WorldWideScience

Sample records for fumed silica fillers

  1. Micro Filler Effects of Silica-Fume on the Setting and Hardened Properties of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Sounthararajan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of supplementary cementitious material is gaining much attention owing to its high pozzolanic property and further improvement in strength properties. Silica-fume is one among the widely used pozzolanic material which exhibits high cementing efficiency due to high silica content. This study presents comprehends a detailed insight on the hydration properties of silica fume with cement. Silica fume consists of very fine particle size and contains silica content more than 90%. The cement hydration results in the formation of calcium hydroxide and this is consumed with the addition of silica fume and results in additional calcium silicate hydrate. This compound primarily envisages the strength and improved microstructure of concrete. Addition of silica-fume fills in the spaces between cement grains. The test results showed that higher compressive strength of concrete is obtained by using 8.0% of silica-fume at 7 and 28 days was 48.25 and 55.83 MPa, respectively. This phenomenon is frequently referred to as particle packing or micro-filling. Even if silica fume did not react chemically, the micro-filler effect would lead to significant improvements in the microstructure of concrete. A comprehensive review has been carried out in this study to give a good understanding on the advantages of pozzolanic properties of silica fume in cement concrete.

  2. Composite polymer electrolytes using fumed silica fillers: synthesis, rheology and electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Saad A.; Fedkiw, Peter S.; Baker, Gregory L.

    1999-06-28

    The goal of the synthesis research was to devise routes to PEG/fumed silica/lithium salt composites that can be processed and then photochemically cross-linked to form mechanically stable electrolytes. An essential feature of the system is that the ionic conductivity and the mechanical properties must be de-coupled from each other, i.e., cross-linking of the fumed silica matrix must not cause a significant deterioration of the conductivity of the composite. As shown in Figure 2, we prepared a range of surface-modified fumed silicas and investigated their ability to form mechanically stable composite electrolytes. The groups used to modify the surface properties of the silica ranged from simple linear alkyls that render the silica hydrophobia to polyethers that promote compatibility with the electrolyte. From these materials we developed a cross-linkable system that satisfies the criteria of processibility and high-conductivity. The key material needed for the cross-linking reaction are silicas that bear surface-attached monomers. As shown schematically in Figure 3a, we prepared fumed silicas with a combination of surface groups, for example, an octyl chain with different coverages of tethered methacrylates. The length of the tether was varied, and we found that both C{sub 3} and C{sub 8} tethers gave useful composites. The functionalized silicas were combined with PEG-DM, AIBN or benzophenone (free radical initiators), LiClO{sub 4} or Li imide, and either methyl, butyl, or octyl, methacrylate to form stable clear gels. Upon irradiation with UV light, polymerization of both the tethered methacrylate and the added methacrylate took place, yielding a cross-linked rubbery composite material. Ionic conductivity measurements before and after cross-linking showed only a slight decrease (see Figure 9 later), thereby offering strong experimental evidence that the mechanical properties conferred by the silica matrix are de-coupled from the ionic conductivity of the PEG

  3. The Pozzolanic reaction of silica fume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2012-01-01

    Silica fume is a very important supplementary cementitious binder in High-Performance and Ultra High-Performance Concretes. Through its pozzolanic reaction the silica fume densifies the concrete micro-structure, in particular it strengthens the paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone. In the ...... of activation of the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume is estimated. The results show that the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume has notable differences from Portland cement hydration.......Silica fume is a very important supplementary cementitious binder in High-Performance and Ultra High-Performance Concretes. Through its pozzolanic reaction the silica fume densifies the concrete micro-structure, in particular it strengthens the paste-aggregate interfacial transition zone....... In the present paper different aspects of the pozzolanic reaction of silica fume are investigated. These include chemical shrinkage, isothermal heat development and strength development. Key data for these are given and compared with theoretical calculations, and based on presented measurements the energy...

  4. Influence of Silica Fume on Normal Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Pradhan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of silica fume into the normal concrete is a routine one in the present days to produce the tailor made high strength and high performance concrete. The design parameters are increasing with the incorporation of silica fume in conventional concrete and the mix proportioning is becoming complex. The main objective of this paper has been made to investigate the different mechanical properties like compressive strength, compacting factor, slump of concrete incorporating silica fume. In this present paper 5 (five mix of concrete incorporating silica fume are cast to perform experiments. These experiments were carried out by replacing cement with different percentages of silica fume at a single constant water-cementitious materials ratio keeping other mix design variables constant. The silica fume was replaced by 0%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% for water-cementitious materials (w/cm ratio for 0.40. For all mixes compressive strengths were determined at 24 hours, 7 and 28 days for 100 mm and 150 mm cubes. Other properties like compacting factor and slump were also determined for five mixes of concrete.

  5. Controversial effects of fumed silica on the curing and thermomechanical properties of epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of fumed silica on the curing of a trimethylolpropane epoxy resin was investigated by thermal analysis methods like Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC, and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA. The fumed silica used here is a by-product of the silicon and ferrosilicon industry, consisting of micro and nanosized particles. Both the curing reaction and the properties of the obtained composites were affected by the filler content. Different trends were observed for filler contents above and below the 30 wt%. Up to 30 wt%, the behaviour can be explained as a predominantly agglomeration effect. For 30 wt% and higher filler contents, single particles seem to play a more important role.

  6. A Review for Characterization of Silica Fume and Its Effects on Concrete Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Panjehpour

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mineral additions which are also known as mineral admixtures have been used in Portland cement for many years. There are two types of additions which are commonly mixed into the Portland clinker or blended directly with cement these days. They are crystalline, also known as hydraulically inactive additions and pozzolanic, which are hydraulically active additions. Silica fume is very reactive pozzolan, while it is used in concrete because of its fine particles, large surface area and high SiO2 content. Silica fume is much fined separated silica obtained as a by-product in industry. It is used as an admixture in the concrete mix and it has significant effects on the properties of the resulting material. Simultaneously, silica fume can be also utilized in production of refectory and porcelain, to increase intensity and durability. In addition, it can improve the overall performance of the material as filler used in coating resin, paint, rubber and other high molecular materials. This review paper discusses the effects of silica fume on the concrete properties such as strength, modulus, ductility, permeability, chemical attack resistance, corrosion, freeze-thaw durability, creep rate. Characterisation of silica fume as well as its physical and chemical properties will also be reviewed in this paper.

  7. High effective silica fume alkali activator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vladimír Živica

    2004-04-01

    Growing demands on the engineering properties of cement based materials and the urgency to decrease unsuitable ecologic impact of Portland cement manufacturing represent significant motivation for the development of new cement corresponding to these aspects. One category represents prospective alkali activated cements. A significant factor influencing their properties is alkali activator used. In this paper we present a new high effective alkali activator prepared from silica fume and its effectiveness. According to the results obtained this activator seems to be more effective than currently used activators like natrium hydroxide, natrium carbonate, and water glass.

  8. Upgrading offshore pipelines concrete coated by silica fume additive against aggressive mechanical laying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Abdou

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have been carried out to investigate the possibility of utilizing a broad range of micro-silica partial additions with cement in the production of concrete coating. This study investigated the strength properties and permeability of micro-silica concrete to achieve resistance toward concrete cracking and damage during laying. The chemical composition of micro-silica (silica fume was determined, and has been conducted on concrete mixes with additions of 3 up to 25% by weight of cement in concrete. Properties of hardened concrete such as compressive strength, flexural strength, and permeability have been assessed and analyzed. Cubic specimens and beams were produced and cured in a curing tank for 7 and 28 days. Testing results have shown that additions of silica fume to cement between 5% and 7%, which acts as a filler and cementations material, developed high flexural and compressive strength with reduction of permeability.

  9. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCL WITH BENTONITE – SILICA FUME MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mudimby Andal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of partial replacement of bentonite by silica fume which is used in the manufacture of Geosynthetic Clay Liner (GCL. Geosynthetic Clay Liners consist bentonite (Sodium Based sandwiched between two geotextile. Benotinite, having low permeability imparts better hydraulic performance to the GCL to act as liner. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the hydraulic conductivity of GCL with modified Bentonite. The bentonite is partially replaced by silica fume, a waste product of ferroalloy industries. Silica fume reduces the cracking characteristics of bentonite on desiccation. The replacement levels varied from 0% to 50% at a gradual increment of 5%. The test results indicated that partial replacement of bentonite by silica fume did not affected the permeability of bentonite even at 30%. Beyond 45% replacement levels the bentonite- silica fume mixtures showed increased permeability. This increased permeability also well within permeability limits of liners 1×10-9 m/sec.

  10. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCL WITH BENTONITE - SILICA FUME MATRIX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Andal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the influence of partial replacement of bentonite by silica fume which is used in the manufacture of Geosynthetic Clay Liner (GCL. Geosynthetic Clay Liners consist bentonite (Sodium Based sandwiched between two geotextile. Benotinite, having low permeability imparts better hydraulic performance to the GCL to act as liner. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the hydraulic conductivity of GCL with modified Bentonite. The bentonite is partially replaced by silica fume, a waste product of ferroalloy industries. Silica fume reduces the cracking characteristics of bentonite on desiccation. The replacement levels varied from 0% to 50% at a gradual increment of 5%. The test results indicated that partial replacement of bentonite by silica fume did not affected the permeability of bentonite even at 30%. Beyond 45% replacement levels the bentonite- silica fume mixtures showed increased permeability. This increased permeability also well within permeability limits of liners 1×10-9m/sec.

  11. Mechanical properties and filler distribution as a function filler content in silica filled PDMS samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawley, M. E. (Marilyn E.); Wrobleski, Debra A.; Orler, E. B. (E. Bruce); Houlton, R. J. (Robert J.); Chitanvis, K. E. (Kiran E.); Brown, G. W. (Geoffrey W.); Hanson, D. E. (David E.)

    2004-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) phase imaging and tensile stress-strain measurements are used to study a series of model compression molded fumed silica filled polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) samples with filler content of zero, 20, 35, and 50 parts per hundred (phr) to determine the relationship between filler content and stress-strain properties. AFM phase imaging was used to determine filler size, degree of aggregation, and distribution within the soft PDMS matrix. A small tensile stage was used to measure mechanical properties. Samples were not pulled to break in order to study Mullins and aging effects. Several identical 35 phr samples were subjected to an initial stress, and then one each was reevaluated over intervals up to 26 weeks to determine the degree to which these samples recovered their initial stress-strain behavior as a function of time. One sample was tested before and after heat treatment to determine if heating accelerated recovery of the stress-strain behavior. The effect of filler surface treatment on mechanical properties was examined for two samples containing 35 phr filler treated or untreated with hexamethyldisilazane (HMDZ), respectively. Fiduciary marks were used on several samples to determine permanent set. 35 phr filler samples were found to give the optimum mechanical properties. A clear Mullins effect was seen. Within experimental error, no change was seen in mechanical behavior as a function of time or heat-treatment. The mechanical properties of the sample containing the HDMZ treated silica were adversely affected. AFM phase images revealed aggregation and nonuniform distribution of the filler for all samples. Finally, a permanent set of about 3 to 6 percent was observed for the 35 phr samples.

  12. Properties of silica fume procured from natural diatomite and its usage in the production of vacuum insulation panels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Selyaev

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article shows the results of the research of silica fume particles procured from diatomite from Atemar deposit by means of separating silicic acid from colloidal dissolved state into the sediment. The objective of the work was to define thermal-physical and structural characteristics of the silica fume. The research included IR-spectrometry, granulometry, thermal gravimetric analysis, X-ray structural analysis, optical microscopy, and small angle X-Ray scattering. As a result of the research, the silica fume was defined to predominantly consist of amorphous silicon dioxide and had the developed pore structure of particles. A large number of nanosized particles and pores decreases heat transmission and increases reactive capability, that gives opportunity of using the powder silica fume as an active agent in dry mixes and concrete composites, as a component of sponge-glass, and as a filler material in vacuum insulation panel.

  13. Thermal pretreatment of silica composite filler materials

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Quan; Ramsey, Christopher; Baran, George

    2010-01-01

    Three different silica filler materials were thermally treated in order to effect dehydration, dehydroxylation, and rehydroxylation. Samples were characterized by thermogravimetry (TG), pycnometry, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). For all fillers, our results indicate incremental removal of silanol groups at higher heating temperatures and irreversible dehydroxylation at over 673 K. To remove the organic content and maintain adequate silanol density for subsequent s...

  14. The Effect of Aging and Silanization on the Mechanical Properties of Fumed Silica-based Dental Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaje S

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Mechanical strength and durability of dental composites are the main topics studied in this field of science today. This study examined fumed silica-based composite as a strong and durable restorative material through flexural and cycling test methods. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of silanization, ageing, cycling and hybridizing on mechanical properties of fumed silica-based resin composite. Materials and Methods: Composites were made of light-cured copolymer based on Bisphenol A glycolmethacrylate (Bis-GMA and Triethylene glycoldimethacrylate (TEGDMA at proportion of 50:50 which reinforced by fumed silica filler. For each composite sample, 5 specimen bars were made using Teflon mould (2 x 2 x 25 mm3. The samples with 12 wt% fumed silica (FS were considered as a base line group. The samples were exposed to cyclic cold water (FS-CCW and hot water (FS-CHW. The effect of silanization and adding more filler was studied together with samples containing 12 wt% (FS-S (12, 16 wt% (FS-S (16 and 20 wt% (FS-S (20 fumed silica filler. The filler was silanized with (γ-MPS. The degree of conversion was assessed with Fourier Transform Infra-Red spectroscopy. Flexural properties were evaluated with the Three-Point Bending test. Flexural data were analyzed with Excel software. Hardness was measured with an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM. Results: The degree of conversion of the resin reached 74% within 24 hrs. Salinization allowed more filler to be wetted by resin. Addition of silanized particles from sample FS-S (12 to sample FS-S (20 improved the mechanical strength. Hybridizing fumed silica with nano-silica (FS-N had no significant effect on the strength, but nano-hardness improved greatly. Ageing and cycling had adverse effects on the strength of the sample FS. The flexural strength of FS-CHW was 72% less than FS sample. Conclusions: Sample FS-N with low diluent and filler percentage complied with the

  15. Development of mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds using functionalized silica nano-fillers for the control of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Michelle; Nayyer, Leila; Butler, Peter E; Palgrave, Robert G; Seifalian, Alexander M; Kalaskar, Deepak M

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to produce mechano-responsive polymeric scaffolds which can alter cellular functions using two different functionalized (OH and NH2) silica nano-fillers. Fumed silica-hydroxyl and fumed silica-amine nano-fillers were mixed with a biocompatible polymer (POSS-PCU) at various wt% to produce scaffolds. XPS and mechanical testing demonstrate that bulk mechanical properties are modified without changing the scaffold's surface chemistry. Mechanical testing showed significant change in bulk properties of POSS-PCU scaffolds with an addition of silica nanofillers as low as 1% (PScaffolds modified with NH2 silica showed significantly higher bulk mechanical properties compared to the one modified with the OH group. Enhanced cell adhesion, proliferation and collagen production over 14days were observed on scaffolds with higher bulk mechanical properties (NH2) compared to those with lower ones (unmodified and OH modified) (Ppolymeric scaffolds, which can help to customize cellular responses for biomaterial applications.

  16. PREPARATION AND PROPERTIES OF FUMED SILICA/CYANATE ESTER NANOCOMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Elhussein A.Taha; Jun-tao Wu; Kai Gao; Lin Guo

    2012-01-01

    Fumed silica/bisphenol A dicyanate ester (BADCy) nanocomposites were prepared by introducing different contents of nano-sized fumed SiO2 into the BADCy matrix.Two different average primary particle diameters of 12 and 40 nm were chosen.Dibutyltindilaurate (DBTDL) catalyst was chosen to catalyze the cyanate ester group into triazine group via cyclotrimerization reaction.The SEM micrographs indicated that the fumed SiO2 particles were homogeneously dispersed in the poly(bisphenol A dicyanate) matrix by means of ultrasonic treatment and the addition of a coupling agent.The FTIR spectroscopy shows that,not only DBTDL catalyzes the polymerization reaction but also-OH groups of the SiO2 particles surface help the catalyst for the complete polymerization of BADCy monomer.The thermal stability of the cured BADCy can be improved by adequate addition of fumed SiO2.A slight increase in the dielectric constant and dielectric loss values were identified by testing the dielectric properties of the prepared nanocomposite samples.By increasing the SiO2 content,there was a slight increasing in the thermal conductivity values of the tested samples.The obtained results proved that the fumed silica/BADCy nanocomposites had good thermal and dielectrical properties and can be used in many applications such as in the thermal insulation field.

  17. Hydrophobic silica nanoparticles as reinforcing filler for poly (lactic acid polymer matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilić Branka M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Properties of poly (lactic acid (PLA and its nanocomposites, with silica nanoparticles (SiO2, as filler were investigated. Neat PLA films and PLA films with different percentage of hydrophobic fumed silica nanoparticles (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 5 wt. % were prepared by solution casting method. Several tools were used to characterize the influence of different silica content on crystalline behavior, and thermal, mechanical and barrier properties of PLA/SiO2 nanocomposites. Results from scanning electron microscope (SEM showed that the nanocomposite preparation and selection of specific hydrophobic spherical nano filler provide a good dispersion of the silica nanoparticles in the PLA matrix. Addition of silica nanoparticles improved mechanical properties, the most significant improvement being observed for lowest silica content (0.2wt.%. Barrier properties were improved for all measured gases at all loadings of silica nanoparticles. The degree of crystallinity for PLA slightly increased by adding 0.2 and 0.5 wt. % of nano filler. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46001

  18. HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF GCL WITH BENTONITE – SILICA FUME MATRIX

    OpenAIRE

    M. Andal; Chandrasekhar, M.; G. K. Viswanadh

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the influence of partial replacement of bentonite by silica fume which is used in the manufacture of Geosynthetic Clay Liner (GCL). Geosynthetic Clay Liners consist bentonite (Sodium Based) sandwiched between two geotextile. Benotinite, having low permeability imparts better hydraulic performance to the GCL to act as liner. In this investigation, an attempt has been made to study the hydraulic conductivity of GCL with modified Bentonite. The bentonite is partially replaced...

  19. Some engineering properties of heavy concrete added silica fume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkaş, Ayşe; Başyiǧit, Celalettin; Esen, Serap

    2013-12-01

    Many different types of building materials have been used in building construction for years. Heavy concretes can be used as a building material for critical building as it can contain a mixture of many heavy elements. The barite itself for radiation shielding can be used and also in concrete to produce the workable concrete with a maximum density and adequate structural strength. In this study, some engineering properties like compressive strength, elasticity modules and flexure strength of heavy concretes' added Silica fume have been investigated.

  20. Influence of Silica Fume on Corrosion Behaviour of Reinforced Steel in Different Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Electrochemical and corrosion behaviour of reinforced steel embedded in cement pastes incorporating differentamounts of silica fume as a partial replacement of cement has been studied in chloride and sulphate solutionsby using different electrochemical techniques. The results indicate that, while steel passivity degree is Iow in thecontrol samples upon soaking in the corrosive media, it has been high in samples incorporating silica fume andincreased with increasing silica fume content. The improvement effect of silica fume may be attributed to the poresolution structure of the cement paste, which limits the mobility of aggressive ions near the surface of the steel. Themechanism of steel corrosion due to chloride and sulphate attack and passivation effect of silica fume are discussed.

  1. High performance superplasticized silica fume mortars for ferrocement works

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rathish Kumar P.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferrocement works demand cement mortars of good workability and high strength. Reduction in water-cement ratio combined with a refined pore structure increases the compressive strength in addition to the enhancement of durability characteristics, but the workability decreases. Workability becomes important, as the mortar has to easily penetrate between the layers of the mesh wires. A reasonably workable high strength cement mortar can be obtained by using a high cement content coupled with the use of superplasticizers. These were also found to retain the cohesiveness and check undesirable bleeding and segregation. An experimental program was conducted to study the functional efficacy of an SNF condensate used as a water reducing superplasticizer. The compressive strength and flow characteristics of the mortars were determined to decide their suitability for ferrocement works. The parameters included the mix proportions, the grade of cement, age of curing and the dosage of superplasticizer. It was concluded from the study that the addition of an optimum dosage of superplasticizer improved the workability and strength characteristics of silica fume mortars. There was a late gain in the compressive strength of silica fume mortars.

  2. Rheological behavior of fumed silica suspension in polyethylene glycol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The rheological behavior of fumed silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol(PEG) was studied at steady and oscillatory shear stress using AR 2000 stress controlled rheometer. The systems show reversible shear thickening behavior and the shear-thickening behavior can be explained by the clustering mechanism. The viscosity and the degree of shear-thickening of the systems strongly depend on the mass fraction of the silica, the molecular weigh of PEG and the frequency used in the rheological measurement. The silica volume fraction of the systems is 1.16 %-3.62%, corresponding to the mass fraction of 4%- 9 %. The shear-thickening taking place in the low volume fraction may contribute to the fractal nature of the silica. At oscillatory shear stress, when the shear stress is less than the critical stress, the storage modulus decreases significantly, meanwhile the loss modulus and the complex viscosity almost remain unchanged; when the shear stress is larger than the critical stress, the storage modulus, the loss modulus and the complex viscosity increase with the increase of shear stress. The loss modulus is larger than the storage modulus in the range of stress studied and both moduli depend on frequency.

  3. Elucidation of filler-to-filler and filler-to-rubber interactions in silica-reinforced natural rubber by TEM Network Visualization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, W.K.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Filler-to-rubber interaction is a key parameter in the reinforcement of rubber. This paper presents an investigation into filler-to-filler and filler-to-rubber interactions in silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR) in the presence and absence of a silane coupling agent. Using a special network visual

  4. Effect of Silica Fume on two-stage Concrete Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelgader, H. S.; El-Baden, A. S.

    2015-11-01

    Two-stage concrete (TSC) is an innovative concrete that does not require vibration for placing and compaction. TSC is a simple concept; it is made using the same basic constituents as traditional concrete: cement, coarse aggregate, sand and water as well as mineral and chemical admixtures. As its name suggests, it is produced through a two-stage process. Firstly washed coarse aggregate is placed into the formwork in-situ. Later a specifically designed self compacting grout is introduced into the form from the lowest point under gravity pressure to fill the voids, cementing the aggregate into a monolith. The hardened concrete is dense, homogeneous and has in general improved engineering properties and durability. This paper presents the results from a research work attempt to study the effect of silica fume (SF) and superplasticizers admixtures (SP) on compressive and tensile strength of TSC using various combinations of water to cement ratio (w/c) and cement to sand ratio (c/s). Thirty six concrete mixes with different grout constituents were tested. From each mix twenty four standard cylinder samples of size (150mm×300mm) of concrete containing crushed aggregate were produced. The tested samples were made from combinations of w/c equal to: 0.45, 0.55 and 0.85, and three c/s of values: 0.5, 1 and 1.5. Silica fume was added at a dosage of 6% of weight of cement, while superplasticizer was added at a dosage of 2% of cement weight. Results indicated that both tensile and compressive strength of TSC can be statistically derived as a function of w/c and c/s with good correlation coefficients. The basic principle of traditional concrete, which says that an increase in water/cement ratio will lead to a reduction in compressive strength, was shown to hold true for TSC specimens tested. Using a combination of both silica fume and superplasticisers caused a significant increase in strength relative to control mixes.

  5. The effects of utilizing silica fume in Portland Cement Pervious Concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Daniel Allen

    Silica fume has long been used as a supplementary cementing material to provide a high density, high strength, and durable building material. Silica fume has a particle size a fraction of any conventional cement, which allows it to increase concrete strength by decreasing the porosity especially near the aggregates surface. Because Portland Cement Pervious Concrete (PCPC) has a smaller bond area between aggregate and paste, silica fume has significant impacts on the properties of the PCPC. The research in this paper studies the workability of a cement paste containing silica fume in addition to analyzing the results of testing on Portland Cement Pervious Concrete mixtures that also contained silica fume. Testing conducted included a study of the effects of silica fume on cement's rheological properties at various dosage rates ranging from zero to ten percent by mass. It was determined that silica fume has negligible effects on the viscosity of cement paste until a dosage rate of five percent, at which point the viscosity increases rapidly. In addition to the rheological testing of the cement paste, trials were also conducted on the pervious concrete samples. Sample groups included mixes with river gravel and chipped limestone as aggregate, washed and unwashed, and two different void contents. Workability tests showed that mixtures containing a silica fume dosage rate of 5 percent or less had comparable or slightly improved workability when compared to control groups. Workability was found to decrease at a 7 percent dosage rate. Samples were tested for compressive strength at 7 and 28 days and splitting tensile strength at 28 days. It was found in most sample groups, strength increased with dosage rates of 3 to 5 percent but often decreased when the dosage reached 7 percent. Abrasion testing showed that both samples containing washed aggregate and samples containing silica fume exhibited a reduced mass loss.

  6. Effect of silica fume and SBR latex on the pasteaggregate interfacial transition zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Adriano Rossignolo

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of silica fume and styrene-butadiene latex (SBR on the microstructure of the interfacial transition zone (ITZ between Portland cement paste and aggregates (basalt. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM equipped with energy dispersive x ray analysis system (EDX was used to determine the ITZ thickness. In the plain concrete a marked ITZ around the aggregate particles (55 µm was observed, while in concretes with silica fume or latex SBR the ITZ was less pronounced (35-40 µm. However, better results were observed in concretes with silica fume and latex SBR (20-25 µm.

  7. Synthesis and comparison of mechanical behavior of fly ash-epoxy and silica fumes-epoxy composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangamesh; Ravishankar, K. S.; Kulkarni, S. M.

    2017-08-01

    Present day innovation requires materials with a typical combination of properties that are not possible by conventional metal, alloys, ceramics and polymeric materials. Particulate reinforcements for polymers are selected with the dual objective of improving composite properties and save on the total cost of the system. The point of this study is to utilize and compare the mechanical properties of filler (fly ash and silica fumes) reinforced epoxy composites. The composites of different proportions by percentage of matrix (100%), fillers (5%, 10% and 15%) volume are developed using hand lay-up process are tested for tensile and compression, according to ASTM Standards. From these mechanical properties, the flexural analysis of these composites is simulated. And which are characterized by Scanning electron microscopy for the fracture surface study, which reveals the brittle fracture, this also conforms from the Finite element analysis (FEA). And the overall mechanical properties of the fly ash reinforced polymer composites were found to have better than silica fumes reinforced composites.

  8. Effects of Fumed and Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles on the Properties of Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane

    OpenAIRE

    Junshan Liu; Guoge Zong; Licheng He; Yangyang Zhang; Chong Liu; Liding Wang

    2015-01-01

    The effects of silica nanoparticles on the properties of a commonly used Sylgard 184 polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) in microfluidics were systemically studied. Two kinds of silica nanoparticles, A380 fumed silica nanoparticles and MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles, were individually doped into PDMS, and the properties of PDMS with these two different silica nanoparticles were separately tested and compared. The thermal and mechanical stabilities of PDMS were significantly enhanced, and the ...

  9. Improvement of RVNRL film properties by adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adul Thiangchanya

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of adding fumed silica and hydroxy apatite to Radiation Vulcanized Natural Rubber Latex (RVNRL for improving tear strength, aging properties, degradability and water-soluble protein content of rubber films has been investigated. The addition of fumed silica and hydroxy apatite in RVNRL improves tear strength and aging properties of rubber films, whereas tensile strength and degradability of rubber films were unchanged during storage at room temperature. The water-soluble protein content in rubber films was reduced by immobilization of the fumed silica and hydroxy apatite and enhanced by addition of ZnO. This may reduce allergy problems of natural rubber latex products caused by water-soluble protein. The MST of the RVNRL with fumed silica and hydroxy apatite indicated that the latex must be used within two months after mixing because of its stability.

  10. Analysis of the Damping Behavior and Microstructure of Cement Matrix with Silane-treated Silica Fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Jinping; LIU Tiejun; LI Jiahe

    2006-01-01

    The surface treatment of silica fume with silane coupling agent prior to incorporation in a cement mortar resulted in composites exhibiting increases in loss tangent by 5%-200% and storage modulus by 10%-20%, relative to the value obtained by using as-received silica fume. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images indicate that there is a morphological difference in the cement paste with treated and as-received silica fume. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared (IR) spectrum analyses and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) have provided evidence to understand the reaction mechanism between treated silica fume and the hydrate product of cement. This has led to the establishment of an initial microscopic model describing the damping behavior of cement matrix.

  11. Improved Reactivity of Fly Ash-Slag Geopolymer by the Addition of Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the improved reactivity of a geopolymer based on a combination of fly ash and blast furnace slag (BFS by the addition of silica fume. The geopolymer was synthesized by activating a mixture of fly ash, BFS, and three different types of silica fume with alkali activator. X-ray diffraction (XRD and inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES were utilized to characterize the reaction. The silicate structure was also analyzed by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy. From these results, it was found that the replacement of fly ash with the silica fume led to a significant decrease in the Q4(1Al and an increase in the Q4(2Al, Q4(3Al, and Q4(4Al. The Si/Al ratio of the aluminosilicate gel was relatively constant, ranging from 2.0 to 2.6, while the Si/Al ratio of the C-S-H gel increased with the addition of silica fume. Therefore, some of the Al dissolved from the slag contributed to the formation of aluminosilicate gel, and the remnant slag particles mostly participated in the formation of the C-(A-S-H gel with a decrease in the Q2(1Al. The increase in the reactivity of slag caused by the addition of silica fume was attributed to the reaction of the Al in the slag with the silica fume.

  12. Testing Silica Fume-Based Concrete Composites under Chemical and Microbiological Sulfate Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Estokova

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Current design practices based on descriptive approaches to concrete specification may not be appropriate for the management of aggressive environments. In this study, the durability of cement-based materials with and without the addition of silica fume, subjected to conditions that leach calcium and silicon, were investigated. Chemical corrosion was simulated by employing various H2SO4 and MgSO4 solutions, and biological corrosion was simulated using Acidithiobacillus sp. bacterial inoculation, leading to disrupted and damaged surfaces; the samples’ mass changes were studied following both chemical and biological attacks. Different leaching trends were observed via X-ray fluorescence when comparing chemical with biological leaching. Lower leaching rates were found for concrete samples fortified with silica fume than those without silica fume. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy confirmed a massive sulfate precipitate formation on the concrete surface due to bacterial exposure.

  13. Properties of High Volume Fly Ash Concrete Compensated by Metakaolin or Silica Fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The compressive strength and dynamic modulus of high volume fly ash concrete with incorporation of either metakaolin or silica fume were investigated. The water to cementitious materials ratio was kept at 0.4 for all mixtures. The use of high volume fly ash in concrete greatly reduces the strength and dynamic modulus during the first 28 days. The decreased properties during the short term of high volume fly ash concrete is effectively compensated by the incorporation of metakaolin or silica fume. The DTA results confirmed that metakaolin or silica fume increase the amount of the hydration products. An empirical relationship between dynamic modulus and compressive strength of concrete has been obtained. This relation provides a nondestructive evaluation for estimating the strength of concrete by use of the dynamic modulus.

  14. Strength development, hydration reaction and pore structure of autoclaved slag cement with added silica fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi, Y. [China Building Materials Academy, Beijing (China); Siemer, D.D. [LITCO, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Scheetz, B.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Materials Research Lab.

    1997-01-01

    Under continuous hydrothermal treatment the strength of portland cement paste decreases with curing time and the pore structure coarsens. It was found in this study that the compressive strength of slag cement paste containing 67.5 wt.% ggbfs also decreases with time after 24 hour hydrothermal processing, but with a small addition of silica fume to the slag cement, the cement strength increases and the pore structure densifies when processed under comparable conditions. Based on observations XRD and SEM, these changes are attributed to: (1) changes in the hydration reactions and products by highly reactive silica fume, such that amorphous products dominate and the strength reducing phase {alpha}-C{sub 2}SH does not form; (2) slower hydration of slag, partially caused by the decreased pH of the pore solution, favors the formation of a dense pore structure; and (3) the space filling properties of the micro particles of silica fume.

  15. Stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash using silica fume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xinying; Chen, Quanyuan [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); State Environmental Protection Engineering Center for Pollution Treatment and Control in Textile Industry, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Zhou, Yasu [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Tyrer, Mark [Mineral Industry Research Organisation, Solihull B37 7HB (United Kingdom); Yu, Yang [School of Environment Science and Engineering, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • The stabilization of heavy metals in MSWI fly ash was investigated. • The addition of silica fume effectively reduced the leaching of Pb and Cd. • The relation of solid phase transformation and leaching behavior of heavy metals was discussed. - Abstract: The objective of this work was to investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of silica fume on stabilizing heavy metals in municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) fly ash. In addition to compressive strength measurements, hydrated pastes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermal-analyses (DTA/TG), and MAS NMR ({sup 27}Al and {sup 29}Si) techniques. It was found that silica fume additions could effectively reduce the leaching of toxic heavy metals. At the addition of 20% silica fume, leaching concentrations for Cu, Pb and Zn of the hydrated paste cured for 7 days decreased from 0.32 mg/L to 0.05 mg/L, 40.99 mg/L to 4.40 mg/L, and 6.96 mg/L to 0.21 mg/L compared with the MSWI fly ash. After curing for 135 days, Cd and Pb in the leachates were not detected, while Cu and Zn concentrations decreased to 0.02 mg/L and 0.03 mg/L. The speciation of Pb and Cd by the modified version of the European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) extractions showed that these metals converted into more stable state in hydrated pastes of MSWI fly ash in the presence of silica fume. Although exchangeable and weak-acid soluble fractions of Cu and Zn increased with hydration time, silica fume addition of 10% can satisfy the requirement of detoxification for heavy metals investigated in terms of the identification standard of hazardous waste of China.

  16. Dynamic Moisture Sorption and Desorption in Fumed Silica-filled Silicone Foam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trautschold, Olivia Carol [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-02

    Characterizing dynamic moisture sorption and desorption in fumed silica-filled silicone foam is necessary for determining material compatibilities and life predictions, particularly in sealed environments that may be exposed to a range of environmental conditions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) were performed on S5470 fumed silica-filled silicone foam to determine the weight percent of moisture at saturation. Additionally, TGA was used to determine the time, temperature, and relative humidity levels required for sorption and desorption of physisorbed moisture in S5470.

  17. Stabilities and rheological properties of coagulated silica sols formed from fumed silica suspensions in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Ryotaro; Kawaguchi, Masami

    2010-06-15

    The stability and rheological response of coagulated silica sols formed from fumed silica suspensions were investigated in aqueous KOH solution at pH 11 upon the addition of hexadecyltrimethylammonium chloride (C(16)TAC) as functions of silica and surfactant concentration. The coagulated silica sols with negative charges are stable at given concentration ranges of silica and C(16)TAC, and the C(16)TAC molecules are completely adsorbed on the silica surface in these ranges. The average hydrodynamic diameters of the coagulated silica colloidal sols at C(16)TAC concentrations from 1.0 x 10(-4) to 5.0 x 10(-4) M are almost twice the diameter observed in the absence of C(16)TAC, independent of silica concentration. At C(16)TAC concentrations below 4.0 x 10(-4) M, the resulting coagulated colloidal sols showed Newtonian responses under hysteresis loop measurements, whereas at above 5.0 x 10(-4) M, the flow curve changes from a positive hysteresis loop to a crossover hysteresis loop with increasing concentration. This change under shear flow is due to a partial breakdown of the coagulated structure of the fumed silica suspensions as a result of electrical neutralization. Finally, the coagulated colloidal sols which gave a crossover hysteresis loop present a shear-thinning behavior and their transit shear stresses exhibit overshoots whatever the shear rate used. Plots of the resulting steady-state viscosities against shear rate indicate shear-thinning behavior.

  18. 42 CFR 84.1147 - Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators; minimum requirements. 84.1147 Section 84.1147 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1147 Silica mist test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Three non-powered respirators will be tested for a period of...

  19. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Garwan, M A; Maslehuddin, M; Nagadi, M M; Al-Amoudi, O S B; Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M

    2009-09-01

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  20. Prompt gamma analysis of fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz blended cement concrete specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, A.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)], E-mail: aanaqvi@kfupm.edu.sa; Garwan, M.A. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Maslehuddin, M. [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Nagadi, M.M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Amoudi, O.S.B. [Department of Civil Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Khateeb-ur-Rehman; Raashid, M. [Department of Physics, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-09-15

    Preventive measures against corrosion of reinforcing steel require making the concrete dense by adding pozzolanic materials, such as fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag, etc. to Portland cement. In order to obtain the desired strength and durability of concrete, it is desirable to monitor the concentration of the pozzolan in the blended cement concrete. Addition of pozzolan to blended cement changes the overall concentration of calcium and silicon in the blended cement concrete. The resulting variation in calcium and silicon gamma-ray yield ratio from blended cement concrete has found to have an inverse correlation with concentration of fly ash, silica fume, Superpozz, blast furnace slag in the blended cement concrete. For experimental verification of the correlation, intensities of calcium and silicon prompt gamma-ray due to capture of thermal neutrons in blended cement concrete samples containing 5-80% (by weight of cement) silica fume, fly ash and Superpozz were measured. The gamma-ray intensity ratio was measured from 6.42 MeV gamma-rays from calcium and 4.94 MeV gamma-ray from silicon. The experimentally measured values of calcium to silicon gamma-ray yield ratio in the fly ash, silica fume and Superpozz cement concrete specimens agree very well with the results of the Monte Carlo simulations.

  1. Effect of plasticizer and fumed silica on ionic conductivity behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing HPF6

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitender Paul Sharma; S S Sekhon

    2013-08-01

    The effect of addition of propylene carbonate (PC) and nano-sized fumed silica on the ionic conductivity behaviour of proton conducting polymer electrolytes containing different concentrations of hexafluorophosphoric acid (HPF6) in polyethylene oxide (PEO) has been studied. The addition of PC results in an increase in ionic conductivity, whereas the addition of nano-sized fumed silica improves mechanical strength of electrolytes along with a small increase in ionic conductivity. It was observed that the simultaneous addition of PC and fumed silica results in electrolytes with optimum value of ionic conductivity and other properties.

  2. Autogenous Deformation and Change of the Relative Humidity in Silica Fume-Modified Cement Paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Hansen, Per Freiesleben

    1996-01-01

    Even during sealed curing and at a constant temperature a hardening cement paste will deform and the relative humidity within its pores will lower. This autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change may be so significant that the cement paste cracks if the deformation is restrained....... This article focuses on the influence of silica fume addition on autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change. Continuous measurement of autogenous deformation and autogenous relative humidity change for more than 1 year and 1« years, respectively, was performed. The investigations show...... thatsilica fume addition markedly increases the autogenous shrinkage as well as the autogenous relative humidity change....

  3. Prediction of Flexural Strength of Concretes Containing Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Rubber (SBR) with an Empirical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieyzadeh, M.

    2015-12-01

    In the flexural test, the theoretical maximum tensile stress at the bottom fiber of a test beam is known as the modulus of rupture or flexural strength. This work deals with the effects of Silica Fume and Styrene-Butadiene Latex (SBR) on flexural strength of concrete. An extensive experimentation was carried out to determine the effects of silica fume and SBR on flexural strength of concrete. Two water-binder ratios and several percentages of silica fume and SBR were considered. Abrams' Law, which was originally formulated for conventional concrete containing cement as the only cementations material, is used for prediction of flexural strength of these concretes. The aim of this work is to construct an empirical model to predict the flexural strength of silica fume-SBR concretes using concrete ingredients and time of curing in water. Also, the obtained results for flexural strength tests have been compared with predicted results.

  4. Silica Fume and Fly Ash Admixed Can Help to Improve the PRC Durability Combine Microscopic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Li-guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Silica fume/Fly ash RPC can greatly improve durability. When Silica fume to replace the same amount of 8% of the proportion of cement, re-mixed 15min of mechanically activated Fly ash content of 10%, by chloride ion flux detector measuring, complex doped than the reference RPC impermeability improved significantly; In addition, by using static nitrogen adsorption method showed, RPC internal pore structure determination, the hole integral volume was lower than the reference admixed RPC integral pore volume significantly; And combined SEM microscopic experimental methods, mixed of RPC internal structure and the formation mechanism analysis showed that, SF/FA complex fully embodies the synergy doped composites “Synergistic” principle.

  5. Chloride accelerated test: influence of silica fume, water/binder ratio and concrete cover thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Pereira

    Full Text Available In developed countries like the UK, France, Italy and Germany, it is estimated that spending on maintenance and repair is practically the same as investment in new constructions. Therefore, this paper aims to study different ways of interfering in the corrosion kinetic using an accelerated corrosion test - CAIM, that simulates the chloride attack. The three variables are: concrete cover thickness, use of silica fume and the water/binder ratio. It was found, by analysis of variance of the weight loss of the steel bars and chloride content in the concrete cover thickness, there is significant influence of the three variables. Also, the results indicate that the addition of silica fume is the path to improve the corrosion protection of low water/binder ratio concretes (like 0.4 and elevation of the concrete cover thickness is the most effective solution to increase protection of high water/binder ratio concrete (above 0.5.

  6. Effect of Some Admixtures on the Hydration of Silica Fume and Hydrated Lime

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The effects of sodium salt of naphthalene formaldehyde sulfonic acid and stearic acid on the hydration of silica fume and Ca(0H)2 have been investigated. The hydration was carried out at 60℃ and W/S ratio of 4 for various time intervals namely, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days and in the presence of 0.2% and 5% superplasticizer and stearic acid. The results of the hydration kinetics show that both admixtures accelerate the hydration reaction of silica fume and calcium hydroxide during the first 7 days. Whereas, after 28 days hydration there is no significant effect. Generally, most of free calcium hydroxide seems to be consumed after 28 days. In addition, the phase composition as well as the microstructure of the formed hydrates was examined by using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) respectively.

  7. Building Materials Realized with Ultra-Fine Fly Ash and Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cătălin Badea

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The author’s experimental researches presented in this paper were focused on the building materials obtained by using ultra-fine fly ash and silica fume (like heavy mortars or compacted lightweight concretes. From experimental determinations there have been studied the following characteristics: the water absorption in function of mass, apparent density, tensile and compression strength (at 7 and 28 days, technical efficiency at 28 days and shrinkage.

  8. A Comparative Study on the Pozzolanic Activity between Nano-SiO2 and Silica Fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Qing; ZHANG Zenan; SHENG Li; CHEN Rongshen

    2006-01-01

    The pozzolanic activity of nano-SiO2 and silica fume was comparatively studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive, bond and bending strengths of hardened paste and concrete were also measured. Results indicate that the compressive strength development of the paste made from Ca(OH)2 and nano-SiO2, the reaction rate of Ca(OH)2 with nano-SiO2 and the velocity of C-S-H gel formation from Ca(OH)2 with nano-SiO2 showed marked increases over those of Ca(OH)2 with silica fume. Furthermore, the bond strength at the interface between aggregate and hardened cement paste, and the bending strength of concrete incorporated with 3% NS increased more than those with SF, especially at early ages. To sum up, the pozzolanic activity of nano-SiO2 was much greater than that of silica fume. The results suggest that with a small amount of nano-SiO2,the Ca(OH)2 crystal at the interface between hardened cement paste and aggregate at early ages may be effectively absorbed in high performance concrete.

  9. Effect of silica fume on the characterization of the geopolymer materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Hisham M.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of silica fume (SF) addition on properties of geopolymer materials produced from alkaline activation of alumino-silicates metakaolin and waste concrete produced from demolition works has been studied through the measurement of compressive strength, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Alumino-silicate materials are coarse aggregate included waste concrete and fired kaolin (metakaolin) at 800°C for 3 h, both passing a sieve of 90 μm. Mix specimens containing silica fume were prepared at water/binder ratios in a range of 0.30 under water curing. The used activators are an equal mix of sodium hydroxide and silicate in the ratio of 3:3 wt.%. The control geopolymer mix is composed of metakaolin and waste concrete in an equal mix (50:50, wt.%). Waste concrete was partially replaced by silica fume by 1 to 10 wt.%. The results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increased up to 7% substitution and then decreased up to 10% but still higher than that of the control mix. Results indicated that compressive strengths of geopolymer mixes incorporating SF increases up to 7% substitution and then decreases up to 10% but still higher than the control mix, where 7% SF-digested calcium hydroxide (CH) crystals, decreased the orientation of CH crystals, reduced the crystal size of CH gathered at the interface, and improved the interface more effectively.

  10. Electrospun Ultrafine Fiber Composites Containing Fumed Silica: From Solution Rheology to Materials with Tunable Wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufficy, Martin K; Geiger, Mackenzie T; Bonino, Christopher A; Khan, Saad A

    2015-11-17

    Fumed silica (FS) particles with hydrophobic (R805) or hydrophilic (A150) surface functionalities are incorporated in polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fibers by electrospinning to produce mats with controlled wettability. Rheological measurements are conducted to elucidate the particle-polymer interactions and characterize the system while microscopic and analytic tools are used to examine FS location within both fibers and films to aid in the fundamental understanding of wetting behavior. Unlike traditional polymers, we find these systems to be gel-like, yet electrospinnable; the fumed silica networks break down into smaller aggregates during the electrospinning process and disperse both within and on the surface of the fibers. Composite nanofiber mats containing R805 FS exhibit an apparent contact angle over 130° and remain hydrophobic over 30 min, while similar mats with A150 display rapid surface-wetting with a static contact angle of ∼30°. Wicking experiments reveal that the water absorption properties can be further manipulated, with R805 FS-impregnated mats taking up only 8% water relative to mat weight in 15 min. In contrast, PAN fibers containing A150 FS absorb 425% of water in the same period, even more than the pure PAN fiber (371%). The vastly different responses to water demonstrate the versatility of FS in surface modification, especially for submicron fibrous mats. The role of fumed silica in controlling wettability is discussed in terms of their surface functionality, placement on nanofibers and induced surface roughness.

  11. Electric conductivity percolation in naturally dehydrating, lightly wetted, hydrophilic fumed silica powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolowska, Dagmara; Dziob, Daniel; Gorska, Urszula; Kieltyka, Bartosz; Moscicki, Jozef K

    2013-06-01

    In studying the dehydration of surface-moistened fumed silica Aerosil powders, we found a conductivity percolation transition at low hydration levels. Both the percolation exponent and the threshold are typical for correlated site-bond transitions in complex two-dimensional (2D) systems. The exponent values, 0.94-1.10, are indicative of severe heterogeneity in the conducting medium. The surface moisture at the percolation threshold takes on a universal value of 0.65 mg([H2O])/m(2)([silica]), independent of the silica grain size, and equivalent to twice the first hydration monolayer. This level is just sufficient to sustain a quasi-2D, hydrogen-bonded water network spanning the silica surface.

  12. Dry plant extracts loaded on fumed silica for direct compression: preparation and preformulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, S D; Manzo, R H; Allemandi, D A

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a method to load fumed silica with vegetal material (solid residue) from a liquid extract to obtain a solid loaded silica product (LSP) with satisfactory flow properties and compressibility to be processed by direct-compression technology. Extracts of Melissa officinalis L. (M.o.), Cardus marianus L. (C.m.), and Peumus boldus L. (P.b.) were used to load silica support. The release of boldine from LSP (P.b.) reached 100% in HCl 0.1 N solution and only approximately 70% in water. Some physical-mechanical properties of LSP (M.o. and C.m.) alone and LSP-excipient mixtures were determined. The densities (bulk and tap) of LSP were higher than those of fumed silica alone. Consequently, good flow properties of LSP products were observed. On the other hand, flowability, densities, and compactibility of directly compressible excipients (lactose, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, and microcrystalline cellulose) were not adversely affected when mixed with LSP.

  13. 42 CFR 84.1152 - Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as...; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1152 Silica dust loading test; respirators designed as protection against dusts, fumes, and mists having...

  14. Physico-chemical characteristics of blended cement pastes containing electric arc furnace slag with and without silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S. Amin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Filled-pozzolanic cement pastes were made by different replacements of OPC by electric arc furnace slag (EAFS with silica fume (SF at water/cement ratio of 0.27. The pastes were hydrated up to 90 days. At each time interval, the physico-chemical characteristics of the hardened cement pastes were studied and related to the structure of the hardened pastes and the role of EAFS replacement as a filler in the hardened OPC-EAFS pastes. It was found that the optimum replacement of OPC by EAFS for the improvement in hydraulic properties of filled cement pastes is 6%. High replacement of OPC by EAFS (10% or 15% causes a notable deterioration in the compressive strength at all ages of hydration. The replacement of EAFS in Mix (90% OPC + 10% EAFS by 4% SF causes a marked improvement in the mechanical properties for the hardened pastes of Mix (90% OPC + 6% EAFS + 4% SF. The DSC thermograms for all pastes indicated the formation of nearly amorphous calcium silicate hydrates, calcium sulphoaluminate hydrates, calcium aluminate hydrates and portlandite. The SEM micrographs showed that the partial substitution of OPC by EAFS and/or SF leads to more dense structures as compared to the neat OPC paste.

  15. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Poly (Vinyl Chloride) Modified by Silica Fume/Acrylic Core-Shell Impact Modifier Blends

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Jian; MA Baoguo; LI Xiangguo; JIAN Shouwei; TAN Hongbo

    2012-01-01

    This research explored replacing acrylic core-shell impact modifier (AIM) by silica fume to toughen PVC.100%,75%,50% and 25% of AIM (8 phr) were substituted by silica fume in PVC respectively,and then processed by dry blending and twin-screw extrusion.Severe silica fume agglomeration was observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM) in the PVC matrix when 8 phr pure silica fume was used and processed by screw speed of 20 rpm.Its tensile strength was thereby reduced by 38% comparing to unmodified PVC.The silica fume was successfully dispersed while the screw speed was slowed down to 10 rpm to give a stronger screw torque and a longer melt residential time in the extruder.The tensile strength was ‘recovered' to a level comparable to unmodified PVC.Impact test were performed on all formulations extruded at 10 rpm screw speed and synergetic toughening effect was found with 50% substitution and it had the impact strength that was comparable to 8 phr pure AIM toughened PVC.

  16. Effect of Fly Ash and Silica Fume on Hydration Rate of Cement Pastes and Strength of Mortars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jun; ZHANG Yun; LIU Runqing; ZHANG Bing

    2014-01-01

    The effect of fly ash and silica fume on hydration rate and strength of cement in the early stage was studied. Contrast test was applied to the complex cementitious system to investigate the hydration rate. Combined with mechanical strength, the influence of fly ash and silica fume during the hydration process of complex binder was researched. The peak of the rate of hydration heat evolution and the mechanical strength decreased as the ratio of fly ash increased, however, as the ratio of silica fume increased, the peak of the rate of hydration heat evolution and the mechanical strength increased obviously. When the ratios of fly ash and silica fume are 10%and 5%, the peak of the rate of hydration heat evolution is the highest. At the same time 7 days of flexural and compressive strength are the highest as 8.89 MPa and 46.52 MPa, respectively. Fly ash and silica fume are the main factors affecting the hydration rate and the mechanical property.

  17. Effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memon, Fareed Ahmed; Nuruddin, Muhd Fadhil; Shafiq, Nasir

    2013-02-01

    The effect of silica fume on the fresh and hardened properties of fly ash-based self-compacting geopolymer concrete (SCGC) was investigated in this paper. The work focused on the concrete mixes with a fixed water-to-geopolymer solid (W/Gs) ratio of 0.33 by mass and a constant total binder content of 400 kg/m3. The mass fractions of silica fume that replaced fly ash in this research were 0wt%, 5wt%, 10wt%, and 15wt%. The workability-related fresh properties of SCGC were assessed through slump flow, V-funnel, and L-box test methods. Hardened concrete tests were limited to compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths, all of which were measured at the age of 1, 7, and 28 d after 48-h oven curing. The results indicate that the addition of silica fume as a partial replacement of fly ash results in the loss of workability; nevertheless, the mechanical properties of hardened SCGC are significantly improved by incorporating silica fume, especially up to 10wt%. Applying this percentage of silica fume results in 4.3% reduction in the slump flow; however, it increases the compressive strength by 6.9%, tensile strength by 12.8% and flexural strength by 11.5%.

  18. Monolithic stationary phases with incorporated fumed silica nanoparticles. Part II. Polymethacrylate-based monolithic column with "covalently" incorporated modified octadecyl fumed silica nanoparticles for reversed-phase chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğan, Cemil; El Rassi, Ziad

    2016-05-01

    This study is concerned with the incorporation of surface modified fumed silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) into polymethacrylate based monolithic columns for use in reversed phase chromatography (RPC) of small solutes and proteins. First, FSNPs were modified with 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propylmethacrylate (TMSPM) to yield the "hybrid" methacryloyl fumed silica nanoparticle (MFSNP) monomer. The resulting MFSNP was then mixed with glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in a binary porogenic solvent composed of cyclohexanol and dodecanol, and the in situ copolymerization of MFSNP, GMM and EDMA was performed in a stainless steel column of 4.6 mm i.d. The silanol groups of the hybrid monolith thus obtained were grafted with octadecyl ligands by perfusing the hybrid monolithic column with a solution of 4% w/v of dimethyloctadecylchlorosilane (DODCS) in toluene while the column was maintained at 110°C for 6h (in a heated HPLC oven). One of the originalities of this study was to demonstrate MFSNP as a novel derivatized "hybrid monomer" in making RPC monolithic columns with surface bound octadecyl ligands. In this respect, the RPC behavior of the monolithic column with "covalently" incorporated FNSPs having surface grafted octadecyl ligands was evaluated with alkylbenzenes, aniline derivatives and phenolic compounds. The results showed that the hybrid poly(GMA-EDMA-MFSNP) having surface bound octadecyl ligands exhibited hydrophobic interactions under reversed phase elution conditions. Furthermore, six standard proteins were baseline separated on the column using a 10min linear gradient elution at increasing ACN concentration in the mobile phase at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min using a 10 cm×4.6mm i.d. column. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) for the retention times of the tested solutes were lower than 2.1% and 2.4% under isocratic elution and gradient elution conditions, respectively.

  19. Lipase immobilization for catalytic applications obtained using fumed silica deposited with MAPLE technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloisi, Francesco; Califano, Valeria; Perretta, Giuseppe; Nasti, Libera; Aronne, Antonio; Di Girolamo, Rocco; Auriemma, Finizia; De Rosa, Claudio; Vicari, Luciano R. M.

    2016-06-01

    Lipases are enzymes used for catalyzing reactions of acylglycerides in biodiesel production from lipids, where enzyme immobilization on a substrate is required. Silica nanoparticles in different morphologies and configurations are currently used in conjunction with biological molecules for drug delivery and catalysis applications, but up to date their use for triglycerides has been limited by the large size of long-chain lipid molecules. Matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), a laser deposition technique using a frozen solution/suspension as a target, is widely used for deposition of biomaterials and other delicate molecules. We have carried out a MAPLE deposition starting from a frozen mixture containing fumed silica and lipase in water. Deposition parameters were chosen in order to increase surface roughness and to promote the formation of complex structures. Both the target (a frozen thickened mixture of nanoparticles/catalyst in water) and the deposition configuration (a small target to substrate distance) are unusual and have been adopted in order to increase surface contact of catalyst and to facilitate access to long-chain molecules. The resulting innovative film morphology (fumed silica/lipase cluster level aggregation) and the lipase functionality (for catalytic biodiesel production) have been studied by FESEM, FTIR and transesterification tests.

  20. Chloride Permeability and Corrosion of Reinforcement in Concrete Containing Silica Fume

    OpenAIRE

    鳥居, 和之; 川村, 満紀; 浅野, 篤郎; 三原, 守弘

    1991-01-01

    Condensed silica fume (CSF) is an ultra-fine and high reactive pozzolan. Some properties of fresh and hardened concretes can be significantly improved by the use of CSF. CSF has been used in concrete to make a high-strength and durable concrete. This study aims at revealing the influence of CSF on the chloride permeability of concrete and the chloride corrosion of steel bars embedded in concrete. From the experimental results, it was confirmed that the use of small amounts of CSF could effect...

  1. Freeze-Thaw Resistance of Normal and High Strength Concretes Produced with Fly Ash and Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenk Karakurt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study is based on determination of the freeze-thaw resistance of air-entrained and non-air-entrained normal strength concrete (NC and high strength concrete (HSC produced with fly ash and silica fume according to surface scaling. The procedure allows us to measure the amount of scaling per unit surface area due to a number of well defined freezing and thawing cycles in the presence of deicing salt. The weight loss, surface scaling, moisture uptake, and internal damage were measured after 0 and after every 4th freeze-thaw cycle. The test results showed that the freeze-thaw resistance is influenced directly by the compressive strength property of the concrete. Silica fume significantly reduced the resistance of normal strength concrete against freeze-thaw effect without plasticizing agent. The surface scaling of silica fume concrete without admixture was 22% higher than reference normal concrete.

  2. Effects of magnesium potassium phosphate cements mixed with silica fume on the solidification and reduction of municipal sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yanchang; Wang, Lixin; Song, Peng; Wang, Qi

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate Magnesium-Potassium Phosphate Cement (MKPC) mixed with silica fume on the solidification and reduction of high moisture content (94%) of municipal sludge. The moisture content of the solidified sludge, volume shrinkage, compressive strength and other properties were studied, and the mechanism was discussed based on phase and morphology analysis. The results indicates that the solidified sludge (30% MKPC) with 30% silica fume can obtain with the early compressive strength of 430 KPa, which reached the requirements of the landfill (≥ 350 KPa). The moisture content of solidified sludge decrease to 30% and the volume shrinkage of solidified sludge can reduce to 68% or less at 7d, which played a key role for sludge reduction. MKPC and silica fume form skeleton structure that can promote the evaporation of moisture in the sludge.

  3. The Effect of Filler-Polymer Interactions on Cold-Crystallization Kinetics in Crosslinked, Silica Filled PDMS/PDPS Copolymer Melts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, A; DeTeresa, S; Thompson, L; Cohenour, R; Balazs, B; Maxwell, R S

    2006-04-21

    Crystallization in a series of variable crosslink density poly(dimethyl-diphenyl) siloxanes random block copolymers reinforced through a mixture of precipitated and fumed silica fillers has been studied by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA), and X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The silicone composite studied was composed of 94.6 mol% Dimethoylsiloxane, 5.1 mol% diphenylsiloxane, and 0.3 mol% methyl-vinyl siloxane (which formed crosslinking after a peroxide cure). The polymer was filled with a mixture of 21.6 wt. % fumed silica and 4.0 wt. % precipitated silica previously treated with 6.8 wt. % ethoxy-endblocked siloxane processing aid. The base composite was characterized by a molecular weight between crosslinks in the polymer network of {approx}24 kDa and an overall molecular weight (including the influence of the silica fillers) between crosslinks of {approx}11 kDa. Molecular weight between crosslinks and filler-polymer interaction strength were then modified by exposure to {gamma}-irradiation in either air or vacuum. The unirradiated material exhibited crystallization at -80 C as measured by DSC with a 16% crystallization as measured by XRD. Isothermal DMA experiments illustrated that crystallization at -85 C occurred over a 1.8 hour period in silica-filled systems and 2.2-2.6 hours in unfilled systems. The onset of crystallization typically occurred after a 30-minute incubation/nucleation period. The crystallization kinetics were dependent on crosslink density. Changes in molecular weight of a factor of two did not, however, change the amount of crystallization. Irradiation in vacuum resulted in faster overall crystallization rates compared to air irradiation for the same crosslink density, likely due to a reduction in the interaction between the polymer chains and the silica filler surface. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry contrasted the crystallization and melting behavior of pure PDMS versus the PDMS/PDPS base

  4. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Tsan-Ching CHENG; Cheng, An; Ran HUANG; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed t...

  5. Effects of Fumed and Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles on the Properties of Sylgard 184 Polydimethylsiloxane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junshan Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of silica nanoparticles on the properties of a commonly used Sylgard 184 polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS in microfluidics were systemically studied. Two kinds of silica nanoparticles, A380 fumed silica nanoparticles and MCM-41 mesoporous silica nanoparticles, were individually doped into PDMS, and the properties of PDMS with these two different silica nanoparticles were separately tested and compared. The thermal and mechanical stabilities of PDMS were significantly enhanced, and the swelling characteristics were also improved by doping these two kinds of nanoparticles. However, the transparency of PDMS was decreased due to the light scattering by nanoparticles. By contrast, PDMS/MCM-41 nanocomposites showed a lower coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE owing to the mesoporous structure of MCM-41 nanoparticles, while PDMS/A380 nanocomposites showed a larger elastic modulus and better transparency due to the smaller size of A380 nanoparticles. In addition, A380 and MCM-41 nanoparticles had the similar effects on the swelling characteristics of PDMS. The swelling ratio of PDMS in toluene was decreased to 0.68 when the concentration of nanoparticles was 10 wt %.

  6. Cement with silica fume and granulated blast-furnace slag: strength behavior and hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonavetti, V. L.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses the influence of portland cement replacement by silica fume (up to 10% and/or granulated blast furnace slag (up to 70% on the hydration cement (XRD, heat of hydration, non evaporable water content and calcium hydroxide content curing under sealed conditions and their effect on the mechanical strength. The obtained results indicate that binary cements containing silica fume and ternary cements there was a significant increase of hydration rate at early age. At later ages, most of studied cements have an equivalent or greater strength that those obtained in the plain portland cement.En este trabajo se analiza la influencia de la incorporación al cemento portland de humo de sílice (hasta 10% y/o escoria granulada de alto horno (hasta 70% sobre la hidratación (DRX, calor de hidratación, contenido de agua no evaporable y de hidróxido de calcio, bajo condiciones de curado sellado y su incidencia sobre la resistencia mecánica. Los resultados obtenidos indican que en los cementos binarios con humo de sílice y en los cementos ternarios se produce un importante aumento de la velocidad de hidratación en las primeras edades, mientras que a edades más avanzadas la mayor parte del dominio estudiado alcanza o supera la resistencia obtenida por el cemento portland sin adición.

  7. Physico-mechanical properties of high performance concrete using different aggregates in presence of silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah A. Abo-El-Enein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Heavy weight high performance concrete (HPC can be used when particular properties, such as high strength and good radiation shielding are required. Such concrete, using ilmenite and hematite coarse aggregates can significantly have higher specific gravities than those of concrete made with dolomite and air-cooled slag aggregates. Four different concrete mixes with the same cement content and different w/c ratios were designed using normal dolomite aggregate, air-cooled slag by-product and two different types of iron ore aggregates. High performance concrete (grade-M60 can be achieved using superplasticizer to reduce the water/cement ratio; the effect of SF on the performance of concrete was studied by addition of 10% silica fume to the total cement content. The physico-mechanical properties of coarse aggregates and hardened concrete were studied. The results show that, Ilmenite coarse aggregate gives higher physical and mechanical properties than the other aggregates. Also, addition of 10% silica fume developed a stronger and a denser interfacial transition zone (ITZ between concrete particles and the cement matrix. Crushed air-cooled slag can be used to produce a high-strength concrete with better mechanical properties than corresponding concrete made with crushed hematite and ilmenite. Heavy density concrete made with fine aggregates of ilmenite and air-cooled slag are expected to be suitable as shielding materials to attenuate gamma rays.

  8. Silica-filled elastomers: polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botti, A.; Pyckhout-Hintzen, W.; Richter, D. [IFF-Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Urban, V. [ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); IPNS, Argonne 60439-4814 (United States); Kohlbrecher, J. [PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Straube, E. [University of Halle, FB Physik, 06099 Halle (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  9. Silica-filled elastomers polymer chain and filler characterization by a SANS-SAXS approach

    CERN Document Server

    Botti, A; Richter, D; Urban, V; Ipns, A 6 4; Kohlbrecher, J; Straube, E

    2002-01-01

    A study of composites based upon commercially available silica fillers and networks of blends of protonated and deuterated anionically prepared polyisoprene is presented. The extraction of the single chain structure factor for SANS in the polymeric soft phase in isotropic and deformed state has been performed for the first time. The quasi three-component system could not be compositionally matched due to the internal structures of the activated fillers. For this, a parallel SAXS investigation provided the neccessary information on the filler structure which was lacking in the SANS analysis. Whereas mechanically clear reinforcement at low strains and filler-networking can be observed, the microscopic characterization of the chain deformation in the framework of the network tube model agrees with the estimates for hydrodynamic reinforcement of fractal fillers. (orig.)

  10. Mechanical stress in silicon nanosized architectures: Defects of SOD processed silica filler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricci, Pier Carlo, E-mail: carlo.ricci@dsf.unica.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Casula, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy); Gulleri, Gianluca; Fumagalli, Francesco [Micron Semiconductor Italia, s.r.l. via Camillo Olivetti, 2 20864 Agrate Brianza, MB (Italy); Carbonaro, Carlo Maria; Corpino, Riccardo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Cagliari, s.p. n 8 Km 0.700, 09042 Monserrato, Cagliari (Italy)

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Structural and optical properties of silica filled STI architectures. • The silica filler induces a compressive stress. • PL spectra show a large distribution of emitting defects in the UV–blue. • The defects were identified and located at the silica–liner interface. - Abstract: The mechanical stress in nanosized silicon architectures is studied in shallow trench isolation systems with different liners and spin on dielectrics processed silica filler by means of Raman spectroscopy. The nanopatterning of silicon wafers causes a tensile stress of the system whereas the presence of the filler induces a compressive stress which depends on the interaction between silica filler and liner: by changing the liner from silicon dioxide to silicon nitride one can induce a larger compressive stress. The analysis of the ultraviolet excited emission properties in the visible range (nanosecond lasting bands at 2.5, 3.0 and 3.3 eV) allowed us to individuate and locate silica related defects and to correlate their presence to the induced compressive stress.

  11. Macroscopic and Microscopic Mechanisms of Cement-Stabilized Soft Clay Mixed with Seawater by Adding Ultrafine Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The strength of the cement-stabilized soil can be improved by the use of seawater. Compressive strength test results show that the strength of cement-stabilized soil mixed with seawater is 50% greater than that mixed with freshwater at the 90th day. However, the application is limited because the expansion of the cement-stabilized soil mixed with seawater increases significantly. A kind of ultrafine silica fume was added into the cement-stabilized soil to inhibit swelling of the cement-stabilized soil with seawater. The expansion of cement-stabilized soil mixed with seawater by adding ultrafine silica fume is close to that of cement-stabilized soil mixed with freshwater. With the addition of ultrafine silica fume, the unconfined compressive strength increases by close to 6.5% compared with seawater alone at the 90th day. The mechanisms of adding ultrafine silica fume into the cement-stabilized soil mixed with seawater are revealed by several physical and chemical characterization parameters, such as specific gravity, unbound water content, surface morphology seen with SEM, and crystal products by X-ray diffraction tests. The results show that the crystal growth is an important factor, affecting the strength and expansion of cement-stabilized soil mixed with seawater.

  12. The influence of blast furnace slag, fly ash and silica fume on corrosion of reinforced concrete in marine environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1996-01-01

    Chloride penetration from sea water may cause corrosion of reinforcement in concrete structures. Adding reactive inorganic materials such as blast furnace slag, fly ash or silica fume to the cement matrix improves the resistance against chloride penetration as compared to Portland cement concrete. A

  13. Monolithic stationary phases with incorporated fumed silica nanoparticles. Part I. Polymethacrylate-based monolithic column with incorporated bare fumed silica nanoparticles for hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydoğan, Cemil; El Rassi, Ziad

    2016-05-01

    Fumed silica nanoparticles (FSNPs), were incorporated for the first time into a polymethacrylate monolithic column containing glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) and ethylene dimethacrylate (EDMA) in order to develop a new monolithic column for hydrophilic interaction high performance liquid chromatography (HILIC). When compared to poly(GMM-EDMA) monolithic column without FSNPs, the same monolithic column with incorporated FSNPs yielded important effects on HILIC separations. The effects of monomers and FSNPs content of the polymerization mixture on the performance of the monolithic column were examined in details, and the optimized stationary phase was investigated over a wide range of mobile phase composition with polar acidic, weakly basic and neutral analytes including hydroxy benzoic acids, nucleotides, nucleosides, dimethylformamide, formamide and thiourea. The retention of these analytes was mainly controlled by hydrophilic interactions with the FSNPs and electrostatic repulsion from the negatively charged silica surface in the case of hydroxy benzoic acids and nucleotides. The electrostatic repulsion was minimized by decreasing the pH of the aqueous component of the mobile phase, which in turn enhanced the retention of acidic solutes. Nucleotides were best separated using step gradient elution at decreasing pH as well as ACN concentration in the mobile phase. Improved peak shape and faster analysis of nucleosides were attained by a fast linear gradient elution with a shallow decrease in the ACN content of the ACN-rich mobile phase. The run-to-run and column-to-column reproducibility were satisfactory. The percent relative standard deviations (%RSDs) for the retention times of tested solutes were lower than 2.5% under isocratic conditions and lower than 3.5 under gradient conditions.

  14. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    low viscosities, which is favorable for loading of inorganic fillers [5]. In this study, commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added...

  15. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated biomimicry for optimal cell-material interactions for artificial organ development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mel, Achala; Ramesh, Bala; Scurr, David J; Alexander, Morgan R; Hamilton, George; Birchall, Martin; Seifalian, Alexander M

    2014-03-01

    Replacement of irreversibly damaged organs due to chronic disease, with suitable tissue engineered implants is now a familiar area of interest to clinicians and multidisciplinary scientists. Ideal tissue engineering approaches require scaffolds to be tailor made to mimic physiological environments of interest with specific surface topographical and biological properties for optimal cell-material interactions. This study demonstrates a single-step procedure for inducing biomimicry in a novel nanocomposite base material scaffold, to re-create the extracellular matrix, which is required for stem cell integration and differentiation to mature cells. Fumed silica nanoparticle mediated procedure of scaffold functionalization, can be potentially adapted with multiple bioactive molecules to induce cellular biomimicry, in the development human organs. The proposed nanocomposite materials already in patients for number of implants, including world first synthetic trachea, tear ducts and vascular bypass graft.

  16. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PERFORMANCE OF PORTLAND CEMENT BLENDED WITH NANOSILICA AND SILICA FUME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I TOBÓN

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper some physical properties of Colombian Portland cement type III replaced with nanosilica in percentages of 1, 3, 5 and 10% were evaluated. Main determined properties were fluidity, normal consistency, setting times, heat of hydration and compressive strength on pastes and mortars. It was made also a comparative analysis with samples substituted with commercial silica fume in percentages of 5, 10 and 15%. Results showed that the nanosilica from 5% beginning to have a major positive influence on the mechanical strength of mortars and with a 10% of substitution improvements in compressive strength up to 120% with respect to the control sample for one day of curing can be achieved. For longer curing time the improvement is decreased slightly, with near 80%, remaining this improvement in strength after 28 days of curing.

  17. Carbonation of ternary cementitious concrete systems containing fly ash and silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eehab Ahmed Badreldin Khalil

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Carbonation is quite a complex physical negative effect phenomenon on concrete especially in the ones containing ternary blends of Portland Cement, fly ash, and silica fume. Nine selected concrete mixtures were prepared with various water to cementitious materials’ ratios and various cementitious contents. The concrete mixtures were adapted in such a way to have the same workability and air content. The fresh concrete properties were kept near identical in slump, air content, and unit weight. The variation was in the hardened concrete mechanical properties of compression and tension strength. The carbonation phenomenon was studied for these mixes showing at which mixes of ternary cementitious content heavy carbonation attacks maybe produced. The main components of such mixes that do affect the carbonation process with time were presented.

  18. Durability and Strength Properties on High Performance Self Compacting Concrete with GGBS and Silica Fumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M.Srishaila

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study on the experimental investigation on strength aspects like compressive strength, flexural strength and split tensile strength, and durability aspects like rapid chloride penetration test(RCPT of high performance self-compacting concrete with different mineral admixtures . Initials tests like slump test, L-box test, U-box test and T50 test will be carried out. The methodology adopted here is Ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBS which is replaced partially by cement at 10%, 20% and 30% and silica fumes(SF by 3%, 6%, 9% in combination with Portland cement and the performance is measured and compared. The influence of mineral admixtures on the workability, mechanical strength and durability aspects of self-compacting concrete are studied. The mix proportion is obtained as per the guidelines given by European Federation of producers and contractors of special products for structure.

  19. The effect of silica fume and metakaolin on glass-fibre reinforced concrete (GRC ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enfedaque Díaz, A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The deterioration of the mechanical properties of glassfibre reinforced concrete (GRC over time rules out the use of this material in load-bearing structures. While one possible solution to this problem is the addition of pozzolans or metakaolin to the cement mortar, the amounts needed to ensure GRC integrity raise its price to non-competitive levels. Experimental research has been conducted to analyze whether the addition of small amounts of silica fume or metakaolin can prevent or mitigate the ageing issue. Unfortunately, the findings indicate that the addition of small proportions of metakaolin or silica fume to GRC are ineffective in improving its long-term performance.

    Para el uso del mortero de cemento reforzado con fibras de vidrio (GRC en estructuras portantes se han de solucionar los problemas de reducción de las propiedades mecánicas que aparecen con el paso del tiempo. Estos problemas pueden ser solucionados mediante la adición de puzolanas o de metacaolín, a la pasta de mortero de cemento. Sin embargo, la cantidad de metacaolín que ha de ser añadida es elevada y el precio del GRC fabricado está fuera del mercado. Se ha realizado una campaña experimental que analiza si la adición de humo de sílice o de metacaolín en proporciones reducidas consigue evitar o paliar el problema del envejecimiento, que supone un freno al uso del GRC en elementos estructurales. Desgraciadamente, los resultados experimentales muestran que proporciones bajas de metacaolín o de humo de sílice no son efectivas para reducir el problema de pérdida de propiedades mecánicas.

  20. Synthesis of nanosilica from silica fume using an acid-base precipitation technique and PVA as a nonionic surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Jafari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to synthesize and characterize nanosilica from alkali-extraction of silica fume under controlled conditions using poly (vinyl alcohol (PVA as a dispersing agent. The dissolution efficiency of silica fume was affected by various factors such as concentration of the reagent, reaction time and temperature. A maximum dissolution efficiency of 91% was achieved at the sodium hydroxide solution concentration of 2.5 M, after areaction time of 30 minutes and at areaction temperature of 80°C. The microstructure and morphology of the obtained nanosilica powder at the optimum conditions were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. SEM images confirmed the formation of smaller and less agglomerated nanosilica particles due to the existence of the surfactant. Further, the synthesized nanosilica was characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRF and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results show that the synthesized nanosilica consisted of pure silica particles.

  1. Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Leslie; Ingle, Danny

    The American Heritage dictionary defines filler as ‘something added to augment weight or size or fill space'. Historically, commercial papermakers have used a variety of inexpensive, minimally beneficiated minerals as fillers for economic extension of more costly wood fibre. As such, these fillers played a relatively inconsequential role in contributing specific quality characteristics to the final sheet. However, as paper grades have evolved, the role of mineral fillers has dramatically expanded to contribute specific functionality to final paper grades. In general, this has resulted in a broader offering of mineral products to the papermaker delivering a range of optical and physical properties. Additionally, the use of mineral fillers may significantly impact dynamics on the paper machine itself. For example, the type and level of filler can dramatically affect chemical demand, drainage, speed and drying rates. A basic understanding of the fundamental characteristics of fillers and their resulting impact, both within the paper matrix and on the paper machine, is a critical requirement for cost-effective grade optimization.

  2. Dental composite resins containing silica-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers with various filler levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H

    1999-07-01

    Currently available direct-filling composite resins are susceptible to fracture and hence are not recommended for use in large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to use ceramic single-crystalline whiskers as fillers to reinforce composites, and to investigate the effect of whisker filler level on composite properties. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whiskers, thereby improving retention in the matrix. The composite flexural strength, elastic modulus, hardness, and degree of polymerization conversion were measured as a function of whisker filler mass fraction, which ranged from 0% to 70%. Selected composites were polished simulating clinical procedures, and the surface roughness was measured with profilometry. The whisker composite with a filler mass fraction of 55% had a flexural strength (mean +/- SD; n = 6) of 196+/-10 MPa, significantly higher than 83+/-14 MPa of a microfill and 120+/-16 MPa of a hybrid composite control (family confidence coefficient = 0.95; Tukey's multiple comparison). The composite modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. The flexural strength first increased, then plateaued with increasing filler level. The degree of conversion decreased with increasing filler level. The whisker composite had a polished surface roughness similar to that of a conventional hybrid composite (p>0.1; Student's t). To conclude, ceramic whisker reinforcement can significantly improve the mechanical properties of composite resins; the whisker filler level plays a key role in determining composite properties; and the reinforcement mechanisms appear to be crack pinning by whiskers and friction from whisker pullout resisting crack propagation.

  3. Comparison of nanoparticle exposures between fumed and sol-gel nano-silica manufacturing facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sewan; Kim, Boowook; Kim, Hyunwook

    2014-01-01

    Silica nanoparticles (SNPs) are widely used all around the world and it is necessary to evaluate appropriate risk management measures. An initial step in this process is to assess worker exposures in their current situation. The objective of this study was to compare concentrations and morphologic characteristics of fumed (FS) and sol-gel silica nanoparticles (SS) in two manufacturing facilities. The number concentration (NC) and particle size were measured by a real-time instrument. Airborne nanoparticles were subsequently analyzed using a TEM/EDS. SNPs were discharged into the air only during the packing process, which was the last manufacturing step in both the manufacturing facilities studied. In the FS packing process, the geometric mean (GM) NC in the personal samples was 57,000 particles/cm(3). The geometric mean diameter (GMD) measured by the SMPS was 64 nm. Due to the high-temperature formation process, the particles exhibited a sintering coagulation. In the SS packing process that includes a manual jet mill operation, the GM NC was calculated to be 72,000 particles/cm(3) with an assumption of 1,000,000 particles/cm(3) when the upper limit is exceeded (5% of total measure). The particles from SS process had a spherical-shaped morphology with GMD measured by SMPS of 94 nm.

  4. Quantitative exposure matrix for asphalt fume, total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica among roofing and asphalt manufacturing workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayerweather, William E; Trumbore, David C; Johnson, Kathleen A; Niebo, Ronald W; Maxim, L Daniel

    2011-09-01

    This paper summarizes available data on worker exposures to asphalt fume (soluble fraction), total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica (quartz) [hereinafter RCS] over a 30-year period in Owens Corning's asphalt production and roofing manufacturing plants. For the period 1977 through 2006, the air-monitoring database contains more than 1,400 personal samples for asphalt fume (soluble fraction), 2,400 personal samples for total particulate, and 1,300 personal samples for RCS. Unique process-job categories were identified for the asphalt production and roofing shingle manufacturing plants. Quantitative exposures were tabulated by agent, process-job, and calendar period to form an exposure matrix for use in subsequent epidemiologic studies of the respiratory health of these workers. Analysis of time trends in exposure data shows substantial and statistically significant exposure reductions for asphalt fume (soluble fraction), total particulate matter, and respirable crystalline silica at Owens Corning plants. Cumulative distribution plots for the most recent sampling period (2001-2006) show that 95% of the asphalt fume (soluble fraction) measurements were less than 0.25 mg/m3; 95% of the total particulate measurements were less than 2.2 mg/m3; and 95% of the RCS measurements were less than 0.05 mg/m3. Several recommendations are offered to improve the design of future monitoring efforts.

  5. Double shroud delivery of silica precursor for reducing hexavalent chromium in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Guan, Jianying; Theodore, Alexandros; Sharby, Jessica; Wu, Chang-Yu; Paulson, Kathleen; Es-Said, Omar

    2012-01-01

    The welding process yields a high concentration of nanoparticles loaded with hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)), a known human carcinogen. Previous studies have demonstrated that using tetramethylsilane (TMS) as a shielding gas additive can significantly reduce the Cr(6+) concentration in welding fume particles. In this study, a novel insulated double shroud torch (IDST) was developed to further improve the reduction of airborne Cr(6+) concentration by separating the flows of the primary shielding gas and the TMS carrier gas. Welding fumes were collected from a welding chamber in the laboratory and from a fixed location near the welding arc in a welding facility. The Cr(6+) content was analyzed with ion chromatography and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results from the chamber sampling demonstrated that the addition of 3.2 ≈ 5.1% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas resulted in more than a 90% reduction of airborne Cr(6+) under all shielding gas flow rates. The XPS result confirmed complete elimination of Cr(6+) inside the amorphous silica shell. Adding 100 ≈ 1000 ppm of nitric oxide or carbon monoxide to the shielding gas could also reduce Cr(6+) concentrations up to 57% and 35%, respectively; however, these reducing agents created potential hazards from the release of unreacted agents. Results of the field test showed that the addition of 1.6% of TMS carrier gas to the primary shielding gas reduced Cr(6+) concentration to the limitation of detection (1.1 μg/m(3)). In a worst-case scenario, if TMS vapor leaked into the environment without decomposition and ventilation, the estimated TMS concentration in the condition of field sampling would be a maximum 5.7 ppm, still well below its flammability limit (1%). Based on a previously developed cost model, the use of TMS increases the general cost by 3.8%. No visual deterioration of weld quality caused by TMS was found, although further mechanical testing is necessary.

  6. Pozzolanic activity of clinoptilolite: A comparative study with silica fume, fly ash and a non-zeolitic natural pozzolan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Uzal; L. Turanli; H. Yucel; M.C. Goncuoglu; A. Culfaz [Nigde University, Nigde (Turkey). Department of Civil Engineering

    2010-03-15

    Pozzolanic activity of clinoptilolite, the most common natural zeolite mineral, was studied in comparison to silica fume, fly ash and a non-zeolitic natural pozzolan. Chemical, mineralogical and physical characterizations of the materials were considered in comparative evaluations. Pozzolanic activity of the natural zeolite was evaluated with various test methods including electrical conductivity of lime-pozzolan suspensions; and free lime content, compressive strength and pore size distribution of hardened lime-pozzolan pastes. The results showed that the clinoptilolite possessed a high lime-pozzolan reactivity that was comparable to silica fume and was higher than fly ash and a non-zeolitic natural pozzolan. The high reactivity of the clinoptilolite is attributable to its specific surface area and reactive SiO{sub 2} content. Relatively poor strength contribution of clinoptilolite in spite of high pozzolanic activity can be attributable to larger pore size distribution of the hardened zeolite-lime product compared to the lime-fly ash system.

  7. Fracture resistance of rubbers with MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black fillers as assessed by the J-integral: Effects of rubber type and filler concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ricco

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The fracture resistance of different rubbers containing various nanofillers, such as multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT, organoclay, silica and carbon black (CB, was determined by the J-integral making use of the single edge notched tensile loaded (SEN-T single specimen approach. The elastomeric matrices were natural (NR, ethylene propylene diene (EPDM and hydrogenated nitrile rubbers (HNBR. Moreover, the strain softening (Payne effect of selected rubbers with 30 part per hundred rubber (phr filler content was also investigated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA in shear mode. DMTA results indicated that the Payne effect follows the ranking: MWCNT(fibrous > organoclay(platy > silica(spherical. J-resistance (JR curves were constructed by plotting the J value as a function of the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD*, monitored during loading. CTOD* = 0.1 mm was considered as crack initiation threshold and thus assigned to the critical value JIc. JIc increased with increasing filler loading, whereby MWCNT outperformed both silica and CB. On the other hand, JIc did not change with filler loading for the NR/organoclay systems that was traced to straininduced crystallization effect in NR. The tearing modulus (TJ also increased with increasing filler loading. The related increase strongly depended on both rubber and filler types. Nonetheless, the most prominent improvement in TJ among the fillers studied was noticed for the fibrous MWCNT.

  8. Re-use of incinerated agro-industrial waste as pozzolanic addition. Comparison with spanish silica fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delgado, A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This study attempted to determine the viability of using incinerated agro-industrial waste, ashes C1 and C2, as possible artificial pozzolanic additions in traditional and highperformance concretes and mortars, mainly, and for this reason, a comparative study was likewise conducted with Spanish silica fume (HS. The conclusion drawn from the findings was that the two ashes used could be regarded to be centainly, silicic artificial pozzolanic additions but only C2, which had a higher SiO2 content, could be regarded to be a “microsilica”, however, because its loss on ignition, L.O.I., fell within the acceptable range of variability. In contrast, C1 could not be so regarded because its L.O.I. was too high, despite its higher reactive silica SiO2r- content. For this reason, ash C1 had to be ruled out for any of the proposed uses, even though in terms of chemical and sulfatic characterization it was closer to HS than C2. By contrast, the mechanical strength values of C2 and HS were comparable, making the former initially acceptable for any of such uses. Finally, it has also been justified that, adoption of any method of trial to determine potential resistance to the sulfates of the Portland cements with calcareous filler lacks of sense.Este trabajo ha tenido por objetivo determinar la viabilidad de uso de dos residuos agroindustriales incinerados, cenizas C1 y C2, como posibles adiciones puzolánicas artificiales, para fabricar cementos y/o de sus productos derivados, hormigones y morteros tradicionales y especiales, principalmente; de aquí su estudio comparativo con el humo de sílice español, HS. Y la conclusión que se obtuvo fue que las dos cenizas pueden ser consideradas como adiciones puzolánicas artificiales con carácter químico silícico cierto, pero sólo una, la C2, podría llegar a ser considerada como “microsílice”, porque su pérdida por calcinación se encuentra dentro de su límite permitido. En cambio la C1, no, porque

  9. An Accelerated Test Method of Simultaneous Carbonation and Chloride Ion Ingress: Durability of Silica Fume Concrete in Severe Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack on mechanical characteristics and durability of concrete containing silica fume have been investigated through an accelerated test method. Specimens containing different amounts of silica fume were maintained in an apparatus in which carbon dioxide pressure and concentration and relative humidity were kept constant, and wetting and drying cycles in saline water were applied. Surface resistivity, sorptivity, CO2 consumption, and carbonation and chloride ion ingress depths measurements were taken. Phase change due to carbonation and chloride ion attack was monitored by XRD analysis, and microstructures and interfacial transition zones were studied by implementing SEM as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry. It was expected to have a synergistic effect in the tidal zone where simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack happen. However, the observed reduced surface resistivity, compared to specimens maintained in CO2 gas, could be due to the moisture that is available near the surface, hindering CO2 from penetrating into the pores of the specimens. Moreover, the porosity analysis of the specimens showed that the sample containing silica fume cured in the tidal zone had 50.1% less total porosity than the plain cement paste cured in the same condition.

  10. EFFECT OF INCORPORATING STARCH/SILICA COMPOUND FILLERS INTO UNCURED SSBR ON ITS DYNAMIC RHEOLOGICAL PROPERTIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Li; Yihu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic rheological properties of a composite composed of solution-polymerized styrene butadiene rubber (SSBR) filled with starch/silica (SiO2) compound fillers were studied by means of temperature,frequency and strain sweeps,respectively,and the influence of the starch content in the compound fillers (SCCF) on the rheological behaviors was discussed.It is found from frequency sweeps that a maximum of loss tangent (tanδ) appears at 20 rad/s,which is independent of SCCF.G' of the composites decreases whereas tanδ and critical strain (γc) of Payne effect increase with increasing SCCF.The reasons for these are believed to be that both SiO2 and starch could form filler networks due to interaction of hydrogen bounding between them,and the interactions between SiO2 and SSBR are stronger than those between starch and SSBR.Moreover,increasing SCCF in the compound fillers is in favor of improving the stability of the filler networks.Furthermore,tanδ values at 0℃ and 60℃ representing the properties for the wet traction and the rolling resistance of SSBR composites respectively can be improved by partial replacing SiO2 with starch.However,the reinforcement effect of starch to SSBR is weaker than that of SiO2 due to starch agglomeration.

  11. Suppression of Aluminum Corrosion in Lithium Bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide-based Electrolytes by the Addition of Fumed Silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis, Hamenu; Ko, Jangmyoun [Hanbat National Univ., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Younggi; Kim, Kwangman [Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Wonil [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    The corrosion property of aluminum by lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt is investigated in liquid and gel electrolytes consisting of ethylene carbonate/propylene carbonate/ethylmethyl carbonate/diethyl carbonate (20:5:55:20, vol %) with vinylene carbonate (2 wt %) and fluoroethylene carbonate (5 wt %) using conductivity measurement, cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. All corrosion behaviors are attenuated remarkably by using three gel electrolytes containing 3 wt % of hydrophilic and hydrophobic fumed silica. The addition of silica particles contributes to the increase in the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte, indicating temporarily formed physical crosslinking among the silica particles to produce a gel state. Cyclic voltammetry also gives lower anodic current responses at higher potentials for repeating cycles, confirming further corrosion attenuation or electrochemical stability. In addition, the degree of corrosion attenuation can be affected mainly by the electrolytic constituents, not by the hydrophilicity or hydrophobicity of silica particles.

  12. Improving Mechanical Properties of Polymer Modified Concrete Using Micro-Steel Fiber and Silica Fume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Abed Attiya

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete (SFRC is to improve the structural behavior such as increasing the resistance to cracking and crack propagation. This work has been made to study the properties of polymer modified concrete when micro-steel fiber is incorporated at different volumetric percentages from 0.1 % to 2 %. Two mixes (1:1.5:2 and 1:2:4 have been used and modified with styrene butadiene rubber resin (SBR and silica fume with maintaining water cement ratio at 0.45. It has been found that increasing steel fiber content in concrete has a significant influence on the increase compressive, tensile, flexural strength, modulus of elasticity and stress- strain relationship. Flexural strength increases from 4.14 MPa (for 0% steel fiber to 11.83 MPa (for 2% steel fiber. Whereas, the modulus of elasticity is improved by about 77% (for 1:1.5:2 mixes and 91% (for 1:2:4 mixes.

  13. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspen- sions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent N was determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*) and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated at γ =750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region and increased dramati- cally to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred,especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscos- ity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  14. Rheological responses of fumed silica suspensions under steady and oscillatory shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG HaiLin; RUAN JianMing; ZOU JianPeng; WU QiuMei; ZHOU ZhongCheng; ZHOU ZhiHua

    2009-01-01

    Rheological experiments under steady and oscillatory shear were conducted for fumed silica suspensions in polyethylene glycol. Under steady shear the shear-thinning and thickening response were exhibited and the flow exponent Nwas determined. With the increase of concentration the flow exponent N showed a rapid increase, and it increased dramatically when the discontinuous shear-thickening took place. Oscillatory shear experiments were conducted at constant frequency and constant amplitude strain, respectively. The shear-thinning and the discontinuous shear-thickening behavior were observed under different constant frequencies from 10 to 80 rad/s. The correlation between complex modulus (G*)and sweep frequency (ω) was illuminated atγ=750%. It was found that the correlation between G* and ω could be fitted by equation: G*∝ωn. The indexes in shear-thinning region and shear-thickening were determined. The indexes were similar to some extent at shear-thinning region end increased dramatically to a much higher value when the shear-thickening occurred, especially at higher weight fractions. The behaviors can be qualitatively explained as follows: the shear-thinning owes to decrease of viscosity, which results from disruption of the aggregates; the cluster theory attributes the shear-thickening to the formation of metastable, flow induced clusters, which block the system.

  15. Escaping the Tyranny of Carbothermal Reduction: Fumed Silica from Sustainable, Green Sources without First Having to Make SiCl4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Eongyu; Hyde, Clare E; Sun, Kai; Laine, Richard M

    2016-02-12

    Fumed silica is produced in 1000 tons per year quantities by combusting SiCl4 in H2 /O2 flames. Given that both SiCl4 and combustion byproduct HCl are corrosive, toxic and polluting, this route to fumed silica requires extensive safeguards that may be obviated if an alternate route were found. Silica, including rice hull ash (RHA) can be directly depolymerized using hindered diols to generate distillable spirocyclic alkoxysilanes or Si(OEt)4 . We report here the use of liquid-feed flame spray pyrolysis (LF-FSP) to combust the aforementioned precursors to produce fumed silica very similar to SiCl4 -derived products. The resulting powders are amorphous, necked, sustainable, green and potentially lower-cost alternative.

  16. Nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing ortho-nitro benzoic acid: role of dielectric constant of solvent and fumed silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing polymethylmethacrylate, dimethylacetamide, diethyl carbonate, fumed silica and ortho-nitro benzoic acid have been synthesized. Electrical conductivity, viscosity, pH and thermal behavior of these electrolytes have been studied. The effect of acid, polymer, fumed silica concentration on conductivity, pH and viscosity has been discussed. The effect of dielectric constant of solvent on conductivity behavior of composite polymer gel electrolytes has also been studied. Two maxima in conductivity behavior have been observed with fumed silica concentration for composite polymer gel electrolytes, which have been explained on the basis of double percolation threshold model. Maximum conductivity of 3.20 × 10-4 and 2.46 × 10-6 S/cm at room temperature has been observed for nano-composite polymer gel electrolytes containing 10 wt% polymethylmethacrylate in 1 M solution of o-nitro benzoic acid in dimethylacetamide and diethyl carbonate respectively. The intensity of first maximum observed in conductivity at low concentration of fumed silica has been found to decrease with the decrease in acid concentration for composite polymer gel electrolytes, while the intensity of second maximum at higher fumed silica concentration remains unaffected. The conductivity of composite gels does not show much change in the temperature range of 20-100 °C and also remains constant with time, making them suitable for use as electrolytes in various devices like fuel cells, proton batteries, electrochromic window applications etc.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid silica/PMMA nanoparticles and their use as filler in dental composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canché-Escamilla, G., E-mail: gcanche@cicy.mx [Unidad de Materiales, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C. Calle 43 No. 130 Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, Mérida, Yucatán 97200 (Mexico); Duarte-Aranda, S. [Unidad de Materiales, Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C. Calle 43 No. 130 Col. Chuburná de Hidalgo, Mérida, Yucatán 97200 (Mexico); Toledano, M. [Facultad de Odontología, Universidad de Granada, Campus Universitario de Cartuja s/n, Granada 18071 (Spain)

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hybrid silica/poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles on the properties of composites for dental restoration was evaluated. Hybrid nanoparticles with silica as core and PMMA as shell were obtained by a seeded emulsion polymerization process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the hybrid nanoparticles shows an intense peak at 1730 cm{sup −1}, corresponding to carbonyl groups (C=O) of the ester. The thermal stability of the hybrid particles decreases with increasing amounts of PMMA and the residual mass at 700 °C corresponds to the silica content in the hybrid particles. Composites were obtained by dispersing nanoparticles (silica or hybrid), as fillers, in a resin—bis glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (40%/60% (w/w)). The paste was then placed in a mold and polymerized under light irradiation. During the preparation of the composites, with the hybrid nanoparticles, the monomers swell the PMMA shell and after photo-curing, a semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) is obtained around the silica core. The properties of the composites, obtained using the hybrid nanoparticles, depend on the filler content and the amount of PMMA in the semi-IPN matrix. For composites with similar inorganic filler contents, the composites with low amounts of PMMA shell had higher modulus than those in which silica was used as the filler. - Highlights: • Hybrid nanoparticles silica/PMMA were used as fillers in dental composites. • The properties of the hybrid nanoparticle depend on the silica/PMMA content ratio. • A higher content of inorganic filler was obtained using hybrid nanoparticle. • Composites with higher modulus were obtained using hybrid nanoparticles. • A semi-IPN matrix between the PMMA shell and the resin is obtained.

  18. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  19. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  20. Abrasion Properties of Steel Fiber Reinforced Silica Fume Concrete According to Los Angeles and Water Abrasion Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsan-Ching CHENG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The current study mainly investigated the influence of different tests on the abrasion resistance of concrete mixed with steel fibers and silica fume. The abrasion resistance was assessed at 28, 56 and 91 days on concretes with water-binder ratios of 0.35 and 0.55 where in some mixes silica fume was substituted by 5 % of cement by weight. Steel fibers of 0.5 % and 1.0 % of concrete volume were also added into the test concrete by replacement of coarse and fine aggregates. The results showed that concrete with higher compressive strength in Los Angeles abrasion tests also had better abrasion resistance. The inclusion of steel fibers into test concrete with a water-binder ratio of 0.35 resulted in a significant increase in compressive strength. This concrete also displayed better abrasion resistance and splitting tensile strength than reference concrete; in the test sample with a water-binder ratio of 0.55, the added steel fibers was unable to effectively produce cementation with the concrete. The inclusion of silica fume improved the abrasion resistance of concretes. In water abrasion testing, the abrasion resistance of concrete containing steel fiber was worse than that of concrete without steel fibers. In the water abrasion testing, the surface of steel fiber reinforced concrete was eroded by water and steel balls, and the impact caused the steel fibers to separate from the concrete and led to higher wear loss. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.4.6460

  1. Synthesis and characterization of hybrid silica/PMMA nanoparticles and their use as filler in dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canché-Escamilla, G; Duarte-Aranda, S; Toledano, M

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hybrid silica/poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) nanoparticles on the properties of composites for dental restoration was evaluated. Hybrid nanoparticles with silica as core and PMMA as shell were obtained by a seeded emulsion polymerization process. Fourier transform infrared spectrum of the hybrid nanoparticles shows an intense peak at 1,730 cm(-1), corresponding to carbonyl groups (CO) of the ester. The thermal stability of the hybrid particles decreases with increasing amounts of PMMA and the residual mass at 700°C corresponds to the silica content in the hybrid particles. Composites were obtained by dispersing nanoparticles (silica or hybrid), as fillers, in a resin-bis glycidyl dimethacrylate (Bis-GMA)/triethylene glycol dimethacrylate (TEGDMA) (40%/60% (w/w)). The paste was then placed in a mold and polymerized under light irradiation. During the preparation of the composites, with the hybrid nanoparticles, the monomers swell the PMMA shell and after photo-curing, a semi-interpenetrating network (semi-IPN) is obtained around the silica core. The properties of the composites, obtained using the hybrid nanoparticles, depend on the filler content and the amount of PMMA in the semi-IPN matrix. For composites with similar inorganic filler contents, the composites with low amounts of PMMA shell had higher modulus than those in which silica was used as the filler. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hartomy, Omar A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al Said, Said A. Farha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Dishovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: dishov@uctm.edu [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ward, Michael B. [LEMAS, Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mihaylov, Mihail; Ivanov, Milcho [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-03-15

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions.

  3. Probing the hydration of composite cement pastes containing fly ash and silica fume by proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proton NMR spin-lattice relaxation (T1) was used as a prober for observing the hydration process of composite cement pastes blending fly ash and silica fume during the early age.The distribution at initial time,evolution curves and signals intensity of T1 were shown in this paper.Results demonstrate that the T1 distribution curves at initial time exhibit two peaks,which are regarded as two different water phases in the pastes.The evolution curves of T1 are in good agreement with the hydration process of composite pastes and could be roughly divided into four stages:initial period,dormant period,acceleration period and steady period.The hydration mechanism for each stage was discussed.The hydration of the composite cement pastes was retarded by the addition of fly ash and silica fume when compared to that of pure cement.However,the hydration degree of the cement in the blends was promoted.

  4. 气相、沉淀、稻壳SiO2/聚乙烯醇复合膜的性能比较%Comparative Study of Performance of Fume, Precipitate and Rice Husk Silica Filled Polyvinyl Alcohol Hybrid Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石红; 刘学清

    2012-01-01

    This paper first compared the physical properties of fume, precipitate and rice husk silica. The tensile properties and water risistance of polyvinyl alcohoKPVA) filled with these silica were studied with respect to filler loading and filler type. Results showed that,at the same filler loading,elongation at breaking and tensile strength of membranes changed in the following order:fume SiO2/PVA> rice husk SiO2/PVA >pre-cipitate SiO2/PVA. Tensile modulus changed in the following order:fume SiO2/PVA> precipitate SiO2/PVA > rice husk SiO2/PVA. In addition,three sources of silica all could enhance the water resistance of PVA, which increased with the silica content. At the same filler loading, the water resistance of membranes changed in the following order:fume SiO2/PVA> precipitate SiO2/PVA> rice husk SiO2/PVA.%分别采用气相SiO2、沉淀SiO2和稻壳SiO2与聚乙烯醇(PVA)按不同的比例制备成复合膜.比较了3种不同来源的纳米SiO2/PVA复合膜的拉伸性能及耐水性能.结果表明:SiO2含量相同时,复合膜的断裂伸长率和拉伸强度的排列顺序为:气相SiO2/PVA>稻壳SiO2/PVA>沉淀SiO2/PVA;拉伸模量的排列顺序为:气相SiO2/PVA>沉淀SiO2/PVA>稻壳SiO2/PVA;3种来源的SiO2都可以提高PVA的耐水性,且耐水性随SiO2含量的增大而增强,SiO2含量相同时,复合膜的耐水性排列顺序为:气相SiO2/PVA>沉淀SiO2/PVA>稻壳SiO2/PVA.

  5. Effects of fillers on the properties of liquid silicone rubbers (LSRs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Zakaria, Shamsul Bin

    fillers. In this study commercially available fillers, such as fumed silica (SiO2), titanium dioxide (TiO2), barium titanate (BaTiO3), copper calcium titanate (CaCu3Ti4O12, CCTO), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were added into the LSRs and we examined how the properties of the networks were...... these additives, the use of multiple titanium dioxides as filler potentially suits to special applications. In the present study, a series of TiO2 fillers were blended into LSRs, such as hydrophilic/ hydrophobic, micro/ nano scale, anatase/ rutile crystal, sphere/ core-shell structure. The results indicate...

  6. Fumed Silica Nanoparticles Incorporated in Quaternized Poly(Vinyl Alcohol Nanocomposite Membrane for Enhanced Power Densities in Direct Alcohol Alkaline Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Rajesh Kumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A nanocomposite polymer membrane based on quaternized poly(vinyl alcohol/fumed silica (QPVA/FS was prepared via a quaternization process and solution casting method. The physico-chemical properties of the QPVA/FS membrane were investigated. Its high ionic conductivity was found to depend greatly on the concentration of fumed silica in the QPVA matrix. A maximum conductivity of 3.50 × 10−2 S/cm was obtained for QPVA/5%FS at 60 °C when it was doped with 6 M KOH. The permeabilities of methanol and ethanol were reduced with increasing fumed silica content. Cell voltage and peak power density were analyzed as functions of fumed silica concentration, temperature, methanol and ethanol concentrations. A maximum power density of 96.8 mW/cm2 was achieved with QPVA/5%FS electrolyte using 2 M methanol + 6 M KOH as fuel at 80 °C. A peak power density of 79 mW/cm2 was obtained using the QPVA/5%FS electrolyte with 3 M ethanol + 5 M KOH as fuel. The resulting peak power densities are higher than the majority of published reports. The results confirm that QPVA/FS exhibits promise as a future polymeric electrolyte for use in direct alkaline alcoholic fuel cells.

  7. 42 CFR 84.1144 - Silica dust test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; single-use or reusable filters; minimum...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... respirators; single-use or reusable filters; minimum requirements. 84.1144 Section 84.1144 Public Health...; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1144 Silica dust test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; single-use or reusable filters;...

  8. Synthesis of Silicon Nitride and Silicon Carbide Nanocomposites through High Energy Milling of Waste Silica Fume for Structural Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Jyothi

    Nanocomposites have been widely used in a multitude of applications in electronics and structural components because of their improved mechanical, electrical, and magnetic properties. Silicon nitride/Silicon carbide (Si 3N4/SiC) nanocomposites have been studied intensively for low and high temperature structural applications, such as turbine and automobile engine components, ball bearings, turbochargers, as well as energy applications due to their superior wear resistance, high temperature strength, high oxidation resistance and good creep resistance. Silica fume is the waste material produced during the manufacture of silicon and ferro-silicon alloys, and contains 94 to 97 wt.% SiO2. In the present dissertation, the feasibility of using waste silica fume as the raw material was investigated to synthesize (I) advanced nanocomposites of Si3N4/SiC, and (2) porous silicon carbide (SiC) for membrane applications. The processing approach used to convert the waste material to advanced ceramic materials was based on a novel process called, integrated mechanical and thermal activation process (IMTA) process. In the first part of the dissertation, the effect of parameters such as carbothermic nitridation and reduction temperature and the graphite concentration in the starting silica fume plus graphite mixture, were explored to synthesize nanocomposite powders with tailored amounts of Si3N4 and SiC phases. An effective way to synthesize carbon-free Si3N 4/SiC composite powders was studied to provide a clear pathway and fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanisms. Si3N4/SiC nanocomposite powders were then sintered using two different approaches, based on liquid phase sintering and spark plasma sintering processes, with Al 2O3 and Y2O3 as the sintering aids. The nanocomposites were investigated for their densification behavior, microstructure, and mechanical properties. Si3N4/SiC nanocomposites thus obtained were found to possess superior mechanical properties at much

  9. A study of mortars prepared with fly ash and silica fume for use in structures exposed to marine enviroments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández, Y.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to evaluate different mortar mixtures containing 5, 10 and 1 5% P/P silica fume and 5, 10, 12.5, 15 and 17.5% P/P fly ash to be used for repairing/constructing reinforced concrete structures exposed to marine environments. These were evaluated from the following standpoints: physical-chemical (capillary absorption and effective porosity; mechanical (compressive strength; electrochemical (lineal polarization, cyclic polarización and rapid chloride permeation; morphological (scanning electron microscopy. Results showed that 15 % silica fume mixture with no fly ash gave the best performance from both the physical-mechanical as well as the economic standpoint.

    El presente trabajo tiene como finalidad evaluar diferentes mezclas de mortero con contenidos de 5, 10 y 15 % P/P de microsílica y contenidos de 5, 10, 12,5, 15 y 17,5 % P/P de ceniza volante para ser utilizadas en la reparación/construcción de estructuras de concreto armado expuestas a ambientes marinos. Se evaluaron desde el punto de vista físico-químico (absorción capilar y porosidad efectiva, mecánico (resistencia a la compresión, electroquímico (polarización lineal, polarización cíclica y permeabilidad rápida de cloruros y su morfología por medio de microscopía electrónica de barrido. Los resultados permitieron seleccionar la mezcla conteniendo 15 % de microsílica sin ceniza volante, tanto desde el punto de vista físico-mecánico y electroquímico como económico.

  10. The evaluation of physical properties and in vitro cell behavior of PHB/PCL/sol-gel derived silica hybrid scaffolds and PHB/PCL/fumed silica composite scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yaping; Yao, Qingqing; Li, Wei; Schubert, Dirk W; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Roether, Judith A

    2015-12-01

    PHB/PCL/sol-gel derived silica hybrid scaffolds (P5S1S) and PHB/PCL/fumed silica composite scaffolds (P5S1N) with a 5:1 organic/inorganic ratio were fabricated through a combination of electrospinning and sol-gel methods and dispersion electrospinning, respectively. In contrast to the silica nanoparticle aggregates appearing on the fiber surface of P5S1N, smooth and uniform fibers were obtained for P5S1S. The fiber diameter distribution, tensile strength, thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), and cellular behavior of both types of scaffolds were characterized and studied. The tensile strength results and TGA indicated that the interfacial interaction between the organic and the inorganic phase was enhanced in P5S1S over the nanocomposite scaffolds, and cells exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphate activity (ALP) for P5S1S, which makes P5S1S hybrid scaffolds candidate materials for bone tissue engineering applications.

  11. Effects of Using Silica Fume and Polycarboxylate-Type Superplasticizer on Physical Properties of Cementitious Grout Mixtures for Semiflexible Pavement Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Mohamed Rehan; Mahmud, Hilmi; Mashaan, Nuha S.; Katman, Herdayati; Husain, Nadiah Md

    2014-01-01

    Semi-flexible pavement surfacing is a composite pavement that utilizes the porous pavement structure of the flexible bituminous pavement, which is subsequently grouted with appropriate cementitious materials. This study aims to investigate the compressive strength, flexural strength, and workability performance of cementitious grout. The grout mixtures are designed to achieve high strength and maintain flow properties in order to allow the cement slurries to infiltrate easily through unfilled compacted skeletons. A paired-sample t-test was carried out to find out whether water/cement ratio, SP percentages, and use of silica fume influence the cementitious grout performance. The findings showed that the replacement of 5% silica fume with an adequate amount of superplasticizer and water/cement ratio was beneficial in improving the properties of the cementitious grout. PMID:24526911

  12. Influence of Silica Fume Addition in the Long-Term Performance of Sustainable Cement Grouts for Micropiles Exposed to a Sulphate Aggressive Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Marcos Ortega

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available At present, sustainability is of major importance in the cement industry, and the use of additions such as silica fume as clinker replacement contributes towards that goal. Special foundations, and particularly micropiles, are one of the most suitable areas for the use of sustainable cements. The aim of this research is to analyse the effects in the very long-term (for 600 days produced by sulphate attack in the microstructure of grouts for micropiles in which OPC (ordinary Portland cement has been replaced by 5% and 10% silica fume. This line of study is building on a previous work, where these effects were studied in slag and fly ash grouts. Grouts made using a commercial sulphate-resisting Portland cement were also studied. The non-destructive impedance spectroscopy technique, mercury intrusion porosimetry, and Wenner resistivity testing were used. Mass variation and the compressive strength have also been analysed. Apparently, impedance spectroscopy is the most suitable technique for studying sulphate attack development. According to the results obtained, grouts for micropiles with a content of silica fume up to 10% and exposed to an aggressive sulphate medium, have a similar or even better behaviour in the very long-term, compared to grouts prepared using sulphate-resisting Portland cement.

  13. Shrinkage and Cracking Sensitivity of Cement Mortar Containing Fly Ash, Granulated Blast-furnace Slag and Silica Fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory study was undertaken to investigate drying shrinkage and cracking sensitivity subjected to restrained shrinkage of mortar containing fly ash (FA), granulated blast-furnace slag (GBFS) and silica fume (SF). Six mortar mixtures including control Portland cement (PC) and FA,GBFS and SF mortar mixtures were prepared. FA replaced the cement on mass basis at the replacement ratios of 20% and 35%, GBFS replaced the cement at the replacement ratios of 40%, SF replaced the cement at the replacement ratios of 8% and the blended mixtures with 20% FA, 20% GBFS and 8% SF. Water-cementitious materials ratio and sand-cementitious materials ratio were 0.4 and 2.0 for all mixtures, respectively. The mixtures were cured at 65% relative humidity and 20℃. The drying shrinkage value, initial cracking time and cracking width of the mortar samples were measured. The results show that all the mortar mixture containing FA exhibited the decrease of drying shrinkage.Moreover, initial cracking time was markedly delayed, and the crack width of the initial crack was reduced. However, the incorporations of various ratios of GBFS and SF led to an increase of drying shrinkage, initial cracking time and cracking width as compared to control mixture.

  14. Physical, Mechanical, and Thermal Analysis of Polylactic Acid/Fumed Silica/Clay (1.28E Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine Chang Hui Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polylactic acid/fumed silica/clay (PLA/FS/clay (1.28E nanocomposites have been successfully prepared by solution-intercalation film-casting technique. The resultant nanocomposites were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, tensile test, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and moisture absorption test. The FT-IR spectrum indicated that PLA/FS/clay with 2 wt% had much broader peak compared to 5 wt%, 10 wt%, and 15 wt% nanocomposites. Incorporation of clay (1.28E with 2 wt% showed the best compatibility with PLA/FS matrix. PLA/FS/clay (1.28E nanocomposite with 2 wt% of clay loading had higher tensile strength and modulus compared to other nanocomposites. The thermal stability and activation energy of 2 wt% of PLA/FS/clay (1.28E nanocomposite are the highest among all the nanocomposites. The moisture absorbed into PLA/FS/clay (1.28E nanocomposite was significantly reduced with clay loading of 2 wt%.

  15. Effect of fillers Granulated slag on the durability of HPC in marine environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tebbal Nadia

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of fillers of silica fume and blast furnace slag on the durability of high performance concretes was studied .The storage media are: seawater and tap water as reference. This work focuses on the effect of the incorporation of different amounts of milk more silica fume on the mechanical strength of concretes with limestone cements and its influence on sustainability with respect to marine. The results show that the addition of quantity 10%slag and 5% silica fume offers the best protection in marine waters .One of the indicators of sustainability are selected and monitored from 1 day to 28 days are variations of unconfined compressive strengths . The PH of the solution, especially related to the frequency of renewal baths, appears as an important parameter of aggressiveness.

  16. Adjustable rheology of fumed silica dispersion in urethane prepolymers: Composition-dependent sol and gel behaviors and energy-mediated shear responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zhong, E-mail: 11329038@zju.edu.cn; Song, Yihu, E-mail: s-yh0411@zju.edu.cn; Wang, Xiang, E-mail: 11229036@zju.edu.cn; Zheng, Qiang, E-mail: zhengqiang@zju.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Variation of colloidal and interfacial interactions leads to a microstructural diversity in fumed silica dispersions exhibiting absolutely different sol- or gel-like rheological responses. In this study, fumed silicas with different surface areas (200–400 m{sup 2}/g) and surface characteristics (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) are dispersed into moisture-cured polyurethane. The microstructures investigated using transmission electron microscope are associated perfectly with three different rheological behaviors: (i) Sols with well-dispersed silica aggregates, (ii) weak gels with agglomerate-linked networks, and (iii) strong gels with concentrated networks of large agglomerates. Though sols and gels are well distinguished by shear thickening or sustained thinning response through steady shear flow test, it is interesting that the sols and weak gels exhibit a uniform modulus plateau-softening-hardening-softening response with increasing dynamic strain at frequency 10 rad s{sup −1} while the strong gels show a sustained softening beyond the linear regime. Furthermore, the onset of softening and hardening can be normalized: The two softening are isoenergetic at mechanical energies of 0.3 J m{sup −3} and 10 kJ m{sup −3}. On the other hand, the hardening is initiated by a critical strain of 60%. The mechanisms involved in the generation of the sol- and the gel-like dispersions and their structural evolutions during shear are thoroughly clarified in relation to the polyols, the characteristic and content of silica and the curing catalysts.

  17. Gel/Space Ratio Evolution in Ternary Composite System Consisting of Portland Cement, Silica Fume, and Fly Ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mengxue Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In cement-based pastes, the relationship between the complex phase assemblage and mechanical properties is usually described by the “gel/space ratio” descriptor. The gel/space ratio is defined as the volume ratio of the gel to the available space in the composite system, and it has been widely studied in the cement unary system. This work determines the gel/space ratio in the cement-silica fume-fly ash ternary system (C-SF-FA system by measuring the reaction degrees of the cement, SF, and FA. The effects that the supplementary cementitious material (SCM replacements exert on the evolution of the gel/space ratio are discussed both theoretically and practically. The relationship between the gel/space ratio and compressive strength is then explored, and the relationship disparities for different mix proportions are analyzed in detail. The results demonstrate that the SCM replacements promote the gel/space ratio evolution only when the SCM reaction degree is higher than a certain value, which is calculated and defined as the critical reaction degree (CRD. The effects of the SCM replacements can be predicted based on the CRD, and the theological predictions agree with the test results quite well. At low gel/space ratios, disparities in the relationship between the gel/space ratio and the compressive strength are caused by porosity, which has also been studied in cement unary systems. The ratio of cement-produced gel to SCM-produced gel ( G C to G S C M ratio is introduced for use in analyzing high gel/space ratios, in which it plays a major role in creating relationship disparities.

  18. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-23

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  19. Mesoporous Silica Gel-Based Mixed Matrix Membranes for Improving Mass Transfer in Forward Osmosis: Effect of Pore Size of Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jian-Yuan; Wang, Yining; Tang, Chuyang Y.; Huo, Fengwei

    2015-11-01

    The efficiency of forward osmosis (FO) process is generally limited by the internal concentration polarization (ICP) of solutes inside its porous substrate. In this study, mesoporous silica gel (SG) with nominal pore size ranging from 4-30 nm was used as fillers to prepare SG-based mixed matrix substrates. The resulting mixed matrix membranes had significantly reduced structural parameter and enhanced membrane water permeability as a result of the improved surface porosity of the substrates. An optimal filler pore size of ~9 nm was observed. This is in direct contrast to the case of thin film nanocomposite membranes, where microporous nanoparticle fillers are loaded to the membrane rejection layer and are designed in such a way that these fillers are able to retain solutes while allowing water to permeate through them. In the current study, the mesoporous fillers are designed as channels to both water and solute molecules. FO performance was enhanced at increasing filler pore size up to 9 nm due to the lower hydraulic resistance of the fillers. Nevertheless, further increasing filler pore size to 30 nm was accompanied with reduced FO efficiency, which can be attributed to the intrusion of polymer dope into the filler pores.

  20. Research on Remove Free Carbon in Silica Fume by Fluidized Bed%流化床法除去微硅粉游离碳工艺研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜子炎; 铁生年; 汪长安

    2013-01-01

    本文采用流化床作为反应装置,改变进入流化床反应器气体的流速使微硅粉达到最佳流化效果,通过对比空气气氛和氧气气氛下微硅粉的除碳效果,调整反应温度、反应时间选择最佳反应条件.结果表明:在氧气气氛下,反应温度700℃,反应时间3.0h,微硅粉中游离碳含量从1.25%下降到0.05%,烧失量从3.36%下降到0.92%,微硅粉中二氧化硅纯度从81.62%提高到85.92%;在空气气氛下,反应温度为700℃,反应时间为3.0h,微硅粉中游离碳含量从1.25%下降到0.027%,烧失量从3.36%下降到0.99%,微硅粉中二氧化硅纯度从81.62%提高到86.97%.本技术能够有效除去微硅粉中游离碳杂质,提高微硅粉的纯度,提高了产品的附加值.%TIn this paper, the fluidized bed was used as the reaction equipment, we could change the flow velocity of gas in it to enable the silica fume to reach its best fluidized state, by comparing the carbon removal in silica fume both in air atmosphere and oxygen atmosphere, it adjusted the reaction temperature and reaction time to seek its optimal values. The result show; under oxygen atmosphere, 700 ℃ of reaction temperature, 3.0 h of reaction time, the content of free carbon in silica fume dropped from 1.25% to 0.05% , the content of loss on ignition dropped from 1.25% to 0.92% , the content of silicon oxide increased from 81.62% to 85. 92%. under air atmosphere, 700 ℃ of reaction temperature, 3. 0 h of reaction time, the content of free carbon in silica fume dropped from 1.25% to 0.027% , the content of loss on ignition dropped from 1. 25% to 0. 99% , the content of silicon oxide increased from 81. 62% to 86.97%. This technology could effectively remove the free carbon impurity in silica fume, improve the purity of silica fume, increase the added value of products.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopic Study on Structural Change and Interfacial Interaction in Rubber Composites Filled with Silica-Kaolin Hybrid Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y.; Guan, J.; Hu, H.; Gao, H.; Zhang, L.

    2016-07-01

    A series of natural rubber/styrene butadiene rubber/polybutadiene rubber composites was prepared with nanometer silica and micron kaolin by a dry modification process, mechanical compounding, and mold vulcanization. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and a scanning electron microscope were used to investigate the structural changes and interfacial interactions in composites. The results showed that the "seesaw" structure was formed particularly with the incorporation of silica particles in the preparation process, which would be beneficial to the dispersibility of fillers in the rubber matrix. The kaolinite platelets were generally arranged in directional alignment. Kaolinite with smaller particle size and low-defect structure was more stable in preparation, but kaolinite with larger particle size and high defect structure tended to change the crystal structure. The composite prepared in this research exhibited excellent mechanical and thermal properties.

  2. Effect of Chromite-Silica Sands Characteristics on Performance of Ladle Filler Sands for Continuous Casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Free opening rate is mainly determined by the performance of the ladle filler sand. High free opening rates of ladles are required in steel making to improve steel quality. Chromite ladle filler sands are one of the most widely used ladle filler sand. Several operative variables and materials characteristics affect the performance of the sands. Three sets of chromite ladle filler sands were selected and researches were focused on the sintering hehaviour and per- formance of the sands under operative conditions. The effect of particle size distribution on sintering, microstruc- ture, flowability, and permeability were presented. In all cases, the particle size varies from 0.1 to 1.5 mm corre- sponding to free flowing powders. One of the samples has higher permeability factor in comparison with others due to low particle size distribution. The other sample presents very good free opening due to its very good flowability and permeability factor.

  3. DISPERSION STABILITY AND RHEOLOGICAL BEHAVIOR OF SUSPENSIONSOF POLYSTYRENE COATED FUMED SILICA PARTICLES IN POLYSTYRENE SOLUTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xian-ze Yin; Ye-qiang Tan; Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Polystyrene coated silica (SiO2@PS) core-shell composite particles with averaged diameter of about 290 nm were prepared by in situ emulsion polymerization of styrene on the surface of γ-methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane grafted SiO2 nanoparticles of 20-50 nm in diameter.Rheological behavior and dispersion stability of SiO2@PS suspension in 10 wt% PS solution were compared with suspensions of untreated SiO2 and silane modified SiO2 nanoparticles.Suspensions of the untreated and the silane modified SiO2 exhibited obvious shear thinning.The SiO2@PS suspension exhibits shear viscosity considerably smaller than suspensions of untreated and silane modified SiO2 at low shear rates.Transmission electron microscopy showed that the composite particles can uniformly and stably dispersc in PS solution compared to other suspensions,implying that the PS shell can effectively enhance the particle compatibility with PS macromolecules in solution.

  4. Performance at high temperature of alkali-activated slag pastes produced with silica fume and rice husk ash based activators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernal, S. A.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the mechanical properties, and structural changes induced by high temperature exposure, of alkali-silicate activated slag cements produced with sodium silicates derived from silica fume (SF and rice husk ash (RHA. Similar reaction products were identified, independent of the type of silicate used, but with subtle differences in the composition of the C-S-H gels, leading to different strength losses after elevated temperature exposure. Cements produced with the alternative activators developed higher compressive strengths than those produced with commercial silicate. All samples retained strengths of more than 50 MPa after exposure to 600 °C, however, after exposure to 800 °C only the specimens produced with the RHA-based activator retained measurable strength. This study elucidated that silicate-activated slag binders, either activated with commercial silicate solutions or with sodium silicates based on SF or RHA, are stable up to 600 °C.Este estudio evaluó las propiedades mecánicas, y cambios estructurales inducidos por exposición a temperaturas elevadas, de cementos de escoria activada alcalinamente producidos con silicatos sódicos derivados de humo de sílice (SF y ceniza de cascarilla de arroz (RHA. Se identificaron productos de reacción similares, independiente del tipo de silicato utilizado, pero con diferencias menores en la composición de las geles C-S-H, lo cual indujo diferentes pérdidas de resistencia posterior a exposición a temperaturas elevadas. Los cementantes producidos con los activadores alternativos desarrollaron resistencias a la compresión más altas que aquellos producidos con silicato comercial. Todas las muestras retuvieron resistencias de más de 50 MPa posterior a la exposición a 600 °C, sin embargo, posterior a la exposición a 800 °C únicamente muestras producidas con activadores de RHA retuvieron resistencias medibles. Este estudio elucidó que cementantes de escoria activada con

  5. Microstructure of Silica Fume-Metakaolin Based Geopolymer%硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物微观结构分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李克亮

    2012-01-01

    采用硅粉、偏高岭土和碱激发剂制得硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物.应用X射线衍射、扫描电镜-能谱、红外光谱和核磁共振等技术分析硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物的化学组成与微观结构,揭示硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物具有独特耐久性的原因.结果表明:硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物为无定形的碱金属铝硅酸盐胶体,Si/Al摩尔比较高,与硅酸盐水泥水化产物完全不同.加入碱激发剂发生化学反应后,偏高岭土和硅粉中对应于Si-O-Si键非对称伸缩振动的谱带吸收强度减弱,同时向低频率方向移动,铝氧四面体取代Si-O-Si链上部分硅氧四面体.硅粉-偏高岭土基地聚合物中的铝氧四面体和硅氧四面体相互键接构成空间三维网络状结构,从而使其具有优良的耐久性.%To explain the cause of excellent durability, X-ray diffraction(XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectrum(FTIR), scanning electron microscope and energy dispersive (SEM-EDS) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were used to investigate the chemical composition and microstructure of silica fume-metakaolin based geopolymer which was prepared with silica fume, metakaolin and alkali activator. The results show that the geopolymer has an amorphous structure without any special peak corresponding to crystal in XRD spectrogram. This amorphous product is alkali alumino-silicate with a higher Si/Al mole ratio that differs from hydrated products of cement. After alkali activator is used, the peaks corresponding to Si—O—Si asymmetric stretching mode in FTIR spectrogram of metakaolin and silica fume have a shift to low frequency. It means that [AlO4] tetrahedrons replace some [SiO4] tetrahedrons in the Si—O—Si chain. Al is in the state of tetra-coordinate in silica fume-metakaolin based geopolymer. A three-dimensional framework structure which consists of [SiO4] tetrahedron and [A1O4] tetrahedron comes into being with the result that silica fume

  6. Evaluation of the influence of the polymer-filler interaction on compounds based on epoxidized elastomeric matrix and precipitated silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana L. A. C. Rocha

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of epoxy groups into the main chain of elastomers has emerged as a promising alternative, considering the monitoring of polymer-filler interaction leading to changes in the properties of vulcanizates. The epoxidation reaction (in situ was chosen to modify elastomers, such as polybutadiene (BR and copolymer of styrene-butadiene-rubber (SBR, because it is a simple, easily controlled reaction, even considering the small epoxidation degree. The modification degree of the polymeric chain was studied with FT-IR and ¹H-NMR. The shift of the Tg to high temperatures with the increase of the epoxy group in the polymer chain was monitored through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. An analysis of the dynamic modulus of the material in relation to its dependence on the amplitude and temperature was carried out. The interaction between epoxidized elastomeric matrix and silica as filler was extremely improved, even in the presence of very low content of epoxy groups into the polymer chain.

  7. Preferential adsorption of polycarboxylate superplasticizers on cement and silica fume in ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroefl, Ch.; Gruber, M.; Plank, J., E-mail: sekretariat@bauchemie.ch.tum.de

    2012-11-15

    UHPC is fluidized particularly well when a blend of MPEG- and APEG-type PCEs is applied. Here, the mechanism for this behavior was investigated. Testing individual cement and micro silica pastes revealed that the MPEG-PCE disperses cement better than silica whereas the APEG-PCE fluidizes silica particularly well. This behavior is explained by preferential adsorption of APEG-PCE on silica while MPEG-PCEs exhibit a more balanced affinity to both cement and silica. Adsorption data obtained from individual cement and micro silica pastes were compared with those found for the fully formulated UHPC containing a cement/silica blend. In the UHPC formulation, both PCEs still exhibit preferential and selective adsorption similar as was observed for individual cement and silica pastes. Preferential adsorption of PCEs is explained by their different stereochemistry whereby the carboxylate groups have to match with the steric position of calcium ions/atoms situated at the surfaces of cement hydrates or silica.

  8. A Thermally Conductive Composite with a Silica Gel Matrix and Carbon-Encapsulated Copper Nanoparticles as Filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin; Zhang, Haiyan; Hong, Haoqun; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xiubin

    2014-07-01

    Core-shell-structured nanocapsules with a copper core encapsulated in a carbon shell (Cu-C) were synthesized by a direct-current arc-discharge method. Morphological and microstructural characterization showed that the Cu-C consisted of a nanosized Cu core and carbon shell, with the carbon shells containing 6 to 15 ordered graphitic layers and amorphous carbon that effectively shield the metallic Cu core from oxidation. A thermally conductive composite was successfully fabricated using a silica gel matrix incorporated with Cu-C filler. The Cu-C nanoparticles were homogeneously dispersed in the silica gel. The effects of Cu-C on the thermal conductivity, electrical resistivity, and coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the composite were investigated. For composites with 6.16 vol.%, 11.04 vol.%, 16.70 vol.%, and 23.34 vol.% Cu-C content, the thermal conductivity at 50°C was 0.32 W/(m K) to 0.77 W/(m K), the electrical resistivity was 1.98 × 109, 3.48 × 107, 302, and 1 Ω m, respectively, while the CTE at 200°C was 3.79 × 10-4 K-1 to 3.44 × 10-4 K-1. The results reveal that the ordered graphitic shells in the Cu-C increased both the thermal and electrical conduction, but decreased the CTE by preventing the Cu cores from expanding.

  9. Influência da técnica de dispersão nas propriedades de sílica ativa Influence of the dispersion process in the silica fume properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. O. Romano

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A sílica ativa tem sido empregada em composições de materiais cimentícios com o intuito de aumentar a compacidade e/ou a resistência devido à sua atividade pozolânica e à sua atuação como filler promovida por sua granulometria muito fina. Contudo, para alcançar esses efeitos a sílica ativa deve se encontrar desaglomerada e dispersa, expondo assim toda a sua superfície reativa, além de possibilitar que suas partículas preencham os espaços vazios no empacotamento. No entanto, devido ao processo de densificação a que normalmente são submetidas, suas partículas se encontram fortemente unidas, podendo resultar, inclusive, em aglomerados macroscópicos que não se rompem com facilidade mesmo após cisalhamento intenso. Nesse caso, os benefícios esperados pelo uso da sílica ativa não são alcançados em sua plenitude. Desta forma, foram avaliadas as características de dispersão em água de duas sílicas ativas comerciais, as quais foram submetidas a condições de cisalhamento brando e intenso em um misturador convencional de baixa energia e em um dispersor de alta energia de cisalhamento, respectivamente.Silica fume (SF has been widely used in cement based products, as it promotes a better packing and increases its mechanical strength, either by its pozzolanic activity, and/or by the filler effect promoted by its fine particle size distribution. However, in order to achieve these benefits, the SF must be dispersed in the suspension, exposing completely its reactive surface and improving particle packing. As a by-product of metallic silicon production, SF particles are strongly bonded as a consequence of densification process involved during its generation, resulting in macroscopic agglomerated grains that require high energy for an effective dispersion. Then, the present study reports the SF dispersion in deionized water under low and high shear conditions, imposed by using a conventional laboratory suspension mixer and a high

  10. Mutagenicity of bitumen and asphalt fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, P R; Väänänen, V; Hämeilä, M; Linnainmaa, K

    2003-08-01

    The mutagenicity of asphalt fumes was tested with the Salmonella bioassays. The aim was to investigate if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of emissions. Recycling of old asphalt is increasing, and we studied also the mutagenicity of emissions sampled during the re-use of asphalt. The composition of vapours and fumes were analysed by gas chromatography and by liquid chromatography. Bitumens containing coal fly ash (CFA) or waste plastics were heated to the paving temperatures in the laboratory. In the field, bitumen fumes were collected during paving of stone mastic asphalts (lime or CFA as a filler), remixing of stone mastic asphalt (lime or CFA as a filler), and of asphalt concrete. All the lab-generated vapour fractions were non-mutagenic. The particulate fractions were mutagenic with TA98 in the presence of the S9 activation. In addition, the lab-fumes from bitumen containing waste plastics were positive with both strains without S9. Only particulate fractions sampled in the field were tested. They were mutagenic with and without metabolic activation with both strains. The mutagenic potency of the field samples was higher than that of the lab-generated fumes without S9, and the remixing fumes were more mutagenic than the normal paving and lab-generated fumes with S9. The use of inorganic additive, CFA, did not change the mutagenicity of the fumes, whereas the organic additive, waste plastics, increased the mutagenicity of the laboratory emissions significantly.

  11. Graphene oxide-silica nanohybrids as fillers for PA6 based nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maio, A. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo, Italy and STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans (Italy); Fucarino, R.; Khatibi, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Gestionale, Informatica, Meccanica, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Botta, L.; Scaffaro, R. [Department of Civil, Environmental, Aerospace, Materials Engineering, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Ed. 6, 90128, Palermo (Italy); Rosselli, S.; Bruno, M. [STEBICEF, Section of Biology and Chemistry, University of Palermo, Viale delle Scienze, Parco d' Orleans II, 90128 Palermo (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) was prepared by oxidation of graphite flakes by a mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}/H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and KMnO{sub 4} based on Marcano's method. Two different masterbatches containing GO (33.3%) and polyamide-6 (PA6) (66.7%) were prepared both via solvent casting in formic acid and by melt mixing in a mini-extruder (Haake). The two masterbatches were then used to prepare PA6-based nanocomposites with a content of 2% in GO. For comparison, a nanocomposite by direct mixing of PA6 and GO (2%) and PA6/graphite nanocomposites were prepared, too. The oxidation of graphite into GO was assessed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Micro-Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. All these techniques demonstrated the effectiveness of the graphite modification, since the results put into evidence that, after the acid treatment, interlayer distance, oxygen content and defects increased. SEM micrographs carried out on the nanocomposites, showed GO layers totally surrounded by polyamide-6, this feature is likely due to the strong interaction between the hydrophilic moieties located both on GO and on PA6. On the contrary, no interactions were observed when graphite was used as filler. Mechanical characterization, carried out by tensile and dynamic-mechanical tests, marked an improvement of the mechanical properties observed. Photoluminescence and EPR measurements were carried out onto nanoparticles and nanocomposites to study the nature of the interactions and to assess the possibility to use this class of materials as semiconductors or optical sensors.

  12. Use of new silica fillers as additives for polymers used in packaging of fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina Arreche

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to synthesize nanosilicas with different degree of hydrophobicity by the sol-gel method, using tetraethyl orthosilicate as a precursor. For this purpose, 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS and 1,1,1,3,3,3 - hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS, were added during synthesis as modifiers. A commercial biopolymer (Hexamoll Dinch, BASF intended for packaging of apples, was added to the new nanosilicas. The materials obtained were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, potentiometric titration, porosity, specific surface area and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity by wetting test. Colorimetry was used to evaluate change in apple pulp color after contact with the different silicas.

  13. Oxidation of Liquid Silicon in a Medium Scale Induction Furnace: Examination of the Fuming Rate and Fume Composition

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the effect of flow rate on the fuming rate/silica flux of liquid silicon in order to gain a better understanding of the silica fuming during industrial ladle refining during silicon production. The formation of silica fume is the results when the liquid silicon is exposed to air. This silica fume has been shown to be a health hazard when breathed by plant workers and increased environmental regulations call for its elimination. This work is being done as part...

  14. Study on Alkali-activated Silica Fume and Fly Ash Based Geopolymer%碱激发硅灰-粉煤灰基矿物聚合物的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚超; 张耀君; 徐德龙

    2011-01-01

    本文在碱激发粉煤灰矿物聚合物的基础上,研究了在粉煤灰中掺人适量硅灰形成碱激发硅灰-粉煤灰基矿物聚合物的性能.结果表明,当碱激发剂Na2SiO3·9H7O用量20wt%,硅灰掺量10wt%时,碱激发硅灰-粉煤灰基矿物聚合物在室温养护下抗压强度达到58.83 Mpa,较不掺硅灰的矿物聚合物强度提高了72%.X衍射分析表明,形成的矿物聚合物为无定形矿物相,SEM微观形貌分析表明,掺入硅灰后,矿物聚合物的微观结构更加致密,其强度大幅度提高.%The performances of alkali-activated silica fume and fly ash based geopolymer were studied based on alkali-activated fly ash geopolymer. The results showed that the compressive strength of geopolymer was 58.83 MPa in the curing time of ambient temperature and it increased by 72% comparing to the geopolymer without silica fume when the amount of activator, Na2SiO3 · 9H20, was 20wt% and incorporation of silica fume was 10wt%. The XRD results demonstrated that the geopolymer took the shape of amorphous phase. SEM images showed that the microstructure of geopolymer was further densification and the compressive strength was significantly improved after silica fume was added.

  15. Polymer composite electrolytes having core-shell silica fillers with anion-trapping boron moiety in the shell layer for all-solid-state lithium-ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jimin; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Hee Joong; Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Jong-Chan

    2015-04-15

    Core-shell silica particles with ion-conducting poly(ethylene glycol) and anion-trapping boron moiety in the shell layer were prepared to be used as fillers for polymer composite electrolytes based on organic/inorganic hybrid branched copolymer as polymer matrix for all-solid-state lithium-ion battery applications. The core-shell silica particles were found to improve mechanical strength and thermal stability of the polymer matrix and poly(ethylene glycol) and boron moiety in the shell layer increase compatibility between filler and polymer matrix. Furthermore, boron moiety in the shell layer increases both ionic conductivity and lithium transference number of the polymer matrix because lithium salt can be more easily dissociated by the anion-trapping boron. Interfacial compatibility with lithium metal anode is also improved because well-dispersed silica particles serve as protective layer against interfacial side reactions. As a result, all-solid-state battery performance was found to be enhanced when the copolymer having core-shell silica particles with the boron moiety was used as solid polymer electrolyte.

  16. Synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement fillers increased the fluoride recharge and lactic acid neutralizing ability of a resin-based pit and fissure sealant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surintanasarn, Atikom; Siralertmukul, Krisana; Thamrongananskul, Niyom

    2017-07-12

    This study evaluated the effect of different types of filler in a resin-based pit and fissure sealant on fluoride release, recharge, and lactic acid neutralization. Resin-based sealant was incorporated with 5% w/w of the following fillers: calcium aluminate cement (CAC), synthesized mesoporous silica (SI), a CAC and SI mixture (CAC+SI), glass-ionomer powder (GIC), and acetic acid-treated GIC (GICA). Sealant without filler served as control. The samples were immersed in deionized water or a lactic acid solution and the concentration of fluoride in the water, before and after fluoride recharge, and the lactic acid pH change, respectively, were determined. The CAC+SI group demonstrated the highest fluoride release after being recharged with fluoride gel. The CAC+SI group also demonstrated increased lactic acid pH. These findings suggest that a resin-based sealant containing synthesized mesoporous silica and calcium aluminate cement may enhance remineralization due to fluoride release and higher pH.

  17. 偏高岭土和硅灰对三元胶凝材料的改性%Modification of ternary cementitious materials blended with metakaolin and silica fume

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许涛; 卢都友; 罗旌旺

    2012-01-01

    To increase the amount of supplementary cementitious materials in cement-based materials, ternary cementitious system of fly ash ( FA)-metakaolin ( MK ) -cement (PC) and FA-silica fume(SF)-cement were prepared, and their compressive strengths and microstructures were investigated. The effects of MK and SF on high-volume FA content cementitious system were compared. Results showed that suitable dosage of MK and SF could enhance the compressive strength of high FA volume ternary system, MK and SF had a slightly different effect due to dosage and curing time. MK and SF could reduce the content of Ca(OH)2(CH) and refine pore structure. The hydration reaction products formed the reaction between MK and CH were.different from that with SF. MK and SF could improve microstructure and interface in pastes for their filler and pozzolanic effects. The high quality MK had similar or even better effect than that of SF used in high volume FA cementitious system.%为了提高水泥基材料中辅助性胶凝材料用量,对比研究偏高岭土(MK)和硅灰(SF)对高粉煤灰(FA)掺量的三元胶凝材料体系抗压强度和微观结构的影响.结果表明:适量MK和SF均能提高FA掺量的三元胶凝材料不同龄期的强度,两者对强度的提高幅度随掺量和浆体龄期的改变而稍有改变;MK和SF均能显著降低三元胶凝材料浆体中Ca(OH)2(CH)的含量、优化浆体孔结构,但两者反应形成的产物有明显不同.MK和SF的物理填充、火山灰效应可优化三元胶凝体系浆体的微观结构、改善不同相界面结合.高品质MK可代替SF用于制备高FA含量三元胶凝材料体系.

  18. The effect of limestone powder, fly ash and silica fume on the properties of self-compacting repair mortars

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Selçuk Türkel; Yiğit Altuntaş

    2009-04-01

    Self-compacting repair mortars (SCRM) are preferred for the rehabilitation and repair of reinforced concrete structures especially at narrow mould systems. Self compactability and stability are susceptible to ternary effects of chemical and mineral admixture type and their content. In this study, the effect of limestone powder (LP) on the properties of SCRM has been compared with other mineral additives (silica fume (SF) and fly ash (FA) and their combinations) effects. Fresh properties, flexural and compressive strengths and water absorption properties of mortars were determined. The use of SF in mortars significantly increased the dosage of superplasticiser (SP). At the same constant SP dosage (0·8%) and mineral additives content (30%), LP can better improve the workability than that of control and FA mixtures by 19% and 27%. However, the results of this study suggest that certain FA, SF and LP combinations can improve the workability of SCRMs, more than FA, SF and LP alone. LP can have a positive influence on the mechanical performance at early strength development while SF improved aggregate-matrix bond resulting from the formation of a less porous transition zone in mortar. SF can better reducing effect on total water absorption while FA and LP will not have the same effect, at 28 days.

  19. Improving the performances of Nafion™-based membranes for microbial fuel cells with silica-based, organically-functionalized mesostructured fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, Simone; Millia, Luca; Bruni, Gianna; Tealdi, Cristina; Mustarelli, Piercarlo; Quartarone, Eliana

    2016-12-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) can be conveniently used for wastewater treatment and bioelectricity production. Their efficiency is strongly influenced by the physico-chemical properties of the ion-conducting membrane. In this work we prepare Nafion™-based composite membranes by using mesoscale SBA-15 silica, and organic-inorganic fillers obtained by functionalizing SBA-15 with SO3H groups. The proposed membranes are tested as alternative separators in MFCs for applications in wastewater treatment and their performances compared to those of standard Nafion™ 117. Prolonged (3 months) MFC operation shows that the composite membrane with 5 wt% of SBA-15 functionalized with 10 mol% of SO3H gives maximum power density of 380 mW m-3, namely three times better than that of Nafion™ after 90 days of operation. The same membrane offers a very effective COD removal after 14 days (more than 95%), an impressive coulombic efficiency of 34%, and very high resistance to biofouling. We conclude that the use of silica-based SO3H functionalized fillers is a powerful strategy to improve the performances of Nafion™ membranes in MFCs.

  20. Beyond waste: new sustainable fillers from fly ashes stabilization, obtained by low cost raw materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rodella

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A sustainable economy can be achieved only by assessing processes finalized to optimize the use of resources. Waste can be a relevant source of energy thanks to energy-from-waste processes. Concerns regarding the toxic fly ashes can be solved by transforming them into resource as recycled materials. The commitment to recycle is driven by the need to conserve natural resources, reduce imports of raw materials, save landfill space and reduce pollution. A new method to stabilize fly ash from Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator (MSWI at room temperature has been developed thanks to COSMOS-RICE LIFE+ project (www.cosmos-rice.csmt.eu. This process is based on a chemical reaction that occurs properly mixing three waste fly ashes with rice husk ash, an agricultural by-product. COSMOS inert can replace critical raw materials (i.e. silica, fluorspar, clays, bentonite, antimony and alumina as filler. Moreover the materials employed in the stabilization procedure may be not available in all areas. This paper investigates the possibility of substituting silica fume with corresponding condensed silica fume and to substitute flue-gas desulfurization (FGD residues with low-cost calcium hydroxide powder. The removal of coal fly ash was also considered. The results will be presented and a possible substitution of the materials to stabilize fly ash will be discussed.

  1. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merget, R; Bauer, T; Küpper, H U; Philippou, S; Bauer, H D; Breitstadt, R; Bruening, T

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic ("thermal" or "fumed") silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physicochemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or emphysema cannot be excluded. There is no study

  2. Colloidal Gold Nanoclusters Spiked Silica Fillers in Mixed Matrix Coatings: Simultaneous Detection and Inhibition of Healthcare-Associated Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaiari, Shahad K; Hammami, Mohammed A; Croissant, Jonas G; Omar, Haneen W; Neelakanda, Pradeep; Yapici, Tahir; Peinemann, Klaus-Viktor; Khashab, Niveen M

    2017-01-25

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are the infections that patients get while receiving medical treatment in a medical facility with bacterial HAIs being the most common. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully employed as antibacterial motifs; however, NPs leaching in addition to poor dispersion and overall reproducibility are major hurdles to further product development. In this study, the authors design and fabricate a smart antibacterial mixed-matrix membrane coating comprising colloidal lysozyme-templated gold nanoclusters as nanofillers in poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(butylene terephthalate) amphiphilic polymer matrix. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles-lysozyme functionalized gold nanoclusters disperse homogenously within the polymer matrix with no phase separation and zero NPs leaching. This mixed-matrix coating can successfully sense and inhibit bacterial contamination via a controlled release mechanism that is only triggered by bacteria. The system is coated on a common radiographic dental imaging device (photostimulable phosphor plate) that is prone to oral bacteria contamination. Variation and eventually disappearance of the red fluorescence surface under UV light signals bacterial infection. Kanamycin, an antimicrobial agent, is controllably released to instantly inhibit bacterial growth. Interestingly, the quality of the images obtained with these coated surfaces is the same as uncoated surfaces and thus the safe application of such smart coatings can be expanded to include other medical devices without compromising their utility.

  3. Colloidal Gold Nanoclusters Spiked Silica Fillers in Mixed Matrix Coatings: Simultaneous Detection and Inhibition of Healthcare-Associated Infections

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2017-01-25

    Healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) are the infections that patients get while receiving medical treatment in a medical facility with bacterial HAIs being the most common. Silver and gold nanoparticles (NPs) have been successfully employed as antibacterial motifs; however, NPs leaching in addition to poor dispersion and overall reproducibility are major hurdles to further product development. In this study, the authors design and fabricate a smart antibacterial mixed-matrix membrane coating comprising colloidal lysozyme-templated gold nanoclusters as nanofillers in poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(butylene terephthalate) amphiphilic polymer matrix. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles-lysozyme functionalized gold nanoclusters disperse homogenously within the polymer matrix with no phase separation and zero NPs leaching. This mixed-matrix coating can successfully sense and inhibit bacterial contamination via a controlled release mechanism that is only triggered by bacteria. The system is coated on a common radiographic dental imaging device (photostimulable phosphor plate) that is prone to oral bacteria contamination. Variation and eventually disappearance of the red fluorescence surface under UV light signals bacterial infection. Kanamycin, an antimicrobial agent, is controllably released to instantly inhibit bacterial growth. Interestingly, the quality of the images obtained with these coated surfaces is the same as uncoated surfaces and thus the safe application of such smart coatings can be expanded to include other medical devices without compromising their utility.

  4. Thermal transformation of bioactive caffeic acid on fumed silica seen by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry and quantum chemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Tetiana V; Lipkovska, Natalia O; Barvinchenko, Valentyna M; Palyanytsya, Borys B; Kazakova, Olga A; Dudik, Olesia O; Menyhárd, Alfréd; László, Krisztina

    2016-05-15

    Thermochemical studies of hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives and their surface complexes are important for the pharmaceutical industry, medicine and for the development of technologies of heterogeneous biomass pyrolysis. In this study, structural and thermal transformations of caffeic acid complexes on silica surfaces were studied by UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) and quantum chemical methods. Two types of caffeic acid surface complexes are found to form through phenolic or carboxyl groups. The kinetic parameters of the chemical reactions of caffeic acid on silica surface are calculated. The mechanisms of thermal transformations of the caffeic chemisorbed surface complexes are proposed. Thermal decomposition of caffeic acid complex chemisorbed through grafted ester group proceeds via three parallel reactions, producing ketene, vinyl and acetylene derivatives of 1,2-dihydroxybenzene. Immobilization of phenolic acids on the silica surface improves greatly their thermal stability.

  5. Application of silica fume as a new SP-extractor for trace determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) in pharmaceutical and environmental samples by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Salwa A.; Gaber, Ahmed A. Abdel; Rahim, Asmaa M. Abdel

    2017-05-01

    In this work, silica fume (SF) is used as a solid-phase extractor for extraction of Zn(II) and Cd(II) from aqueous solutions. Characterization of SF is performed by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The optimum experimental conditions for the two metal ions are investigated using batch and column techniques. The maximum adsorption capacity values are found to be 54.13 and 121.28 mg g-1 at the optimum pH 6.0 and 8.0 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The equilibrium data are analyzed using the Langmuir, Freundlich, and Temkin isotherms by nonlinear regression analysis. Also, the kinetics analysis revealed that the overall adsorption process is successfully fitted with the pseudo-second-order model. The method is applied for determination of the target metal ions in pharmaceutical and environmental samples using square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The limit of detection (LOD) values are 0.102 and 1.43 × 10-3 mg L-1 for Zn(II) and Cd(II), respectively. The percentage recovery values are 98.8-100.5 % which indicate the success of the proposed method for determination of Zn(II) and Cd(II) without interfering effects.

  6. Wrinkle Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... packages for authenticity. The FDA is aware of counterfeit products being marketed and used in the U.S. Do ... dermal filler products online, because they could be counterfeit products, or products not approved for use in the ...

  7. 气相SiO2在不同pH值介质中的分散特性%Effect of pH on the Dispersion Characteristics of Fumed Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑欧; 万南红; 周明明; 周龙瑞; 陈体衔; 刘孝伟

    2011-01-01

    以激光动态光散射法考察了气相SiO2在不同pH值的H2SO4和NaOH介质中的分散平均水化粒径与表面Zeta电位及二者间的关系.Zeta电位数据表明,气相SiO2在水中分散的表面硅羟基的等电点(IEP)和滴定终点(rE)的pH值分别为pH(IEP) =2.09和pH(TE) =7.47,利用滴定终点pH(TE)给出了一种简单的气相SiO2表面Si-OH浓度的测定方法.分散相粒径数据显示,在等电点和滴定终点之间,气相SiO2在水中的分散粒子的粒径能够稳定在230 nm附近;在H2SO4介质中,当pH< pH(IEP)时,随着H2SO4浓度的增大,体系中的分散粒子发生聚结而使表观粒径增大;在NaOH介质中,当pH> pH(TE)时,随着NaOH浓度的增大,分散相的表观水化粒径降低,表明NaOH的加入有利于气相SiO2的分散.%The effect of pH on the particle distribution and zeta potential of the fumed silica(SiO2) suspended in H2SO4 or NaOH aqueous solution and their relationship were investigated with laser dynamic light scattering (DSL). The experiment showed that the isoelectric point(IEP) and titration end(TE) of silanol were at pH(IEP) =2. 09 and pH(TE) =7.47, respectively, and a simple method was given for the determination of Si-OH concentration on SiO2 particle surface based on pH (TE). The dispersed phase particle size measurement showed that between IEP and TE, the hydration radius of SiO2 was stabilized near 230 nm; in H2SO4 medium, when pH pH (TE) , the SiO2 aggregates decomposed and the apparent size of the dispersed phase decreased with increasing the NaOH concentration, which showed that NaOH can promote the dispersion stability of fumed silica in aqueous.

  8. 21 CFR 584.700 - Hydrophobic silicas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrophobic silicas. 584.700 Section 584.700 Food... DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 584.700 Hydrophobic silicas. (a) Product. Amorphous fumed hydrophobic silica or precipitated hydrophobic silica (CAS Reg. No....

  9. Evaluation of Polymer-Filler Interaction Characteristics by Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratto, T; Saab, A

    2007-04-23

    Silicone polymers are frequently used as cushions and inserts between load bearing parts. In this capacity, they must act to position their associated parts and distribute mechanical force as appropriate. One type of failure is specific to silicones that are filled with high surface area particulates for purposes of tailoring the polymer compressive properties. Additives such as fumed silicon oxide are presumed to have a high degree of surface interaction with the polymer matrix, thus causing the polymer to stiffen and to display greater dimensional stability as a function of temperature. However, it has been observed that the compressive behavior of these materials is not always invariant over long times. There is evidence that suggests changes in humidity and temperature can irreversibly alter the silicone-filler interaction, thereby changing the overall characteristics of parts made from such materials. As before, changes in compressive or shear stability can have serious effects on the ability of these materials to effectively position precision parts or distribute high mechanical loads. We approach the analysis of the filled systems by creating controlled layers of silicone polymers attached to silicon oxide substrates. Straight chain vinyl-silicone polymers identical to those used in the formulation of pads for stockpile systems are chemically appended to a substrate surface, and cross-linked to form a three dimensional network. This type of structure serves as a model of silicone polymer coating a silicon oxide filler particle. We study these model systems first by using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to image the samples with nanometer resolution, and then by measuring the forces of interactions between single model silica filler particles and polymer-coated surfaces. We use normal longitudinal force AFM to measure adhesion, and a relatively newly developed technique, lateral force AFM, to determine the frictional forces between the silica particles and the

  10. Drying shrinkage of mortars with limestone filler and blast-furnace slag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrasco, M. F.

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 1990's the use of cements made with port land clinker and two mineral admixtures, called ternary or blended cements, has grown considerably. Nowadays, cements containing several combinations of fly ash and silica fume, blast-furnace slag and silica fume or blast-furnace slag and limestone filler are commonly used. There are numerous works on the influence of blended cements on the fresh state and mechanical properties of mortar and concrete, but the their deformations due to drying shrinkage are not so well described. Analysis of drying shrinkage is relevant because this property influences the possibility of cracking occurrence and, hence, the deterioration of mechanical and durable properties of concrete structures. This paper evaluates the influence on the drying shrinkage of mortars of variable contents of limestone filler and/or blast-furnace slag in Portland cement. Additionally, flexion strength and non evaporable water content were evaluated. Test results show that the inclusion of these mineral admixtures, Joint or separately, increments drying shrinkage of mortars at early ages. Despite this fact, mortars made with limestone filler cement are less susceptible to cracking than mortars made with cements incorporating blast-furnace slag or both admixtures.

    Durante los años 90 el uso de cementos fabricados con clínker Portland y dos adiciones suplementarias (cementos ternarios o compuestos se ha incrementado en forma considerable. En la práctica, es cada vez más común el empleo de estos cementos conteniendo combinaciones de ceniza volante y humo de sílice, escoria y humo de sílice o escoria y filler calcáreo. En la actualidad existen numerosos estudios sobre la influencia de los cementos compuestos en las características en estado fresco y las propiedades mecánicas de morteros y hormigones, pero las deformaciones que estos materiales sufren debido a la retracción por secado no son tan conocidas. El análisis de

  11. Updating Older Fume Hoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, G. Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Provides information on updating older fume hoods. Areas addressed include: (1) adjustment of the hood's back baffle; (2) hood air leakage; (3) light level; (4) hood location in relation to room traffic and room air; and (5) establishing and maintaining hood performance. (JN)

  12. Health hazards due to the inhalation of amorphous silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merget, R.; Bruening, T. [Research Institute for Occupational Medicine (BGFA), Bochum (Germany); Bauer, T. [Bergmannsheil, University Hospital, Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pneumonology, Allergology and Sleep Medicine, Bochum (Germany); Kuepper, H.U.; Breitstadt, R. [Degussa-Huels Corp., Wesseling (Germany); Philippou, S. [Department of Pathology, Augusta Krankenanstalten, Bochum (Germany); Bauer, H.D. [Research Institute for Hazardous Substances (IGF), Bochum (Germany)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust is associated with an increased risk for pulmonary diseases such as silicosis, tuberculosis, chronic bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the health effects of amorphous (non-crystalline) forms of silica. The major problem in the assessment of health effects of amorphous silica is its contamination with crystalline silica. This applies particularly to well-documented pneumoconiosis among diatomaceous earth workers. Intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silicas are without contamination of crystalline silica. These synthetic forms may be classified as (1) wet process silica, (2) pyrogenic (''thermal'' or ''fumed'') silica, and (3) chemically or physically modified silica. According to the different physico-chemical properties, the major classes of synthetic amorphous silica are used in a variety of products, e.g. as fillers in the rubber industry, in tyre compounds, as free-flow and anti-caking agents in powder materials, and as liquid carriers, particularly in the manufacture of animal feed and agrochemicals; other uses are found in toothpaste additives, paints, silicon rubber, insulation material, liquid systems in coatings, adhesives, printing inks, plastisol car undercoats, and cosmetics. Animal inhalation studies with intentionally manufactured synthetic amorphous silica showed at least partially reversible inflammation, granuloma formation and emphysema, but no progressive fibrosis of the lungs. Epidemiological studies do not support the hypothesis that amorphous silicas have any relevant potential to induce fibrosis in workers with high occupational exposure to these substances, although one study disclosed four cases with silicosis among subjects exposed to apparently non-contaminated amorphous silica. Since the data have been limited, a risk of chronic bronchitis, COPD or

  13. Chemical Warfare Agent Surface Adsorption: Hydrogen Bonding of Sarin and Soman to Amorphous Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-17

    small transfer chamber located within the confines of a CWA-certified surety fume hood . Within the main chamber, the sample was mounted on a molybdenum...Particulate silica surface samples were prepared by dispersing silica (200 m2/g, Aerosil fumed silica with a 12 nm average particle diameter) from a

  14. 温度、炭纤维和硅土粉对轻量混凝土力学性能的影响%Effect of temperature,carbon fibers,and silica fume on the mechanical properties of lightweight concretes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Harun TANYILDIZI

    2008-01-01

    The effect of temperature,and carbon fiber and silica fume contents on the mechanical properties (compressive and flexural strength) of lightweight concretes was investigated.Samples containing silica fume ( mass fractions of 0 and 10% ) and carbon fibers (mass fractions of 0,0.5,1,and 2% ) were prepared.The compressive and flexural strengths of the samples were determined after they had been exposed to high temperatures (400,600,and 800 ℃).The Taguchi method was used to determine the optimum conditions and to reduce the number of experiments.The significance of the three factors affecting the mechanical properties of lightweight concretes was determined using the Anova analysis and the F-test.Results showed that the most important factor for mechanical properties was temperature,followed by carbon fiber and silica fume contents.The optimum parameters for compressive strength were different from those for flexural strength.%研究了温度、炭纤维和硅士粉含量对轻量混凝土力学性能的影响.制备了含硅土粉(质量分数0%和10%)及炭纤维(质量分数0%,0.5%,1%,和2%)的混合物,测定了高温(400℃,600℃和800℃)暴烤后轻理混凝土的压缩强度和弯曲强度.采用三个控制因素(硅土粉含量、炭纤维含量及处理温度),应用Taguchi法确定最佳条件并减少实验次数,采用方差(Anova)法确定主要实验参数与轻量混凝土力学性能的基准.结果表明:轻量混凝土力学性能最实效的参数是加热程度,而抗拉强度与抗弯强度的最佳参数各不相同.

  15. Study on the microstructural mechanism to improve the abrasion resistance of concrete by adding silica fume%硅粉增强混凝土抗冲磨性能的微观机理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 何真; 杨华全; 蔡新华

    2013-01-01

      采用Fourier红外光谱(FTIR)和29Si固体核磁共振谱(29Si NMR)结合去卷积技术研究了硅粉增强混凝土抗冲磨性能的微观机理.结果表明硅粉具有较高的水化活性,硅粉掺量为10%的水泥体系水化3d时,大约有41%的硅粉参与反应,水化120d时大约有96%的硅粉参与反应.此外,硅粉的火山灰反应改变了C-S-H结构中Qn的分布和C-S-H的聚合度,在这个过程中,硅粉结构中的Si-O-Si共价键在碱性环境中断裂后形成的水化硅酸根单体与C-S-H二聚体以及Ca2+、OH-结合,形成高聚C-S-H.在分子尺度(几个纳米),硅粉优化了C-S-H结构,使得C-S-H结构有序性增强,在微米尺度,硅粉的火山灰反应使得C-S-H堆积结构更加密实,胶凝性更强,从而改善了混凝土中浆体的性质.这样就从C-S-H层面解释了硅粉改善混凝土强度以及抗冲磨性能的机理.%The mechanism to improve the abrasion resistance of concrete by adding silica fume was studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy,high resolution 29Si MAS NMR with deconvolution technique,re⁃spectively. The results of FTIR and 29Si MAS NMR indicated that SF possesses a high pozzolanic reactivity. About 41% of SF at 3d and about 96% at 120d have reacted in a paste containing 10% SF (by weight of cement replacement). After the covalent bonds of Si-O-Si in SF were broken, monomers formed, which can connect C-S-H dimers to form highly polymerized C-S-H, and increased the average chain length (ACL) of aluminosilicate. At the molecule scale, the incorporation of SF made the C-S-H more long-range order and better organized, at the colloidal-scale, the C-S-H particles bond denser and the quality of pastes was improved, both of which may explain from the point of C-S-H why the compressive strength of hardened cement paste and abrasion resistance of concrete was improved.

  16. Influence of the silica fillers on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations; Etude de l'influence des charges de silice sur le vieillissement des resines epoxyde sous irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benard, F.

    2004-12-17

    Various studies were carried out on the ageing of epoxy resins under irradiations. In all cases, pure polymers were studied. The aim of our work managed by the CEA and the CNRS consists on studying the part of fillers and particularly the part of silica on ageing process under electron beam irradiations. Because of their wide use in industrial applications and especially in nuclear environment, the DGEBA-TETA resins (Diglycidylether of Bisphenol A - Triethylenetetramine) were chosen. Those epoxy resins are difficult to analyse because of their insolubility. Some pure and nano-metric silica filled chemical models which chemical structure very close to the one the DGEBA/TETA resin were synthesized and analysed with classical methods in organic chemistry. A major phenomenon of rupture of the C-O and C-N chemical bonds with creation of phenolic extremities, methylketone extremities, of primary and tertiary amines and notably enamine functions were revealed by the analyses. The quantitative {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses revealed the screen effect due to the silica and the reactions between the chemical species created by the irradiations and the silica surface. Thermic and thermodynamic analyses of the different epoxy resins in function of the irradiation dose and of the kind of silica showed the decrease of the glass transition temperature, of the relaxation temperature and of the crosslink density confirming the major phenomenon of bond ruptures during irradiations. With silica, the decrease of the crosslink density is slowed. This phenomenon can be explained with interactions between the nano-metric silica surface and the epoxy resin offsetting the effect of the chain rupture on the resin mechanical properties. The {sup 13}C solid state NMR analyses confirmed the choice of the chemical models and permitted to detect the chemical species created by the irradiations. The analyse of the polarization transfers with {sup 13}C CP-MAS NMR spectroscopy revealed the

  17. Natural Rubber-Filler Interactions: What Are the Parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alan Jenkin; Steenkeste, Karine; Canette, Alexis; Eloy, Marie; Brosson, Damien; Gaboriaud, Fabien; Fontaine-Aupart, Marie-Pierre

    2015-11-17

    Reinforcement of a polymer matrix through the incorporation of nanoparticles (fillers) is a common industrial practice that greatly enhances the mechanical properties of the composite material. The origin of such mechanical reinforcement has been linked to the interaction between the polymer and filler as well as the homogeneous dispersion of the filler within the polymer matrix. In natural rubber (NR) technology, knowledge of the conditions necessary to achieve more efficient NR-filler interactions is improving continuously. This study explores the important physicochemical parameters required to achieve NR-filler interactions under dilute aqueous conditions by varying both the properties of the filler (size, composition, surface activity, concentration) and the aqueous solution (ionic strength, ion valency). By combining fluorescence and electron microscopy methods, we show that NR and silica interact only in the presence of ions and that heteroaggregation is favored more than homoaggregation of silica-silica or NR-NR. The interaction kinetics increases with the ion valence, whereas the morphology of the heteroaggregates depends on the size of silica and the volume percent ratio (dry silica/dry NR). We observe dendritic structures using silica with a diameter (d) of 100 nm at a ∼20-50 vol % ratio, whereas we obtain raspberry-like structures using silica with d = 30 nm particles. We observe that in liquid the interaction is controlled by the hydrophilic bioshell, in contrast to dried conditions, where hydrophobic polymer dominates the interaction of NR with the fillers. A good correlation between the nanoscopic aggregation behavior and the macroscopic aggregation dynamics of the particles was observed. These results provide insight into improving the reinforcement of a polymer matrix using NR-filler films.

  18. Fumes from shotfiring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonel, P.; Bigourd, J.; Dangreaux, J.

    1980-07-01

    Fumes arising from shotfiring explosives contain a variety of toxic substances depending on the type of explosive used. CERCHAR is studying several test methods for assessing the amounts of these toxic gases. The test conditions, which are varied systematically, have a large effect on the amount of gas produced by a given explosive. Describes 115 l bomb tests and tests in a chamber (15 m3). Presents a comparison with real shotfiring operations underground. The tests in the 15 m3 chamber gave results which were very close to operating practice. (In French)

  19. Nanoscopic properties of silica filled polydimethylsiloxane by means of positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiinberg, P.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard; Maurer, F.H.J.

    2004-01-01

    Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was performed on a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/fumed silicon dioxide (SiO2) composites at temperatures between -185 and 100degreesC to study the effect of filler content and filler particle size on the free volume properties and the pos......Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) was performed on a series of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/fumed silicon dioxide (SiO2) composites at temperatures between -185 and 100degreesC to study the effect of filler content and filler particle size on the free volume properties...

  20. Use of Fillers, Pigments and Additives in Fouling-Release Coatings: a Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Tamaev, Nail; Kiil, Søren; Noguer, Albert Camós; Olsen, Stefan Møller

    2015-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based fouling-release coatings represent a non-toxic alternative in the area of marine protection. Many researches and testing procedures are dedicated to the challenge of exploring of effective, reliable and high-performance constituents of the coatings ‒ fillers, pigments and additives ‒ in order to achieve the desired and long-lasting fouling-release properties.Primarily, coating formulations are prepared on the basis of PDMS with inorganic fillers such as fumed...

  1. Effect of silica-based fillers on structure and properties of epoxy-based composites; Efeito das cargas a base de silica na estrutura e propriedades de compositos a base de resina epoxidica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solymossy, Ana Paula F.; Dahmouche, Karim; Soares, Bluma G. [Instituto de Macromoleculas (IMA), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil); Rocha, L. Alonso; Ribeiro, Sidney J.L, E-mail: apfiuza@ima.ufrj.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista (UNESP), Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    In the present work, the incorporation effect of nanoparticles of commercial silica (Aerosil R200 - R200), polysilsesquioxane (POSS) and in-situ synthesized mesoporous silica (MP) on the structure, curing and thermal properties of epoxy resin. SAXS analysis of R200 and MP composites showed a tendency to Guinier plateau, while the POSS composite showed larger particle size. By the rheological analysis it was possible to measure the gel time of the composites, of which the greater value obtained was for MP, followed by POSS and then by R200, due to their affinity with the matrix and particle sizes. DMA showed that R200 composite has the lowest modulus, when compared with the other composites. The MP composite has higher Tg than POSS composite and lower than R200 composite. (author)

  2. Influence of nano-silica content on fiexural properties of the aluminum borate whisker and silica filler composite resins%纳米二氧化硅含量对硼酸铝晶须-二氧化硅熔附体填料复合树脂弯曲性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文云; 袁艳波; 陈庆华; 肖玉鸿; 李星星

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究正硅酸乙酯(TEOS)水解所得纳米二氧化硅(Si02)含量对硼酸铝晶须(AIBw)与SiO2熔附体填料复合树脂弯曲性能的影响.方法 采用TEOS溶胶一凝胶法制得纳米SiO2,按不同比例通过高温烧结使其熔附于AIBw表面,制作试样并测试其弯曲强度和弯曲弹性模量;利用透射电镜(TEM)观察高温处理过程对晶须表面形态的影响以及不同比例的熔附体形貌.结果 AlBw-SiO2熔附体复合填料可显著提高牙科复合树脂的弯曲性能:AlBw和SiO2的质量比为3:1时牙科复合树脂的弯曲强度达(130.29±8.38)MPa.结论 TEOS溶胶-凝胶法水解所得的纳米SiO2含量可改善AlBw-SiO2熔附体填料复合树脂的弯曲性能.%Objective To discuss the influence of nano-silica content which was hydrolyzed by tetraethyl orthosioate(TEOS) on the aluminum borate whisker(AlBw) and silica filler composite resins on flexural properties.Methods The nanometer-size silicon dioxide (SiO2) particles were prepared by sol-gel method based on tetraethyl orthosioate.Different proportion of AlBw and SiO2 were fused and attached onto the surface of AlBw through high temperature,then polymerized with resin matrix after surface siliconization and their flexural strength and flexural modulus were determined.The effects of heat treatment to the surface morphology of AlBw and the shapes of the mixture at various proportions were characterized by TEM.Results The flexural properties of dental composite resins with AlBw-SiO2 compound as inorganic fillers were significantly improved.The flexural property of a new type of dental composite resins was (130.29±8.38) MPa, when the mass ratio of AlBw and nano-SiO2 particle was 3:1.Conclusion Nano-silica content which was hydrolyzed by tetraethyl orthosioate improved flexural properties of the aluminum borate whisker and silica filler composite resins.

  3. Properties of Natural Rubber Composites with Kaolin and Silica Hybrid Filler%高岭土/白炭黑并用填充天然橡胶复合材料的性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玉德; 刘钦甫; 李和平; 陆银平; 张乾

    2011-01-01

    A series of natural rubber (NR) composites with modified kaolin(MK)and precipitated silica(PS)were prepared by melt blending,and their microstruture,gas barrier properties and mechanical properties were characterized The results show that flake-like kaolinite and spherical silica particles are evenly dispersed in the natural rubber matrix.When NR is filled by MK or PS separately,the gas barrier properties of NR composites are improved gradually with the increasing of MK content,and MK is superior to PS in the barrier and reinforcing capability.When NR is filled by MK and PS blends,their gas barrier properties,tensile strength and tensile modulus all surpass that of NR composites filled by MK or PS separately,and MK/PS hybrid filler further improves the gas barrier properties and mechanical properties of NR composites.%以高岭土和白炭黑作为增强剂,采用熔融共混法制备了一系列的天然橡胶(NR)复合材料,并对其微观结构、气体阻隔性能和力学性能进行了表征.结果表明,改性高岭土(MK)以片层结构,白炭黑(PS)以球状结构,均匀分散于NR基体之中;MK与PS单独填充NR时,随着MK填充量的增加,NR复合材料的气体阻隔性能逐渐提高,而且MK的增强和阻隔作用都优于PS;MK与PS并用填充时,混合物填充NR复合材料的阻隔性能、拉伸模量和拉伸强度都优于MK、PS单独填充的NR复合材料,填料并用更有效地改善了NR复合材料的气体阻隔性能和力学性能.

  4. Linear low-density polyethylene/silica micro- and nanocomposites: dynamic rheological measurements and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Linear low-density polyethylene (LLDPE based composites were prepared by melt compounding with 1, 2, 3 and 4 vol% of various kinds of amorphous silicon dioxide (SiO2 micro- and nanoparticles. Dynamic rheological tests in parallel plate configuration were conducted in order to detect the role of the filler morphology on the rheological behaviour of the resulting micro- and nanocomposites. A strong dependence of the rheological parameters from the filler surface area was highlighted, with a remarkable enhancement of the storage shear modulus (G′ and of the viscosity (η in fumed silica nanocomposites and in precipitated silica microcomposites, while glass microbeads only marginally affected the rheological properties of the LLDPE matrix. This result was explained considering the formation of a network structure arising from particle-particle interactions due to hydrogen bonding between silanol groups. A detailed analysis of the solid like behaviour for the filled samples at low frequencies was conducted by fitting viscosity data with a new model, based on a modification of the original De Kee-Turcotte expression performed in order to reach a better modelling of the high-frequency region.

  5. 42 CFR 84.1146 - Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1146 Lead fume test for dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Three non-powered respirators will be tested for a period of...

  6. Occupational rhinitis due to steel welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castano, Roberto; Suarthana, Eva

    2014-12-01

    Exposure to welding fumes is a recognized respiratory hazard. Occupational asthma but not occupational rhinitis has been documented in workers exposed to steel welding fumes. We report a 26-year-old male with work-related rhinitis symptoms as well as lower airways symptoms suggestive of occupational asthma and metal fume fever associated with exposure to steel welding fumes. The diagnosis of occupational rhinitis was confirmed by specific inhalation challenge.

  7. Polyurethane Filler for Electroplating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, J. L.

    1984-01-01

    Polyurethane foam proves suitable as filler for slots in parts electroplated with copper or nickel. Polyurethane causes less contamination of plating bath and of cleaning and filtering tanks than wax fillers used previously. Direct cost of maintenance and indirect cost of reduced operating time during tank cleaning also reduced.

  8. Rheology of Filler Rubber: Silica-Silicone

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-25

    Elsinore , Denmark, 1986. 13. Cohen-Addad, J. P. ; Roby, C. ; Sauviat, M. ; Polymer, 26, 1231 (1985). 14. ASTM D 412-87. 15. Chahal, R. S., St. Pierre...Division, Code 1113 Chemistry Division, Code 385 800 North Quincy Street Naval Weapons Center Arlington, Virginia 22217-5000 China Lake , CA 93555-6001

  9. Effect of Mineral Admixtures on Alkali-Silica Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chengzhi; WANG Aiqin

    2008-01-01

    The influence of silica fume,slag and fly ash on alkali-silica reaction under the condition of 70℃ is studied.The results show that silica,slag and fly ash may inhibit alkali-silica reaction only under suitable content.When the content is less than 10%,silica fume does not markedly influence the expansion of alkali-silica reaction.When the content is 15%-20%,silica fume only may delay the expansion of alkali-silica reaction.When the content is 30%-70%,slag may only delay the expansion of alkali-silica reaction,but cannot inhibit the expansion of alkali-silica reaction.When the content is 10%,fly ash does not markedly influence the expansion of alkali-silica reaction.When the content is 20%-30%,fly ash may only delay the expansion of alkali-silica reaction,but cannot inhibit the expansion of alkali-silica reaction.When the content is over 50%,it is possible that fly ash can inhibit effectively alkali-silica reaction.

  10. Influence of amorphous silica on the hydration in ultra-high performance concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertel, Tina, E-mail: tina.oertel@isc.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Inorganic Chemistry I, Universität Bayreuth, Universitätsstr. 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Helbig, Uta, E-mail: uta.helbig@th-nuernberg.de [Crystallography and X-ray Methods, Technische Hochschule Nürnberg Georg Simon Ohm, Wassertorstraße 10, 90489 Nürnberg (Germany); Hutter, Frank [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Kletti, Holger [Building Materials, Bauhaus–Universität Weimar, Coudraystr. 11, 99423 Weimar (Germany); Sextl, Gerhard [Fraunhofer–Institute for Silicate Research ISC, Neunerplatz 2, 97082 Würzburg (Germany); Chemical Technology of Advanced Materials, Julius Maximilian Universität, Röntgenring 11, 97070 Würzburg (Germany)

    2014-04-01

    Amorphous silica particles (silica) are used in ultra-high performance concretes to densify the microstructure and accelerate the clinker hydration. It is still unclear whether silica predominantly increases the surface for the nucleation of C–S–H phases or dissolves and reacts pozzolanically. Furthermore, varying types of silica may have different and time dependent effects on the clinker hydration. The effects of different silica types were compared in this study by calorimetric analysis, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, in situ X-ray diffraction and compressive strength measurements. The silica component was silica fume, pyrogenic silica or silica synthesized by a wet-chemical route (Stoeber particles). Water-to-cement ratios were 0.23. Differences are observed between the silica for short reaction times (up to 3 days). Results indicate that silica fume and pyrogenic silica accelerate alite hydration by increasing the surface for nucleation of C–S–H phases whereas Stoeber particles show no accelerating effect.

  11. Gas Metal Arc Welding Using Novel CaO-Added Mg Alloy Filler Wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjung Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Novel “ECO Mg” alloys, i.e., CaO-added Mg alloys, which exhibit oxidation resistance during melting and casting processes, even without the use of beryllium or toxic protection gases such as SF6, have recently been introduced. Research on ECO Mg alloys is still continuing, and their application as welding filler metals was investigated in this study. Mechanical and metallurgical aspects of the weldments were analysed after welding, and welding behaviours such as fume generation and droplet transfer were observed during welding. The tensile strength of welds was slightly increased by adding CaO to the filler metal, which resulted from the decreased grain size in the weld metal. When welding Mg alloys, fumes have been unavoidable so far because of the low boiling temperature of Mg. Fume reduction was successfully demonstrated with a wire composed of the novel ECO Mg filler. In addition, stable droplet transfer was observed and spatter suppression could be expected by using CaO-added Mg filler wire.

  12. The influence of filler particles on space charge measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hole, Stephane [Laboratoire des Instruments et Systemes d' Ile de France, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie - 10, rue Vauquelin, 75005 Paris, France (France); Sylvestre, Alain [Laboratoire d' lectrostatique et des Materiaux Dielectriques, CNRS UMR5517 - 25, avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rowe, Stephen [Direction des Recherches Materiaux, Schneider Electric SA - 20, rue Henri Tarze, 38050 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2004-07-07

    The effects of filler particles on the signal measured using the pressure-wave-propagation method to determine the space charge distribution are analysed. A special test sample geometry is used to classify the influence of particles, and in particular, the role of piezoelectricity is discussed. Applications with Epoxy resin samples loaded either by silica or alumina particles are presented. Silica particles are shown to exhibit piezoelectricity which strongly modifies the measured signals.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Silica-Enoxil Nanobiocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzema, Pavlo O.; Laguta, Iryna V.; Stavinskaya, Oksana N.; Kazakova, Olga A.; Borysenko, Mykola V.; Lupaşcu, Tudor

    2016-02-01

    Silica-Enoxil nanobiocomposites with 13 %w of Enoxil were prepared either by mechanical mixing of corresponding powders or by sorptive modification of fumed silica powder with aqueous Enoxil solution under fluidized bed conditions. The interaction of fumed silica with Enoxil and the properties of silica-Enoxil composites have been investigated using IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and quantum chemistry methods, as well as by means of water absorption, Enoxil desorption, and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) test. It has been shown that the main biomolecules of Enoxil composition interact with silica involving their hydroxyl groups and surface silanol groups. The water absorption of silica-Enoxil nanocomposites was found to be less than that for the individual components. The Enoxil biomolecules are readily and completely desorbed from silica surface into water, and the antioxidant activity of desorbed Enoxil is practically the same as that for the just dissolved one.

  14. Effect of presilanization filler decontamination on aesthetics and degradation resistance of resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yasuhiro; Shirai, Kenichi; Shintani, Hideaki; Okazaki, Masayuki; Suzuki, Kazuomi; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2002-12-01

    Filler-matrix coupling determines, to a large extent, the mechanical strength and clinical longevity of dental composites. The aim of this study was to examine how far a methodology to decontaminate filler prior to silanization may improve aesthetic performance in addition to physico-mechanical properties such as degradation resistance. It was reported that filler particles are surrounded and wrapped by a film that consists of multiple layers of silane molecules. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, however, revealed that silanization of filler particles largely depended upon siloxane bridge (Si-O-Si) formation between the silica surface and the silane molecule rather than on intermolecular bonding between adjacent silane molecules. In this study, we showed that filler decontamination resulted in a higher translucency, thereby providing a better aesthetic potential. In addition, experimental composites produced following presilanization decontamination of filler revealed a higher Vickers hardness value and a diametral tensile strength that was resistant to degradation by thermo-cycling.

  15. Effect of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Soichiro; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Hayakawa, Iwao; Loyaga-Rendon, Paola G; Minakuchi, Shunsuke

    2008-11-01

    In this study, the effects of filler type and polishing on the discoloration of composite resin artificial teeth were examined. Four types of experimental resins were prepared: one was a matrix resin, while the others were composite resins containing three different types of fillers (nano-sized silica filler with or without silanization, and prepolymerized filler). Specimens were immersed in distilled water, coffee, red wine, or curry. Color change after immersion was measured using a colorimeter. Color difference values (delta E) and changes in translucency parameter (delta TP) were statistically analyzed using three-way ANOVA and Tukey's comparison. On the influence of the polishing factor, statistically significant differences were neither observed in delta E nor delta TP between polished and non-polished tooth surfaces. On the contrary, the influences of filler type and discoloration medium, and their interaction thereof, were significant. With unsilanized filler, the delta E value of composite resin artificial teeth was significantly increased.

  16. 填料对聚硫密封剂耐水性能的影响%Effect of filler on water resistance of polysulfide sealants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘嘉

    2012-01-01

    This piper is focused on the effect of different fillers on mechanical properties and adhesion properties of polysulfide sealant after soaking in water.After water resistance experiments,it was found that the polysulfide sealants filled with calcined kaolin,fumed silica or wished kaolin had the best water resistance ,the second was as follows :precipitated calcium carbonate.ground calcium carbonate and precipitated silica.The mechanical properties of polysulfide sealant filled with TiO2 or talcum powder changed greatly.The adhesive failure would occur when the polysulfide sealant was filled with silica. And the polysulfide sealant filled with calcined kaolin had the best adhesion property.%选择8种常规无机填料,考查了填料对聚硫密封剂力学性能和粘接性能的影响.耐水试验后发现填充煅烧高岭土、气相SiO2、水洗高岭土的密封剂耐水性能最优,其次是轻质CaCO3、重质CaCO3、沉淀SiO2,填充TiO2和滑石粉的密封剂性能变化较大.二氧化硅填料单独使用对粘接性能影响大,出现脱粘现象,煅烧高岭土为填料时剥离强度变化最小.

  17. Perspectives for Titanium-Derived Fillers Usage on Denture Base Composite Construction: A Review Article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidal W. Elshereksi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA is an extensively used material in dentistry because of its aesthetics, processability, and reparability. However, PMMA is still far from being ideal in fulfilling the mechanical requirements of prosthesis. PMMA-based denture base polymers exhibit low fracture resistance and radiopacity behavior. Efforts to improve the mechanical and radiopacity properties of denture base materials through inclusion of silica-based fillers are ongoing. Although silane-treated siliceous fillers are commonly used, they are not sufficiently strong. They also exhibit cracks, which either cut through the glass fillers or propagate around the filler particles. This defect occurs when the dental composites are placed in aqueous oral environment because of the hydrolytic degradation of silica-based fillers and silane-coupling agents. The clinical problem of using silanes in adhesion promotion is bond degradation over time in oral environment. In addition, silanes do not bond effectively to nonsilica-based dental restorative materials. This review presents titanium-derived fillers as alternatives to siliceous fillers. Titanate-coupling agents are found to be effective couplers in treating Ti-based fillers because of their chemical compatibility and relatively high stability in aqueous environment.

  18. A Simple, Transparent Fume Hood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericks, John

    1998-10-01

    An inexpensive transparent fume hood can be constructed from a clear-plastic two-liter soft drink bottle that is cut just above the base. A length of vacuum tubing is secured to the opening of the bottle using black electrical tape. The tubing is then connected to a water aspirator. Beakers or flasks easily fit inside the bottle, and the bottle may be secured with a clamp and ring stand for added stability. This device has been used to collect the noxious NO2 gas generated from the reaction of copper metal with nitric acid. It also may be used in the collection of other gases. It should not be used to collect gases that are not water-soluble or in experiments that involve open flames.

  19. Design for a Miniature Portable Fume Hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Ronald A.; Wait, Samuel C., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    Describes the design of undergraduate chemical laboratory fume hoods. Proves that folding the sides and top permit the hood and its duct hose to be stored in a standard 18-inch-wide laboratory cabinet. (WRM)

  20. Visibly transparent and radiopaque inorganic organic composites from flame-made mixed-oxide fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maedler, Lutz [University of California, Los Angeles, Department of Chemical Engineering (United States)], E-mail: lutz@seas.ucla.edu; Krumeich, Frank [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences (Switzerland); Burtscher, Peter; Moszner, Norbert [Ivoclar Vivadent AG (Liechtenstein)

    2006-08-15

    Radiopaque composites have been produced from flame-made ytterbium/silica mixed oxide within a crosslinked methacrylate resin matrix. The refractive index of the filler powder increased with ytterbium oxide loading. A high transparency was achieved for a matching refractive index of the filler powder and the polymer in comparison to commercial materials with 52 wt% ceramic filling. It was demonstrated that powder homogeneity with regard to particle morphology and distribution of the individual metal atoms is essential to obtain a highly transparent composite. In contrast, segregation of crystalline single-oxide phases drastically decreased the composite transparency despite similar specific surface areas, refractive indices and overall composition. The superior physical strength, transparency and radiopacity compared to composites made from conventional silica based-fillers makes the flame-made mixed-oxide fillers especially attractive for dental restoration materials.

  1. Visibly transparent & radiopaque inorganic organic composites from flame-made mixed-oxide fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mädler, Lutz; Krumeich, Frank; Burtscher, Peter; Moszner, Norbert

    2006-08-01

    Radiopaque composites have been produced from flame-made ytterbium/silica mixed oxide within a crosslinked methacrylate resin matrix. The refractive index of the filler powder increased with ytterbium oxide loading. A high transparency was achieved for a matching refractive index of the filler powder and the polymer in comparison to commercial materials with 52 wt% ceramic filling. It was demonstrated that powder homogeneity with regard to particle morphology and distribution of the individual metal atoms is essential to obtain a highly transparent composite. In contrast, segregation of crystalline single-oxide phases drastically decreased the composite transparency despite similar specific surface areas, refractive indices and overall composition. The superior physical strength, transparency and radiopacity compared to composites made from conventional silica based-fillers makes the flame-made mixed-oxide fillers especially attractive for dental restoration materials.

  2. The challenges of silica-silane reinforcement of natural rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dierkes, W.K.; Sarkawi, S.S.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, highly-dispersible silica has become the preferred alternative to carbon-black as reinforcing filler for low rolling-resistance tires. However, the application of this filler system is so far limited to passenger car tires, as their treads contain styrene butadiene rubber (SBR). In

  3. WOOD COLOR CHANGES BY AMMONIA FUMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Miklečić,

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the influence of ammonia gas on wood color changes in response to an increasing demand for dark colored wood specimens. The darker wood color in ammonia fuming is accomplished through chemical reactions between ammonia gas and wood compounds. We exposed oak, maple, spruce, and larch wood samples to ammonia gas for 16 days. During fuming, the color changes were studied using CIE L*a*b* parameters. After fuming, the changes in extractives content, tannin, and nitrogen content were analyzed. The chemical changes of wood and residues of wood extractives after fuming were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. Oak wood reacted intensively with ammonia gas in a very short time, and the darkening was prominent for all the investigated wood species. It was established that tannin had no major influence on color changes of maple and larch wood in the ammonia-fuming process. The FTIR spectra of fumed wood indicated involvement of carbonyl groups, and the FTIR spectra of wood extractives indicated involvement of carbonyl, aromatic, and alcohol groups in reaction with ammonia gas.

  4. A novel technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks using the filler press and monomer infiltration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Koichi; Kameya, Takehiro; Ishino, Hiroshige; Hayakawa, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    The authors have developed a new technique for preparing dental CAD/CAM composite resin blocks (CRBs): the filler press and monomer infiltration (FPMI) method. In this method, surface-treated filler is molded into a green body in which the filler particles are compressed to form an agglomeration. The green body is then infiltrated with a monomer mixture before being polymerized. It is possible to produce CRBs using this method through which densely packed nanofiller is uniformly dispersed. The greater the pressure of the filler molding, the more filler in the CRB, resulting at high pressure in a very dense CRB. A CRB obtained by applying 170 MPa of pressure contained up to 70 wt% of nano-silica filler and had a flexural strength of 200 MPa, as well. It is anticipated that CRBs obtained using the FPMI method will be useful as a dental CAD/CAM material for the fabrication of permanent crown restorations.

  5. Asphalt fume dermal carcinogenicity potential: I. dermal carcinogenicity evaluation of asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles R; Burnett, Donald M; Parker, Craig M; Arp, Earl W; Swanson, Mark S; Minsavage, Gary D; Kriech, Anthony J; Osborn, Linda V; Freeman, James J; Barter, Robert A; Newton, Paul E; Beazley, Shelley L; Stewart, Christopher W

    2011-10-01

    Asphalt (bitumen) fume condensates collected from the headspace above paving and Type III built up roofing asphalt (BURA) tanks were evaluated in two-year dermal carcinogenicity assays in male C3H/HeNCrl mice. A third sample was generated from the BURA using a NIOSH laboratory generation method. Similar to earlier NIOSH studies, the BURA fume condensates were applied dermally in mineral oil twice per week; the paving sample was applied 7 days/week for a total weekly dose of 50 mg/wk in both studies. A single benign papilloma was observed in a group of 80 mice exposed to paving fume condensate at the end of the two-year study and only mild skin irritation was observed. The lab generated BURA fume condensate resulted in statistically significant (P<0.0001) increases in squamous cell carcinomas (35 animals or 55% of animals at risk). The field-matched BURA condensate showed a weaker but significant (P=0.0063) increase (8 carcinomas or 13% of animals) and a longer average latency (90 weeks vs. 76 for the lab fume). Significant irritation was observed in both BURA condensates. It is concluded that the paving fume condensate was not carcinogenic under the test conditions and that the field-matched BURA fume condensate produced a weak tumor response compared to the lab generated sample.

  6. [Rhinoplasty and dermal fillers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jallut, Y; Nguyen, P S

    2014-12-01

    The use of fillers for camouflage after surgical rhinoplasty or during medical rhinoplasty process represent an attractive technique which allows to avoid or to delay surgical time often dreaded by the patients. This technique apparently quite simple, must be applied carefully in order to avoid possible complications that can sometimes be very serious. Through their seven years of experience, the authors have selected absorbable type of products: hyaluronic acid or calcium hydroxylapatite, both approved by ANSM. Preference is given to microcannulas (27G) over needles and injection techniques through multiple tunnels fitted with small fragmented boluses. Due to possible Tyndall effect and skin necrosis risk, a one-shot injection with a lot of product should be avoided. Calcium hydroxyapaptite is preferred for the dorsum area while hyaluronic acid is recommended for the tip. The authors also relate the major encountered complications and describe the appropriated treatments. Nevertheless the strict application of the described technique represents the best way to prevent adverse complications.

  7. Effects of silane-modified fillers on properties of dental composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydınoğlu, Aysu; Yoruç, Afife Binnaz Hazar

    2017-10-01

    The effect of silanization on the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties of dental composites was investigated. Silica fillers were obtained from colloidal silica solution, Ludox® HS-40 and they were silanized by using 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) in an acidic media. Mineralogical and chemical structures of unsilanized and silanized fillers were determined by using XRD and FT-IR analyses. The modification of unsilanized/silanized fillers were investigated by performing XPS and TGA analyses. The morphological evaluations, surface area, and particle size measurements were performed by using SEM, BET, and Zeta-Sizer, respectively. Eventually, pure and amorphous silica fillers were obtained. Furthermore, the weight percentage of the silane in silica/silane structure was compatible with theoretical values. SEM images, surface area, and particle size measurements showed that agglomeration tendencies of silanized fillers were lower compared to silanized fillers because of the MPTMS addition. Experimental composites (5/10/10/5BisGMA/HEMA/UDMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 70wt% silanized/unsilanized SiO2) were fabricated into 4mm diameter×6mm thick discs for compressive strength (CS), angular flexural strength (AFS), curing depth (CD), and polymerization shrinkage (PS) on a 25×2×2mm rectangular Teflon mold for flexural strength (FS) and modulus of elasticity (E) tests. The curing depth (CD) and degree of polymerization percentage (DP) of composites were determined. Consequently, results showed that mechanical properties and DP of composite resins can be greatly influenced by silanization as a result of the organic matrix-inorganic filler interface bonding formed by silane structures. Despite of these findings, silanization of the SiO2 was not effected DC and PS values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Whisker-reinforced dental core buildup composites: effect of filler level on mechanical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H; Smith, D T; Schumacher, G E; Eichmiller, F C

    2000-12-15

    The strength and toughness of dental core buildup composites in large stress-bearing restorations need to be improved to reduce the incidence of fracture due to stresses from chewing and clenching. The aims of the present study were to develop novel core buildup composites reinforced with ceramic whiskers, to examine the effect of filler level, and to investigate the reinforcement mechanisms. Silica particles were fused onto the whiskers to facilitate silanization and to roughen the whisker surface for improved retention in the matrix. Filler level was varied from 0 to 70%. Flexural strength, compressive strength, and fracture toughness of the composites were measured. A nano-indentation system was used to measure elastic modulus and hardness. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the fracture surfaces of specimens. Whisker filler level had significant effects on composite properties. The flexural strength in MPa (mean +/- SD; n = 6) increased from (95+/-15) for the unfilled resin to (193+/- 8) for the composite with 50% filler level, then slightly decreased to (176+/-12) at 70% filler level. The compressive strength increased from (149+/-33) for the unfilled resin to (282+/-48) at 10% filler level, and remained equivalent from 10 to 70% filler level. Both the modulus and hardness increased monotonically with filler level. In conclusion, silica particle-fused ceramic single-crystalline whiskers significantly reinforced dental core buildup composites. The reinforcement mechanisms appeared to be crack deflection and bridging by the whiskers. Whisker filler level had significant effects on the flexural strength, compressive strength, elastic modulus, and hardness of composites.

  9. Hybrid Polyamide/Silica Nanocomposites : Synthesis and Mechanical Testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zyl, W.E.; Garcia, M.; Schrauwen, B.A.G.; Kooi, B.J.; De Hosson, Jeff Th.M.; Verweij, H.

    2002-01-01

    A hybrid inorganic-polymer composite was formed through nanosize silica filler particles (<30 nm) that were incorporated inside a nylon-6 matrix. The composite was microtomed and examined with TEM which revealed that the silica particles were well dispersed and non-aggregated. Optimization of the sy

  10. Persistence of Change: Fume Hood Campaign Lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, Elah; Robinson, Jennifer; Wakefield, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Sustainability initiatives typically operate for a limited time period, but it is often unclear whether they have lasting effects. The purpose of this paper is to examine a laboratory fume hood campaign, in order to identify factors that might contribute or detract from long-term change persistence. Design/methodology/approach: The…

  11. Plasma polymerization of acetylene onto silica: an approach to control the distribution of silica in single elastomers and immiscible blends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tiwari, M.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.; Ooij, W.J.; Dierkes, W.K.

    2008-01-01

    Surface modification of silica by acetylene plasma polymerization is applied in order to improve the dispersion in and compatibility with single rubbers and their blends. Silica, used as a reinforcing filler for elastomers, is coated with a polyacetylene (PA) film under vacuum conditions. Water pene

  12. Morphological, rheological and electrochemical studies ofpoly(ethylene oxide) electrolytes containing fumed silicananoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jiangbing; Kerr, John B.; Duan, Robert G.; Han, Yongbong

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, the rheology and crystallization of composite Poly(Ethylene Oxide) (PEO) electrolytes were studied by dynamic mechanical analysis, DSC and polarized light microscopy. The effects of fumed silica nanoparticles on the conductivities of the polymer electrolytes at temperatures above and below their melting point were measured and related to their rheology and crystallization behavior, respectively. The electrolyte/electrode interfacial properties and cycling performances of the composite polymer electrolytes in Li/Li cells are also discussed. The measured electrochemical properties were found to depend heavily on the operational environments and sample processing history.

  13. Characterization of Nanocomposite filler Morphology using Ultra Small-Angle X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Justice, Ryan S.; Schaefer, Dale W. (UCIN); (AFRL)

    2010-10-22

    Loading polymer matrices with nanoscale fillers is widely believed to have the potential to push polymer properties to extreme values. Realization of anticipated properties, however, has proven elusive. Recent nanocomposite research suggests better characterization of the large-scale morphology will provide insight explaining these shortfalls. This work will present ultra-small angle X-ray scattering as a viable tool for elucidating the hierarchical filler morphology that exists within polymer nanocomposites. Scattering analysis tools developed by our group will be applied to scattering data from nanocomposites filled with carbon nanotubes, layered silicates, and colloidal silica. The relationship between imaging data and scattering data will be discussed in the context of filler dispersion. Finally, the impact of large-scale filler morphology on mechanical and electrical properties will be discussed.

  14. A simple method for fabrication of filler-free stretchable polydimethylsiloxane surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacharouche, Jalal; Kunemann, Philippe; Fioux, Philippe; Vallat, Marie-France; Lalevée, Jacques [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Hemmerlé, Joseph [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, I.N.S.E.R.M. – Unite 595, 11, Rue Humann, 67085 Strasbourg Cedex (France); Roucoules, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Roucoules@uha.fr [Institut de Sciences des Materiaux de Mulhouse, IS2M – C.N.R.S., LRC 7228 – UHA, 15, Rue Jean Starcky, 68057 Mulhouse Cedex (France)

    2013-04-01

    We propose a simple method to elaborate a filler-free stretchable PDMS surface strong enough to resist to successive elongation/retraction cycles even at high degree of stretching. It consists in creating free radicals on a filler-containing PDMS surface by argon plasma exposure and reacting them with a filler-free PDMS resin during the crosslinking step. Changes of physical and chemical properties upon plasma modification are monitored by FTIR and XPS spectroscopies, contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is used to identify the nature of radicals involved in interfacial bonding. Although a brittle silica-like layer is created on the filler-containing PDMS surface after plasma treatment, an increase in the PDMS/PDMS interfacial strength is observed and a high interfacial resistance has been found under elongation/retraction (stretching/relaxation) cycles.

  15. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Oleksy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS. The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM.

  16. Epoxy Resin Composite Based on Functional Hybrid Fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksy, Mariusz; Szwarc-Rzepka, Karolina; Heneczkowski, Maciej; Oliwa, Rafał; Jesionowski, Teofil

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out involving the filling of epoxy resin (EP) with bentonites and silica modified with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). The method of homogenization and the type of filler affect the functional and canceling properties of the composites was determined. The filler content ranged from 1.5% to 4.5% by mass. The basic mechanical properties of the hybrid composites were found to improve, and, in particular, there was an increase in tensile strength by 44%, and in Charpy impact strength by 93%. The developed hybrid composites had characteristics typical of polymer nanocomposites modified by clays, with a fine plate morphology of brittle fractures observed by SEM, absence of a plate separation peak in Wide Angles X-ray Scattering (WAXS) curves, and an exfoliated structure observed by TEM. PMID:28788177

  17. Influence of silane content and filler distribution on chemical-mechanical properties of resin composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tathy Aparecida XAVIER

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of silane concentration and filler size distribution on the chemical-mechanical properties of experimental composites. Experimental composites with silane contents of 0%, 1% and 3% (in relation to filler mass and composites with mixtures of barium glass particles (median size = 0.4, 1 and 2 μm and nanometric silica were prepared for silane and filler analyses, respectively. The degree of conversion (DC was analyzed by FTIR. Biaxial flexural strength (BFS was tested after 24-h or 90-d storage in water, and fracture toughness, after 24 h. The data were subjected to ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p = 0.05. The DC was not significantly affected by the silane content or filler distribution. The 0% silane group had the lowest immediate BFS, and the 90-d storage time reduced the strength of the 0% and 3% groups. BFS was not affected by filler distribution, and aging decreased the BFS of all the groups. Silanization increased the fracture toughness of both the 1% and 3% groups, similarly. Significantly higher fracture toughness was observed for mixtures with 2 μm glass particles. Based on the results, 3% silane content boosted the initial strength, but was more prone to degradation after water storage. Variations in the filler distribution did not affect BFS, but fracture toughness was significantly improved by increasing the filler size.

  18. Methemoglobinemia secondary to automobile exhaust fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laney, R.F.; Hoffman, R.S. (Department of Emergency Medicine, Morristown Memorial Hospital, NJ (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Methemoglobinemia is an uncommon cause of cyanosis. A 28-year-old male presented to the emergency department cyanotic and short of breath after exposure to noxious automobile fumes. He did not improve with the administration of 100% oxygen therapy. The initial arterial blood gas with cooximetry was: pH of 7.38, PaCO2 of 43 mm Hg, PaO2 of 118 mm Hg, measured oxygen saturation of 70%, and a methemoglobin level of 24.8%. Methylene blue was given (2 mg/kg intravenously) and the patient's symptoms resolved. On the following day he was discharged home without complication. A comprehensive review of the literature revealed no reported cases of methemoglobinemia secondary to accidental exposure to exhaust fumes.17 references.

  19. Characterisation of fume from hyperbaric welding operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, John A S; Semple, Sean [Environmental and Occupational Medicine, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger [ELEGI Colt Laboratory, University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Kelly, Frank [Lung Biology Group, Kings College, University of London (United Kingdom); Seldmann, Joerg; Raab, Andrea, E-mail: j.a.ross@abdn.ac.u [Trace Element Speciation Laboratory, University of Aberdeen (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-01

    We report preliminary work characterising dust from hyperbaric welding trials carried out at increased pressure in a helium and oxygen atmosphere. Particle size and concentration were measured during welding. Samples for quartz and metal analysis and toxicity assessment were taken from a filter in the local fume extraction system. The residue of dust after metal extraction by nitric acid in hydrogen peroxide predominantly a non-metallic white powder assumed to be dust from welding rod coatings and thermal insulation material. Metallic analysis showed predominantly calcium, from the welding rod coating, and period 4 transition metals such as iron, manganese, magnesium and titanium (inductively coupled mass spectrometry, Agilent 7500c). The presence of zirconium indicated a contribution from grinding. The fume was nanoparticulate in nature with a mean particle diameter of 20-30 nm (MSI Inc WPS 1000XP). It showed an intermediate level of oxidative potential regarding the low-molecular weight respiratory tract lining fluid antioxidants ascorbate and glutathione and caused release of the inflammatory marker IL-8 in a human lung A 549 epithelial cell culture with no indication of cytotoxicity. The study findings have strong implications for the measurement techniques needed to assess fume exposure in hyperbaric welding and the provision of respiratory protection.

  20. Nanoscale confinement and interfacial effects on the dynamics and glass transition/crystallinity of thin adsorbed films on silica nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathingal, Rajesh Raman

    The research investigated in this dissertation has focused on understanding the structure-property-function relationships of polymer nanocomposites. The properties of composite systems are dictated by the properties of their components, typically fillers in a polymer matrix. In nanocomposites, the polymer near an interface has significantly different properties compared with the bulk polymer, and the contribution of the adsorbed polymer to composite properties becomes increasingly important as the filler size decreases. Despite many reports of highly favorable properties, the behavior of polymer nanocomposites is not generally predictable, and thus requires a better understanding of the interfacial region. The ability to tailor the filler/matrix interaction and an understanding of the impact of the interface on macroscopic properties are keys in the design of nanocomposite properties. In this original work the surface of silica nanoparticles was tailored by: (a) Changing the number of sites for polymer attachment by varying the surface silanols and, (b) By varying the size/curvature of nanoparticles. The effect of surface tailoring on the dynamic properties after the adsorption of two model polymers, amorphous polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and semicrystalline polyethylene oxide (PEO) was observed. The interphase layer of polymers adsorbed to silica surfaces is affected by the surface silanol density as well as the relative size of the polymer compared with the size of the adsorbing substrate. The non-equilibrium adsorption of PMMA onto individual colloidal Stober silica (SiO2) particles, where Rparticle (100nm) > RPMMA (˜6.5nm) was compared with the adsorption onto fumed silica, where Rparticle (7nm) ˜ RPMMA (6.5nm) bridging of PMMA between aggregates occurred. The anchoring point densities were comparable to the silanol densities, suggesting that PMMA adsorbed as trains rather than loops. For hydrophilic SiO2, Tg increased with [SiOH], as more carbonyl groups

  1. Surface Modification of Fillers and Curatives by Plasma Polymerization for Enhanced Performance of Single Rubbers and Dissimilar Rubber/Rubber Blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordermeer, J. W. M.; Datta, R. N.; Dierkes, W. K.; Guo, R.; Mathew, T.; Talma, A. G.; Tiwari, M.; van Ooij, W.

    Plasma polymerization is a technique for modifying the surface characteristics of fillers and curatives for rubber from essentially polar to nonpolar. Acetylene, thiophene, and pyrrole are employed to modify silica and carbon black reinforcing fillers. Silica is easy to modify because its surface contains siloxane and silanol species. On carbon black, only a limited amount of plasma deposition takes place, due to its nonreactive nature. Oxidized gas blacks, with larger oxygen functionality, and particularly carbon black left over from fullerene production, show substantial plasma deposition. Also, carbon/silica dual-phase fillers react well because the silica content is reactive. Elemental sulfur, the well-known vulcanization agent for rubbers, can also be modified reasonably well.

  2. Multi-scale analysis of the effect of nano-filler particle diameter on the physical properties of CAD/CAM composite resin blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Inoue, Sayuri; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Kitagawa, Haruaki; Imazato, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of silica nano-filler particle diameters in a computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM) composite resin (CR) block on physical properties at the multi-scale in silico. CAD/CAM CR blocks were modeled, consisting of silica nano-filler particles (20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 nm) and matrix (Bis-GMA/TEGDMA), with filler volume contents of 55.161%. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios for the block at macro-scale were analyzed by homogenization. Macro-scale CAD/CAM CR blocks (3 × 3 × 3 mm) were modeled and compressive strengths were defined when the fracture loads exceeded 6075 N. MPS values of the nano-scale models were compared by localization analysis. As the filler size decreased, Young's moduli and compressive strength increased, while Poisson's ratios and MPS decreased. All parameters were significantly correlated with the diameters of the filler particles (Pearson's correlation test, r = -0.949, 0.943, -0.951, 0.976, p CAD/CAM CR blocks can be enhanced by loading silica nanofiller particles of smaller diameter. CAD/CAM CR blocks by using smaller silica nano-filler particles have a potential to increase fracture resistance.

  3. Health hazards from inhalation of metal fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscator, M.

    1976-04-01

    Hazards to the health of workers exposed to metal fumes in high-temperature industrial operations (such as in shipyards) are detailed. After oxidation, the metals appear as submicron particles which are deposited in various parts of the respiratory system. Mixed exposures and a wide variety of symptoms may occur, depending on the type of metal and the intensity and duration of exposure. The major metal may not always be the most dangerous. Two of the most hazardous metals are lead and cadmium, the former being well recognized but still a problem, the latter often unrecognized but capable of causing severe, acute or chronic disease. (RFC)

  4. Genotoxicity of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P F; Chiang, T A; Ko, Y C; Lee, H

    1999-02-01

    Epidemiologic investigations of lung cancer among Taiwanese nonsmoking women have found that exposure to fumes from cooking oils may be an important risk factor. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils (lard, soybean, and peanut oils) often used in Taiwan for preparing Chinese meals were collected for genotoxicity analysis in SOS chromotest and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays. The induction factors of the SOS chromotest in Escherichia coli PQ 37 were dependent on the concentrations of lard and soybean cooking oil extracts without S9 mix. In addition, when CHO-K1 cells were exposed to condensates of cooking oil fumes for 12 h, SCEs showed a dose-related increase in extracts of lard and soybean oil fumes. This result provides experimental evidence and is in accordance with the findings of epidemiologic studies that women exposed to the emitted fumes of cooking oils are at an increase risk of contracting lung cancer. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Maintenance and Testing of Fume Cupboard

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussein, Falah H.; Al-Dahhan, Wedad H.; Al-Zuhairi, Ali Jassim; Rodda, Kabrena E.; Yousif, Emad

    2017-01-01

    Scientists at universities across Iraq are actively working to report actual incidents and accidents occurring in their laboratories, as well as structural improvements made to improve safety and security, to raise awareness and encourage openness, leading to widespread adoption of robust Chemical Safety and Security (CSS) practices. This manuscript highlights the importance of periodic maintenance on fume cupboards, and is the fourth in a series of five case studies describing laboratory incidents, accidents, and laboratory improvements. In this study, we describe a situation in which the ventilation capacity of the fume cupboard in the undergraduate chemistry laboratories at Al-Nahrain University had decreased to an unacceptable level. The CSS Committee investigated and found the ducting system had been blocked by plastic sheets and dead birds. All the ducts have since been cleaned, and four extra ventilation fans have been installed to further increase ventilation capacity. By openly sharing what happened along with the lessons learned from the accident, we hope to minimize the possibility of another researcher being injured in a similar incident in the future.

  6. Soy-based fillers for thermoset composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Paula

    Considerable work has been done with bio-based fillers in thermoplastics. Wood dust has been used for decades in wood plastic composites in conjunction with recycled high HDPE and PET. In recent years rapidly renewable fillers derived from dried distillery grains and from wood have been introduced commercially for thermoset polymers. These fillers provide bio-content and weight reduction to thermoset molding compounds but issues with moisture absorption and polymerization inhibition have limited their commercial acceptance. The intent of this research was to develop a bio-based filler suitable for thermoset composites. This filler would provide a low density alternative to mined mineral filler, such as CaCO3 or clay. Composites made with these fillers would be lighter in weight, which is desirable for many markets, particularly transportation. Cost parity to the mineral fillers, on a volume basis, was desirable and the use of green chemistry principles was a key objective of the project. This work provides a basis from which further development of modified soy flours as fillers for thermoset composites will continue. Biomass has been evaluated as fillers for thermoset composites since the early 1980s but failed to gain commercial acceptance due to excessive water absorption and inhibition issues with free radical curing. Biomass, with a large percentage of carbohydrates, are very hydrophilic due to their abundance of hydroxyl groups, while biomass, high in lignin, resulted in inhibition of the free radical cure of the unsaturated styrenated polyester matrix systems. Generally protein use as a filler is not desirable due to its food value. Torrefaction has proved to be a good, cost effective, process to reduce hydrophilicity of high cellulose feedstock. Surprising, however, some levels of torrefaction were found to induce the inhibition effect of the filler. Scientific inquiry into this problem proved that aromatics form during the torrefaction process and can

  7. Filler leachability of composites stored in distilled water or artificial saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderholm, K J; Mukherjee, R; Longmate, J

    1996-09-01

    Though dental composite materials leach filler elements when stored in distilled water, it is not known whether similar leaching occurs in saliva. The hypothesis to be tested was that due to ion exchange occurring at the filler surfaces, more filler elements leach from composites stored in a salt solution simulating saliva than from composites stored in distilled water. Another aim was to determine how matrix selection, filler composition, and filler silanization affect filler leachability of composites after storage in the simulated saliva and water media. We made 128 batches of experimental composites. Half of these used a bis-GMA/TEGDMA matrix and the other a UEDMA/TEGDMA matrix. Either silica or barium glass filler particles were incorporated into these matrices. Filler silanization was followed by a filler drying at 60 degrees C for 24 h. Half of the silanized particles received an additional heat treatment for 1 h at 110 degrees C in vacuum. One specimen per batch was stored in distilled water and the other in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. After each 30-day interval for one year, the specimens were transferred to either freshly distilled water or newly mixed artificial saliva. The "old" solutions were analyzed by ICP for determination of the Si, Ba, and Al concentrations. Analysis of variance revealed that storage solution, filler composition, and total time in the storage solution had strong effects on the leachability (p water) and 2.80 +/- 1.20 microgram/mL (artificial saliva). For barium-glass-filled composites, the corresponding Si leaching values were 0.73 +/- 0.48 microgram/mL and 5.00 +/- 2.20 microgram/mL. The monthly means of the barium leaching values were 2.00 +/- 1.00 microgram/mL (distilled water) and 3.10 +/- 1.80 microgram/mL (artificial saliva). The large difference between leaching in artificial saliva and in distilled water, as well as the interaction between storage medium and filler, cast doubt on the clinical relevance of in vitro

  8. Reinforcement of natural rubber hybrid composites based on marble sludge/Silica and marble sludge/rice husk derived silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalil Ahmed

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A research has been carried out to develop natural rubber (NR hybrid composites reinforced with marble sludge (MS/Silica and MS/rice husk derived silica (RHS. The primary aim of this development is to scrutinize the cure characteristics, mechanical and swelling properties of such hybrid composite. The use of both industrial and agricultural waste such as marble sludge and rice husk derived silica has the primary advantage of being eco-friendly, low cost and easily available as compared to other expensive fillers. The results from this study showed that the performance of NR hybrid composites with MS/Silica and MS/RHS as fillers is extremely better in mechanical and swelling properties as compared with the case where MS used as single filler. The study suggests that the use of recently developed silica and marble sludge as industrial and agricultural waste is accomplished to provide a probable cost effective, industrially prospective, and attractive replacement to the in general purpose used fillers like china clay, calcium carbonate, and talc.

  9. Effect of Silane Treatment on Hybridized Use of Short Cellulose Fibers and Silica Particles for Natural Rubber Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopattananon, Natinee; Jitkalong, Dolmalik; Seadan, Manus; Sakai, Tadamoto

    Processability, swelling and tensile properties of natural-rubber-based hybrid composites prepared by mixing short cellulose fibers and fine silica particles of equal contents with total loading of 20 phr using a two-roll mill were analyzed. Their properties were compared with those of natural rubber reinforced with single filler (silica or cellulose fiber) and corresponding unfilled natural rubber. The tensile test showed the reinforcing effect of both single filler system and hybrid filler system in relation to natural rubber. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of hybrid composites generally laid between those of fiber-reinforced and silica-reinforced natural rubber composites, whereas the elongation at break of hybrid composites was equal to that of single filler reinforcement system. The Mooney viscosity of silica-filled compound was much higher than that of unfilled natural rubber and short fiber-filled compounds, and was significantly reduced when hybridized fillers were used. Furthermore, a silane coupling agent, Si 69, was used to modify the surface properties of cellulose fibers and silica particles. Three microscopic evaluation techniques, that is, elemental X-ray mapping (EDX), 3D microfocus X-ray scanning, and N-ARC methods were applied to investigate the filler dispersion/mixing effects. It was found that both of the fillers were more homogeneously dispersed in the hybrid composites, and the affinity between the fillers and natural rubber was improved after the silane treatment. The results from this work suggested that the better dispersion of short cellulose fiber/silica hybrid fillers had great advantages in rubber processing, and allowed for equal or higher composite strength compared to a simply silica-filled composite system.

  10. [Analysis on oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, De-Sheng; Kuang, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Xin; Dai, Fei-Hong

    2012-06-01

    By measuring the particulate matter of oil fume which is over 10 microm or below 10 microm separately and using microradiography and Electrical Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI), it is found out the distributing characteristic of oil fume particles in catering industry cooking emission. The result shows that the diameter of the oil fume particles which was sedimentated in the kitchen is between 10-400 microm, the concentration peak value is between 10-100 microm. The diameter of oil fume aerosol is mostly smaller than 1 microm, while the concentration peak value is between 0.063-0.109 microm. In addition, the mass concentration peak value is between 6.560-9.990 microm. Through the analysis to the physical characteristics of oil fume from catering industry cooking emissions, the eigenvalue of the oil fume has been found and the feature matter for monitoring the oil fume has been discovered to provide a reasonable standard for controlling and monitoring the catering industry cooking emission.

  11. Bitumen fume-induced gene expression profile in rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gate, Laurent; Langlais, Cristina; Micillino, Jean-Claude; Nunge, Hervé; Bottin, Marie-Claire; Wrobel, Richard; Binet, Stéphane

    2006-08-15

    Exposure to bitumen fumes during paving and roofing activities may represent an occupational health risk. To date, most of the studies performed on the biological effect of asphalt fumes have been done with regard to their content in carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). In order to gain an additional insight into the mechanisms of action of bitumen fumes, we studied their pulmonary effects in rodents following inhalation using the microarray technology. Fisher 344 rats were exposed for 5 days, 6 h/day to bitumen fumes generated at road paving temperature (170 degrees C) using a nose-only exposition device. With the intention of studying the early transcriptional events induced by asphalt fumes, lung tissues were collected immediately following exposure and gene expression profiles in control and exposed rats were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays. Data analysis revealed that genes involved in lung inflammatory response as well as genes associated with PAH metabolization and detoxification were highly expressed in bitumen-exposed animals. In addition, the expression of genes related to elastase activity and its inhibition which are associated with emphysema was also modulated. More interestingly genes coding for monoamine oxidases A and B involved in the metabolism of neurotransmitters and xenobiotics were downregulated in exposed rats. Altogether, these data give additional information concerning the bitumen fumes biological effects and would allow to better review the health effects of occupational asphalt fumes exposure.

  12. Raman study of the formation of beta silicomolybdic acid supported on silica, prepared by impregnation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuc, Nguyen Huu Huy; Ohkita, Hironobu; Mizushima, Takanori; Kakuta, Noriyoshi

    2012-12-01

    Beta silicomolibdic acid/silica (β-SMA, a metastable form of silicomolybdic acid - H4SiMo12O40) forms by the impregnation of fumed silica into molybdenum solution obtained by hydrolyzation of MoO2Cl2. β-SMA/silica is found to be stable up to 300 °C after calcination for 1 h due to the existence of an interlayer MoO3 between silica surface and β-SMA. Structures of molybdenum species in the preparation process (including precursor solution) were analyzed by Raman spectroscopy and XRD.

  13. Control of Cr6+ emissions from gas metal arc welding using a silica precursor as a shielding gas additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Huang, Joyce; Yu, Kuei-Min; Hsu, Yu-Mei; Wu, Chang-Yu; Oh, Sewon; Cho, Kuk; Paulson, Kathleen

    2012-03-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)) emitted from welding poses serious health risks to workers exposed to welding fumes. In this study, tetramethylsilane (TMS) was added to shielding gas to control hazardous air pollutants produced during stainless steel welding. The silica precursor acted as an oxidation inhibitor when it decomposed in the high-temperature welding arc, limiting Cr(6+) formation. Additionally, a film of amorphous SiO(2) was deposited on fume particles to insulate them from oxidation. Experiments were conducted following the American Welding Society (AWS) method for fume generation and sampling in an AWS fume hood. The results showed that total shielding gas flow rate impacted the effectiveness of the TMS process. Increasing shielding gas flow rate led to increased reductions in Cr(6+) concentration when TMS was used. When 4.2% of a 30-lpm shielding gas flow was used as TMS carrier gas, Cr(6+) concentration in gas metal arc welding (GMAW) fumes was reduced to below the 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration standard (5 μg m(-3)) and the efficiency was >90%. The process also increased fume particle size from a mode size of 20 nm under baseline conditions to 180-300 nm when TMS was added in all shielding gas flow rates tested. SiO(2) particles formed in the process scavenged nanosized fume particles through intercoagulation. Transmission electron microscopy imagery provided visual evidence of an amorphous film of SiO(2) on some fume particles along with the presence of amorphous SiO(2) agglomerates. These results demonstrate the ability of vapor phase silica precursors to increase welding fume particle size and minimize chromium oxidation, thereby preventing the formation of hexavalent chromium.

  14. Technical assistance for development of thermally conductive nitride filler for epoxy molding compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Song, Kee Chan; Jung, In Ha

    2005-07-15

    Technical assistance was carried out to develop nitride filler for thermally conductive epoxy molding compounds. Carbothermal reduction method was used to fabricate silicon nitride powder from mixtures of silica and graphite powders. Microstructure and crystal structure were observed by using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction technique. Thermal properties of epoxy molding compounds containing silicon nitride were measured by using laser flash method. Fabrication process of silicon nitride nanowire was developed and was applied to a patent.

  15. Morphology of Silica-Reinforced Natural Rubber: Effect of Silane Coupling Agent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkawi, S.S.; Dierkes, W.K.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    A good dispersion of silica in a rubber vulcanizate is important as it influences the filler-to-rubber interaction and consequently the final properties. This article presents an investigation into the morphology of silica-reinforced natural rubber (NR) in the presence and absence of a silane coupli

  16. Welding-fume-induced transmission loss in tapered optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji-Haeng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a method for sensing welding fumes in real time. This method is based on the results of nanoparticle-induced optical-fiber loss experiments that show that the losses are determined by the nanoparticle density and the taper waist. The tapered fiber is obtained by applying heat radiated from hot quartz, and monitoring is done in real time. First, the durability of the tapered fiber during the welding process is proven. Then, the loss is categorized by using the sizes of welding fume particles. The sensitivity to welding fumes increases with increasing size of the particles; consequently, the dimension of the taper waist decreases.

  17. [Synthesis of a nano-antibacterial inorganic filler containing a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl and its effect on dental resin composites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junling, Wu; Kaiyun, Zhou; Ting, Zhu; Chuanjian, Zhou

    2014-10-01

    This study aimed to synthesize a novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl and to report the antibacterial property of dental resin composites. A novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl was synthesized based on previous research. The antibacterial property of the filler was measured. The surface of the novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler was modified by a coupling agent to achieve a good interfacial bonding between the filler and the resin matrix. Infrared spectrum analysis was carried out. The modified novel nano-antibacterial inorganic fillers were then incorporated into the dental resin matrix. The dispersion of the fillers was observed and compared with those incorporated into Tetric N-Ceram, a commercial resin composite, under a scanning electron microscope. Streptococcus mutans was used in testing the antibacterial property of the dental resin composites. A quaternary ammonium salt with a long chain alkyl was successfully grafted onto the surface of nano-silica particles. The novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains quaternary ammonium salt with a long chain alkyl showed stronger antibacterial efficacy than the antibacterial inorganic filler that contains quaternary ammonium salt with a short chain alkyl. The modified novel antibacterial inorganic fillers displayed a homogeneous dispersion in the resin composite bulk and combined closely with the resin matrix, similar to the Tetric N-Ceram. The resin composites that contain novel antibacterial inorganic fillers showed stronger antibacterial effect on Streptococcus mutans compared with the control group. The novel nano-antibacterial inorganic filler that contains a quaternary ammonium salt with long chain alkyl showed a strong antibacterial property. It also exhibited good compatibility with the dental resin matrix after undergoing coupling treatment.

  18. Nature and morphology of fumed oxides and features of interfacial phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gun'ko, V. M.; Zarko, V. I.; Goncharuk, O. V.; Matkovsky, A. K.; Remez, O. S.; Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Wojcik, G.; Walusiak, B.; Blitz, J. P.

    2016-03-01

    Individual and complex fumed nanooxides were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption, desorption (evaporation), and quantum chemical methods. For mixed nanooxides in contrast to simple and small nanoparticles of individual silica or titania, complex core-shell nanoparticles (50-200 nm in size) with titania or alumina cores and silica or alumina shells can be destroyed under high-pressure cryogelation (HPCG), mechnochemical activation (MCA) that also affect the structure of aggregates of nanoparticles and agglomerates of aggregates becoming more compacted. This is accompanied by changes in color from white to beige of different tints and changes in the UV-vis spectra in the 300-600 nm range, as well as changes in crystalline structure of alumina. Any treatment of 'soft' nanooxides affects the interfacial behavior of polar and nonpolar adsorbates. For some of them, the hysteresis loops become strongly open. Rearrangement of secondary particles affects the freezing-melting point depression. Clusterization of adsorbates bound in pores causes diminution of heat effects during phase transition (freezing, fusion). Freezing point depression and increasing melting point cause significant hysteresis freezing-melting effects for adsorbates bound to oxide nanoparticles. The study shows that complex nanooxides can be more sensitive to external actions than simple nanooxides such as silica.

  19. Improving mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baloš Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main drawback of flowable dental composite resin is low strength compared to conventional composite resin, due to a low amount of filler, neccessary for achieving low viscosity and ease of handling. The aim of this study was to improve mechanical properties of flowable dental composite resin by adding small amount of nanoparticles, which would not compromise handling properties. Methods. A commercially available flowable dental composite resin material was mixed with 7 nm aftertreated hydrophobic fumed silica and cured by an UV lamp. Four sets of samples were made: control sample (unmodified, the sample containing 0.05%, 0.2% and 1% nanosilica. Flexural modulus, flexural strength and microhardness were tested. One-way ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test with the significance value of p < 0.05 was performed to statistically analyze the obtained results. Furthermore, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and SEM analysis were performed. To asses handling properties, slumping resistance was determined. Results. It was found that 0.05% is the most effective nanosilica content. All the tested mechanical properties were improved by a significant margin. On the other hand, when 0.2% and 1% nanosilica content was tested, different results were obtained, some of the mechanical properties even dropped, while some were insignificantly improved. The difference between slumping resistance of unmodified and modified samples was found to be statistically insignificant. Conclusions. Low nanosilica addition proved more effective in improving mechanical properties compared to higher additions. Furthermore, handling properties are unaffected by nanosilica addition.

  20. Effect of particle structure and surface chemistry on PMMA adsorption to silica nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madathingal, Rajesh Raman; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2010-04-06

    The interphase layer of polymers adsorbed to silica surfaces can be affected by the surface silanol density as well as the relative size of the polymer compared with the size of the adsorbing substrate. Here, the nonequilibrium adsorption of PMMA onto individual colloidal Stober silica (SiO(2)) particles, where R(particle) (100 nm) > R(PMMA) (approximately 6.5 nm) was compared with the adsorption onto fumed silica, where R(particle) (7 nm) approximately R(PMMA) (6.5 nm) bonded to the silanols, and was independent of particle morphology. For methylated silica, (CH(3))(3)SiO(2), the adsorption isotherms were identical for colloidal and fumed silica, but T(g) was depressed for the former, and comparable to the bulk value for the latter. The increased T(g) of PMMA adsorbed onto fumed (CH(3))(3)SiO(2) was attributed to the larger loops formed by the bridging PMMA chains between the silica aggregates.

  1. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    OpenAIRE

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W.; Rajani, K R

    1984-01-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to spec...

  2. Peripheral neuropathy following intentional inhalation of naphtha fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbein, M; deGroot, W; Rajani, K R

    1984-11-01

    Two adolescent native Canadians who presented with peripheral neuropathy secondary to the abuse of volatile hydrocarbons are described. They were initially thought to have been sniffing leaded gasoline fumes, but public health investigation revealed that they had been sniffing naphtha fumes. Naphtha contains a significant amount of n-hexane, a known inducer of neuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and nerve biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of naphtha abuse. These cases emphasize the need to specifically identify the formulation of hydrocarbons being abused.

  3. Anatomical indications of fume resistance in certain woody plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninova, D.

    1970-01-01

    An attempt is made to describe studies on seven species of fruit and forest trees close to or far from a Bulgarian factory emitting fumes containing S. The most resistant species (Quercus borealis, Gleditsia triacanthos, Morus alba) had the smallest stomata and the greatest number of stomata per unit leaf area. Changes observed in leaf anatomy as a result of exposure to the fumes were: decreased leaf aeration, elongated palisade cells, thicker cuticles, and more stomata.

  4. 7 CFR 58.914 - Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... gravity and vacuum type fillers shall be of sanitary design and all product contact surfaces, if metal... Standards for Plastic, and Rubber and Rubber-Like Materials. Fillers shall be designed so that they in no... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) GRADING AND INSPECTION,...

  5. Adverse reactions to injectable soft tissue fillers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Requena, Luis; Requena, Celia; Christensen, Lise

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, injections with filler agents are often used for wrinkle-treatment and soft tissue augmentation by dermatologists and plastic surgeons. Unfortunately, the ideal filler has not yet been discovered and all of them may induce adverse reactions. Quickly biodegradable or resorbable...

  6. Self Compacting Concrete with Chalk Filler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eigil V.

    2007-01-01

    at 28 days from about 35 MPa down to about 13 MPa. The cementing efficiency factor of the chalk filler was found to be in the range 0.21 - 0.42. The chalk filler performed equally well with a grey and a white cement; the latter opens the possibility to produce white SCC more cost effectively....

  7. Rheology of cement mixtures with dolomite filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez de la Cuesta, P. J.

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available This experimental program has studied the behavior of fresh paste made up from cements mixed with dolomite filler. Through prior experiments the starting point is obtained for the designs 22 and 23 factorials. With these designs the governing equations are established that influence the specific surface of the filler, the filler percentage and the ratio water/(cement + filler, used as objective functions: test probe penetration, flow on table and shear stress in viscometer. Also the type of rheological conduct is determined and the influence over initial and final setting is observed.

    Este programa experimental estudia el comportamiento de las pastas frescas fabricadas a partir de cementos mezclados con filler dolomítico. En los experimentos previos se obtiene el punto central para los diseños 22 y 23 factoriales. Con estos diseños se establecen las ecuaciones que rigen la influencia de la superficie específica del filler, el porcentaje de filler y la relación agua/(cemento + filler, utilizando como funciones objetivos la penetración de sonda, la mesa de sacudidas y la tensión de corte en el viscosímetro. También se determina el tipo de conducta reológica y la influencia sobre el principio y fin de fraguado.

  8. 7 CFR 58.514 - Container fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container fillers. 58.514 Section 58.514 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....514 Container fillers. Shall comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for Equipment for Packaging...

  9. Decreasing biotoxicity of fume particles produced in welding process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kuei-Min; Topham, Nathan; Wang, Jun; Kalivoda, Mark; Tseng, Yiider; Wu, Chang-Yu; Lee, Wen-Jhy; Cho, Kuk

    2011-01-30

    Welding fumes contain heavy metals, such as chromium, manganese, and nickel, which cause respiratory diseases and cancer. In this study, a SiO(2) precursor was evaluated as an additive to the shielding gas in an arc welding process to reduce the biotoxicity caused by welding fume particles. Transmission electron micrographic images show that SiO(2) coats on the surface of welding fume particles and promotes particle agglomeration. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy further shows that the relative amount of silicon in these SiO(2)-coated agglomerates is higher than in baseline agglomerates. In addition, Escherichia coli (E. coli) exposed to different concentrations of pure SiO(2) particles generated from the arc welding process exhibits similar responses, suggesting that SiO(2) does not contribute to welding fume particle toxicity. The trend of E. coli growth in different concentrations of baseline welding fume particle shows the most significant inhibition occurs in higher exposure concentrations. The 50% lethal logarithmic concentrations for E. coli in arc welding particles of baseline, 2%, and 4.2% SiO(2) precursor additives were 823, 1605, and 1800 mg/L, respectively. Taken together, these results suggest that using SiO(2) precursors as an additive to arc welding shielding gas can effectively reduce the biotoxicity of welding fume.

  10. Required response time for variable air volume fume hood controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, L E; Melin, J

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes results from tests made with the aim of investigating how quickly the exhaust air flow rate through fume hoods needs to be controlled in order to prevent contaminants from leaking out of the fume hood and putting the safety of the laboratory personnel at risk. The measurements were made on a laboratory fume hood in a chemical laboratory. There were no other fume hoods in the laboratory, and the measurements were made without interference from persons entering or leaving the laboratory or walking about in it. A tracer gas method was used with the concentration of dinitrogen oxide (N(2)O) being recorded by a Foxboro Miran 101 infra-red gas analyser. In parallel with the tracer gas measurements, the air velocity through the face opening was also measured, as was the control signal to the damper controlling the air flow rate. The measurements show an increased outward leakage of tracer gas from the fume hood if the air flow rate is not re-established within 1-2 s after the sash is opened. If the delay exceeds 3 s the safety function is temporarily defeated. The measurements were made under virtually ideal conditions. Under more typical conditions, the fume hood could be exposed to various other external perturbations, which means that the control system should re-establish the correct exhaust flow more quickly than indicated by the measurement results obtained under these almost ideal conditions.

  11. Design considerations for fume hoods for process plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodfellow, H D; Bender, M

    1980-07-01

    Proper design of fume hoods is a necessary requisite for a clean working environment for many industrial processes. Until recently, the design of these hoods has been rather a trial and error approach and not based on sound engineering design principles. Hatch Associates have developed and applied new techniques to establish hood parameters for different industrail processes. The paper reviews the developed techniques and illustrates practical application of these techniques to the solving of difficult and comples fume hood design and operating performance problems. The scope of the paper covers the following subject areas: definitions and general considerations: evaluation of volume and heat flow rates for emission sources; local capture of process emissions; remote capture of process emissions and case studies of fume hood applications. The purpose of the paper is to detail a coherent approach in the analysis of emission problems which will result in the development of an efficient design of a fume capture hood. An efficient fume hood can provide a safe working place as well as a clean external environment. Although the techniques can be applied to smaller sources, the case studies which will be examined will be for fume hoods in the flow design range of 50 000 CFM to +1 000 000 CFM.

  12. Influence of limestone fillers on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar for pavements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Wu; Kai, Zhu; Wu, Hao;

    2014-01-01

    Asphalt materials will be ignited and release significant toxic fumes within tunnel fires. Thus, combustion characteristics of asphalt materials used in road tunnel should be studied in order to limit such an adverse effect. In the present work we study the influence of limestone fillers...... on combustion characteristics of asphalt mortar by thermogravimetric and kinetic analysis. It is shown that the combustion of asphalt mortar is not just a linear superposition of asphalt and limestone. The limestone will increase the ignition point and the activation energy of the primary volatile release......, and will catalyze the char formation from the primary volatile release. Kinetic analysis shows that the primary volatile release stage of asphalt mortar combustion can be explained by a three-dimensional diffusion model, the secondary volatile release and char combustion stage can be explained by a model under...

  13. Accelerator, superplasticiter and silica gome by wet shotcrete; Hormigon Proyectado por Via Humeda

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This project has been carried out by Geocontrol during the period September 1997-november 2000. The main target of this project was to establish a better knowledgement about the influence of the accelerator, silica fume, steel fibres and super plasticizer on the wet shotcrete properties. This project has been developed in three phases focused in three specifical targets: I. Effect of the accelerator, superplasticizer and silica fume dosages on shotcrete strength. II. Influence of steel fibres and silica fume on shotcrete characteristics. III. Steel fibres dosages and type effect of shotcrete absorbed energy. The main conclusions obtained from this research are the following. 1. Accelerators free of alkalis have a very little influence on the shotcrete strength reduction. 2. The best results are obtained when the accelerator dosage is the lowest, with a reference of the 4% of cement weigh. 3. The superplasticizer is very important in order to reach the lowest water/cement ratio. 4. Silica fume has a strong and positive influence on shotcrete characteristics but only if the dosages is higher than 30 kg/m''3. 5. The best results with silica fume are obtained when this product is added as a separate product, instead to be missed with other additive as superplasticizer. 6. Steel fibres addition improves dramatically the shotcrete post-failure characteristics. 7. A shotcrete without steel fibres and with a strength ranged between 25 and 40 MPa absorbers 130-180 Joules and another one with a steel mesh of 150x150x6 mm absorbers 1100 Joules. 8. Steel fibres shotcrete can reach the same energy absorption that another one reinforced with wire mesh. 9. During shotcreting the steel fibres dosages has a loss of 10 to 30 % due to shotcrete rebound. This research project allows to improve the knowledgement os shotcreting technique in order to use it with more efficiency than in the past. (Author)

  14. The three dimensional distribution of chromium and nickel alloy welding fumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeoka,Kiyoshi

    1991-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the fumes generated from manual metal arc (MMA and submerged metal arc (SMA welding of low temperature service steel, and the chromium and nickel percentages in these fumes, were measured at various horizontal distances and vertical heights from the arc in order to obtain a three dimensional distribution. The MMA welding fume concentrations were significantly higher than the SMA welding fume concentrations. The highest fume concentration on the horizontal was shown in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The fume concentration vertically was highest at 50 cm height and reduced by half at 150 cm height. The fume concentration at 250 cm height was scarcely different from that at 150 cm height. The distribution of the chromium concentration vertically was analogous to the fume concentration, and a statistically significant difference in the chromium percentages was not found at the different heights. The nickel concentrations were not statistically significant within the welding processes, but the nickel percentages in the SMA welding fumes were statistically higher than in the MMA welding fumes. The highest nickel concentration on the horizontal was found in the fumes collected directly above the arc. The highest nickel concentration vertically showed in the fume samples collected at 50 cm height, but the greater the height the larger the nickel percentage in the fumes.

  15. Novel processing of bioglass ceramics from silicone resins containing micro- and nano-sized oxide particle fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiocco, L; Bernardo, E; Colombo, P; Cacciotti, I; Bianco, A; Bellucci, D; Sola, A; Cannillo, V

    2014-08-01

    Highly porous scaffolds with composition similar to those of 45S5 and 58S bioglasses were successfully produced by an innovative processing method based on preceramic polymers containing micro- and nano-sized fillers. Silica from the decomposition of the silicone resins reacted with the oxides deriving from the fillers, yielding glass ceramic components after heating at 1000°C. Despite the limited mechanical strength, the obtained samples possessed suitable porous architecture and promising biocompatibility and bioactivity characteristics, as testified by preliminary in vitro tests.

  16. Remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate based composite resins: the influence of inert fillers on monomer conversion, polymerization shrinkage, and microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marović, Danijela; Šariri, Kristina; Demoli, Nazif; Ristić, Mira; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Škrtić, Drago; Rosentritt, Martin; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine if the addition of inert fillers to a bioactive dental restorative composite material affects its degree of conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), and microhardness (HV). Methods Three amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based composite resins: without added fillers (0-ACP), with 10% of barium-glass fillers (Ba-ACP), and with 10% of silica fillers (Si-ACP), as well as commercial control (Ceram•X, Dentsply DeTrey) were tested in laboratory conditions. The amount of ACP (40%) and the composition of the resin mixture (based on ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate) was the same for all ACP materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the DC (n = 40), 20 min and 72 h after polymerization. Linear PS and Vickers microhardness (n = 40) were also evaluated. The results were analyzed by paired samples t test, ANOVA, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA with Student-Newman-Keuls or Tukey’s post-hoc test (P = 0.05). Results The addition of barium fillers significantly increased the DC (20 min) (75.84 ± 0.62%) in comparison to 0-ACP (73.92 ± 3.08%), but the addition of silica fillers lowered the DC (71.00 ± 0.57%). Ceram•X had the lowest DC (54.93 ± 1.00%) and linear PS (1.01 ± 0.24%) but the highest HV (20.73 ± 2.09). PS was significantly reduced (P < 0.010) in both Ba-ACP (1.13 ± 0.25%) and Si-ACP (1.17 ± 0.19%) compared to 0-ACP (1.43 ± 0.21%). HV was significantly higher in Si-ACP (12.82 ± 1.30) than in 0-ACP (10.54 ± 0.86) and Ba-ACP (10.75 ± 0.62) (P < 0.010). Conclusion Incorporation of inert fillers to bioactive remineralizing composites enhanced their physical-mechanical performance in laboratory conditions. Both added fillers reduced the PS while maintaining high levels of the DC. Silica fillers additionally moderately improved the HV of ACP composites. PMID:27815937

  17. Silica Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Ghahramani

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heavy metals, organic solvents and silica is associated with a variety of renal manifestations. Improved understanding of occupational renal disease provides insight into environmental renal disease, improving knowledge of disease pathogenesis. Silica (SiO2 is an abundant mineral found in sand, rock, and soil. Workers exposed to silica include sandblasters, miners, quarry workers, masons, ceramic workers and glass manufacturers. New cases of silicosis per year have been estimated in the US to be 3600–7300. Exposure to silica has been associated with tubulointerstitial disease, immune-mediated multisystem disease, chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. A rare syndrome of painful, nodular skin lesions has been described in dialysis patients with excessive levels of silicon. Balkan endemic nephropathy is postulated to be due to chronic intoxication with drinking water polluted by silicates released during soil erosion. The mechanism of silica nephrotoxicity is thought to be through direct nephrotoxicity, as well as silica-induced autoimmune diseases such as scleroderma and systemic lupus erythematosus. The renal histopathology varies from focal to crescentic and necrotizing glomerulonephritis with aneurysm formation suggestive of polyarteritis nodosa. The treatment for silica nephrotoxicity is non-specific and depends on the mechanism and stage of the disease. It is quite clear that further research is needed, particularly to elucidate the pathogenesis of silica nephropathy. Considering the importance of diagnosing exposure-related renal disease at early stages, it is imperative to obtain a thorough occupational history in all patients with renal disease, with particular emphasis on exposure to silica, heavy metals, and solvents.

  18. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Liyun; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    2016-01-01

    One prominent method of modifying the properties of dielectric elastomers (DEs) is by adding suitable metal oxide fillers. However, almost all commercially available silicone elastomers are already heavily filled with silica to reinforce the otherwise rather weak silicone network and the resulting...... metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR) has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present...... study, four commercial LSRs with varying loadings of silica and one benchmark room-temperature vulcanizable rubber (RTV) were investigated. The resulting elastomers were evaluated with respect to their dielectric permittivity, tear and tensile strengths, electrical breakdown, thermal stability...

  19. Cosmetic Fillers: Perspectives on the Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basta, Steven L

    2015-11-01

    The cosmetic filler industry has evolved substantially over the last 30 years. The market is characterized by multiple fillers and a competitive dynamic among major aesthetics companies. Marketing in the United States and Europe has been different owing to regulatory constraints. Differences have led to more rapid growth in the European market. The US market has evolved owing to growth of major companies with multiple product portfolios and leverage in consumer promotion and aesthetics office marketing owing to scale. The evolution of the filler market will include new materials, injection techniques, and facilitation devices, and new areas of injection.

  20. Fillers for the improvement in acne scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wollina U

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Uwe Wollina,1 Alberto Goldman2 1Department of Dermatology and Allergology, Academic Teaching Hospital, Dresden-Friedrichstadt, Dresden, Germany; 2Clinica Goldman, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Abstract: Acne is a common inflammatory disease. Scarring is an unwanted end point of acne. Both atrophic and hypertrophic scar types occur. Soft-tissue augmentation aims to improve atrophic scars. In this review, we will focus on the use of dermal fillers for acne scar improvement. Therefore, various filler types are characterized, and available data on their use in acne scar improvement are analyzed. Keywords: acne, scars, dermal fillers, injection, extracellular matrix

  1. Reactions Involved in Fingerprint Development Using the Cyanoacrylate - Fuming Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, L.A.

    2001-07-30

    The Learning Objective is to present the basic chemistry research findings to the forensic community regarding development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method. Chemical processes involved in the development of latent fingerprints using the cyanoacrylate fuming method have been studied, and will be presented. Two major types of latent prints have been investigated--clean (eccrine) and oily (sebaceous) prints. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used as a tool for determining the morphology of the polymer developed separately on clean and oily prints after cyanoacrylate fuming. A correlation between the chemical composition of an aged latent fingerprint, prior to development, and the quality of a developed fingerprint was observed in the morphology. The moisture in the print prior to fuming was found to be a critical factor for the development of a useful latent print. In addition, the amount of time required to develop a high quality latent print was found to be minimal. The cyanoacrylate polymerization process is extremely rapid. When heat is used to accelerate the fuming process, typically a period of 2 minutes is required to develop the print. The optimum development time is dependent upon the concentration of cyanoacrylate vapors within the enclosure.

  2. Silica-reinforced natural rubber for low rolling resistance, energy-saving tires: aspects of mixing, formulation and compatibilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaewsakul, W.

    2013-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) is a renewable material, which combines excellent mechanical and dynamic properties. It has been and still is in use in a variety of applications, mostly in the form of filled vulcanizates. Silica filler technology used for rubber is relatively new, since silica can reinforce rub

  3. Silica-reinforced natural rubber for low rolling resistance, energy-saving tires: aspects of mixing, formulation and compatibilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaewsakul, Wisut

    2013-01-01

    Natural rubber (NR) is a renewable material, which combines excellent mechanical and dynamic properties. It has been and still is in use in a variety of applications, mostly in the form of filled vulcanizates. Silica filler technology used for rubber is relatively new, since silica can reinforce

  4. New Manufacturing Method for Paper filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus

    2011-11-22

    The study compares commercial available filler products with a new developed “Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material” and how main structural, optical and strength properties are affected by increasing the filler content of at least 5% over commercial values. The study consists of: (i) an overview of paper filler materials used in the paper production process, (ii) discusses the manufacturing technology of lime based filler materials for paper applications, (iii) gives an overview of new emerging paper filler technologies, (iv) discusses a filler evaluation of commercial available digital printing paper products, (v) reports from a detailed handsheet study and 12” pilot plant paper machine trial runs with the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material, and (vi) evaluates and compares commercial filler products and the new Hybrid Fiber Filler Composite Material with a life cycle analyses that explains manufacturing, economic and environmental benefits as they are applied to uncoated digital printing papers.

  5. Studies on the Analysis of Lead and Silica in Lead Processing Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ravichandra Babu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Practice two samples have to be proceeded separately to determine both lead and silica in lead process samples like concentrates, coarse sinter etc. In the present recommended procedure, the lead and silica are precipitated together by using acid fuming, but, instead of using ammonium acetate treatment to separate lead and silica, a mixture of hydrochloric acid-sodium chloride is used to achieve the same purpose. This helps in determine all the components of lead process samples from the same solution without loss of accuracy in any of the components. This method saves considerable time and especially useful for routine analysis in process control lab.

  6. Synthesis of novel functional liquid and its application as a modifier in SBR/silica composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel functional ionic liquid (IL, 1-methylimidazolium methacrylate (MimMa, was synthesized for modifying styrene butadiene rubber (SBR/silica composites. MimMa was found to be readily polymerized via the initiated radical mechanism and could be analogously grafted onto rubber chains during vulcanization. Substantial hydrogen bonding between polymerized MimMa (poly(MimMa and silica can facilitate the silica dispersion and improve the SBR/silica interfacial bonding. Filler networking, curing behavior, silica dispersion and mechanical performance of the modified SBR/silica composites were studied. With a low concentration of MimMa, remarkable improvements in the interfacial interactions and mechanical properties were achieved which was attributed to the improved silica dispersion and strengthened interfacial bonding induced by MimMa. A modified interphase structure was accordingly proposed and related to the mechanical performance of the modified SBR/silica composites.

  7. The Effects of Silica/Carbon Black Ratio on the Dynamic Properties of the Tread compounds in Truck Tires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Zafarmehrabian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available NR is the major constituent in the rubber compound used for the tread on the truck tires. A general compound formulation of the tire tread includes NR and BR as polymer base and carbon black as the reinforcing filler, and curative components. In this paper the effects of dual filler system (carbon black and precipitated silica on the dynamic properties of tire treat has been studied. The results show by increasing of precipitated silica, significant improvement was observed in fatigue resistance, rolling resistance and heat buildup of the tire. Tensile strength and modulus and wet grip of tire tread decrease with increasing of silica in rubber compound formulation.

  8. Catalytic Disposal of Cooking Fume Discharged from the Restaurant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; XiangYu

    2001-01-01

    The cooking oil fume pollution have been becoming a serious problem.1 Though several methods on disposal technology of the fume have been developed at home and abroad, such as filtration process, electrostatic process and wet process, practical and effective technology is still needed.2In the present study, we will report a new disposal process of cooking fume, which were turned complete into water and CO2 in the presence of the catalysts.  Catalysts were prepared by the following procedure. First, layer of A12O3 was painted on the inner pore surface of ceramic honeycomb carrier. Second, a solution of platinum and palladium salts in alcohol was used for impregnation in a suitable concentration to obtain a catalyst 0.3% noble metals.  ……

  9. 42 CFR 84.1140 - Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance... Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1140 Dust, fume, and mist respirators; performance requirements; general. Dust, fume, and mist respirators and the individual components of each such device shall,...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  11. Determination of silica coating efficiency on metal particles using multiple digestion methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Topham, Nathan; Wu, Chang-Yu

    2011-10-15

    Nano-sized metal particles, including both elemental and oxidized metals, have received significant interest due to their biotoxicity and presence in a wide range of industrial systems. A novel silica technology has been recently explored to minimize the biotoxicity of metal particles by encapsulating them with an amorphous silica shell. In this study, a method to determine silica coating efficiency on metal particles was developed. Metal particles with silica coating were generated using gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process with a silica precursor tetramethylsilane (TMS) added to the shielding gas. Microwave digestion and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) were employed to solubilize the metal content in the particles and analyze the concentration, respectively. Three acid mixtures were tested to acquire the appropriate digestion method targeting at metals and silica coating. Metal recovery efficiencies of different digestion methods were compared through analysis of spiked samples. HNO(3)/HF mixture was found to be a more aggressive digestion method for metal particles with silica coating. Aqua regia was able to effectively dissolve metal particles not trapped in the silica shell. Silica coating efficiencies were thus calculated based on the measured concentrations following digestion by HNO(3)/HF mixture and aqua regia. The results showed 14-39% of welding fume particles were encapsulated in silica coating under various conditions. This newly developed method could also be used to examine the silica coverage on particles of silica shell/metal core structure in other nanotechnology areas.

  12. PROPERTIES OF THERMO-MOLDED GLUTEN/GLYCEROL/SILICA COMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-hu Song; Qiang Zheng; Zheng-zheng Lai

    2008-01-01

    Environmentally friendly thermosetting composites were successfully prepared by conventional blending wheat gluten as matrix.glycerol as plasticizer and silica as filler followed by thermo-molding of the mixture at 120℃.The strong interfacial interaction between silica particles and gluten proteins leaded to an increase in storage modulus and a decrease in loss factor as revealed by dynamic mechanical analysis.The moisture absorption and elongation at break decrease while Young's modulus and tensile strength increase with increasing silica content from 0 to 10 wt%.However,the moisture absorption and mechanical properties show discontinuous changes at a silica content of 6 wt%.The glycerol content also has a marked influence on the moisture absorption and mechanical properties of the composites with a constant gluten-to-silica ratio.

  13. deFUME: Dynamic exploration of functional metagenomic sequencing data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Helm, Eric; Geertz-Hansen, Henrik Marcus; Genee, Hans Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Functional metagenomic selections represent a powerful technique that is widely applied for identification of novel genes from complex metagenomic sources. However, whereas hundreds to thousands of clones can be easily generated and sequenced over a few days of experiments, analyzing the data...... to a comprehensive visual data overview that facilitates effortless inspection of gene function, clustering and distribution. The webserver is available at cbs.dtu.dk/services/deFUME/and the source code is distributed at github.com/EvdH0/deFUME....

  14. A comparison between the effects of sepiolite and silica on mechanical properties and thermal stability of NR/EPDM blend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winya Nattawat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on improving the ablation properties and mechanical properties of natural rubber (NR/ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM blends by using two different commercial fillers: sepiolite and silica. The results showed that sepiolite and silica similarly improved both properties in the loading range of interest (0–12.5 phr. However, sepiolite was superior than silica as using less loading to acheive comparable mechanical and thermal properties. The optimum loading of sepiolite was 5 phr, while that of silica was 10 phr. For both filler systems, the minimum ablation rate found was approximately 0.17 mm/s, and the tensile strength and the hardness of corresponding NR/EPDM composite were improved after modification with sepiolite or silica.Thus, the composite reinforced with sepiolite or silica is suitable for many applications, such as internal insulations of rocket motor.

  15. Friction and wear of HNBR with different fillers under dry rolling and sliding conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxide cured hydrogenated acrylonitrile/butadiene rubber (HNBR compounds with 20 parts per hundred rubber (phr active fillers, such as carbon black (CB, multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT and silica were produced and their friction and wear properties under unlubricated rolling and sliding conditions were evaluated. The network-related properties of the HNBR compounds were deduced from dynamic-mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA. The coefficient of friction (COF and the specific wear rate (Ws were determined in different home-made test rigs. The CB and MWCNT containing HNBR compounds exhibited the best resistance to rolling and sliding wear, respectively, among the HNBR systems studied. The worn surfaces were inspected in scanning electron microscope (SEM and the wear mechanisms were analyzed and discussed in respect to the types of wear and fillers.

  16. Nature and morphology of fumed oxides and features of interfacial phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gun’ko, V.M., E-mail: vlad_gunko@ukr.net [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Zarko, V.I.; Goncharuk, O.V.; Matkovsky, A.K.; Remez, O.S. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, 17 General Naumov Street, 03164 Kyiv (Ukraine); Skubiszewska-Zięba, J.; Wojcik, G. [Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Skłodowska University, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Walusiak, B.; Blitz, J.P. [Eastern Illinois University, Department of Chemistry, Charleston, IL 61920 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Effects of oxide surface structure on interfacial behavior of nonpolar and polar adsorbates. • Confined space effects on freezing and melting temperatures of bound adsorbates. • Equilibrium adsorption and evaporation rate vs. structure of nanooxide adsorbents. - Abstract: Individual and complex fumed nanooxides were studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-visible (UV–vis) spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, adsorption, desorption (evaporation), and quantum chemical methods. For mixed nanooxides in contrast to simple and small nanoparticles of individual silica or titania, complex core–shell nanoparticles (50–200 nm in size) with titania or alumina cores and silica or alumina shells can be destroyed under high-pressure cryogelation (HPCG), mechnochemical activation (MCA) that also affect the structure of aggregates of nanoparticles and agglomerates of aggregates becoming more compacted. This is accompanied by changes in color from white to beige of different tints and changes in the UV–vis spectra in the 300–600 nm range, as well as changes in crystalline structure of alumina. Any treatment of ‘soft’ nanooxides affects the interfacial behavior of polar and nonpolar adsorbates. For some of them, the hysteresis loops become strongly open. Rearrangement of secondary particles affects the freezing-melting point depression. Clusterization of adsorbates bound in pores causes diminution of heat effects during phase transition (freezing, fusion). Freezing point depression and increasing melting point cause significant hysteresis freezing-melting effects for adsorbates bound to oxide nanoparticles. The study shows that complex nanooxides can be more sensitive to external actions than simple nanooxides such as silica.

  17. Magneto-rheological response of elastomer composites with hybrid-magnetic fillers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloui, Sahbi; Klüppel, Manfred

    2015-02-01

    We study the magneto-rheological response of hybrid-magnetic elastomer composites consisting of two different magnetic filler particles at fixed overall concentration. Thereby, we focus on an optimization of mechanical and magnetic properties by combining highly reinforcing magnetic nano-particles (MagSilica) with micro-sized carbonyl-iron particles (CIP), which exhibit high switch ability in a magnetic field. We observe a symbiotic interaction of both filler types, especially in the case when an orientation of the magnetic filler particles is achieved due to curing in an external magnetic field. The orientation effect is significant only for the micro-sized CIP particles with high saturation magnetization, indicating that the induced magnetic moment for the nano-sized particles is too small for delivering sufficient attraction between the particles in an external magnetic field. A pronounced switching behavior is observed for the non-cross-linked melts with 15 and 20 vol.% CIP, whereby the small strain modulus increases by more than 50%. For the sample without the coupling agent silane, one even observes a relative modulus increase of about 140%, which can be related to the combined effect of a higher mobility of the particles without a silane layer and the ability of the particles to come in close contact when they are arranged in strings along the field lines. For the cross-linked samples, a maximum switching effect of about 30% is achieved for the system with pure CIP. This magneto-sensitivity decreases successively if CIP is replaced by MagSilica, while the tensile strength of the systems increases significantly. The use of silane reduces the switching effect, but it is necessary for a good mechanical performance by delivering strong chemical bonding of the magnetic filler particles to the polymer matrix.

  18. A Study on Genotoxicity of Cooking Fume from Rapessed Oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENHUA; YANGMINGDING; 等

    1992-01-01

    The present article reports the genotoxic potential of rapeseed oil cooking fume investigated by a battery of short-term tests(Ames test,SCE/V79 in vitor and mice micronucleus in vivo test).The results showed that the cooking fume contained mutagenic activity.In the presence of S9 mix,an increase in the number of the Salmonella TA98 was observed at doses ranging from 1.0 to 5.0mg/plate,and the SCE frequencies of V79 cell were markedly raised at doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.5mg·m-1.The positive result was also obtained in mice micronucleus assay,the mice had inhaled the cooking fume a week earlier.The requency of mice bone marrow MN-PCR ws increased and it showed a remarkable time-dose-response relationship during the 4 weeks exposure.The results suggested that this cooking fume exposure may be a risk factor of lung cancer in Chinese women.

  19. Exposure to inhalable, respirable, and ultrafine particles in welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, Martin; Pesch, Beate; Lotz, Anne; Pelzer, Johannes; Kendzia, Benjamin; Gawrych, Katarzyna; Heinze, Evelyn; Van Gelder, Rainer; Punkenburg, Ewald; Weiss, Tobias; Mattenklott, Markus; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Möhlmann, Carsten; Berges, Markus; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    This investigation aims to explore determinants of exposure to particle size-specific welding fume. Area sampling of ultrafine particles (UFP) was performed at 33 worksites in parallel with the collection of respirable particles. Personal sampling of respirable and inhalable particles was carried out in the breathing zone of 241 welders. Median mass concentrations were 2.48 mg m(-3) for inhalable and 1.29 mg m(-3) for respirable particles when excluding 26 users of powered air-purifying respirators (PAPRs). Mass concentrations were highest when flux-cored arc welding (FCAW) with gas was applied (median of inhalable particles: 11.6 mg m(-3)). Measurements of particles were frequently below the limit of detection (LOD), especially inside PAPRs or during tungsten inert gas welding (TIG). However, TIG generated a high number of small particles, including UFP. We imputed measurements welding fume. Concentrations were mainly predicted by the welding process and were significantly higher when local exhaust ventilation (LEV) was inefficient or when welding was performed in confined spaces. Substitution of high-emission techniques like FCAW, efficient LEV, and using PAPRs where applicable can reduce exposure to welding fume. However, harmonizing the different exposure metrics for UFP (as particle counts) and for the respirable or inhalable fraction of the welding fume (expressed as their mass) remains challenging.

  20. Insitu grafting silica nanoparticles reinforced nanocomposite hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Han, Chun-Rui; Duan, Jiu-Fang; Xu, Feng; Sun, Run-Cang

    2013-10-01

    Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties.Highly flexible nanocomposite hydrogels were prepared by using silica nanoparticles (SNPs) as fillers and multi-functional cross-links to graft hydrophilic poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) by free radical polymerization from an aqueous solution. The SNPs were collected by neighboring polymer chains and dispersed uniformly within a PAA matrix. The mechanical properties of the nanocomposite hydrogels were tailored by the concentration of SNPs according to the percolation model. It was proposed that covalent bonds of adsorbed chains on the filler surface resulted in the formation of a shell of an immobilized glassy layer and trapped entanglements, where the glassy polymer layer greatly enhanced the elastic modulus and the release of trapped entanglements at deformation contributed to the viscoelastic properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: FTIR spectra of SNP after silane treatment, dynamic oscillatory shear measurements as a function of frequency, constrained polymer chain analysis by a change in the peak height in loss factor spectra, molecular weight of grafted chains at different stages of gelation, prediction of the SNP reinforcing mechanism in the

  1. Structural, thermal and ion transport studies of different particle size nanocomposite fillers incorporated PVdF-HFP hybrid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, G. Gnana [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Pil [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ae Rhan [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Kee Suk [Specialized Graduate School of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: nahmks@chonbuk.ac.kr; Elizabeth, R. Nimma [Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai 625002 (India)

    2009-05-15

    Organic-inorganic hybrid membranes based on poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexa fluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP)/sulfosuccinic acid were fabricated with different nanometer sizes of silica particles. Morphological images reveal the embedded ceramic filler over the membrane. Structural characterizations were made by FT-IR and XPS, ensure the inclusion of sulfosuccinic acid and silica into the PVdF-HFP polymer matrix. Sulfonic acid groups promote the IEC values and greater swelling behavior. Silica content in the hybrid membranes had a great effect on crystalline character as well as thermal properties of the membranes. Decrease in the filler size creates an effective route of polymer-filler interface and promotes the protonic conductivity of the membranes. The high conductivities in the range of 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} were achieved through synergistic interactions between the organic and inorganic moieties of the hybrid membranes. Due to these splendid features, the prepared hybrid membranes can be a trademark in the field of fuel cells.

  2. Solid State Electrolytes Prepared from PEO (360) Silanated Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, P.; Ding, J.; Liu, B.; Wunder, S. L.; Lin, H.-P.; Chua, D.; Salomon, M.

    2002-01-01

    All solid state composite electrolytes were prepared using fumed silica (SiO2) silanated with an oligomeric polyethylene oxide (PEO) silane containing 6-9 ethylene oxide repeat units, a PEO matrix and LiClO4 (8/1 O/Li). The PEO-silane covalently attached to the silica was amorphous, with a T(sub g) that increased from -90 C to -53 C after attachment. The conductivity of films prepared using the PEO-silanated silica increased to approx. 6 x 10(exp -5) S/cm at RT compared with approx. 1 x 10(-5) S/cm for films prepared with unsilanated SiO2.

  3. Organically Modified Aero-Sol Gel Silica for Elastomer Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratsinis, S. E.; Kohls, D. J.; Beaucage, G.

    2000-03-01

    We have developed facilities to produce organically functionalized silicas using a novel, room-temperature, aerosol, chemical reactor (ASG reactor). This reactor can produce exceedingly high surface area nano-structured materials (up to 800 m2/g) with tuned interfacial chemistries. This poster will present our results on dynamic mechanical properties of elastomer compounds with ASG-organically modified silicas and comparison with conventional carbon black, conventional precipated and fumed silica as well as blends of the conventional materials. The mass-fractal structure as determined by SAXS and SALS, as well as conventional gas and DBP absorption measurements and microscopy will be presented. Hyeon-Lee, J.; Beaucage, G.; Pratsinis, S. E. (1997) Chem. of Mat. 9, 2400. Hyeon-Lee, J.; Beaucage, G.; Pratsinis, S. E.; Vemury, S. (1998) Langmuir 5751.

  4. Thermo-mechanical properties of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber filled epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Liyun

    The optimization of thermo-mechanical properties of polymer composites at low filler loadings is of great interest in both engineering and scientific fields. There have been several studies on high aspect ratio fillers as novel reinforcement phase for polymeric materials. However, facile synthesis method of high aspect ratio nanofillers is limited. In this study, a scalable synthesis method of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers is going to be presented. I will also demonstrate that the inclusion of high aspect ratio silica nanofibers in epoxy results in a significant improvement of epoxy thermo-mechanical properties at low filler loadings. With silica nanofiber concentration of 2.8% by volume, the Young's modulus, ultimate tensile strength and fracture toughness of epoxy increased ~23, ~28 and ~50%, respectively, compared to unfilled epoxy. At silica nanofiber volume concentration of 8.77%, the thermal expansion coefficient decreased by ˜40% and the thermal conductivity was improved by ˜95% at room temperature. In the current study, the influence of nano-sized silica filler aspect ratio on mechanical and thermal behavior of epoxy nanocomposites were studied by comparing silica nanofibers to spherical silica nanoparticles (with aspect ratio of one) at various filler loadings. The significant reinforcement of composite stiffness is attributed to the variation of the local stress state in epoxy due to the high aspect ratio of the silica nanofiber and the introduction of a tremendous amount of interfacial area between the nanofillers and the epoxy matrix. The fracture mechanisms of silica nanofiber filled epoxy were also investigated. The existence of high aspect ratio silica nanofiber promotes fracture energy dissipation by crack deflection, crack pinning as well as debonding with fiber pull-out leading to enhanced fracture toughness. High aspect ratio fillers also provide significant reduction of photon scattering due to formation of a continuous fiber network

  5. Thermal Properties of Asphalt Mixtures Modified with Conductive Fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byong Chol Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the thermal properties of asphalt mixtures modified with conductive fillers used for snow melting and solar harvesting pavements. Two different mixing processes were adopted to mold asphalt mixtures, dry- and wet-mixing, and two conductive fillers were used in this study, graphite and carbon black. The thermal conductivity was compared to investigate the effects of asphalt mixture preparing methods, the quantity, and the distribution of conductive filler on thermal properties. The combination of conductive filler with carbon fiber in asphalt mixture was evaluated. Also, rheological properties of modified asphalt binders with conductive fillers were measured using dynamic shear rheometer and bending beam rheometer at grade-specific temperatures. Based on rheological testing, the conductive fillers improve rutting resistance and decrease thermal cracking resistance. Thermal testing indicated that graphite and carbon black improve the thermal properties of asphalt mixes and the combined conductive fillers are more effective than the single filler.

  6. Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

    2004-07-01

    Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

  7. Reduction of Biomechanical and Welding Fume Exposures in Stud Welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fethke, Nathan B; Peters, Thomas M; Leonard, Stephanie; Metwali, Mahmoud; Mudunkotuwa, Imali A

    2016-04-01

    The welding of shear stud connectors to structural steel in construction requires a prolonged stooped posture that exposes ironworkers to biomechanical and welding fume hazards. In this study, biomechanical and welding fume exposures during stud welding using conventional methods were compared to exposures associated with use of a prototype system that allowed participants to weld from an upright position. The effect of base material (i.e. bare structural beam versus galvanized decking) on welding fume concentration (particle number and mass), particle size distribution, and particle composition was also explored. Thirty participants completed a series of stud welding simulations in a local apprenticeship training facility. Use of the upright system was associated with substantial reductions in trunk inclination and the activity levels of several muscle groups. Inhalable mass concentrations of welding fume (averaged over ~18 min) when using conventional methods were high (18.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 65.7 mg m(-3) for through deck), with estimated mass concentrations of iron (7.8 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), zinc (0.2 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 15.8 mg m(-3) for through deck), and manganese (0.9 mg m(-3) for bare beam; 1.5 mg m(-3) for through deck) often exceeding the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values (TLVs). Number and mass concentrations were substantially reduced when using the upright system, although the total inhalable mass concentration remained above the TLV when welding through decking. The average diameters of the welding fume particles for both bare beam (31±17 nm) through deck conditions (34±34 nm) and the chemical composition of the particles indicated the presence of metallic nanoparticles. Stud welding exposes ironworkers to potentially high levels of biomechanical loading (primarily to the low back) and welding fume. The upright system used in this study improved exposure

  8. Silica-Polystyrene Nanocomposite Particles Synthesized by Nitroxide-Mediated Polymerization and Their Encapsulation through Miniemulsion Polymerization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bérangère Bailly

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Polystyrene (PS chains with molecular weights comprised between 8000 and 64000 g⋅mol-1 and narrow polydispersities were grown from the surface of silica nanoparticles (Aerosil A200 fumed silica and Stöber silica, resp. through nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP. Alkoxyamine initiators based on N-tert-butyl-1-diethylphosphono-2,2-dimethylpropyl nitroxide (DEPN and carrying a terminal functional group have been synthesized in situ and grafted to the silica surface. The resulting grafted alkoxyamines have been employed to initiate the growth of polystyrene chains from the inorganic surface. The maximum grafting density of the surface-tethered PS chains was estimated and seemed to be limited by initiator confinement at the interface. Then, the PS-grafted Stöber silica nanoparticles were entrapped inside latex particles via miniemulsion polymerization. Transmission electron microscopy indicated the successful formation of silica-polystyrene core-shell particles.

  9. Silica-Supported Arsine Palladium(0) Complex: a Highly Active and Stereoselective Catalyst for Arylation of Butyl Acrylate and Acrylamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡明中; 赵红; 胡文英

    2005-01-01

    A silica-supported arsine palladium(O) complex has been prepared from y-chloropropyltriethoxysilane via immobilization on fumed silica, followed by reaction with potassium diphenylarsenide and palladium chloride, and then reduction with hydrazine hydrate. The complex has been characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and it is a highly active and stereoselective catalyst for arylation of butyl acrylate and acrylamide with aryl halides, affording a variety of tram-butyl cinnamates and trans-cinnamamides in high yields.

  10. Filler functionality in edible solid foams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2016-01-01

    We review the functionality of particulate ingredients in edible brittle foams, such as expanded starchy snacks. In food science and industry there is not a complete awareness of the full functionality of these filler ingredients, which can be fibers, proteins, starch granules and whole grains. B

  11. Porous Properties of Nano-fibriform Silica from Natural Chrysotile

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lijuan; LU Anhuai; WANG Changqiu; LI Xuejun; ZHENG Xishen; ZHAO Dongjun; LIU Rui

    2006-01-01

    With the TEM and physical gas adsorption techniques, porous properties of nano-fibriform silica (MLD: 92.73 %) from natural chrysotile are studied in this paper. The results indicate that porous nano-fibriform silica results from brucite octahedral sheets of nature chrysotile dissolved completely and Si-O tetrahedral sheets collapsed by acid leaching. Its length is at a micron or nanometer scale.There are two types of pores: pores among neighboring fibers and pores in nanofiber. These pores (less than 6.5 nm in diameter, mostly 2.1 nm and 3.8 nm) all belong to mesopores. The pores in fibers consist of those among SiO2 particles, those among aggregates, remnant nanotubes and capillary tubes. Nanofibriform silica proves better than the traditional silica as a carrier of catalyzer and a filler for reinforce rubber and plastics.

  12. Tuning the Mechanical Properties of Tapioca Starch by Plasticizers, Inorganic Fillers and Agrowaste-Based Fillers

    OpenAIRE

    Edwin Azwar; Minna Hakkarainen

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical properties of tapioca starch-based films were tuned by different additives and additive combinations. The additives included plasticizers (glycerol, sorbitol, and citric acid), inorganic fillers (halloysite and kaolin), and agrowaste-based fillers (milled wood flour and rice bran). In addition, new biobased additives were prepared from wood flour and rice bran through liquefaction reaction. Through different additive combinations, starch-based materials with significant differences...

  13. Influence of Nano Silica on Alkyd Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav

    . The present work centers on the reinforcement of alkyd binders emulsified in water and used in exterior wood coatings with nano silica. Raman spectroscopy was used throughout the study to maintain the reproducibility of results as it was found that colloidal nano silica can increase or decrease the speed...... the interactions with the alkyd polymer while keeping the nano filler stable in the water phase did not show further improvements of mechanical properties. The best results in respect to mechanical properties, as measured under static and dynamic loading, were obtained with the use of hexamethyldisilazane treated...... of premature cracking. In this study we have shown that increased stiffness in the first stage of coating lifetime is just one of the parameters and that behavior during the aging needs to be taken into account before drawing conclusions....

  14. Influence of using nanoobjects as filler on functionality-based energy use of nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roes, A. L.; Tabak, L. B.; Shen, L.; Nieuwlaar, E.; Patel, M. K.

    2010-08-01

    The goal of our study was to investigate the potential benefits of reinforcing polymer matrices with nanoobjects for structural applications by looking at both the mechanical properties and environmental impacts. For determining the mechanical properties, we applied the material indices defined by Ashby for stiffness and strength. For the calculation of environmental impacts, we applied the life cycle assessment methodology, focusing on non-renewable energy use (NREU). NREU has shown to be a good indicator also for other environmental impacts. We then divided the NREU by the appropriate Ashby index to obtain the `functionality-based NREU'. We studied 23 different nanocomposites, based on thermoplastic and thermosetting polymer matrices and organophilic montmorillonite, silica, carbon nanotubes (single-walled and multiwalled) and calcium carbonate as filler. For 17 of these, we saw a decrease of the functionality-based NREU with increasing filler content. We draw the conclusion that the use of nanoobjects as filler can have benefits from both an environmental point of view and with respect to mechanical properties.

  15. Influence of nanometer scale particulate fillers on some properties of microfilled composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sufyan; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different weight fractions of nanometer sized particulate filler on properties of microfilled composite resin. Composite resin was prepared by mixing 33 wt% of resin matrix to the 67 wt% of silane treated microfine silica particulate fillers with various fractions of nanometer sized fillers (0, 10, 15, 20, 30 wt%) using a high speed mixing machine. Test specimens made of the composites were tested with a three-point bending test with a speed of 1.0 mm/min until fracture. Surface microhardess (Vicker's microhardness) was also determined. The volumetric shrinkage in percent was calculated as a buoyancy change in distilled water by means of the Archimedes principle. The degree of monomer conversion (DC%) of the experimental composites containing different nanofiller fractions was measured using FTIR spectroscopy. Surface roughness (Ra) was determined using a surface profilometer. Nanowear measurements were carried out using a nanoindentation device. The water uptake of specimens was also measured. Parameters were statistically analysed by ANOVA (P < 0.05). The group without nanofillers showed the highest flexural strength and modulus, DC% and Ra value. The group with 30% nanofillers had the highest water uptake and volumetric shrinkage. No significant difference was found in Vicker's microhardness and the nanowear of the composites. The plain microfilled composite demonstrated superior properties compared to the composites loaded with nanofillers with the exception of surface roughness.

  16. Pulmonary effects of occupational exposure to cadmium fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetana, R.; Pilnacek, M.; Schuller, W.; Pospischil, E.; Meisinger, V.; Hochmeister, M.; Kopsa, H.; Sommer, G.

    1988-11-01

    Smelters (n=9) with occupational exposure to cadmium fumes underwent clinical routine screening, lung function test, blood gas analysis and chest-X-ray, furthermore the concentration of cadmium in blood and 24 h-urine samples was determined. The results were compared with data from controls (n=9) without specific occupational burden. Smelters showed decreased vital capacity, decreased partial pressure of oxygen and increased concentration of cadmium in blood and 24 h-urine samples compared to controls. Chronical exposure to cadmium fumes is suspected to be a causal factor for the altered data of smelters. Therefore routine-check-up in workers health control must include diagnostic means, which provide early detection of pulmonary effects.

  17. Pulmonary adverse effects of welding fume in automobile assembly welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifian, Seyed Akbar; Loukzadeh, Ziba; Shojaoddiny-Ardekani, Ahmad; Aminian, Omid

    2011-01-01

    Welding is one of the key components of numerous manufacturing industries, which has potential physical and chemical health hazards. Many components of welding fumes can potentially affect the lung function. This study investigates the effects of welding fumes on lung function and respiratory symptoms among welders of an automobile manufacturing plant in Iran. This historical cohort study assesses 43 male welders and 129 office workers by a questionnaire to record demographic data, smoking habits, work history and respiratory symptoms as well as lung function status by spirometry. The average pulmonary function values of welders were lower relative to controls with dose-effect relationship between work duration and pulmonary function impairment. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was higher in welders than controls. Our findings suggest that welders are at risk for pulmonary disease.

  18. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  19. Modeling of Fume Formation from Shielded Metal Arc Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirakasam, S. P.; Mohan, Sreejith; Santhosh Kumar, M. C.; Surianarayanan, M.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, a semi-empirical model of fume formation rate (FFR) from a shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) process has been developed. The model was developed for a DC electrode positive (DCEP) operation and involves the calculations of droplet temperature, surface area of the droplet, and partial vapor pressures of the constituents of the droplet to predict the FFR. The model was further extended for predicting FFR from nano-coated electrodes. The model estimates the FFR for Fe and Mn assuming constant proportion of other elements in the electrode. Fe FFR was overestimated, while Mn FFR was underestimated. The contribution of spatters and other mechanism in the arc responsible for fume formation were neglected. A good positive correlation was obtained between the predicted and experimental FFR values which highlighted the usefulness of the model.

  20. Bioactive glass particulate filler composite: Effect of coupling of fillers and filler loading on some physical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oral, Onur; Lassila, Lippo V; Kumbuloglu, Ovul; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of silanization of biostable and bioactive glass fillers in a polymer matrix on some of the physical properties of the composite. The water absorption, solubility, flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness of different particulate filler composite resins were studied in vitro. Five different specimen groups were analyzed: A glass-free control, a non-silanized bioactive glass, a silanized bioactive glass, a non-silanized biostable glass and a silanized biostable glass groups. All of these five groups were further divided into sub-groups of dry and water-stored materials, both of them containing groups with 3wt%, 6wt%, 9wt% or 12wt% of glass particles (n=8 per group). The silanization of the glass particles was carried out with 2% of gamma-3-methacryloxyproyltrimethoxysilane (MPS). For the water absorption and solubility tests, the test specimens were stored in water for 60 days, and the percentages of weight change were statistically analyzed. Flexural strength, flexural modulus and toughness values were tested with a three-point bending test and statistically analyzed. Higher solubility values were observed in non-silanized glass in proportion to the percentage of glass particles. Silanization, on the other hand, decreased the solubility values of both types of glass particles and polymer. While 12wt% non-silanized bioactive glass specimens showed -0.98wt% solubility, 12wt% silanized biostable glass specimens were observed to have only -0.34wt% solubility. The three-point bending results of the dry specimens showed that flexural strength, toughness and flexural modulus decreased in proportion to the increase of glass fillers. The control group presented the highest results (106.6MPa for flexural strength, 335.7kPA for toughness, 3.23GPa for flexural modulus), whereas for flexural strength and toughness, 12wt% of non-silanized biostable glass filler groups presented the lowest (70.3MPa for flexural strength

  1. Bonding of ceramic insert to a laboratory particle filler composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kienanen, Pietari; Alander, Pasi; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2005-10-01

    The push-out bond strength of cylindrical ceramic inserts (CI) to particulate filler resin composite (VC) was evaluated in this study. Various surface treatments to improve the adhesion of CI to resin composite were tested. Additionally, the effect of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) laminate encapsulation around CI was tested. Feldspathic porcelain CI with a diameter of 3.1 mm was bonded to VC. Adhesive resin was used for bonding. In group 1, no surface treatment of CI was done. In group 2, CI was encapsulated with a thin layer of woven glass FRC. In group 3, the surface of the CI was tribochemically silica coated and silanized. In group 4, the surface of the CI was grit-blasted with 50 microm aluminum oxide and etched with hydrofluoric acid. In group 5, the grit-blasted CI was encapsulated with a layer of FRC. The specimens (n = 6/group) were either dry stored or thermocycled in water (6000 x 5-55 degrees C). The push-out test was carried out with a universal material testing machine. The highest push-out strength was achieved in group 5 (20.4 MPa) and the lowest in group 2 (11.5 MPa). ANOVA revealed that both surface treatment and storage condition had a significant effect on push-out strength (p < 0.05). We conclude that the additional glass FRC encapsulation can be used to increase the bond strength of insert to composite.

  2. Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia following nitric acid fume exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L T; Ho, C H B; Putti, T C

    2014-03-01

    We describe a patient with clinical, radiological and pathological features of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia. Investigation showed that this was likely to have been a delayed consequence of inhalation of nitric acid fumes (containing nitrogen dioxide) after a fire. This case shows that thorough investigation of the aetiology is important not only in clinical management but also in ensuring patients benefit from appropriate work injury compensation.

  3. Detailed characterization of welding fumes in personal exposure samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quémerais, B.; Mino, James; Amin, M. R.; Golshahi, H.; Izadi, H.

    2015-05-01

    The objective of the project was to develop a method allowing for detailed characterization of welding particles including particle number concentration, size distribution, surface chemistry and chemical composition of individual particles, as well as metal concentration of various welding fumes in personal exposure samples using regular sampling equipment. A sample strategy was developed to evaluate the variation of the collection methods on mass concentration. Samples were collected with various samplers and filters at two different locations using our collection system. The first location was using a robotic welding system while the second was manual welding. Collected samples were analysed for mass concentration using gravimetryand metal concentration using ICP/OES. More advanced analysis was performed on selected filters using X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy to determine surface composition of the particles, and X-Ray Diffraction to determine chemical composition of the fumes. Results showed that the robotic system had a lot of variation in space when the collection system was located close to the weld. Collection efficiency was found to be quite variable depending upon the type of filter. As well, metal concentrations in blank filters were dependent upon the type of filter with MCE presenting with the highest blank values. Results obtained with the XRD and XPS systems showed that it was possible to analyse a small of powdered welding fume sample but results on filters were not conclusive.

  4. The effect of thermal loading on laboratory fume hood performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, J D; Chessin, S J; Chesnovar, B W; Lillquist, D R

    2000-11-01

    A modified version of the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 Method of Testing Performance of Laboratory Fume Hoods was used to evaluate the relationship between thermal loading in a laboratory fume hood and subsequent tracer gas leakage. Three types of laboratory burners were used, alone and in combination, to thermally challenge the hood. Heat output from burners was measured in BTU/hr, which was based on the fuel heat capacity and flow rate. Hood leakage was measured between 2824 and 69,342 BTU/hr. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was released at 23.5 LPM for each level of thermal loading. Duct temperature was also measured during the heating process. Results indicate a linear relationship for both BTU/hr vs. hood leakage and duct temperature vs. hood leakage. Under these test conditions, each increase of 10,000 BTU/hr resulted in an additional 4 ppm SF6 in the manikin's breathing zone (r2 = 0.68). An additional 3.1 ppm SF6 was measured for every 25 degrees F increase in duct temperature (r2 = 0.60). Both BTU/hr and duct temperature models showed p hood leakage than duct temperature. The results of this study indicate that heat output may compromise fume hood performance. This finding is consistent with those of previous studies.

  5. Toughening Mechanisms in Silica-Filled Epoxy Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Binay S.

    and modeled fracture energy results. Furthermore, the contribution of microcracking was most prevalent at lower filler contents which suggests that the presence of microcracking may account for the previously unexplained improvements in fracture behavior attained in silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites at low filler contents. Secondly, surface modification through the application of three different propriety surface treatments ("A", "B" and "C") was found to greatly influence the processibility and fracture behavior of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites. B-treated silica nanoparticles were found to readily form micron-scale agglomerates, settled during nanocomposite curing and showed no improvement in fracture toughness with increasing filler content. In contrast, the nanocomposites consisting of A-treated and C-treated silica nanoparticles yielded morphologies primarily containing well-dispersed nanoparticles. Therefore, fracture toughness improved with increasing filler content. Finally, particle porosity was found to have no significant effect on fracture behavior for the range of silica-filled epoxy nanocomposites investigated. Lower density porous silica nanoparticles were just as effective toughening agents as higher density non-porous silica nanoparticles. Consequently, the potential exists for the use of toughened-epoxies in lightweight structural applications.

  6. Influence of surface modified nano silica on alkyd binder before and after accelerated weathering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolic, Miroslav; Nguyen, Hiep Dinh; Daugaard, Anders Egede

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of nano fillers in exterior wood coatings is not straight forward. Influence on aging of polymer binder needs to be taken into account along with possible benefits that nano fillers can provide immediately after application. This study shows the influence of two differently modified...... hydrophobic nano silica on an alkyd binder for exterior wood coatings. One month after application, the highest strength and energy required to break the films was obtained with addition of 3% disilazane modified silica. Changes in tensile properties were accompanied with a small increase in glass transition...... temperature. However, the highest stability upon accelerated weathering, measured by ATR-IR and DMA, was for nano composites with the highest amount of nano filler. The reasons for the observed changes are discussed together with the appearance of a feature that is possibly a secondary relaxation of alkyd...

  7. The humoral immune response of mice exposed to simulated road paving-like asphalt fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Stacey E; Munson, Albert E; Tomblyn, Seth; Meade, B Jean; Diotte, Nicole M

    2008-07-01

    Asphalt is a complex mixture of organic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), which have been reported to cause serious adverse health effects in humans. Workers in manufacturing and construction trades exposed to asphalt are potentially at risk for being exposed to asphalt fumes and PAHs. Epidemiological investigations have collected mounting evidence that chemicals found in asphalt fumes present carcinogenic and possibly immunotoxic hazards. Studies evaluating the immunotoxic effects of asphalt fume are limited due to the large number of variables associated with asphalt fume exposures. This work investigates the immuno-toxic effects of road paving-like asphalt fume by analyzing the in vivo IgM response to a T-dependent antigen after exposure to whole, vapor, and particulate phase road paving-like asphalt fumes and asphalt fume condensate. Systemic exposures via intraperitoneal injection of asphalt fume condensate (at 0.625 mg/kg) and the particulate phase (at 5 mg/kg) resulted in significant reductions in the specific spleen IgM response to SRBC. Pharyngeal aspiration of the asphalt fume condensate (at 5 mg/kg) also resulted in significant suppression of the IgM response to SRBC. A significant reduction in the specific spleen IgM activity was observed after inhalation exposure to whole asphalt fumes (35 mg/m(3)) and the vapor components (11 mg/m(3)). Dermal exposures to the asphalt fume condensate resulted in significant reductions in the total (at 50 mg/kg) and specific (at 250 mg/kg) spleen IgM response to SRBC. These results demonstrate that exposure to road paving-like asphalt fumes is immunosuppressive through systemic, respiratory, and dermal routes of exposure in a murine model and raise concerns regarding the potential for adverse immunological effects.

  8. EVALUATION OF LEAKAGE FROM FUME HOODS USING TRACER GAS, TRACER NANOPARTICLES AND NANOPOWDER HANDLING TEST METHODOLOGIES

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Kevin H.; Tsai, Candace Su-Jung; Woskie, Susan R.; Bennett, James S.; Garcia, Alberto; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    The most commonly reported control used to minimize workplace exposures to nanomaterials is the chemical fume hood. Studies have shown, however, that significant releases of nanoparticles can occur when materials are handled inside fume hoods. This study evaluated the performance of a new commercially available nano fume hood using three different test protocols. Tracer gas, tracer nanoparticle, and nanopowder handling protocols were used to evaluate the hood. A static test procedure using tr...

  9. Full-scale experimental research on fire fume refluence of sloped long and large curved tunnel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale experimental research is conducted on the fire fume refluence of a sloped long and large curved tunnel in the underground plant of a hydraulic and hydropower engineering project under three different fire powers.As a result,the eddy effect and pattern of the fire fume flow in the tunnel in case of fire is discovered and the refluence of the fume layers in case of fire is observed.Through analysis of the temperature measurement resulted in the course of the experiment,the main characteristics and performance of the fire fume refluence are discussed under the three different fire powers.

  10. Effect of Nano-Aluminum and Fumed Silica Particles on Deflagration and Detonation of Nitromethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    cm3 syringe, equipped with varying gauges of long hypodermic needles , was employed to load the tube. The syringe allowed for the gel-like mixtures to...when maximum properties predicted by the Chapman – Jouguet theory are exceeded due to upstream pressures. All constituents used in failure diameter...burning times between the 38 and 80 nmparticles, described by the d2-law of diffusion flame theory (tb,diff/ dp2) and the d1-law for kinetically

  11. Evaluation of Clay and Fumed Silica Nanoparticles on Adsorption of Surfactant Polymer during Enhanced Oil Recovery

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cheraghian, Goshtasp

    2017-01-01

    .... The effects of nano concentration on static adsorption of surfactant were investigated at variable condition polymer and surfactant concentration and nanoparticles are critical parameters influence...

  12. Effect of silica fume addition on the chloride related transport properties of high performance concrete

    OpenAIRE

    JUAN LIZARAZO-MARRIAGA; LUCIO GUILLERMO LÓPEZ YÉPEZ

    2012-01-01

    La corrosión del acero de refuerzo, debido a la penetración de cloruro es la principal causa de problemas de durabilidad en el concreto. De esta forma, este documento resume los resultados de un estudio experimental llevado a cabo con el fin de investigar la influencia del contenido de microsilice (SF) en los cloruros relacionados con algunas propiedades de transporte del concreto. Para ello, la resistencia a la compresión, la penetración de cloruros libres por difusión, la carga pasada bajo ...

  13. Microstructure-based modelling of arbitrary deformation histories of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, H.; Klüppel, M.

    2012-11-01

    A physically motivated theory of rubber reinforcement based on filler cluster mechanics is presented considering the mechanical behaviour of quasi-statically loaded elastomeric materials subjected to arbitrary deformation histories. This represents an extension of a previously introduced model describing filler induced stress softening and hysteresis of highly strained elastomers. These effects are referred to the hydrodynamic reinforcement of rubber elasticity due to strain amplification by stiff filler clusters and cyclic breakdown and re-aggregation (healing) of softer, already damaged filler clusters. The theory is first developed for the special case of outer stress-strain cycles with successively increasing maximum strain. In this more simple case, all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of the cycle and the mechanical energy stored in the strained clusters is completely dissipated, i.e. only irreversible stress contributions result. Nevertheless, the description of outer cycles involves already all material parameters of the theory and hence they can be used for a fitting procedure. In the general case of an arbitrary deformation history, the cluster mechanics of the material is complicated due to the fact that not all soft clusters are broken at the turning points of a cycle. For that reason additional reversible stress contributions considering the relaxation of clusters upon retraction have to be taken into account for the description of inner cycles. A special recursive algorithm is developed constituting a frame of the mechanical response of encapsulated inner cycles. Simulation and measurement are found to be in fair agreement for CB and silica filled SBR/BR and EPDM samples, loaded in compression and tension along various deformation histories.

  14. Dermal fillers for tissue augmentation: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeplin, Philip H.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Treatments with dermal fillers for tissue augmentation constitute the majority of all non-surgical procedures in plastic surgery. Newly developed products get launched and the market grows continuously, but the “ideal” substance has yet not been found. The substances used these days are high molecular compounds. They have substantial differences in their physicochemical properties and are suspended in complex matrices. This overview describes the latest history of dermal fillers and the commonly used substances of different origin and formalizes the need for the development of systematic procedures of standardized pre-clinical tests with subsequent certification as well as the establishment of interdisciplinary clinical guidelines to ensure custumer’s safety.

  15. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anthony J.; Chang, Brian L.; Percec, Ivona

    2016-01-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005–2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration–approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that “product customization” is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes. PMID:28018778

  16. Technical Considerations for Filler and Neuromodulator Refinements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, José Raúl; Wilson, Anthony J; Chang, Brian L; Percec, Ivona

    2016-12-01

    Background: The toolbox for cosmetic practitioners is growing at an unprecedented rate. There are novel products every year and expanding off-label indications for neurotoxin and soft-tissue filler applications. Consequently, aesthetic physicians are increasingly challenged by the task of selecting the most appropriate products and techniques to achieve optimal patient outcomes. Methods: We employed a PubMed literature search of facial injectables from the past 10 years (2005-2015), with emphasis on those articles embracing evidence-based medicine. We evaluated the scientific background of every product and the physicochemical properties that make each one ideal for specific indications. The 2 senior authors provide commentary regarding their clinical experience with specific technical refinements of neuromodulators and soft-tissue fillers. Results: Neurotoxins and fillers are characterized by unique physical characteristics that distinguish each product. This results in subtle but important differences in their clinical applications. Specific indications and recommendations for the use of the various neurotoxins and soft-tissue fillers are reviewed. The discussion highlights refinements in combination treatments and product physical modifications, according to specific treatment zones. Conclusions: The field of facial aesthetics has evolved dramatically, mostly secondary to our increased understanding of 3-dimensional structural volume restoration. Our work reviews Food and Drug Administration-approved injectables. In addition, we describe how to modify products to fulfill specific indications such as treatment of the mid face, décolletage, hands, and periorbital regions. Although we cannot directly evaluate the duration or exact physical properties of blended products, we argue that "product customization" is safe and provides natural results with excellent patient outcomes.

  17. Evaluation of dermal fillers with noncontact optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Over 2 million dermal filler procedures are performed each year in the USA alone, and this figure is only expected to increase as the aging population continues to grow. Dermal filler treatments can last from a few months to years depending on the type of filler and its placement. Although adverse reactions are rare, they can be quite severe due to ischemic events and filler migration. Previously, techniques such as ultrasound or magnetic resonance imaging have been used to evaluate the filler injections. However, these techniques are not practical for real-time filler injection guidance due to limitations such as the physical presence of the transducer. In this work, we propose the use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for image-guided dermal filler injections due to the high spatial and temporal resolution of OCT. In addition, we utilize a noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) technique, to evaluate the efficacy of the dermal filler injection. A grid of air-pulse OCE measurements was taken, and the dynamic response of the skin to the air-pulse was translated to the Young's modulus and shear viscosity. Our results show that OCT was able to visualize the dermal filler injection process, and that OCE was able to localize the dermal filler injection sites. Combined with functional techniques such as optical microangiography, and recent advanced in OCT hardware, OCT may be able to provide real-time injection guidance in 3D by visualizing blood vessels to prevent ischemic events.

  18. Persistence of deposited metals in the lungs after stainless steel and mild steel welding fume inhalation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Stone, Samuel; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Chapman, Rebecca; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G

    2011-05-01

    Welding generates complex metal fumes that vary in composition. The objectives of this study were to compare the persistence of deposited metals and the inflammatory potential of stainless and mild steel welding fumes, the two most common fumes used in US industry. Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 40 mg/m(3) of stainless or mild steel welding fumes for 3 h/day for 3 days. Controls were exposed to filtered air. Generated fume was collected, and particle size and elemental composition were determined. Bronchoalveolar lavage was done on days 0, 8, 21, and 42 after the last exposure to assess lung injury/inflammation and to recover lung phagocytes. Non-lavaged lung samples were analyzed for total and specific metal content as a measure of metal persistence. Both welding fumes were similar in particle morphology and size. Following was the chemical composition of the fumes-stainless steel: 57% Fe, 20% Cr, 14% Mn, and 9% Ni; mild steel: 83% Fe and 15% Mn. There was no effect of the mild steel fume on lung injury/inflammation at any time point compared to air control. Lung injury and inflammation were significantly elevated at 8 and 21 days after exposure to the stainless steel fume compared to control. Stainless steel fume exposure was associated with greater recovery of welding fume-laden macrophages from the lungs at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. A higher concentration of total metal was observed in the lungs of the stainless steel welding fume at all time points compared with the mild steel fume. The specific metals present in the two fumes were cleared from the lungs at different rates. The potentially more toxic metals (e.g., Mn, Cr) present in the stainless steel fume were cleared from the lungs more quickly than Fe, likely increasing their translocation from the respiratory system to other organs.

  19. Dimethylsilanone generation from pyrolysis of polysiloxanes filled with nanosized silica and ceria/silica

    CERN Document Server

    Kulyk, Kostiantyn; Gatchell, Michael; Alexander, John D; Borysenko, Mykola; Palianytsia, Borys; Larsson, Mats; Kulik, Tetiana

    2016-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is a widely used organosilicon polymer often employed in formulations with fine oxide particles for various high temperature applications. Although PDMS is considered to be thermally stable and chemically inert, it is not always clear how the oxide filler influences its thermoresistance, decomposition chemistry and what reactive products are formed in the underlying thermal reactions. In this work we use temperature programmed desorption mass spectrometry (TPD MS) to study the pyrolysis of PDMS and its composites with nanosized silica and ceria/silica. Our results suggest that the elusive organosilicon compound - dimethylsilanone is generated from PDMS over a broad temperature range (in some cases starting at 70${\\deg}$C). The presence of nano-oxides catalyzed this process. Ions characteristic of the fragmentation of dimethylsilanone under electron ionization were assigned with the aid of DFT structure calculations. Possible reaction mechanisms for generating dimethylsilanone were ...

  20. Ultrasound detection and identification of cosmetic fillers in the skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wortsman, X.; Wortsman, J.; Orlandi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background While the incidence of cosmetic filler injections is rising world-wide, neither exact details of the procedure nor the agent used are always reported or remembered by the patients. Thus, although complications are reportedly rare, availability of a precise diagnostic tool to detect...... cutaneous filler deposits could help clarify the association between the procedure and the underlying pathology. Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate cutaneous sonography in the detection and identification of cosmetic fillers deposits and, describe dermatological abnormalities found associated...... with the presence of those agents. Methods We used ultrasound in a porcine skin model to determine the sonographic characteristics of commonly available filler agents, and subsequently applied the analysis to detect and identify cosmetic fillers among patients referred for skin disorders. Results Fillers...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1158 - Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with...-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1158 Dust, fume, and mist tests; respirators with filters; minimum requirements; general. (a) Three respirators with cartridges containing,...

  2. Numerical investigation of turbulent diffusion in push-pull and exhaust fume cupboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chern, Ming-Jyh; Cheng, Wei-Ying

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate airflow motions and associated pollutant distributions in fume hoods. Currently, most exhaust fume hoods are designed to use an airflow induced by a fan at the top to remove pollutants. Ambient fluids are drawn, flowing toward the opening and subsequently turning to the outlet at the roof. Pollutants are supposedly captured by the airflow and brought out from the cupboard. The present numerical study based on the finite-volume method and the standard k-epsilon turbulence model simulates flow patterns and pollutant distributions in an exhaust fume hood with and without a manikin present. Subsequently, a push-pull air curtain technique is applied to a fume cupboard. To investigate the capturing performance of a push-pull fume cupboard, numerical approaches are used to simulate flow and concentration variations. Numerical results reveal that four characteristic flow modes exist for a variety of speed ratios of push-pull flows and openings. A concave curtain mode which has a fast pull flow and a weak push flow is suggested for the operation of a push-pull fume cupboard. According to ANSI-ASHRAE Standard 110-1995, the local concentration at the specified point is fume cupboard are not affected by a manikin. In terms of those predicted results, it turns out that a push-pull fume cupboard successfully captures pollutants and prevents an operator from breathing pollutants.

  3. Indirect Prediction of Welding Fume Diffusion inside a Room Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujit Dahal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Welding is an important and widely used process in the manufacturing and maintenance of various works involving metals and alloys. While welding has broad applications, the welding fume generated during the process has impacts on workers’ health, which needs to be addressed. One of the major steps that can be undertaken to take care of this issue is the use of ventilation, which requires knowledge of characteristics and dispersion of the welding fume in the workers’ breathing zone. It is difficult to assess welding fume dispersion from manual measurement due to numerous welding processes and sufficient data requirement. Numerical prediction of welding fume is dubious due to several errors. This paper considers the use of numerically predicted CO2 concentrations to indirectly predict welding fume distribution in workshops. This is based on the assumption that if the particles are sufficiently small size, they follow the diffusion pattern of gases. Experiments are carried out in a room with an opening and a welding fume generation system for measurement of CO2 and fume diffusion. The results show high possibility of predicting welding fume concentration based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD simulated CO2 concentration with a correlation coefficient of 0.74.

  4. Effect of composition on thermal conductivity of silica insulation media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung; Kwon, Young-Pil; Kwon, Hyuk-Chon; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2008-10-01

    Nano-sized fumed silica-based insulation media were prepared by adding TiO2 powders and ceramic fibers as opacifiers and structural integrity improvers, respectively. The high temperature thermal conductivities of the fumed silica-based insulation media were investigated using different types of TiO2 opacifier and by varying its content. The opacifying effects of nanostructured TiO2 powders produced by homogeneous precipitation process at low temperatures (HPPLT) were compared with those of commercial TiO2 powder. The nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder with a mean particle size of 1.8 microm was more effective to reduce radiative heat transfer than the commercial one with a similar mean particle size. The insulation samples with the HPPLT TiO2 powder showed about 46% lower thermal conductivity at temperatures of about 820 degrees C than those with the commercial one. This interesting result might be due to the more effective radiation scattering efficiency of the nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder which has better gap filling and coating capability in nano-sized composite compacts.

  5. Fume hoods, open canopy type--their ability to capture pollutants in various environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, M

    1979-02-01

    Using field observations, modelling techniques and theoretical analysis, parameters describing the performance and collection efficiency of large industrial canopy fume hoods are established for, a) steady state collection of fume and b) collection of plumes with fluctuating flowrates. Hopper and pool type hoods are investigated. A baffle plate arrangement for placement within hoods is proposed. It prevents recirculation and spillage of fume. Temporary storage of fume surges within the hood is shown to be possible. At a cost of $6 per m3/hr ($10 per ft3/min) of installed fume control system capacity the arrangement promises to save millions of dollars on large new installations and to significantly improve the collection efficiency of many existing systems. A practical application of the results is proposed for the design of electric arc furnace canopy hoods.

  6. Synthetic Reference Materials Based on Polymer Films for the Control of Welding Fumes Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, O. V.; Kuznetsova, A. N.; Begunova, L. A.

    2017-04-01

    Analysis of the current hygienic situation in the welding production showed that the intensification of welding processes involves the deterioration of air quality, which negatively affects the welders health. Welders are exposed to a variety of metal fumes, including manganese that may elevate the risk for neurological diseases. The control of metals concentration in the air of the working area is difficult due to the lack of reference materials. The creation of reference materials of welding fumes composition is a challenge due to chemical characteristics of their physical properties. Synthetic samples in a form of the polymer film containing powder particles of welding fumes were create. Studies on the selection of the polymer were done. Experiments proved that the qualitative materials of synthetic welding fumes are obtained by using polyvinyl alcohol. The metals concentration in the samples was determined by X-ray fluorescence analysis. The obtained data demonstrates indirectly the uniform distribution of welding fumes powder particles on the polymer film.

  7. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, M.L.; Sikka, V.K.

    1998-03-10

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and cast in copper chill molds. 3 figs.

  8. Filler metal alloy for welding cast nickel aluminide alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santella, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01

    A filler metal alloy used as a filler for welding east nickel aluminide alloys contains from about 15 to about 17 wt. % chromium, from about 4 to about 5 wt. % aluminum, equal to or less than about 1.5 wt. % molybdenum, from about 1 to about 4.5 wt. % zirconium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % yttrium, equal to or less than about 0.01 wt. % boron and the balance nickel. The filler metal alloy is made by melting and casting techniques such as are melting the components of the filler metal alloy and east in copper chill molds.

  9. New Filler Material for Reference Free Part Encapsulation Fixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bei-zhi; YANG Jian-guo; ZHOU Hu

    2002-01-01

    Reference free part encapsulation (RFPE) is a nontraditional universal fixturing technique. In this paper,new filler material-a lower melting point alloy for RFPE technique is introduced. Based on experiment, the shrinlkage and expansion rate, the effect of filler on workpiece drift and the effect of filler thickness on cutting distortion are studied. The alloy has a good mechanical and physical performance and the need of RFPE fixturing can be perfectly satisfied. The result shows that if the formula and process parameters of filler material are properly selected, it can obviously improve the quality of the workpiece, enhance the machining efficiency and reduce the manufacturing cost.

  10. Coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules as a basis for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ting; Fan, Jun; Chen, Wensen; Shu, Jiayan; Qian, Xueren; Wei, Haifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Shen, Jing

    2016-09-20

    The sustainable, efficient use of renewable bio-based additives in the production of various materials fits well into the concept of sustainability. Here, the concept of coaggregation of mineral filler particles and starch granules for improving filler-fiber interaction in paper-based cellulosic networks is presented. Coaggregation of precipitated calcium carbonate filler particles and uncooked, unmodified corn starch granules by cationic polyacrylamide (a cationic high molecular weight polymer flocculant) in combination with bentonite (an anionic microparticle) prior to addition to cellulosic fiber slurry delivered enhanced filler bondability with cellulosic fibers. For instance, under the conditions studied, preaggregation resulted in an increase in filler bondability factor from 9.24 to 15.21 at starch dosage of 1% (on the basis of the dry weight of papermaking stock). The swelling and gelatinization of the starch granules in starch-filler preaggregates or hybrids enabled the "bridging" of the gaps in cellulosic networks, leading to structural consolidation and strength enhancement.

  11. Development of polymer concrete radioactive waste management containers - Effect of ceramic fillers on the mechanical and physico-chemical properties of polymer concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Chun; Park, Min Jin; Shin, Hyun Ick; Choi, Yong Jin [Myongji University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-11-01

    Particle size distribution of the ceramic filler is the primary factor to influence the composition of polymer concrete. The estimated optimum compositions of the polymer concretes prepared in the study are 62 {approx} 71wt% for fine aggregates, 6 {approx} 29wt% for ceramic fillers and 9 {approx}13wt% for polymer resin. Calcium Carbonate and silica are the ceramic fillers practically usable for manufacturing polymer concrete. Less polymer resin is required for the preparation of polymer concrete at lower relative packing volume of ceramic fillers. It has been found that depended on the type of fine aggregates, the effect of ceramic filler on the mechanical behavior of polymer concrete can be opposite. Strength and elastic modulus of polymer concrete are affected by gamma radiation. Crosslinking of unsaturated polyester resin and epoxy resin are promoted by gamma radiation up to 00 MRad and 50 MRad, respectively. However, higher dose of radiation degrades the mechanical properties of polymer concrete. Hydrothermal treatment of polymer concrete at 80 deg. C and 1bar for 30 days causes about 25% reduction of bending strength and elastic modulus. The strength reduction arises from the hydrolysis of ester groups in unsaturated polyester catalyzed by hydrothermal condition. 13 refs., 37 figs., 15 tabs. (Author)

  12. Evaluation of one-step luminescent cyanoacrylate fuming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuu, Alicia; Chadwick, Scott; Spindler, Xanthe; Lam, Rolanda; Moret, Sébastien; Roux, Claude

    2016-06-01

    One-step luminescent cyanoacrylates have recently been introduced as an alternative to the conventional cyanoacrylate fuming methods. These new techniques do not require the application of a luminescent post-treatment in order to enhance cyanoacrylate-developed fingermarks. In this study, three one-step polymer cyanoacrylates: CN Yellow Crystals (Aneval Inc.), PolyCyano UV (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) and PECA Multiband (BVDA), and one monomer cyanoacrylate: Lumikit™ (Crime Scene Technology), were evaluated against a conventional two-step cyanoacrylate fuming method (Cyanobloom (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) with rhodamine 6G stain). The manufacturers' recommended conditions or conditions compatible with the MVC™ 1000/D (Foster+Freeman Ltd.) were assessed with fingermarks aged for up to 8 weeks on non-porous and semi-porous substrates. Under white light, Cyanobloom generally gave better development than the one-step treatments across the substrates. Similarly when viewed under the respective luminescent conditions, Cyanobloom with rhodamine 6G stain resulted in improved contrast against the one-step treatments except on polystyrene, where PolyCyano UV and PECA Multiband gave better visualisation. Rhodamine 6G post-treatment of one-step samples did not significantly enhance the contrast of any of the one-step treatments against Cyanobloom/rhodamine 6G-treated samples.

  13. Testing procedures to determine the toxicity of blast fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonel, P.; Bigourd, J. (Centre d' Etudes et Recherches des Charbonnages de France (CERCHAR), 60 - Verneuil-en-Halatte:

    1980-05-01

    Several methods are available in CERCHAR to determine the production of toxic gases from a shot of explosives: blasting of 50 g or 100 g of explosives in a 115 l bomb usually in the presence of sand and in a nitrogen atmosphere, blasting from 0.5 kg to 1 kg of explosive in a 15 m/sup 3/ chamber in the presence of air, under variable confinement (suspended charge or charge in a test mortar with or without stemming and possibly with a sheath). The test results show that the production of toxic gases depends to a great extent on the blasting conditions: type of detonation of the explosive, work done by the fumes, possible reactions of the fumes with atmospheric oxygen or with materials in contact with the explosive (cartridge material, stemming, sheath). It appears that the method consisting in blasting of explosives in a steel mortar with stemming in the 15 m/sup 3/ chamber gives results most closely related to those obtained in underground blasting. Therefore this method seems prefereble.

  14. Standard guidelines for the use of dermal fillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedamurthy Maya

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used fillers vary greatly in their sources, efficacy duration and site of deposition; detailed knowledge of these properties is essential for administering them. Indications for fillers include facial lines (wrinkles, folds, lip enhancement, facial deformities, depressed scars, periocular melanoses, sunken eyes, dermatological diseases-angular cheilitis, scleroderma, AIDS lipoatrophy, earlobe plumping, earring ptosis, hand, neck, dιcolletι rejuvenation. Physicians′ qualifications : Any qualified dermatologist may use fillers after receiving adequate training in the field. This may be obtained either during postgraduation or at any workshop dedicated to the subject of fillers. The physicians should have a thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the area designated to receive an injection of fillers and the aesthetic principles involved. They should also have a thorough knowledge of the chemical nature of the material of the filler, its longevity, injection techniques, and any possible side effects. Facility: Fillers can be administered in the dermatologist′s minor procedure room. Preoperative counseling and informed consent: Detailed counseling with respect to the treatment, desired effects, and longevity of the filler should be discussed with the patient. Patients should be given brochures to study and adequate opportunity to seek information. Detailed consent forms need to be completed by the patients. A consent form should include the type of filler, longevity expected and possible postoperative complications. Preoperative photography should be carried out. Choice of the filler depends on the site, type of defect, results needed, and the physician′s experience. Injection technique and volume depend on the filler and the physician′s preference, as outlined in these guidelines.

  15. Mechanical property and thermal stability of polyurethane composites reinforced with polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes and inorganic flame retardant filler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Kwon, Younghwan; Kim, Chang Kee

    2014-08-01

    Mechanical properties and thermal stability of polyurethane composites were investigated with a combination of polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS) molecules and inorganic barium sulfate. These hybrid composites were prepared using one-step method through the incorporation of flexible hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene prepolymer, reactive POSS nanoparticles, and barium sulfate under isophorone diisocyanate curative system. In polyurethane composites, POSS and inorganic barium sulfate were utilized for mechanical reinforcement and flame retardant filler, respectively. The decomposition of POSS molecules during oxyacetylene torch exposure resulted in the formation of silica-based nanosized droplets, contributing on ablation behavior.

  16. Investigation of Mechanical and Electrical Properties of Hybrid Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes and Micrometer-Sized Silica Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Yun; You, Byeong Il; Ahn, Ji Ho; Lee, Gyo Woo [Chonbuk Nat’l Univ., Junju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, to enhance the electrical insulation of composite specimens in addition to the improved mechanical properties, the epoxy composite were reinforced with carbon nanotubes and silica particles. Tensile strength, Young's modulus, dynamic mechanical behavior, and electrical resistivity of the specimens were measured with varied contents of the two fillers. The mechanical and electrical properties were discussed, and the experimental results related to the mechanical properties of the specimens were compared with those from several micromechanics models. The hybrid composites specimens with 0.6 wt% of carbon nanotubes and 50 wt% of silica particles showed improved mechanical properties, with increase in tensile strength and Young's modulus up to 11% and 35%, respectively, with respect to those of the baseline specimen. The electrical conductivity of the composite specimens with carbon nanotubes filler also improved. Further, the electrical insulation of the hybrid composites specimens with the two fillers improved in addition to the improvement in mechanical properties.

  17. Synthetic aspects and characterization of polypropylene–silica nanocomposites prepared via solid-state modification and sol–gel reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, Sachin; Goossens, Han; Picchioni, Francesco; Magusin, Pieter; Mezari, Brahim; Duin, Martin van

    2005-01-01

    A new route is developed by combining solid-state modification (SSM) by grafting vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES) with a sol–gel method to prepare PP/silica nanocomposites with varying degree of adhesion between filler and matrix. VTES was grafted via SSM in porous PP particles. Bulk polymerization unde

  18. Synthetic aspects and characterization of polypropylene-silica nanocomposites prepared via solid-state modification and sol-gel reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jain, S; Goossens, H; Picchioni, F; Magusin, P; Mezari, B

    2005-01-01

    A new route is developed by combining solid-state modification (SSM) by grafting vinyl triethoxysilane (VTES) with a sol-gel method to prepare PP/silica nanocomposites with varying degree of adhesion between filler and matrix. VTES was grafted via SSM in porous PP particles. Bulk polymerization unde

  19. High filler concrete using fly ash. Chloride penetration and microstructure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valcke, S.L.A.; Polder, R.B.; Nijland, T.G.; Leegwater, G.A.; Visser, J.H.M.; Bigaj-van Vliet, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    Most high filler concrete studies are based on relatively high contents of powder (cement + filler) (>400 kg m-3). This paper aims to increase the total fly ash content relative to the clinker content, while simultaneously minimizing the total powder content in the concrete to values lower than 300

  20. 7 CFR 58.229 - Filler and packaging equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Filler and packaging equipment. 58.229 Section 58.229....229 Filler and packaging equipment. All filling and packaging equipment shall be of sanitary... equipment should comply with the 3-A Sanitary Standards for equipment for Packaging Dry Milk and Dry...

  1. Bio-based fillers for environmentally friendly composites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokhothu, Thabang H

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available of Composites from Renewable Materials, Volume 1, Structure and Chemistry, p. 243-270 Bio-based Fillers for Environmentally Friendly Composites Thabang H. Mokhothu and Maya J. John ABSTRACT: The use of bio-based fillers as alternative replacement...

  2. Selecting fillers on emotional appearance improves lineup identification accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowe, Heather D; Klatt, Thimna; Colloff, Melissa F

    2014-12-01

    Mock witnesses sometimes report using criminal stereotypes to identify a face from a lineup, a tendency known as criminal face bias. Faces are perceived as criminal-looking if they appear angry. We tested whether matching the emotional appearance of the fillers to an angry suspect can reduce criminal face bias. In Study 1, mock witnesses (n = 226) viewed lineups in which the suspect had an angry, happy, or neutral expression, and we varied whether the fillers matched the expression. An additional group of participants (n = 59) rated the faces on criminal and emotional appearance. As predicted, mock witnesses tended to identify suspects who appeared angrier and more criminal-looking than the fillers. This tendency was reduced when the lineup fillers matched the emotional appearance of the suspect. Study 2 extended the results, testing whether the emotional appearance of the suspect and fillers affects recognition memory. Participants (n = 1,983) studied faces and took a lineup test in which the emotional appearance of the target and fillers was varied between subjects. Discrimination accuracy was enhanced when the fillers matched an angry target's emotional appearance. We conclude that lineup member emotional appearance plays a critical role in the psychology of lineup identification. The fillers should match an angry suspect's emotional appearance to improve lineup identification accuracy.

  3. Supplementary catechins attenuate cooking-oil-fumes-induced oxidative stress in rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Huei; Lin, Chun-Yao; Yang, Joan-Hwa; Liou, Shaw-Yih; Li, Ping-Chia; Chien, Chiang-Ting

    2009-06-30

    Cooking-oil-fumes containing toxic components may induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) to oxidize macromolecules and lead to acute lung injury. Our previous study showed that a decaffineated green tea extract containing (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, (+)-gallocatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate, and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate can inhibit oxidation, inflammation, and apoptosis. We determined whether the catechins supplement may reduce cooking-oil-fumes-induced acute lung injury in rat. In the urethane-anesthetized Wistar rat subjected to 30-120 min of cooking-oil-fumes exposure, blood ROS significantly increased in the recovery stage. After 30-min cooking-oil-fumes exposure, the enhanced blood ROS level further increased in a time-dependent manner during the recovery stage (321 +/- 69 counts/10 s after 1 h, 540 +/- 89 counts/10 s after 2 h, and 873 +/- 112 counts/10 s after 4 h). Four hours after 30-min cooking-oil-fumes exposure, lung lavage neutrophils and ROS as well as lung tissue dityrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal increased significantly. Two weeks of catechins supplememnt significantly reduced the enhanced lavage ROS, lung dityrosine and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal level. Cooking-oil-fumes-induced oxidative stress decreased lung Bcl-2/Bax ratio and HSP70 expression, but catechins treatment preserved the downregulation of Bcl-2/Bax ratio and HSP70 expression. We conclude that catechins supplement attenuates cooking-oil-fumes-induced acute lung injury via the preservation of oil-smoke induced downregulation of antioxidant, antiapoptosis, and chaperone protein expression.

  4. Gaps in scientific knowledge about the carcinogenic potential of asphalt/bitumen fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Paul A

    2007-01-01

    Despite a relatively large body of published research, the potential carcinogenicity of asphalt/bitumen fumes is still a vexing question. Various uncertainties and gaps in scientific knowledge need to be addressed. These include uncertainties in chemistry, animal studies, and human studies. The chemistry of asphalt/bitumen fumes is complex and varies according to the source of the crude oil and the application parameters. The epidemiological studies, while showing weak evidence of lung cancer, are inconsistent and many confounding factors have not been addressed. Studies of animal exposure are also inconsistent regarding laboratory and field-generated fumes. There is a need for further human studies that address potential confounding factors such as smoking, diet, coal tar, and diesel exposures. Animal inhalation studies need to be conducted with asphalt/bitumen fumes that are chemically representative of roofing and paving fumes. Underlying all of this is the need for continued characterization of fumes so their use in animal and field studies can be properly assessed. Nonetheless, uncertainties such as these should not preclude appropriate public health actions to protect workers in the even that asphalt fumes are found to be a carcinogenic hazard.

  5. Modifying welding process parameters can reduce the neurotoxic potential of manganese-containing welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Krishnan; Lin, Gary X; Jefferson, Amy M; Stone, Samuel; Afshari, Aliakbar; Keane, Michael J; McKinney, Walter; Jackson, Mark; Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared L; Roberts, Jenny R; Frazer, David G; Antonini, James M

    2015-02-03

    Welding fumes (WF) are a complex mixture of toxic metals and gases, inhalation of which can lead to adverse health effects among welders. The presence of manganese (Mn) in welding electrodes is cause for concern about the potential development of Parkinson's disease (PD)-like neurological disorder. Consequently, from an occupational safety perspective, there is a critical need to prevent adverse exposures to WF. As the fume generation rate and physicochemical characteristics of welding aerosols are influenced by welding process parameters like voltage, current or shielding gas, we sought to determine if changing such parameters can alter the fume profile and consequently its neurotoxic potential. Specifically, we evaluated the influence of voltage on fume composition and neurotoxic outcome. Rats were exposed by whole-body inhalation (40 mg/m(3); 3h/day × 5 d/week × 2 weeks) to fumes generated by gas-metal arc welding using stainless steel electrodes (GMA-SS) at standard/regular voltage (25 V; RVSS) or high voltage (30 V; HVSS). Fumes generated under these conditions exhibited similar particulate morphology, appearing as chain-like aggregates; however, HVSS fumes comprised of a larger fraction of ultrafine particulates that are generally considered to be more toxic than their fine counterparts. Paradoxically, exposure to HVSS fumes did not elicit dopaminergic neurotoxicity, as monitored by the expression of dopaminergic and PD-related markers. We show that the lack of neurotoxicity is due to reduced solubility of Mn in HVSS fumes. Our findings show promise for process control procedures in developing prevention strategies for Mn-related neurotoxicity during welding; however, it warrants additional investigations to determine if such modifications can be suitably adapted at the workplace to avert or reduce adverse neurological risks.

  6. Effect of Natural Fillers on Mechanical Properties of GFRP Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Dhawan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs have replaced conventional engineering materials in many areas, especially in the field of automobiles and household applications. With the increasing demand, various modifications are being incorporated in the conventional FRPs for specific applications in order to reduce costs and achieve the quality standards. The present research endeavor is an attempt to study the effect of natural fillers on the mechanical characteristics of FRPs. Rice husk, wheat husk, and coconut coir have been used as natural fillers in glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs. In order to study the effect of matrix on the properties of GFRPs, polyester and epoxy resins have been used. It has been found that natural fillers provide better results in polyester-based composites. Amongst the natural fillers, in general, the composites with coconut coir have better mechanical properties as compared to the other fillers in glass/epoxy composites.

  7. EFFECT OF RICE HUSKS AS FILLER IN POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hardinnawirda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, rice husk-filled polyester composites were produced with rice husks (RH as the filler and unsaturated polyester resin (UPR as the matrix. Several percentages of filler loadings were used (10, 15, 20 and 25 wt % in order to gain insights into the effect of filler content on the mechanical properties and water intake of the composites. The tensile strength of the RH-filled UPR composites was found to decrease as the filler loading increased; however, as it reached 25 wt %, the strength showed a moderate increase. The Young’s modulus showed a remarkable increase for 15 wt % of RH but decreased as the RH percentage increased further to 25 wt %. A water absorption test was conducted and the results showed that the composites absorb more water as the percentage weight of RH increased, which is attributed to the ability of the RH filler to absorb water.

  8. Silica in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Sargent, B A; Tayrien, C; McClure, M K; Li, A; Basu, A R; Manoj, P; Watson, D M; Bohac, C J; Furlan, E; Kim, K H; Green, J D; Sloan, G C

    2008-01-01

    Mid-infrared spectra of a few T Tauri stars (TTS) taken with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) on board the Spitzer Space Telescope show prominent narrow emission features indicating silica (crystalline silicon dioxide). Silica is not a major constituent of the interstellar medium; therefore, any silica present in the circumstellar protoplanetary disks of TTS must be largely the result of processing of primitive dust material in the disks surrouding these stars. We model the silica emission features in our spectra using the opacities of various polymorphs of silica and their amorphous versions computed from earth-based laboratory measurements. This modeling indicates that the two polymorphs of silica, tridymite and cristobalite, which form at successively higher temperatures and low pressures, are the dominant forms of silica in the TTS of our sample. These high temperature, low pressure polymorphs of silica present in protoplanetary disks are consistent with a grain composed mostly of tridymite named Ada found...

  9. Multifunctional mesoporous silica catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Victor Shang-Yi; Tsai, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Hung-Ting; Pruski, Marek; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides bifunctional silica mesoporous materials, including mesoporous silica nanoparticles ("MSN"), having pores modified with diarylammonium triflate and perfluoroaryl moieties, that are useful for the acid-catalyzed esterification of organic acids with organic alcohols.

  10. Silica extraction from geothermal water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, William L; Bruton, Carol J

    2014-09-23

    A method of producing silica from geothermal fluid containing low concentration of the silica of less than 275 ppm includes the steps of treating the geothermal fluid containing the silica by reverse osmosis treatment thereby producing a concentrated fluid containing the silica, seasoning the concentrated fluid thereby producing a slurry having precipitated colloids containing the silica, and separating the silica from the slurry.

  11. Chemically Tunable 2D Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-30

    or fumed silica, or chemically modified , precipitated silica and used as fillers in the rubber industry, carriers in agrochemicals, paints...tiles, wall board, and reinforcement for concrete . 144 In contrast to these sheet-like and fibrous silicates, pure Si02 is an abundant mineral that...occurs as crystalline silica or cx-quartz or as amorphous silica.14s Crystalline silica is used in concrete , mortar, porcelain, paints, and abrasives

  12. In vitro effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles on chondrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Yoon, Diana [University of Maryland, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States); Patel, Minal; Fisher, John [University of Maryland, Fischell Department of Bioengineering (United States); Ehrman, Sheryl, E-mail: sehrman@umd.ed [University of Maryland, Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering (United States)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, we evaluated the combined effect of a known toxic molecule, cisplatin, in combination with relatively nontoxic nanoparticles, amorphous fumed silica, on chondrocyte cells. Cisplatin was attached to silica nanoparticles using aminopropyltriethoxy silane as a linker molecule, and characterized in terms of size, shape, specific surface area, as well as the dissolution of cisplatin from the silica surface. The primary particle diameter of the as-received silica nanoparticles ranged from 7.1 to 61 nm, estimated from measurements of specific surface area, and the primary particles were aggregated. The effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica particles with different specific surface areas (41, 85, 202, 237, and 297 m{sup 2}/g) were compared in vitro on chondrocytes, the parenchymal cell of hyaline cartilage. The results show that adverse effects on cell function, as evidenced by reduced metabolic activity measured by the MTT assay and increased membrane permeability observed using the Live/Dead stain, can be correlated with specific surface area of the silica. Cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles with the highest specific surface area incited the greatest response, which was almost equivalent to that induced by free cisplatin. This result suggests the importance of particle specific surface area in interactions between cells and surface-functionalized nanomaterials.

  13. In vitro effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles on chondrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Tridib Kumar; Yoon, Diana; Patel, Minal; Fisher, John; Ehrman, Sheryl

    2010-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the combined effect of a known toxic molecule, cisplatin, in combination with relatively nontoxic nanoparticles, amorphous fumed silica, on chondrocyte cells. Cisplatin was attached to silica nanoparticles using aminopropyltriethoxy silane as a linker molecule, and characterized in terms of size, shape, specific surface area, as well as the dissolution of cisplatin from the silica surface. The primary particle diameter of the as-received silica nanoparticles ranged from 7.1 to 61 nm, estimated from measurements of specific surface area, and the primary particles were aggregated. The effects of cisplatin-functionalized silica particles with different specific surface areas (41, 85, 202, 237, and 297 m2/g) were compared in vitro on chondrocytes, the parenchymal cell of hyaline cartilage. The results show that adverse effects on cell function, as evidenced by reduced metabolic activity measured by the MTT assay and increased membrane permeability observed using the Live/Dead stain, can be correlated with specific surface area of the silica. Cisplatin-functionalized silica nanoparticles with the highest specific surface area incited the greatest response, which was almost equivalent to that induced by free cisplatin. This result suggests the importance of particle specific surface area in interactions between cells and surface-functionalized nanomaterials.

  14. Synthesis of Silica Nanoparticles by Sol-Gel: Size-Dependent Properties, Surface Modification, and Applications in Silica-Polymer Nanocomposites—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Ab Rahman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of silica nanoparticles as fillers in the preparation of nanocomposite of polymers has drawn much attention, due to the increased demand for new materials with improved thermal, mechanical, physical, and chemical properties. Recent developments in the synthesis of monodispersed, narrow-size distribution of nanoparticles by sol-gel method provide significant boost to development of silica-polymer nanocomposites. This paper is written by emphasizing on the synthesis of silica nanoparticles, characterization on size-dependent properties, and surface modification for the preparation of homogeneous nanocomposites, generally by sol-gel technique. The effect of nanosilica on the properties of various types of silica-polymer composites is also summarized.

  15. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy under the fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küster, Simon K; Danieli, Ernesto; Blümich, Bernhard; Casanova, Federico

    2011-08-07

    This work reports the possibility to acquire high-resolution (1)H NMR spectra with a fist-sized NMR magnet directly installed under the fume hood. The small NMR sensor based on permanent magnets was used to monitor the trimerization of propionaldehyde catalyzed by indium trichloride in real time by continuously circulating the reaction mixture through the magnet bore in a closed loop with the help of a peristaltic pump. Thanks to the chemical selectivity of NMR spectroscopy the progress of the reaction can be monitored on-line by determining the concentrations of both reactant and product from the area under their respective lines in the NMR spectra as a function of time. This in situ measurement demonstrates that NMR probes can be used in chemistry laboratories, e.g. for reaction optimization, or installed at specific points of interest along industrial process lines. Therefore, it will open the door for the implementation of feedback control based on spectroscopic NMR data.

  16. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Poly(butylene succinate Films Reinforced with Silica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangviroon Nanthaporn

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent year, bioplastics have become more popular resulting from the growing concerns on environmental issues and the rising fossil fuel price. However, their applications were limited by its mechanical and thermal properties. The aim of this research is thus to improve mechanical and thermal properties of PBS bioplastic films by reinforcing with silica. Due to the poor interfacial interaction between the PBS matrix and silica, glycidyl methacrylate grafted poly(butylene succinate (PBS-g-GMA was used as a compatibilizer in order to improve the interaction between bioplastic films and filler. PBS-g-GMA was prepared in a twin-screw extruder and analyzed by the FTIR spectrometer. PBS and silica were then mixed in a twin-screw extruder and processed into films by a chill-roll cast extruder. The effects of silica loading on thermal and mechanical properties of the prepared bioplastic films were investigated. It was found that the mechanical properties of PBS/silica composite films were improved when 1%wt of silica was added. However, the mechanical properties decreased with increasing silica loading due to the agglomeration of silica particles. The results also show that the silica/PBS films with PBS-g-GMA possessed improved mechanical properties over the films without the compatibilizer.

  17. Influence of Filler from a Renewable Resource and Silane Coupling Agent on the Properties of Epoxidized Natural Rubber Vulcanizates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiphawadee Pongdong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice husk ash (RHA was used as a reinforcing filler in epoxidized natural rubber (ENR with various loading levels (0, 10, 20, and 30 phr, and silica filled ENR was also studied for comparison. The effects of RHA content on cure characteristics, mechanical properties, dynamic mechanical properties, and thermoelastic behavior of the filled ENR composites were investigated. It was found that the incorporation of RHA significantly affected the cure characteristics and mechanical properties. That is, the incorporation of RHA caused faster curing reactions and increased Young’s modulus and tensile strength relative to the unfilled compound. This might be attributed to the metal oxide impurities in RHA that enhance the crosslinking reactions, thus increasing the crosslink density. Further improvements in the curing behavior and the mechanical properties of the filled composites were achieved by in situ silanization with bis(triethoxysilylpropyl tetrasulfide (Si69. It was found that the rubber-filler interactions reinforced the composites. This was indicated by the decreased damping characteristic (tan ⁡δ and the other changes in the mechanical properties. Furthermore, the ENR composites with Si69 had improved filler dispersion. Temperature scanning stress relaxation (TSSR results suggest that the metal oxide impurities in RHA promote degradation of the polymer network at elevated temperatures.

  18. [Case of polymer fume fever with interstitial pneumonia caused by inhalation of polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Masami; Maruyama, Eiichi; Shindo, Yuichiro; Suganuma, Nobukazu; Sato, Shinji; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    A 30-year old man was admitted to our hospital with cough, slight fever, and dyspnea that he had developed several hours after inhaling the fumes produced from a Teflon-coated pan, after evaporation of the water in the pan. Chest radiography revealed diffuse infiltrations, and a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed patchy interstitial shadows in both lungs. In pulmonary function tests, the diffusing capacity of the lungs showed a moderate decrease. Leukocytosis and slight hypoxemia were observed. The patient recovered clinically in a few days without any specific treatment. We speculated that the pulmonary problems in this patient may have been induced by the products of thermal degradation of Teflon that were present in the fumes. When Teflon is heated, the fumes generated cause an influenza like syndrome (polymer fume fever) or cause severe toxic effects such as pulmonary edema, pneumonitis, and death in the exposed individual.

  19. Structural dynamics and interfacial properties of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritzsche, J; Klueppel, M, E-mail: Manfred.Klueppel@DIKautschuk.de [Deutsches Institut fuer Kautschuktechnologie e V, Eupener Strasse 33, D-30519 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-01-26

    The combined effect of filler networking and reduced chain mobility close to the filler interface is analyzed based on investigations of the relaxation dynamics of a solution of styrene butadiene rubber filled with different loadings and types of nanostructured carbon blacks. Dynamic-mechanical and dielectric spectra are studied in a wide frequency and temperature range. By referring to a tunneling process of charge carriers over nanoscopic gaps between adjacent carbon black particles the gap distance is evaluated from the dielectric spectra. This distance corresponds to the length of glassy-like polymer bridges forming flexible bonds between adjacent filler particles of the filler network. It is found that the gap distance decreases with increasing filler loading and specific surface area which correlates with an increase of the apparent activation energy of the filler network evaluated from dynamic-mechanical data. Due to the thermal activation of glassy-like polymer bridges the time-temperature superposition principle is not fulfilled for filled elastomers and the introduction of vertical shift factors is necessary to obtain viscoelastic master curves. The change in the low frequency viscoelastic properties by the incorporation of fillers is shown to be related to the superimposed dynamics of the filler network governed by the viscoelastic response of the glassy-like polymer bridges. This effect is distinguished from the reduced chain mobility close to the filler surface which results in a broadening of the glass transition on the high temperature or low frequency side. The microstructure-based interpretation of viscoelastic data is supported by an analysis of the relaxation time spectra.

  20. Structural dynamics and interfacial properties of filler-reinforced elastomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, J.; Klüppel, M.

    2011-01-01

    The combined effect of filler networking and reduced chain mobility close to the filler interface is analyzed based on investigations of the relaxation dynamics of a solution of styrene butadiene rubber filled with different loadings and types of nanostructured carbon blacks. Dynamic-mechanical and dielectric spectra are studied in a wide frequency and temperature range. By referring to a tunneling process of charge carriers over nanoscopic gaps between adjacent carbon black particles the gap distance is evaluated from the dielectric spectra. This distance corresponds to the length of glassy-like polymer bridges forming flexible bonds between adjacent filler particles of the filler network. It is found that the gap distance decreases with increasing filler loading and specific surface area which correlates with an increase of the apparent activation energy of the filler network evaluated from dynamic-mechanical data. Due to the thermal activation of glassy-like polymer bridges the time-temperature superposition principle is not fulfilled for filled elastomers and the introduction of vertical shift factors is necessary to obtain viscoelastic master curves. The change in the low frequency viscoelastic properties by the incorporation of fillers is shown to be related to the superimposed dynamics of the filler network governed by the viscoelastic response of the glassy-like polymer bridges. This effect is distinguished from the reduced chain mobility close to the filler surface which results in a broadening of the glass transition on the high temperature or low frequency side. The microstructure-based interpretation of viscoelastic data is supported by an analysis of the relaxation time spectra.

  1. Workplace field testing of the pressure drop of particulate respirators using welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik

    2012-10-01

    In a previous study, we concluded that respirator testing with a sodium chloride aerosol gave a conservative estimate of filter penetration for welding fume aerosols. A rapid increase in the pressure drop (PD) of some respirators was observed as fumes accumulated on the filters. The present study evaluated particulate respirator PD based on workplace field tests. A field PD tester was designed and validated using the TSI 8130 Automatic Filter Tester, designed in compliance with National Institute for Occupational and Safety and Health regulation 42 CFR part 84. Three models (two replaceable dual-type filters and one replaceable single-type filter) were evaluated against CO(2) gas arc welding on mild steel in confined booths in the workplace. Field tests were performed under four airborne concentrations (27.5, 15.4, 7.9, and 2.1 mg m(-3)). The mass concentration was measured by the gravimetric method, and number concentration was monitored using P-Trak (Model 8525, TSI, USA). Additionally, photos and scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to visualize and analyze the composition of welding fumes trapped in the filters. The field PD tester showed no significant difference compared with the TSI tester. There was no significant difference in the initial PD between laboratory and field results. The PD increased as a function of fume load on the respirator filters for all tested models. The increasing PD trend differed by models, and PD increased rapidly at high concentrations because greater amount of fumes accumulated on the filters in a given time. The increase in PD as a function of fume load on the filters showed a similar pattern as fume load varied for a particular model, but different patterns were observed for different models. Images and elemental analyses of fumes trapped on the respirator filters showed that most welding fumes were trapped within the first layer, outer web cover, and second layer, in order, while no fumes

  2. Comparative microscopic study of human and rat lungs after overexposure to welding fume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Mercer, Robert R

    2013-11-01

    Welding is a common industrial process used to join metals and generates complex aerosols of potentially hazardous metal fumes and gases. Most long-time welders experience some type of respiratory disorder during their time of employment. The use of animal models and the ability to control the welding fume exposure in toxicology studies have been helpful in developing a better understanding of how welding fumes affect health. There are no studies that have performed a side-by-side comparison of the pulmonary responses from an animal toxicology welding fume study with the lung responses associated with chronic exposure to welding fume by a career welder. In this study, post-mortem lung tissue was donated from a long-time welder with a well-characterized work background and a history of extensive welding fume exposure. To simulate a long-term welding exposure in an animal model, Sprague-Dawley rats were treated once a week for 28 weeks by intratracheal instillation with 2mg of a stainless steel, hard-surfacing welding fume. Lung tissues from the welder and the welding fume-treated rats were examined by light and electron microscopy. Pathological analysis of lung tissue collected from the welder demonstrated inflammatory cell influx and significant pulmonary injury. The poor and deteriorating lung condition observed in the welder examined in this study was likely due to exposure to very high levels of potentially toxic metal fumes and gases for a significant number of years due to work in confined spaces. The lung toxicity profile for the rats treated with welding fume was similar. For tissue samples from both the welder and treated rats, welding particle accumulations deposited and persisted in lung structures and were easily visualized using light microscopic techniques. Agglomerates of deposited welding particles mostly were observed within lung cells, particularly alveolar macrophages. Analysis of individual particles within the agglomerates showed that these

  3. Influence of Processing Conditions on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of PP/Silica-Lignin Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukasz Klapiszewski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional silica-lignin dual fillers were obtained via mechanical grinding of the components (Syloid 244 silica and kraft lignin. Of particular importance here is the fact that lignin is a natural polymer and particularly that it is a waste by-product of paper production, whose recycling is highly desirable. The product underwent comprehensive dispersive-morphological and thermal analysis. SiO2-lignin hybrid fillers were also used in polypropylene-based composites, extruded via corotating a twin screw machine with different screw speeds. The thermogravimetric data obtained for the extrudates confirmed that the application of the lignin into PP produces a significant char residue. Addition of silica to lignin via this new hybrid formulation has a positive effect on the thermal stability of PP/silica-lignin composites, which can be seen even when observing the temperature for the maximum rate of weight reduction. Tensile test results show that the addition of silica by means of dual filler incorporation improves the mechanical parameters in comparison with pure PP and PP/lignin composite.

  4. Transport and Deposition of Welding Fume Agglomerates in a Realistic Human Nasal Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Inthavong, Kiao; Lidén, Göran; Shang, Yidan; Tu, Jiyuan

    2016-07-01

    Welding fume is a complex mixture containing ultra-fine particles in the nanometer range. Rather than being in the form of a singular sphere, due to the high particle concentration, welding fume particles agglomerate into long straight chains, branches, or other forms of compact shapes. Understanding the transport and deposition of these nano-agglomerates in human respiratory systems is of great interest as welding fumes are a known health hazard. The neurotoxin manganese (Mn) is a common element in welding fumes. Particulate Mn, either as soluble salts or oxides, that has deposited on the olfactory mucosa in human nasal airway is transported along the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb within the brain. If this Mn is further transported to the basal ganglia of the brain, it could accumulate at the part of the brain that is the focal point of its neurotoxicity. Accounting for various dynamic shape factors due to particle agglomeration, the current computational study is focused on the exposure route, the deposition pattern, and the deposition efficiency of the inhaled welding fume particles in a realistic human nasal cavity. Particular attention is given to the deposition pattern and deposition efficiency of inhaled welding fume agglomerates in the nasal olfactory region. For particles in the nanoscale, molecular diffusion is the dominant transport mechanism. Therefore, Brownian diffusion, hydrodynamic drag, Saffman lift force, and gravitational force are included in the model study. The deposition efficiencies for single spherical particles, two kinds of agglomerates of primary particles, two-dimensional planar and straight chains, are investigated for a range of primary particle sizes and a range of number of primary particles per agglomerate. A small fraction of the inhaled welding fume agglomerates is deposited on the olfactory mucosa, approximately in the range 0.1-1%, and depends on particle size and morphology. The strong size dependence of the deposition

  5. Research on Alkaline Filler Flame-Retarded Asphalt Pavement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Shuguang; ZHANG Houji; WANG Jiaolan

    2006-01-01

    Used as flame retardant of tunnel asphalt pavement, organic bromides produce a large amount of poisons and smoke in construction and flame retardation stage. The alkaline filler was found to replace mineral filler, and the flame-retarded asphalt mixtures were produced. Experimental results show that these asphalt mixtures are smoke restrained; the performances and construction technology of asphalt pavement are not influenced; also the alkaline filler is of low-price. So this kind of flame-retarded asphalt mixtures is suitable for tunnel pavement.

  6. Peculiarities of Shape Recovery in Polymer Composites with Compacting Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Beloshenko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Peculiarities of the shape memory effect development in composites based on the epoxy polymer and various fillers, such as thermoexpanded graphite, aerosils, metallized graphite, and basalt flakes, have been investigated. It has been determined that straining followed by the shape recovery of composites is accompanied by changes in their volume. Extent and character of the changes depend on the ability of fillers to compaction under pressure, deformation scheme, adsorption ability of the filler. It is shown that the combined deformation consisting of compression and stretching of specimens in different sequence gives structural states for which the longitudinal strain-transverse strain ratio can take zero, positive, or negative values.

  7. Advanced Laser Techniques for Filler-Induced Complications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cassuto, D.; Marangoni, O.; Santis, G. De

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND The increasing use of injectable fillers has been increasing the occurrence of disfiguring anaerobic infection or granulomas. This study presents two types of laser-assisted evacuation of filler material and inflammatory and necrotic tissue that were used to treat disfiguring facial...... nodules after different types of gel fillers. MATERIALS AND METHODS Infectious lesions after hydrogels were drained using a lithium triborate laser at 532 nm, with subsequent removal of infected gel and pus (laser assisted evacuation). Granuloma after gels containing microparticles were treated using...

  8. Alterations in welding process voltage affect the generation of ultrafine particles, fume composition, and pulmonary toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonini, James M; Keane, Michael; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel; Roberts, Jenny R; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Andrews, Ronnee N; Frazer, David G; Sriram, Krishnan

    2011-12-01

    The goal was to determine if increasing welding voltage changes the physico-chemical properties of the fume and influences lung responses. Rats inhaled 40 mg/m³ (3 h/day × 3 days) of stainless steel (SS) welding fume generated at a standard voltage setting of 25 V (regular SS) or at a higher voltage (high voltage SS) of 30 V. Particle morphology, size and composition were characterized. Bronchoalveolar lavage was performed at different times after exposures to assess lung injury. Fumes collected from either of the welding conditions appeared as chain-like agglomerates of nanometer-sized primary particles. High voltage SS welding produced a greater number of ultrafine-sized particles. Fume generated by high voltage SS welding was higher in manganese. Pulmonary toxicity was more substantial and persisted longer after exposure to the regular SS fume. In summary, a modest raise in welding voltage affected fume size and elemental composition and altered the temporal lung toxicity profile.

  9. Mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon content of fumes from heated cooking oils produced in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, T A; Wu, P F; Wang, L F; Lee, H; Lee, C H; Ko, Y C

    1997-11-28

    According to epidemiologic studies, exposure of women to fumes from cooking oils appears to be an important risk factor for lung cancer. Fume samples from three different commercial cooking oils frequently used in Taiwan were collected and analyzed for mutagenicity in the Salmonella/microsome assay. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were extracted from the samples and identified by HPLC chromatography. Extracts from three cooking oil fumes were found to be mutagenic in the presence of S9 mix. All samples contained dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DB[a,h]A) and benz[a]anthracene (B[a]A). Concentration of DB[a,h]A and B[a]A were 1.9 and 2.2 micrograms/m3 in fumes from lard oil, 2.1 and 2.3 micrograms/m3 in soybean oil, 1.8 and 1.3 micrograms/m3 in peanut oil, respectively. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) was identified in fume samples of soybean and peanut oil, in concentrations of 19.6 and 18.3 micrograms/m3, in this order. These results provide experimental evidence and support the findings of epidemiologic observations, in which women exposed to the emitted fumes of cooking oils are at increased risk of contracting lung cancer.

  10. Alternatives for Benzene in the Extraction of Bitumen Fume from Exposure Sample Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Benjamin; Ravera, Christel; Hussard, Caroline; Langlois, Eddy

    2016-01-01

    Benzene is frequently used to extract collected bitumen fumes from personal sampler substrates. However, this solvent is particularly dangerous because of its carcinogenicity (group 1 of the International Agency for Research on Cancer classification). Therefore, to prevent the exposure of laboratory technicians to benzene during the fume extraction step from samplers, a compromise had to be found to identify a less toxic solvent with the same extraction capacity. To compare the extraction capacities of selected solvents, bitumen fumes were generated in the laboratory from three different batches of road surfacing bitumen collected on dedicated bitumen fume samplers. The samplers were then extracted by benzene and the solvents tested. Of 11 selected solvents less toxic than benzene and used in studies on bitumen and bitumen fume analyses, n-hexane and n-heptane were identified as alternatives to benzene. In particular, the results demonstrated that n-heptane was the best candidate solvent for benzene replacement, due to its extraction efficiency comparable to benzene for the three bitumen fumes tested and its low toxicity, which is highly compatible with benzene replacement.

  11. Dopamine/Silica Nanoparticle Assembled, Microscale Porous Structure for Versatile Superamphiphobic Coating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Du, Miao; Zheng, Qiang

    2016-02-23

    Artificial superamphiphobic surfaces, which could repel both water and low surface tension organic liquids, have been limited to particular kinds of materials or surfaces thus far. In this work, a kind of microscale porous coating was developed. Taking dopamine and hydrophilic fumed silica nanoparticles as initial building blocks, microscale porous coating was constructed via ice templation. Polydopamine bound silica nanoparticles together to form a porous structure network and rendered the coating to have potential for further postfunctionalization. After two-step CVD, the microscale porous coating changes from superhydrophilic to superamphiphobic, exhibiting super-repellency to droplets with surface tension of 73-23 mN/m. The influences of concentration of initial dopamine, hydrophilic fumed silica nanoparticles, and dry conditions on the formation of the porous structure have been studied to optimize the conditions. Coatings with different pore sizes and pore heights have been fabricated to discover the relationship between the structure parameters and the repellency of the porous coatings. Only with optimal pore size and pore height can the porous coating display superamphiphobicity. Compared with nanoscale, the microscale structure favors the achievement of superamphiphobicity. Given the outstanding adhesive ability of polydopamine, the superamphiphobic coatings have been successfully applied to various materials including artificial materials and natural materials.

  12. Influence of variously functionalized SBA-15 fillers on conductivity and electrochemical properties of PBI composite membranes for high temperature polymer fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angioni, S.; Villa, D. C.; Cattaneo, A. S.; Mustarelli, P.; Quartarone, E.

    2015-10-01

    The use of inorganic fillers is an interesting strategy to improve the electrochemical performances of PBI membranes for application as electrolytes in HT-PEMFCs. Here, we prepared several mesoporous silica (SBA-15) based hybrids, functionalised with different moieties, namely acidic (SO3H-), basic (NH2-), and amphoteric (SO3H-NH2) units. The electrochemical properties of the resulting electrolytes were investigated in terms of proton transport and functional tests by varying the silica functionalization degree in the range 10-70 mol%, as well as the particles loading in the polymer (0-30 wt%). The actual effectiveness of the SBA-15 functionalization process in improving the electrolyte properties was compared with both the unfilled membrane and the one filled with pristine SBA-15. The best conductivity (∼90 mS cm-1 at 120 °C, 30%RH) was obtained with PBI composites loaded with 30 wt% of non-functionalized SBA-15. The use of fillers functionalized with acidic, basic of amphoteric groups did not lead to improvements with respect to pure SBA-15. This could be related to the set up of significant interactions between the functionalised fillers and H3PO4, which negatively influence the proton mobility. Encouraging MEA results (power peak >320 mW cm-2) were obtained in case of membranes based on pure SBA-15. These performances make the SBA-15/PBI composites particularly interesting for application in HT-PEMFCs.

  13. Use of Cellulose-Containing Fillers in Composites with Polypropylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna LAKA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The composites, containing recycled polypropylene and fillers, obtained from different lignocellulosics by the thermocatalytic destruction method, were investigated. Birch sawdust, newsprint wastes, cotton residues and wood bleached sulphate pulp were used as raw materials for obtaining fillers. The indices of mechanical properties (tensile strength, modulus of elasticity, deformation at break, shear modulus, toughness, twisting moment of the composites' samples were determined. It has been found that the obtained composites have relatively good mechanical properties. Better results were obtained, using fillers from sawdust and wood pulp. After treating the fillers with rapeseed oil, their water vapour sorption and water retention value (WRV decreased. In this case, the strength of the composites was higher.http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.17.2.484

  14. Microstructural and rheological analysis of fillers and asphalt mastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, R.; Simon, A.; Kocserha, I.; Buzimov, A.

    2017-01-01

    Pavements are made of different grades of mineral aggregates and organic binder. The aggregates are sorted in different sizes and different amount which are mixed together with bitumen. The finest mineral fraction (ddolomite) which are used in Hungarian road constructions with the use of different techniques (particle size distribution, scanning electronmicroscopy tests, mercury intrusion porosimetry, BET specific surface tests, determination of hydrophobicity). After the tests of fillers, asphalt mastics were prepared and rheological examinations were obtained. These examinations served to observe the interaction and the effect of fillers. The stiffening effect of fillers and the causes of rutting were also investigated. Based on our results, it can be stated that particle size, hydrophobic properties and the amount of fillers highly affect the rheological properties of mastics.

  15. Dielectric properties of inorganic fillers filled epoxy thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norshamira, A., E-mail: myra.arshad@gmail.com; Mariatti, M., E-mail: mariatti@usm.my [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering, Engineering Campus, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The demand on the small size and high performance electronics has driven changes in the electronic packaging requirements from discrete capacitor to embedded capacitor. Embedded capacitor can improve electrical performance compared with discrete capacitor. This study aimed to achieve high dielectric of epoxy thin film composite that were targeted for application as embedded capacitor. In this study, inorganic fillers such as Calcium Copper Titanate (CCTO), Iron(III) Oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Titanium Dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) were loaded in epoxy system at 5 and 20vol%. Morphology and dielectric properties were investigated to identify the effect of fillers loading and types of fillers on the properties of epoxy thin film composite. Based on the study, CCTO with 20vol% loading was found to have good dielectric properties compared to other type of fillers.

  16. Gel-based composite polymer electrolytes with novel hierarchical mesoporous silica network for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Xiaoliang; Cai Qiang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fan Lizhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hua Tao; Lin Yuanhua [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Nan Cewen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)], E-mail: cwnan@tsinghua.edu.cn

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, novel gel-based composite polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries were prepared by introducing a hierarchical mesoporous silica network to the poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)-based gel electrolytes. As compared with the PVDF-HFP-based gel electrolytes with/without conventional nano-sized silica fillers, the novel electrolytes have shown more homogeneous microstructure, higher ionic conductivity and better mechanical stability, which could be caused by the strong silica network and the effective interactions among the polymer, the liquid electrolytes and the silica. Moreover, the cell with this kind of electrolytes could achieve a discharge capacity as much as 150 mAh g{sup -1} at room temperature (LiCoO{sub 2} as the cathode active material), with high Coulomb efficiency.

  17. Gel-based composite polymer electrolytes with novel hierarchical mesoporous silica network for lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Liang; Cai, Qiang; Hua, Tao; Lin, Yuan-Hua; Nan, Ce-Wen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Fan, Li-Zhen [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2008-11-15

    In the present work, novel gel-based composite polymer electrolytes for lithium batteries were prepared by introducing a hierarchical mesoporous silica network to the poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene) (PVDF-HFP)-based gel electrolytes. As compared with the PVDF-HFP-based gel electrolytes with/without conventional nano-sized silica fillers, the novel electrolytes have shown more homogeneous microstructure, higher ionic conductivity and better mechanical stability, which could be caused by the strong silica network and the effective interactions among the polymer, the liquid electrolytes and the silica. Moreover, the cell with this kind of electrolytes could achieve a discharge capacity as much as 150 mAh g{sup -1} at room temperature (LiCoO{sub 2} as the cathode active material), with high Coulomb efficiency. (author)

  18. Effects of Silica Nanostructures in Poly(ethylene oxide)-Based Composite Polymer Electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanta, Jagdeep; Anwar, Shahid; Si, Satyabrata

    2016-06-01

    The present work describes the synthesis of some poly(ethylene oxide)-based nanocomposite polymer electrolyte films using various silica nanostructures as the inorganic filler by simple solution mixing technique, in which the nature of the silica nanostructures play a vital role in modulating their electrochemical performances at room temperature. The silica nanostructures are prepared by ammonical hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate following the modified St6ber method. The resulting films are characterized by X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimeter to study their crystallinity. Room temperature AC impedance spectroscopy is utilized to determine the Li+ ion conductivity of the resulting films. The observed conductivity values of various NCPE films depend on the nature of silica filling as well as on their surface characteristics and also on the varying PEO-Li+ ratio, which is observed to be in the order of 10(-7)-10(-6) S cm(-1).

  19. Genotoxic effects of fumes from asphalt modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, Hanna K; Väänänen, Virpi; Järventaus, Hilkka; Suhonen, Satu; Nygren, Jonas; Hämeilä, Mervi; Valtonen, Jarkko; Heikkilä, Pirjo; Norppa, Hannu

    2008-05-31

    As the use of recycled materials and industrial by-products in asphalt mixtures is increasing, we investigated if recycled additives modify the genotoxicity of fumes emitted from asphalt. Fumes were generated in the laboratory at paving temperature from stone-mastic asphalt (SMA) and from SMA modified with waste plastic (90% polyethylene, 10% polypropylene) and tall oil pitch (SMA-WPT). In addition, fumes from SMA, SMA-WPT, asphalt concrete (AC), and AC modified with waste plastic and tall oil pitch (AC-WPT) were collected at paving sites. The genotoxicity of the fumes was studied by analysis of DNA damage (measured in the comet assay) and micronucleus formation in human bronchial epithelial BEAS 2B cells in vitro and by counting mutations in Salmonella typhimurium strains TA98 and YG1024. DNA damage was also assessed in buccal leukocytes from road pavers before and after working with SMA, SMA-WPT, AC, and AC-WPT. The chemical composition of the emissions was analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The SMA-WPT fume generated in the laboratory induced a clear increase in DNA damage in BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. The laboratory-generated SMA fume increased the frequency of micronucleated BEAS 2B cells without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes collected at the paving sites produced DNA damage with or without metabolic activation. Fumes from SMA and SMA-WPT from the paving sites increased micronucleus frequency without metabolic activation. None of the asphalt fumes studied showed mutagenic activity in Salmonella. No statistically significant differences in DNA damage in buccal leukocytes were detected between the pre- and post-shift samples collected from the road pavers. However, a positive correlation was found between DNA damage and the urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) after work shift, which suggested an association between occupational exposures during road paving and genotoxic effects. Our

  20. ACID-BASE INTERACTIONS BETWEEN POLYMERS AND FILLERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qingguo; CHEN Fute; HUANG Yuanfu; ZHOU Qingli

    1987-01-01

    Inverse gas chromatography(IGC) and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques were applied to determining the relative acid-base strength of polymers and coupling agents. The acid-base characteristics of fillers such as CaCO3 could be altered by treatment with different coupling agents. It was shown that some mechanical properties of filled polymers were obviously associated with acid-base interactions between polymers and fillers.

  1. Influence of silanization and filler fraction on aged dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C T; Lee, S Y; Keh, E S; Dong, D R; Huang, H M; Shih, Y H

    2000-11-01

    The effect of silanization and filler fraction on the mechanical properties of aged dental composites was investigated. Experimental composites (75/25 Bis-GMA/TEGDMA resin reinforced with 0, 12.6, 30.0, and 56.5 vol% 8 microm silanized/unsilanized BaSiO6) were fabricated into 4.7 mm diameter x 2.2 mm thick discs and 3.5 mm diameter x 7.3 mm thick discs for diametral tensile and compressive tests, respectively. The effect of immersion in 75% ethanol at 37 degrees C for 0-30 days on the diametral tensile strength (DTS) and compressive strength (CS) of the samples was evaluated and analysed by ANOVA and Tukey LSD test. The fracture interface between filler and resin matrix was then examined by scanning electron microscope. Results and subsequent statistical evidence from DTS (18.6+/-7.6 MPa, silanized versus 11.7+/-2.6 MPa, unsilanized) and CS (85.1+/-29.7 MPa, silanized versus 56.0+/-11.3 MPa, unsilanized) strongly implies that silanization may greatly enhance the mechanical properties of the resin composites. Furthermore, it also shows that both DTS and CS increased proportionally as the filler fraction of the composites increased. However, in the unsilanized groups, DTS decreased (up to 40%) as the filler fraction increased, and CS showed no relevance to the filler fraction at all. As for the influence of aging, it was found that both DTS and CS showed a significant decrease after immersion in 75% ethanol, and silanization heavily correlated with the filler fraction of aged-resin composites. Microscopic examination of the fractured samples showed that failure primarily occurred within the resin matrix per se for silanized composites and adjacent to the filler particles for unsilanized composites. All the evidence points to the conclusion that mechanical properties of aged-resin composites can be greatly influenced by silanization and the filler fraction.

  2. Silicone rubbers for dielectric elastomers with improved dielectric and mechanical properties as a result of substituting silica with titanium dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyun Yu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One prominent method of modifying the properties of dielectric elastomers (DEs is by adding suitable metal oxide fillers. However, almost all commercially available silicone elastomers are already heavily filled with silica to reinforce the otherwise rather weak silicone network and the resulting metal oxide filled elastomer may contain too much filler. We therefore explore the replacement of silica with titanium dioxide to ensure a relatively low concentration of filler. Liquid silicone rubber (LSR has relatively low viscosity, which is favorable for loading inorganic fillers. In the present study, four commercial LSRs with varying loadings of silica and one benchmark room-temperature vulcanizable rubber (RTV were investigated. The resulting elastomers were evaluated with respect to their dielectric permittivity, tear and tensile strengths, electrical breakdown, thermal stability and dynamic viscosity. Filled silicone elastomers with high loadings of nano-sized titanium dioxide (TiO2 particles were also studied. The best overall performing formulation had 35 wt.% TiO2 nanoparticles in the POWERSIL® XLR LSR, where the excellent ensemble of relative dielectric permittivity of 4.9 at 0.1 Hz, breakdown strength of 160 V µm−1, tear strength of 5.3 MPa, elongation at break of 190%, a Young’s modulus of 0.85 MPa and a 10% strain response (simple tension in a 50 V μm−1 electric field was obtained.

  3. Effect of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber and silica masterbatch for tyre application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azira, A. A.; Verasamy, D.; Kamal, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The availability of concentrated epoxidised natural rubber (ENR-LC) has provided a better opportunity for using epoxidised natural rubber (ENR) with silica to reinforce natural rubber for tyre application. ENR-LC mixed directly with silica to rubber by high speed stirrer without using any coupling agent. Some rubber compounds were prepared by mixing a large amount of precipitated amorphous white silica with natural rubber. The silica was prepared in aqueous dispersion and the filler was perfectly dispersed in the ENR-LC. The performance of the composites was evaluated in this work for the viability of ENR-LC/Si in tyre compounding. Compounding was carried out on a two roll mill, where the additives and curing agents was later mixed. Characterization of these composites was performed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) for dispersion as well as mechanical testing. C-ENR/Si showed efficient as primary reinforcing filler in ENR with regard to modulus and tensile strength, resulting on an increase in the stiffness of the rubbers compared to ENR latex. Overall improvement in the mechanical properties for the ENR-LC over the control crosslinked rubber sample was probably due to synergisms of silica reinforcement and crosslinking of the polymeric matrix phase.

  4. Mechanical and Morphological Properties of Nano Filler Polyester Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnia Noor Najmi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is focusing on mechanical and morphological properties of unsaturated polyester (UP reinforced with two different types of filler which is nano size clay Cloisite 30B (C30B and Carbon Black (CB. Samples were fabricated via hand lay-up and open molding technique. Percentages of Cloisite 30B & Carbon Black (CB used vary from 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 wt%. The mechanical properties were evaluated by impact, flexural and hardness testing. Result shows that the mechanical strength of C30B was better compare to CB filled composite. The combination of UP with C30B helps to improve the properties due to the high surface area of nanosize filler in the matrix. The result shows that increasing of filler content had increased mechanical properties of composites. Optimum percentage represent good mechanical properties are 4% for both fillers. SEM images showed that rough surface image indicate to agglomeration of filler in the matrix for CB sample and smooth surface image on C30B sample indicate to homogenous blending between filler and matrix polyester. SEM images proved that mechanical properties result indicate that C30B polyester composite is a good reinforcement compare to CB polyester composite.

  5. Wear of nanofilled dental composites at varying filler concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Nathaniel C; Burgess, John O

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of nanofiller concentration on the mechanisms of wear of a dental composite. Nanofilled composites were fabricated with a bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate polymer and 40 nm SiO2 filler particles at three filler loads (25, 50, and 65 wt %). The elastic modulus, flexural strength, and hardness of the composites and the unfilled resin were measured. The materials (n = 8) were tested in the modified wear testing device at 50,000, 100,000, and 200,000 cycles with 20N force at 1 Hz. A 33% glycerine lubricant and stainless steel antagonist were used. The worn composite and antagonist surfaces were analyzed with noncontact profilometry and SEM. The volumetric wear data indicated that there are significant differences between filler concentrations and cycles (p composites. Increasing filler content increased hardness and modulus and increased flexural strength up to 50% fill. SEM evaluation of the worn specimens indicated that the resin and 25% filled materials exhibited cracking and failed by fatigue and the 50 and 65% filled materials exhibited microcutting and failed by abrasive wear. Based on the results of this study, composite manufacturers are recommended to use a filler concentration between 25 and 50% when using nanosized filler particles. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Analysis of filler particle levels and sizes in dental alginates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Lemes Carlo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the inorganic filler fractions and sizes of commercially alginates. The inorganic particles volumetric fractions of five alginates - Jeltrate(J, Jeltrate Plus(JP, Jeltrate Chromatic Ortho(JC, Hydrogum(H and Ezact Krom(E were accessed by weighing a previously determined mass of each material in water before and after burning samples at 450 °C for 3 hours. Unsettled materials were soaked in acetone and chloroform and sputter-coated with gold for SEM evaluation of fillers' morphology and size. The results for the volumetric inorganic particle content were (%: J - 48.33, JP - 48.33, JC - 33.79, H - 37.55 and E - 40.55. The fillers presented a circular appearance with helical form and various perforations. Hydrogum fillers looked like cylindrical, perforated sticks. The mean values for fillers size were (μm: J - 12.91, JP - 13.67, JC - 13.44, E - 14.59 and H - 9 (diameter, 8.81 (length. The results of this study revealed differences in filler characteristics that could lead to different results when testing mechanical properties.

  7. Evaluation of Hydrated Lime Filler in Asphalt Mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abbas Hasan Al-Jumaily

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Mineral filler is one of important materials and affecting on properties and quality of asphalt mixtures .There are different types of mineral filler depended on cost and quality , the matter encourages us to achieve this study to evaluate hydrated lime filler effects on properties of asphalt mixes related with strength and durability. Conventional asphaltic concrete mixtures with Portland cement and soft sandstone fillers and mixtures modified with hydrated lime were evaluated for their fundamental engineering properties as defined by Marshall properties , index of retained strength , indirect tensile strength , permanent deformation characteristics , and fatigue resistance .A typical dense graded mixture employed in construction of surface course pavement in Iraq in accordance with SCRB specifications was used .The materials used in this study included mineral aggregate materials (coarse and fine sizes were originally obtained from Najaf Sea quarries and two grades of asphalt cements produced from Daurah refinery which are D47 and D66 . The physical properties , stiffness modulus and chemical composition are evaluated for the recovered asphalt cement from prepared asphalt mixes containing various filler types .The paper results indicated that the addition of hydrated lime as mineral filler improved the permanent deformation characteristics and fatigue life and the use of hydrated lime will decrease the moisture susceptibility of the asphalt mixtures.

  8. SILICA SURFACED CARBON FIBERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    carbon fibers . Several economical and simple processes were developed for obtaining research quantities of silica surfaced carbon filaments. Vat dipping processes were utilized to deposit an oxide such as silica onto the surface and into the micropores of available carbon or graphite base fibers. High performance composite materials were prepared with the surface treated carbon fibers and various resin matrices. The ablative characteristics of these composites were very promising and exhibited fewer limitations than either silica or...treated

  9. Silica in higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, A G; Hodson, M J

    1986-01-01

    Opaline silica deposits are formed by many vascular (higher) plants. The capacity of these plants for silica absorption varies considerably according to genotype and environment. Plant communities exchange silica between soil and vegetation, especially in warmer climates. Silica deposition in epidermal cell walls offers mechanical and protective advantages. Biogenic silica particles from plants are also implicated in the causation of cancer. Recent techniques are reviewed which may aid in the identification of plant pathways for soluble silica movement to deposition sites and in the determination of ionic environments. Botanical investigations have focused on silicification of cell walls in relation to plant development, using scanning and transmission electron microscopy combined with X-ray microanalysis. Silica deposition in macrohair walls of the lemma of canary grass (Phalaris) begins at inflorescence emergence and closely follows wall thickening. The structure of the deposited silica may be determined by specific organic polymers present at successive stages of wall development. Lowering of transpiration by enclosure of Phalaris inflorescences in plastic bags reduced silica deposition in macrohairs. Preliminary freeze-substitution studies have located silicon, as well as potassium and chloride, in the cell vacuole and wall deposition sites during initial silicification.

  10. Fracture behavior of silica nanoparticle filled epoxy resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittanet, Peerapan

    This dissertation involves the addition of silica nanoparticles to a lightly crosslinked, model epoxy resin and investigates the effect of nanosilica content and particle size on glass transition temperature (Tg), coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), Young's modulus (E), yield stress, and fracture toughness. This study aims to understand the influence of silica nanoparticle size, bimodal particle size distribution and silica content on the toughening behavior. The toughening mechanisms were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and transmission optical microscopy (TOM). The approach identifies toughening mechanisms and develops a toughening model from unimodal-particle size systems first, then extends these concepts to various mixtures micron- and nanometer-size particles in a similar model epoxy. The experimental results revealed that the addition of nanosilica did not have a significant effect on Tg or the yield stress of epoxy resin, i.e. the yield stress and Tg remained constant regardless of nanosilica particle size. As expected, the addition of nanosilica had a significant impact on CTE, modulus and fracture toughness. The CTE values of nanosilica-filled epoxies were found to decrease with increasing nanosilica content, which can be attributed to the much lower CTE of the nanosilica fillers. Interestingly, the decreases in CTE showed strong particle size dependence. The Young's modulus was also found to significantly improve with addition of nanosilica and increase with increasing filler content. However, the particle size did not exhibit any effect on the Young's modulus. Finally, the fracture toughness and fracture energy showed significant improvements with the addition of nanosilica, and increased with increasing filler content. The effect of particle size on fracture toughness was negligible. Observation of the fracture surfaces using SEM and TOM showed evidence of debonding of nanosilica particles

  11. Stability of poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene)-based composite gel electrolytes with functionalized silicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkowiak, Mariusz [Central Laboratory of Batteries and Cells, Forteczna 12 St., 61-362 Poznan (Poland); Zalewska, Aldona [Warsaw University of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Noakowskiego 3 St., 00-664 Warsaw (Poland); Jesionowski, Teofil [Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Marii Sklodowskiej-Curie 2 Sq., 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Pokora, Monika [Central Laboratory of Batteries and Cells, Forteczna 12 St., 61-362 Poznan (Poland); Poznan University of Technology, Institute of Chemical Technology and Engineering, Marii Sklodowskiej-Curie 2 Sq., 60-965 Poznan (Poland)

    2007-11-15

    Various aspects of stability of composite polymer gel electrolytes based on poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF/HFP) polymeric matrix and functionalized precipitated silicas have been studied. The silica fillers have been surface modified with methacryloxy or vinyl groups by partially replacing silanol groups, so that bi-functional (hydrophilic/hydrophobic) character of the inorganic fillers was created. Compatibility of the gel electrolytes with lithium electrode has been examined by means of EIS technique. Electrochemical stability window has been studied with the application of cyclic voltammetry technique with fast sweeping rate. Passive layer formation on graphite electrode has been investigated for all the gel electrolytes by means of cyclic voltammetry with slow scan rate and galvanostatic charging/discharging technique. It has been shown that stability of the interface between lithium and gel electrolyte is significantly improved when bi-functional silicas are used as fillers. The phenomenon has been ascribed to more effective scavenging of trace impurities as well as to better shielding of the electrode surfaces. Cyclic voltammetry on platinum has revealed excessive electrochemical redox processes upon prolonged cycling for all the gel electrolytes. It has been demonstrated that stable passive layers are formed on graphite electrodes upon electrochemical reduction in the presence of the studied composite polymer gel electrolytes. (author)

  12. Organosilane modified silica/polydimethylsiloxane mixed matrix membranes for enhanced propylene/nitrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltran, Arnel B.; Nisola, Grace M.; Cho, Eulsaeng; Lee, Erli Eros D.; Chung, Wook-Jin

    2011-10-01

    Gas transport behaviors of oxygen (O 2), nitrogen (N 2) and propylene (C 3H 6) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membranes (MMM) containing modified silica (SiO 2) nanoparticles are presented. Two surface modified SiO 2 nanoparticles, silica dimethyloctyl silane (Si-DMOS) and silica dimethylphenyl silane (Si-DMPS), were used as fillers. Surface modification was carried out through silanization, which was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From elemental analysis, degrees of modifications on Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS were estimated to be 29.64% and 79.89%, respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed uniform distribution of the modified SiO 2 fillers in MMMs. Both MMMs exhibited reduced O 2 and N 2 permeabilities as compared to pure PDMS, while enhanced C 3H 6 permeabilities were observed. Consequently, C 3H 6/N 2 permselectivities were increased by 35 and 44% in MMMs filled with Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS, respectively. Results revealed that permeability was dependent on penetrant diffusivities, a parameter related to the structure of MMMs. Density measurements and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to elucidate the changes in MMM properties which affected the permeation behaviors of O 2, N 2 and C 3H 6. Overall, both Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS show potential as fillers for the enhancement of PDMS permeation performance.

  13. Accidental exposure to isocyanate fumes in a group of firemen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axford, A T; McKerrow, C B; Jones, A P; Le Quesne, P M

    1976-05-01

    A total of 35 firemen involved in fighting a fire in a factory in which polyurethane foam was made were exposed to fumes of toluene di-isocyanate from two large storage tanks which were damaged during the fire, resulting in massive spillage. Most of the men experienced symptoms during the fire or during the three weeks after it. The symptoms were mainly gastrointestinal, respiratory, or neurological. Altogether 15 men described gastrointestinal symptoms which subsided within two days of onset. Respiratory symptoms were described by 31 men and were most pronounced during the three days after the fire, thereafter tending to improve. The neurological findings are described separately. When the men were reviewed at six months there was a suggestion that some of them might have sustained long-term damage to the respiratory tract, and almost four years later 20 men had persistent respiratory symptoms. Serial measurements of ventilatory capacity revealed a marked decline in the first six months although this was not sustained.

  14. Fume hood exhaust re-entry into a chemistry building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B K; Cronn, D R

    1986-02-01

    The rooftop air intakes are in close proximity to the fume hood exhaust vents on the roof of the attached chemistry buildings (Fulmer Hall and Fulmer Annex) at Washington State University. Complaints resulted from the apparent re-entry of hazardous and odorous exhaust vapors and gases returning into the building fresh air supplies. An atmospheric tracer study of the flow patterns and exhaust gas dilution rates determined the suitability of other potential air intake locations. Isopleth maps showed concentration patterns for tests conducted during the different wind regimes (southwest prevailing winds and substantial wintertime southeast periods). As expected, the observed dilution rates were greater than the conservative minimum dilution rates calculated from models. Tracer gas concentrations indicated large areas over which odor thresholds would exceeded for vapors resulting from typical evaporation rates of solvents. Tracer gas concentrations at the building air intakes were about the same as inside building concentrations because little dilution occurred between the intakes and building interiors. Significant infiltration was observed due to negative building pressure relative to outside. The recommendation to move the intakes down the south building walls is being followed since roof-level concentrations are typically a factor of ten or more higher than below-roof levels.

  15. Excellent thermal conductivity and dielectric properties of polyimide composites filled with silica coated self-passivated aluminum fibers and nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongcun; Bai, Yuanyuan; Yu, Ke; Kang, Yan; Wang, Hong

    2013-06-01

    A polymer based composite was prepared by using modified aluminum fibers and aluminum nanoparticles as fillers in polyimide matrix that resulted in the high thermal conductivity and low relative permittivity. It was found that silica coated aluminum fibers with the multilayer coating structures can significantly reduce the relative permittivity (about 19.6 at 1 MHz) of the composite while keeping lower dielectric loss (0.024 at 1 MHz). The thermal conductivity of composites was significantly increased to 15.2 W/m K. This work shows a useful way to choose proper modifier fillers to improve the composite properties for electronic packaging composite materials.

  16. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of carbon-silica hybrid catalyst from rice straw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Safie, N. N.; Siambun, N. J.

    2016-07-01

    The hybrid-carbon catalyst has been studied because of its promising potential to have high porosity and surface area to be used in biodiesel production. Silica has been used as the support to produce hybrid carbon catalyst due to its mesoporous structure and high surface area properties. The chemical synthesis of silica-carbon hybrid is expensive and involves more complicated preparation steps. The presence of natural silica in rice plants especially rice husk has received much attention in research because of the potential as a source for solid acid catalyst synthesis. But study on rice straw, which is available abundantly as agricultural waste is limited. In this study, rice straw undergone pyrolysis and functionalized using fuming sulphuric acid to anchor -SO3H groups. The presence of silica and the physiochemical properties of the catalyst produced were studied before and after sulphonation. The catalytic activity of hybrid carbon silica acid catalyst, (H-CSAC) in esterification of oleic acid with methanol was also studied. The results showed the presence of silica-carbon which had amorphous structure and highly porous. The carbon surface consisted of higher silica composition, had lower S element detected as compared to the surface that had high carbon content but lower silica composition. This was likely due to the fact that Si element which was bonded to oxygen was highly stable and unlikely to break the bond and react with -SO3H ions. H-CSAC conversions were 23.04 %, 35.52 % and 34.2 7% at 333.15 K, 343.15 K and 353.15 K, respectively. From this research, rice straw can be used as carbon precursor to produce hybrid carbon-silica catalyst and has shown catalytic activity in biodiesel production. Rate equation obtained is also presented.

  17. Effect of three surface conditioning methods to improve bond strength of particulate filler resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Alander, P; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W

    2005-01-01

    The use of resin-based composite materials in operative dentistry is increasing, including applications in stress-bearing areas. However, composite restorations, in common with all restorations, suffer from deterioration and degradation in clinical service. Durable repair alternatives by layering a new composite onto such failed composite restorations, will eliminate unnecessary loss of tooth tissue and repeated insults to the pulp. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of three surface conditioning methods on the repair bond strength of a particulate filler resin-composite (PFC) to 5 PFC substrates. The specimens were randomly assigned to one of the following surface conditioning methods: (1) Hydrofluoric (HF) acid gel (9.5%) etching, (2) Air-borne particle abrasion (50 microm Al2O3), (3) Silica coating (30 microm SiOx, CoJet-Sand). After each conditioning method, a silane coupling agent was applied. Adhesive resin was then applied in a thin layer and light polymerized. The low-viscosity diacrylate resin composite was bonded to the conditioned substrates in polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested in dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. One-way ANOVA showed significant influence of the surface conditioning methods (p acid etched specimens (5.7-14.3 MPa) and those treated with either air-borne particle abrasion (13.0-22.5 MPa) or silica coating (25.5-41.8 MPa) in dry conditions (ANOVA, p < 0.001). After thermocycling, the silica coating process resulted in the highest bond values in all material groups (17.2-30.3 MPa).

  18. Profiling mild steel welding processes to reduce fume emissions and costs in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, Michael J; Siert, Arlen; Chen, Bean T; Stone, Samuel G

    2014-05-01

    To provide quantitative information to choose the best welding processes for minimizing workplace emissions, nine gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes for mild steel were assessed for fume generation rates, normalized fume generation rates (milligram fume per gram of electrode consumed), and normalized generation rates for elemental manganese, nickel, and iron. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux-cored arc-welding (FCAW) processes were also profiled. The fumes were collected quantitatively in an American Welding Society-type fume chamber and weighed, recovered, homogenized, and analyzed by inductively coupled atomic emission spectroscopy for total metals. The processes included GMAW with short circuit, globular transfer, axial spray, pulsed spray, Surface Tension Transfer™, Regulated Metal Deposition™, and Cold Metal Transfer™ (CMT) modes. Flux-cored welding was gas shielded, and SMAW was a single rod type. Results indicate a wide range of fume emission factors for the process variations studied. Fume emission rates per gram of electrode consumed were highest for SMAW (~13 mg fume g(-1) electrode) and lowest for GMAW processes such as pulsed spray (~1.5mg g(-1)) and CMT (~1mg g(-1)). Manganese emission rates per gram of electrode consumed ranged from 0.45 mg g(-1) (SMAW) to 0.08 mg g(-1) (CMT). Nickel emission rates were generally low and ranged from ~0.09 (GMAW short circuit) to 0.004 mg g(-1) (CMT). Iron emission rates ranged from 3.7 (spray-mode GMAW) to 0.49 mg g(-1) (CMT). The processes studied have significantly different costs, and cost factors are presented based on a case study to allow comparisons between processes in specific cost categories. Costs per linear meter of weld were $31.07 (SMAW), $12.37 (GMAW short circuit), and $10.89 (FCAW). Although no single process is the best for minimizing fume emissions and costs while satisfying the weld requirements, there are several processes that can minimize emissions. This study provides

  19. Nanotubularchrysotile fillers for radiationand protective constructional composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAVLENKO Vyacheslav Ivanovich

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Strengthening of manifestation of quantum-dimensional effect in nanoparticles will make considerable impact on absorption of photon radiation. Therefore, application of ultradisperse systems will promote high-quality strengthening of radiation protective properties of material and will allow creation of more compact material with improved protective characteristics. The unique combination of properties of chrysotile allows creation of the materials on its basis which possess high mechanical and thermal strength, radiation resistance. The presence of the combined water in its structure favours appearance of radiation protective properties by neutron radiation in such materials. In this connection the authors offered to fill chrysotile nanotubes with nanodispersed compounds that make it possible to raise its radiation protective characteristics. As a result, these compounds have to possess higher extinction coefficient of γ-radiation, and respectively possess high density and content of heavy elements. Nanocrystal plumbous tungstate of PbWO4 is offered to use as compound for intercalation. The authors developed a method to produce nanotubular filler of radiation protective composite materials by filling hydrosilicate nanotubes of chrysotile structure with refractory slightly soluble compound on the basis of PbWO4 and serial processing of material with solutions of reagents. The best result has been achieved when chrysotile was treated consistently in K2WO4 and Pb(СН3СОО2 solutions, at the same time mass content of PbWO4 in an end product reaches 30%. The introduced K2WO4 filled nanotubes not only in the internal channel, but also in interlayered space, and localization of PbWO4 happens both in internal channels of nanotubes and on their surface. In spite of the fact that the developed technology does not allow us to modify chrysotile so that all injected PbWO4 could be contained only in internal canals of nanotubes, the obtained product gets

  20. Crystalline Silica Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline silica is the scientific name for a group of minerals composed of silicon and oxygen. The term crystalline refers to the fact that the oxygen and silicon atoms are arranged in a threedimensional repeating pattern. This group of minerals has shaped human history since the beginning of civilization. From the sand used for making glass to the piezoelectric quartz crystals used in advanced communication systems, crystalline silica has been a part of our technological development. Crystalline silica's pervasiveness in our technology is matched only by its abundance in nature. It's found in samples from every geologic era and from every location around the globe. Scientists have known for decades that prolonged and excessive exposure to crystalline silica dust in mining environments can cause silicosis, a noncancerous lung disease. During the 1980's, studies were conducted that suggested that crystalline silica also was a carcinogen. As a result of these findings, crystalline silica has been regulated under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). Under HCS, OSHAregulated businesses that use materials containing 0.1% or more crystalline silica must follow Federal guidelines concerning hazard communication and worker training. Although the HCS does not require that samples be analyzed for crystalline silica, mineral suppliers or OSHAregulated

  1. Silica Refractory Bricks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Lingyan; Peng Xigao

    2011-01-01

    @@ 1.Scope This standard specifies the classification,technical requirements,test methods,quality appraisal procedures,packing,marking,transportation,storage,and quality certificate of silica refractory bricks.This standard is applicable to silica refractory bricks with single weight≤40 kg.

  2. The detection of drugs of abuse in fingerprints using Raman spectroscopy II: cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Joanna S.; Edwards, Howell G. M.; Dobrowski, Steven A.; Voice, Alison M.

    2004-07-01

    This paper describes the application of Raman spectroscopy to the detection of exogenous substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. The scenario considered was that of an individual handling a substance and subsequently depositing a contaminated fingerprint. These fingerprints were enhanced by cyanoacrylate fuming, a process in which a layer of white cyanoacrylate polymer is deposited on the fingerprint material, enabling visual detection. Five drugs of abuse (codeine phosphate, cocaine hydrochloride, amphetamine sulphate, barbital and nitrazepam) and five non-controlled substances of similar appearance, which may be used in the adulteration of drugs of abuse (caffeine, aspirin, paracetamol, starch and talc), were used. The substances studied could be clearly distinguished using their Raman spectra and were all successfully detected in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints. Photobleaching was necessary to reduce the fluorescence background in the spectra of some substances. Raman spectra obtained from the substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints were of a similar quality to spectra obtained from the substances under normal sampling conditions, however, interfering Raman bands arising from the cyanoacrylate polymer were present in the spectra. In most cases the only interfering band was the CN stretching mode of the polymer, and there were no cases where the interfering bands prevented identification of the substances. If necessary, the interfering bands could be successfully removed by spectral subtraction. The most difficult aspect of the detection of these substances in cyanoacrylate-fumed fingerprints was visually locating the substance in the fingerprint beneath the polymer layer in order to obtain a Raman spectrum.

  3. Effects of Exposure to Welding Fume on Lung Function: Results from the German WELDOX Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, M; Hoffmeyer, F; Gawrych, K; Lotz, A; Heinze, E; Berresheim, H; Merget, R; Harth, V; Van Gelder, R; Hahn, J-U; Hartwig, A; Weiß, T; Pesch, B; Brüning, T

    2015-01-01

    The association between exposure to welding fume and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has been insufficiently clarified. In this study we assessed the influence of exposure to welding fume on lung function parameters. We investigated forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1/FVC, and expiratory flow rates in 219 welders. We measured current exposure to respirable particles and estimated a worker's lifetime exposure considering welding techniques, working conditions and protective measures at current and former workplaces. Multiple regression models were applied to estimate the influence of exposure to welding fume, age, and smoking on lung function. We additionally investigated the duration of working as a welder and the predominant welding technique. The findings were that age- and smoking-adjusted lung function parameters showed no decline with increasing duration, current exposure level, and lifetime exposure to welding fume. However, 15% of the welders had FEV1/FVC below the lower limit of normal, but we could not substantiate the presence of an association with the measures of exposure. Adverse effects of cigarette smoking were confirmed. In conclusion, the study did not support the notion of a possible detrimental effect of exposure to welding fume on lung function in welders.

  4. FILLER ENGINEERING FOR PAPERMAKING: COMPARISION WITH FIBER ENGINEERING AND SOME IMPORTANT RESEARCH TOPICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Fibers and fillers are important raw materials for the preparation of paper products. Similar to fiber engineering, filler engineering for papermaking has become an active research area. There are similarities as well as differences between engineering involving each of these classes of materials. There are differences in such aspects as the nature of materials to be engineered, applicable engineering methods, and engineerablity of the material surfaces. The co-development of fiber engineering and filler engineering can potentially provide many benefits to the papermaking industry. For filler engineering, the relevant research topics broadly can include fibrous filler engineering, hollow/porous filler engineering, acid-stabilization of calcium carbonate fillers, surface encapsulation of naturally occurring polymers or their derivatives, preflocculation, precoagulation, cationic modification, filler/size hybrid formation, organic filler engineering, using combinations of different types of available fillers, multilayer deposition modification, modification with polymer latexes or dispersants, physical modification, mechanical modification, surface functionalization, fines-filler composite/hybrids or fiber-filler composite/ hybrid formation, in-situ polymerization modification, surface grafting, physical treatment in the presence of polymeric additives, filler precipitation, and core-shell composite filler engineering.

  5. Loading antifungal drugs onto silica particles grafted with cyclodextrins by means of inclusion complex formation at the solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hbaieb, Souhaira; Kalfat, Rafik; Chevalier, Yves

    2012-12-15

    Immobilization of antifungal drugs to solid particles has been addressed in order to limit the skin penetration to the skin surface during topical administration. Antifungal drug griseofulvin has been immobilized at the surface of silica particles by formation of its inclusion complex with β-cyclodextrins grafted to silica. A simple and fast process for loading griseofulvin into the hydrophobic cavity of cyclodextrins at the surface of the solid particles in aqueous suspension has been designed. It allowed the formation of the griseofulvin:cyclodextrin inclusion complex of 1:1 stoichiometry to completion. Grafting β-cyclodextrins to silica surface has been performed in a two-step procedure. The coupling agent 3-amino-propylmethyldiethoxysilane was reacted onto fumed silica particles as a first step. The second step was the reaction of grafted primary amino groups with tosylated β-cyclodextrin that led to β-cyclodextrin grafted silica. Loading griseofulvin onto grafted silica particles have been investigated by IR spectroscopy and by tracking possible crystals of griseofulvin in aqueous suspension by optical and scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Successful formation of the inclusion complex at the surface of grafted silica suggested a strong adsorption of griseofulvin by means of heterogeneous nucleation of crystals, followed by inclusion complexation taking place between the partners being in close proximity at the surface of silica particles. The high adsorption capacity of CD-grafted silica for griseofulvin compared to bare silica and amino-grafted silica supports this interpretation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel dental composites reinforced with zirconia-silica ceramic nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Guangqing; Fan, Yuwei; Zhang, Jian-Feng; Hagan, Joseph L; Xu, Xiaoming

    2012-04-01

    To fabricate and characterize dental composites reinforced with various amounts of zirconia-silica (ZS) or zirconia-yttria-silica (ZYS) ceramic nanofibers. Control composites (70 wt% glass particle filler, no nanofibers) and experimental composites (2.5, 5.0, and 7.5 wt% ZS or ZYS nanofibers replacing glass particle filler) were prepared by blending 29 wt% dental resin monomers, 70 wt% filler, and 1.0 wt% initiator, and polymerized by either heat or dental curing light. Flexural strength (FS), flexural modulus (FM), energy at break (EAB), and fracture toughness (FT) were tested after the specimens were stored in 37°C deionized water for 24h, 3 months, or 6 months. Degree of conversion (DC) of monomers in composites was measured using Fourier transformed near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy. Fractured surfaces were observed by field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM). The data were analyzed using ANOVA with Tukey's Honestly Significant Differences test used for post hoc analysis. Reinforcement of dental composites with ZS or ZYS nanofibers (2.5% or 5.0%) can significantly increase the FS, FM and EAB of dental composites over the control. Further increase the content of ZS nanofiber (7.5%), however, decreases these properties (although they are still higher than those of the control). Addition of nanofibers did not decrease the long-term mechanical properties of these composites. All ZS reinforced composites (containing 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% ZS nanofibers) exhibit significantly higher fracture toughness than the control. The DC of the composites decreases with ZS nanofiber content. Incorporation of ceramic nanofibers in dental composites can significantly improve their mechanical properties and fracture toughness and thus may extend their service life. Copyright © 2011 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Manganese and welding fume exposure and control in construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, John D; Susi, Pam; Flynn, Michael R

    2007-12-01

    Overexposure to welding fume constituents, particularly manganese, is of concern in the construction industry due to the prevalence of welding and the scarcity of engineering controls. The control effectiveness of a commercially available portable local exhaust ventilation (LEV) unit was assessed. It consisted of a portable vacuum and a small bell-shaped hood connected by a flexible 2 inch (50.8 mm) diameter hose, in both experimental and field settings. The experimental testing was done in a semienclosed booth at a pipefitter training facility. Five paired trials of LEV control vs. no control, each approximately 1 hr in duration and conducted during two successive welds of 6 inch (152.4 mm) diameter carbon steel pipe were run in random order. Breathing zone samples were collected outside the welding hood during each trial. In the field scenario, full-shift breathing zone samples were collected from two pipefitters welding carbon steel pipe for a chiller installation on a commercial construction project. Eight days of full-shift sampling were conducted on both workers (n = 16), and the LEV was used by one of the two workers on an alternating basis for 7 of the days. All samples were collected with personal sample pumps calibrated at 2 L/min. Filter cassettes were analyzed for total particulate and manganese concentration by a certified laboratory. In the experimental setting, use of the portable LEV resulted in a 75% reduction in manganese exposure (mean 13 microg/m(3) vs. 51 microg/m(3); p 0.05). These results demonstrate that LEV use can reduce manganese exposure associated with welding tasks in construction.

  8. An investigation of tendon sheathing filler migration into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naus, D.J.; Oland, C.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    During some of the inspections at nuclear power plants with prestressed concrete containments, it was observed that the containments has experienced leakage of the tendon sheathing filler (i.e., streaks). The objective of this activity was to provide an indication of the extent of tendon sheathing filler leakage into the concrete and its affects on concrete properties. Literature was reviewed and concrete core samples were obtained from the Trojan Nuclear Plant and tested. The literature primarily addressed effects of crude or lubricating oils that are known to cause concrete damage. However, these materials have significantly different characteristics relative to the materials used as tendon sheathing fillers. Examination and testing of the concrete cores indicated that the appearance of tendon sheathing filler on the concrete surface was due to leakage from the conduits and its subsequent migration through cracks that were present. Migration of the tendon sheathing filler was confined to the cracks and there was no perceptible movement into the concrete. Results of compressive strength testing indicated that the concrete quality was consistent in the containment and that the strength had increased over 40% in 25.4 years relative to the average compressive strength at 28-days age.

  9. Complications caused by injection of dermal filler in Danish patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uth, Charlotte Caspara; Elberg, Jens Jørgen; Zachariae, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number of complicati......Background: The usage of dermal fillers has increased significantly in recent years. Soft tissue augmentation with fillers helps to diminish the facial lines and to restore volume and fullness in the face at a relatively low cost. With the increasing number of treatments, the number...... of complications is likely to increase as well.  Methods: A total of 37 patients with complications were collected retrospectively during a period of 13 years using original data files. Information on the type, date, number and location of the injections, type and date of complications, treatment, bacteria...... and complications was 2 years (range 1 day–8 years). The most common reported complications were edema (81 %), noduli (67.7 %), infections (54.1 %), discoloration (51.4 %), and granuloma formation (48.6 %). Surgical removal of the filler material was attempted in four patients.  Conclusions: With the increased use...

  10. 42 CFR 84.1141 - Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for respiratory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... mist respirators designed for respiratory protection against fumes of various metals having an air...; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1141 Isoamyl acetate tightness test; dust, fume, and mist respirators designed for...

  11. Evaluation of the relationship between PAH content and mutagenic activity of fumes from roofing and paving asphalts and coal tar pitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, M L; Beatty, P W; Fetzer, J C; Glickman, A H; McGinnis, E L

    1993-11-01

    Fume condensates from asphalt and coal tar pitch were evaluated to determine if polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) composition, crude oil source, or temperature at which the fume was generated correlated with mutagenic activity. The fume condensates were tested for mutagenic activity using a modified Ames Test. Benzo[a]pyrene (BP) and other PAHs were detected in all samples. The concentration of BP in coal tar pitch was 18,100 ppm while the concentration in asphalt was less than 6 ppm. Coal tar fumes contained between two and three orders of magnitude more BP, as well as other PAH species, than asphalt fumes. Coal tar fume condensates were also approximately 100 times more mutagenic than those of asphalt. Generation temperature, crude oil source, and/or process conditions affected the PAH concentrations but not the mutagenicity in roofing asphalt fume condensates. With paving asphalt fumes, PAH content and mutagenicity varied with crude oil source but not with processing conditions; due to limited data, it was not possible to determine the effect of generation temperature. Coal tar pitch fumes generated at 316 degrees C contained significantly higher concentrations of PAHs than those generated at 232 degrees C and the mutagenic activity generally paralleled the PAH content. A subset of the paving asphalts demonstrated good correlation between mutagenicity and three- to seven-ring PAH content. These results indicate that asphalt fumes are far less mutagenic than coal tar fumes. Asphalt fumes differ in their ability to induce mutagenic activity, and, most likely, in their potential carcinogenicity.

  12. Water-borne pressure-sensitive adhesives acrylics modified using amorphous silica nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czech Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The application of water-borne pressure-sensitive adhesives (PSA based on acrylics is increasing in a variety of industrial areas. The have been used for manufacturing of double sided and carrier free mounting tapes, splicing tapes, marking and sign films, self-adhesive labels, packaging tapes, protective films and diverse high quality medical materials. Nano-sized inorganic fillers can modify diverse adhesive and self-adhesive coating properties such as tack, peel adhesion, shear strength at 20°C and 70°C, and removability Amorphous synthetic silica nanoparticles in form of water dispersions: Ludox PX-30 (30 wt.% silica stabilizing with counter ion sodium, Ludox PT-40 (40 wt.% silica stabilizing with counter ion sodium, Ludox PT-40AS (40 wt.% silica stabilizing with counter ion ammonium, and Ludox PW-50 (50 wt.% silica stabilizing with counter ion sodium (from Grace in concentrations between 1 and 5wt.% were used for modifying of water-born pressure-sensitive adhesive acrylics: Acronal 052, Acronal CR 516 (both BASF and Plextol D273 (Synthomer properties. It has been found in this study that the nano-technologically reinforced system containing of Acronal 052 and amorphous silica Ludox PX-30 showed a great enhancement in tack, peel adhesion and shear strength. In this paper we evaluate the performance of Acronal 052 modified with amorphous silica Ludox PX-30.

  13. Organosilane grafted silica: Quantitative correlation of microscopic surface characters and macroscopic surface properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tuo; Ma, Chi; Brisbin, Logan; Mu, Liwen; Robertson, Christopher G.; Dong, Yalin; Zhu, Jiahua

    2017-03-01

    In polymer composites, organosilanes are often used to modify the surface property of silica nanoparticles and improve the interfacial properties. Surface properties of the modified silica, such as grafting density and consequent surface energy, largely depend on the molecular structure of the silane. Achieving maximum interfacial bonding between the filler and polymer requires precise control of silica surface property. In this work, four silanes with similar molecular structure but different alkyl chain lengths, trimethoxy(propyl)silane, trimethoxy(octyl)silane, hexadecyltrimethoxysilane and trimethoxy(octadecyl)silane, are selected as model agents to study their roles in influencing silica surface property. The grafting density of silane on the silica is well controlled by regulating the reaction conditions. Three main surface characters, silane grafting density, surface energy and surface potential, are measured. More importantly, a linear relationship has been correlated when plotting grafting density vs. surface energy and grafting density vs. surface potential. Utilizing these relationships, a linear model has been developed to predict grafting density and surface energy by simply measuring surface potential. This model has been validated by both commercial silica and synthesized silica particles of different sizes.

  14. Silica nanoparticles to control the lipase-mediated digestion of lipid-based oral delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Angel; Simovic, Spomenka; Davey, Andrew K; Rades, Thomas; Boyd, Ben J; Prestidge, Clive A

    2010-04-05

    We investigate the role of hydrophilic fumed silica in controlling the digestion kinetics of lipid emulsions, hence further exploring the mechanisms behind the improved oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs promoted by silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) microcapsules. An in vitro lipolysis model was used to quantify the lipase-mediated digestion kinetics of a series of lipid vehicles formulated with caprylic/capric triglycerides: lipid solution, submicrometer lipid emulsions (in the presence and absence of silica), and SLH microcapsules. The importance of emulsification on lipid digestibility is evidenced by the significantly higher initial digestion rate constants for SLH microcapsules and lipid emulsions (>15-fold) in comparison with that of the lipid solution. Silica particles exerted an inhibitory effect on the digestion of submicrometer lipid emulsions regardless of their initial location, i.e., aqueous or lipid phases. This inhibitory effect, however, was not observed for SLH microcapsules. This highlights the importance of the matrix structure and porosity of the hybrid microcapsule system in enhancing lipid digestibility as compared to submicrometer lipid emulsions stabilized by silica. For each studied formulation, the digestion kinetics is well correlated to the corresponding in vivo plasma concentrations of a model drug, celecoxib, via multiple-point correlations (R(2) > 0.97). This supports the use of the lipid digestion model for predicting the in vivo outcome of an orally dosed lipid formulation. SLH microcapsules offer the potential to enhance the oral absorption of poorly soluble drugs via increased lipid digestibility in conjunction with improved drug dissolution/dispersion.

  15. Carboxylated nitrile butadiene rubber/hybrid filler composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Mousa

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The surface properties of the OSW and NLS are measured with the dynamic contact-angle technique. The x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS of the OSW reveals that the OSW possesses various reactive functional groups namely hydroxyl groups (OH. Hybrid filler from NLS and OSW were incorporated into carboxylated nitrile rubber (XNBR to produce XNBR hybrid composites. The reaction of OH groups from the OSW with COOH of the XNBR is checked by attenuated total reflectance spectra (ATR-IR of the composites. The degree of curing ΔM (maximum torque-minimum torque as a function of hybrid filler as derived from moving die rheometer (MDR is reported. The stress-strain behavior of the hybrid composites as well as the dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA is studied. Bonding quality and dispersion of the hybrid filler with and in XNBR are examined using scanning-transmission electron microscopy (STEM in SEM.

  16. Comparative study of filler influence on polylactide photooxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bocchini

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Polylactide (PLA based nanocomposites of organically modified montmorillonite and micro-talc based microcomposites were prepared with different compositions and were UV-light irradiated under artificial accelerated conditions representative of solar irradiation. The chemical modifications resulting from photo-oxidation were followed by infrared (IR and ultraviolet (UV-visible spectroscopies. The infrared analysis of PLA photooxidation shows the formation of a band at 1847 cm–1 due to the formation of anhydrides. The filler addition provokes an increase of anhydride formation rate dependent on filler nature, amount and dispersion degree on the matrix. The main factors that influence oxidation rate are the total extension of polymer/filler interfacial area and the presence of transition metal impurities of clays.

  17. Phase analysis of fume during arc weld brazing of steel sheets with protective coatings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Matusiak

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research of the phase identification and of the quantitative phase analysis of fume generated during Cold Metal Transfer (CMT, ColdArc and Metal Inert Gas / Metal Active Gas (MIG / MAG weld brazing. Investigations were conducted for hot - dip coated steel sheets with zinc (Zn and zinc-iron (Zn - Fe alloy coatings. Arc shielding gases applied during the research-related tests were Ar + O2, Ar + CO2, Ar + H2 and Ar + CO2 + H2 gas mixtures. The analysis of the results covers the influence of the chemical composition of shielding gas on the chemical composition of welding fume.

  18. A comparative study for radiological decontamination of laboratory fume hood materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth; Sweet, Lucas; MacFarlan, Paul; McNamara, Bruce; Kerschner, Harrison

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy for radiological decontamination of the laboratory standard fume hood as constructed of stainless steel, compared to that of powder-coated carbon steel is described. While the chemical inertness of powder-coated surfaces is good, faced with everyday abrasion, aggressive inorganic solutions and vapors, and penetrating organics commonly employed in government laboratory fume hoods, radiological decontamination of powder-coated steel surfaces was found to be similar to those made of stainless steel for easily solubilized or digestible radionuclides. Plutonium was difficult to remove from stainless steel and powder-coated surfaces, especially after prolonged contact times.

  19. Durability of LDPE Nanocomposites with Clay, Silica, and Zinc Oxide—Part I: Mechanical Properties of the Nanocomposite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halim Hamid Redhwi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three types of LDPE-based nanocomposites with montmorillonite clay, silica, and zinc oxide were prepared by melt blending the nanofiller with the resin. As a prelude to studying their durability, the extent of reinforcement of the LDPE matrix by the nanofillers was investigated using mechanical, thermal, and microscopic studies of the composites. No significant chemical modification of the polyethylene matrix was observed as a result of the processing of the composite compound. While reinforcement was obtained in all cases, the efficiency of reinforcement appears to be qualitatively influenced by surface functionalization, filler interactions, and the extent of dispersion of the filler in the matrix as well as the specific surface area of the nanoparticle fillers.

  20. Assessment of the effect of nanomaterials on sediment-dwelling invertebrate Chironomustentans larvae

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Oberholster, Paul J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available they are not biodegradable. The seven NMs used in this study were precipitated silica (a silica grade widely used as a reinforcing filler in rubber compounds); silica fume and calcined silica fume (a by-product of silicon smelters and used in concrete);a-alumina; g... characterized using a range of techniques. Physicochemical proper- ties that were determined included: zeta potential, particle size, shape, density, solubility, surface area, and morphology. The X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, a Phillips PW 1830) generator...

  1. Effect of filler size on wear resistance of resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, K; Suzuki, S; Katoh, Y

    2001-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of filler size on the wear of resin cements. Materials tested included four experimental dual-cure resin cements (Kuraray) consisting of different-sized filler particles. A rectangular box cavity was prepared on the flattened occlusal surface of extracted human molars. Ceramic inlays for the cavities were fabricated using the Cerec 2 system. The Cerec inlays were cemented with the respective cements and adhesive systems according to the manufacturer's directions. The restored surface was finished by wet-grinding with an 800-grit silicon carbide paper. Six specimens were prepared for each resin cement. Half of the specimens were subjected to a three-body wear test for 200,000 cycles, and the others were subjected to a toothbrush abrasion test for 30,000 cycles. The worn surface of each restoration was scanned by a profilometer (Surfcom 475 A) at eight different points for each restoration. The wear value was determined by measuring the vertical gap depth on the profilometric tracings. The data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe's test. The results showed that, with increase of filler size, the wear value decreased in the toothbrush test and increased in the three-body wear test. The cement with 0.04-microm filler exhibited the lowest wear value among the materials in the three-body wear test, and the same wear value as the cement with 0.97-microm filler in the toothbrush test. Based upon the results of this study, it is concluded that the wear of resin cements was affected by the filler size as well as the mode of wear test.

  2. Environmentally-Friendly Geopolymeric Binders Made with Silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, S. T.

    2013-12-01

    Portland cement (PC) is the ubiquitous binding material for constructions works. It is a big contributor to global warming and climate change since its production is responsible for 5-10 % of all anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Half of this emission arises from the calcination of calcareous raw materials and half from kiln fuel burning and cement clinker grinding. Recently there have been efforts to develop alternative binders with lower greenhouse gas emissions. One such class of binders is geopolymers, formed by activating natural or waste materials with suitable alkaline or acidic solutions. These binders use natural or industrial waste raw materials with a very low CO2 footprint from grinding of the starting materials, and some from the production of the activating chemicals. The total CO2 emissions from carefully formulated mixtures can be as low as 1/10th - 1/5th of those of PC concrete mixtures with comparable properties. While use of industrial wastes as raw materials is environmentally preferable, the variability of their chemical compositions over time renders their use difficult. Use of natural materials depletes resources but can have more consistent properties and can be more easily accepted. Silica sand is a natural material containing very high amounts of quartz. Silica fume is a very fine waste from silicon metal production that is mostly non-crystalline silica. This study describes the use of sodium hydroxide and sodium silicate solutions to yield mortars with mechanical properties comparable to those of portland cement mortars and with better chemical and thermal durability. Strength gain is slower than with PC mixtures at room temperature but adequate ultimate strength can be achieved with curing at slightly elevated temperatures in less than 24 h. The consistency of the chemical compositions of these materials and their abundance in several large, developing countries makes silica attractive for producing sustainable concretes with reduced carbon

  3. Wear and mechanical properties of nano-silica-fused whisker composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H H K; Quinn, J B; Giuseppetti, A A

    2004-12-01

    Resin composites must be improved if they are to overcome the high failure rates in large stress-bearing posterior restorations. This study aimed to improve wear resistance via nano-silica-fused whiskers. It was hypothesized that nano-silica-fused whiskers would significantly improve composite mechanical properties and wear resistance. Nano-silicas were fused onto whiskers and incorporated into a resin at mass fractions of 0%-74%. Fracture toughness (mean +/- SD; n = 6) was 2.92 +/- 0.14 MPa.m(1/2) for whisker composite with 74% fillers, higher than 1.13 +/- 0.19 MPa.m(1/2) for a prosthetic control, and 0.95 +/- 0.11 MPa.m(1/2) for an inlay/onlay control (Tukey's at 0.95). A whisker composite with 74% fillers had a wear depth of 77.7 +/- 6.9 mum, less than 118.0 +/- 23.8 microm of an inlay/onlay control, and 172.5 +/- 15.4 microm of a prosthetic control (p hardness, modulus, strength, and toughness, with R = 0.95-0.97. Novel nano-silica-fused whisker composites possessed high toughness and wear resistance with smooth worn surfaces, and may be useful in large stress-bearing restorations.

  4. Lower Face: Clinical Anatomy and Regional Approaches with Injectable Fillers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, André; Humphrey, Shannon; Weinkle, Susan; Yee, G Jackie; Remington, B Kent; Lorenc, Z Paul; Yoelin, Steve; Waldorf, Heidi A; Azizzadeh, Babak; Butterwick, Kimberly J; de Maio, Mauricio; Sadick, Neil; Trevidic, Patrick; Criollo-Lamilla, Gisella; Garcia, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    The use of injectable fillers enables facial sculpting through treatment of volume depletion and modeling of facial contours. Injectable fillers are among the most frequently performed minimally invasive cosmetic procedures.However, treatment of the lower third of the face can be challenging and requires expertise in facial anatomy. In this article, the authors provide a comprehensive review of the anatomy of the lower third of the face, highlighting danger zones. In addition, the authors describe their preferred approach and detailed technique used in the treatment of each specific area, namely the jawline, prejowl sulcus, melomental folds, and lips.

  5. Properties of hybrid resin composite systems containing prepolymerized filler particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackham, Jason T; Vandewalle, Kraig S; Lien, Wen

    2009-01-01

    This study compared the properties of newer hybrid resin composites with prepolymerized-filler particles to traditional hybrids and a microfill composite. The following properties were examined per composite: diametral tensile strength, flexural strength/modulus, Knoop microhardness and polymerization shrinkage. Physical properties were determined for each Jason T Blackham, DMD, USAF, General Dentistry, Tyndall composite group (n = 8), showing significant differences between groups per property (p hybrid composites (Z250, Esthet-X) had higher strength, composites containing pre-polymerized fillers (Gradia Direct Posterior, Premise) performed more moderately and the microfill composite (Durafill VS) had lower strength. Premise and Durafill VS had the lowest polymerization shrinkage.

  6. Effect of biobased fillers nature on biodeterioration of hybrid polyethylene composites by mold fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastalygina, E. E.; Popov, A. A.; Pantyukhov, P. V.

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deterioration of natural fillers and polyethylene composites on their basis (polyethylene/filler=70/30) due to the action of mold fungi. The fillers chemical composition, dimensional parameters and biodegradability have been analyzed as factors exert a considerable impact on composite materials biodeterioration. It has been found that the principal factor determining the biodeterioration of polyethylene/filler composites by mold fungi is chemical composition of a filler and, in turn, its biodegradability. The excess of holocellulose content over lignin content and high protein content in a filler are able to induce biofouling of the polymeric composite materials. The presence of soluble and easy hydrolysed fraction in a filler increases its availability in a polymeric matrix. According to the study results, most effective natural fillers as additives stimulating polyethylene composites biodegradability are milled straw of seed flax and hydrolyzed keratin of bird’s feather.

  7. Effect of precipitated calcium carbonate--Cellulose nanofibrils composite filler on paper properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ming; Cho, Byoung-Uk; Won, Jong Myoung

    2016-01-20

    A new concept of composite filler was developed by using cellulose nanofibrils (CNF), precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) and cationic starch (C-starch). In this study, cellulose nanofibrils were utilized in two different ways: a PCC-CNF composite filler and a papermaking additive in sheet forming. The aim was to elucidate their effects on flocculation, filler retention and the strength and optical properties of handsheets. The highest filler retention was obtained by using the PCC-CNF composite filler in paper sheets. The paper filled with the composite fillers had much higher bursting and tensile strengths than conventional PCC loading. It was also found that the paper prepared with PCC-CNF composite fillers became denser with increasing the filler content of paper.

  8. Effect of filler addition on porosity and strength of polysiloxane-derived porous silicon carbide ceramics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KUMAR, B. V. Manoj; EOM, Jung-Hye; KIM, Young-Wook

    2011-01-01

    Polycarbosilane (PCS) or silicon carbide (SiC) fillers were used as fillers in fabricating partially interconnected, open-cell porous SiC ceramics by carbothermal reduction of polysiloxane-derived SiOC and subsequent sintering process...

  9. Influence of welding fume on systemic iron status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casjens, Swaantje; Henry, Jana; Rihs, Hans-Peter; Lehnert, Martin; Raulf-Heimsoth, Monika; Welge, Peter; Lotz, Anne; Gelder, Rainer Van; Hahn, Jens-Uwe; Stiegler, Hugo; Eisele, Lewin; Weiss, Tobias; Hartwig, Andrea; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate

    2014-11-01

    Iron is the major metal found in welding fumes, and although it is an essential trace element, its overload causes toxicity due to Fenton reactions. To avoid oxidative damage, excess iron is bound to ferritin, and as a result, serum ferritin (SF) is a recognized biomarker for iron stores, with high concentrations linked to inflammation and potentially also cancer. However, little is known about iron overload in welders. Within this study, we assessed the iron status and quantitative associations between airborne iron, body iron stores, and iron homeostasis in 192 welders not wearing dust masks. Welders were equipped with personal samplers in order to determine the levels of respirable iron in the breathing zone during a working shift. SF, prohepcidin and other markers of iron status were determined in blood samples collected after shift. The impact of iron exposure and other factors on SF and prohepcidin were estimated using multiple regression models. Our results indicate that respirable iron is a significant predictor of SF and prohepcidin. Concentrations of SF varied according to the welding technique and respiratory protection used, with a median of 103 μg l(-1) in tungsten inert gas welders, 125 μg l(-1) in those wearing air-purifying respirators, and 161 μg l(-1) in other welders. Compared to welders with low iron stores (SF < 25 μg l(-1)), those with excess body iron (SF ≥ 400 μg l(-1)) worked under a higher median concentration of airborne iron (60 μg m(-3) versus 148 μg m(-3)). Even though air concentrations of respirable iron and manganese were highly correlated, and low iron stores have been reported to increase manganese uptake in the gastrointestinal tract, no correlation was seen between SF and manganese in blood. In conclusion, monitoring SF may be a reasonable method for health surveillance of welders. Respiratory protection with air-purifying respirators can decrease iron exposure and avoid chronically higher SF in welders working with

  10. Effects of asphalt fume condensate exposure on acute pulmonary responses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, J.Y.C.; Barger, M.W.; Castranova, V. [Health Effects Lab. Div., National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV (United States); Kriech, A.J. [Heritage Research Group, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2000-10-01

    The present study was carried out to characterize the effects of in vitro exposure to paving asphalt fume condensate (AFC) on alveolar macrophage (AM) functions and to monitor acute pulmonary responses to in vivo AFC exposure in rats. Methods: For in vitro studies, rat primary AM cultures were incubated with various concentrations of AFC for 24 h at 37 C. AM-conditioned medium was collected and assayed for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) as a marker of cytotoxicity. Tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) production were assayed in AM-conditioned medium to monitor AM function. The effect of AFC on chemiluminescence (CL) generated by resting AM or AM in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation was also determined as a marker of AM activity. For in vivo studies, rats received either (1) a single intratracheal (IT) instillation of saline, or 0.1 mg or 0.5 mg AFC and were killed 1 or 3 days later; or (2) IT instillation of saline, or 0.1, 0.5, or 2 mg AFC for three consecutive days and were killed the following day. Differential counts of cells harvested by bronchoalveolar lavage were measured to monitor inflammation. Acellular LDH and protein content in the first lavage fluid were measured to monitor damage. CL generation, TNF-{alpha} and IL-1 production by AM were assayed to monitor AM function. Results: In vitro AFC exposure at <200 {mu}g/ml did not induce cytotoxicity, oxidant generation, or IL-1 production by AM, but it did cause a small but significant increase in TNF-{alpha} release from AM. In vitro exposure of AM to AFC resulted in a significant decline of CL in response to zymosan or PMA stimulation. The in vivo studies showed that AFC exposure did not induce significant neutrophil infiltration or alter LDH or protein content in acellular lavage samples. Macrophages obtained from AFC-exposed rats did not show significant differences in oxidant production or cytokine secretion at rest or in response to LPS in comparison with control

  11. Fumed metallic oxides and conventional pigments for glossy inkjet paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkook

    Product development activity in the area of inkjet printing papers has accelerated greatly to meet the rapidly growing market for inkjet papers. Advancements in inkjet printing technology have also placed new demands on the paper substrate due to faster printing rates, greater resolution through increased drop volumes, and colorants added to the ink. To meet these requirements, papermakers are turning to pigmented size press formulations or pigmented coating systems. For inkjet coating applications, both the internal porosity of the pigment particles as well as the packing porosity of the coating affect print quality and dry time. Pores between the pigment particles allow for rapid diffusion of ink fluids into the coating structure, while also providing capacity for ink fluid uptake. Past research has shown the presence of coating cracks to increase the microroughness of the papers, consequently reducing the gloss of the silica/polyvinyl alcohol based coating colors. Coating cracks were not observed, at the same level of magnification, in the scanning electron microscopy images of alumina/polyvinyl alcohol coated papers. Studies are therefore needed to understand the influence of coating cracking on the microroughening of silica/polyvinyl alcohol based coatings and consequences to coating and ink gloss. Since micro roughening is known to be linked to shrinkage of the coating layer, studies are needed to determine if composite pigments can be formulated, which would enable the coating solids of the formulations to be increased to minimize the shrinkage of coating layer during drying. Coating solids greater than 55% solids are needed to reduce the difference between application solids and the coating's immobilization solids point in order to reduce shrinkage. The aim of this research was to address the above mentioned needed studies. Studies were performed to understand the influence of particle packing on gloss and ink jet print quality. Composite pigment structures

  12. The Use of Feedback in Lab Energy Conservation: Fume Hoods at MIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Daniel; Olivetti, Elsa; Graham, Amanda; Lanou, Steve; Cooper, Peter; Doughty, Jim; Wilk, Rich; Glicksman, Leon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on the results of an Massachusetts Institute of Technology Chemistry Department campaign to reduce energy consumption in chemical fume hoods. Hood use feedback to lab users is a crucial component of this campaign. Design/methodology/approach: Sash position sensor data on variable air volume fume…

  13. Blunted behavioral and c Fos responses to acidic fumes in the African naked mole-rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Colleen LaVinka

    Full Text Available Acidosis in the skin triggers activation of pain pathways and behaviors indicative of pain in vertebrates. The exception is the naked mole-rat, the only known vertebrate to show physiological and behavioral insensitivity to acid pain in the skin. The goal of the present study was to determine behavioral and physiological responses of this species to airborne acidic fumes, which would be expected to affect the trigeminal pain pathway in other species. Behaviorally, naked mole-rats did not avoid fumes from moderately high concentrations of acetic acid (10 and 20%, and c Fos labeling showed no increase in activity in the trigeminal nuclei and nucleus tractus solitarius. In contrast, these concentrations triggered behavioral aversion and increased Fos activity in other laboratory rodents. For a very high concentration of acetic acid (50%, naked mole-rats showed significant avoidance behavior and increased Fos labeling in the nucleus tractus solitarius caudal region, which receives vagal chemosensory information. However, there was no increase in trigeminal labeling, and in fact, activity significantly decreased. This pattern is opposite of that associated with another irritant, ammonia fumes, which elicited an increase in trigeminal but not nucleus tractus solitarius Fos labeling, and no behavioral avoidance. Behavioral avoidance of acidic fumes, but no increased labeling in the trigeminal pain nucleus is consistent with the notion of adaptations to blunt acid pain, which would be advantageous for naked mole-rats as they normally live under chronically high levels of acidosis-inducing CO(2.

  14. Impact of fillers on dissolution kinetic of fenofibrate dry foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Elisabeth; Sprunk, Angela; Kleinebudde, Peter; Page, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Dry foam technology reveals the opportunity to improve the dissolution behavior of poorly soluble drugs tending to agglomeration due to micronization. In this study, the impact of fillers on the manufacturability, the properties of dry foams and granules as well as the dissolution kinetics of dry foam tablets was investigated using fenofibrate as a model compound. Different maltodextrins and dried glucose syrups, a maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex, isomalt and a 1:1 mixture of mannitol/glucose syrup were used as filler. Within the group of maltodextrins and glucose syrups, the influences of dextrose equivalent (DE), particle morphology and botanical source of starch were investigated. Comparable macroscopic foam structures were obtained with maltodextrins and glucose syrups whereas different foam morphologies were obtained for the other fillers tested. Regarding the maltodextrins and glucose syrups, different physicochemical and particle properties had a minor impact on granule characteristics and tablet dissolution. Using the maltodextrin-phosphatidylcholine complex resulted in a low specific surface area of the granules and a slow tablet dissolution caused by a slow disintegration. In contrast, a high specific surface area and a fast release were obtained with isomalt and glucose syrup/mannitol mixture indicating that high soluble low molecular weight fillers enable the development of fast dissolving dry foam tablets.

  15. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Ven, M. van de; Vliet, D. van

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand-bitumen ratio and the com

  16. Induction heating of mastic containing conductive fibers and fillers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García, Á.; Schlangen, E.; Van de Ven, M.; Van Vliet, D.

    The objective of this research is to examine the induction heating of mastic through the addition of electrically conductive fillers and fibers (graphite and steel wool), and to prove that this material can be healed with induction energy. The effect of fibers content, sand–bitumen ratio and the com

  17. Multipass Narrow Gap of Heavy Gauge Steel with Filler Wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markushov, Y.; Evtihiev, N.; Grezev, N.; Murzakov, M.

    This article describes method of heavy gauge welding using laser radiation as beam source of energy. The article contains the results of single-pass laser-arc welding and multipass laser welding with filler wire; highlight benefits and drawbacks of each welding method. The results obtained were compared with the traditional methods of welding of the same thickness.

  18. Effect of waste rubber powder as filler for plywood application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ong Huei Ruey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the suitability of waste rubber powder (WRP use as filler in adhesive formulation for plywood application. Melamine Urea Formaldehyde (MUF was employed as resin for formulating the wood adhesive. To improve chemical properties and bonding quality of adhesive, WRP was treated by different chemicals like 20% nitric acid, 30% hydrogen peroxide and acetone solution. The treated WRP were analysed by XRD and it showed that inorganic compounds were removed and carbon was remained as major component under the treatment of 20% HNO3. The treatment improved the mechanical properties like shear strength and formaldehyde emission of plywood (high shear strength and low formaldehyde emission. The physico-chemical interaction between the wood, resin and filler was investigated using fourier transform infrared spectroscopic (FTIR technique and the interactions among N-H of MUF and C=O of wood and WRP were identified. The morphology of wood-adhesive interface was studied by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM and light microscope (LM. It showed that the penetration of adhesives and fillers through the wood pores was responsible for mechanical interlocking. Therefore, chemically treated WRP proved its potential use as filler in MUF based adhesive for making plywood.

  19. Fibrous Fillers to Manufacture Ultra High Ash/Performance Paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. VIjay K. Mathur

    2009-04-30

    The paper industry is one of the largest users of energy and emitters of CO2 in the US manufacturing industry. In addition to that, it is facing tremendous financial pressure due to lower cost imports. The fine paper industry has shrunk from 15 million tons per year production to 10 million tons per year in the last 5 years. This has resulted in mill closures and job loses. The AF&PA and the DOE formed a program called Agenda 2020 to help in funding to develop breakthrough technologies to provide help in meeting these challenges. The objectives of this project were to optimize and scale-up Fibrous Fillers technology, ready for commercial deployment and to develop ultra high ash/high performance paper using Fibrous Fillers. The goal was to reduce energy consumption, carbon footprint, and cost of manufacturing paper and related industries. GRI International (GRI) has been able to demonstrate the techno - economic feasibility and economic advantages of using its various products in both handsheets as well as in commercial paper mills. GRI has also been able to develop sophisticated models that demonstrate the effect of combinations of GRI's fillers at multiple filler levels. GRI has also been able to develop, optimize, and successfully scale-up new products for use in commercial paper mills.

  20. Filler reinforcement in cross-linked elastomer nanocomposites: insights from fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander S; Khalatur, Pavel G

    2016-06-28

    Using a fully atomistic model, we perform large-scale molecular dynamics simulations of sulfur-cured polybutadiene (PB) and nanosilica-filled PB composites. A well-integrated network without sol fraction is built dynamically by cross-linking the coarse-grained precursor chains in the presence of embedded silica nanoparticles. Initial configurations for subsequent atomistic simulations are obtained by reverse mapping of the well-equilibrated coarse-grained systems. Based on the concept of "maximally inflated knot" introduced by Grosberg et al., we show that the networks simulated in this study behave as mechanically isotropic systems. Analysis of the network topology in terms of graph theory reveals that mechanically inactive tree-like structures are the dominant structural components of the weakly cross-linked elastomer, while cycles are mainly responsible for the transmission of mechanical forces through the network. We demonstrate that quantities such as the system density, thermal expansion coefficient, glass transition temperature and initial Young's modulus can be predicted in qualitative and sometimes even in quantitative agreement with experiments. The nano-filled system demonstrates a notable increase in the glass transition temperature and an approximately two-fold increase in the nearly equilibrium value of elastic modulus relative to the unfilled elastomer even at relatively small amounts of filler particles. We also examine the structural rearrangement of the nanocomposite subjected to tensile deformation. Under high strain-rate loading, the formation of structural defects (microcavities) within the polymer bulk is observed. The nucleation and growth of cavities in the post-yielding strain hardening regime mainly take place at the elastomer/nanoparticle interfaces. As a result, the cavities are concentrated just near the embedded nanoparticles. Therefore, while the silica nanofiller increases the elastic modulus of the elastomer, it also creates a more

  1. A novel method for assessing respiratory deposition of welding fume nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Keane, M J; Chisholm, W P; Stone, S; Harper, M; Chen, B T

    2014-01-01

    Welders are exposed to high concentrations of nanoparticles. Compared to larger particles, nanoparticles have been associated with more toxic effects at the cellular level, including the generation of more reactive oxygen species activity. Current methods for welding-fume aerosol exposures do not differentiate between the nano-fraction and the larger particles. The objectives of this work are to establish a method to estimate the respiratory deposition of the nano-fraction of selected metals in welding fumes and test this method in a laboratory setting. Manganese (Mn), Nickel (Ni), Chromium (Cr), and hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) are commonly found in welding fume aerosols and have been linked with severe adverse health outcomes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and ion chromatography (IC) were evaluated as methods for analyzing the content of Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) nanoparticles in welding fumes collected with nanoparticle respiratory deposition (NRD) samplers. NRD samplers collect nanoparticles at deposition efficiencies that closely resemble physiological deposition in the respiratory tract. The limits of detection (LODs) and quantitation (LOQs) for ICP-MS and IC were determined analytically. Mild and stainless steel welding fumes generated with a robotic welder were collected with NRD samplers inside a chamber. LODs (LOQs) for Mn, Ni, Cr, and Cr(VI) were 1.3 μg (4.43 μg), 0.4 μg (1.14 μg), 1.1 μg (3.33 μg), and 0.4 μg (1.42 μg), respectively. Recovery of spiked samples and certified welding fume reference material was greater than 95%. When testing the method, the average percentage of total mass concentrations collected by the NRD samplers was ~30% for Mn, ~50% for Cr, and ~60% for Ni, indicating that a large fraction of the metals may lie in the nanoparticle fraction. This knowledge is critical to the development of toxicological studies aimed at finding links between exposure to welding fume nanoparticles and adverse health

  2. New Manufacturing Method for Paper Filler and Fiber Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doelle, Klaus [SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

    2013-08-25

    The use of fillers in printing and writing papers has become a prerequisite for competing in a global market to reduce the cost of materials. Use of calcium carbonates (ranging from 18% to 30%) as filler is a common practice in the paper industry but the choices of fillers for each type of papers vary widely according to its use. The market for uncoated digital printing paper is one that continues to introduce exciting growth projections. and it is important to understand the effect that new manufacturing methods of calcium carbonates have on the energy efficiency and paper production. Research conducted under this award showed that the new fiber filler composite material has the potential to increase the paper filler content by up to 5% without losing mechanical properties. Benefits of the technology can be summarized as follows for a 1% filler increase per metric ton of paper produced: (i) production cost savings over $12, (ii) Energy savings of 100,900 btu, (iii) CO{sub 2} emission savings of 33 lbs, and additional savings for wood preparation, pulping, recovery of 203593 btu with a 46lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per 1% filler increase. In addition the technology has the potential to save: (i) additional $3 per ton of bleached pulp produced, (ii) bleaching energy savings of 170,000 btu, (iii) bleaching CO{sub 2} emission savings of 39 lbs, and (iv) additional savings for replacing conventional bleaching chemicals with a sustainable bleaching chemical is estimated to be 900,000 btu with a 205 lbs of CO{sub 2} emission savings per ton of bleached pulp produced. All the above translates to a estimated annual savings for a 12% filler increase of 296 trillion buts or 51 million barrel of oil equivalent (BOE) or 13.7% of the industries energy demand. This can lead to a increase of renewable energy usage from 56% to close to 70% for the industry sector. CO{sub 2} emission of the industry at a 12% filler increase could be lowered by over 39 million tons annually

  3. Increasing the electrical discharge endurance of acid anhydride cured DGEBA epoxy resin by dispersion of nanoparticle silica. High Perform. Polym. 11 (1999) pp 281-296 by IOP Publishing Ltd

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henk, Peter O; Kortsen, T.W.; Kvarts, T.

    1999-01-01

    combinations were used: (a) fumed nanoparticle silicon dioxide referred to as Aerosil, (b) equal volumes of Aerosil and nanoparticle anatase, and (c) Aerosil plus anatase in combination with coarse-particle filler grade calcium-magnesium carbonate dolomite. A test for endurance using the CIGRE method II...... the endurance by a factor of up to 20 as the Aerosil content goes from zero to 5.4 vol%. Aerosil mixed with anatase has a similar effect. The high level of endurance is maintained with an additional high-volume (35 vol.%) filling of coarse-particle dolomite to an epoxy system already containing Aerosil...

  4. Polymer surface modification and characterization of particulate calcium carbonate fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui Miao

    2003-12-30

    The efficacy of the surface treatment of particulate fillers depends on the chemical character of the components, on the method and conditions of the treatment, and on the amount of the treating agent. Here, the ultra-fine calcium carbonate is surface treated with 1, 2, 3 and 4 wt.% polyacrylic acid (PAA) synthesized by ourselves, which has strong ionic interaction and is an efficient surface modifier. The PAA coated filler is submitted to the measurement of the surface bonded amount, bonding efficacy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inverse gas chromatography. Maximum efficacy is expected at the monolayer coverage of the surface, which is about 0.6 wt.% according to the calculation based on the way they are aligned and is basically in agreement with the 'substrate overlayer' model based on the mole ratio of C{sup 286} and C{sup 290} taking no account of the possible underestimation because of the inaccuracy or because of the CH{sub x} contamination present originally on the CaCO{sub 3}. The initial decrease of the mole ratio of C{sup 290}/O and C{sup 290}/Ca with the surface bonded PAA may indicate that the bonding interaction between the polymer and the filler surface is the leaving of one molecular carbon dioxide. The IGC measurement shows that there is a considerable surface tension falling in the case of the PAA modified filler compared with the reference. An abnormal high surface energy in the case of filler treated with 4% PAA is observed.

  5. EFFECT OF SILICA FUME ADDITION ON THE CHLORIDE-RELATED TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HIGH-PERFORMANCE CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN LIZARAZO-MARRIAGA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available La corrosión del acero de refuerzo, debido a la penetración de cloruro es la principal causa de problemas de durabilidad en el concreto. De esta forma, este documento resume los resultados de un estudio experimental llevado a cabo con el fin de investigar la influencia del contenido de microsilice (SF en los cloruros relacionados con algunas propiedades de transporte del concreto. Para ello, la resistencia a la compresión, la penetración de cloruros libres por difusión, la carga pasada bajo un ensayo de migración de cloruros no estacionario (ASTM C1202 y la resistividad AC, se midieron en las mezclas de concreto de alto desempeño. Cuatro mezclas de hormigón se hicieron incorporando 5, 10, y el 15% de SF, como adición al cemento Portland. Los resultados mostraron que el humo de sílice en el hormigón provoca un aumento en la resistencia y la reducción de la permeabilidad de iones de cloruro, sin embargo se encontraron diferencias claras entre los resultados de los ensayos difusión a largo plazo y las pruebas eléctricas aceleradas.

  6. Effect of Fly Ash and Silica Fume on the Mechanical Properties of Cement Paste at Different Stages of Hydration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-10

    material is a fine white powder byproduct from silicon metal or ferrosilicon alloy production is very reactive in cement. Silicon dioxide makes up a...of cement concrete . The ferrite goes through two progressive reactions with the gypsum. The first reaction is when the ettringite reacts with the...resulting from the combustion of ground or powdered coal, which is transported from the firebox through the boiler by flue gases. Fly ash consists of

  7. Deicing salt scaling resistance of concrete incorporating fly ash and (or) silica fume: laboratory and field sidewalk test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzoubaa, N.; Bilodeau, A.; Fournier, B.; Hooton, R.D.; Gagne, R.; Jolin, M.

    2011-04-15

    A study was carried out in the spring of 2002 on sidewalk sections cast with different concrete mixtures showing the severity of the ASTM C 672 procedure and the adequateness of the BNQ (Bureau de normalisation du Quebec)procedure. This study set out to confirm these results and determine the impact of time of casting on the scaling resistance of the concrete. The results confirmed the adequateness of the BNQ procedure, showing that concrete cast in the fall season scaled more than those cast in the spring. Curing compounds increase the scaling resistance. This study provided results which could be useful when planning to cast sidewalk sections.

  8. Effects on the efficiency of activated carbon on exposure to welding fumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1995-02-01

    It is the intention of this paper to document that certain types of welding fumes have little or no effect on the effectiveness of the carbon filter air filtration efficiency when directly exposed to a controlled amount of welding fumes for a short-term period. The welding processes studied were restricted to shielded metal arc welding (SMAW), flux cored arc welding (FCAW), gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and gas metal arc welding (GMAW) processes. Contrary to the SMAW and FCAW processes, the GTAW (or TIG) and the GMAW (or MIG) welding processes do not require the use of flux as part of the overall process. Credit was taken for these processes occurring in inert gas environments and producing minimal amount of smoke. It was concluded that a study involving the SMAW process would also envelop the effects of the TIG and MIG welding processes. The quantity of welding fumes generated during the arc welding process is a function of the particular process, the size and type of electrode, welding machine amperage, and operator proficiency. For this study, the amount of welding for specific testing was equated to the amount of welding normally conducted during plant unit outages. Different welding electrodes were also evaluated, and the subsequent testing was limited to an E7018 electrode which was judged to be representative of all carbon and stainless steel electrodes commonly used at the site. The effect of welding fumes on activated charcoal was tested using a filtration unit complete with prefilters, upstream and downstream high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and a carbon adsorber section. The complete system was field tested in accordance with ANSI N510 standards prior to exposing the filters and the adsorber bed to welding fumes. The carbon samples were tested at an established laboratory using ASTM D3803-1989 standards.

  9. Airborne nanoparticle exposures associated with the manual handling of nanoalumina and nanosilver in fume hoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Su-Jung (Candace); Ada, Earl; Isaacs, Jacqueline A.; Ellenbecker, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Manual handling of nanoparticles is a fundamental task of most nanomaterial research; such handling may expose workers to ultrafine or nanoparticles. Recent studies confirm that exposures to ultrafine or nanoparticles produce adverse inflammatory responses in rodent lungs and such particles may translocate to other areas of the body, including the brain. An important method for protecting workers handling nanoparticles from exposure to airborne nanoparticles is the laboratory fume hood. Such hoods rely on the proper face velocity for optimum performance. In addition, several other hood design and operating factors can affect worker exposure. Handling experiments were performed to measure airborne particle concentration while handling nanoparticles in three fume hoods located in different buildings under a range of operating conditions. Nanoalumina and nanosilver were selected to perform handling experiments in the fume hoods. Air samples were also collected on polycarbonate membrane filters and particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Handling tasks included transferring particles from beaker to beaker by spatula and by pouring. Measurement locations were the room background, the researcher's breathing zone and upstream and downstream from the handling location. Variable factors studied included hood design, transfer method, face velocity/sash location and material types. Airborne particle concentrations measured at breathing zone locations were analyzed to characterize exposure level. Statistics were used to test the correlation between data. The test results found that the handling of dry powders consisting of nano-sized particles inside laboratory fume hoods can result in a significant release of airborne nanoparticles from the fume hood into the laboratory environment and the researcher's breathing zone. Many variables were found to affect the extent of particle release including hood design, hood operation (sash height, face velocity

  10. Dynamic effects on containment of air-curtain fume hood operated with heat source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Kun; Huang, Rong Fung; Hsin, Pei-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study focused on the leakage characteristics of the air-curtain fume hood that are subject to the influences of sash movement and walk-by motion while a high temperature heat source was operated in the hood. The flow visualization and trace gas test method were used to investigate the performance of the air-curtain fume hood. An electric heater was placed in the hood to simulate the heat source. The temperature of the heat source installed inside the air-curtain fume hood varied between 180°C and 300°C. Trace gas tests following the dynamic test methods of EN-14175 protocol were employed to measure the spillages of sulfur hexafluoride gas that were released in the hood. When subject to the influence of sash movement at a heat source temperature lower than 260°C, the leakage level was high at the suction velocity V(s) 10 m/sec. When subject to the influence of people walk-by, the leakage level was relatively low at the suction velocity larger than 8 m/sec at sash height H = 50 cm. The height of the sash opening was a crucial parameter for the containment of the air-curtain fume hood. At the sash opening lower than about 25 cm, suction velocity less than or equal to 6 m/sec was enough to make the sulfur hexafluoride leakage less than the threshold value, 0.65 ppm, suggested by the BG Chemie. The air-curtain fume hood presented a great performance to resist the effect of drafts even though there was a high temperature heat source working in the hood.

  11. Physicochemical and toxicological characteristics of welding fume derived particles generated from real time welding processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cali; Demokritou, Philip; Shafer, Martin; Christiani, David

    2013-01-01

    Welding fume particles have been well studied in the past; however, most studies have examined welding fumes generated from machine models rather than actual exposures. Furthermore, the link between physicochemical and toxicological properties of welding fume particles has not been well understood. This study aims to investigate the physicochemical properties of particles derived during real time welding processes generated during actual welding processes and to assess the particle size specific toxicological properties. A compact cascade impactor (Harvard CCI) was stationed within the welding booth to sample particles by size. Size fractionated particles were extracted and used for both off-line physicochemical analysis and in vitro cellular toxicological characterization. Each size fraction was analyzed for ions, elemental compositions, and mass concentration. Furthermore, real time optical particle monitors (DustTrak™, TSI Inc., Shoreview, Minn.) were used in the same welding booth to collect real time PM2.5 particle number concentration data. The sampled particles were extracted from the polyurethane foam (PUF) impaction substrates using a previously developed and validated protocol, and used in a cellular assay to assess oxidative stress. By mass, welding aerosols were found to be in coarse (PM 2.5–10), and fine (PM 0.1–2.5) size ranges. Most of the water soluble (WS) metals presented higher concentrations in the coarse size range with some exceptions such as sodium, which presented elevated concentration in the PM 0.1 size range. In vitro data showed size specific dependency, with the fine and ultrafine size ranges having the highest reactive oxygen species (ROS) activity. Additionally, this study suggests a possible correlation between welders' experience, the welding procedure and equipment used and particles generated from welding fumes. Mass concentrations and total metal and water soluble metal concentrations of welding fume particles may be

  12. Global metabolomic profiling reveals an association of metal fume exposure and plasma unsaturated fatty acids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyue Wei

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Welding-associated air pollutants negatively affect the health of exposed workers; however, their molecular mechanisms in causing disease remain largely unclear. Few studies have systematically investigated the systemic toxic effects of welding fumes on humans. OBJECTIVES: To explore the effects of welding fumes on the plasma metabolome, and to identify biomarkers for risk assessment of welding fume exposure. METHODS: The two-stage, self-controlled exploratory study included 11 boilermakers from a 2011 discovery panel and 8 boilermakers from a 2012 validation panel. Plasma samples were collected pre- and post-welding fume exposure and analyzed by chromatography/mass spectrometry. RESULTS: Eicosapentaenoic or docosapentaenoic acid metabolic changes post-welding were significantly associated with particulate (PM2.5 exposure (p<0.05. The combined analysis by linear mixed-effects model showed that exposure was associated with a statistically significant decline in metabolite change of eicosapentaenoic acid [β(95% CI = -0.013(-0.022 ≈ -0.004; p = 0.005], docosapentaenoic acid n3 [β(95% CI = -0.010(-0.018 ≈ -0.002; p = 0.017], and docosapentaenoic acid n6 [β(95% CI = -0.007(-0.013 ≈ -0.001; p = 0.021]. Pathway analysis identified an association of the unsaturated fatty acid pathway with exposure (p Study-2011 = 0.025; p Study-2012 = 0.021; p Combined = 0.009. The functional network built by these fatty acids and their interactive genes contained significant enrichment of genes associated with various diseases, including neoplasms, cardiovascular diseases, and lipid metabolism disorders. CONCLUSIONS: High-dose exposure of metal welding fumes decreases unsaturated fatty acids with an exposure-response relationship. This alteration in fatty acids is a potential biological mediator and biomarker for exposure-related health disorders.

  13. Characterization of Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) Welding Fume Generated by Apprentice Welders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graczyk, Halshka; Lewinski, Nastassja; Zhao, Jiayuan; Concha-Lozano, Nicolas; Riediker, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Tungsten inert gas welding (TIG) represents one of the most widely used metal joining processes in industry. Its propensity to generate a greater portion of welding fume particles at the nanoscale poses a potential occupational health hazard for workers. However, current literature lacks comprehensive characterization of TIG welding fume particles. Even less is known about welding fumes generated by welding apprentices with little experience in welding. We characterized TIG welding fume generated by apprentice welders (N = 20) in a ventilated exposure cabin. Exposure assessment was conducted for each apprentice welder at the breathing zone (BZ) inside of the welding helmet and at a near-field (NF) location, 60cm away from the welding task. We characterized particulate matter (PM4), particle number concentration and particle size, particle morphology, chemical composition, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production potential, and gaseous components. The mean particle number concentration at the BZ was 1.69E+06 particles cm(-3), with a mean geometric mean diameter of 45nm. On average across all subjects, 92% of the particle counts at the BZ were below 100nm. We observed elevated concentrations of tungsten, which was most likely due to electrode consumption. Mean ROS production potential of TIG welding fumes at the BZ exceeded average concentrations previously found in traffic-polluted air. Furthermore, ROS production potential was significantly higher for apprentices that burned their metal during their welding task. We recommend that future exposure assessments take into consideration welding performance as a potential exposure modifier for apprentice welders or welders with minimal training.

  14. Evolution of Welding-Fume Aerosols with Time and Distance from the Source: A study was conducted on the spatiotemporal variability in welding-fume concentrations for the characterization of first- and second-hand exposure to welding fumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cena, L G; Chen, B T; Keane, M J

    2016-08-01

    Gas metal arc welding fumes were generated from mild-steel plates and measured near the arc (30 cm), representing first-hand exposure of the welder, and farther away from the source (200 cm), representing second-hand exposure of adjacent workers. Measurements were taken during 1-min welding runs and at subsequent 5-min intervals after the welding process was stopped. Number size distributions were measured in real time. Particle mass distributions were measured using a micro-orifice uniform deposition impactor, and total mass concentrations were measured with polytetrafluorothylene filters. Membrane filters were used for collecting morphology samples for electron microscopy. Average mass concentrations measured near the arc were 45 mg/m(3) and 9 mg/m(3) at the farther distance. The discrepancy in concentrations at the two distances was attributed to the presence of spatter particles, which were observed only in the morphology samples near the source. As fumes aged over time, mass concentrations at the farther distance decreased by 31% (6.2 mg/m(3)) after 5 min and an additional 13% (5.4 mg/m(3)) after 10 min. Particle number and mass distributions during active welding were similar at both distances, indicating similar exposure patterns for welders and adjacent workers. Exceptions were recorded for particles smaller than 50 nm and larger than 3 μm, where concentrations were higher near the arc, indicating higher exposures of welders. These results were confirmed by microscopy analysis. As residence time increased, number concentrations decreased dramatically. In terms of particle number concentrations, second-hand exposures to welding fumes during active welding may be as high as first-hand exposures.

  15. Effect of silicon fume on the resistance to sulfates of geopolymer concrete%硅粉对地聚合物混凝土抗硫酸盐性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛剑锋; 谢子令; 倪孝威; 姜启新; 周汝栋

    2015-01-01

    以地聚合物混凝土为研究对象,对其进行了硫酸盐干湿循环实验,分析了试样的强度及质量损失,探讨了硅粉对粉煤灰基地聚合物混凝土抗硫酸盐侵蚀的影响,结果表明:地聚合物混凝土强度随硅粉掺量的提高而增大,质量及强度损失随硅粉掺量的增大而降低。%Taking the geopolymer concrete as the research object,the loss of compressive strength and weight were analyzed after sulfate attack and wet-dry circulation experiment,and the influence of silicon fume on the sulfates corrosion of fly ash geopolymer concrete were also studied. The results showed that the compressive strength of the geopolymer concrete was improved with the increasing dosage of silica fume,but the loss of the compressive strength and the weight was on the contrary.

  16. An international perspective on fillers in dermatology-from an American perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Michael H

    2012-09-01

    This manuscript is intended to give one an international perspective on the use of fillers around the world-what makes some of them special and what is the need and what is the purpose of having so many fillers in this global dermatologic community we live in. In the US, we have a finite number of fillers and only a handful more currently going through FDA testing. We demand much from our fillers in terms of safety and efficacy, and for all of us in the US, this is a very good reason to keep the numbers of fillers available to a reasonable number.

  17. Kinetics of silica polymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weres, O.; Yee, A.; Tsao, L.

    1980-05-01

    The polymerization of silicic acid in geothermal brine-like aqueous solutions to produce amorphous silica in colloidal form has been studied experimentally and theoretically. A large amount of high quality experimental data has been generated over the temperature rang 23 to 100{sup 0}C. Wide ranges of dissolved silica concentration, pH, and sodium chloride concentration were covered. The catalytic effects of fluoride and the reaction inhibiting effects of aluminum and boron were studied also. Two basic processes have been separately studied: the formation of new colloidal particles by the homogeneous nucleation process and the deposition of dissolved silica on pre-existing colloidal particles. A rigorous theory of the formation of colloidal particles of amorphous silica by homogeneous nucleation was developed. This theory employs the Lothe-Pound formalism, and is embodied in the computer code SILNUC which quantitatively models the homogeneous nucleation and growth of colloidal silica particles in more than enough detail for practical application. The theory and code were extensively used in planning the experimental work and analyzing the data produced. The code is now complete and running in its final form. It is capable of reproducing most of the experimental results to within experimental error. It is also capable of extrapolation to experimentally inaccessible conditions, i.e., high temperatures, rapidly varying temperature and pH, etc.

  18. Optical coherence tomography for image-guided dermal filler injection and biomechanical evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manmohan; Wang, Shang; Yee, Richard W.; Han, Zhaolong; Aglyamov, Salavat R.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2017-02-01

    Dermal fillers are a very popular anti-ag ing treatment with estimated sales in the billions of dollars and millions of procedures performed. As the aging population continues to grow, these figures are only e xpected to increase. Dermal fillers have various compositions depending on their intended applicati on. Reactions to dermal fillers can be severe, such as ischemic events and filler migration to the eyes. Howe ver, these adverse reactions are rare. Nevertheless, the capability to perform imag e-guided filler injections would minimize th e risk of such reacti ons. In addition, the biomechanical properties of various fillers have been evalua ted, but there has been no investigation on the effects of filler on the biomechanical properties of skin. In this work, we utilize optical cohe rence tomography (OCT) for visualizing dermal filler injections with micrometer-scale sp atial resolution. In addition, we utilize noncontact optical coherence elastography (OCE) to quantify the changes in the biomechan ical properties of pig skin after the dermal filler injections. OCT was successfully able to visualize the dermal filler injecti on process, and OCE showed that the viscoelasticity of the pig skin was increased locally at the filler injection sites. OCT may be able to provide real-time image guidance in 3D, and when combined with functional OCT techniques such as optical microangiography, could be used to avoid blood vessels during the injection.

  19. Pengaruh Penggunaan Aspal Buton sebagai Filler Campuran Split Mastic Asphalt terhadap Karakteristik Marshall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuryadin Eko Raharjo

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menguji penggunaan asbuton sebagai filler dalam campuran SMA beserta pengaruhnya terhadap karakteristik marshal yang meliputi: VITM, VFWA, Stabilitas, flow dan MQ. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode eksperimen dengan menguji penggunaan asbuton sebagai filler dalam campuran SMA. Variasi kadar asbuton sebagai filler dibuat 4%, 4,5%, 5%, 5,5% dan 6%. Setiap varian dalam penelitian ini menggunakan 3 benda uji sehingga jumlah sampel adalah 15 buah. Uji menggunakan Aspal yang digunakan Aspalt AC 80/100. Filler yang digunakan Asbuton mikro B30. Kadar aspal yang digunakan ditetapkan sebesar  7%. Analisis data dilakukan dengan menggunakan statistik deskriptif Penelitian ini menyimpulkan bahwa: (1 nilai VITM akan mengalami penurunan seiring bertambahnya kadar filler asbuton mikro, (2 penambahan filler asbuton kadar 4 – 5% akan meningkatkan nilai VFWA , namun pada kadar filler 5,5% dan 6% akan menurunkan nilai VFWA karena filler yang digunakan terlalu banyak sehingga persentase bitumen terhadap total aspal dalam campuran juga semakin besar, (3 penggunaan asbuton mikro filler pada campuran SMA memberi pengaruh menurunnya nilai stabilitas (4 penambahan filler asbuton mikro akan menaikkan nilai flow, hal ini terjadi karena dengan penambahan asbuton mikro kandungan aspal pada campuran akan bertambah, dan (5 nilai MQ mengalami penurunan seiring dengan bertambahnya kadar filler.

  20. Study on a novel Sn-electroplated silver brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingxing; Peng, Jin; Cui, Datian

    2017-08-01

    Novel Sn-electroplated Ag brazing filler metal with a high tin content was prepared by combining the plating and thermal diffusion method. The BAg45CuZn alloy was used as a base filler metal, and a Sn layer was electroplated on it. Then the H62 brass was brazed with the Sn-plated brazing filler metal containing 6.2 wt% of Sn. The results showed that the microstructure of the brazed joints with the Sn-plated filler mainly consisted of the Ag phase, Cu phase, CuZn phase and Cu5Zn8 phase. The tensile strength of the joints brazed with the Sn-plated filler metal was 326 MPa, which was higher than that of the joints with the base filler metal. Fracture analysis showed that the fractures of the joints brazed by the Sn-plated filler metal was mainly ductile fracture mixed with a small quantity of brittle fracture.

  1. Thermal analysis of resin composites with ellipsoidal filler considering thermal boundary resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakuma, Yusuke; Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    The effective thermal conductivity of composites with ellipsoidal fillers is analyzed by using a homogenization method that is able to represent the microstructure precisely. In this study, various parameters such as the volume fraction, shape, and distribution of the filler are quantitatively estimated to understand the mechanisms of heat transfer in the composite. First, thermal boundary resistance between resin and filler is important for obtaining composites with higher thermal conductivity. Second, the anisotropy of the effective thermal conductivity arises from contact between filler in the case of ellipsoidal filler and produces lower thermal resistance. Finally, the filler network and thermal resistance are essential for the heat transfer in composites because the path of thermal conduction is improved by contact between neighboring filler particles.

  2. Dental resin composites containing silica-fused whiskers--effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on fracture toughness and indentation properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hockin H K; Quinn, Janet B; Smith, Douglas T; Antonucci, Joseph M; Schumacher, Gary E; Eichmiller, Frederick C

    2002-02-01

    Dental resin composites need to be strengthened in order to improve their performance in large stress-bearing applications such as crowns and multiple-unit restorations. Recently, silica-fused ceramic whiskers were used to reinforce dental composites, and the whisker-to-silica ratio was found to be a key microstructural parameter that determined the composite strength. The aim of this study was to further investigate the effects of whisker-to-silica ratio on the fracture toughness, elastic modulus, hardness and brittleness of the composite. Silica particles and silicon carbide whiskers were mixed at whisker:silica mass ratios of 0:1, 1:5. 1:2, 1:1, 2:1, 5:1, and 1:0. Each mixture was thermally fused, silanized and combined with a dental resin at a filler mass percentage of 60%. Fracture toughness was measured with a single-edge notched beam method. Elastic modulus and hardness were measured with a nano-indentation system. Whisker:silica ratio had significant effects on composite properties. The composite toughness (mean+/-SD; n = 9) at whisker:silica = 2:1 was (2.47+/-0.28) MPa m(1/2), significantly higher than (1.02+/-0.23) at whisker:silica = 0:1, (1.13+/-0.19) of a prosthetic composite control, and (0.95+/-0.11) of an inlay/onlay composite control (Tukey's at family confidence coefficient = 0.95). Elastic modulus increased monotonically and hardness plateaued with increasing the whisker:silica ratio. Increasing the whisker:silica ratio also decreased the composite brittleness, which became about 1/3 of that of the inlay:onlay control. Electron microscopy revealed relatively flat fracture surfaces for the controls, but much rougher ones for the whisker composites, with fracture steps and whisker pullout contributing to toughness. The whiskers appeared to be well-bonded with the matrix, probably due to the fused silica producing rough whisker surfaces. Reinforcement with silica-fused whiskers resulted in novel dental composites that possessed fracture toughness

  3. Pure Silica Zeolite Beta Membrane: A Potential Low Dielectric Constant Material For Microprocessor Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Yeong Yin; Bhatia, Subhash

    The semiconductor industry needs low dielectric constant (low k-value) materials for more advance microprocessor and chips by reducing the size of the device features. In fabricating these contents, a new material with lower k-value than conventional silica (k = 3.9-4.2) is needed in order to improve the circuit performance. The choice of the inorganic zeolite membrane is an attractive option for low k material and suitable for microprocessor applications. A pure silica zeolite beta membrane was synthesized and coated on non-porous stainless steel support using insitu crystallization in the presence of tetraethylammonium hydroxide, TEA (OH), as structure directing agent, fumed silica, HF and deionized water at pH value of 9. The crystallization was carried out for the duration of 14 days under hydrothermal conditions at 130°C. The membrane was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), nitrogen adsorption and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). SEM results show a highly crystalline; with a truncated square bipyramidal morphology of pure silica zeolite beta membrane strongly adhered on the non-porous stainless steel support. In the present work, the k-value of the membrane was measured as 2.64 which make it suitable for the microprocessor applications.

  4. Wettability of modified silica layers deposited on glass support activated by plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terpiłowski, Konrad, E-mail: terpil@umcs.pl [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Rymuszka, Diana [Department of Physical Chemistry – Interfacial Phenomena, Faculty of Chemistry, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin (Poland); Goncharuk, Olena V.; Sulym, Iryna Ya.; Gun’ko, Vladimir M. [Chuiko Institute of Surface Chemistry, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2015-10-30

    Highlights: • New modified silica materials synthesis. • Support surface plasma activation. • Apparent surface free energy determination. • Equilibrium contact angle calculation. - Abstract: Fumed silica modified by hexamethyldisilazane [HDMS] and polydimethylsiloxane [PDMS] was dispersed in a polystyrene/chloroform solution. To increase adhesion between deposited silica layers and a glass surface, the latter was pretreated with air plasma for 30 s. The silica/polystyrene dispersion was deposited on the glass support using a spin coater. After deposition, the plates were dried in a desiccator for 24 h. Water advancing and receding contact angles were measured using the tilted plate method. The apparent surface free energy (γ{sub S}) was evaluated using the contact angle hysteresis approach. The surface topography was determined using the optical profilometry method. Contact angles changed from 59.7° ± 4.4 (at surface coverage with trimethylsilyl groups Θ = 0.14) to 155° ± 3.1 at Θ = 1. The value of γ{sub S} decreased from 51.3 ± 2.8 mJ/m{sup 2} (for the sample at the lowest value of Θ) to 1.0 ± 0.4 mJ/m{sup 2} for the most hydrophobic sample. Thus, some systems with a high degree of modification by HDMS showed superhydrophobicity, and the sliding angle amounted to about 16° ± 2.1.

  5. Response of the mouse lung transcriptome to welding fume: effects of stainless and mild steel fumes on lung gene expression in A/J and C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonini James M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debate exists as to whether welding fume is carcinogenic, but epidemiological evidence suggests that welders are an at risk population for the development of lung cancer. Recently, we found that exposure to welding fume caused an acutely greater and prolonged lung inflammatory response in lung tumor susceptible A/J versus resistant C57BL/6J (B6 mice and a trend for increased tumor incidence after stainless steel (SS fume exposure. Here, our objective was to examine potential strain-dependent differences in the regulation and resolution of the lung inflammatory response induced by carcinogenic (Cr and Ni abundant or non-carcinogenic (iron abundant metal-containing welding fumes at the transcriptome level. Methods Mice were exposed four times by pharyngeal aspiration to 5 mg/kg iron abundant gas metal arc-mild steel (GMA-MS, Cr and Ni abundant GMA-SS fume or vehicle and were euthanized 4 and 16 weeks after the last exposure. Whole lung microarray using Illumina Mouse Ref-8 expression beadchips was done. Results Overall, we found that tumor susceptibility was associated with a more marked transcriptional response to both GMA-MS and -SS welding fumes. Also, Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that gene regulation and expression in the top molecular networks differed between the strains at both time points post-exposure. Interestingly, a common finding between the strains was that GMA-MS fume exposure altered behavioral gene networks. In contrast, GMA-SS fume exposure chronically upregulated chemotactic and immunomodulatory genes such as CCL3, CCL4, CXCL2, and MMP12 in the A/J strain. In the GMA-SS-exposed B6 mouse, genes that initially downregulated cellular movement, hematological system development/function and immune response were involved at both time points post-exposure. However, at 16 weeks, a transcriptional switch to an upregulation for neutrophil chemotactic genes was found and included genes such as S100A8, S100A9 and

  6. Comparison of pressure drop and filtration efficiency of particulate respirators using welding fumes and sodium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Woo; Yoon, Chung-Sik; Lee, Jin-Ho; Lee, Seung-Joo; Viner, Andrew; Johnson, Erik W

    2011-07-01

    Respirators are used to help reduce exposure to a variety of contaminants in workplaces. Test aerosols used for certification of particulate respirators (PRs) include sodium chloride (NaCl), dioctyl phthalate, and paraffin oil. These aerosols are generally assumed to be worst case surrogates for aerosols found in the workplace. No data have been published to date on the performance of PRs with welding fumes, a hazardous aerosol that exists in real workplace settings. The aim of this study was to compare the performance of respirators and filters against a NaCl aerosol and a welding fume aerosol and determine whether or not a correlation between the two could be made. Fifteen commercial PRs and filters (seven filtering facepiece, two replaceable single-type filters, and six replaceable dual-type filters) were chosen for investigation. Four of the filtering facepiece respirators, one of the single-type filters, and all of the dual-type filters contained carbon to help reduce exposure to ozone and other vapors generated during the welding process. For the NaCl test, a modified National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health protocol was adopted for use with the TSI Model 8130 automated filter tester. For the welding fume test, welding fumes from mild steel flux-cored arcs were generated and measured with a SIBATA filter tester (AP-634A, Japan) and a manometer in the upstream and downstream sections of the test chamber. Size distributions of the two aerosols were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Penetration and pressure drop were measured over a period of aerosol loading onto the respirator or filter. Photos and scanning electron microscope images of clean and exposed respirators were taken. The count median diameter (CMD) and mass median diameter (MMD) for the NaCl aerosol were smaller than the welding fumes (CMD: 74 versus 216 nm; MMD: 198 versus 528 nm, respectively). Initial penetration and peak penetration were higher with the NaCl aerosol

  7. Influence of filler type on wet skid resistance of SSBR/BR composites: Effects from roughness and micro-hardness of rubber surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Xia; Wu, You-Ping; Li, Wen-Ji; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    The wet skid resistance (WSR) of SSBR/BR(solution styrene-butadiene rubber/butadiene rubber) composites filled with carbon black, silica, and nano-diamond partly replacing carbon black or silica, respectively, was measured with a portable British Pendulum Skid Tester (BPST). A dynamic mechanical thermal analyzer was used to obtain the viscoelasticity of the composites. A 3D scanning white-light interfering profilometer was used and the scratch test performed to characterize surface roughness and micro-roughness, respectively, of the composites. WSR of the silica-filled composite was better than that of the carbon black-filled one, and further enhancement of WSR was obtained by replacing silica with nano-diamond. Tan δ of the composites at 0 °C, 10 Hz, and tensile strain of 2% did not show good correlation with WSR. The surface roughness of the composites had effects on WSR. The scratch test indicated that the higher the hardness of the filler in the composite, the higher the micro-hardness and the better the WSR. Therefore, the surface micro-hardness of the composites is an important factor affecting WSR, besides viscoelasticity and surface roughness.

  8. Fractals of Silica Aggregates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhinhongLi; DongWu; Yuhansun; JunWang; YiLiu; BaozhongDong; Zhinhong

    2001-01-01

    Silica aggregates were prepared by base-catalyzed hydrolysis and condensation of alkoxides in alcohol.Polyethylene glycol(PEG) was used as organic modifier.The sols were characterized using Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) with synchrotron radiation as X-ray source.The structure evolution during the sol-gel process was determined and described in terms of the fractal geometry.As-produced silica aggregates were found to be mass fractals.The fractl dimensions spanned the regime 2.1-2.6 corresponding to more branched and compact structures.Both RLCA and Eden models dominated the kinetic growth under base-catalyzed condition.

  9. An Experimental Study on Mitigating Alkali Silica Reaction by Using Fly Ash (FA in Combination with Silica Fume and Expanded Perlite Powder (EPP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isneini Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ASR suppression by FA, SF, EPP, FA in combination with SF and EPP were evaluated by both mortar bar and concrete prism test. Mortar bars were made based on JIS A 1146, meanwhile concrete prism bars were casted in accordance with Rilem AAR-3. Both specimens were stored in 40°C 100% R.H. controlled room. Mortar and concrete mixtures used reactive aggregate in pessimum proportion. The results indicated that FA in combination with SF and EPP showed smaller expansion compared to FA. The best of concrete mixtures in reducing expansion is combination of FA with SF (FA15SF10.

  10. Silica reinforced triblock copolymer gels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theunissen, E.; Overbergh, N.; Reynaers, H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of silica and polymer coated silica particles as reinforcing agents on the structural and mechanical properties of polystyrene-poly(ethylene/butylene)-polystyrene (PS-PEB-PS) triblock gel has been investigated. Different types of chemically modified silica have been compared in order...... a viscoclastic rubber to a plastic fluid and from a plastic fluid to a viscoelastic liquid are shifted to more elevated temperatures when silica is added to the triblock copolymer gel. (C) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  11. Effect of baffles and a louvered bypass on the airflow and the convective patterns of contaminant inside a fume hood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, P; Ingham, D B; Wen, X

    1998-05-01

    Various numerical predictions are given for the containment testing of fume hoods with internal baffles of different size and at different locations and with a louvered bypass. The numerical predictions were compared with experimental data and a fairly good agreement for the air velocity was found, although there was only qualitative agreement for the concentration of the contaminant. It was found that the level of contaminant leakage at the working aperture depended not only on the size of the recirculating airflow behind the fume hood sash but also on the blockage caused by the baffles inside the fume hood near the exhaust duct. Finally, some new suggestions for the design of the fume hood have been proposed. However, before implementing these suggestions it is essential that either experimental testing be performed, or the cost-effective alternative of using numerical predictions for containment testing, to determine accurately the level of contaminant leakage from the working aperture.

  12. Effect of blend ratio on aging, oil and ozone resistance of silica-filled chloroprene rubber/natural rubber (CR/NR blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of blend ratio on properties of chloroprene rubber/natural rubber (CR/NR blends was investigated. In addition to the mechanical properties, attention was also given to the resistance to thermal aging, oil and ozone of the blends. Silica was selected as a reinforcing filler in this study due to its unique characteristic to interact with CR. The results reveal that, due to the better filler dispersion and the greater crosslink density, the silica-filled CR possesses lower compound viscosity and better mechanical properties, compared to the silica-filled NR. The aging properties, oil and ozone resistance of the silica-filled CR are also significantly better than those of the silica-filled NR. The mechanical properties and the resistance to degradation of the silica-filled CR/NR blends are mainly governed by the blend morphology. It is found that good mechanical properties in association with adequately high resistance to degradation from thermal aging and oil are obtained when CR remains the matrix in the blends. Even though the ozone cracks are found in all blends, a thorough look at the results reveals that considerable improvement in ozone resistance is achieved with increasing CR content.

  13. Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel%Effect of Heat Input on Fume Generation and Joint Properties of Gas Metal Arc Welded Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Srinivasan; V Balasubramanian

    2011-01-01

    The effect of heat input on fume and their compositions during gas metal arc welding (GMAW) of AISI 316 stainless steel plates are investigated. Fume generation rate (FGR) and fume percentage were determined by ANSI/AWS F1.2 methods. Particle characterization was performed with SEM-XEDS and XRF analysis to reveal the particle morphology and chemical composition of the fume particles. The SEM analysis reveals the morphology of particles having three distinct shapes namely spherical, irregular, and agglomerated. Spherical particles were the most abundant type of individual particle. All the fume particle size falls in the range of less than 100 nm. Mechanical properties (strength, hardness and toughness) and microstructural analysis of the weld deposits were evaluated. It is found that heat input of 1.15 kJ/mm is beneficial to weld stainless steel by GMAW process due to lower level of welding fume emissions and superior mechanical properties of the joints.

  14. The comparative assessment of welders’ exposure to welding fumes based on mass and number concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Sajedifar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW is the most widely used arc welding. During the welding operation, typically, various harmful agents such as fumes, gases, heat, sound and ultraviolet radiation are produced of which fume is the most important component from the viewpoint of occupational health. The present study aims to compare the number and the mass concentration emitted in SMAW to determine the most appropriate index of exposure to fumes in the welding processes. Material and Method: In this study, the portable laser aerosol spectrometer and dust monitor of GRIMM, model 1.106, was used to measure the number and mass concentration of fumes emitted from SMAW on 304 stainless steel with a thickness of 0.4 mm. Air sampling was performed at a distance of 41 cm representing the welder’s breathing zone. The measurements of number concentration (NC and mass concentration (MC were taken under the condition of 25 volt voltage and direct current of the electrode polarity. Result: The total NC and MC of welding fumes in welder’s breathing zone was 1140451 particles per liter and 1631.11 micrograms per cubic meter, respectively. The highest number concentration was found to correspond to the particles with 0.35 to 0.5 micrometer-sized distribution (NC1; 938976 particles per liter and the lowest was related to the particles with 5 to 6.5 micrometer-sized distribution (NC7; 288 particles per liter and the particles larger than 6.5 micrometer (NC8; 463 particles per liter. Moreover, the highest mass concentration was related to the particles with 0.35 to 0.5 micrometer-sized distribution (MC1; 450 micrograms per cubic meter and the particles larger than 6.5 micrometer (MC8; 355 micrograms per cubic meter. Conclusion: The findings indicated that there is no agreement between number and mass concentration as two particles assessment index, and as the particles’ size become smaller, the mismatch of them is becoming more apparent

  15. The Study Of Histopathological Effects Of Welding Fumes On Spermatogenesis In Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arab M R

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fumes generated during electric welding are one of air pollutants of working place in industrial companies, which can cause some clinical signs and diseases in worker, including mucosal irritation, changing of semen quality and cancer. Chronic exposure of workers with these fumes can cause reduce sperm motility and forward penetration and decrease in normal sperm count. Although a lot of researches were done in this field up to now, there is little information about histopathological effects of these fumes on germinal epithelium. The aim of this study was to identify structural changes of germinal epithelium in Rat as an experimental model after exposure to fumes of electric welding in exposure chamber. Material and Methods: A total number of 60 Sprague Dawley Rats were chosen and divided into experimental (40 and control (20 groups. Each of groups was subdivided into 2, 4, 6 and 8-week subgroups. The number of Rat in each subgroup of experimental and control group was 10 and 5 respectively. Animals were housed in standard situation. After adaptation experimental group were exposed to fumes of electric welding (AMA 2000 electrode, 100 Ampere, 0.1 cm/s speed of electrode welding for 2 hour/day and 5 day/week. The rate of air turn over in exposure chamber was fixed to 12-15/hour. The amount of O3, CO, CO2, NO + NO2 and particulate matter were measured by Galtec detectors and Cellulose acetate filter respectively. According to time table animals were killed and specimens from testis were taken and fixed in formaline buffer solution and processed routinely. Sections with 5-7 micrometer in thickness were stained by H-E, PAS, PNA and Alcian blue pH=2.5. The thickness of germinal epithelium was measured and data were analyzed by Kruskall Wallis test. Results: The results of this study showed a few quantitative and qualitative changes in germinal epithelium. Vasodilatation of vessels in tunica albuginea and interstitial tissue, decreasing of

  16. Nafion®/ODF-silica composite membranes for medium temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Treekamol, Yaowapa

    2014-01-01

    A series of composite membranes were prepared by dispersing fluorinated polyoxadiazole oligomer (ODF)-functionalized silica nanoparticles in a Nafion matrix. Both melt-extrusion and solvent casting processes were explored. Ion exchange capacity, conductivity, water uptake and dimensional stability, thermal stability and morphology were characterized. The inclusion of functionalized nanoparticles proved advantageous, mainly due to a physical crosslinking effect and better water retention, with functionalized nanoparticles performing better than the pristine silica particles. For the same filler loading, better nanoparticle dispersion was achieved for solvent-cast membranes, resulting in higher proton conductivity. Filler agglomeration, however,was more severe for solvent-castmembranes at loadings beyond 5wt.%. The composite membranes showed excellent thermal stability, allowing for operation in medium temperature PEM fuel cells. Fuel cell performance of the compositemembranesdecreaseswithdecreasing relativehumidity, but goodperformance values are still obtained at 34% RHand 90 °C,with the best results obtained for solvent castmembranes loaded with 10 wt.% ODF-functionalized silica. Hydrogen crossover of the composite membranes is higher than that forpureNafion membranes,possiblydue toporosityresulting fromsuboptimalparticle- matrixcompatibility. © 2013 Crown Copyright and Elsevier BV. All rights reserved.

  17. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Assisted Processing of Silica/PMMA Nanocomposite Foams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rende, Deniz; Schadler, Linda S.; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    Polymer nanocomposite foams receive considerable attention in both scientific and industrial communities. These structures are defined as closed or open cells (pores) surrounded by bulk material and are widely observed in nature in the form of bone structure, sponge, corals and natural cork. Inspired by these materials, polymer nanocomposite foams are widely used in advanced applications, such as bone scaffolds, food packaging and transportation materials due to their lightweight and enhanced mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties compared to bulk polymer foams. The presence of the nanosized fillers facilitates heterogeneous bubble nucleation as a result, the number of bubbles increases while the average bubble size decreases. Therefore, the foam morphology can be controlled by the size, concentration, and surface chemistry of the nanofiller. In the current study, we used supercritical carbon dioxide as a foaming agent for silica/poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, foams. The silica nanoparticles were chemically modified by fluoroalkane chains to make them CO2-philic. The surface coverage was controlled via tethering density, and the effect of silica surface coverage and concentration on foam morphology was investigated through scanning electron microscopy and image processing. Results indicated that nanofiller concentration and filler surface chemistry (CO2-philicity) had tremendous effect on foam morphology but surface coverage did not have any effect.

  18. Filler segmentation of SEM paper images based on mathematical morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait Kbir, M; Benslimane, Rachid; Princi, Elisabetta; Vicini, Silvia; Pedemonte, Enrico

    2007-07-01

    Recent developments in microscopy and image processing have made digital measurements on high-resolution images of fibrous materials possible. This helps to gain a better understanding of the structure and other properties of the material at micro level. In this paper SEM image segmentation based on mathematical morphology is proposed. In fact, paper models images (Whatman, Murillo, Watercolor, Newsprint paper) selected in the context of the Euro Mediterranean PaperTech Project have different distributions of fibers and fillers, caused by the presence of SiAl and CaCO3 particles. It is a microscopy challenge to make filler particles in the sheet distinguishable from the other components of the paper surface. This objectif is reached here by using switable strutural elements and mathematical morphology operators.

  19. Laser brazing with filler wire for galvanized steel sheets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xiaosong; Li Liqun; Chen Yanbin; Zhou Shanbao

    2005-01-01

    The process properties and interface behavior of CO2 laser brazing with automatic wire feed for galvanized steel sheets were investigated , in which the brazing filler metal was CuSi3 and no flux was used. As to the appearance quality of the brazing seams, the roles of the processing parameters, such as brazing speed, wire feeding rate, inclination and feeding direction of the wire, laser power, spot diameter and heating position, were assessed. The further investigation indicates that the behavior of the active elements Si, Mn and Zn are significantly influenced by energy input. At the interface, the microstructure of the base metal was composed of columnar crystals and the acicalar α solid solution was found on the filler metal side.

  20. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2013-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no ...

  1. Thin supported silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Tijana

    2007-01-01

    This thesis discusses several transport-related aspects relevant for the application of thin supported silica membranes for gas separation and nanofiltration. The influence of support geometry on overall membrane performance is investigated. Planar (i.e., flat plate), tubular, and multichannel suppo

  2. Installation of a flow control device in an inclined air-curtain fume hood to control wake-induced exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia-Kun

    2016-08-01

    An inclined plate for flow control was installed at the lower edge of the sash of an inclined air-curtain fume hood to reduce the effects of the wake around a worker standing in front of the fume hood. Flow inside the fume hood is controlled by the inclined air-curtain and deflection plates, thereby forming a quad-vortex flow structure. Controlling the face velocity of the fume hood resulted in convex, straight, concave, and attachment flow profiles in the inclined air-curtain. We used the flow visualization and conducted a tracer gas test with a mannequin to determine the performance of two sash geometries, namely, the half-cylinder and inclined plate designs. When the half-cylinder design was used, the tracer gas test registered a high leakage concentration at Vf ≦ 57.1 fpm or less. This concentration occurred at the top of the sash opening, which was close to the breathing zone of the mannequin placed in front of the fume hood. When the inclined plate design was used, the containment was good, with concentrations of 0.002-0.004 ppm, at Vf ≦ 63.0 fpm. Results indicate that an inclined plate effectively reduces the leakage concentration induced by recirculation flow structures that form in the wake of a worker standing in front of an inclined air-curtain fume hood.

  3. NANOCELLULOSE FROM RICE HUSK FOLLOWING ALKALINE TREATMENT TO REMOVE SILICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Ludueña

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work deals with the use of multiple-step procedures to obtain valuable sub-products, including nanocellulose, from rice husk. Each sub-product was characterized after every step by analyzing the chemical composition (mainly based on thermogravimetric analysis, Fourier transformed infrared spectra, and X-ray diffraction and morphology (using visual observations and scanning electron microscopy. The results clearly showed that the selected procedure gave the possibility to separate silica in the first step and then to purify the resultant material, leading to nanocellulose production. All acquired sub-products can be used as additives and fillers in a very wide range of applications. The obtained results will be useful both from technological and academic points of view, mainly for people working in the field of biocomposites. The final material could give added value to a raw biomass material source such as rice husk.

  4. Structure-property relationships in silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulibarri, T.A.; Derzon, D.K.; Wang, L.C.

    1997-03-01

    The simultaneous formation of a filler phase and a polymer matrix via in situ sol-gel techniques provides silica-siloxane nanocomposite materials of high strength. This study concentrates on the effects of temperature and relative humidity on a trimodal polymer system in an attempt to accelerate the reaction as well as evaluate subtle process- structure-property relations. It was found that successful process acceleration is only viable for high humidity systems when using the tin(IV) catalyst dibutyltin dilaurate. Processes involving low humidity were found to be very temperature and time dependent. Bimodal systems were investigated and demonstrated that the presence of a short-chain component led to enhanced material strength. This part of the study also revealed a link between the particle size and population density and the optimization of material properties.

  5. Braze welding of cobalt with a silver–copper filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everett M. Criss

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of joining cobalt by braze-welding it with a silver–copper filler was developed in order to better understand the residual stresses in beryllium–aluminum/silicon weldments which are problematic to investigate because of the high toxicity of Be. The base and filler metals of this new welding system were selected to replicate the physical properties, crystal structures, and chemical behavior of the Be–AlSi welds. Welding parameters of this surrogate Co–AgCu system were determined by experimentation combining 4-point bending tests and microscopy. Final welds are 5 pass manual TIG (tungsten inert gas, with He top gas and Ar back gas. Control of the welding process produces welds with full penetration melting of the cobalt base. Microscopy indicates that cracking is minimal, and not through thickness, whereas 4-point bending shows failure is not by base-filler delamination. These welds improve upon the original Be–AlSi welds, which do not possess full penetration, and have considerable porosity. We propose that utilization of our welding methods will increase the strength of the Be–AlSi weldments. The specialized welding techniques developed for this study may be applicable not only for the parent Be–AlSi welds, but to braze welds and welds utilizing brittle materials in general. This concept of surrogacy may prove useful in the study of many different types of exotic welds.

  6. Hydrodynamic parameters of mesh fillers relevant to miniature regenerative cryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, E. C.; Conrad, T. J.; Ghiaasiaan, S. M.; Kirkconnell, Carl S.

    2010-06-01

    Directional hydrodynamic parameters of two fine-mesh porous materials that are suitable for miniature regenerative cryocoolers were studied under steady and oscillating flows of helium. These materials included stacked discs of #635 stainless steel (wire diameter of 20.3 μm) and #325 phosphor bronze (wire diameter of 35.6 μm) wire mesh screens, which are among the commercially available fillers for use in small-scale regenerators and heat exchangers, respectively. Experiments were performed in test sections in which pressure variations across these fillers, in the axial and lateral (radial) directions, were measured under steady and oscillatory flows. The directional permeability and Forchheimer's inertial coefficient were then obtained by using a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)-assisted method. The oscillatory flow experiments covered a frequency range of 50-200 Hz. The results confirmed the importance of anisotropy in the mesh screen fillers, and indicated differences between the directional hydrodynamic resistance parameters for steady and oscillating flow regimes.

  7. NANOSCALE BOEHMITE FILLER FOR CORROSION AND WEAR RESISTANT POLYPHENYLENESULFIDE COATINGS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2003-06-26

    The authors evaluated the usefulness of nanoscale boehmite crystals as a filler for anti-wear and anti-corrosion polyphenylenesulfide (PPS) coatings exposed to a very harsh, 300 C corrosive geothermal environment. The boehmite fillers dispersed uniformly into the PPS coating, conferring two advanced properties: First, they reduced markedly the rate of blasting wear; second, they increased the PPS's glass transition temperature and thermal decomposition temperature. The wear rate of PPS surfaces was reduced three times when 5wt% boehmite was incorporated into the PPS. During exposure for 15 days at 300 C, the PPS underwent hydrothermal oxidation, leading to the substitution of sulfide linkages by the sulfite linkages. However, such molecular alteration did not significantly diminish the ability of the coating to protect carbon steel against corrosion. In fact, PPS coating filled with boehmite of {le} 5wt% adequately mitigated its corrosion in brine at 300 C. One concern in using this filler was that it absorbs brine. Thus, adding an excess amount of boehmite was detrimental to achieving the maximum protection afforded by the coatings.

  8. Injectable facial fillers: imaging features, complications, and diagnostic pitfalls at MRI and PET CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundada, Pravin; Kohler, Romain; Boudabbous, Sana; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Platon, Alexandra; Becker, Minerva

    2017-10-04

    Injectable fillers are widely used for facial rejuvenation, correction of disabling volumetric fat loss in HIV-associated facial lipoatrophy, Romberg disease, and post-traumatic facial disfiguring. The purpose of this article is to acquaint the reader with the anatomy of facial fat compartments, as well as with the properties and key imaging features of commonly used facial fillers, filler-related complications, interpretation pitfalls, and dermatologic conditions mimicking filler-related complications. The distribution of facial fillers is characteristic and depends on the anatomy of the superficial fat compartments. Silicone has signature MRI features, calcium hydroxyapatite has characteristic calcifications, whereas other injectable fillers have overlapping imaging features. Most fillers (hyaluronic acid, collagen, and polyalkylimide-polyacrylamide hydrogels) have signal intensity patterns compatible with high water content. On PET-CT, most fillers show physiologic high FDG uptake, which should not be confounded with pathology. Abscess, cellulitis, non-inflammatory nodules, and foreign body granulomas are the most common filler-related complications, and imaging can help in the differential diagnosis. Diffusion weighted imaging helps in detecting a malignant lesion masked by injected facial fillers. Awareness of imaging features of facial fillers and their complications helps to avoid misinterpretation of MRI, and PET-CT scans and facilitates therapeutic decisions in unclear clinical cases. • Facial fillers are common incidental findings on MRI and PET-CT scans. • They have a characteristic appearance and typical anatomic distribution • Although considered as safe, facial filler injections are associated with several complications • As they may mask malignancy, knowledge of typical imaging features is mandatory. • MRI is a problem-solving tool for unclear cases.

  9. Retrofitting Laboratory Fume Hoods With Face Velocity Monitors at NASA Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Ingrid E.; Bold, Margaret D.; Diamond, David B.; Kall, Phillip M.

    1997-01-01

    Extensive use and reliance on laboratory fume hoods exist at LeRC for the control of chemical hazards (nearly 175 fume hoods). Flow-measuring devices are necessary to continually monitor hood performance. The flow-measuring device should he tied into an energy management control system to detect problems at a central location without relying on the users to convey information of a problem. Compatibility concerns and limitations should always be considered when choosing the most effective flow-measuring device for a particular situation. Good practice on initial hood design and placement will provide a system for which a flow-measuring device may be used to its full potential and effectiveness.

  10. Acute Inhalation Exposure to Titanium Ethanolate as a Possible Cause of Metal Fume Fever

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Ahmadimanesh

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational inhalation exposure to noxious agents is not uncommon. Herein, we present a 26-year-old male student who had accidental acute inhalation exposure to a large quantity of titanium ethanolate and hydrogen chloride in chemistry lab. He was referred to the emergency department of our hospital with low-grade fever, dyspnea, headache, fatigue and myalgia. After 24 hrs of symptomatic treatment (oxygen therapy and acetaminophen, the fever was subsided and the patient discharged home in a good clinical condition. The presented symptoms could be interpreted as a form of metal fume fever. It can therefore be concluded that organo-metallic compound of titanium metal may have the potential to produce metal fume fever in human.

  11. Non-occupational exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Andersen, Anne-Marie N; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    associations between residential exposure to paint fumes during pregnancy and fetal growth within the Danish National Birth Cohort which consecutively recruited pregnant women from 1996 to 2002 from all over Denmark. Around the 30th pregnancy week, 19,000 mothers were interviewed about use of paint...... in their residence during pregnancy. The mothers were also asked about smoking habits and alcohol consumption during pregnancy, pre-pregnancy weight, height, parity and occupation. Information on birth weight and gestational age was obtained from national registers. We found that 45% of the mothers had been exposed......Occupational exposure to organic solvents during pregnancy has been associated with reduced fetal growth. Though organic solvents in the form of paint fumes are also found in the home environment, no studies have investigated the effect of such exposure in a general population. We studied...

  12. A general method for growing large area mesoporous silica thin films on flat substrates with perpendicular nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Kun-Che; Lin, Cheng-Han; Chen, Tzu-Ying; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-03-25

    Here we introduce a new synthetic approach to grow mesoporous silica thin films with vertical mesochannels on centimeter-sized substrates via an oil-induced co-assembly process. Adding an oil, i.e., decane, into a CTAB-EtOH-TEOS ammonia solution leads to thin-film formation of mesoporous silica of controlled thickness between 20 and 100 nm with vertical mesochannels on various surfaces. The vertical mesoporous channels were evidenced by grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterizations. Decane played two roles: (a) as a pore expansion agent (up to 5.7 ± 0.5 nm) and (b) inducing vertically oriented hexagonal mesophases of micelle-silica composite. The production of periodic and vertical nanochannels is very robust, over many different substrate surfaces (from silicon to polystyrene), various silica precursors (TEOS, fumed silica, or zeolite seed), and many oils (decane, petroleum ether, or ethyl acetate). This wide robustness in the formation of vertical nanophases is attributed to a unique mechanism of confined synthesis of surfactant-silicate between two identical thin layers of oils on a substrate.

  13. A review of published quantitative experimental studies on factors affecting laboratory fume hood performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Kwangseog; Woskie, Susan; DiBerardinis, Louis; Ellenbecker, Michael

    2008-11-01

    This study attempted to identify the important factors that affect the performance of a laboratory fume hood and the relationship between the factors and hood performance under various conditions by analyzing and generalizing the results from other studies that quantitatively investigated fume hood performance. A literature search identified 43 studies that were published from 1966 to 2006. For each of those studies, information on the type of test methods used, the factors investigated, and the findings were recorded and summarized. Among the 43 quantitative experimental studies, 21 comparable studies were selected, and then a meta-analysis of the comparable studies was conducted. The exposure concentration variable from the resulting 617 independent test conditions was dichotomized into acceptable or unacceptable using the control level of 0.1 ppm tracer gas. Regression analysis using Cox proportional hazards models provided hood failure ratios for potential exposure determinants. The variables that were found to be statistically significant were the presence of a mannequin/human subject, the distance between a source and breathing zone, and the height of sash opening. In summary, performance of laboratory fume hoods was affected mainly by the presence of a mannequin/human subject, distance between a source and breathing zone, and height of sash opening. Presence of a mannequin/human subject in front of the hood adversely affects hood performance. Worker exposures to air contaminants can be greatly reduced by increasing the distance between the contaminant source and breathing zone and by reducing the height of sash opening. Many other factors can also affect hood performance. Checking face velocity by itself is unlikely to be sufficient in evaluating hood performance properly. An evaluation of the performance of a laboratory fume hood should be performed with a human subject or a mannequin in front of the hood and should address the effects of the activities

  14. Characterization of the early pulmonary inflammatory response associated with PTFE fume exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, C. J.; Finkelstein, J. N.; Gelein, R.; Baggs, R.; Oberdorster, G.; Clarkson, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    Heating of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) has been described to release fumes containing ultrafine particles (approximately 18 nm diam). These fumes can be highly toxic in the respiratory tract inducing extensive pulmonary edema with hemorrhagic inflammation. Fischer-344 rats were exposed to PTFE fumes generated by temperatures ranging from 450 to 460 degrees C for 15 min at an exposure concentration of 5 x 10(5) particles/cm3, equivalent to approximately 50 micrograms/m3. Responses were examined 4 hr post-treatment when these rats demonstrated 60-85% neutrophils (PMNs) in their lung lavage. Increases in abundance for messages encoding the antioxidants manganese superoxide dismutase and metallothionein (MT) increased 15- and 40-fold, respectively. For messages encoding the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines: inducible nitric oxide synthase, interleukin 1 alpha, 1 beta, and 6 (IL-1 alpha, IL-1 beta, and IL-6), macrophage inflammatory protein-2, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF alpha) increases of 5-, 5-, 10-, 40-, 40-, and 15-fold were present. Vascular endothelial growth factor, which may play a role in the integrity of the endothelial barrier, was decreased to 20% of controls. In situ sections were hybridized with 33P cRNA probes encoding IL-6, MT, surfactant protein C, and TNF alpha. Increased mRNA abundance for MT and IL-6 was expressed around all airways and interstitial regions with MT and IL-6 demonstrating similar spatial distribution. Large numbers of activated PMNs expressed IL-6, MT, and TNF alpha. Additionally, pulmonary macrophages and epithelial cells were actively involved. These observations support the notion that PTFE fumes containing ultrafine particles initiate a severe inflammatory response at low inhaled particle mass concentrations, which is suggestive of an oxidative injury. Furthermore, PMNs may actively regulate the inflammatory process through cytokine and antioxidant expression.

  15. The precancerous effect of emitted cooking oil fumes on precursor lesions of cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chien-Hung; Yang, Sheau-Fang; Peng, Chiung-Yu; Li, Ruei-Nian; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Chan, Te-Fu; Tsai, Eing-Mei; Kuo, Fu-Chen; Huang, Joh-Jong; Tsai, Hsiu-Ting; Hung, Yu-Hsiu; Huang, Hsiao-Ling; Tsai, Sharon; Wu, Ming-Tsang

    2010-08-15

    Although cooking emission from high-temperature frying has been deemed a Group 2A carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, little is known about its impact on cervical tumorigenesis. To investigate the precancerous consequence of cooking oil fumes on cervical intraepithelial neoplasm (CIN), a community-based case-control study, which takes all known risk factors into consideration, was conducted in Taiwan. From 2003 to 2008, in a Pap smear screening and biopsy examination network, 206 pathology-verified women with inflammations/atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or CIN grade-1 (CIN1) and 73 with CIN2-3 (defined as low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSIL), respectively); and 1,200 area-and-age-matched controls with negative cytology were recruited. Multinomial logistic regression was applied in the multivariate analysis to determine the likelihood of contracting LGSIL or HGSIL. The risks of the two lesions increased with the increase of carcinogenic high-risk human papillomavirus DNA load, with a clear dose-response relationship. Chefs were observed to experience a 7.9-fold elevated HGSIL risk. Kitchens with poor fume ventilation during the main cooking life-stage correlated to a 3.7-fold risk of HGSIL, but not for LGSIL. More than 1 hr of daily cooking in kitchens with poor fume conditions appeared to confer an 8.4-fold HGSIL risk, with an 8.3-fold heterogeneously higher odds ratio than that (aOR = 1.0) for LGSIL. Similar risk pattern has been reproduced among never-smoking women. Our findings demonstrate the association between indoor exposure to cooking fumes from heated oil and the late development of cervical precancerous lesions. This final conclusion needs to be verified by future research.

  16. Increased levels of oxidative DNA damage attributable to cooking-oil fumes exposure among cooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yuebin; Cheng, Jinquan; Zhang, Zhicheng; Zhang, Renli; Zhang, Zhunzhen; Shuai, Zhihong; Wu, Tangchun

    2009-07-01

    Previous investigations have indicated that cooks are exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from cooking-oil fumes. However, Emission of PAH and their carcinogenic potencies from cooking oil fumes sources have not been investigated among cooks. To investigate the urinary excretion of a marker for oxidative DNA damage, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), in different groups of cooks and different exposure groups, and to study the association between 8-OHdG and 1-hydroxypyrene(1-OHP), a biological marker for PAH exposure. Urine samples were collected from different groups of cooks (n = 86) and from unexposed controls (n = 36); all were male with similar age and smoking habits. The health status, occupational history, smoking, and alcohol consumption 24 h prior to sampling was estimated from questionnaires. The urine samples were frozen for later analyses of 8-OHdG and 1-OHP levels by high-performance liquid chromatography. Excretion in urine of 8-OHdG was similar for controls (mean 1.2micromol/mol creatinine, n = 36), and for those who had been in the kitchen with an exhaust-hood operating (mean 1.5micromol/mol creatinine, n = 45). Cooks exposed to cooking-oil fumes without exhaust-hood operation had significantly increased excretion of 8-OHdG (mean 2.3micromol/mol creatinine, n = 18), compared with controls. The urinary levels of ln 1-OHP and ln 8-OHdG were still significantly correlated in a multiple regression analysis. The results indicate that exposure to PAH or possibly other compounds in cooking-oil fumes may cause oxidative DNA damage.

  17. Effects of welding fumes on nuclear air cleaning system carbon adsorber banks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberson, P.W. [Duke Power Company, Huntersville, NC (United States)

    1997-08-01

    Standard Technical Specifications for nuclear air cleaning systems include requirements for surveillance tests following fire, painting, or chemical release in areas communicating with the affected system. To conservatively implement this requirement, many plants categorize welding as a chemical release process, and institute controls to ensure that welding fumes do not interact with carbon adsorbers in a filter system. After reviewing research data that indicated welding had a minimal impact on adsorber iodine removal efficiency, further testing was performed with the goal of establishing a welding threshold. It was anticipated that some quantity of weld electrodes could be determined that had a corresponding detrimental impact on iodine removal efficiency for the exposed adsorber. This value could be used to determine a conservative sampling schedule that would allow the station to perform laboratory testing to ensure system degradation did not occur without a full battery of surveillance tests. A series of tests was designed to demonstrate carbon efficiency versus cumulative welding fume exposure. Three series of tests were performed, one for each of three different types of commonly used weld electrodes. Carbon sampling was performed at baseline conditions, and every five pounds of electrode thereafter. Two different laboratory tests were performed for each sample; one in accordance with ASTM 3803/1989 at 95% relative humidity and 30 degrees C, and another using the less rigorous conditions of 70% relative humidity and 80 degrees C. Review of the test data for all three types of electrodes failed to show a significant correlation between carbon efficiency degradation and welding fume exposure. Accordingly, welding is no longer categorized as a `chemical release process` at McGuire Nuclear Station, and limits on welding fume interaction with ventilation systems have been eliminated. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Organosilane modified silica/polydimethylsiloxane mixed matrix membranes for enhanced propylene/nitrogen separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beltran, Arnel B.; Nisola, Grace M. [Energy and Environment Fusion Technology Center (E2FTC), Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, Yongin City, Gyeonggi Province 449-728 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eulsaeng [Korea Environment Institute, Division of Water and Environmental Strategy Research Group, 290 Jinheungno, Eunpyeong-Gu, Seoul, 122-706 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Erli Eros D. [Energy and Environment Fusion Technology Center (E2FTC), Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, Yongin City, Gyeonggi Province 449-728 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wook-Jin, E-mail: wjc0828@gmail.com [Energy and Environment Fusion Technology Center (E2FTC), Department of Environmental Engineering and Biotechnology, Myongji University, Yongin City, Gyeonggi Province 449-728 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Gas transport behaviors of oxygen (O{sub 2}), nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and propylene (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}) in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mixed matrix membranes (MMM) containing modified silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles are presented. Two surface modified SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles, silica dimethyloctyl silane (Si-DMOS) and silica dimethylphenyl silane (Si-DMPS), were used as fillers. Surface modification was carried out through silanization, which was confirmed via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. From elemental analysis, degrees of modifications on Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS were estimated to be 29.64% and 79.89%, respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy showed uniform distribution of the modified SiO{sub 2} fillers in MMMs. Both MMMs exhibited reduced O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} permeabilities as compared to pure PDMS, while enhanced C{sub 3}H{sub 6} permeabilities were observed. Consequently, C{sub 3}H{sub 6}/N{sub 2} permselectivities were increased by 35 and 44% in MMMs filled with Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS, respectively. Results revealed that permeability was dependent on penetrant diffusivities, a parameter related to the structure of MMMs. Density measurements and differential scanning calorimetry were performed to elucidate the changes in MMM properties which affected the permeation behaviors of O{sub 2}, N{sub 2} and C{sub 3}H{sub 6}. Overall, both Si-DMOS and Si-DMPS show potential as fillers for the enhancement of PDMS permeation performance.

  19. Development and evaluation of an air-curtain fume cabinet with considerations of its aerodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, R F; Wu, Y D; Chen, H D; Chen, C-C; Chen, C-W; Chang, C-P; Shih, T-S

    2007-03-01

    In order to avoid the inherent aerodynamic difficulties of the conventional fume hood, an innovative design--the 'air curtain-isolated fume hood' is developed. The new hood applies a specially designed air curtain (which is generated by a narrow planar jet and a suction slot flow at low velocities) across the sash plane. The hood constructed for the study is full size and transparent for flow visualization. The aerodynamic characteristics are diagnosed by using the laser-light-sheet-assisted smoke flow visualization method. Four characteristic air-curtain flow modes are identified in the domain of jet and suction velocities when the sash remains static. Some of these characteristic flow modes have much improved flow patterns when compared with those of the conventional fume hoods. From the viewpoint of the aerodynamics and mass transport, the results indicate that the air curtain properly setup across the sash opening allows almost no sensible exchange of momentum and mass between the flowfields of the cabinet and the outside environment. Two standard sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas concentration measurement methods following the ANSI/ASHRAE 110-1995 standard and the prEN14175 protocol for static test are employed to examine the contaminant leakage levels. Results of the rigorous examinations of leakage show unusually satisfactory hood performance. The leakage of the tracer gas can approach almost null (<0.001 p.p.m.) if the jet and suction velocities are properly adjusted.

  20. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-19

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  1. Toxic effect of cooking oil fumes in primary fetal pulmonary type II-like epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jiyu; Ding, Rui; Wang, Yong; Chen, Daojun; Guo, Dongmei; Liang, Chunmei; Feng, Zhewei; Che, Zhen

    2013-09-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated that there is an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among cooks and bakers. The cooking oil fumes are believed to conduct this risk, and many studies have focused on evaluating the mutagenicity and finding the mutagenic components in oil fumes. COFs contains two major classes of compounds. One class consists of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, fluoranthene, and benzo[g,h,i]perylene. BaP is a known immunosuppressant. It can also alter cell cycle progression, induce inflammation, and impair DNA repair and apoptotic processes leading to aberrant cellular functioning. This study investigates the effect of toxicity of cooking oil fumes (COFs) in primary ICR mice' fetal lung type II-like epithelium cells (AEC II). The cells were cultured in different concentrations (0, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, and 200μg/ml) of COFs for different time periods. The results showed that cell viability decreased in a dose- and time- dependent manner, which is accompanied by increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level and decreased superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione (GSH) activities. Moreover, comet assay suggested DNA damage, as well as increased production of DNA adducts induced by PAHs. The present study also shows that COFs may disturb cell cycles even at a very low dose. In summary, the present study indicates that COFs may lead to toxicity in AEC II cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of Using Waste Welded Tuff Material as Mineral Filler in Asphalt Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebnem KARAHANCER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the welded tuff waste- known as koyke in Isparta region - was used in the hot mix asphalt (HMA as mineral filler for reduction of the moisture susceptibility of HMA. Optimum binder content was assessed with Marshall Design Method. First of all, welded tuff was substituted as filler with limestone filler in proportion of 50% and 100%. After that Marshall Stability test was performed on specimens. The results showed that the 50% substitution was more effective than the 100% substitution. Therefore, welded tuff was substituted with limestone filler in proportion of 25%, 50%, 65% and 75%. Next, Indirect Tensile Strength test was practiced on the fabricated specimens and the results were assessed. According to the Indirect Tensile Strength results, welded tuff with 65% was given higher strength than the limestone filler. As a result, it has come up that welded tuff can be used as mineral filler in the hot mix asphalt.

  3. New fillers under consideration: what is the future of injectable aesthetics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivkin, Alexander

    2009-05-01

    The past 5 years in the United States have seen an explosion in the popularity of noninvasive aesthetic procedures. Not only have fillers and Botox turned out to be fantastically reliable and effective aesthetic tools, but also they have vastly expanded the accessibility of cosmetic procedures. Our cosmetic filler options are growing quickly as more and more fillers are coming before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), seeking entry into the lucrative U.S. market. This article outlines the approval process that foreign fillers go through in their home countries and gives an idea of the fillers that are currently under consideration by the FDA. As our armamentarium of injectable fillers grows, it will be essential to know each product's strengths and weaknesses so that we can provide our patients with the best possible aesthetic results.

  4. Influence of Erosion Phenomenon on Flow Behavior of Liquid Al-Si Filler Between Brazed Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Takahiro; Ueda, Toshiki

    Automotive heat exchangers are predominantly composed of plates, tubes and fins. Each component is brazed by using Al-Si filler. In the plate/tube/fin brazed-structures, the flow of the liquid filler between the components affects the fillet size at each joint. In this study, the influence of the erosion phenomenon, i.e., silicon diffusion from the braze cladding into the core alloy, in the tube on the flow behavior of the liquid filler flowing on the tube from the plate to the fin has been investigated. As a result, the area of the liquid filler not flowing but existing around α phases on the tube during brazing, which is defined as filler flow channel, can change depending on the erosion degree. The flow ability of the liquid filler flowing from the plate to the fin increases as the area increases.

  5. EFFECT OF FILLER LOADING ON PHYSICAL AND FLEXURAL PROPERTIES OF RAPESEED STEM/PP COMPOSITES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Majid Zabihzadeh

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study is to develop a new filler for the production of natural filler thermoplastic composites using the waste rapeseed stalks. The long-term water absorption and thickness swelling behaviors and flexural properties of rapeseed filled polypropylene (PP composites were investigated. Three different contents of filler were tested: 30, 45, and 60 wt%. Results of long-term hygroscopic tests indicated that by the increase in filler content from 30% to 60%, water diffusion absorption and thickness swelling rate parameter increased. A swelling model developed by Shi and Gardner can be used to quantify the swelling rate. The increasing of filler content reduced the flexural strength of the rapeseed/PP composites significantly. In contrast to the flexural strength, the flexural modulus improved with increasing the filler content. The flexural properties of these composites were decreased after the water uptake, due to the effect of the water molecules.

  6. Brazing diamond grits onto a steel substrate using copper alloys as the filler metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S.-M.; Lin, S.-T.

    1996-12-01

    Surface-set diamond tools were fabricated by an active metal brazing process, using bronze (Cu-8.9Sn) powder and 316L stainless steel powder mixed to various ratios as the braze filler metals. The diamond grits were brazed onto a steel substrate at 1050 °C for 30 min in a dry hydrogen atmosphere. After brazing practice, an intermediate layer rich in chromium formed between the braze filler metal and diamond. A braze filler metal composed of 70 wt % bronze powder and 30 wt % stainless steel powder was found to be optimum in that the diamond grits were strongly impregnated in the filler metal by both mechanical and chemical types of holding. The diamond tools thus fabricated performed better than conventional nickel-plated diamond tools. In service, the braze filler metal wore at almost the same rate as the diamond grits, and no pullout of diamond grits or peeling of the filler metal layer took place.

  7. Skin Necrosis with Oculomotor Nerve Palsy Due to a Hyaluronic Acid Filler Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Il Lee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Performing rhinoplasty using filler injections, which improve facial wrinkles or soft tissues, is relatively inexpensive. However, intravascular filler injections can cause severe complications, such as skin necrosis and visual loss. We describe a case of blepharoptosis and skin necrosis caused by augmentation rhinoplasty and we discuss the patient’s clinical progress. We describe the case of a 25-year-old female patient who experienced severe pain, blepharoptosis, and decreased visual acuity immediately after receiving a filler injection. Our case suggests that surgeons should be aware of nasal vascularity before performing an operation, and that they should avoid injecting fillers at a high pressure and/or in excessive amounts. Additionally, filler injections should be stopped if the patient complains of severe pain, and appropriate measures should be taken to prevent complications caused by intravascular filler injections.

  8. Brazing of copper to stainless steel with a low-silver-content brazing filler metal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukikoshi, Tatsuya; Watanabe, Yūki; Miyazawa, Yasuyuki; Kanasaki, Fumio

    2014-08-01

    The brazing of copper to stainless steel (SUS304 JIS) was performed using a low- silver-content brazing filler metal, Ag-50Cu, under an Ar gas atmosphere with a conventional furnace, owing to the potential economic benefits of using low-silver-content filler metals. The brazeability of the low-silver-content brazing filler metal to copper and SUS304 was investigated. A good joint was obtained, and a drastic dissolution reaction occurred at the copper side. Molten BAg8 penetrated along the crystal grain boundary of the copper base metal when BAg8 was used as the filler metal. This was caused by the dissolution of Ni from the stainless steel into the molten filler metal. Ag-50Cu, which was investigated in this work, can be used instead of BAg8 filler metal.

  9. Use of hyaluronic acid fillers for the treatment of the aging face

    OpenAIRE

    Michael H Gold

    2007-01-01

    Michael H GoldGold Skin Care Center, Tennessee Clinical Research Center, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical School,Vanderbilt University Nursing School, Nashville, TN, USA; Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, ChinaAbstract: Hyaluronic acid fillers have become popular soft tissue filler augmentation agents over the past several years. They have helped revolutionize the filler market with a number of new products available for use for our patient...

  10. Novel high chromium containing braze filler metals for heat exchanger applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangaswamy, S.; Fortuna, D. [Sulzer Metco, Troy (United States)

    2007-07-01

    A new family of boron-free, high chromium containing braze filler metal compositions were developed (Amdry 105, Amdry 108, Amdry 805). Filler metal properties including metallurgical phases, melting range, flow, corrosion resistance and high temperature oxidation resistance are reported. Additionally, the technical and economical advantages of using these new filler metals in fabricating flat plate type of heat exchangers and metallic catalytic converters is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Characteristics of The Fillers Used for Realizing the Asphalt Mixtures in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Mihaela Dămiean

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the lab results for four types of filler used in producing the asphalt mixture in Romania, as well as other physical-chemical characteristics of a new type of filler, derivate of the grinding of the bituminous shists through a ball mill/crusher. Knowing these physical-chemical characteristics is crucial for asphalt mixtures due to the complex purpose of the filler.

  12. Increasing the wear resistance of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene by adding solid lubricating fillers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panin, S. V., E-mail: svp@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055, Russia and National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Kornienko, L. A.; Poltaranin, M. A.; Ivanova, L. R. [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Suan, T. Nguen [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-14

    In order to compare effectiveness of adding solid lubricating fillers for polymeric composites based on ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) with graphite, molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene, their tribotechnical characteristics under dry friction, boundary lubrication and abrasive wearing were investigated. The optimal weight fractions of fillers in terms of improving wear resistance have been determined. The supramolecular structure and topography of wear track surfaces of UHMWPE-based composites with different content of fillers have been studied.

  13. Effects of Rare Earths on Properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni Base Brazing Filler Alloys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Tianjun; Kang Hui; Wu Yongqin; Qu Ping

    2004-01-01

    The effects of the addition of rare earths on the properties of Ti-Zr-Cu-Ni base brazing filler alloys and the mechanical microstructure and properties were studied for the brazed-joints in the vacuum brazing of TC4 by comparing synthetical properties of two kinds of filler metals.The results indicate that the filler metals added with rare earths have lower melting point, better wettability and higher mechanical properties in the brazing joints.

  14. Aniline incorporated silica nanobubbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M J Rosemary; V Suryanarayanan; Ian Maclaren; T Pradeep

    2006-09-01

    We report the synthesis of stearate functionalized nanobubbles of SiO2 with a few aniline molecules inside, represented as C6H5NH2@SiO2@stearate, exhibiting fluorescence with red-shifted emission. Stearic acid functionalization allows the materials to be handled just as free molecules, for dissolution, precipitation, storage etc. The methodology adopted involves adsorption of aniline on the surface of gold nanoparticles with subsequent growth of a silica shell through monolayers, followed by the selective removal of the metal core either using sodium cyanide or by a new reaction involving halocarbons. The material is stable and can be stored for extended periods without loss of fluorescence. Spectroscopic and voltammetric properties of the system were studied in order to understand the interaction of aniline with the shell as well as the monolayer, whilst transmission electron microscopy has been used to study the silica shell.

  15. Evaluation of factors affecting the containment performance of traditional and nanomaterial fume hoods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kevin Holden

    This research was conducted to: 1) evaluate different methods for measuring containment effectiveness of a nanomaterial handling enclosure; 2) to evaluate design and operational factors which may impact containment performance for a traditional constant air volume (CAV) and nano fume using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and; 3) to assess the impact on the operator body and arm motion on nanoparticle containment of the CAV and nano fume hoods. The research approach to address these objectives starts with an evaluation of the containment effectiveness of a new nanomaterial handling enclosure using tracer gas, nanoparticle and nanoparticle handling methodologies in a real-world laboratory setting. The tracer gas and nanoparticle test results were well-correlated showing hood leakage under the same conditions and at the same sample locations. However, the nanoparticle method was more sensitive than the tracer gas test showing leakage in situations not indicated by the tracer gas tests. These experiments also identified substantial leaks near the sides of the hood sides even when the tracer gas concentration in the manikin breathing zone was not elevated. This result was consistent with new research showing that sampling in the manikin breathing zone may not be adequate to describe containment of fume hood devices. The second phase of this project provides an assessment of the internal flow patterns of a nano fume hood and a traditional CAV chemical fume hood. The impacts of design and operational differences between these hoods are investigated using both experimental measurements and numerical simulations with CFD. An investigation of the airflow patterns inside the hoods showed that large scale recirculation zones develop behind the sash for both hoods. However, the design of the side airfoils of the nano hood resulted in a secondary recirculation pattern along the sides of the hood which impacts interior contaminant dispersion and potential for leakage. The

  16. Poly(lactic) acid fibers loaded with mesoporous silica for potential applications in the active food packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacciotti, Ilaria; Nanni, Francesca

    2016-06-01

    Multifunctional fibrous systems based on poly(lactic) acid (PLA), mesoporous silica (SiO2) and ascorbic acid (AA) were produced by means of electrospinning technique, for potential applications in the active food packaging sector, as platform for the controlled release of antioxidant and/or antimicrobial agents with the additional filtering function. The ascorbic acid was physisorbed on the surface of mesoporous silica in order to stabilize it and to extend its antioxidant action. The influence of mesoporous silica and ascorbic acid on the microstructural and mechanical properties was investigated, revealing a revelant mechanical reinforcement in the case of fibers loaded only with SiO2 and a decrement in the case of SiO2 with physisorbed ascorbic acid, due to the worse interface between the fillers and the polymeric matrix.

  17. Suspect filler similarity in eyewitness lineups: a literature review and a novel methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Ryan J; Oriet, Chris; Price, Heather L

    2015-02-01

    Eyewitness lineups typically contain a suspect (guilty or innocent) and fillers (known innocents). The degree to which fillers should resemble the suspect is a complex issue that has yet to be resolved. Previously, researchers have voiced concern that eyewitnesses would be unable to identify their target from a lineup containing highly similar fillers; however, our literature review suggests highly similar fillers have only rarely been shown to have this effect. To further examine the effect of highly similar fillers on lineup responses, we used morphing software to create fillers of moderately high and very high similarity to the suspect. When the culprit was in the lineup, a higher correct identification rate was observed in moderately high similarity lineups than in very high similarity lineups. When the culprit was absent, similarity did not yield a significant effect on innocent suspect misidentification rates. However, the correct rejection rate in the moderately high similarity lineup was 20% higher than in the very high similarity lineup. When choosing rates were controlled by calculating identification probabilities for only those who made a selection from the lineup, culprit identification rates as well as innocent suspect misidentification rates were significantly higher in the moderately high similarity lineup than in the very high similarity lineup. Thus, very high similarity fillers yielded costs and benefits. Although our research suggests that selecting the most similar fillers available may adversely affect correct identification rates, we recommend additional research using fillers obtained from police databases to corroborate our findings.

  18. B218 Weld Filler Wire Characterization for Al-Li Alloy 2195

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorkman, Gerry; Russell, Carolyn

    2000-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Lockheed Martin Space Systems- Michoud Operations, and McCook Metals have developed an aluminum-copper weld filler wire for fusion welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195. The aluminum-copper based weld filler wire has been identified as B218, a McCook Metals designation. B218 is the result of six years of weld filler wire development funded by NASA, Lockheed Martin, and McCook Metals. The filler wire chemistry was developed to produce enhanced 2195 weld and repair weld mechanical properties over the 4043 aluminum-silicon weld filler wire, which is currently used to weld 2195 on the Super Lightweight External Tank for the NASA Space Shuttle Program. An initial characterization was performed consisting of a repair weld evaluation using B218 and 4043 weld filler wires. The testing involved room temperature and cryogenic repair weld tensile testing along with fracture toughness testing. From the testing, B218 weld filler wire produce enhanced repair weld tensile strength, ductility, and fracture properties over 4043. B218 weld filler wire has proved to be a superior weld filler wire for welding aluminum lithium alloy 2195 over 4043.

  19. The Microstructural Evolution of Vacuum Brazed 1Cr18Ni9Ti Using Various Filler Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunxia Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures and weldability of a brazed joint of 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel with BNi-2, BNi82CrSiBFe and BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metals in vacuum were investigated. It can be observed that an interdiffusion region existed between the filler metal and the base metal for the brazed joint of Ni-based filler metals. The width of the interdiffusion region was about 10 μm, and the microstructure of the brazed joint of BNi-2 filler metal was dense and free of obvious defects. In the case of the brazed joint of BMn50NiCuCrCo filler metal, there were pits, pores and crack defects in the brazing joint due to insufficient wettability of the filler metal. Crack defects can also be observed in the brazed joint of BNi82CrSiBFe filler metal. Compared with BMn50NiCuCrCo and BNi82CrSiBFe filler metals, BNi-2 filler metal is the best material for 1Cr18Ni9Ti austenitic stainless steel vacuum brazing because of its distinct weldability.

  20. Improvement of Scratch and Wear Resistance of Polymers by Fillers Including Nanofillers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Brostow

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polymers have lower resistance to scratching and wear than metals. Liquid lubricants work well for metals but not for polymers nor for polymer-based composites (PBCs. We review approaches for improvement of tribological properties of polymers based on inclusion of fillers. The fillers can be metallic or ceramic—with obvious consequences for electrical resistivity of the composites. Distinctions between effectiveness of micro- versus nano-particles are analyzed. For example, aluminum nanoparticles as filler are more effective for property improvement than microparticles at the same overall volumetric concentration. Prevention of local agglomeration of filler particles is discussed along with a technique to verify the prevention.