

    Candida albicans is a common microbe, colonizer and potential pathogen found in respiratory cultures of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Because of possible development of resistance in patient isolates resulting from residence in the abnormal milieu of CF patient airways, or from exposure to antifungals, and considering the possibility of patient-to-patient spread of microbes and reports of elevated resistance to other fungal pathogens, it was important to assay the susceptibility of isolates of Candida and compare that profile to isolates from the community. In our center, and unlike another fungal pathogen, no increase in resistance of Candida isolates of the CF cohort was found.

  5. Fluoroquinolones in the treatment of bronchopulmonary disease in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Matthew; Smyth, Alan

    2012-12-01

    Fluoroquinolones are commonly used to treat lung infections in patients with cystic fibrosis. These patients are susceptible to lung infection with common bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae, but are also prone to infection by opportunistic bacteria, including Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The good oral bioavailability and broad antimicrobial spectrum of activity, including antipseudomonal properties, make this class of antimicrobial attractive. We review the evidence assessing the use of fluoroquinolones in the context of preventing and eradicating early lung infection and in managing chronic lung infection and pulmonary exacerbations. The safety of fluoroquinolones and the use of newer agents in the class are also discussed.

  6. State of progress in treating cystic fibrosis respiratory disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flume Patrick A

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Since the discovery of the gene associated with cystic fibrosis (CF, there has been tremendous progress in the care of patients with this disease. New therapies have entered the market and are part of the standard treatment of patients with CF, and have been associated with marked improvement in survival. Now there are even more promising therapies directed at different components of the pathophysiology of this disease. In this review, our current knowledge of the pathophysiology of lung disease in patients with CF is described, along with the current treatment of CF lung disease, and the therapies in development that offer great promise to our patients.

  7. Imaging from cystic fibrosis; Bildgebung bei zystischer Fibrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Funktionsbereich Paediatrische Radiologie; Posselt, H.G. [Frankfurt Univ. (Germany). Zentrum fuer Paediatrische Gastroenterologie und Mukoviszidose

    2008-06-15

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent metabolic disorder with autosomal recessive inheritance in the Caucasian population. The gene defect is located on the long arm of chromosome 7. In Germany today, the actual median survival is 37 years. The genetic defect caused by chloride anion disturbances affects multiple body systems but the morbidity and mortality is due to lung disease. The secretion of highly viscous mucus promotes viral and bacterial pulmonary infections leading to airway obstruction and consecutive destruction of the lung parenchyma. This article will review and discuss both the clinical aspects of the disease and the diagnostic methods, referring in particular to new imaging strategies. (orig.)

  8. Hepatocellular carcinoma complicating cystic fibrosis related liver disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Donnell, D H

    2012-02-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment of the respiratory and gastrointestinal complications of cystic fibrosis (CF) have led to improved survival with many patients living beyond the fourth decade. Along with this increased life expectancy is the risk of further disease associated with the chronic manifestations of their condition. We report a patient with documented CF related liver disease for which he was under routine surveillance that presented with histologically proven hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is important that physicians are aware of this association as increased vigilance may lead to earlier diagnosis and perhaps, a better outcome.

  9. Gene therapy for the treatment of cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Tabinda J Burney1,2, Jane C Davies1,2,31Department of Gene therapy, Imperial College London, 2UK CF Gene Therapy Consortium London, 3Department of Paediatric Respiratory Medicine, Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust, London, UKAbstract: Gene therapy is being developed as a novel treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), a condition that has hitherto been widely-researched yet for which no treatment exists that halts the progression of lung disease. Gene therapy invol...

  10. Diagnosis of biofilm infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients is the best described biofilm infection in medicine. The initial focus can be the paranasal sinuses and then follows repeated colonization and infection of the lungs by aspiration. The matrix of the biofilms...... from the paranasal sinuses, where aggregates of the bacteria are found surrounded by the abundant alginate matrix. Specific PNA-FISH probes can be used to identify P. aeruginosa and other pathogens in situ in the biofilms. Growth of mucoid colonies from the locations mentioned above is also diagnostic...

  11. Taking stock of gene therapy for cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alton Eric WFW

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of the cystic fibrosis (CF gene opened the way for gene therapy. In the ten years since then, proof of principle in vitro and then in animal models in vivo has been followed by numerous clinical studies using both viral and non-viral vectors to transfer normal copies of the gene to the lungs and noses of CF patients. A wealth of data have emerged from these studies, reflecting enormous progress and also helping to focus and define key difficulties that remain unresolved. Gene therapy for CF remains the most promising possibility for curative rather than symptomatic therapy.

  12. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Omendra; Davies, Siobhan; Tibbins, Carly; Rees, JH Martyn; Lenney, Warren; Gilchrist, Francis J

    2015-01-01

    Patient handheld records (PHHRs) promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online. PMID:26316833

  13. Scandinavian Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (SNSG/CF)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnballe, Vibeke; Erwander, Inger

    2006-01-01

    /CF comprises one CF nurse from each of the centers. The board meets twice a year to plan workshops and courses. SNSG/CF is part of the International Nurse Specialist Group/Cystic Fibrosis (INSG/CF). Results: Within the framework of SNSG/CF a 2-day workshop is held every second year for approximately 40......Aims: SNSG/CF was established to stimulate and improve cooperation between CF nurses from Scandinavian CF centers. Methods: SNSG/CF includes all the CF centers in Norway (Oslo and Bergen), Sweden (Stockholm, Gothenburg, Lund and Uppsala) and Denmark (Copenhagen and Aarhus). The board of SNSG...

  14. Biliary liver cirrhosis secondary to cystic fibrosis: a rare indication for liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sańko-Resmer, J; Paczek, L; Wyzgał, J; Ziółkowski, J; Ciszek, M; Alsharabi, A; Grzelak, I; Paluszkiewicz, R; Patkowski, W; Krawczyk, M

    2006-01-01

    As more effective therapies prolong the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis, there are now more patients in this population diagnosed with liver diseases. Secondary biliary cirrhosis is not a rare complication of mucoviscidosis. It is diagnosed in 20% of patients with mucoviscidosis; in 2% it is accompanied by portal hypertension. On average patients with portal hypertension and its complications are 12 years old. Liver transplantation is an accepted method of treatment for children with cystic fibrosis and portal hypertension. It eliminates the cause of the portal hypertension, decreases life-threatening medical conditions, and improves their nutritional status and quality of life. Despite immunosuppressive treatment they do not seem to beat increased risk of upper respiratory tract infections. On the contrary improved respiratory function and status are generally observed. We present our first case of orthotopic liver transplantation performed in a 29-year-old man with cystic fibrosis. The donor was a 42-year-old woman who died of a ruptured cerebral aneurysm. The surgery was performed in September 2004. The patient received immunosuppression based on steroids, basiliximab, tacrolimus, and mycophenolic acid due to renal insufficiency. Antibiotic (meropenem) and antiviral prophylaxis (gancyclovir) were used. A 6-month period of observation confirmed the clinical data from the pediatric population-a good prognosis with improved nutritional status, respiratory function, and quality of life.

  15. Correction of a Cystic Fibrosis Splicing Mutation by Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igreja, Susana; Clarke, Luka A; Botelho, Hugo M; Marques, Luís; Amaral, Margarida D

    2016-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common life-threatening genetic disease in Caucasians, is caused by ∼2,000 different mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. A significant fraction of these (∼13%) affect pre-mRNA splicing for which novel therapies have been somewhat neglected. We have previously described the effect of the CFTR splicing mutation c.2657+5G>A in IVS16, showing that it originates transcripts lacking exon 16 as well as wild-type transcripts. Here, we tested an RNA-based antisense oligonucleotide (AON) strategy to correct the aberrant splicing caused by this mutation. Two AONs (AON1/2) complementary to the pre-mRNA IVS16 mutant region were designed and their effect on splicing was assessed at the RNA and protein levels, on intracellular protein localization and function. To this end, we used the 2657+5G>A mutant CFTR minigene stably expressed in HEK293 Flp-In cells that express a single copy of the transgene. RNA data from AON1-treated mutant cells show that exon 16 inclusion was almost completely restored (to 95%), also resulting in increased levels of correctly localized CFTR protein at the plasma membrane (PM) and with increased function. A novel two-color CFTR splicing reporter minigene developed here allowed the quantitative monitoring of splicing by automated microscopy localization of CFTR at the PM. The AON strategy is thus a promising therapeutic approach for the specific correction of alternative splicing.

  16. Health Human Resources Guidelines: Minimum Staffing Standards and Role Descriptions for Canadian Cystic Fibrosis Healthcare Teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Ian D

    2016-01-01

    In cystic fibrosis clinics across Canada, the most common barrier that healthcare workers face when providing care to their patients is having too little time. The Health Human Resources Guidelines were developed to define specifically what amounts of time should be allocated for each discipline of cystic fibrosis clinical care and to provide a description of all the roles involved, reinforcing how these work together to provide comprehensive multidisciplinary care. With involvement from all cystic fibrosis clinics in Canada, through the use of a tailored survey, the Health Human Resources Guidelines are an exclusively Canadian document that has been developed for implementation across the country. The guidelines have been incorporated into a national Accreditation Site Visit program for use in evaluating and improving care across the country and have been distributed to all Canadian cystic fibrosis clinics. The guidelines provide hospital administrators with clear benchmarks for allocating personnel resources to the cystic fibrosis clinics hosted within their institutions.

  17. Maintenance of nutritional status in patients with cystic fibrosis: new and emerging therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalnins D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Daina Kalnins,1 Michael Wilschanski21Clinical Dietetics, Respiratory Medicine, The Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada; 2Pediatric Gastroenterology Unit, Hadassah University Hospitals, Jerusalem, IsraelAbstract: Poor clinical outcomes in cystic fibrosis are often associated with undernutrition. Normal growth and development should be achieved in cystic fibrosis, and nutritional counseling is paramount at all ages. Prevention and early detection of growth failure is the key to successful nutritional intervention. The advance in nutritional management is certainly one factor that has contributed to the improved survival in recent decades. This review outlines the major nutritional parameters in the management of the patient with cystic fibrosis, including recent advances in pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy and fat-soluble vitamin therapy. There are sections on complicated clinical situations which directly affect nutrition, for example, before and after lung transplantation, cystic fibrosis-related diabetes, and bone health.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, nutrition, fat-soluble vitamins, pancreatic enzymes

  18. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; James, Tamara; Conover, Chris; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is one of the most commonly tested autosomal recessive disorders in the United States. Clinical cystic fibrosis is associated with mutations in the CFTR gene, of which the most common mutation among Caucasians, DeltaF508, was identified in 1989. The University of Michigan, Johns Hopkins University, and the Hospital for Sick Children, where much of the initial research occurred, hold key patents on cystic fibrosis genetic sequences, mutations, and methods for detecting them. Several patents, including the one that covers detection of the DeltaF508 mutation, are jointly held by the University of Michigan and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, with Michigan administering patent licensing in the United States. The University of Michigan broadly licenses the DeltaF508 patent for genetic testing with >60 providers of genetic testing to date. Genetic testing is now used in newborn screening, diagnosis, and for carrier screening. Interviews with key researchers and intellectual property managers, a survey of laboratories' prices for cystic fibrosis genetic testing, a review of literature on cystic fibrosis tests' cost-effectiveness, and a review of the developing market for cystic fibrosis testing provide no evidence that patents have significantly hindered access to genetic tests for cystic fibrosis or prevented financially cost-effective screening. Current licensing practices for cystic fibrosis genetic testing seem to facilitate both academic research and commercial testing. More than 1000 different CFTR mutations have been identified, and research continues to determine their clinical significance. Patents have been nonexclusively licensed for diagnostic use and have been variably licensed for gene transfer and other therapeutic applications. The Cystic Fibrosis Foundation has been engaged in licensing decisions, making cystic fibrosis a model of collaborative and cooperative patenting and licensing practice.

  19. Probiotic supplementation in children with cystic fibrosis-a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthan, Anitha; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna; Rao, Shripada; Patole, Sanjay

    2016-10-01

    Probiotics may benefit in cystic fibrosis (CF) as gut dysbiosis is associated with gastrointestinal symptoms and exacerbation of respiratory symptoms in CF. We conducted a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs of probiotic supplementation in children with CF, using the Cochrane methodology, preferred reporting items for systematic reviews (PRISMA) statement, and meta-analysis of observational studies in epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines. Primary outcomes were pulmonary exacerbations, duration of hospitalization and antibiotics, and all-cause mortality. Secondary outcomes included gastrointestinal symptoms, markers of gut inflammation, and intestinal microbial balance. A total of nine studies (RCTs, 6, non-RCTs, 3; N = 275) with some methodological weaknesses were included in the review. The pooled estimate showed significant reduction in the rate of pulmonary exacerbation (fixed effects model, two parallel group RCTs and one cross-over trial: relative risk (RR) 0.25, (95 % confidence interval (95 % CI) 0.15,0.41); p Bacteroides in one RCT, one non-RCT). Limited low-quality evidence exists on the effects of probiotics in children with CF. Well-designed adequately powered RCTs assessing clinically meaningful outcomes are required to study this important issue. • Gut dysbiosis is frequent in children with cystic fibrosis due to frequent exposure to pathogens and antibiotics. • Probiotics decrease gut dysbiosis and improve gut maturity and function. What is New: • This comprehensive systematic review shows that current evidence on the safety and efficacy of probiotics in children with cystic fibrosis is limited and of low quality. • Well-designed and adequately powered trials assessing clinically important outcomes are required considering the health burden of cystic fibrosis and the potential benefits of probiotics.

  20. Insulin therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis in the pre-diabetes stage: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Zorrón Mei Hsia Pu

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To elucidate whether insulin is effective or not in patients with cystic fibrosis before the diabetes mellitus phase. Data source: The study was performed according to the Prisma method between August and September 2014, using the PubMed, Embase, Lilacs and SciELO databases. Prospective studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish from 2002 to 2014, evaluating the effect of insulin on weight parameters, body mass index and pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis, with a mean age of 17.37 years before the diabetes mellitus phase were included. Data synthesis: Eight articles were identified that included 180 patients undergoing insulin use. Sample size ranged from 4 to 54 patients, with a mean age ranging from 12.4 to 28 years. The type of follow-up, time of insulin use, the dose and implementation schedule were very heterogeneous between studies. Conclusions: There are theoretical reasons to believe that insulin has a beneficial effect in the studied population. The different methods and populations assessed in the studies do not allow us to state whether early insulin therapy should or should not be carried out in patients with cystic fibrosis prior to the diagnosis of diabetes. Therefore, studies with larger samples and insulin use standardization are required.

  1. Raman spectroscopy as a new tool for early detection of bacteria in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, Giulia; Capriglione, Paola; Pesce, Giuseppe; Abete, Pasquale; Carnovale, Vincenzo; Sasso, Antonio

    2013-07-01

    Respiratory infections represent a major threat for people affected by cystic fibrosis, leading to pulmonary deterioration and lung transplantation as a therapeutic option for end-stage patients. A fast and correct identification of pathogens in airway fluid of these patients is crucial to establish appropriate therapies, to prevent cross-infections and, ultimately, to preserve lung function. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy to reveal bacteria in the sputa of patients such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus, which are among the earliest and the most frequent bacteria affecting cystic fibrosis patients. We found that Raman analysis, combined with principal component analysis, is able to provide a correct identification of these bacteria, with a global accuracy higher than 95%. Interestingly, bacterial identification is performed by analysing patients’ sputa as a whole, avoiding, therefore, time-consuming procedures involving bacterial isolation or even bacterial cultures. This study suggests that Raman spectroscopy could be a suitable candidate for the development of innovative and non-invasive procedures for a fast and reliable identification of respiratory infections in cystic fibrosis patients.

  2. Insulin therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis in the pre-diabetes stage: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Mariana Zorrón Mei Hsia; Christensen-Adad, Flávia Corrêa; Gonçalves, Aline Cristina; Minicucci, Walter José; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Ribeiro, Antonio Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To elucidate whether insulin is effective or not in patients with cystic fibrosis before the diabetes mellitus phase. Data source: The study was performed according to the Prisma method between August and September 2014, using the PubMed, Embase, Lilacs and SciELO databases. Prospective studies published in English, Portuguese and Spanish from 2002 to 2014, evaluating the effect of insulin on weight parameters, body mass index and pulmonary function in patients with cystic fibrosis, with a mean age of 17.37 years before the diabetes mellitus phase were included. Data synthesis: Eight articles were identified that included 180 patients undergoing insulin use. Sample size ranged from 4 to 54 patients, with a mean age ranging from 12.4 to 28 years. The type of follow-up, time of insulin use, the dose and implementation schedule were very heterogeneous between studies. Conclusions: There are theoretical reasons to believe that insulin has a beneficial effect in the studied population. The different methods and populations assessed in the studies do not allow us to state whether early insulin therapy should or should not be carried out in patients with cystic fibrosis prior to the diagnosis of diabetes. Therefore, studies with larger samples and insulin use standardization are required. PMID:26994743

  3. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane recruiter the alter ego of CFTR as a multi-kinase anchor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Anil

    2007-11-01

    This review focuses on a newly discovered interaction between protein kinases involved in cellular energetics, a process that may be disturbed in cystic fibrosis for unknown reasons. I propose a new model where kinase-mediated cellular transmission of energy provides mechanistic insight to a latent role of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). I suggest that CFTR acts as a multi-kinase recruiter to the apical epithelial membrane. My group finds that, in the cytosol, two protein kinases involved in cell energy homeostasis, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (NDPK) and AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), bind one another. Preliminary data suggest that both can also bind CFTR (function unclear). The disrupted role of this CFTR-kinase complex as 'membrane transmitter to the cell' is proposed as an alternative paradigm to the conventional ion transport mediated and CFTR/chloride-centric view of cystic fibrosis pathogenesis. Chloride remains important, but instead, chloride-induced control of the phosphohistidine content of one kinase component (NDPK, via a multi-kinase complex that also includes a third kinase, CK2; formerly casein kinase 2). I suggest that this complex provides the necessary near-equilibrium conditions needed for efficient transmission of phosphate energy to proteins controlling cellular energetics. Crucially, a new role for CFTR as a kinase controller is proposed with ionic concentration acting as a signal. The model posits a regulatory control relay for energy sensing involving a cascade of protein kinases bound to CFTR.

  4. FOXO1 Content Is Reduced in Cystic Fibrosis and Increases with IGF-I Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianna Smerieri

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes is to date the most frequent complication in cystic fibrosis (CF. The mechanisms underlying this condition are not well understood, and a possible role of insulin resistance is debated. We investigated insulin signal transduction in CF. Total insulin receptor, IRS1, p85 PI3K, and AKT contents were substantially normal in CF cells (CFBE41o-, whereas winged helix forkhead (FOXO1 contents were reduced both in baseline conditions and after insulin stimulation. In addition, CF cells showed increased ERK1/2, and reduced β2 arrestin contents. No significant change in SOCS2 was observed. By using a CFTR inhibitor and siRNA, changes in FOXO1 were related to CFTR loss of function. In a CF-affected mouse model, FOXO1 content was reduced in the muscle while no significant difference was observed in liver and adipose tissue compared with wild-type. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-I increased FOXO1 content in vitro and in vivo in muscle and adipose tissue. In conclusion; we present the first description of reduced FOXO1 content in CF, which is compatible with reduced gluconeogenesis and increased adipogenesis, both features of insulin insensitivity. IGF-I treatment was effective in increasing FOXO1, thereby suggesting that it could be considered as a potential treatment in CF patients possibly to prevent and treat cystic fibrosis-related diabetes.

  5. [Nutritional status of adults with cystic fibrosis - current methods of assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabla, Anna; Skorupa, Wojciech; Milewska, Magdalena; Weker, Halina

    2015-11-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most frequent monogenic disease in the Caucasian population, inherited in an autosomal recessive pattern. This is a multiple organ disease and its main manifestations include pulmonary and gastrointestinal dysfunction. The exocrine pancreatic deficiency results in impaired digestion and absorption what may lead to malnutrition and vitamins and minerals deficiencies. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients has been increasing over the past years, so there is a need to verify usefulness of existing or create new methods of nutritional status assessment. The aim of this paper was presentation current data on the methods of assessment and monitoring of nutritional status. Particular attention has been paid to appropriate nutritional support in prevention and treatment of malnutrition patients with cystic fibrosis. On the basis of recent literature we can conclude that the advanced nutritional status assessment is recommended in patient with CF by using anthropometrical methods, body composition analysis and biochemical data. Good nutritional status is connected with pulmonary functions, quality and life length.

  6. Increased NF-κB Activity and Decreased Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Mediate Reduced Osteoblast Differentiation and Function in ΔF508 Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Henaff, Carole; Mansouri, Rafik; Modrowski, Dominique; Zarka, Mylène; Geoffroy, Valérie; Marty, Caroline; Tarantino, Nadine; Laplantine, Emmanuel; Marie, Pierre J

    2015-07-17

    The prevalent human ΔF508 mutation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is associated with reduced bone formation and bone loss in mice. The molecular mechanisms by which the ΔF508-CFTR mutation causes alterations in bone formation are poorly known. In this study, we analyzed the osteoblast phenotype in ΔF508-CFTR mice and characterized the signaling mechanisms underlying this phenotype. Ex vivo studies showed that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation negatively impacted the differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells into osteoblasts and the activity of osteoblasts, demonstrating that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation alters both osteoblast differentiation and function. Treatment with a CFTR corrector rescued the abnormal collagen gene expression in ΔF508-CFTR osteoblasts. Mechanistic analysis revealed that NF-κB signaling and transcriptional activity were increased in mutant osteoblasts. Functional studies showed that the activation of NF-κB transcriptional activity in mutant osteoblasts resulted in increased β-catenin phosphorylation, reduced osteoblast β-catenin expression, and altered expression of Wnt/β-catenin target genes. Pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB activity or activation of canonical Wnt signaling rescued Wnt target gene expression and corrected osteoblast differentiation and function in bone marrow stromal cells and osteoblasts from ΔF508-CFTR mice. Overall, the results show that the ΔF508-CFTR mutation impairs osteoblast differentiation and function as a result of overactive NF-κB and reduced Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Moreover, the data indicate that pharmacological inhibition of NF-κB or activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling can rescue the abnormal osteoblast differentiation and function induced by the prevalent ΔF508-CFTR mutation, suggesting novel therapeutic strategies to correct the osteoblast dysfunctions in cystic fibrosis.

  7. Metagenomic analysis of respiratory tract DNA viral communities in cystic fibrosis and non-cystic fibrosis individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Willner

    Full Text Available The human respiratory tract is constantly exposed to a wide variety of viruses, microbes and inorganic particulates from environmental air, water and food. Physical characteristics of inhaled particles and airway mucosal immunity determine which viruses and microbes will persist in the airways. Here we present the first metagenomic study of DNA viral communities in the airways of diseased and non-diseased individuals. We obtained sequences from sputum DNA viral communities in 5 individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF and 5 individuals without the disease. Overall, diversity of viruses in the airways was low, with an average richness of 175 distinct viral genotypes. The majority of viral diversity was uncharacterized. CF phage communities were highly similar to each other, whereas Non-CF individuals had more distinct phage communities, which may reflect organisms in inhaled air. CF eukaryotic viral communities were dominated by a few viruses, including human herpesviruses and retroviruses. Functional metagenomics showed that all Non-CF viromes were similar, and that CF viromes were enriched in aromatic amino acid metabolism. The CF metagenomes occupied two different metabolic states, probably reflecting different disease states. There was one outlying CF virome which was characterized by an over-representation of Guanosine-5'-triphosphate,3'-diphosphate pyrophosphatase, an enzyme involved in the bacterial stringent response. Unique environments like the CF airway can drive functional adaptations, leading to shifts in metabolic profiles. These results have important clinical implications for CF, indicating that therapeutic measures may be more effective if used to change the respiratory environment, as opposed to shifting the taxonomic composition of resident microbiota.

  8. [Transition from paediatric to adult cystic fibrosis care centre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieu, I; Reynaud, Q; Nove-Josserand, R

    2016-02-01

    The number of adolescents and young adults with chronic diseases has increased dramatically over the last decade. This led paediatric teams to organize the transition to adult centres with the aim to ensure the quality of care and prognosis, adherence to survey and treatment. To promote a good work and family life is also a challenge. Several studies have shown the importance of a successful transition in cystic fibrosis (CF) in order to prevent complications and loss monitoring and to improve the perception of patients and their families. In France in 2003, cystic fibrosis centres (CRCM) have been identified and among them of adult CF centres. The regular increase of the adult centre's active file requires improving the transition process. It is necessary to improve the transition process and to prepare the young patient and their family early during adolescence. The process in place should concern the whole aspects of care, i.e., medical, psychological and educational. The transition to adulthood will be successful if it results in a stable state of the disease allowing family and career plans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A comparison of bronchial drainage treatments in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluft, J; Beker, L; Castagnino, M; Gaiser, J; Chaney, H; Fink, R J

    1996-10-01

    We compared standard chest physical therapy and postural drainage (CPT/PD) with a new airway clearance therapy called high-frequency chest wall oscillation (HFCWO) in a group of stable cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In this crossover trial, 29 CF patients (15 males, 14 females), aged 7-47 years that met the inclusion criteria were randomly assigned to alternate CPT/PD and HFCWO, on a daily basis, over a 4 day period. Each patient received 2 days of each form of therapy; treatment frequency and the length of treatment were the same for both techniques. Expectorated secretions were collected during each 30 minute therapy session and for 15 minutes following treatment. The wet and dry weights of collected secretions were determined gravimetrically, and the therapy methods were compared. Significantly more sputum was expectorated during HFCWO than during CPT/PD as determined by both the wet (P HFCWO is at least as effective as manual CPT/PD in clearing secretions from the airways in patients with cystic fibrosis.

  10. Molecular basis of cystic fibrosis in the Republic of Macedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petreska, L; Koceva, S; Plaseska, D; Chernick, M; Gordova-Muratovska, A; Fustic, S; Nestorov, R; Efremov, G D

    1998-09-01

    Eighty-three cystic fibrosis (CF) patients and their families, belonging to various ethnic groups living in the Republic of Macedonia were studied for molecular defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, and for the associated extragenic marker loci XV-2c and KM19. The DNA methodology used included characterization of CFTR mutations in 19 exons (and flanking sequences) of the gene and analysis of distribution of the XV-2c/KM19 haplotypes among normal (N) and CF chromosomes by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by dot blot hybridization, restriction digestion, single-strand conformational polymorphism, constant denaturing gel electrophoresis, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and sequencing. We identified 58.4% (97/166) of the CF chromosomes. Nine different CFTR gene mutations, including three novel ones, were found. Eight known and one new CFTR intragene polymorphisms were also characterized. The haplotype analysis of the XV-2c/TaqI and KM19/PstI polymorphic loci have shown that haplotype C is the most frequently found haplotype among the non-deltaF508 CF chromosomes from Macedonia (36.5%). The results demonstrate the broad heterogeneity of CF origin in this part of the Balkan Peninsula.

  11. Achromobacter xylosoxidans respiratory tract infection in cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambiase, A; Catania, M R; Del Pezzo, M; Rossano, F; Terlizzi, V; Sepe, A; Raia, V

    2011-08-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the frequency of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection in a cohort of cystic fibrosis patients, to investigate antimicrobial sensitivity, to establish possible clonal likeness among strains, and to address the clinical impact of this infection or colonization on the general outcome of these patients. The study was undertaken between January 2004 and December 2008 on 300 patients receiving care at the Regional Cystic Fibrosis Center of the Naples University "Federico II". Sputum samples were checked for bacterial identification. For DNA fingerprinting, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was carried out. Fifty-three patients (17.6%) had at least one positive culture for A. xylosoxidans; of these, 6/53 (11.3%) patients were defined as chronically infected and all were co-colonized by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Of the patients, 18.8% persistently carried multidrug-resistant isolates. Macrorestriction analysis showed the presence of seven major clusters. DNA fingerprinting also showed a genetic relationship among strains isolated from the same patients at different times. The results of DNA fingerprinting indicate evidence of bacterial clonal likeness among the enrolled infected patients. We found no significant differences in the forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) and body mass index (BMI) when comparing the case group of A. xylosoxidans chronically infected patients with the control group of P. aeruginosa chronically infected patients.

  12. Developing a handheld record for patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan O

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Omendra Narayan,1 Siobhan Davies,1 Carly Tibbins,2 JH Martyn Rees,3 Warren Lenney,1,4 Francis J Gilchrist1,4 1Academic Department of Child Health, Royal Stoke University Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, 2West Midlands Medicines for Children Research Network, Royal Stoke University Hospital, Stoke-on-Trent, 3Department of Paediatrics, Royal Shrewsbury Hospital, Shrewsbury, 4Institute for Science and Technology in Medicine, Keele University, Guy Hilton Research Centre, Stoke-on-Trent, UK Abstract: Patient handheld records (PHHRs promote self-management and empower the holder to take a more active role in the management of their disease. They have been used successfully in improving preventative care for children and have contributed to improved adherence in a number of chronic illnesses. Despite the potential advantages, there are no standard PHHRs for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF. We report the consultation process that led to the development of a CF PHHR, describe the final document, and analyze the feedback from their use at our center. We have made the CF PHHR freely available online.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, pediatrics, patient and public involvement, patient handheld records

  13. Airway acidification initiates host defense abnormalities in cystic fibrosis mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Viral S.; Meyerholz, David K.; Tang, Xiao Xiao; Reznikov, Leah; Alaiwa, Mahmoud Abou; Ernst, Sarah E.; Karp, Philip H.; Wohlford-Lenane, Christine L.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Allen, Patrick D.; Zabner, Joseph; McCray, Paul B.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Stoltz, David A.; Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) anion channel. In humans and pigs, the loss of CFTR impairs respiratory host defenses, causing airway infection. But CF mice are spared. We found that in all three species, CFTR secreted bicarbonate into airway surface liquid. In humans and pigs lacking CFTR, unchecked H+ secretion by the nongastric H+/K+ adenosine triphosphatase (ATP12A) acidified airway surface liquid, which impaired airway host defenses. In contrast, mouse airways expressed little ATP12A and secreted minimal H+; consequently, airway surface liquid in CF and non-CF mice had similar pH. Inhibiting ATP12A reversed host defense abnormalities in human and pig airways. Conversely, expressing ATP12A in CF mouse airways acidified airway surface liquid, impaired defenses, and increased airway bacteria. These findings help explain why CF mice are protected from infection and nominate ATP12A as a potential therapeutic target for CF. PMID:26823428

  14. Severe hypercapnia in critically ill adult cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Hassan S; Tiangco, Noel Dexter; Harrell, Christopher; Vender, Robert L

    2011-10-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a monogenetic autosomal recessive multi-organ disease affecting approximately 50,000 patients worldwide. Overall median survival is continually increasing but pulmonary disease remains the most common cause of death. Guidelines have been published in relation to the outpatient maintenance of lung health for CF patients and treatment of acute lung exacerbations but little information exists about the management of the critically ill CF patient. Invasive mechanical ventilation in CF patients with acute respiratory failure is associated with poor outcome and high mortality. Retrospective analysis of adult patients with CF who required endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU). Between the years 2003 - 2009, 14 adult patients with CF required endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of the Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, USA. Eleven patients died in the MICU because of progressive respiratory failure and inability to liberate from mechanical ventilation. Seven individuals consistently manifested arterial partial pressures of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) greater than 20.00 kPa despite high levels of conventional modes of mechanical ventilation. Intubated CF patients with respiratory failure have a high mortality rate. Based on our experience, multiple factors contribute to severe hypercapnia and the effectiveness of conventional modes of mechanical ventilation in many of these patients is limited. Cystic fibrosis; Mechanical ventilation; Critical care; Hypercapnia; Respiratory failure.

  15. Cancer risk among lung transplant recipients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Aliza K; Yanik, Elizabeth L; Marshall, Bruce C; Wilschanski, Michael; Lynch, Charles F; Austin, April A; Copeland, Glenn; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Engels, Eric A

    2017-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated increased digestive tract cancers among individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF), particularly among lung transplant recipients. We describe cancer incidence among CF and non-CF lung recipients. We used data from the US transplant registry and 16 cancer registries. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) compared cancer incidence to the general population, and competing risk methods were used for the cumulative incidence of colorectal cancer. We evaluated 10,179 lung recipients (1681 with CF). Risk was more strongly increased in CF recipients than non-CF recipients for overall cancer (SIR 9.9 vs. 2.7) and multiple cancers including colorectal cancer (24.2 vs. 1.7), esophageal cancer (56.3 vs. 1.3), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (61.8 vs. 9.4). At five years post-transplant, colorectal cancer was diagnosed in 0.3% of CF recipients aged <50 at transplant and 6.4% aged ≥50. CF recipients have increased risk for colorectal cancer, suggesting a need for enhanced screening. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Fungi in the cystic fibrosis lung: bystanders or pathogens?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotirmall, Sanjay H; McElvaney, Noel G

    2014-07-01

    Improvement to the life expectancy of people with cystic fibrosis (PWCF) brings about novel challenges including the need for evaluation of the role of fungi in the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung. To determine if such organisms represent bystanders or pathogens affecting clinical outcomes we review the existing knowledge from a clinical, biochemical, inflammatory and immunological perspective. The prevalence and importance of fungi in the CF airway has likely been underestimated with the most frequently isolated filamentous fungi being Aspergillus fumigatus and Scedosporium apiospermum and the major yeast Candida albicans. Developing non-culture based microbiological methods for fungal detection has improved both our classification and understanding of their clinical consequences including localized, allergic and systemic infections. Cross-kingdom interaction between bacteria and fungi are discussed as is the role of biofilms further affecting clinical outcome. A combination of host and pathogen-derived factors determines if a particular fungus represents a commensal, colonizer or pathogen in the setting of CF. The underlying immune state, disease severity and treatment burden represent key host variables whilst fungal type, form, chronicity and virulence including the ability to evade immune recognition determines the pathogenic potential of a specific fungus at a particular point in time. Further research in this emerging field is warranted to fully elucidate the spectrum of disease conferred by the presence of fungi in the CF airway and the indications for therapeutic interventions. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Effects of Positive End-Expiratory Pressure on Oscillated Volume during High-Frequency Chest Compression in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Peter C Zuberbuhler; Tabk, Joan I; Jones, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) on end-expiratory lung volume (EELV) and mean oscillated volume (Vosc) during high frequency chest compression (HFCC).DESIGN: A clinic-based prospective intervention study.SETTING: Pulmonary function laboratory, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta.POPULATION: Nine children with cystic fibrosis with little or no obstructive airway disease who were selected from the outpatient Cystic Fibrosis and Pediatric Pul...

  18. Use of exercise in the management of cystic fibrosis: short communication about a survey of cystic fibrosis referral centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, T A; ZeBranek, J D; McKey, R M

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 47 cystic fibrosis referral centers was conducted to study the use of exercise in the management of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A questionnaire with 5 brief questions concerning the prescription and application of exercise therapy was sent to the first 47 centers (38.5%) listed in the 1988 CF Foundation Directory, and 46 (97.9%) were returned. While all but one of the respondents recommend exercise at least to selected patients, and while 80.4% of the centers refer patients to summer camp programs, only 43.5% offer exercise stress testing and only 21.7% offer an exercise program for their patients. Most of the respondents who recommend exercise prescribe aerobic exercise, swimming being the most frequently chosen type. Although there is a large discrepancy between those centers that acknowledge the benefits of exercise and those that have arranged for regularly available exercise services, inroads have been made in utilizing this therapeutic tool for patients with CF.

  19. Long-Term Effects of Exercise Training and Hyperalimentation in Adult Cystic Fibrosis Patients with Severe Pulmonary Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijerman, Harry G. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 10 adult patients with cystic fibrosis, found that the improvement in lung function and ergometry parameters obtained by a short in-patient training program could be maintained on an out-patient basis through a voluntary self-treatment program. (DB)

  20. Cystic fibrosis and the role of gastrointestinal outcome measures in the new era of therapeutic CFTR modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewes, Frank A J A; Verkade, Henkjan J; Taminiau, Jan A J M; Borowitz, Drucy; Wilschanski, Michael

    With the development of new drugs that directly affect CFTR protein function, clinical trials are being designed or initiated for a growing number of patients with cystic fibrosis. The currently available and accepted clinical endpoints, FEV1 and BMI, have limitations. The aim of this report is to

  1. Inhalation of tobramycin in cystic fibrosis. Part 2 : Optimization of the tobramycin solution for a jet and an ultrasonic nebulizer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Brun, P.P.H.; De Boer, A.H.; Gjaltema, D.; Hagedoorn, P.; Heijerman, H.G.M.; Frijlink, H.W.

    1999-01-01

    The inhalation of tobramycin is part of current cystic fibrosis (CF) therapy. Local therapy with inhaled antibiotics has demonstrated improvements in pulmonary function. Current inhalation therapy is limited by the available drug formulations in combination with the nebulization time. The aim of thi

  2. Effects of sildenafil on pulmonary hypertension and exercise tolerance in severe cystic fibrosis-related lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Gregory S; Sagel, Scott D; Taylor, Amy L; Abman, Steven H

    2006-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with advanced lung disease are at risk for developing pulmonary vascular disease and pulmonary hypertension, characterized by progressive exercise intolerance beyond the exercise-limiting effects of airways disease in CF. We report on a patient with severe CF lung disease who experienced clinically significant improvements in exercise tolerance and pulmonary hypertension without changing lung function during sildenafil therapy.

  3. Cystic fibrosis and the role of gastrointestinal outcome measures in the new era of therapeutic CFTR modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodewes, Frank A J A; Verkade, Henkjan J; Taminiau, Jan A J M; Borowitz, Drucy; Wilschanski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new drugs that directly affect CFTR protein function, clinical trials are being designed or initiated for a growing number of patients with cystic fibrosis. The currently available and accepted clinical endpoints, FEV1 and BMI, have limitations. The aim of this report is to d

  4. Comparative Efficacy of Two Doses of Nebulized Colistimethate for the Eradication of Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Children with Cystic Fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Sophie Brochet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF affects the respiratory and digestive systems. It evolves toward deterioration of pulmonary function through colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. There is no consensus with respect to its eradication. Nebulized colistimethate is used for eradication treatment, but the optimal dose and duration is yet to be determined.

  5. Late presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Danielle M; Burns, Cartland; Segura, Bradley J; Weiner, Daniel J

    2010-04-01

    Late presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is unusual, especially in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). To our knowledge, cases of CDH in CF patients and the combined effects on lung function have not been previously described. Here we report two cases of late presenting CDH in CF patients and describe effects on lung function. Late presentation of CDH in CF patients can cause gastrointestinal or respiratory symptoms and requires a high index of suspicion as well as proper interpretation of imaging. In patients with CF and CDH, lung function abnormalities could include obstructive, restrictive defects, or combined defects.

  6. Cystic fibrosis-related liver disease: a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Catarino Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Prospective studies concerning liver disease in pediatric cystic fibrosis patients are scarce. The present study aimed to describe the prevalence and clinical expression of cystic fibrosis - related liver disease, in a cohort of 62 pediatric patients. Descriptive study, resulting from the prospective evaluation, between 1994 and 2009, of 62 pediatric patients (age <18 years with cystic fibrosis. The follow-up protocol included a clinical assessment every 2 months, liver function tests every 6 months and annual liver ultrasonography. The cumulative prevalence of liver disease was 11.2% (7/62 cases. All patients had ΔF508 mutation and pancreatic insufficiency, none had meconium ileus. The liver involvement became clinically evident at a mean age of 8 years (3-15 years, revealed by hepatomegaly or hepatosplenomegaly (3 cases and/ or abnormalities of liver function tests (3 cases changes of liver ultrasound (7 cases with evidence of portal hypertension (2 cases. Four patients were submitted to liver biopsy; biliary fibrosis was documented in one case, focal biliary cirrhosis in 2 cases and multilobular cirrhosis in another case. Within a median 11.6 years follow-up period (all patients under UDCA therapy after liver disease diagnosis, progression of liver disease was observed in 2 patients; one patient developed refractory variceal bleeding and progressive hepatic failure, requiring liver transplant. The results of the present study agree with those of previous pediatric studies, further documenting clinical expression of liver disease in CF patients, which is usually detected in the first decade of life and emphasize the contribution of ultrasound to early diagnosis of liver involvement. Moreover, although advanced liver disease is a relatively rare event, early isolated liver transplantation may have to be considered at this age group.

  7. Blunted perception of neural respiratory drive and breathlessness in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles C. Reilly

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The electromyogram recorded from the diaphragm (EMGdi and parasternal intercostal muscle using surface electrodes (sEMGpara provides a measure of neural respiratory drive (NRD, the magnitude of which reflects lung disease severity in stable cystic fibrosis. The aim of this study was to explore perception of NRD and breathlessness in both healthy individuals and patients with cystic fibrosis. Given chronic respiratory loading and increased NRD in cystic fibrosis, often in the absence of breathlessness at rest, we hypothesised that patients with cystic fibrosis would be able to tolerate higher levels of NRD for a given level of breathlessness compared to healthy individuals during exercise. 15 cystic fibrosis patients (mean forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 53.5% predicted and 15 age-matched, healthy controls were studied. Spirometry was measured in all subjects and lung volumes measured in the cystic fibrosis patients. EMGdi and sEMGpara were recorded at rest and during incremental cycle exercise to exhaustion and expressed as a percentage of maximum (% max obtained from maximum respiratory manoeuvres. Borg breathlessness scores were recorded at rest and during each minute of exercise. EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and associated Borg breathlessness scores differed significantly between healthy subjects and cystic fibrosis patients at rest and during exercise. The relationship between EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max and Borg score was shifted to the right in the cystic fibrosis patients, such that at comparable levels of EMGdi % max and sEMGpara % max the cystic fibrosis patients reported significantly lower Borg breathlessness scores compared to the healthy individuals. At Borg score 1 (clinically significant increase in breathlessness from baseline corresponding levels of EMGdi % max (20.2±12% versus 32.15±15%, p=0.02 and sEMGpara % max (18.9±8% versus 29.2±15%, p=0.04 were lower in the healthy individuals compared to the cystic

  8. Molecular chaperones as targets to circumvent the CFTR defect in cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca A Chanoux

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is the most common autosomal recessive lethal disorder among Caucasian populations. CF results from mutations and resulting dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR. CFTR is a cyclic AMP-dependent chloride channel that is localized to the apical membrane in epithelial cells where it plays a key role in salt and water homeostasis. An intricate network of molecular chaperone proteins regulates CFTR’s proper maturation and trafficking to the apical membrane. Understanding and manipulation of this network may lead to therapeutics for Cystic Fibrosis in cases where mutant CFTR has aberrant trafficking.

  9. Pseudomembranous colitis in four patients with cystic fibrosis following lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, B; Murphy, D M; Fisher, A J; Gould, F K; Lordan, J L; Dark, J H; Corris, P A

    2007-06-01

    Pseudomembranous colitis is an uncommon complication in patients with cystic fibrosis, despite the use of multiple high-dose antibiotic regimens and the frequency of hospital admissions. Four patients from a total of 137 patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation are described who developed fulminant pseudomembranous colitis. Initial presentation was variable and the mortality rate was 50% despite urgent colectomy. In one case the presenting abdominal distension was thought to be due to meconium ileus equivalent. It is concluded that Clostridium difficile colitis may be a difficult diagnosis in patients with cystic fibrosis and follows a fulminant course after lung transplantation.

  10. Experiences of physical activity: A phenomenological study of individuals with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Rachael; Mercer, Jenny; Mills-Bennett, Rebekah; O'Leary, Catherine; Thirlaway, Kathryn

    2016-02-01

    Although extensive research has investigated the benefits of physical activity in cystic fibrosis, minimal exploration of the experiences for individuals from a qualitative, phenomenological perspective has been carried out. The aim of this study was to explore the subjective experiences of physical activity for individuals with cystic fibrosis. The health-care team, at an Adult Cystic Fibrosis Unit in the United Kingdom, recruited 12 participants to take part. Interview data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. A central theme of 'self-monitoring' emerged from the accounts and was embedded in the three super-ordinate themes.

  11. Anesthesia for Lobectomy in a Pediatric Patient` with Cystic Fibrosis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyedhejazi Mahin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis is the most common autosomal recessive disease which causes a lot of complications and there are some needed operations in lifelong of such patients. Anesthesia in these patients requires particular attention and a full cooperation of surgeon, anesthetist and pediatrician .We reported a case of lobectomy with lung separation in a 4.5 years old child with cystic fibrosis which was performed with minor complications in the hope that an awareness of such situations may turn up similar cases of study.Keywords: Cystic Fibrosis, Anesthesia, Pulmonic Lobectomy

  12. Lubiprostone ameliorates the cystic fibrosis mouse intestinal phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Lisle Robert C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis (CF is caused by mutations in the CFTR gene that impair the function of CFTR, a cAMP-regulated anion channel. In the small intestine loss of CFTR function creates a dehydrated, acidic luminal environment which is believed to cause an accumulation of mucus, a phenotype characteristic of CF. CF mice have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, an altered innate immune response, and impaired intestinal transit. We investigated whether lubiprostone, which can activate the CLC2 Cl- channel, would improve the intestinal phenotype in CF mice. Methods Cftrtm1UNC (CF and wildtype (WT littermate mice on the C57BL/6J background were used. Lubiprostone (10 μg/kg-day was administered by gavage for two weeks. Mucus accumulation was estimated from crypt lumen widths in periodic acid-Schiff base, Alcian blue stained sections. Luminal bacterial load was measured by qPCR for the bacterial 16S gene. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit in fasted mice were assessed using gavaged rhodamine dextran. Gene expression was evaluated by Affymetrix Mouse430 2.0 microarray and qRT-PCR. Results Crypt width in control CF mice was 700% that of WT mice (P P = 0.001. Lubiprostone increased bacterial load in WT mice to 490% of WT control levels (P = 0.008. Conversely, lubiprostone decreased bacterial overgrowth in CF mice by 60% (P = 0.005. Lubiprostone increased gastric emptying at 20 min postgavage in both WT (P P P = 0.024 but not in CF mice (P = 0.377. Among other innate immune markers, expression of mast cell genes was elevated 4-to 40-fold in the CF intestine as compared to WT, and lubiprostone treatment of CF mice decreased expression to WT control levels. Conclusions These results indicate that lubiprostone has some benefits for the CF intestinal phenotype, especially on bacterial overgrowth and the innate immune response. The unexpected observation of increased mucus accumulation in the crypts of lubiprostone-treated CF mice

  13. A new Era of Personalized Medicine for Cystic Fibrosis – at Last!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S Quon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF was discovered 25 years ago. This breakthrough has enabled a sophisticated understanding of how various mutations lead to specific alterations in the structure and function of the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR protein. Until recently, all therapies in CF were focused on ameliorating the downstream consequences of CFTR dysfunction. High-throughput drug screening approaches have yielded compounds that can modify CFTR structure and function, thus targeting the basic defect in CF. The present article describes the CFTR mutational classes, reviews mutation-specific therapies currently in late-phase clinical development, and highlights research opportunities and challenges with personalized medicine in CF.

  14. The genome of Burkholderia cenocepacia J2315, an epidemic pathogen of cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holden, Matthew T G; Seth-Smith, Helena M B; Crossman, Lisa C

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial infections of the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients cause major complications in the treatment of this common genetic disease. Burkholderia cenocepacia infection is particularly problematic since this organism has high levels of antibiotic resistance, making it difficult to eradicate...... of this highly transmissible pathogen comprises three circular chromosomes and a plasmid and encodes a broad array of functions typical of this metabolically versatile genus, as well as numerous virulence and drug resistance functions. Although B. cenocepacia strains can be isolated from soil and can...

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel blockers: Pharmacological, biophysical and physiological relevance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Paul; Linsdell

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane con-ductance regulator(CFTR) chloride channel causes cys-tic fibrosis, while inappropriate activity of this channeloccurs in secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney dis-ease. Drugs that interact directly with CFTR are there-fore of interest in the treatment of a number of diseasestates. This review focuses on one class of small mol-ecules that interacts directly with CFTR, namely inhibi-tors that act by directly blocking chloride movementthrough the open channel pore. In theory such com-pounds could be of use in the treatment of diarrheaand polycystic kidney disease, however in practice allknown substances acting by this mechanism to inhibitCFTR function lack either the potency or specificity forin vivo use. Nevertheless, this theoretical pharmaco-logical usefulness set the scene for the developmentof more potent, specific CFTR inhibitors. Biophysically,open channel blockers have proven most useful as ex-perimental probes of the structure and function of theCFTR chloride channel pore. Most importantly, the useof these blockers has been fundamental in developing afunctional model of the pore that includes a wide innervestibule that uses positively charged amino acid sidechains to attract both permeant and blocking anionsfrom the cell cytoplasm. CFTR channels are also subjectto this kind of blocking action by endogenous anionspresent in the cell cytoplasm, and recently this blocking effect has been suggested to play a role in the physio-logical control of CFTR channel function, in particular as a novel mechanism linking CFTR function dynamically to the composition of epithelial cell secretions. It has also been suggested that future drugs could target this same pathway as a way of pharmacologically increasing CFTR activity in cystic fibrosis. Studying open channel blockers and their mechanisms of action has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of CFTR as a pharmacological target in disease states, of

  16. Outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in cystic fibrosis patients, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittar, Fadi; Cassagne, Carole; Bosdure, Emmanuelle; Stremler, Nathalie; Dubus, Jean Christophe; Sarles, Jacques; Reynaud-Gaubert, Martine; Raoult, Didier; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2010-08-01

    An increasing body of evidence indicates that nondiphtheria corynebacteria may be responsible for respiratory tract infections. We report an outbreak of Corynebacterium pseudodiphtheriticum infection in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). To identify 18 C. pseudodiphtheriticum strains isolated from 13 French children with CF, we used molecular methods (partial rpoB gene sequencing) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Clinical symptoms were exhibited by 10 children (76.9%), including cough, rhinitis, and lung exacerbations. The results of MALDI-TOF identification matched perfectly with those obtained from molecular identification. Retrospective analysis of sputum specimens by using specific real-time PCR showed that approximately 20% of children with CF were colonized with these bacteria, whereas children who did not have CF had negative test results. Our study reemphasizes the conclusion that correctly identifying bacteria at the species level facilitates detection of an outbreak of new or emerging infections in humans.

  17. [Recommendations for the management of bone demineralization in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sermet-Gaudelus, I; Nove-Josserand, R; Loeille, G-A; Dacremont, G; Souberbielle, J-C; Fritsch, J; Laurans, M; Moulin, P; Cortet, B; Salles, J-P; Ginies, J-L; Guillot, M; Perez-Martin, S; Ruiz, J-C; Montagne, V; Cohen-Solal, M; Cormier, C; Garabédian, M; Mallet, E

    2008-03-01

    A high prevalence of low bone mineralization is documented in adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Osteopenia is present in as much as 85% of adult patients and osteoporosis in 13 to 57% of them. In children, studies are discordant probably because of different control database. Denutrition, inflammation, vitamin D and vitamin K deficiency, altered sex hormone production, glucocorticoid therapy, and physical inactivity are well known risk factors for poor bone health. Puberty is a critical period and requires a careful follow-up for an optimal bone peak mass. This review is a consensus statement established by the national working group of the French Federation of CF Centers to develop practice guidelines for optimizing bone health in patients with CF. Recommendations for screening and for calcium, vitamin D and K supplementation are given. Further work is needed to define indications for treatment with biphosphonates and anabolic agents.

  18. Gastrointestinal transit times and motility in patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedsund, Caroline; Gregersen, Tine; Jønsson, Iben;

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) often suffer from gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction including obstructive symptoms, malabsorption and pain, but the underlying pathophysiology remains obscure. AIM: To compare GI motility and transit times in CF patients and healthy controls. MATERIAL...... AND METHODS: Ten CF patients (five women, median age 23) with pancreatic insufficiency were studied. Total gastrointestinal transit time (GITT) and segmental colonic transit times (SCTT) were assessed by radiopaque markers. Gastric emptying and small intestinal transit were evaluated using the magnet......-based motility tracking system (MTS-1). With each method patients were compared with 16 healthy controls. RESULTS: Basic contraction frequencies of the stomach and small intestine were normal, but the pill reached the cecum after 7 h in only 20% of CF patients while in 88% of controls (p = 0.001). Paradoxically...

  19. Lifestyle treatments in cystic fibrosis: The NHS should pay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketchell, Robert Ian

    2016-08-01

    With the NHS under increasing financial pressure and healthcare costs soaring year on year, it is perhaps not surprising that assessment agencies focus on cost-effectiveness analysis when assessing new therapies. Such an approach does not however, always take sufficient account of treatment burden, lifestyle and patient choice and therefore new equally effective but perhaps "easier to take" formulations and faster delivery systems for current therapies do not always take precedence in current treatment guidelines. In arguing that the NHS should pay for so-called lifestyle treatments in cystic fibrosis the counterintuitive nature of some of the current decision making is discussed and a more holistic approach to improve NHS efficiency is presented.

  20. Infection in cystic fibrosis: impact of the environment and climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, K A; Stockwell, R E; Bell, S C; Kidd, T J

    2016-01-01

    In many countries numbers of adults with cystic fibrosis (CF) exceed that of children, with median survival predicted to surpass 50 years. Increasing longevity is, in part, due to intensive therapies including eradication of early infection and suppressive therapies and pulmonary exacerbations. Initial infections with common CF pathogens are thought to arise from the natural environment. We review the impact of climate and environment on infection in CF. Specifically, several studies indicate that higher ambient temperatures, proximity to the equator and the summer season may be linked to the increased prevalence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in people with CF. The environment may also play an important role in the acquisition of Gram negative organisms other than P. aeruginosa. There is emerging data suggesting that climatic and environmental factors are likely to impact on the risk of infection with NTM and fungi in people which are found extensively throughout the natural environment.

  1. The cystic fibrosis neutrophil: a specialized yet potentially defective cell.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Elaine

    2011-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the commonest genetically inherited diseases in the world. It is characterized by recurrent respiratory tract infections eventually leading to respiratory failure. One of the hallmarks of this disease is a persistent and predominantly neutrophil driven inflammation. Neutrophils provide the first line of defence by killing and digesting phagocytosed bacteria and fungi, yet despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of CF, there remains a paradox of why recruited CF neutrophils fail to eradicate bacterial infections in the lung. This review describes mechanisms involved in neutrophil migration, microbial killing and apoptosis leading to inflammatory resolution. We discuss dysregulated neutrophil activity and consider genetic versus inflammatory neutrophil reprogramming in CF and ultimately pharmacological modulation of the CF neutrophil for therapeutic intervention.

  2. The cystic fibrosis neutrophil: a specialized yet potentially defective cell.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hayes, Elaine

    2012-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the commonest genetically inherited diseases in the world. It is characterized by recurrent respiratory tract infections eventually leading to respiratory failure. One of the hallmarks of this disease is a persistent and predominantly neutrophil driven inflammation. Neutrophils provide the first line of defence by killing and digesting phagocytosed bacteria and fungi, yet despite advances in our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of CF, there remains a paradox of why recruited CF neutrophils fail to eradicate bacterial infections in the lung. This review describes mechanisms involved in neutrophil migration, microbial killing and apoptosis leading to inflammatory resolution. We discuss dysregulated neutrophil activity and consider genetic versus inflammatory neutrophil reprogramming in CF and ultimately pharmacological modulation of the CF neutrophil for therapeutic intervention.

  3. The Use of Home Spirometry in Pediatric Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakkottai, Aarti; Nasr, Samya Z.

    2017-01-01

    Medication adherence is poor among pediatric cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, with adolescents having one of the lowest adherence rates. We wanted to identify an adherence intervention that would be acceptable to CF adolescents and assess its feasibility. We surveyed 40 adolescents with CF and asked about barriers to and motivators for their own adherence and to generate ideas for potential adherence interventions. Since most of the respondents chose frequent spirometry at home and medication reminders for interventions, we selected 5 subjects, 10 to 14 years of age, with CF to test the feasibility of home spirometry and medication reminders in pediatric CF patients. This article summarizes the results of both the survey and the feasibility pilot study. PMID:28229102

  4. Tuberculosis reinfection in a pregnant cystic fibrosis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asween Marco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic Fibrosis (CF is a multisystem disease predominantly affecting the airways and predisposing patients to recurrent infections with various multidrug resistant organisms. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB infection is rarely seen, but considered a potential pathogen in CF patients. We report a 26 year old pregnant CF patient on Ivacaftor who was admitted with symptoms suggestive of tuberculosis. Three years prior to the current admission, she had completed four drug anti- MTB therapy for pulmonary tuberculosis and was considered cured as her sputum cultures after six months of treatment were negative. Genotype analysis revealed the current MTB strain to be different from the strain causing the previous infection. After receiving first line anti-tuberculous regimen for nine months, the patient's condition markedly improved culminating in an uneventful pregnancy and delivery. To our knowledge, this is the only reported case of reinfection tuberculosis in a CF patient.

  5. New insights into the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis sinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Eugene H.

    2013-01-01

    People with cystic fibrosis (CF) sinus disease have developmental sinus abnormalities with airway bacterial infection, inflammation, impaired mucociliary clearance and thick obstructive mucus. The pathophysiology of airway disease in CF is not completely understood, and current treatments in CF sinus disease ameliorate symptoms but do not provide a cure. This manuscript reviews the history of CF, its manifestations in sinus disease, and the potential impact and relationship of CF on the upper and lower airway. We discuss recent discoveries in the pathophysiology of CF using the CF porcine animal model and exciting treatments that address the primary gene defect that may translate into improved outcomes in CF and non-CF sinusitis in humans. PMID:24282147

  6. Dictamine Stimulates Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Cl- Transport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; YANG Hong; LIU Li-dan; WANG Su-mei; XU Li-na; YU Bo; LIN Sen; HOU Shu-guang; ZHOU Na; JIN Ling-ling

    2007-01-01

    Dictamine is a furoquinoline alkaloid isolated from Dictamus dasycarpus Turcz. In the present study, we found that dictamine is able to stimulate the chloride transport activity of wild-type and △F508 mutant CFTR. The activity is cAMP-dependent and can be completely reversed by specific CFTR inhibitor CFTRinh-172. In addition, dictamine can further increase the chloride transport activity when CFTR is maximally activated by the combination of cAMP stimulators forskolin(FSK) and IBMX, suggesting direct interaction of dictamine with CFTR. Dictamine may be useful for probing CFTR channel gating mechanisms and used as a lead compound to develop the pharmacological therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as idiopathic chronic pancreatitis and keratoconjunctivitis sicca and cystic fibrosis.

  7. Computed tomography dose optimisation in cystic fibrosis: A review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ferris, Helena

    2016-04-28

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common autosomal recessive disease of the Caucasian population worldwide, with respiratory disease remaining the most relevant source of morbidity and mortality. Computed tomography (CT) is frequently used for monitoring disease complications and progression. Over the last fifteen years there has been a six-fold increase in the use of CT, which has lead to a growing concern in relation to cumulative radiation exposure. The challenge to the medical profession is to identify dose reduction strategies that meet acceptable image quality, but fulfil the requirements of a diagnostic quality CT. Dose-optimisation, particularly in CT, is essential as it reduces the chances of patients receiving cumulative radiation doses in excess of 100 mSv, a dose deemed significant by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation. This review article explores the current trends in imaging in CF with particular emphasis on new developments in dose optimisation.

  8. Phenotypes selected during chronic lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Mandsberg, Lotte F; Wang, Hengzhuang

    2012-01-01

    by genetic variation. Mucoidy, hypermutability and acquirement of mutational antibiotic resistance are important adaptive phenotypes that are selected during chronic P. aeruginosa infection. This review dicsusses the role played by these phenotypes for the tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics and show......During chronic lung infection of patients with cystic fibrosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa can survive for long periods of time under the challenging selective pressure imposed by the immune system and antibiotic treatment as a result of its biofilm mode of growth and adaptive evolution mediated...... that mucoidy and hypermutability change the architecture of in vitro formed biofilms and lead to increase tolerance to antibiotics. Production of high levels of beta-lactamase impairs penetration of beta-lactam antibiotics due to inactivation of the antibiotic. In conclusion, these data underline...

  9. Genetic testing for cystic fibrosis in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Mencinger

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cystic fibrosis (CF is an autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in gene encoding cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR protein. Over 1400 mutations found in the gene contribute to the complexity of the CF phenotypes ranging from a classic multiorgan disease commonly involving respiratory, gastrointestinal and reproductive tract to mild and monosymptomatic presentations. Pilocarpine iontophoresis is considered as standard diagnostic test for CF, but it often fails in atypical forms of CF.Methods: In order to provide an additional diagnostic test to assure the diagnosis and provide patients with a proper medical care, we performed a genetic testing on 16 adults suspected to have atypical form of CF. Following counselling, parents of patients with possible homozygote variant of mutations were tested. On a personal request testing was also performed in an adult sibling of a patient with two known mutations to investigate possible carrier hood. The allele specific polymerase chain reaction method (PCR was used to detect 29 most common mutations in the cftr gene.Results: The diagnosis was proved in 3 individuals, a homozygote for Δ F508, and two compound heterozygotes Δ F508/R1162X and Δ F508/3849+10kbC>T. In three cases only one mutation was found: I148T, 2789+5G>A and Δ F508 in a heterozygote form.Conclusions: The genetic testing for CF is a valuable diagnostic tool in atypical forms of CF. Exclusion of possible differential diagnosis is warranted because of a variable CF phenotype. In cases where only one or no mutation was detected a necessity of whole gene sequencing is indicated to exclude rare mutations and polymorphisms that could be implicated in the pathogenesis of atypical CF.

  10. Mast cells and gastrointestinal dysmotility in the cystic fibrosis mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert C De Lisle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic fibrosis (CF has many effects on the gastrointestinal tract and a common problem in this disease is poor nutrition. In the CF mouse there is an innate immune response with a large influx of mast cells into the muscularis externa of the small intestine and gastrointestinal dysmotility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential role of mast cells in gastrointestinal dysmotility using the CF mouse (Cftr(tm1UNC, Cftr knockout. METHODOLOGY: Wild type (WT and CF mice were treated for 3 weeks with mast cell stabilizing drugs (ketotifen, cromolyn, doxantrazole or were treated acutely with a mast cell activator (compound 48/80. Gastrointestinal transit was measured using gavage of a fluorescent tracer. RESULTS: In CF mice gastric emptying at 20 min post-gavage did not differ from WT, but was significantly less than in WT at 90 min post-gavage. Gastric emptying was significantly increased in WT mice by doxantrazole, but none of the mast cell stabilizers had any significant effect on gastric emptying in CF mice. Mast cell activation significantly enhanced gastric emptying in WT mice but not in CF mice. Small intestinal transit was significantly less in CF mice as compared to WT. Of the mast cell stabilizers, only doxantrazole significantly affected small intestinal transit in WT mice and none had any effect in CF mice. Mast cell activation resulted in a small but significant increase in small intestinal transit in CF mice but not WT mice. CONCLUSIONS: The results indicate that mast cells are not involved in gastrointestinal dysmotility but their activation can stimulate small intestinal transit in cystic fibrosis.

  11. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmida, M C; Pereira, R H V; Silva, E A S R; Marques, E A; Lopes, A J

    2016-01-01

    The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10), intermittently colonized/infected (n=15), and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18) were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group). Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002). Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033). In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A. xylosoxidans.

  12. Clinical impact of Achromobacter xylosoxidans colonization/infection in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Firmida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of diagnosis of colonization/infection of the airways with Achromobacter xylosoxidans has increased in cystic fibrosis patients, but its clinical significance is still controversial. This retrospective, case-control study aimed to evaluate the clinical impact of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in cystic fibrosis patients. Individuals who were chronically colonized/infected (n=10, intermittently colonized/infected (n=15, and never colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (n=18 were retrospectively evaluated during two periods that were 2 years apart. Demographic characteristics, clinical data, lung function, and chronic bacterial co-colonization data were evaluated. Of the total study population, 87% were pediatric patients and 65.1% were female. Individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans had decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 s (51.7% in the chronic colonization/infection group vs 82.7% in the intermittent colonization/infection group vs 76% in the never colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, the rate of co-colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was higher in individuals chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.002. Changes in lung function over 2 years in the three groups were not significant, although a trend toward a greater decrease in lung function was observed in the chronically colonized/infected group. Compared with the other two groups, there was a greater number of annual hospitalizations in patients chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans (P=0.033. In cystic fibrosis patients, there was an increased frequency of A. xylosoxidans colonization/infection in children, and lung function was reduced in patients who were chronically colonized/infected with A. xylosoxidans. Additionally, there were no differences in clinical outcomes during the 2-year period, except for an increased number of hospitalizations in patients with A

  13. Polymorphonuclear leucocytes consume oxygen in sputum from chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia in cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolpen, Mette; Hansen, C. R.; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the most severe complication for patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). This infection is characterised by endobronchial mucoid biofilms surrounded by numerous polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNs). The mucoid phenotype offers protectio...

  14. Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolain Jean-Marc

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Respiratory tract infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Nocardia are rarely implicated in these infections and few reports of the involvement of this species are found in the literature. Case presentation We describe a case of lung infection followed by chronic colonization of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole resistant Nocardia farcinica in a patient with cystic fibrosis. The chronic colonization of this uncommon bacterium in patients with cystic fibrosis was proved using a newly developed real-time polymerase chain reaction assay, which indicates that this bacterium, despite treatment, is difficult to eradicate. Conclusion Our case report confirms that this organism can be recovered in persons with cystic fibrosis. Its eradication is necessary especially if the patient is to undergo lung transplantation.

  15. Phenotypic shift in Pseudomonas aeruginosa populations from cystic fibrosis lungs after 2-week antipseudomonal treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Ciofu, Oana; Kragh, Kasper N

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The influence of suppressive therapy on the different P. aeruginosa phenotypes harbored in the lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the phenotypic changes (mucoidy, hypermutability, antibiotic resistance, transcriptomic profiles and biofil...

  16. Limited Restoration of Cystic Fibrosis Lung Epithelium In Vivo with Adult Bone Marrow–derived Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Loi, Roberto; Beckett, Travis; Goncz, Kaarin K.; Suratt, Benjamin T.; Weiss, Daniel J.

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: Recent literature suggests that adult bone marrow–derived cells can localize to lung and acquire immunophenotypic characteristics of lung epithelial cells. We speculated this might be a potential therapeutic approach for correcting defective lung epithelium in cystic fibrosis.

  17. Diversity of metabolic profiles of cystic fibrosis Pseudomonas aeruginosa during the early stages of lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Karin Meinike; Wassermann, Tina; Johansen, Helle Krogh;

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the dominant pathogen infecting the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. During the intermittent colonization phase, P. aeruginosa resembles environmental strains but later evolves to the chronic adapted phenotype characterized by resistance to antibiotics...

  18. Iron accumulates in the lavage and explanted lungs of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract Oxidative stress participates in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF). An underlying disruption in iron homeostasis can frequently be demonstrated in injuries and diseases associated with an oxidative stress. We tested the hypothesis that iron accumulation and ...

  19. Vitamin A intake and serum retinol levels in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenenk, JW; Broos, Nancy; Stellato, Rebecca K; Arets, Hubertus G M; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Houwen, RHJ

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) patients receive vitamin A supplementation according to CF-specific recommendations to prevent deficiencies. Whether current recommendations are optimal for preventing both deficiency and toxicity is a subject of debate. We assessed the longit

  20. Conventional chest physiotherapy compared to other airway clearance techniques for cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Main, Eleanor; Prasad, Ammani; van der Schans, Cees P

    2005-01-01

    Background Cystic fibrosis is an inherited life-limiting disorder, characterised by pulmonary infections and thick airway secretions. Chest physiotherapy has been integral to clinical management in facilitating removal of airway secretions. Conventional chest physiotherapy techniques (CCPT) have

  1. Lumbar disc herniation in three patients with cystic fibrosis: a case series

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    Gruebl Armin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction To date, lumbar disc herniation has not been reported in the context of cystic fibrosis even though back pain and musculoskeletal problems are very common in patients with cystic fibrosis. Case presentation We report on three patients with cystic fibrosis who experienced lumbar disc herniation in the course of their disease at ages 19 to 21 years (a 22-year-old Caucasian man, a 23-year-old Caucasian man, and a 21-year-old Caucasian woman. Our third patient eventually died because of her deteriorated pulmonary situation, which was influenced by the lumbar disc herniation as it was not possible for her to perform pulmonary drainage techniques properly because of the pain. Conclusions Lumbar disc herniation can lead to a vicious cycle for patients with cystic fibrosis as it may promote pulmonary infections. This report highlights the need to investigate patients correctly.

  2. Persistent fat malabsorption in cystic fibrosis; lessons from patients and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M; Bodewes, F A J A; Verkade, H J

    2011-01-01

    Fat malabsorption in pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is classically treated with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). Despite PERT, intestinal fat absorption remains insufficient in most CF patients. Several factors have been suggested to contribute to the persistent f

  3. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment is associated with improvement of liver stiffness in cystic fibrosis patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Feen, Cathelijne; van der Doef, Hubert P. J.; van der Ent, Cornelis K.; Houwen, Roderick H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) might prevent progression of cystic fibrosis liver disease, but objective parameters for its effect are lacking. Methods: We used liver stiffness measurements to evaluate the effect of Ursodeoxycholic acid. Results: Paired measurements of liver stiffness were

  4. Persistent fat malabsorption in cystic fibrosis; lessons from patients and mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M; Bodewes, F A J A; Verkade, H J

    Fat malabsorption in pancreatic insufficient cystic fibrosis (CF) patients is classically treated with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). Despite PERT, intestinal fat absorption remains insufficient in most CF patients. Several factors have been suggested to contribute to the persistent

  5. PECULIARITIES OF REPLACEMENT ENZYME THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH CYSTIC FIBROSIS: BENEFITS OF HIGH-TECH ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Simonova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years we have gained enormous success not only in the field of understanding of pathologic basis and genetics of cystic fibrosis, but we have also developed new therapeutic approach to this disease. Enzyme therapy is one of the main parts of a complex treatment of cystic fibrosis. Correct therapeutic decision upon medication and treatment regimen allows to reach dramatic amelioration o patient’s condition, and significantly decrease the risk of complications of the disease itself and side-effects of the treatment given. This article contains guidelines of enzyme therapy in cystic fibrosis and clinical mistakes analysis that occur while deciding upon therapy. Key words: chronic pancreatic failure, replacement enzyme therapy, kreon, cystic fibrosis, children. (Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. — 2011; 10 (5: 152–156.

  6. Inhalable Antimicrobials for Treatment of Bacterial Biofilm-Associated Sinusitis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klodzinska, Sylvia Natalie; Priemel, Petra Alexandra; Rades, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilm-associated chronic sinusitis in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections and the lack of available treatments for such infections constitute a critical aspect of CF disease management. Currently, inhalation therapies to combat P. aeruginosa...

  7. Antibiotic therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis : a European consensus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Döring, G; Conway, S P; Heijerman, H G; Hodson, M E; Høiby, N; Smyth, A; Touw, D J

    2000-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most common lethal hereditary disorder with autosomal recessive heredity in caucasians. The majority of CF patients suffer from chronic respiratory infection with the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. No consensus among clinicians has been reached

  8. Costs, effects, and savings of screening for cystic fibrosis gene carriers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.F. Wildhagen (Mark); H.B. Hilderink; J.G. Verzijl; J.B. Verheij (Joke); L. Kooij (Loes); T. Tijmstra; L.P. ten Kate; J.D.F. Habbema (Dik)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractSTUDY OBJECTIVE: Evaluating the costs, effects, and savings of several strategies for cystic fibrosis (CF) gene carrier screening. DESIGN: A general model for evaluating prenatal, preconceptional, school, and neonatal carrier screening was constructed. For p

  9. Molecular detection of an atypical, highly resistant, clonal Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolate in cystic fibrosis patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Keating, Deirdre

    2013-03-01

    The identification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) isolates in sputum from cystic fibrosis (CF) patients can be challenging due to the multitude of phenotypic changes isolates undergo during adaptation to the microenvironment of the CF lung.

  10. Rnaseq As A Method To Study Microbial Interactions Arising In The Cystic Fibrosis Airways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amador Hierro, Cristina Isabel; Jelsbak, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In previous studies from our laboratory, a Pseudomonas aeruginosa lineage, named DK2, has been identified and characterized as highly successful, transmissible and persistent over four decades in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. This lineage underwent substantial phenotypic and genetic...

  11. Loss of FEV1 in cystic fibrosis: correlation with HRCT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikonomou, Anastasia; Papadopoulou, Frederica; Efremidis, Stavros C. [Department of Radiology, Ippokratio Hospital of Thessaloniki, 54642 Thessaloniki (Greece); Manavis, John [Department of Radiology, Democritio University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis (Greece); Karagianni, Paraskevi; Tsanakas, John [Department of Pediatrics, Ippokratio Hospital, Aristotelio University of Thessaloniki, 54642 Thessaloniki (Greece); Wells, Athol U.; Hansell, David M. [Royal Brompton Hospital of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) features in patients with cystic fibrosis are most strongly associated with functional impairment as expressed by forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1). Forty-seven patients with cystic fibrosis underwent chest HRCT and had pulmonary function tests. The HRCT examinations were evaluated for 11 features scored using a modification of Bhalla system and FEV1 was recorded as percentage of the predicted value. Univariate and multivariate correlations between HRCT scores and FEV1 were performed. The most common HRCT feature was bronchiectasis (98%) followed by atelectasis-consolidation (81%), bronchial wall thickening (77%), tree-in-bud sign (74%), mucous plugging (72%) and mosaic perfusion pattern (47%). On univariate analysis the following features correlated strongly with FEV1: bronchial wall thickening (p<0.0000001), tree-in-bud sign (p<0.0000001), mucous plugging (p<0.0000001), atelectasis-consolidation (p<0.0000001), thickening of interlobular septa (p<0.0002), severity (p<0.0002) and extent of bronchiectasis (p<0.0002). On multivariate analysis bronchial wall thickening and atelectasis-consolidation were the strongest independent determinants of the FEV1. We found a regression equation between FEV1 and the two HRCT features: FEV1=constant variable+a multiplied by bronchial wall thickening+b multiplied by atelectasis-consolidation (a and b=regression coefficients, R{sup 2}=0.48). The major morphological determinants of functional abnormality in cystic fibrosis, as expressed by the loss of FEV1, are bronchial wall thickening and atelectasis-consolidation. (orig.)

  12. [Molecular typification of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, N G; Marengo, J M; Rentería, F; Gatti, B; Segal, E; Semorile, L

    2008-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is the most frequent lethal genetic disease that affects the caucasian population. The main cause of morbidity is the chronic lung infection, being the infection caused by Pseudomonas aeruginosa the most difficult to eradicate. This bacteria can be acquired in direct form, by person-to-person transfer, or indirectly, by hospital acquired infection. The Centro Provincial de Referencia de Fibrosis Quistica functioning in the Hospital de Niños "Sor María Ludovica", in La Plata, cares almost 220 patients aged two months to 45 years. The life expectancy depends of factors like the early diagnosis of the disease and the later acquisition of the chronic lung infection. The purpose of this work was the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to evaluate the genomic relationship among them. The study was carried out using RAPD-PCR. The analysis showed a great genetic heterogeneity among the isolates. The separation of the patients in groups in accordance with its bacteriology, that implies the attendance in different days and the implementation of isolation (or segregation) measures had demonstrated to be, in addition to other strategies, effective in the reduction of cross infections.

  13. The Impact of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin T. Kopp

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe has multiple adverse effects on lung function and growth, nutrition, and immune function in children; it is increasingly being recognized as an important modifier of disease severity for children with chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF. This review examines what is known regarding the prevalence of SHSe in CF, with the majority of reviewed studies utilizing parental-reporting of SHSe without an objective biomarker of exposure. A wide range of SHSe is reported in children with CF, but under-reporting is common in studies involving both reported and measured SHSe. Additionally, the impact of SHSe on respiratory and nutritional health is discussed, with potential decreases in long-term lung function, linear growth, and weight gain noted in CF children with SHSe. Immunologic function in children with CF and SHSe remains unknown. The impact of SHSe on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR function is also examined, as reduced CFTR function may be a pathophysiologic consequence of SHSe in CF and could modulate therapeutic interventions. Finally, potential interventions for ongoing SHSe are delineated along with recommended future areas of study.

  14. The Impact of Secondhand Smoke Exposure on Children with Cystic Fibrosis: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Benjamin T.; Ortega-García, Juan Antonio; Sadreameli, S. Christy; Wellmerling, Jack; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Thompson, Rohan; McGrath-Morrow, Sharon; Groner, Judith A.

    2016-01-01

    Secondhand smoke exposure (SHSe) has multiple adverse effects on lung function and growth, nutrition, and immune function in children; it is increasingly being recognized as an important modifier of disease severity for children with chronic diseases such as cystic fibrosis (CF). This review examines what is known regarding the prevalence of SHSe in CF, with the majority of reviewed studies utilizing parental-reporting of SHSe without an objective biomarker of exposure. A wide range of SHSe is reported in children with CF, but under-reporting is common in studies involving both reported and measured SHSe. Additionally, the impact of SHSe on respiratory and nutritional health is discussed, with potential decreases in long-term lung function, linear growth, and weight gain noted in CF children with SHSe. Immunologic function in children with CF and SHSe remains unknown. The impact of SHSe on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function is also examined, as reduced CFTR function may be a pathophysiologic consequence of SHSe in CF and could modulate therapeutic interventions. Finally, potential interventions for ongoing SHSe are delineated along with recommended future areas of study. PMID:27754353

  15. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR allelic variants relate to shifts in faecal microbiota of cystic fibrosis patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Schippa

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: In this study we investigated the effects of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane conductance Regulator (CFTR gene variants on the composition of faecal microbiota, in patients affected by Cystic Fibrosis (CF. CFTR mutations (F508del is the most common lead to a decreased secretion of chloride/water, and to mucus sticky secretions, in pancreas, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts. Intestinal manifestations are underestimated in CF, leading to ileum meconium at birth, or small bowel bacterial overgrowth in adult age. METHODS: Thirty-six CF patients, fasting and under no-antibiotic treatment, were CFTR genotyped on both alleles. Faecal samples were subjected to molecular microbial profiling through Temporal Temperature Gradient Electrophoresis and species-specific PCR. Ecological parameters and multivariate algorithms were employed to find out if CFTR variants could be related to the microbiota structure. RESULTS: Patients were classified by two different criteria: 1 presence/absence of F508del mutation; 2 disease severity in heterozygous and homozygous F508del patients. We found that homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients exhibited an enhanced dysbiotic faecal microbiota composition, even within the CF cohort itself, with higher biodiversity and evenness. We also found, by species-specific PCR, that potentially harmful species (Escherichia coli and Eubacterium biforme were abundant in homozygous-F508del and severe CF patients, while beneficial species (Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Bifidobacterium spp., and Eubacterium limosum were reduced. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report that establishes a link among CFTR variants and shifts in faecal microbiota, opening the way to studies that perceive CF as a 'systemic disease', linking the lung and the gut in a joined axis.

  16. Nocardia farcinica lung infection in a patient with cystic fibrosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Respiratory tract infections are the major causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis. Nocardia are rarely implicated in these infections and few reports of the involvement of this species are found in the literature. Case presentation We describe a case of lung infection followed by chronic colonization of trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole resistant Nocardia farcinica in a patient with cystic fibrosis. The chronic colonization of this uncommon ba...

  17. Parents’ Religious Coping Styles in the First Year After Their Child’s Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Grossoehme, Daniel H.; Ragsdale, Judy; Cotton, Sian; WOOLDRIDGE, JAMIE L.; Grimes, Lisa; Seid, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Parents of children diagnosed with cystic fibrosis described it as “devastating.” Given religion’s importance to many Americans, parents may utilize religious coping. Relatively little is known about parents’ use of religious coping to handle their child’s illness. Interviews with 15 parents about their use of religion in the year following their child’s cystic fibrosis diagnosis were coded for religious coping styles. Sixteen styles were identified. Positive religious coping styles were more...

  18. Cystic fibrosis and Crohn’s disease:Successful treatment and long term remission with infliximab

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francesca; Vincenzi; Barbara; Bizzarri; Alessia; Ghiselli; Nicola; de; Angelis; Fabiola; Fornaroli; Gian; Luigi; de; Angelis

    2010-01-01

    The association of cystic fibrosis and Crohn's disease (CD) is well known, but to date, there are very few cas-es in the literature of patients suffering from mucovisci-dosis who have required treatment with infliximab. We report the case of a 23-year-old patient suffering from cystic fibrosis and severe CD treated successfully with infliximab without any infective complications or wors-ening of the pulmonary disease and with a long term (2 years) complete remission.

  19. Progress toward generating a ferret model of cystic fibrosis by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Engelhardt John F; Li Ziyi

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian cloning by nuclear transfer from somatic cells has created new opportunities to generate animal models of genetic diseases in species other than mice. Although genetic mouse models play a critical role in basic and applied research for numerous diseases, often mouse models do not adequately reproduce the human disease phenotype. Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one such disease. Targeted ablation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene in mice does not...

  20. Colonic wall thickness measured by ultrasound: striking differences in patients with cystic fibrosis versus healthy controls.

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colonic strictures represent an advanced stage of fibrosing colonopathy in patients with cystic fibrosis. AIMS: To clarify whether ultrasonography can identify patients with an early stage of fibrosing colonopathy and to determine clinical factors that influence bowel wall thickening. PATIENTS: Ninety patients with cystic fibrosis, median age 10 years, and 46 healthy controls, median age 13 years, were investigated. METHODS: Bowel wall thickness was measured by ultrasound in a pro...

  1. Antimicrobial resistance, respiratory tract infections and role of biofilms in lung infections in cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciofu, Oana; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim; Jensen, Peter Østrup

    2015-01-01

    Lung infection is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis and is mainly dominated by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The biofilm mode of growth makes eradication of the infection impossible, and it causes a chronic inflammation in the airways. The general mechanisms of ...... of adaptive evolution of the persisting bacteria imposes important therapeutic challenges and requires development of new drug delivery systems able to reach the different niches occupied by the bacteria in the lung of cystic fibrosis patients....

  2. Serum bactericidal effect on Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from cystic fibrosis patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Thomassen, M J; Demko, C A

    1981-01-01

    The bactericidal activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains isolated from cystic fibrosis patients was determined in a 10% concentration of normal serum or autologous cystic fibrosis serum. Of the 167 strains tested, 77 (46%) were sensitive (greater than 95% killed) in normal serum. Mucoid strains were more frequently sensitive than nonmucoid strains. Twenty-three sensitive strains tested in ethyleneglycoltetraacetic acid-chelated serum were resistant (less than 10% killed), suggesting o...

  3. Muscular strength after different types of training in physically active patients with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sahlberg, M.; Svantesson, U.; Magnusson, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Physical training is important in the treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). Optimal types of training and intensity are unknown. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect on muscular strength after 6 months of endurance training (ET) and/or resistance training (RT). Twenty patients....... Vitamin E and cytokines were analyzed. Fifteen tests of muscular strength were used. Handgrip strength in females and quadriceps strength in males were significantly decreased compared with healthy age- and sex-matched controls and positively associated with lung function. Sixteen patients completed...

  4. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, David C.; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-01

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  5. The ABC protein turned chloride channel whose failure causes cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadsby, David C; Vergani, Paola; Csanády, László

    2006-03-23

    CFTR chloride channels are encoded by the gene mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. These channels belong to the superfamily of ABC transporter ATPases. ATP-driven conformational changes, which in other ABC proteins fuel uphill substrate transport across cellular membranes, in CFTR open and close a gate to allow transmembrane flow of anions down their electrochemical gradient. New structural and biochemical information from prokaryotic ABC proteins and functional information from CFTR channels has led to a unifying mechanism explaining those ATP-driven conformational changes.

  6. Cystic fibrosis, common variable immunodeficiency and Aspergers syndrome: an immunological and behavioural challenge.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2012-02-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is of particular importance in Ireland as the Irish population has both the highest incidence (2.98\\/10,000) and the highest carrier rate (1 in 19) in the world. Primary immunodeficiency has not been previously reported as co-existing with CF. CASE REPORT: We report a unique case of CF associated with a primary immunodeficiency syndrome--common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). DISCUSSION: Our patient has CF, CVID and the additional comorbidity of Aspergers syndrome. The challenges inherent in diagnosing and treating such a case are outlined herein and the successful management of this case is evidenced by the well-preserved lung function of our patient.

  7. Cystic fibrosis, common variable immunodeficiency and Aspergers syndrome: an immunological and behavioural challenge.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chotirmall, S H

    2009-08-07

    INTRODUCTION: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is of particular importance in Ireland as the Irish population has both the highest incidence (2.98\\/10,000) and the highest carrier rate (1 in 19) in the world. Primary immunodeficiency has not been previously reported as co-existing with CF. CASE REPORT: We report a unique case of CF associated with a primary immunodeficiency syndrome-common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). DISCUSSION: Our patient has CF, CVID and the additional comorbidity of Aspergers syndrome. The challenges inherent in diagnosing and treating such a case are outlined herein and the successful management of this case is evidenced by the well-preserved lung function of our patient.

  8. Decreased coenzyme Q10 concentration in plasma of children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, J.H.; Lecluse, A.L.Y.; Berg, R. van den; Vaes, W.H.J.; Laag, J. van der; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an effective lipophilic antioxidant and protects against lipid peroxidation by scavenging radicals. Patients with cystic fibrosis generally have fat malabsorption; thus, we hypothesized that overall plasma CoQ10 concentration in pediatric patients with cystic fibr

  9. Optimisation and assessment of airway clearance in children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van der Giessen (Lianne)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in the white population.1 It affects approximately 1300 individuals in the Netherlands2 and 60.000 individuals worldwide. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fi brosis

  10. Decreased coenzyme Q10 concentration in plasma of children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudshoorn, J.H.; Lecluse, A.L.Y.; Berg, R. van den; Vaes, W.H.J.; Laag, J. van der; Houwen, R.H.J.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is an effective lipophilic antioxidant and protects against lipid peroxidation by scavenging radicals. Patients with cystic fibrosis generally have fat malabsorption; thus, we hypothesized that overall plasma CoQ10 concentration in pediatric patients with cystic

  11. Optimisation and assessment of airway clearance in children with cystic fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.J. van der Giessen (Lianne)

    2009-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is the most common life-shortening genetic disorder in the white population.1 It affects approximately 1300 individuals in the Netherlands2 and 60.000 individuals worldwide. CF is caused by mutations in the cystic fi brosis transmembrane conductance

  12. β2-Adrenergic receptor agonists activate CFTR in intestinal organoids and subjects with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijftigschild, Lodewijk A W; Berkers, Gitte; Dekkers, Johanna F; Zomer-van Ommen, Domenique D; Matthes, Elizabeth; Kruisselbrink, Evelien; Vonk, Annelotte; Hensen, Chantal E; Heida-Michel, Sabine; Geerdink, Margot; Janssens, Hettie M; van de Graaf, Eduard A; Bronsveld, Inez; de Winter-de Groot, Karin M; Majoor, Christof J; Heijerman, Harry G M; de Jonge, Hugo R; Hanrahan, John W; van der Ent, Cornelis K; Beekman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    We hypothesized that people with cystic fibrosis (CF) who express CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) gene mutations associated with residual function may benefit from G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-targeting drugs that can activate and enhance CFTR function.We used intestinal organoids to screen a GPCR-modulating compound library and identified β2-adrenergic receptor agonists as the most potent inducers of CFTR function.β2-Agonist-induced organoid swelling correlated with the CFTR genotype, and could be induced in homozygous CFTR-F508del organoids and highly differentiated primary CF airway epithelial cells after rescue of CFTR trafficking by small molecules. The in vivo response to treatment with an oral or inhaled β2-agonist (salbutamol) in CF patients with residual CFTR function was evaluated in a pilot study. 10 subjects with a R117H or A455E mutation were included and showed changes in the nasal potential difference measurement after treatment with oral salbutamol, including a significant improvement of the baseline potential difference of the nasal mucosa (+6.35 mV, pCFTR activation when administered ex vivo to organoids.This proof-of-concept study suggests that organoids can be used to identify drugs that activate CFTR function in vivo and to select route of administration.

  13. Impact of cystic fibrosis disease on archaea and bacteria composition of gut microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragoli, Francesco; Federici, Sara; Ferrari, Susanna; Minuti, Andrea; Rebecchi, Annalisa; Bruzzese, Eugenia; Buccigrossi, Vittoria; Guarino, Alfredo; Callegari, Maria Luisa

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis is often associated with intestinal inflammation due to several factors, including altered gut microbiota composition. In this study, we analyzed the fecal microbiota among patients with cystic fibrosis of 10-22 years of age, and compared the findings with age-matched healthy subjects. The participating patients included 14 homozygotes and 14 heterozygotes with the delF508 mutation, and 2 heterozygotes presenting non-delF508 mutations. We used PCR-DGGE and qPCR to analyze the presence of bacteria, archaea and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Overall, our findings confirmed disruption of the cystic fibrosis gut microbiota. Principal component analysis of the qPCR data revealed no differences between homozygotes and heterozygotes, while both groups were distinct from healthy subjects who showed higher biodiversity. Archaea were under the detection limit in all homozygotes subjects, whereas methanogens were detected in 62% of both cystic fibrosis heterozygotes and healthy subjects. Our qPCR results revealed a low frequency of sulfate-reducing bacteria in the homozygote (13%) and heterozygote (13%) patients with cystic fibrosis compared with healthy subjects (87.5%). This is a pioneer study showing that patients with cystic fibrosis exhibit significant reduction of H2-consuming microorganisms, which could increase hydrogen accumulation in the colon and the expulsion of this gas through non-microbial routes.

  14. Specific antibodies to recombinant allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus in cystic fibrosis patients with ABPA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moss Richard B

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aspergillus fumigatus, a widely distributed fungus, has been implicated in causing life threatening infections as well as severe asthma and allergic diseases in man. Allergic affliction like allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA is a disabling lung disease frequently seen in patients with asthma and cystic fibrosis. Immunodiagnosis of the former is comparatively easier due to the availability of purified antigens and sensitive methods. However, this is not true with cystic fibrosis patients where the prevalence of ABPA is fairly high and the morbidity and mortality are significant. Methods In the present study, we have evaluated purified recombinant allergens from A. fumigatus, namely Asp f 1, f 2, f 3, f 4, and f 6 using ELISA and a semi-automated method (ImmunoCAP. We studied 17 patients each from cystic fibrosis with ABPA, and cystic fibrosis with asthma, 22 cystic fibrosis with no ABPA or asthma, and 11 age matched controls. Results The results indicate that no antigen, antibody or method is capable of differentiating cystic fibrosis (CF with ABPA from other CF patients, although some allergens showed strong reaction or showed more prevalence among the patients studied. Conclusion When results of several allergens such as Asp f 1, f 2, f 3, f 4, and f 6 in their binding to IgA, IgG, and IgE antibodies were analyzed, a more strong discrimination of CF patients with ABPA was possible from the other groups studied.

  15. Pulmonary outcome prediction (POP) tools for cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Wagener, Jeffrey S; Pasta, David J; Elkin, Eric; Jacobs, Joan R; Morgan, Wayne J; Konstan, Michael W

    2010-12-01

    Loss of lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with increased mortality and varies between individuals and over time. Predicting this decline could improve patient management. To develop simple pulmonary outcome prediction (POP) tools to estimate lung function at age 6 in patients aged 2-5 years (POP(2-5)) and lung function change over a 4-year period in patients aged 6-17 years (POP(6-17)). Analyses were conducted using patients from the Epidemiologic Study of CF (ESCF). To be included in any analysis, patients had to have 1 year of clinical history recorded in ESCF prior to a clinically stable routine Index Clinic Visit (ICV). In addition to this criterion, for the POP(2-5) tool patients had to be between 2 and 5 years old at ICV and have a second clinically stable visit with spirometric measures at age 6. For the POP(6-17) tool, patients had to be between the ages of 6 and 17 years old at an ICV that included spirometric measures and had to have a second clinically stable visit with spirometric measures from 3 to 5 years after ICV. All patients enrolled in ESCF who met these inclusion criteria were studied. POP(2-5) and POP(6-17) populations were further divided into development groups (with ICV before January 1, 1998) and validation groups (with ICV after that date). Development groups were used to model forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV(1)) percent predicted at age 6 years (for POP(2-5)) and annualized FEV(1) % predicted change from ICV to the second visit (for POP(6-17)) by multivariable linear regression using age, sex, weight-for-age percentile, cough, sputum production, clubbing, crackles, wheeze, sinusitis, number of exacerbations requiring intravenous antibiotics in the past year, elevated liver enzymes, pancreatic enzyme use, and respiratory tract culture status, plus height-for-age percentile (POP(2-5)) and index FEV(1) (POP(6-17)). Integer-based POP(2-5) and POP(6-17) tools created from selected variables were

  16. Repairing the basic defect in cystic fibrosis - one approach is not enough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinha, Carlos M; Matos, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis has attracted much attention in recent years due to significant advances in the pharmacological targeting of the basic defect underlying this recessive disorder: the deficient functional expression of mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. However, increasing evidence points to the reduced efficacy of single treatments, thus reinforcing the need to combine several therapeutic strategies to effectively target the multiple basic defect(s). Protein-repair therapies that use potentiators (activating membrane-located CFTR) or correctors (promoting the relocation of intracellular-retained trafficking mutants of CFTR) in frequent mutations such as F508del and G551D have been put forward and made their way to the clinic with moderate to good efficiency. However, alternative (or additional) approaches targeting the membrane stability of mutant proteins, or correcting the cellular phenotype through a direct effect upon other ion channels (affecting the overall electrolyte transport or simply promoting alternative chloride transport) or targeting less frequent mutations (splicing variants, for example), have been proposed and tested in the field of cystic fibrosis (CF). Here, we cover the different strategies that rely on novel findings concerning the CFTR interactome and signalosome through which it might be possible to further influence the cellular trafficking and post-translational modification machinery (to increase rescued CFTR abundance and membrane stability). We also highlight the new data on strategies aiming at the regulation of sodium absorption or to increase chloride transport through alternative channels. The development and implementation of these complementary approaches will pave the way to combinatorial therapeutic strategies with increased benefit to CF patients.

  17. Association of lung perfusion disparity and mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis awaiting lung transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchina, Michael L; Tantisira, Kelan G; Aquino, Suzanne L; Wain, John C; Ginns, Leo C

    2002-02-01

    The risk of death for patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis awaiting lung transplantation remains high and most patients succumb to respiratory failure. This study was conducted to evaluate the usefulness of ventilation-perfusion scintillation scans, obtained during the pre-transplant period, to identify patterns that predict prognosis while on the waiting list. These patterns were compared with other pulmonary physiologic markers of ventilation and perfusion obtained from pulmonary function and cardiopulmonary exercise tests. From November 1990 to January 1999, 46 patients with cystic fibrosis were listed for bilateral lung transplantation. Fourteen (30.4%) died while waiting for a transplant (Group 1), whereas 32 were transplanted successfully or remain alive and waiting (Group 2). Mean arterial blood gas values, Brasfield radiograph scores, cardiopulmonary exercise data and the degree of scintillation scan abnormalities between lungs were compared for each group. Mean survival for Group 1 was 10.2 +/- 1.7 months, and for Group 2 was 23.5 +/- 3.0 months (p < 0.001). The right upper lung zone was the most severely affected segment. The Cox proportional hazards model revealed an increased perfusion disparity and resting hypercapnia as the main predictors of death while on the transplant list. The Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated greater survival for the groups with <30% disparity between lungs on the pre-transplant scintillation scans. The results suggest that severe, unilateral perfusion abnormalities seen on scintillation scans in patients with cystic fibrosis are associated with an increased risk of dying while on the lung transplant waiting list and may be helpful in identifying patients who should be considered for early or living-donor transplantation.

  18. Effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cystic fibrosis is a multisystem disease where the main problems are existing in the respiratory system. Aerobic exercise programs are effective in increasing physical fitness and muscle endurance in addition to chest physiotherapy. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chest physiotherapy and aerobic exercise training on physical fitness in young children with cystic fibrosis. Methods Sixteen patients with cystic fibrosis, between the ages 5-13 ye...

  19. [Impact of physical exercise in cystic fibrosis patients: A systematic review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gal, C; Vandervelde, L; Poncin, W; Reychler, G

    2016-09-01

    Beneficial effects of physical exercise have been previously demonstrated in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this systematic review was to summarize the evidence supporting physical exercise to improve on lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in cystic fibrosis patients. Medline database was used to search clinical studies from 2000 to 2015. We also analyzed the bibliographic section of the included studies, in order to identify additional references. A total of 17 studies were identified. A great disparity was found in the results of the different studies. No systematic benefit was found on lung function, exercise capacity or quality of life. No relationship between the type of program and the benefits achieved was observed. Evidence that physical exercise benefits lung function, exercise capacity and quality of life in cystic fibrosis patient is inconsistent and evidence does not support a particular standardized program for all patients. Copyright © 2016 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Airway microbiota and pathogen abundance in age-stratified cystic fibrosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Michael J; Allgaier, Martin; Taylor, Byron; Baek, Marshall S; Huang, Yvonne J; Daly, Rebecca A; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L; Brown, Ronald; Fujimura, Kei E; Wu, Brian; Tran, Diem; Koff, Jonathan; Kleinhenz, Mary Ellen; Nielson, Dennis; Brodie, Eoin L; Lynch, Susan V

    2010-06-23

    Bacterial communities in the airways of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients are, as in other ecological niches, influenced by autogenic and allogenic factors. However, our understanding of microbial colonization in younger versus older CF airways and the association with pulmonary function is rudimentary at best. Using a phylogenetic microarray, we examine the airway microbiota in age stratified CF patients ranging from neonates (9 months) to adults (72 years). From a cohort of clinically stable patients, we demonstrate that older CF patients who exhibit poorer pulmonary function possess more uneven, phylogenetically-clustered airway communities, compared to younger patients. Using longitudinal samples collected form a subset of these patients a pattern of initial bacterial community diversification was observed in younger patients compared with a progressive loss of diversity over time in older patients. We describe in detail the distinct bacterial community profiles associated with young and old CF patients with a particular focus on the differences between respective "early" and "late" colonizing organisms. Finally we assess the influence of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator (CFTR) mutation on bacterial abundance and identify genotype-specific communities involving members of the Pseudomonadaceae, Xanthomonadaceae, Moraxellaceae and Enterobacteriaceae amongst others. Data presented here provides insights into the CF airway microbiota, including initial diversification events in younger patients and establishment of specialized communities of pathogens associated with poor pulmonary function in older patient populations.