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Sample records for fulvic acid fractions

  1. Fractionation of fulvic acid by iron and aluminum oxides: influence on copper toxicity to Ceriodaphnia dubia

    Smith, Kathleen S.; Ranville, James F.; Lesher, Emily K.; Diedrich, Daniel J.; McKnight, Diane M.; Sofield, Ruth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the effect on aquatic copper toxicity of the chemical fractionation of fulvic acid (FA) that results from its association with iron and aluminum oxyhydroxide precipitates. Fractionated and unfractionated FAs obtained from streamwater and suspended sediment were utilized in acute Cu toxicity tests on ,i>Ceriodaphnia dubia. Toxicity test results with equal FA concentrations (6 mg FA/L) show that the fractionated dissolved FA was 3 times less effective at reducing Cu toxicity (EC50 13 ± 0.6 μg Cu/L) than were the unfractionated dissolved FAs (EC50 39 ± 0.4 and 41 ± 1.2 μg Cu/L). The fractionation is a consequence of preferential sorption of molecules having strong metal-binding (more aromatic) moieties to precipitating Fe- and Al-rich oxyhydroxides, causing the remaining dissolved FA to be depleted in these functional groups. As a result, there is more bioavailable dissolved Cu in the water and hence greater potential for Cu toxicity to aquatic organisms. In predicting Cu toxicity, biotic ligand models (BLMs) take into account dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentration; however, unless DOC characteristics are accounted for, model predictions can underestimate acute Cu toxicity for water containing fractionated dissolved FA. This may have implications for water-quality criteria in systems containing Fe- and Al-rich sediment, and in mined and mineralized areas in particular. Optical measurements, such as specific ultraviolet absorbance at 254 nm (SUVA254), show promise for use as spectral indicators of DOC chemical fractionation and inferred increased Cu toxicity.

  2. Conductivity-Dependent Flow Field-Flow Fractionation of Fulvic and Humic Acid Aggregates

    Martha J. M. Wells

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic (FAs and humic acids (HAs are chemically fascinating. In water, they have a strong propensity to aggregate, but this research reveals that tendency is regulated by ionic strength. In the environment, conductivity extremes occur naturally—freshwater to seawater—warranting consideration at low and high values. The flow field flow fractionation (flow FFF of FAs and HAs is observed to be concentration dependent in low ionic strength solutions whereas the corresponding flow FFF fractograms in high ionic strength solutions are concentration independent. Dynamic light scattering (DLS also reveals insight into the conductivity-dependent behavior of humic substances (HSs. Four particle size ranges for FAs and humic acid aggregates are examined: (1 <10 nm; (2 10 nm–6 µm; (3 6–100 µm; and (4 >100 µm. Representative components of the different size ranges are observed to dynamically coexist in solution. The character of the various aggregates observed—such as random-extended-coiled macromolecules, hydrogels, supramolecular, and micellar—as influenced by electrolytic conductivity, is discussed. The disaggregation/aggregation of HSs is proposed to be a dynamic equilibrium process for which the rate of aggregate formation is controlled by the electrolytic conductivity of the solution.

  3. Nonlinear binding of phenanthrene to the extracted fulvic acid fraction in soil in comparison with other organic matter fractions and to the whole soil sample

    Liu Wenxin; Xu, Shanshan; Xing, Baoshan; Pan, Bo; Tao, Shu

    2010-01-01

    Fractions of soil organic matter in a natural soil were extracted and sorption (or binding) characteristics of phenanthrene on each fraction and to the whole sample were investigated. The organic carbon normalized single point sorption (or binding) coefficient followed lipid > humin (HM) > humic acid (HA) > fulvic acid (FA) > whole soil sample, while the nonlinear exponent exhibited lipid > FA > HA > whole soil sample > HM. FA showed nonlinear binding of phenanthrene as it often does with other fractions. HM and HA contributed the majority of organic carbon in the soil. The calculated sorption coefficients of the whole soil were about two times greater than the measured values at different equilibrium phenanthrene concentrations. As for phenanthrene, the sorption capacity and nonlinearity of the physically mixed HA-HM mixtures were stronger as compared to the chemically reconstituted HA-HM composite. This was attributed to (besides the conditioning effect of the organic solvents) interactions between HA and HM and acid-base additions during fractionation. - Nonlinear binding of phenanthrene to fulvic acid extracted from soil organic matter was found.

  4. Interactions between stepwise-eluted sub-fractions of fulvic acids and protons revealed by fluorescence titration combined with EEM-PARAFAC.

    Song, Fanhao; Wu, Fengchang; Guo, Fei; Wang, Hao; Feng, Weiying; Zhou, Min; Deng, Yanghui; Bai, Yingchen; Xing, Baoshan; Giesy, John P

    2017-12-15

    In aquatic environments, pH can control environmental behaviors of fulvic acid (FA) via regulating hydrolysis of functional groups. Sub-fractions of FA, eluted using pyrophosphate buffers with initial pHs of 3.0 (FA 3 ), 5.0 (FA 5 ), 7.0 (FA 7 ), 9.0 (FA 9 ) and 13.0 (FA 13 ), were used to explore interactions between the various, operationally defined, FA fractions and protons, by use of EEM-PARAFAC analysis. Splitting of peaks (FA 3 and FA 13 ), merging of peaks (FA 7 ), disappearance of peaks (FA 9 and FA 13 ), and red/blue-shifting of peaks were observed during fluorescence titration. Fulvic-like components were identified from FA 3 -FA 13 , and protein-like components were observed in fractions FA 9 and FA 13 . There primary compounds (carboxylic-like, phenolic-like, and protein-like chromophores) in PARAFAC components were distinguished based on acid-base properties. Dissociation constants (pK a ) for fulvic-like components with proton ranged from 2.43 to 4.13 in an acidic pH and from 9.95 to 11.27 at basic pH. These results might be due to protonation of di-carboxylate and phenolic functional groups. At basic pH, pK a values of protein-like components (9.77-10.13) were similar to those of amino acids. However, at acidic pH, pK a values of protein-like components, which ranged from 3.33 to 4.22, were 1-2units greater than those of amino acids. Results presented here, will benefit understanding of environmental behaviors of FA, as well as interactions of FA with environmental contaminants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemical characteristics of fulvic acids from Arctic surface waters: Microbial contributions and photochemical transformations

    Cory, Rose M.; McKnight, Diane M.; Chin, Yu-Ping; Miller, Penney; Jaros, Chris L.

    2007-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) originating from the extensive Arctic tundra is an important source of organic material to the Arctic Ocean. Chemical characteristics of whole water dissolved organic matter (DOM) and the fulvic acid fraction of DOM were studied from nine surface waters in the Arctic region of Alaska to gain insight into the extent of microbial and photochemical transformation of this DOM. All the fulvic acids had a strong terrestrial/higher plant signature, with uniformly depleted δ13C values of -28‰, and low fluorescence indices around 1.3. Several of the measured chemical characteristics of the Arctic fulvic acids were related to water residence time, a measure of environmental exposure to sunlight and microbial activity. For example, fulvic acids from Arctic streams had higher aromatic contents, higher specific absorbance values, lower nitrogen content, lower amino acid-like fluorescence and were more depleted in δ15N relative to fulvic acids isolated from lake and coastal surface waters. The differences in the nitrogen signature between the lake and coastal fulvic acids compared to the stream fulvic acids indicated that microbial contributions to the fulvic acid pool increased with increasing water residence time. The photo-lability of the fulvic acids was positively correlated with water residence time, suggesting that the fulvic acids isolated from source waters with larger water residence times (i.e., lakes and coastal waters) have experienced greater photochemical degradation than the stream fulvic acids. In addition, many of the initial differences in fulvic acid chemical characteristics across the gradient of water residence times were consistent with changes observed in fulvic acid photolysis experiments. Taken together, results from this study suggest that photochemical processes predominantly control the chemical character of fulvic acids in Arctic surface waters. Our findings show that hydrologic transport in addition to

  6. Isolation and Characterization of Chinese Standard Fulvic Acid Sub-fractions Separated from Forest Soil by Stepwise Elution with Pyrophosphate Buffer

    Bai, Yingchen; Wu, Fengchang; Xing, Baoshan; Meng, Wei; Shi, Guolan; Ma, Yan; Giesy, John P.

    2015-01-01

    XAD-8 adsorption technique coupled with stepwise elution using pyrophosphate buffers with initial pH values of 3, 5, 7, 9, and 13 was developed to isolate Chinese standard fulvic acid (FA) and then separated the FA into five sub-fractions: FApH3, FApH5, FApH7, FApH9 and FApH13, respectively. Mass percentages of FApH3-FApH13 decreased from 42% to 2.5%, and the recovery ratios ranged from 99.0% to 99.5%. Earlier eluting sub-fractions contained greater proportions of carboxylic groups with greater polarity and molecular mass, and later eluting sub-fractions had greater phenolic and aliphatic content. Protein-like components, as well as amorphous and crystalline poly(methylene)-containing components were enriched using neutral and basic buffers. Three main mechanisms likely affect stepwise elution of humic components from XAD-8 resin with pyrophosphate buffers including: 1) the carboxylic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at lower pH values and eluted earlier, while phenolic-rich sub-fractions are deprotonated at greater pH values and eluted later. 2) protein or protein-like components can be desorbed and eluted by use of stepwise elution as progressively greater pH values exceed their isoelectric points. 3) size exclusion affects elution of FA sub-fractions. Successful isolation of FA sub-fractions will benefit exploration of the origin, structure, evolution and the investigation of interactions with environmental contaminants. PMID:25735451

  7. Complex forming properties of natural occurring fulvic acids

    Marinsky, J.A.; Mathuthu, A.; Bicking, M.; Ephraim, J.

    1985-07-01

    The experimental program developed in our earlier investigations of the protonation equilibria encountered with Armadale Horizons Bh and Suwannee River fulvic-acid has been employed in the present investigation of a Swedish fulvic acid source. Complications introduced by the polyelectrolyte nature and the degree of heterogeneity in the functional unit content of this natural organic acid molecule have been resolved as they were with the previous fulvic acid samples. The physical chemical properties of this fulvic acid have been compared with those resolved for the Armadale Horizons Bh and the Suwannee River fulvic acid as well. The insight gained from these protonation studies and metal ion binding studies, also carried out in the course of this investigation, has led to the development of a model for interpretation of the binding of metal ions to fulvic acid at any fulvic acid concentration level. With 12 refs. (Author)

  8. Complexation of Pu and Am with fulvic acid under saline condition

    Nagao, Seiya; Tanaka, Tadao; Ogawa, Hiromichi; Nakaguchi, Yuzuru; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hiraki, Keizo

    1999-01-01

    Molecular size distribution of Pu and Am in the presence of groundwater fulvic acid was studied in an ionic medium of artificial seawater by ultrafiltration technique. The 80% of Pu was mainly associated with the fulvic acid having molecular size fraction less than 5,000 daltons. The molecular size distribution of Pu was almost similar with that of fulvic acid. The results indicate that the complexation of Pu depends on the percentage of each molecular size of fulvic acid. On the other hand, 34% and 54% of Am were found in molecular size of more than 0.45 μm and less than 30,000 daltons, respectively. Am was selectively complexed with fulvic acid having molecular size of 30,000-10,000 daltons at seawater condition. (author)

  9. Amino acids in the sedimentary humic and fulvic acids

    Sardessai, S.

    acids in the coastal Arabian Sea sediments: whereas amino acids content of fulvic acids was lower than that of humic acids in the coastal sediments of Bay of Bengal. Slope sedimentary humic acids were relatively enriched in amino acids as compared...

  10. Fulvic acid affects pepper antioxidant activity and fruit quality ...

    Fulvic acid has been considered as a valuable fertilizer for sustainable agriculture. The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the effect of fulvic acid (FA) on antioxidant compounds and fruit quality of pepper under field conditions. Plants were grown in the Department of Horticulture Farm, Ferdowsi University of ...

  11. Characteristics of humic and fulvic acids in Arabian Sea sediments

    Sardessai, S.

    Humic and fulvic acids isolated from some of the shelf, slope and offshore sediments of the Arabian Sea were studied. The molecular weight, functional groups, elemental composition and infrared spectra were examined. Humic substances, dominated...

  12. Vertical exchange of Gorleben fulvic acids of different origin

    Schaefer, T.; Buckau, G.; Artinger, R.; Kim, J.I.; Geyer, S.; Wolf, M.; Bleam, W.F.; Wirick, S.; Jacobsen, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Gorleben aquifer system overlaying a salt dome has been under investigation for the potential to host a repository for nuclear waste in Germany for more than two decades. Groundwater in the aquifer shows a wide span of compositions, especially with respect to salt content and concentration of dissolved organic matter (DOC) with up to around 200 mgC/L. DOC originates from recharge, showing large variations depending on land-use and conditions (forest, agriculture, wet-land,..). An additional source of DOC is microbiologically mediated turn-over of lignite intercalations in sandy Miocene sediments (''in-situ generation''). The DOC consists mainly of humic and fulvic acids that are of concern for potentially enhanced transport of radionuclides in the groundwater region. A key issue in this respect is the mobility of these complexing dissolved organic acids. For this reason, a combination of isotope data and carbon as well as sulfur X-Ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy data is used in order to determine the mobility of fulvic acids. It is shown, that fulvic acid from the recharge zone is mobile over the entire depth, including into the salt dome influenced brines. Fulvic acid originating from in-situ generation is less hydrophilic than that originating from recharge and thus do not reach the brines but flocculate at the high ionic strength. The content of different carbon entities/functional groups correlates with the origin of fulvic acid. Contrary to this, the fulvic acid associated sulfur oxidation state also appears to be influenced by geochemical conditions/reactions. The invariance in the backbone structures of fulvic acid against high residence times and variations in geochemical conditions is in agreement with their high stability and mobility as also found in previous studies. The high mobility of fulvic acid over the broad range of chemical groundwater conditions and residence times verifies the potential for dissolved humic

  13. Time-dependent uptake and toxicity of nickel to Enchytraeus crypticus in the presence of humic acid and fulvic acid

    He, Erkai; Qiu, Hao; Qiu, Rongliang; Rentenaar, Charlotte; Devresse, Quentin; Van Gestel, Cornelis A.M.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the influence of different fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) on the uptake and toxicity of nickel (Ni) in the soil invertebrate Enchytraeus crypticus after different exposure times. The addition of DOC as humic acid or fulvic acid significantly

  14. Fulvic Acid Mediated Photolysis of Ibuprofen in Water.

    Photolysis of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ibuprofen was studied in solutions of fulvic acid (FA) isolated from Pony Lake, Antarctica; Suwannee River, GA, USA; and Old Woman Creek, OH, USA. At an initial concentration of 10 µM ibuprofen degrades by direct photolysis...

  15. Preparation of fulvic acid and low-molecular organic acids by oxidation of weathered coal humic acid

    Shinozuka, T.; Ito, A.; Sasaki, O.; Yazawa, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba Institute of Technolgy, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    2002-07-01

    Weathered coal contains much humic acid and a little fulvic acid. Therefore, the production of fulvic acid, the most valuable humic substance because of its water-solubility, was examined by ozone and hydrogen peroxide oxidation of humic acid extracted form Xinjiang (China) weathered coal. The resulting products of the oxidation were water soluble fulvic acid and organic acids, mainly formic acid and oxalic acid. The product yield of fulvic acid was 20 (C%) and that of organic acids were 39 (C%) for formic and acid 13 (C%) for oxalic acid. The formed fulvic acid showed a higher content of oxygen and carboxyl groups, than those of the extracted one from the original weathered coal.

  16. Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid using a Donnan Potential model

    Marinsky, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Calcium ion binding to a soil fulvic acid (Armadale Bh Horizon) was evaluated over a range of calcium ion concentrations, from pH 3.8 to 7.3, using potentiometric titrations and calcium ion electrode measurements. Fulvic acid concentration was constant (100 milligrams per liter) and calcium ion concentration varied up to 8 x 10 -4 moles per liter. Experiments discussed here included: (1) titrations of fulvic acid-calcium ion containing solutions with sodium hydroxide; and (2) titrations of fully neutralized fulvic acid with calcium chloride solutions. Apparent binding constants (expressed as the logarithm of the value, log β app ) vary with solution pH, calcium ion concentration, degree of acid dissociation, and ionic strength (from log β app =2.5 to 3.9) and are similar to those reported by others. Fulvic acid charge, and the associated Donnan Potential, influences calcium ion-fulvic acid ion pair formation. A Donnan Potential correction term allowed calculation of intrinsic calcium ion-fulvic acid binding constants. Intrinsic binding constants vary from 1.2 to 2.5 (the average value is about log β=1.6) and are similar to, but somewhat higher than, stability constants for calcium ion-carboxylic acid monodentate complexes. (orig.)

  17. Molecular Features of Humic Acids and Fulvic Acids from Contrasting Environments

    Schellekens, Judith; Buurman, Peter; Kalbitz, Karsten; Zomeren, van Andre; Vidal-Torrado, Pablo; Cerli, Chiara; Comans, Rob N.J.

    2017-01-01

    Insight in the molecular structure of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) can contribute to identify relationships between their molecular properties, and further our quantitative abilities to model important organic matter functions such as metal complexation and association with mineral

  18. Enzymatic coupling of 2,4-dichlorophenol to stream fulvic acid in the presence of oxidoreductases

    Sarkar, J.M.; Malcolm, R.L.; Bollag, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The coupling 14 C-ring-labelled 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) to stream fulvic acid was investigated in the presence of several oxidoreductases including tyrosinase, peroxidase, and laccases of Rhizoctonia praticola and Trametes vesicolor. During 12-h incubation of the oxidoreductases with 14 C-2, 4-DCP and stream fulvic acid, a substantial amount of the radioactivity was incorporated into fulvic acid. Chromatographic analysis indicated that although a large portion of the radioactivity remained in solution, no unbound 14 C-2,4-DCP was present in the supernatant. The effects of pH, temperature, concentration of fulvic acid, and concentration of enzyme on the coupling processes were studied. The results of this research provide evidence that the enzymatic coupling of certain xenobiotic pollutants to humic substances is an important natural process which must be considered in studies of the fate, reactivity, and persistence of these organic compounds in soils and stream waters

  19. Nitrosation and Nitration of Fulvic Acid, Peat and Coal with Nitric Acid.

    Kevin A Thorn

    Full Text Available Nitrohumic acids, produced from base extraction of coals and peats oxidized with nitric acid, have received considerable attention as soil ammendments in agriculture. The nitration chemistry however is incompletely understood. Moreover, there is a need to understand the reaction of nitric acid with natural organic matter (NOM in general, in the context of a variety of environmental and biogeochemical processes. Suwannee River NOM, Suwannee River fulvic acid, and Pahokee Peat fulvic acid were treated with 15N-labeled nitric acid at concentrations ranging from 15% to 22% and analyzed by liquid and solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. Bulk Pahokee peat and Illinois #6 coal were also treated with nitric acid, at 29% and 40% respectively, and analyzed by solid state 15N NMR spectroscopy. In addition to nitro groups from nitration of aromatic carbon, the 15N NMR spectra of all five samples exhibited peaks attributable to nitrosation reactions. These include nitrosophenol peaks in the peat fulvic acid and Suwannee River samples, from nitrosation of phenolic rings, and N-nitroso groups in the peat samples, from nitrosation of secondary amides or amines, the latter consistent with the peat samples having the highest naturally abundant nitrogen contents. Peaks attributable to Beckmann and secondary reactions of the initially formed oximes were present in all spectra, including primary amide, secondary amide, lactam, and nitrile nitrogens. The degree of secondary reaction product formation resulting from nitrosation reactions appeared to correlate inversely with the 13C aromaticities of the samples. The nitrosation reactions are most plausibly effected by nitrous acid formed from the reduction of nitric acid by oxidizable substrates in the NOM and coal samples.

  20. Influence of Soil Humic and Fulvic Acid on the Activity and Stability of Lysozyme and Urease

    Li, Yan; Tan, WenFeng; Koopal, Luuk K.; Wang, MingXia; Liu, Fan; Norde, Willem

    2013-01-01

    Humic substances (HS), including humic acids (HA) and fulvic acids (FA), are important components of soil systems. HS form strong complexes with oppositely charged proteins, which will lead to changes in the enzyme activity. The effect of soil HS on the activity and stability of two enzymes was

  1. Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids: comparative analysis by colloid titration and potentiometric titration with continuous pK-distribution function model.

    Bratskaya, S; Golikov, A; Lutsenko, T; Nesterova, O; Dudarchik, V

    2008-09-01

    Charge characteristics of humic and fulvic acids of a different origin (inshore soils, peat, marine sediments, and soil (lysimetric) waters) were evaluated by means of two alternative methods - colloid titration and potentiometric titration. In order to elucidate possible limitations of the colloid titration as an express method of analysis of low content of humic substances we monitored changes in acid-base properties and charge densities of humic substances with soil depth, fractionation, and origin. We have shown that both factors - strength of acidic groups and molecular weight distribution in humic and fulvic acids - can affect the reliability of colloid titration. Due to deviations from 1:1 stoichiometry in interactions of humic substances with polymeric cationic titrant, the colloid titration can underestimate total acidity (charge density) of humic substances with domination of weak acidic functional groups (pK>6) and high content of the fractions with molecular weight below 1kDa.

  2. Cu2+ and Ca2+ adsorption to goethite in the presence of fulvic acids

    Weng, L.P.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.; Hiemstra, T.

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between copper ions (Cu2+), Strichen fulvic acid (FA), and goethite has been studied with batch experiments in the pH range of 3¿11. Similar systems with Ca2+ have been studied previously and are used here for comparison. Depending on the pH and Cu2+ loading, the binding of Cu ions

  3. [Effects of Fulvic Acid on Absorption and Form Distribution of Heavy Metals on Sediments].

    Li, Yu-qing; He, Jiang; Lü, Chang-wei; Fan, Ming-de; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-qing; Xie, Zhi- lei; Wang, Jing-hua; Yu, Bo; En, He; Ding, Tao

    2016-03-15

    Based on the extracted fulvic acid (FA) from Lake Wuliangsuhai sediments by sequential alkali extraction, this work studied the effects of FA on the adsorption and fraction distribution of heavy metals (HM) on sediments using original sediments and sediments treated with 30% H₂O₂ as adsorbents. The results showed both organic matter and FA had effects on the HM adsorption onto sediments; The treatments of FA-free conditions and the sediments treated by H₂O₂ showed relatively strong influence on Cu²⁺ adsorption, which decreased the Cu²⁺ adsorption by 17.85%. With the increasing FA addition, the adsorption percentage of HM on both types of sediments showed gradually decreasing trends, with the order of Cu²⁺ > Cd²⁺ > Zn²⁺ > Pb²⁺; when the FA content was more than 5% , FA became the governing factor on the decreasing adsorption percentage of HM. With increasing FA addition, forms distribution of HM showed significant changes in both types of sediments; i. e. FA additions showed significant negative and positive correlations with percentages of metals bound to carbonates and organic matter, respectively, since the FA addition increased the H⁺ concentration of the system, in which H⁺ could activate the metals bound to carbonate from the sediments. As an organophilic weak element, the fraction percentage of Cd bound to organic matter was the lowest with the minimal changes.

  4. Experimental determination and modeling of arsenic complexation with humic and fulvic acids.

    Fakour, Hoda; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-08-30

    The complexation of humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) with arsenic (As) in water was studied. Experimental results indicate that arsenic may form complexes with HA and FA with a higher affinity for arsenate than for arsenite. With the presence of iron oxide based adsorbents, binding of arsenic to HA/FA in water was significantly suppressed, probably due to adsorption of As and HA/FA. A two-site ligand binding model, considering only strong and weak site types of binding affinity, was successfully developed to describe the complexation of arsenic on the two natural organic fractions. The model showed that the numbers of weak sites were more than 10 times those of strong sites on both HA and FA for both arsenic species studied. The numbers of both types of binding sites were found to be proportional to the HA concentrations, while the apparent stability constants, defined for describing binding affinity between arsenic and the sites, are independent of the HA concentrations. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to characterize the impact of HA concentrations on the applicability of the ligand binding model, and to extrapolate the model to FA. The obtained results may give insights on the complexation of arsenic in HA/FA laden groundwater and on the selection of more effective adsorption-based treatment methods for natural waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ground water dating on the basis of the 14C content of dissolved humic and fulvic acids. Final report

    Kim, J.I.; Artinger, R.; Buckau, G.; Kardinal, C.; Geyer, S.; Wolf, M.; Halder, H.; Fritz, P.

    1995-05-01

    The groundwater dating on the basis of the 14 C content of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is studied. Fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) are used as DOC fractions. In addition, the groundwaters are dated with the 14 C content of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). The isotopic contents of 2 H, 3 H, 13 C, 15 N, 18 O, and 34 S of groundwater and humic substances are alse determined. The isolated humic substances are characterized with regard to their chemical composition as well as their molecular size and spectroscopic properties. For aquifer systems which have a neglectable content of sedimentary organic carbon (SOC), the 14 C dating of FA show plausible groundwater ages. In aquifer systems with a high SOC content, the mixing of 14 C free FA from sediment partly falsifies the 14 C groundwater age as determined by dissolved FA. Due to the high transfer of HA from sediment to groundwater, HA are less suitable for groundwater dating. The FA characterization allows the distinction between FA of sedimentary origin and FA which infiltrate with seepage water. Several starting points for a correction of the calculated 14 C ages of FA exist. The results indicate, 14 C groundwater dating with fulvic acids is a valuable expansion of groundwater dating methods. (orig.) [de

  6. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Calza, P.; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-01-01

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  7. The role of humic and fulvic acids in the phototransformation of phenolic compounds in seawater

    Calza, P., E-mail: paola.calza@unito.it; Vione, D.; Minero, C.

    2014-09-15

    Humic substances (HS) are known to act as photosensitizers toward the transformation of pollutants in the surface layer of natural waters. This study focused on the role played by HS toward the transformation of xenobiotics in seawater, with the purpose of assessing the prevailing degradation routes. Phenol was chosen as model xenobiotic and its transformation was investigated under simulated sunlight in the presence of terrestrial or marine humic and fulvic acids, in pure water at pH 8, artificial seawater (ASW) or natural seawater (NSW). The following parameters were determined: (1) the phenol degradation rate; (2) the variation in HS concentration with irradiation time; (3) the production of transformation products; (4) the influence of iron species on the transformation process. Faster transformation of phenol was observed with humic acids (HA) compared to fulvic acids (SRFA), and transformation induced by both HA and SRFA was faster in ASW than that in pure water. These observations can be explained by assuming an interplay between different competing and sometimes opposite processes, including the competition between chloride, bromide and dissolved oxygen for reaction with HS triplet states. The analysis of intermediates formed in the different matrices under study showed the formation of several hydroxylated (hydroquinone, 1,4-benzoquinone, resorcinol) and condensed compounds (2,2′-bisphenol, 4,4′-bisphenol, 4-phenoxyphenol). Although 1,4-benzoquinone was the main transformation product, formation of condensed molecules was significant with both HA and SRFA. Experiments on natural seawater spiked with HS confirmed the favored formation of condensed products, suggesting a key role of humic matter in dimerization reactions occurring in saline water. - Highlights: • Phenol transformation in seawater can be photosensitized by humic substances. • Dimeric species are peculiar intermediates formed in the process. • Phenol degradation occurred faster with

  8. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada, USA, The Suwannee River, Georgia, USA and by polycarboxylic acids

    Reddy, Michael M.; Leenheer, Jerry

    2011-01-01

    Calcite crystallization rates are characterized using a constant solution composition at 25°C, pH=8.5, and calcite supersaturation (Ω) of 4.5 in the absence and presence of fulvic acids isolated from Big Soda Lake, Nevada (BSLFA), and a fulvic acid from the Suwannee River, Georgia (SRFA). Rates are also measured in the presence and absence of low-molar mass, aliphatic-alicyclic polycarboxylic acids (PCA). BSLFA inhibits calcite crystal-growth rates with increasing BSLFA concentration, suggesting that BSLFA adsorbs at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. Calcite growth morphology in the presence of BSLFA differed from growth in its absence, supporting an adsorption mechanism of calcite-growth inhibition by BSLFA. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by BSLFA is consistent with a model indicating that polycarboxylic acid molecules present in BSLFA adsorb at growth sites on the calcite crystal surface. In contrast to published results for an unfractionated SRFA, there is dramatic calcite growth inhibition (at a concentration of 1 mg/L) by a SRFA fraction eluted by pH 5 solution from XAD-8 resin, indicating that calcite growth-rate inhibition is related to specific SRFA component fractions. A cyclic PCA, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6-cyclohexane hexacarboxylic acid (CHXHCA) is a strong calcite growth-rate inhibitor at concentrations less than 0.1 mg/L. Two other cyclic PCAs, 1, 1 cyclopentanedicarboxylic acid (CPDCA) and 1, 1 cyclobutanedicarboxylic acid (CBDCA) with the carboxylic acid groups attached to the same ring carbon atom, have no effect on calcite growth rates up to concentrations of 10 mg/L. Organic matter ad-sorbed from the air onto the seed crystals has no effect on the measured calcite crystal-growth rates.

  9. Effects of Humic and Fulvic Acids on Silver Nanoparticle Stability, Dissolution, and Toxicity

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Mousavi, Maral P. S.; Hussein, Kadir; Bühlmann, Philippe; Haynes, Christy L.

    2015-01-01

    The colloidal stability of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in natural aquatic environments influences their transport and environmental persistence, while their dissolution to Ag+ influences their toxicity to organisms. Here, we characterize the colloidal stability, dissolution behavior, and toxicity of two industrially relevant classes of AgNPs (i.e., AgNPs stabilized by citrate or polyvinylpyrrolidone) after exposure to natural organic matter (NOM, i.e., Suwannee River Humic and Fulvic Acid Standards and Pony Lake Fulvic Acid Reference). We show that NOM interaction with the nanoparticle surface depends on (i) the NOM’s chemical composition, where sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM more significantly increases colloidal stability, and (ii) the affinity of the capping agent for the AgNP surface, where nanoparticles with loosely bound capping agents are more effectively stabilized by NOM. Adsorption of NOM is shown to have little effect on AgNP dissolution under most experimental conditions, the exception being when the NOM is rich in sulfur and nitrogen. Similarly, the toxicity of AgNPs to a bacterial model (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1) decreases most significantly in the presence of sulfur- and nitrogen-rich NOM. Our data suggest that the rate of AgNP aggregation and dissolution in aquatic environments containing NOM will depend on the chemical composition of the NOM, and that the toxicity of AgNPs to aquatic microorganisms is controlled primarily by the extent of nanoparticle dissolution. PMID:26047330

  10. Application of microwave energy to speed up the alkaline extraction of humic and fulvic acids from marine sediments

    Romaris-Hortas, Vanessa; Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of microwave energy to speed up the alkaline extraction of humic substances (humic acid, HA, and fulvic acid, FA) from marine sediments has been checked. Extractions were performed by using 20 mL of sodium hydroxide at 0.1 M (two repeated extractions) after an ultrasound-assisted acid pre-treatment of samples to remove the carbonate fraction (ultrasound power at 17 kHz, 10 mL of 6.0 M hydrochloric acid for 15 min). After separation of HA and FA fractions by acidifying with 6 M HCl, the FA fraction (supernatant) was purified by passing the solution through a column of Amberlite XAD-8. Both HA and FA extracts were measured by UV-visible spectrophotometry. All variables affecting the extraction process (sodium hydroxide concentration and volume, ramp and hold times, temperature and number of repeated extractions) have been screened by using a Plackett-Burman design (PBD) as multivariate approach. The variables temperature and number of repeated extractions were the most significant factors (P = 95%) affecting the extraction of both FA and HA from marine sediments. These two variables have led optimum values of 150 deg. C and two repeated extractions. The developed method has been found precise (R.S.D.s of 9% for HA and 12% for FA, for 11 determinations) and its results were comparable in terms of elemental (C, H and N) composition to those obtained after applying methods based on mechanical stirring and ultrasounds assisting. However, higher HA and FA concentrations than those obtained after conventional stirring and ultrasound irradiation were obtained when applying microwave energy. This means a higher efficiency of microwave energy than ultrasounds or mechanical stirring to extract HA and FA fractions from marine sediments. The method was finally applied to different surface marine sediments from the Ria de Arousa estuary

  11. Hyporheic exchange and fulvic acid redox reactions in an alpine stream/wetland ecosystem, Colorado front range

    Miller, Matthew P.; McKnight, Diane M.; Cory, R.M.; Williams, Mark W.; Runkel, Robert L.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of hyporheic zone interactions on the redox state of fulvic acids and other redox active species was investigated in an alpine stream and adjacent wetland, which is a more reducing environment. A tracer injection experiment using bromide (Br-) was conducted in the stream system. Simulations with a transport model showed that rates of exchange between the stream and hyporheic zone were rapid (?? ??? 10-3 s -1). Parallel factor analysis of fluorescence spectra was used to quantify the redox state of dissolved fulvic acids. The rate coefficient for oxidation of reduced fulvic acids (?? = 6.5 ?? 10-3 s -1) in the stream indicates that electron-transfer reactions occur over short time scales. The rate coefficients for decay of ammonium (?? = 1.2 ?? 10-3 s-1) and production of nitrate (?? = -1.0 ?? 10-3 s-1) were opposite in sign but almost equal in magnitude. Our results suggest that fulvic acids are involved in rapid electron-transfer processes in and near the stream channel and may be important in determining ecological energy flow at the catchment scale. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  12. Change of physical and chemical parameters of fulvic acids at different pH of the system

    Dinu, Marina; Kremleva, Tatyana

    2017-04-01

    Organic substances of humic nature significantly change physicochemical properties at different pH of natural waters. As a consequence, a large number of consecutive and parallel reactions in the structure of organic polymers, and reacting with inorganic anions. The main indicators of changes in the properties of organic acids in natural systems are changes in their IR spectra, changes in the colloid stability (the zeta potential) as well as in the molecular weight and emission spectra (fluorescence emission spectra). The aim of our study was to evaluate of changing in physical and chemical properties of the fulvic acid from soil/water samples in the natural areas of European Russia and Western Siberia (the steppe and the northern taiga zones) at different pH (from 8 to 1.5). Changes in absorption bands of fulvic acid caused by both COOH groups and amino groups with varying degrees of protonation were found. Consequently, we can assume that in an electric field fulvic acid change the sign of their charge at depending on pH. During the lowering of the pH intensity of C-O bands generally decreases, while in the region 1590 cm-1 disappears. In turn, the band at 1700 cm-1 is the most intense; it could mean a complete protonation of the carboxyl groups. According to our data, the values of zeta potential changes depending on pH of the system. The zeta potential becomes more negative with increasing pH and it may be due to ionization of oxygen groups of fulvic acid. For the colloidal polymer systems the value of the zeta potential is strongly negative (less than -20 mV) and strongly positive (over 20 mV) characterize the system as the most stable. Our experimental data for the study of the zeta potential of fulvic acids extracted from the soils and waters of different climatic zones show zonal influence of the qualitative characteristics of organic substances on the surface charge of the high-molecular micelle of fulvic acids. It was found that fulvic acids extracted

  13. A new method to radiolabel fulvic acids with tritium for the purpose of tracing organic matter transport at low concentrations

    Tinnacher, R.M.; Honeyman, B.D.; Leenheer, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: It is increasingly evident that reactive transport models for radionuclides need to include the effects of natural organic ligands, such as bacterial exudates and humic and fulvic acids. Understanding the role of such ligands in radionuclide transport requires an ability to track ligand concentrations in time and space with an analytical resolution similar to that of the target radionuclide. Unfortunately, for many systems of interest for radioactive waste disposal and performance assessment, organic ligand concentrations are quite low (e.g., mg C/ L or less). Radiolabeling organic ligands can provide a means of tracing such species at low levels and for relatively low cost. Currently-used labeling methods, however, show some limitations with respect to the chemical stability of the radiolabel, the ability to produce high label specific activities and method reproducibility. In the procedure that we will describe, fulvic acid is radiolabeled with tritium by its reduction with tritiated sodium borohydride (NaBH 4 ) at alkaline pH and slightly elevated temperatures. The reactant selectively reduces the carbonyl groups of aromatic and aliphatic ketones as well as quinones. This results in the formation of tritium-labeled secondary alcohols. After completion of the labeling reaction, aerobically unstable reduction products of quinones and aromatic ketones are re-oxidized under controlled experimental conditions during an aeration step. Labeling efficiency in terms of reduced reactive fulvic acid groups is in the range of 100 percent with equal weights of fulvic acid and NaBH 4 in the reaction solution. This yields specific activities on the order of 50 to 100 μCi / mg fulvic acid. A quasi-chemical model of the labeling process allows the accurate prediction of the labeling efficiency based on a simplified mass action expression for the labeling reaction and the mass balance equations for fulvic acid and sodium borohydride. Such a

  14. Use of the cation exchange equilibrium method for the determination of stability constants of Co(II) with soil humic and fulvic acids

    Du, J.Z.; Zhou, C.Y.; Dong, W.M.; Tao, Z.Y.

    1999-01-01

    The stability constants for tracer concentrations of Co(II) complexes with both the red earth humic and fulvic acids were determined at pH 5.9 and ionic strength 0.010 mol/l by using the ARDAKANI-STEVENSON cation exchange equilibrium method and the radiotracer 60 Co. It was found that the 1:1 complexes of Co(II) with the red earth humic and fulvic acids were formed and that the average values of logβ (stability constant) of humic and fulvic acid complexes were 5.76±0.19 and 4.42±0.03, respectively. (author)

  15. Effect of gypsum, pressmud, fulvic acid and zinc sources on yield and zinc uptake by rice crop in a saline-sodic soil

    Chand, M.

    1980-01-01

    The application of fulvic acid to a saline-sodic soil augmented the solubility of zinc by thousands fold. Zinc fulvate when applied at levels equivalent to that of zinc sulphate was more effective in enhancing diffusion of zinc in the soil. Application of gypsum, zinc sulphate and fulvic acid significantly increased dry matter yield and uptake of zinc by rice crop in a saline-sodic soil. Application of gypsum with pressmud or with fulvic acid and zinc sulphate resulted in significantly higher yield and zinc uptake than in other treatments. (orig.)

  16. Water-Mediated Differential Binding of Strontium and Cesium Cations in Fulvic Acid.

    Sadhu, Biswajit; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Bandyopadhyay, Tusar

    2015-08-27

    The migration of potentially harmful radionuclides, such as cesium ((137)Cs) and strontium ((90)Sr), in soil is governed by the chemical and biological reactivity of soil components. Soil organic matter (SOM) that can be modeled through fulvic acid (FA) is known to alter the mobility of radionuclide cations, Cs(+) and Sr(2+). Shedding light on the possible interaction mechanisms at the atomic level of these two ions with FA is thus vital to explain their transport behavior and for the design of new ligands for the efficient extraction of radionuclides. Here we have performed molecular dynamics, metadynamics simulations, and density-functional-theory-based calculations to understand the binding mechanism of Sr(2+) and Cs(+) cations with FA. Our studies predict that interaction of Cs(+) to FA is very weak as compared with Sr(2+). While the water-FA interaction is largely responsible for the weak binding of Cs(+) to FA, leading to the outer sphere complexation of the ion with FA, the interaction between Sr(2+) and FA is stronger and thus can surpass the existing secondary nonbonding interaction between coordinated waters and FA, leading to inner sphere complexation of the ion with FA. We also find that entropy plays a dominant role for Cs(+) binding to FA, whereas Sr(2+) binding is an enthalpy-driven process. Our predicted results are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data on complexation of Cs(+) and Sr(2+) with SOM.

  17. Spectral characterization of the fluorescent components present in humic substances, fulvic acid and humic acid mixed with pure benzo(a)pyrene solution

    El Fallah, Rawa; Rouillon, Régis; Vouvé, Florence

    2018-06-01

    The fate of benzo(a)pyrene (BaP), a ubiquitous contaminant reported to be persistent in the environment, is largely controlled by its interactions with the soil organic matter. In the present study, the spectral characteristics of fluorophores present in the physical fractions of the soil organic matter were investigated in the presence of pure BaP solution. After extraction of humic substances (HSs), and their fractionation into fluvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA), two fluorescent compounds (C1 and C2) were identified and characterized in each physical soil fraction, by means of fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (FEEMs) and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC). Then, to each type of fraction having similar DOC content, was added an increasing volume of pure BaP solution in attempt to assess the behavior of BaP with the fluorophores present in each one. The application of FEEMs-PARAFAC method validated a three-component model that consisted of the two resulted fluorophores from HSs, FA and HA (C1 and C2) and a BaP-like fluorophore (C3). Spectral modifications were noted for components C2HSs (C2 in humic substances fraction) (λex/λem: 420/490-520 nm), C2FA (C2 in fulvic acid fraction) (λex/λem: 400/487(517) nm) and C1HA (C1 in humic acid fraction) (λex/λem: 350/452(520) nm). We explored the impact of increasing the volume of the added pure BaP solution on the scores of the fluorophores present in the soil fractions. It was found that the scores of C2HSs, C2FA, and C1HA increased when the volume of the added pure BaP solution increased. Superposition of the excitation spectra of these fluorophores with the emission spectrum of BaP showed significant overlaps that might explain the observed interactions between BaP and the fluorescent compounds present in SOM physical fractions.

  18. Poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite: A novel adsorbent for enhanced fulvic acid removal from aqueous solution

    Wei, Wei; Yang, Lei; Zhong, Wenhui; Cui, Jing; Wei, Zhenggui

    2015-03-01

    In this study, poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fulvic acid (FA) from aqueous solution. Surface functionality, crystallinity, and morphology of the synthetic adsorbent were studied by Fourier-transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of various parameters such as crystallinity of adsorbent, contact time, adsorbent dosage, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkaline earth metal ions on FA adsorption were investigated. Results indicated that the nanosized HAP calcined at lower temperature was poorly crystalline (Xc = 0.23) and had better adsorption capacity for FA than those (Xc = 0.52, 0.86) calcined at higher temperature. FA removal was increased with increases of adsorbent dosage, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkali earth metal ions, but decreased as the pH increased. Kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model better described the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were best described by Sips models, and the estimated maximum adsorption capacity of poorly crystalline HAP was 90.20 mg/g at 318 K, displaying higher efficiency for FA removal than previously reported adsorbents. FT-IR results revealed that FA adsorption over the adsorbent could be attributed to the surface complexation between the oxygen atom of functional groups of FA and calcium ions of HAP. Regeneration studies indicated that HAP could be recyclable for a long term. Findings of the present work highlight the potential for using poorly crystalline HAP nanoparticles as an effective and recyclable adsorbent for FA removal from aqueous solution.

  19. Propriedades ácido-base e de complexação de ácidos húmico e fúlvico isolados de vermicomposto Acid/base and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids isolated from vermicompost

    Sandro de Miranda Colombo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Proton binding properties of humic and fulvic acids were studied by potentiometric titration. Carboxylic groups were the predominant ionizable sites in comparison to phenolic and amine groups. Total acidity of fulvic acid was 12 x 10-3 mol g-1, a number significantly higher than that obtained for humic acid (5.2 x 10-3 mol g-1. Copper ion binding was evaluated at pH 4, 5 and 6 by potentiometric titration with an ion selective electrode for Cu(II. Differential stability constants and complexation capacities were systematically higher for humic acid, despite its lower number of ionizable sites in comparison with fulvic acid.

  20. Poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite: A novel adsorbent for enhanced fulvic acid removal from aqueous solution

    Wei, Wei [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yang, Lei; Zhong, Wenhui; Cui, Jing [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Wei, Zhenggui, E-mail: weizhenggui@gmail.com [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Center for Collaborative Innovation in Geographical Information Resource Development and Application, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Poorly crystalline HAP was firstly used for FA removal from aqueous solution. • The maximum adsorption capacity was determined to be 90.20 mg/g at 318 K. • Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and thermodynamic have been studied in detail. • Adsorption mechanism involved surface complexation, electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonding. - Abstract: In this study, poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HAP) was developed as an efficient adsorbent for the removal of fulvic acid (FA) from aqueous solution. Surface functionality, crystallinity, and morphology of the synthetic adsorbent were studied by Fourier-transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effects of various parameters such as crystallinity of adsorbent, contact time, adsorbent dosage, pH, initial adsorbate concentration, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkaline earth metal ions on FA adsorption were investigated. Results indicated that the nanosized HAP calcined at lower temperature was poorly crystalline (X{sub c} = 0.23) and had better adsorption capacity for FA than those (X{sub c} = 0.52, 0.86) calcined at higher temperature. FA removal was increased with increases of adsorbent dosage, temperature, ionic strength and the presence of alkali earth metal ions, but decreased as the pH increased. Kinetic studies showed that pseudo-second-order kinetic model better described the adsorption process. Equilibrium data were best described by Sips models, and the estimated maximum adsorption capacity of poorly crystalline HAP was 90.20 mg/g at 318 K, displaying higher efficiency for FA removal than previously reported adsorbents. FT-IR results revealed that FA adsorption over the adsorbent could be attributed to the surface complexation between the oxygen atom of functional groups of FA and calcium ions of HAP. Regeneration studies indicated that HAP could be recyclable for a long

  1. Impact of fulvic acids on bio-methanogenic treatment of municipal solid waste incineration leachate.

    Dang, Yan; Lei, Yuqing; Liu, Zhao; Xue, Yiting; Sun, Dezhi; Wang, Li-Ying; Holmes, Dawn E

    2016-12-01

    A considerable amount of leachate with high fulvic acid (FA) content is generated during the municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration process. This incineration leachate is usually processed by downstream bio-methanogenic treatment. However, few studies have examined the impact that these compounds have on methanogenesis and how they are degraded and transformed during the treatment process. In this study, a laboratory-scale expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor was operated with MSW incineration leachate containing various concentrations of FA (1500 mg/L to 8000 mg/L) provided as the influent. We found that FA degradation rates decreased from 86% to 72% when FA concentrations in the reactor were increased, and that molecular size, level of humification and aromatization of the residual FA macromolecules all increased after bio-methanogenic treatment. Increasing FA influent concentrations also inhibited growth of hydrogenotrophic methanogens from the genus Methanobacterium and syntrophic bacteria from the genus Syntrophomonas, which resulted in a decrease in methane production and a concomitant increase in CO 2 content in the biogas. Sequences most similar to species from the genus Anaerolinea went up as FA concentrations increased. Bacteria from this genus are capable of extracellular electron transfer and may be using FA as an electron acceptor for growth or as a shuttle for syntrophic exchange with other microorganisms in the reactor. In order to determine whether FA could serve as an electron shuttle to promote syntrophy in an anaerobic digester, co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens and G. sulfurreducens were grown in the presence of FA from raw leachate or from residual bioreactor effluent. While raw FA stimulated electron transfer between these two bacteria, residual FA did not have any electron shuttling abilities, indicating that FA underwent a significant transformation during the bio-methanogenic treatment process. These results are

  2. [Fluorescence spectroscopic characteristics of fulvic acid from the long-term located fertilization in black soil].

    Li, Yan-Ping; Wei, Dan; Zhou, Bao-Ku; Zhao, Yue; Zhang, Xi-Lin; Wei, Zi-Min; Li, Shu-Ling

    2011-10-01

    In order to investigate the effect of long-term located fertilization on soil fulvic acid (FA), in this study, four soil samples were taken from black soil with long-term located fertilization (about 30 year) in Harbin, Heilongjiang province. The fertilization treatments included control (CK), N, P and K fertilization (NPK), horse manure (OM), combination of organic manure and chemical fertilizations (MNPK). Soil FA was extracted from the samples and purified. The excitation, emission, synchronous, and three-dimensional-excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy (3DEEM) characteristics of the FA were determined. The excitation, emission and synchronous scan spectra all indicated that the main peaks of FA in the NPK treatment exhibited a significantly blue shift compared with CK, while those of MNPK, OM treatment caused a red shift to some extent. 3DEEM spectra of FA in all treatments exhibited four peaks (peak a, peak b, peak c, and peak d), compared with FA in CK, the wavelengths shift tendency of peak a, peak b, and peak c of FA 3DEEM in NPK, MNPK and OM treatments were similar to that of traditional spectra in FA. In order to provide quantitative information of FA humification degree in different treatments, we investigated the fluorescence index f450/500 (FI), area integration (A370-600 nm, A1 370-412 nm, A4 538-600 nm). Compared with CK, the f450/500, ratio of A1/A in NPK and A4/A in MNPK treatment increased by 4.62%, 6.12%, 7.22%, respectively. However, the f450/500, the ratio of A1/A in MNPK and A4/A in NPK treatment decreased by 3.86%, 15.31%, and 7.22% respectively. This indicated that NPK application gave a lower degree of FA humification, and combination of organic manure and chemical fertilizations would lead to a greater degree of FA aromatization in black soil with long-term located fertilization than CK.

  3. Ion binding by humic and fulvic acids: A computational procedure based on functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions

    Marinsky, J.A.; Reddy, M.M.; Ephraim, J.; Mathuthu, A.

    1988-04-01

    Ion binding equilibria for humic and fulvic acids are examined from the point of view of functional site heterogeneity and the physical chemistry of polyelectrolyte solutions. A detailed explanation of the potentiometric properties of synthetic polyelectrolytes and ion-exchange gels is presented first to provide the basis for a parallel consideration of the potentiometric properties exhibited by humic and fulvic acids. The treatment is then extended to account for functional site heterogeneity. Sample results are presented for analysis of the ion-binding reactions of a standard soil fulvic acid (Armadale Horizons Bh) with this approach to test its capability for anticipation of metal ion removal from solution. The ultimate refined model is shown to be adaptable, after appropriate consideration of the heterogeneity and polyelectrolyte factors, to programming already available for the consideration of ion binding by inorganics in natural waters. (orig.)

  4. Physiological responses of Brassica napus to fulvic acid under water stress: Chlorophyll a fluorescence and antioxidant enzyme activity

    Ramin Lotfi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The ameliorative effect of fulvic acid (0, 300, and 600 mg L− 1 on photosystem II and antioxidant enzyme activity of the rapeseed (Brassica napus L. plant under water stress (60, 100, and 140 mm evaporation from class A pan was studied using split plots in a randomized complete block design with three replications. Results indicated that application of fulvic acid (FA improved the maximum quantum efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm and performance index (PI of plants under both well-watered and limited-water conditions. The time span from Fo to Fm and the energy necessary for the closure of all reaction centers was significantly increased, but the size of the plastoquinone pool was reduced with increasing water stress levels. Plants treated with FA had higher peroxidase and catalase activities under all irrigation conditions. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase and superoxide dismutase in plants increased with increasing water stress. Malondialdehyde increased under severe water stress, but application of FA significantly decreased lipid peroxidation. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS is a common phenomenon in plants under stress. Under this condition, the balance between the production of ROS and the quenching activity of antioxidants is upset, often resulting in oxidative damage. In this study, application of FA significantly increased fluorescence of chlorophyll a, inhibiting ROS production and enhancing antioxidant enzymes activity that destroyed ROS. Thus, ROS in plant cells was reduced under water stress by application of FA and consequently lipid peroxidation was reduced.

  5. Effects of fulvic acid concentration and origin on photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in aqueous solution: Importance of active oxygen

    Xia Xinghui; Li Gongchen; Yang Zhifeng; Chen Yumin; Huang, Gordon H.

    2009-01-01

    With an Xe arc lamp house as simulated sunlight, the influences of fulvic acid (FA) concentration and origins on photodegradation of acenaphthene, fluorine, phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene in aqueous solution have been studied. Similar effects of FAs, collected from five places around China, on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) photodegradation have been observed. Active oxygen was of significance in PAH photodegradation with the presence of FAs. For systems with 1.25 mg L -1 FAs, the contributions of ·OH to PAH photodegradation rates were from 33% to 69%. FAs had two opposite effects, i.e., stimulating the generation of active oxygen and advancing PAH photodegradation; competing with PAHs for energy and photons and restraining PAH photodegradation. Generally, photodegradation rates of the 5 PAHs decreased with the increase of FAs concentration; except fluoranthene and pyrene were advanced in solutions with low FA concentration. The influences of FA concentration on PAH photodegradation were more significant than FA origin. - Influences of fulvic acid (FA) concentration on PAH photodegradation were more significant than FA origin, and active oxygen played an important role in PAH photodegradation

  6. Seasonal variation and mixing behaviour of glutathione, thioacetamide and fulvic acids in a temperate macrotidal estuary (Aulne, NW France)

    Marie, Lauriane; Pernet-Coudrier, Benoît; Waeles, Matthieu; Riso, Ricardo

    2017-01-01

    Fulvic acids and two dissolved reduced sulphur substances (RSS) were analysed for one year along the whole salinity gradient in the Aulne estuary (north-western France) using differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. Concentrations of glutathione-like (GSH-like), thioacetamide-like (TA-like) and fulvic acid-like (FA-like) compounds ranged from 0.2 to 38 nmol L-1, from 0.02 to 6.6 μmol L-1 and from 0.1 to 4 mgC L-1, respectively. Our results indicated primarily allochthonous-continental sources for all three compounds. The behaviour of GSH-like compounds along the salinity gradient was globally conservative, with minor losses (important removals. In terms of the TA-like budget, losses were counterbalanced by exceptional inputs occurring in the flood period (February). FA-like compounds were intensely degraded (∼50%) in the last section of the river and then behaved conservatively in the estuary. The annual flux of FA-like compounds to coastal waters was 2800 ± 600 tC. This flux was mainly (74%) delivered during the high discharge period, in accordance with its known pedogenic origin.

  7. Comparative study on sorption of radiocobalt to montmorillonite and its Al-pillared and cross-linked samples. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid

    Yu, S.; Cheng, J.; Chen, C.; Wang, X.

    2007-01-01

    Effects of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on sorption of radiocobalt on montmorillonite and its Al-pillared and cross-linked samples were studied using batch technique. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH values and independent of ionic strength. Fulvic acid enhances the sorption of cobalt slightly at low pH, but has no influence at high pH values. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to montmorillonite. The sequences of FA/Co 2+ additions to the system did not affect cobalt sorption. (author)

  8. Impact of humic/fulvic acid on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions using nanomaterials: a review.

    Tang, Wang-Wang; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Gong, Ji-Lai; Liang, Jie; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chang; Huang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-15

    Nowadays nanomaterials have been widely used to remove heavy metals from water/wastewater due to their large surface area and high reactivity. Humic acid (HA) and fulvic acid (FA) exist ubiquitously in aquatic environments and have a variety of functional groups which allow them to complex with metal ions and interact with nanomaterials. These interactions can not only alter the environmental behavior of nanomaterials, but also influence the removal and transportation of heavy metals by nanomaterials. Thus, the interactions and the underlying mechanisms involved warrant specific investigations. This review outlined the effects of HA/FA on the removal of heavy metals from aqueous solutions by various nanomaterials, mainly including carbon-based nanomaterials, iron-based nanomaterials and photocatalytic nanomaterials. Moreover, mechanisms involved in the interactions were discussed and potential environmental implications of HA/FA to nanomaterials and heavy metals were evaluated. © 2013.

  9. Effect of fulvic acid on adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    Uwamariya, V.

    2015-05-15

    Abstract Natural contamination has become a challenging problem in drinking water production due to metal contamination of groundwater throughout the world, and arsenic and chromium are well-known toxic elements. In this study, iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were used to study the effects of fulvic acid (FA) on the adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) from synthetic groundwater. IOCS and GFH were characterized by SEM/EDS, and experiments were performed at different pH levels (6, 7, and 8). The surface of IOCS and GFH showed a high content of Fe and O (75 and 60 % of the atomic composition, respectively), suggesting that they can highly effectively adsorb Cr(VI) and As(V). Adsorption tests with the simultaneous presence of As(V) and FA, on the one hand, and Cr(VI) with FA, on the other hand, revealed that the role of FA on chromate and arsenate adsorption was insignificant at almost all pH values investigated with both adsorbents. A small influence as a result of FA was only observed for the removal of As(V) by IOCS at pH 6 with a decrease of 13 and 23 % when 2 and 5 mg/l were added to the synthetic water, respectively. It was also found that organic matter (OM) was leached from the IOCS during batch adsorption experiments. The use of FEEM revealed that humic-like, fulvic-like, and protein-like organic matter fractions are present on the IOCS surface. © 2015 Springer International Publishing Switzerland.

  10. Equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange: adaptation of the method for determination of conditional stability constants of radionuclide-fulvic acid complexes

    Glaus, M.A.; Hummel, W.; Van Loon, L.R.

    1995-01-01

    The equilibrium dialysis-ligand exchange technique (EDLE) is used to determine conditional stability constants for the complexation of metal ions with humic acid, particularly in high pH solutions. Here, this technique has been adapted to measure conditional stability constants with fulvic acid. Fulvic acid permeates across all membranes during the experiment. The quantities involved therefore have to be determined analytically and taken into account when calculating the conditional stability constants. Co(II) and Laurentian Soil fulvic (LFA) acid were selected as a test system in order to investigate the time scale required to establish chemical and diffusion equilibria. After an incubation time of approximately two days, the conditional stability constants measured for the formation of Co-LFA-complexes are not time dependent, although across the whole time period investigated, LFA was still diffusing in increasing amounts across the dialysis membrane. This work demonstrates that the modified EDLE technique can be used in the determination of conditional metal stability constants of fulvic acid. (authors)

  11. Competition from Cu(II), Zn(II) and Cd(II) in Pb(II) binding to Suwannee River Fulvic Acid

    Chakraborty, P.; Chakrabarti, C.L.

    2008-01-01

    This is a study of trace metal competition in the complexation of Pb(II) by well-characterized humic substances, namely Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) in model solutions. It was found that Cu(II) seems to compete with Pb(II) for strong binding sites of SRFA when present at the same concentration

  12. Effects of growth stage and fulvic acid on the diversity and dynamics of endophytic bacterial community in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves

    Xuejian eYu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to learn the interactions among the endophytic bacteria, the plant growth, the foliar spray of fulvic acid, and the accumulation of steviol glycosides in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from the Stevia leaves at different growth stages with or without the fulvic acid treatment; and the diversity of endophytic bacteria in Stevia leaves was estimated by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. As results, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes were found to be the dominant phyla despite the growth stages and fulvic acid application. Stevia growth stages strongly regulated composition of endophytic community. The genera Agrobacterium (12.3 % and Erwinia (7.2 % dominated in seedling stage were apparently declined in the vegetable and initial flowering stages, while Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium increased in mature leaves at harvest time, which showed that the mature leaves of Stevia preferred to accumulate some certain endophytic bacteria. Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium constituted an important part of the core endophytic community and were positively correlated with the stevioside content and UGT74G1 gene expression, respectively; while Erwinia, Agrobacterium and Bacillus were negatively correlated with the stevioside accumulation. Fulvic acid treatment accelerated the variation of endophytes along the growth stages.

  13. Surface complexation modeling of U(VI) sorption on GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid

    Zheng, Jie [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Luo, Daojun [Ministry of Industry and Information Technology, Guangzhou (China). The 5th Electronics Research Inst.; Qiao, Yahua; Wang, Liang; Zhang, Chunming [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Wu, Wangsuo [Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory; Ye, Yuanlv [Ministry of Environmental Protection, Beijing (China). Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center; Lanzhou Univ. (China). Radiochemistry Laboratory

    2017-03-01

    In this work, experiments and modeling for the interactions between uranyl ion and GMZ bentonite in the presence of fulvic acid are presented. The results demonstrated that FA is strongly bound to GMZ bentonite, and these molecules have a very large effect on the U(VI) sorption. The results also demonstrated that U(VI) sorption to GMZ bentonite in the presence and absence of sorbed FA can be well predicted by combining SHM and DLM. According to the model calculations, the nature of the interactions between FA with U(VI) at GMZ bentonite surface is mainly surface complex. The first attempt to simulate clay interaction with humus by the SHM model.

  14. Effect of pH, ionic strength and fulvic acid on the sorption and desorption of cobalt to bentonite

    Yu, Sh.M.; Ren, A.P.; Chen, Ch.L.; Chen, Y.X.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    Humic substances and bentonite have attracted great interest in radioactive waste management. Here the sorption of cobalt on bentonite in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) under ambient conditions was studied. The effects of pH, ionic strength, FA and solution concentrations on cobalt sorption to bentonite were also investigated using batch techniques. The results indicate that the sorption of cobalt is strongly dependent on pH and is independent of ionic strength under our experimental conditions. Surface complexation is considered the main mechanism of cobalt sorption to bentonite. In the presence of FA, little effect of FA on cobalt sorption was found at pH 8. The addition sequences of FA/Co 2+ to the bentonite suspension on the sorption of cobalt to FA-coated bentonite were also studied. The results indicated that the sorption is not influenced by the addition sequences. Some possible mechanisms are discussed

  15. Effects of growth stage and fulvic acid on the diversity and dynamics of endophytic bacterial community in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni leaves

    Yu, Xuejian; Yang, Jinshui; Wang, Entao; Li, Baozhen; Yuan, Hongli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to learn the interactions among the endophytic bacteria, the plant growth, the foliar spray of fulvic acid, and the accumulation of steviol glycosides in the leaves of Stevia rebaudiana. Metagenomic DNA was extracted from the Stevia leaves at different growth stages with or without the fulvic acid treatment; and the diversity of endophytic bacteria in Stevia leaves was estimated by pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes. As results, Proteobacteria, Actinobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Firmicutes were found to be the dominant phyla despite the growth stages and fulvic acid application. Stevia growth stages strongly regulated composition of endophytic community. The genera Agrobacterium (12.3%) and Erwinia (7.2%) dominated in seedling stage were apparently declined in the vegetable and initial flowering stages, while Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium increased in mature leaves at harvest time, which showed that the mature leaves of Stevia preferred to accumulate some certain endophytic bacteria. Sphingomonas and Methylobacterium constituted an important part of the core endophytic community and were positively correlated with the stevioside content and UGT74G1 gene expression, respectively; while Erwinia, Agrobacterium, and Bacillus were negatively correlated with the stevioside accumulation. Fulvic acid treatment accelerated the variation of endophytes along the growth stages and increased the steviol glycosides content. This is the first study to reveal the community composition of endophytic bacteria in the Stevia leaves, to evidence the strong effects of growth stage and fulvic acid application on the endophytes of Stevia, and to demonstrate the correlation between the endophytic bacteria and the steviol glycosides accumulation. PMID:26379644

  16. Hydroxyl Radical Formation from HULIS and Fe(II) Interactions: Fulvic Acid-Fe(II) Complexes in Simulated and Human Lung Fluids

    Gonzalez, D.

    2017-12-01

    Inhalation of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) has long been associated with adverse health outcomes. However, the causative agents and underlying mechanisms for these health effects have yet to be identified. One hypothesis is that PM2.5 deposited in the alveoli produce an excess of highly reactive radicals, leading to oxidative stress. The OH radical may be the most physiologically damaging, capable of oxidizing of lipids, proteins and DNA. Due to the variability and uncertainty in PM2.5 composition, the components that contribute to OH formation are not well understood. Soluble Fe is a component of PM2.5that produces OH under physiological conditions. Humic-like substances are water soluble organics found in biomass burning and tobacco smoke. Humic-like substances are capable of binding to Fe and enhancing OH formation, but this chemistry is not well understood. In this work, we use soil derived fulvic acid as a surrogate for Humic-like substances and investigate its effect on OH formation from Fe(II) under conditions relevant to the lungs. We use a fluorescent OH trapping probe, chemical kinetics and thermodynamic modeling to investigate OH formation from fulvic acid and Fe(II) dissolved in simulated and human lung fluids. In simulated lung fluid, we find that fulvic acid binds to Fe(II) and enhances the rate of key reactions that form OH. When fulvic acid is added to human lung fluids containing Fe(II), an enhancement of OH formation is observed. In human lung fluid, fulvic acid and metal binding proteins compete for Fe binding. These metal binding proteins are typically not found in simulated lung fluids. Results show that fulvic acid strongly binds Fe(II) and catalyzes key reactions that form OH in both simulated and human lung fluids. These results may help explain the role of Humic-like substances and Fe in oxidative stress and adverse health outcomes. Furthermore, we suggest that future studies employ simulated lung fluids containing metal binding proteins

  17. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  18. Adsorption of copper(II) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes in the absence and presence of humic or fulvic acids

    Sheng Guodong; Li Jiaxing; Shao Dadong; Hu Jun; Chen Changlun; Chen Yixue; Wang Xiangke

    2010-01-01

    The adsorption of Cu(II) on multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) as a function of pH and ionic strength in the absence and presence of humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) was studied using batch technique. The results indicated that the adsorption is strongly dependent on pH but independent of ionic strength. A positive effect of HA/FA on Cu(II) adsorption was found at pH 7.5. The adsorption isotherms can be described better by the Freundlich model than by the Langmuir model in the absence and presence of HA/FA. Adsorption isotherms of Cu(II) at higher initial HA/FA concentrations are higher than those of Cu(II) at lower FA/HA concentrations. The thermodynamic data calculated from temperature-dependent adsorption isotherms suggested that the adsorption was spontaneous and enhanced at higher temperature. Results of this work suggest that MWCNTs may be a promising candidate for the removal of heavy metal ions from aqueous solutions.

  19. The effect of MWCNT treatment by H2O2 and/or UV on fulvic acids sorption.

    Czech, Bożena

    2017-05-01

    The carbon nanotubes (CNT) present in the wastewater subjected to treatment will possess altered physico-chemical properties. The changed properties will result in the unknown behavior of CNT in the environment after disposal; and it is expected to differ from their pristine analogues. In the present paper the effect of sorption of dissolved organic matter with fulvic acids (FA) as representatives onto UV and/or H 2 O 2 treated CNT was tested. Both kinetics and mechanism of sorption was estimated. The chemical adsorption was a rate limiting step and a pseudo-second order kinetics described the sorption of FA onto UV and/or H 2 O 2 treated CNT. The treating increased affinity towards FA and treating by UV and H 2 O 2 simultaneously possessed greater impact on k 2 than UV and H 2 O 2 separately. The greatest effect on CNT sorption capacity revealed H 2 O 2 . The sorption mechanism was described by Temkin (CNT-H 2 O 2 ) and Dubinin-Radushkevich model. The increase in CNT surface disorder caused by UV and/or H 2 O 2 treatment favored sorption of FA via π-π interactions (exfoliated surface and disordered CNT walls). FA sorption occurred between aromatic rings of FA and CNT and hydrogen bonds formed with the oxygen functional groups. The results indicate that UV and/or H 2 O 2 treatment affected the sorption capacity and affinity of CNT towards FA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Green synthesis of low-toxicity graphene-fulvic acid with an open band gap enhances demethylation of methylmercury.

    Hu, Xiangang; Mu, Li; Lu, Kaicheng; Kang, Jia; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-06-25

    The demethylation of methylmercury has received substantial attention. Here, a novel chemical method for the demethylation of methylmercury is proposed. The low-toxicity graphene-fulvic acid (FA, a ubiquitous material in the environment) was synthesized without the use of a chemical reagent. The hybridized graphene-FA presented an indirect open band gap of 2.25-2.87 eV as well as adequate aqueous dispersion. More importantly, the hybridized graphene-FA exhibited 6- and 10-fold higher photocatalytic efficiencies for the demethylation of methylmercury than FA and free FA with graphene, respectively. This result implies that immobilized, rather than free, FA accelerated the catalysis. Furthermore, inorganic mercuric ion, elemental mercury, and mercuric oxide were identified as the primary demethylation products. For free FA with graphene, graphene quenches the excited-state FA, inhibiting the demethylation by electron transfer. In contrast, the graphene of the self-assembled graphene-FA serves as an electron reservoir, causing electron-hole pair separation. Graphene-FA showed a negligible toxicity toward microalgae compared to graphene. The above results reveal that the green synthesis of graphene and organic molecules is a convenient strategy for obtaining effective cocatalysts.

  1. In situ study of binding of copper by fulvic acid: comparison of differential absorbance data and model predictions.

    Yan, Mingquan; Dryer, Deborah; Korshin, Gregory V; Benedetti, Marc F

    2013-02-01

    This study examined the binding of copper(II) by Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) using the method of differential absorbance that was used at environmentally-relevant concentrations of copper and SRFA. The pH- and metal-differential spectra were processed via numeric deconvolution to establish commonalities seen in the changes of absorbance caused by deprotonation of SRFA and its interactions with copper(II) ions. Six Gaussian bands were determined to be present in both the pH- and Cu-differential spectra. Their maxima were located, in the order of increasing wavelengths at 208 nm, 242 nm, 276 nm, 314 nm, 378 nm and 551 nm. The bands with these maxima were denoted as A0, A1, A2, A3, A4 and A5, respectively. Properties of these bands were compared with those existing in the spectra of model compounds such as sulfosalicylic acid (SSA), tannic acid (TA), and polystyrenesulfonic acid-co-maleic acid (PSMA). While none of the features observed in differential spectra of the model compound were identical to those present in the case of SRFA, Gaussian bands A1, A3 and possibly A2 were concluded to be largely attributable to a combination of responses of salicylic- and polyhydroxyphenolic groups. In contrast, bands A4 and A5 were detected in the differential spectra of SRFA only. Their nature remains to be elucidated. To examine correlations between the amount of copper(II) bound by SRFA and changes of its absorbance, differential absorbances measured at indicative wavelengths 250 nm and 400 nm were compared with the total amount of SRFA-bound copper estimated based on Visual MINTEQ calculations. This examination showed that the differential absorbances of SRFA in a wide range of pH values and copper concentrations were strongly correlated with the concentration of SRFA-bound copper. The approach presented in this study can be used to generate in situ information concerning the nature of functional groups in humic substances engaged in interactions with metals ions. This

  2. Facilitated Bioaccumulation of Perfluorooctanesulfonate in Common Carp (Cyprinus carpio) by Graphene Oxide and Remission Mechanism of Fulvic Acid.

    Qiang, Liwen; Chen, Meng; Zhu, Lingyan; Wu, Wei; Wang, Qiang

    2016-11-01

    As one of the most popular carbon-based nanomaterials, graphene oxide (GO) has the potential to be released in aquatic environment and interact with some coexistent organic pollutants, such as perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), which is an emerging persistent organic pollutant. In this study, the adsorption of PFOS on GO in the presence of fulvic acid (FA), the impacts of GO and FA on PFOS toxicokinetics in carp (Cyprinus carpio), and in vitro digestion behaviors were examined. The results indicated that PFOS could be strongly adsorbed on GO with a Freundlich affinity coefficient K F of 580 ± 205 (mg/g)/(mg/L) n , while the adsorption was suppressed by FA due to competitive adsorption. GO significantly enhanced the bioaccumulation of PFOS in blood, kidney, liver, gill, intestine, and muscle of carp, and the corresponding bioaccumulation factor (BAF) was in the range of 2026-53513 L/kg. The enhancement was greatest for liver and intestine, which was 10.3 and 9.33 times of that without GO, respectively. In vivo toxicokinetic and in vitro digestion-absorption experiments indicated that GO could carry PFOS to penetrate the intestine cells. There herein, PFOS absorption, especially via intestine, and the uptake rate coefficient (k u ) were greatly enhanced, leading to distinctly promoted bioaccumulation of PFOS in fish. However, FA could facilitate the flocculation of GO in the intestine and also accelerate excretion of GO-PFOS complex. Thus, in the presence of FA, PFOS absorption was reduced and the promotion effect of GO on PFOS accumulation was remitted.

  3. Transfer of Ni, Cr, Zn, Cu and 99mTc to plant biomass of Raphanus sativus L. Role of 125I-fulvic acid and the influence of different treatments on urban soil in Havana

    Santana Romero, Jorge Luis; Diaz Velazquez, Alberto; Garcia Cespedes, Damaris; Lima Cazorla, Lazaro; Saborit Sanchez, Israel; Olivares Rieumont, Susana; Rivas, Edgar; Manduca, Michel

    2011-01-01

    The importance of studying the transfer of heavy metals from soil to plant biomass is a current scientific topic. The global economic changes have caused accelerated environmental degradation processes in urban soils, in which important amount of agricultural production is obtained. The application of 'ecological' techniques on these soils, including the use of vermicompost, is be-coming more and more extensive and common. The question is: Is always safe and pertinent to apply vermicompost to urban soils?. Hence the importance of studying the heavy metal mobility and bioavailability to plant biomass in these conditions. In the present work, using different analytical techniques, a sample of Havana urban soil is characterized by determination of ph, electrical conductivity, organic material content and the total and EDTA extractable Ni, Cr, Zn and Cu levels. Fulvic acid was extracted from vermicompost and chemically characterized as well as its ability to chelate metals. The conditional stability constant, K of the fulvic acid-copper complex at different ph values was determined (log K cond = 7.39) using size-exclusion chromatography method. The Ni, Cr, Zn and Cu transfer study was conducted using biomass of Raphanus sativus L. The result shows significative statistical agreement with proposed experimental design 2 4-1 and allowed us to recognize the significant positive influence of factors such as the addition of Cu as possible pollutant in soil, ph, addition of fulvic acid and the time of addition of fulvic acid (vermicompost) at different physiological stages of plant development in increasing the bioavailability of Cu into plant biomass studied. The application of radiochemical methods with the use of fulvic acid labeled with 99mTc and 125I respectively allowed to ratify the influence of the factors studied on the transfer of heavy metals into biomass in terms of urban soil. It was possible to determine that the fulvic acid acts as a heavy metals transporter in

  4. Biogeochemical processes of incorporation and transformation of 14C labelled fulvic acid, humic acid and simple organic molecules at the sediment-water interface (submarine canyon of the NW Mediterranean)

    Buscail, R.; Gadel, F.

    1987-01-01

    The input of organic compounds at the marine water-sediment interface was simulated by the injection of 14 C labelled raygrass fulvic and humic acids and glutamic acid in the overlying water of three identically preserved interfaces. After incubations of 6 days under in situ conditions (13 0 C, oxidizing conditions), separation of the resulting products are carried out by successive chemical extractions. They correspond to the relative importance of biological (respiration, assimilation) and geochemical (condensation in geopolymers and adsorption) processes. Two experiments have showed predominance of biological processes (with 14 C fulvic and glutamic acids), while in the case of 14 C humic acid, incorporation in sediment and geochemical processes are more important. (Auth.)

  5. Contribution of bacterial cell nitrogen to soil humic fractions

    Knowles, R.; Barro, L.

    1981-01-01

    Living cells of Serratia marcescens, uniformly labelled with 15 N, were added to samples of maple (Acer saccharum) and black spruce (Picea mariana) forest soils. After different periods of incubation from zero time to 100 days, the soils were subjected to alkali-acid and phenol extraction to provide humic acid, fulvic acid, humin and 'humoprotein' fractions. Significant amounts of the cell nitrogen were recovered in the humic and fulvic acids immediately after addition. After incubation, less cell nitrogen appeared in the humic acid and more in the fulvic acid. The amount of cell nitrogen recovered in the humin fraction increased with incubation. Roughly 5 to 10 per cent of the added cell nitrogen was found as amino acid nitrogen from humoprotein in a phenol extract of the humic acid. The data are consistent with the occurrence of co-precipitation of biologically labile biomass nitrogen compounds with humic polymers during the alkaline extraction procedure involved in the humic-fulvic fractionation. (orig.)

  6. Synthesis of Fulvic Acid-Coated Magnetite (Fe3O4–FA and Its Application for the Reductive Adsorption of [AuCl4]–

    Philip Anggo Krisbiantoro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fulvic acid-coated magnetite (Fe3O4–FA has been synthesized through coprecipitation method using NH4OH. Synthesis conducted by cheap and environmentally friendly preparation used iron salts and extracted fulvic acid (FA from Peat soil of Rawa Pening, Central Java, Indonesia. Characterization using FT–IR indicated that the coating of FA on Fe3O4 occurred through the formation of chemical bond between iron of Fe3O4 and carboxyl group of FA. The XRD measurement indicated that coated Fe3O4 successfully dispersed in smaller size than uncoated Fe3O4, i.e. from 16.67 to 14.84 nm for Fe3O4 and Fe3O4–FA, respectively. Synthesized Fe3O4–FA has pHPZC 6.37 and stable at pH > 3.0. The extracted FA has total acidity 866.61 cmol kg–1, –COOH content 229.77 cmol kg–1 and –OH content 636.84 cmol kg–1. Fe3O4–FA has total acidity 494.86 cmol kg–1, –COOH content 67.80 cmol kg–1 and –OH content 427.06 cmol kg–1. The adsorption rate constant (k of [AuCl4]– on Fe3O4–A according to the Ho kinetic model was 8006.53 g mol–1 min–1. The adsorption capacity (qmax according to Langmuir isotherm model was 1.24 × 10–4 mol g–1. The presence of reduction towards the adsorbed [AuCl4]– was shown by the appearance of peaks at 2θ: 37.41; 43.66; 64.25, and 76.67° in the XRD diffractogram.

  7. Randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid in topical treatment of eczema

    Gandy JJ

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Justin J Gandy, Jacques R Snyman, Constance EJ van RensburgDepartment of Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, South AfricaBackground: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbohydrate-derived fulvic acid (CHD-FA in the treatment of eczema in patients two years and older.Methods: In this single-center, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group comparative study, 36 volunteers with predetermined eczema were randomly assigned to receive either the study drug or placebo twice daily for four weeks.Results: All safety parameters remained within normal limits, with no significant differences in either group. Significant differences were observed for both severity and erythema in the placebo and CHD-FA treated groups, and a significant difference was observed for scaling in the placebo-treated group. With regard to the investigator assessment of global response to treatment, a significant improvement was observed in the CHD-FA group when compared with the placebo group. A statistically significant decrease in visual analog scale score was observed in both groups, when comparing the baseline with the final results.Conclusion: CHD-FA was well tolerated, with no difference in reported side effects other than a short-lived burning sensation on application. CHD-FA significantly improved some aspects of eczema. Investigator assessment of global response to treatment with CHD-FA was significantly better than that with emollient therapy alone. The results of this small exploratory study suggest that CHD-FA warrants further investigation in the treatment of eczema.Keywords: fulvic acid, eczema, anti-inflammatory, efficacy, safety

  8. Acid-base and copper-binding properties of three organic matter fractions isolated from a forest floor soil solution

    van Schaik, Joris W. J.; Kleja, Dan B.; Gustafsson, Jon Petter

    2010-02-01

    Vast amounts of knowledge about the proton- and metal-binding properties of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in natural waters have been obtained in studies on isolated humic and fulvic (hydrophobic) acids. Although macromolecular hydrophilic acids normally make up about one-third of DOM, their proton- and metal-binding properties are poorly known. Here, we investigated the acid-base and Cu-binding properties of the hydrophobic (fulvic) acid fraction and two hydrophilic fractions isolated from a soil solution. Proton titrations revealed a higher total charge for the hydrophilic acid fractions than for the hydrophobic acid fraction. The most hydrophilic fraction appeared to be dominated by weak acid sites, as evidenced by increased slope of the curve of surface charge versus pH at pH values above 6. The titration curves were poorly predicted by both Stockholm Humic Model (SHM) and NICA-Donnan model calculations using generic parameter values, but could be modelled accurately after optimisation of the proton-binding parameters (pH ⩽ 9). Cu-binding isotherms for the three fractions were determined at pH values of 4, 6 and 9. With the optimised proton-binding parameters, the SHM model predictions for Cu binding improved, whereas the NICA-Donnan predictions deteriorated. After optimisation of Cu-binding parameters, both models described the experimental data satisfactorily. Iron(III) and aluminium competed strongly with Cu for binding sites at both pH 4 and pH 6. The SHM model predicted this competition reasonably well, but the NICA-Donnan model underestimated the effects significantly at pH 6. Overall, the Cu-binding behaviour of the two hydrophilic acid fractions was very similar to that of the hydrophobic acid fraction, despite the differences observed in proton-binding characteristics. These results show that for modelling purposes, it is essential to include the hydrophilic acid fraction in the pool of 'active' humic substances.

  9. Investigations of the uptake of transuranic radionuclides by humic and fulvic acids chemically immobilized on silica gel and their competitive release by complexing agents

    Bulman, R.A.; Szabo, G.; Clayton, R.F.; Clayton, C.R.

    1998-01-01

    The chemistry of the interactions of transuranic elements (TUs) with humic substances needs to be understood so that humate-mediated movement of transuranic radionuclides through the environment can be predicted. This paper reports the chemical immobilization on silica gel of humic and fulvic acids and evaluates the potential of these new materials for the retention of Pu and Am. In addition to the preparation of the foregoing immobilized humic substances, other low molecular weight metal-binding ligands have also been immobilized on silica gel to investigate the binding sites for transuranic elements (TUs) in humic substances. The X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) of Th(IV) complexed by humic acid and the immobilized humic acid are similar thus it appears that immobilization of humic acid does not generate any configurational changes in the Th(IV)-binding sites of the macromolecule. A variety of chelating agents partly mobilize these TUs sorbed on the solid phases. A batch method was used to determine the distribution coefficients (R d ) of Pu and Am between the silica gels and aqueous solutions of phosphate and citrate. The effects of the immobilized ligands, the anions and pH in the solution on sorption were assessed. Distributed coefficients (R d ) for the uptake of Pu and Am by these prepared solid phases are, in some cases, of a similar order of magnitude as those determined for soil and particles suspended in terrestrial surface waters

  10. Characterization of Nanoparticles and Colloids in Aquatic Systems 1. Small Angle Neutron Scattering Investigations of Suwannee River Fulvic Acid Aggregates in Aqueous Solutions

    Diallo, Mamadou S.; Glinka, Charles J.; Goddard, William A.; Johnson, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Fulvic acids (FA) and humic acids (HA) constitute 30-50% of dissolved organic matter in natural aquatic systems. In aqueous solutions, a commonly accepted view is that FA and HA exist as soluble macroligands at low concentration and as supramolecular aggregates at higher concentration. The size, shape and structure of these aggregates are still the subject of ongoing debate in the environmental chemistry literature. In this article, we use small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to assess the effects of solute concentration, solution pH and background electrolyte (NaCl) concentration on the structures of Suwannee River FA (SRFA) aggregates in D 2 O. The qualitative features of the SANS curves and data analysis are not consistent with the view point that SRFA forms micelle-like aggregates as its concentration in aqueous solution increases. We find that SRFA forms fractal aggregates in D 2 0 with size greater than 242 nm. The SRFA aggregates undergo a significant degree of restructuring in compactness as solution pH, solute concentration and NaCl concentration increase

  11. The influence of a fulvic acid on the adsorption of europium and strontium by alumina and quartz: effects of pH and ionic strength

    Norden, M.; Ephraim, J.H.; Allard, B.

    1994-01-01

    A batch method has been employed to study the adsorption of trace quantities of Eu and Sr on α-Al 2 O 3 and SiO 2 as a function of pH (3-9), ionic strength (0.10 and 0.01 M NaClO 4 ) and the presence of a well-characterized aquatic fulvic acid (FA). A comparison of Eu and Sr adsorption by alumina showed that FA could both reduce and enhance metal ion adsorption. In the absence of FA the adsorption of the metal ions onto alumina was a function of both pH and ionic strength. In the presence of FA the ionic strength effect on the Eu adsorption vanished, while the Sr adsorption showed a clear dependence on ionic strength. The adsorption of Eu and Sr on quartz was lower than the adsorption of the metals on alumina. Additionally, the adsorption of Eu and Sr on quartz was apparently lower than the adsorption on alumina in the presence of Fa. For both metal ions the adsorption on quartz was higher at 0.10 M than at 0.01 M NaClO 4 - an observation that was reversed in the case of alumina. Increasing concentrations of FA lowered the pH at which Eu adsorption on alumina would be reduced. (orig.)

  12. Examination of soil contaminated by coal-liquids by size exclusion chromatography in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone solution to evaluate interference from humic and fulvic acids and extracts from peat.

    Morgan, T J; Herod, A A; Brain, S A; Chambers, F M; Kandiyoti, R

    2005-11-18

    Soil from a redundant coke oven site has been examined by extraction of soluble materials using 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidinone (NMP) followed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) of the extracted material. The extracted material was found to closely resemble a high temperature coal tar pitch. Standard humic and fulvic acids were also examined since these materials are very soluble in NMP and would be extracted with pitch if present in the soil. Humic substances derived from peat samples and NMP-extracts of peats were also examined. The results show that the humic and fulvic substances were not extracted directly by NMP from peats. They were extracted using caustic soda solution and were different from the peat extracts in NMP. These results indicate that humic and fulvic acids were soluble in NMP in the protonated polyelectrolyte form but not in the original native polyelectrolyte form. The extraction of soil using NMP followed by SEC appears to be a promising method for identifying contamination by coal-based industries.

  13. Assessing the Effects of Soil Humic and Fulvic Acids on Germination and Early Growth of Native and Introduced Grass Varieties

    Senesi, Nicola

    2007-01-01

    The presence of humic acid (HA) generally affects positively and at various extent the germination and early growth of all varieties examined but in some cases negative effects are measured on the early growth...

  14. Use of the ion exchange method for the determination of stability constants of trivalent metal complexes with humic and fulvic acids II. Tb3+, Yb3+ and Gd3+ complexes in weakly alkaline conditions

    Dong Wenming; Li Weijuan; Tao Zuyi

    2002-01-01

    The conditional stability constants for tracer concentrations of Tb(III), Yb(III), and Gd(III) with three soil humic acids, three soil fulvic acids and a fulvic acid from weathered coal were determined at pH 9.0-9.1 (these values are similar to those in calcareous soils) in the presence of NaHCO 3 by using the anion exchange method. It was found that 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes were simultaneously formed in the weakly alkaline conditions. The conditional stability constants of these 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes were calculated from the distribution coefficients of rare earth elements at various concentrations of humate or fulvate. The stability constants indicate the very high stability of trivalent Tb 3+ , Yb 3+ and Gd 3+ complexes with humic substances in weakly alkaline conditions. The key parameters necessary for the experimental determination of the conditional stability constants of metal ions with humic substances in the presence of NaHCO 3 by using an anion exchange method were discussed. The conditional stability constants of these 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes were compared in this paper. It was found that stabilities of Tb 3+ 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes with humic acid are greater than the corresponding ones with fulvic acid from the same soil. In addition, the effect of the presence of Ca 2+ as a competitor on the stabilities of 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 complexes of Yb was examined and no pronounced change of stabilities of 1 : 1 complex was found, even though Ca 2+ is in a 10 3 excess to Yb 3+

  15. Comparative study on sorption/desorption of radioeuropium on alumina, bentonite and red earth: effects of pH, ionic strength, fulvic acid, and iron oxides in red earth

    Dong Wenming; Wang Xiangke; Bian Xiaoyan; Wang Aixia; Du Jingzhou; Tao, Z.Y.

    2001-01-01

    The sorption and desorption of Eu(III) as a representative of trivalent lanthanides and actinides on bentonite, alumina, red earth and red earth treated to remove free iron oxides were comparatively investigated by using batch technique and radiotracer 152+154 Eu. The effects of pH, ionic strength, fulvic acid, iron oxides in red earth and the sorption mechanism were also discussed. As compared to alumina and red earth, Eu(III) presents a considerable distribution coefficient (K d ) onto bentonite. It was found that the pH and the presence of clay minerals are the main factors dominating the sorption/desorption characteristic of Eu 3+ in the soil, and that a sorption-desorption hysteresis on bentonite and red earth actually occurs. Furthermore, the main sorption mechanism of lanthanides onto bentonite, alumina and red earth is the formation of bridged hydroxo complexes with the surface, and there are negative effects of fulvic acid and free iron oxides in red earth on the sorption of Eu(III). The results of this paper indicate that the additivity rule on the sorption characteristic of a soil from the individual component's characteristics is not general

  16. H-binding of size- and polarity-fractionated soil and lignite humic acids after removal of metal and ash components

    Drosos, Marios; Leenheer, Jerry A.; Avgeropoulos, Apostolos; Deligiannakis, Yiannis

    2014-01-01

    A fractionation technique, combining dialysis removal of metal and ash components with hydrofluoric acid and pH 10 citrate buffer followed by chromatography of dialysis permeate on XAD-8 resin at decreasing pH values, has been applied to lignite humic acid (lignite-HA) and soil humic acid (soil-HA). H-binding data and non ideal competitive adsorption-Donnan model parameters were obtained for the HA fractions by theoretical analysis of H-binding data which reveal a significant increase of the carboxyl and the phenolic charge for the lignite-HA fractions vs. the parental lignite humic acid (LParentalHA). The fractionated lignite-HA material consisted mainly of permeate fractions, some of which were fulvic acid-like. The fractionated soil-HA material consisted mainly of large macromolecular structures that did not permeate the dialysis membrane during deashing. Chargeable groups had comparable concentrations in soil-HA fractions and parental soil humic acid (SParentalHA), indicating minimal interference of ash components with carboxyl and phenolic (and/or enolic) groups. Fractionation of HA, combined with theoretical analysis of H-binding, can distinguish the supramolecular vs. macromolecular nature of fractions within the same parental HA.

  17. Isolation and fractionation of soil humin using alkaline urea and dimethylsulphoxide plus sulphuric acid

    Song, Guixue; Hayes, Michael H. B.; Novotny, Etelvino H.; Simpson, Andre J.

    2011-01-01

    Humin, the most recalcitrant and abundant organic fraction of soils and of sediments, is a significant contributor to the stable carbon pool in soils and is important for the global carbon budget. It has significant resistance to transformations by microorganisms. Based on the classical operational definition, humin can include any humic-type substance that is not soluble in water at any pH. We demonstrate in this study how sequential exhaustive extractions with 0.1 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) + 6 M urea, followed by dimethylsulphoxide (DMSO) + 6% ( v/ v) sulphuric acid (H2SO4) solvent systems, can extract 70-80% of the residual materials remaining after prior exhaustive extractions in neutral and aqueous basic media. Solid-state 13C NMR spectra have shown that the components isolated in the base + urea system were compositionally similar to the humic and fulvic acid fractions isolated at pH 12.6 in the aqueous media. The NMR spectra indicated that the major components isolated in the DMSO + H2SO4 medium had aliphatic hydrocarbon associated with carboxyl functionalities and with lesser amounts of carbohydrate and peptide and minor amounts of lignin-derived components. The major components will have significant contributions from long-chain fatty acids, waxes, to cuticular materials. The isolates in the DMSO + H2SO4 medium were compositionally similar to the organic components that resisted solvation and remained associated with the soil clays. It is concluded that the base + urea system released humic and fulvic acids held by hydrogen bonding or by entrapment within the humin matrix. The recalcitrant humin materials extracted in DMSO + H2SO4 are largely biological molecules (from plants and the soil microbial population) that are likely to be protected from degradation by their hydrophobic moieties and by sorption on the soil clays. Thus, the major components of humin do not satisfy the classical definitions for humic substances which emphasise that these arise from

  18. Copper isotope fractionation in acid mine drainage

    Kimball, B.E.; Mathur, R.; Dohnalkova, A.C.; Wall, A.J.; Runkel, R.L.; Brantley, S.L.

    2009-01-01

    We measured the Cu isotopic composition of primary minerals and stream water affected by acid mine drainage in a mineralized watershed (Colorado, USA). The ??65Cu values (based on 65Cu/63Cu) of enargite (??65Cu = -0.01 ?? 0.10???; 2??) and chalcopyrite (??65Cu = 0.16 ?? 0.10???) are within the range of reported values for terrestrial primary Cu sulfides (-1??? waters (1.38??? ??? ??65Cu ??? 1.69???). The average isotopic fractionation (??aq-min = ??65Cuaq - ??65Cumin, where the latter is measured on mineral samples from the field system), equals 1.43 ?? 0.14??? and 1.60 ?? 0.14??? for chalcopyrite and enargite, respectively. To interpret this field survey, we leached chalcopyrite and enargite in batch experiments and found that, as in the field, the leachate is enriched in 65Cu relative to chalcopyrite (1.37 ?? 0.14???) and enargite (0.98 ?? 0.14???) when microorganisms are absent. Leaching of minerals in the presence of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans results in smaller average fractionation in the opposite direction for chalcopyrite (??aq-mino = - 0.57 ?? 0.14 ???, where mino refers to the starting mineral) and no apparent fractionation for enargite (??aq-mino = 0.14 ?? 0.14 ???). Abiotic fractionation is attributed to preferential oxidation of 65Cu+ at the interface of the isotopically homogeneous mineral and the surface oxidized layer, followed by solubilization. When microorganisms are present, the abiotic fractionation is most likely not seen due to preferential association of 65Cuaq with A. ferrooxidans cells and related precipitates. In the biotic experiments, Cu was observed under TEM to occur in precipitates around bacteria and in intracellular polyphosphate granules. Thus, the values of ??65Cu in the field and laboratory systems are presumably determined by the balance of Cu released abiotically and Cu that interacts with cells and related precipitates. Such isotopic signatures resulting from Cu sulfide dissolution should be useful for acid mine drainage

  19. Studying of distribution of 137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu, 241Am and 244Cm according to the organic acids fractions of the alienation zone soils

    Odintsov, A.A.; Sazhenyuk, A.D.

    2004-01-01

    The paper deals with data of research on the distribution of the radionuclides 137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu, 241Am and 244Cm of ''the Chornobyl rains'' by the fractions of the organic matters of derno-podzolic sandy, derno-meadow and peat soils sampled in the alienation zone of the Chornobyl NPP. Functioning of organic matters was carried according to Tyurin's method. It is stressed that, independently on soil type, 137Cs is connected with the mineral contituent by 80-95%. It is found out that, independently on the soil type, 50-70% 137Sr and 15-45% 241Am are associated with fulvic acid fractions. The 241Am and 244Cm distribution according to organic acids taking into account deviations while carrying out determinations is unambiguous. It is found out that in all the soils tested the main quality of 239+24Pu is connected with humic acids

  20. Interference effects from coexisting fatty acids on elaidic acid separation by fractionating crystallization: A model study

    Jala, Ram Chandra Reddy; Guo, Zheng; Bjerring, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A multi-stage temperature-programmed fractionating crystallization process was carried out to examine the effects of the presence of stearic acid (SA), oleic acid (OA), and linoleic acid (LA) on the separation of elaidic acid (EA). The results showed that the efficiency of fractionating...

  1. Isotope-geochemical studies on fractions of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) for determining the origin and evolution of DOC for purposes of groundwater dating

    Geyer, S.

    1994-01-01

    The laboratory work consisted in developing and testing methods of extraction and enrichment of individual high-purity DOC fractions (fulvic acids, humic acids, and low-molecular substances) with the aim of preparing large quantities of groundwaters (> 1000 l) with low DOC concentrations so as to obtain sufficient sampling material. Chemical characterisation of DOC consisted in an analysis of humic and fulvic acids with regard to element composition (C, H, N, O, S) and inorganic trace elements. Isotopic characterization of the DOC fractions consisted in determining 14 C, 13 C, and 2 H levels. For the first time δ 34 S and δ 15 N relations in humic and fulvic acids dissolved in groundwater were determined. (orig./DG) [de

  2. Size-Controlled TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals with exposed {001} and {101} facets strongly linking to graphene oxide via p-Phenylenediamine for efficient photocatalytic degradation of fulvic acids

    Yan, Wen-Yuan; Zhou, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Chen, Xing, E-mail: xingchen@iim.ac.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yang, Yong [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure,Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Zhang, Yong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Huang, Xing-Jiu [Laboratory of Nanomaterials and Environmental Detection, Institute of Intelligent Machines, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Yu-Cheng, E-mail: ycwu@hfut.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Anhui Key Laboratory of Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • N-RGO/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were prepared via one-step hydrothermal method. • Facets of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were modulated with addition of HF. • Sizes of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were controlled by the contents of RGO-NH{sub 2.} • Obtained N-RGO/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites exhibited excellent photocatalytic activity and stability. - Abstract: Photocatalytic degradation is one of the most promising methods for removal of fulvic acids (FA), which is a typical category of natural organic contamination in groundwater. In this paper, TiO{sub 2}/graphene nanocomposites (N-RGO/TiO{sub 2}) were prepared via simple chemical functionalization and one-step hydrothermal method for efficient photodegradation of FA under illumination of a xenon lamp as light source. Here, p-phenylenediamine was used as not only the linkage chemical agent between TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals and graphene, but also the nitrogen dopant for TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals and graphene. During the hydrothermal process, facets of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were modulated with addition of HF, and sizes of TiO{sub 2} nanocrystals were controlled by the contents of graphene oxide functionalized with p-phenylenediamine (RGO-NH{sub 2}). The obtained N-RGO/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites exhibited a much higher photocatalytic activity and stability for degradation of methyl blue (MB) and FA compared with other TiO{sub 2} samples under xenon lamp irradiation. For the third cycle, the 10wt%N-RGO/TiO{sub 2} catalyst maintains high photoactivity (87%) for the degradation of FA, which is much better than the TiO{sub 2}-N/F (61%) in 3 h. This approach supplies a new strategy to design and synthesize metal oxide and graphene oxide nanocomposites with highly efficient photocatalytic performance.

  3. Acid fractionation for low level liquid waste cleanup and recycle

    Gombert, D. II; McIntyre, C.V.; Mizia, R.E.; Schindler, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    At the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant, low level liquid wastes containing small amounts of radionuclides are concentrated via a thermosyphon evaporator for calcination with high level waste, and the evaporator condensates are discharged with other plant wastewater to a percolation pond. Although all existing discharge guidelines are currently met, work has been done to reduce all waste water discharges to an absolute minimum. In this regard, a 15-tray acid fractionation column will be used to distill the mildly acidic evaporator condensates into concentrated nitric acid for recycle in the plant. The innocuous overheads from the fractionator having a pH greater than 2, are superheated and HEPA filtered for atmospheric discharge. Nonvolatile radionuclides are below detection limits. Recycle of the acid not only displaces fresh reagent, but reduces nitrate burden to the environment, and completely eliminates routine discharge of low level liquid wastes to the environment

  4. Fatty acid content and lipid fractions in herbs

    Petersen, Majbritt Bonefeld; Søegaard, Karen; Jensen, Søren Krogh

    2012-01-01

    Experiments have shown a higher transfer efficiency of n-3 and n-6 fatty acids (FA) to milk when feeding herbs compared to feeding grass-clover. With the aim to gain more knowledge for this, the FA profile of ten single plant species and the incorporation of FA in lipid fractions were analysed...

  5. The incorporation of labelled amino acids into the subcellular fractions of the rabbit brain

    Ogrodnik, W.

    1980-01-01

    Radioactive amino acids were injected into the fourth ventriculum of adult rabbits. After 3, 6 and 13 hours the animals were killed and tissue subcellular fractions were prepared from their brains. Nucleic acids were extracted and quantitatively determined from nucleic, myelin, mitochondrial, microsomal and cytoplasmic fractions. The radioactivity was determined in the protein and nucleic acid fractions. It was found out that the incorporation of radioactive amino acids increased in relation to time. In the analyzed subcellular fractions a very rapid incorporation of glutamic acid and leucine into cytoplasmic proteins was observed. The chromatographic analysis of the nucleic acids showed that radioactivity in the nucleic acid fractions depended on a radioactive protein contamination. Radioactive aminoacyl-tRNA was not found in the nucleic acid fractions, extracted from different subcellular fractions. (author)

  6. Comparative study of humic and fulvic substances in groundwaters. Pt. 3

    Higgo, J.J.W.; Davis, J.; Smith, B.

    1992-01-01

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of three different groundwaters. After purification they were characterised in terms of proton-binding properties, molecular weight, UV spectra and trace impurities. Conditional stability constants were measured for fulvic and humic binding with cobalt, nickel, calcium and uranium. From these, intrinsic binding constants were calculated using Humic Ion-Binding Model V which was found to describe the dependence of binding strength on pH and ionic strength reasonably well. Species distributions in the groundwaters were calculated and the effects of competition with alkali earths are discussed. All the experimental data are reported in a separate volume (Appendix A and B) so that they are available for testing other models. (author)

  7. Silicon Isotope Fractionation During Acid Water-Igneous Rock Interaction

    van den Boorn, S. H.; van Bergen, M. J.; Vroon, P. Z.

    2007-12-01

    Silica enrichment by metasomatic/hydrothermal alteration is a widespread phenomenon in crustal environments where acid fluids interact with silicate rocks. High-sulfidation epithermal ore deposits and acid-leached residues at hot-spring settings are among the best known examples. Acid alteration acting on basalts has also been invoked to explain the relatively high silica contents of the surface of Mars. We have analyzed basaltic-andesitic lavas from the Kawah Ijen volcanic complex (East Java, Indonesia) that were altered by interaction with highly acid (pH~1) sulfate-chloride water of its crater lake and seepage stream. Quantitative removal of major elements during this interaction has led to relative increase in SiO2 contents. Our silicon isotope data, obtained by HR-MC-ICPMS and reported relative to the NIST RM8546 (=NBS28) standard, show a systematic increase in &δ&&30Si from -0.2‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for unaltered andesites and basalts to +1.5‰ (±0.3, 2sd) for the most altered/silicified rocks. These results demonstrate that silicification induced by pervasive acid alteration is accompanied by significant Si isotope fractionation, so that alterered products become isotopically heavier than the precursor rocks. Despite the observed enrichment in SiO2, the rocks have experienced an overall net loss of silicon upon alteration, if Nb is considered as perfectly immobile. The observed &δ&&30Si values of the alteration products appeared to correlate well with the inferred amounts of silicon loss. These findings would suggest that &28Si is preferentially leached during water-rock interaction, implying that dissolved silica in the ambient lake and stream water is isotopically light. However, layered opaline lake sediments, that are believed to represent precipitates from the silica-saturated water show a conspicuous &30Si-enrichment (+1.2 ± 0.2‰). Because anorganic precipitation is known to discriminate against the heavy isotope (e.g. Basile- Doelsch et al., 2006

  8. Fractionation of 137Cs and Pu in natural peatland

    Mihalík, Ján; Bartusková, Miluše; Hölgye, Zoltán; Ježková, Tereza; Henych, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    High Cs-137 concentrations in plants growing on peatland inspired us to investigate the quantity of its bioavailable fraction in natural peat. Our investigation aims to: a) estimate the quantity of bioavailable Cs-137 and Pu present in peat, b) verify the similarity of Cs-137 and K-40 behaviours, and c) perform a quantification of Cs-137 and Pu transfer from peat to plants. We analysed the vertical distribution of Cs-137 and Pu isotopes in the peat and their concentrations in plants growing on these places. Bioavailability of radionuclides was investigated by sequential extraction. Sequential analyses revealed that it was the upper layer which contained the majority of Cs-137 in an available form while deeper layers retained Cs-137 in immobile fractions. We can conclude that 18% of all Cs-137 in the peat is still bioavailable. Despite of the low quantity of bioavailable fraction of Cs-137 its transfer factor reached extremely high values. In the case of Pu, 64% of its total amount was associated with fulvic/humic acids which resulted in the high transfer factor from peat to plants. 27 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the significant part of radionuclides deposited in peatland is still bioavailable. - Highlights: • Decrease of exchangeable 137 Cs and its increase in residual fraction with depth. • High 137 Cs transfer factor contrary to its low quantity in bioavailable fractions. • Fulvic/humic acids are a more effective carrier for Pu than for Cs

  9. Occurrence of pesticide non extractable residues in physical and chemical fractions from two natural soils.

    Andreou, K.; Jones, K.; Semple, K.

    2009-04-01

    Distribution of pesticide non extractable residues resulted from the incubation of two natural soils with each of the isoproturon, diazinon and cypermethrin pesticide was assessed in this study. Pesticide non extractable residues distribution in soil physical and chemical fractions is known to ultimately affect their fate. This study aimed to address the fate and behaviour of the non extractable residues in the context of their association with soil physical and chemical fractions with varying properties and characteristics. Non extractable residues were formed from incubation of each pesticide in the two natural soils over a period of 24 months. Soils containing the non extractable residues were fractionated into three solid phase fractions using a physical fractionation procedure as follows: Sediment (SED, >20 μm), (II) Microaggregate (MA, 20-2 μm) and (III) Colloid phase (COL, 2-0.05 μm). Each soil fraction was then fractionated into organic carbon chemical fractionations as follows: Fulvic acid (FA), Humic acid (HA) and Humin (HM). Significant amount of the pesticides was lost during the incubation period. Enrichment factors for the organic carbon and the 14C-pesticide residues were higher in the MA and COL fraction rather than the SED fraction. Greater association and enrichment of the fulvic acid fraction of the organic carbon in the soil was observed. Non extractable residues at the FA fraction showed to diminish while in the HA fraction were increased with decreasing the fraction size. An appreciable amount of non extractable residues were located in the HM fraction but this was less than the amount recovered in the humic substances. Long term fate of pesticide non extractable residues in the soil structural components is important in order to assess any risk associated with them.

  10. Concentration and fractionation of hydrophobic organic acid constituents from natural waters by liquid chromatography

    Thurman, E.M.; Malcolm, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A scheme is presented which used adsorption chromatography with pH gradient elution and size-exclusion chromatography to concentrate and separate hydrophobic organic acids from water. A review of chromatographic processes involved in the flow scheme is also presented. Organic analytes which appear in each aqueous fraction are quantified by dissolved organic carbon analysis. Hydrophobic organic acids in a water sample are concentrated on a porous acrylic resin. These acids usually constitute approximately 30-50 percent of the dissolved organic carbon in an unpolluted water sample and are eluted with an aqueous eluent (dilute base). The concentrate is then passed through a column of polyacryloylmorpholine gel, which separates the acids into high- and low-molecular-weight fractions. The high- and low-molecular-weight eluates are reconcentrated by adsorption chromatography, then are eluted with a pH gradient into strong acids (predominately carboxylic acids) and weak acids (predominately phenolic compounds). For standard compounds and samples of unpolluted waters, the scheme fractionates humic substances into strong and weak acid fractions that are separated from the low molecular weight acids. A new method utilizing conductivity is also presented to estimate the acidic components in the methanol fraction.

  11. Comparison of aqueous ammonia and dilute acid pretreatment of bamboo fractions: Structure properties and enzymatic hydrolysis.

    Xin, Donglin; Yang, Zhong; Liu, Feng; Xu, Xueru; Zhang, Junhua

    2015-01-01

    The effect of two pretreatments methods, aqueous ammonia (SAA) and dilute acid (DA), on the chemical compositions, cellulose crystallinity, morphologic change, and enzymatic hydrolysis of bamboo fractions (bamboo yellow, timber, green, and knot) was compared. Bamboo fractions with SAA pretreatment had better hydrolysability than those with DA pretreatment. High crystallinity index resulted in low hydrolysis yield in the conversion of SAA pretreated bamboo fractions, not DA pretreated fractions. The increase of cellulase loading had modestly positive effect in the hydrolysis of both SAA and DA pretreated bamboo fractions, while supplement of xylanase significantly increased the hydrolysis of the pretreated bamboo fractions, especially after SAA pretreatment. The results indicated that SAA pretreatment was more effective than DA pretreatment in conversion of bamboo fractions, and supplementation of xylanase was necessary in effective conversion of the SAA pretreated fractions into fermentable sugars. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of 137Cs, 90Sr, 239+240Pu, 241Am and 230,232Th on the fractions of natural organic species soils of ChNPP alienation zone

    Odintsov, A.A.; Sazhenyuk, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    The experimental data determination of distribution 137 Cs, 90 Sr, 239+240 Pu, 241 Am 'Chernobyl' releases and 230 , 232 Th on the fraction of humic and fulvic acids sandy- podsolic, meadow and peaty soils taken in the exclusive zone ChNPP are presents. Soils organic matter was isolated by conventional alkali extraction (Turin's method). It was shown that, with depending of soils types 15-45 % 241 Am associate with fulvic acids. In all investigated types of soils 30 - 40 % 239+240 Pu connects with humic acids, as strong complexes. The distribution of environmental 230 , 232 Th and artificial 239+240 Pu on the fraction natural organic species is the same

  13. Kinetic fractionation of stable nitrogen isotopes during amino acid transamination

    Macko, S.A.; Fogel Estep, M.L.; Engel, M.H.; Hare, P.E.

    1986-01-01

    This study evaluates a kinetic isotope effect involving 15 N, during the transamination reactions catalyzed by glutamic oxalacetic transaminase. During the transfer of amino nitrogen from glutamic acid to oxaloacetate to form aspartic acid, 14 NH 2 reacted 1.0083 times faster than 15 NH 2 . In the reverse reaction transferring NH 2 from aspartic acid to α-ketoglutarate, 14 NH 2 was incorporated 1.0017 times faster than 15 NH 2 . Knowledge of the magnitude and sign of these isotope effects will be useful in the interpretation of the distribution of 15 N in biological and geochemical systems. (author)

  14. fractionation of lead-acid battery soil amended with biochar 36

    USER

    Biochar has a high surface area, highly porous, variable – charge organic material that has the potential to ... Keywords: Biochar, Lead–acid Battery, Fractionation and Heavy metals. INTRODUCTION .... toxicity of heavy metal ions in the soils.

  15. Fractional and sequential recovery of inorganic contaminants from acid mine drainage using cryptocrystalline magnesite

    Masindi, Vhahangwele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the fractional and sequential recovery of inorganic contaminants from acid mine drainage (AMD) using cryptocrystalline magnesite. Batch experimental approach was used to fulfil the goals of this study. The obtained results...

  16. Effect of disintegration wave grinding on fractional protein and amino acid composition of chickpea

    G. O. Magomedov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of fractional changes and amino acid composition of proteins in the application of chickpea disintegration wave grinding. Comparative analysis of six varieties of chickpea before and after grinding.

  17. Effect of disintegration wave grinding on fractional protein and amino acid composition of chickpea

    G. O. Magomedov; M. K. Sadigova; S. I. Lukina; V. Y. Kustov

    2013-01-01

    The study of fractional changes and amino acid composition of proteins in the application of chickpea disintegration wave grinding. Comparative analysis of six varieties of chickpea before and after grinding.

  18. Distribution of Artificial Radioisotopes in Granulometric and Organic Fractions of Alluvial Soils Downstream the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine

    Korobova, Elena M.; Linnik, Vitaly G. [Vernadsky Institute of Geochemistry and Analytical Chemistry, 117991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Brown, Justin E. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority P.O. Box 55, N-1332 Oesteraas (Norway)

    2014-07-01

    A study of some artificial radionuclides discharged by the Krasnoyarsk Mining and Chemical Combine (KMCC) in different granulometric and organic fractions of alluvial soils was performed in the near and remote impact zones of the enterprise. Radionuclides were shown to concentrate in fine fractions enriched in hydro-mica and smectites. However in natural conditions the dominating size fraction associated with radionuclide accumulation at the study sites appeared to be made up of silt (0.010 mm) to clay (0.001 mm) sizes. Therefore due to radionuclide sorption and natural aggregation the peaks of a relatively high radionuclide mass accumulation were associated with three granulometric fractions: <0.001 mm, 0.063-0.010 mm and 0.25-0.125 mm. Soil granulometry was shown to reflect specificity of sedimentation at different landscape positions downstream from the KMCC. At the Balchug site a coarser fraction was accumulated close to the channel while finer fractions are deposited at a higher level. The portion of the clay fraction corresponded to the elevation level increasing from the river bank to the terrace. At the Mikhin Island the tendency was different. A coarser fraction was deposited on higher levels while the portion of clay fraction was at a minimum compared to the lower levels. To study the relationship between radionuclide activity concentrations and organic matter content, selected soil samples were subjected to extraction of the humic and fulvic acid fractions with a subsequent determination of radionuclides in the separated phases and the residue component. The air-dry sample was saturated with 0.1 M NaOH, humic acid was precipitated by 1 M HCl at pH=1. The separation resulted in three fractions of the fulvic acids, humic acids, and the residue containing the denuded mineral phase and the refractory organic residue. Radionuclides measured in the first fraction were believed to be the most mobile, those in the second fraction - subjected to the complexation

  19. Comparison of bolus versus fractionated oral applications of [13C]-linoleic acid in humans.

    Demmelmair, H; Iser, B; Rauh-Pfeiffer, A; Koletzko, B

    1999-07-01

    The endogenous conversion of linoleic acid into long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids is of potential importance for meeting substrate requirements, particularly in young infants. After application of [13C]-linoleic acid, we estimated its conversion to dihomo-gamma-linolenic and arachidonic acids from only two blood samples. Oral tracer doses were given to five healthy adults as a single bolus. In four subjects the tracer was given in nine equal portions over 3 days. Concentration and 13C content of fatty acids from serum phospholipids were analysed by gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio-mass spectrometry. Areas under the tracer-concentration curves were calculated, and fractional transfer and turnover rates estimated from compartmental models. The median fractional turnover of linoleic acid was 93.7% per day (interquartile range 25.3) in the bolus group and 80. 0% per day (6.3) in the fraction group (NS). Fractional conversion of linoleic to dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid was 1.5% (0.9) vs. 2.1% (0.7) (bolus vs. fraction, P /= 0.94, P < 0.05) with the ratio of areas under the curve. Using areas under the curve overestimates the conversion, because different residence times are not considered. Estimation of conversion intensity appears possible with only one blood sample obtained after tracer application.

  20. SOIL ORGANIC MATTER FRACTIONS IN PRESERVED AND DISTURBED WETLANDS OF THE CERRADO BIOME

    Ricardo Fernandes de Sousa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Veredas are humid tropical ecosystems, generally associated to hydromorphic soils and a shallow water table. The soils of these ecosystems are affected by the use of the areas around these veredas. The objective of this study was to determine soil organic matter (SOM fractions in veredas adjacent to preserved (native savanna and disturbed environments (agricultural areas and pastures in the Cerrado biome. Soil samples were collected from the 0-10 and 10-20 cm layers along reference lines drawn along the relief following the upper, middle and lower positions of one of the slopes, in the direction of the draining line of the vereda. The soil analysis determined: total soil OC, total nitrogen and C:N ratio; C and N contents and C:N ratio in particulate and mineral-associated fractions (of SOM; fulvic acids, humic acids and humin fractions and ratio between humic and fulvic acids. The agricultural use around the veredas induced changes in the SOM fractions, more pronounced in the lower part of the slope. In the soil surface of this part, the OC levels in the humic substances and the particulate fraction of SOM, as well as total soil OC were reduced in the vereda next to crop fields.

  1. Hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid-soluble and -insoluble fractions of pelagic sediment: Readsorption revisited

    Piper, D.Z.; Wandless, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The extraction of the rare earth elements (REE) from deep-ocean pelagic sediment, using hydroxylamine hydrochloride-acetic acid, leads to the separation of approximately 70% of the bulk REE content into the soluble fraction and 30% into the insoluble fraction. The REE pattern of the soluble fraction, i.e., the content of REE normalized to average shale on an element-by-element basis and plotted against atomic number, resembles the pattern for seawater, whereas the pattern, as well as the absolute concentrations, in the insoluble fraction resembles the North American shale composite. These results preclude significant readsorption of the REE by the insoluble phases during the leaching procedure.

  2. FRACTIONATION OF FATTY ACID OMEGA 3, 6 AND 9 FROM SNAIL (Achatina fulica USING COLOUM CHROMATOGRAPHY

    Winarto Haryadi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The extraction of fat from snail has been carried out by Soxhlet extractor with petroleum ether solvent. Fatty product from extraction was transesterificated in BF3/methanol solvent for an hour by reflux procedure, then extracted by n-hexane to produce methyl ester fatty acid. Free water fatty acid methyl ester was analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass spectrometer (GC-MS. Fatty acid ester was separated from its fractions use column chromatography in n-hexane, n-hexane:dietil eter (2:1 v/v, dietil eter, aseton, ethanol and methanol. This fractions wer also analized by GC-MS. From GC-MS data sheet can be obtained 5 fractions which details are; fraction 1 contains omega 3: 27.54 %, omega 6: 15.40 % and omega 9: 6.77 %. Fraction 2 contains omega 3: 3.08 %, omega 6: 15.62 % and omega 9: 10.72 %. Fraction 3 contains omega 6: 3.57 %, omega 9: 7.02 % and none omega 3 inside it. Omega 3, 6 and 9 can't be identification in fraction 4 and 5.   Keywords: extraction, transesterification, column chromatography, GC-MS

  3. Using soil organic matter fractions as indicators of soil physical quality

    Pulido Moncada, Mansonia A.; Lozano, Z; Delgado, M

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of chemical and physical fractions of soil organic matter (SOM), rather than SOM per se, as indicators of soil physical quality (SPQ) based on their effect on aggregate stability (AS). Chemically extracted humic and fulvic acids (HA and FA) were...... used as chemical fractions, and heavy and light fractions (HF and LF) obtained by density separation as physical fractions. The analyses were conducted on medium-textured soils from tropical and temperate regions under cropland and pasture. Results show that soil organic carbon (SOC), SOM fractions...... and AS appear to be affected by land use regardless of the origin of the soils. A general separation of structurally stable and unstable soils between samples of large and small SOC content, respectively, was observed. SOM fractions did not show a better relationship with AS than SOC per se. In both...

  4. Anti-tumour potential of a gallic acid-containing phenolic fraction from Oenothera biennis.

    Pellegrina, Chiara Dalla; Padovani, Giorgia; Mainente, Federica; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Bissoli, Gaetano; Mosconi, Silvia; Veneri, Gianluca; Peruffo, Angelo; Andrighetto, Giancarlo; Rizzi, Corrado; Chignola, Roberto

    2005-08-08

    A phenolic fraction purified form defatted seeds of Oenothera biennis promoted selective apoptosis of human and mouse bone marrow-derived cell lines following first-order kinetics through a caspase-dependent pathway. In non-leukemia tumour cell lines, such as human colon carcinoma CaCo(2) cells and mouse fibrosarcoma WEHI164 cells, this fraction inhibited (3)H-thymidine incorporation but not cell death or cell cycle arrest. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells showed low sensitivity to treatment. Single bolus injection of the phenolic fraction could delay the growth of established myeloma tumours in syngeneic animals. HPLC and mass spectrometry analysis revealed that the fraction contains gallic acid. However, the biological activity of the fraction differs from the activity of this phenol and hence it should be attributed to other co-purified molecules which remain still unidentified.

  5. Antihistaminic and antieicosanoid effects of oleanolic and ursolic acid fraction from Helichrysum picardii.

    Santos Rosa, C; García Gimenez, M D; Saenz Rodriguez, M T; De la Puerta Vazquez, R

    2007-06-01

    Helichrysum picardii Boiss. & Reuter is a Mediterranean vegetal species from the Asteraceae family. From the methanolic extract of the aerial flowering parts of this plant, a fraction of two pentacyclic triterpenes has been isolated. Gas chromatography revealed that the triterpene isomers ursolic and oleanolic acids comprised 69% and 29% respectively of the composition of this fraction. The triterpene isomeric fraction was tested in two phagocyte cell systems. It inhibited compound 48/80-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in an approximately percentage of 45% at 100 microM and myeloperoxidase secretion from A23187-ionophore-stimulated rat peritoneal leukocytes in a significant manner at doses of 50 and 100 miroM. Furthermore, the triterpene isomers very significantly and dose-dependently inhibited generation of the cyclo-oxygenase metabolite prostaglandin E2 (41% inhibition at 50 miroM) and the 5-lipoxygenase metabolite leukotriene B4 (79% inhibition at 50 microM) from activated rat leukocytes. This anti-eicosanoid activity of the triterpene fraction was more potent than that produced by the pure triterpene oleanolic acid used for comparision, indicating a stronger action of the ursolic acid, the major compound of the isolated triterpene fraction. From these data, it can be suggested that the triterpene isomers oleanolic and ursolic acids present in the medicinal plant Helichrysum picardii contribute to the anti-inflammatory profile of this vegetal species.

  6. Three-dimensional fluorescence analysis of chernozem humic acids and their electrophoretic fractions

    Trubetskoi, O. A.; Trubetskaya, O. E.

    2017-09-01

    Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with size-exclusion chromatography (SEC-PAGE) has been used to obtain stable electrophoretic fractions of different molecular size (MS) from chernozem humic acids (HAs). Three-dimensional fluorescence charts of chernozem HAs and their fractions have been obtained for the first time, and all fluorescence excitation-emission maxima have been identified in the excitation wavelength range of 250-500 nm. It has been found that fractionation by the SEC-PAGE method results in a nonuniform distribution of protein- and humin-like fluorescence of the original HA preparation among the electrophoretic fractions. The electrophoretic fractions of the highest and medium MSs have only the main protein-like fluorescence maximum and traces of humin-like fluorescence. In the electrophoretic fraction of the lowest MS, the intensity of protein-like fluorescence is low, but the major part of humin-like fluorescence is localized there. Relationships between the intensity of protein-like fluorescence and the weight distribution of amino acids have been revealed, as well as between the degree of aromaticity and the intensity of humin-like fluorescence in electrophoretic fractions of different MSs. The obtained relationships can be useful in the interpretation of the spatial structural organization and ecological functions of soil HAs.

  7. On the fractionation of natural radioactivity in the production of phosphoric acid by the wet acid method

    Bolivar, J.P.; Garcia-Tenorio, R.; Garcia-Leon, M.

    1996-01-01

    The fractionation of different natural radionuclides (U-isotopes, 226 Ra and 210 Po) in the process used for the production of phosphoric acid in some factories located in the south-west of Spain is analyzed. As a consequence, different ways of natural radionuclide liberation to the environment can be evaluated due to these industrial activities. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-01-01

    Background Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fa...

  9. Title: Effects of supplementing humic/fulvic acid on rumen ...

    Casey McMurphy

    Effects of supplementing humates on rumen fermentation in Holstein ... research on the utilization of humates in beef cattle diets and their effect on rumen fermentation. .... potassium chloride, 80 g/kg; magnesium oxide, 34.5 g/kg; ammonium ...

  10. Fulvic acid affects pepper antioxidant activity and fruit quality

    standard

    2012-08-23

    ); total soluble .... −1 sodium carbonate solution was added and the mixture was vortexed vigorously. The ..... fertilizer for their protein synthesis and growth .... laboratory (ESTL): Analytical procedures and training manual.

  11. Functional groups and reactivity of size-fractionated Aldrich humic acid

    Tanaka, Tadao, E-mail: tanaka.tadao26@jaea.go.jp [Nuclear Safety Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakata 2-4, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2012-03-20

    The complexation affinity of the Aldrich Chemicals humic acid with {sup 60}Co was examined with respect to molecular size of humic acid. Correlations between the affinity and the structures of humic acid were studied. At low humic acid concentration range, {sup 60}Co was interacted with the humic acid of size fraction over 100k Da (HA(100<)). With increasing humic acid concentration, the {sup 60}Co was preferentially interacted with the 30k-100k Da of humic acid (HA(30-100)). Fractionated HA(100<) and HA(30-100) were characterized from their FTIR (Fourier Transform Infra-Red), {sup 13}C NMR spectral analyses and acid-base titration curves. The HA(10<) having aliphatic branched structure, smaller amount of COOH group and large proton exchangeable capacity, seem to show low covalent bonding nature and high ion exchangeability in the complexation. In addition, steric hindrance may affect on the complexation, by winding up like random coils from the branched structure. The HA(30-100) is dominated with the aromatic COOH group and OH group and it may preferentially coordinate to {sup 60}Co by covalent binding. These presumptions were supported by XPS analysis, in which the biding energy of cobalt-humates was discussed.

  12. Fractionation, amino acid profiles, antimicrobial and free radical scavenging activities of Citrullus lanatus seed protein.

    Dash, Priyanka; Ghosh, Goutam

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, a modified Osborne fractionation method was followed to isolate albumin (C alb ), globulin (C glo ), prolamin (C pro ) and glutelin (C glu ) successively from seeds of Citrullus lanatus (watermelon). This research work was undertaken to investigate the antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of isolated protein fractions of C. lanatus seed. Amino acid composition and molecular weight distribution were determined to establish their relationship with antimicrobial and antioxidant activity. Among all the fractions, C pro was found to be most effective against A. baumannii followed by C alb and C glo . The results showed that growth of inhibition of these protein fractions differ significantly from each other (p ≤ 0.05). In view of antioxidant potential, C glo exhibited strongest antioxidant capacity while C glu showed weakest antioxidant potential.

  13. Fractionated dose cholecystography: a comparison between iopanoic acid and sodium ipodate

    Reiner, R.G.; Lawson, M.J.; Davies, G.T.; Tucker, W.G.; Mileski, O.; Read, T.R.; Grant, A.K. (Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide (Australia))

    1980-11-01

    Two randomised groups of 100 subjects each, undergoing oral cholecystography, were given either a 6 g fractionated dose of iopanoic acid (Telepaque) or sodium ipodate (Biloptin) to determine the relative merits of this dose schedule. Exclusions to the study were pregnancy and iodine sensitivity. Calculi or abnormal gall-bladder opacification were present in 45% of subjects. Both agents were equally effective in demonstrating abnormalities, although bile duct visualisation was better using iopanoic acid (P<0.05). Of 46 subjects with abnormal cholecystograms subsequently undergoing surgery, all had the diagnosis confirmed. Side effects occurred in 63% of all subjects, being twice as common in those taking iopanoic acid (P<0.01). Sodium ipodate in a large fractionated dose is favoured because of the lower occurrence of side effects without loss of diagnostic accuracy.

  14. Fractionated dose cholecystography: a comparison between iopanoic acid and sodium ipodate

    Reiner, R.G.; Lawson, M.J.; Davies, G.T.; Tucker, W.G.; Mileski, O.; Read, T.R.; Grant, A.K.

    1980-01-01

    Two randomised groups of 100 subjects each, undergoing oral cholecystography, were given either a 6 g fractionated dose of iopanoic acid (Telepaque) or sodium ipodate (Biloptin) to determine the relative merits of this dose schedule. Exclusions to the study were pregnancy and iodine sensitivity. Calculi or abnormal gall-bladder opacification were present in 45% of subjects. Both agents were equally effective in demonstrating abnormalities, although bile duct visualisation was better using iopanoic acid (P<0.05). Of 46 subjects with abnormal cholecystograms subsequently undergoing surgery, all had the diagnosis confirmed. Side effects occurred in 63% of all subjects, being twice as common in those taking iopanoic acid (P<0.01). Sodium ipodate in a large fractionated dose is favoured because of the lower occurrence of side effects without loss of diagnostic accuracy. (author)

  15. mobilization of iron from soil recalcitrant fractions by using mango

    User

    The percent organic matter analysis indicated that, the forest soil has the highest ... Fertilizers, natural or synthetic chemical .... acids, fulvic and low molecular weight ..... Chemistry of metal retention by soils,. Environ, sci Tech, 23: 1046-. 1056.

  16. Fractionation for further conversion: from raw corn stover to lactic acid

    Ting He; Zhicheng Jiang; Ping Wu; Jian Yi; Jianmei Li; Changwei Hu

    2016-01-01

    Fractionation is considered to be one promising strategy to utilize raw biomass to its fullest and produce chemicals with high selectivity. Herein, ethanol/H2O (1/1, v/v) co-solvent with 0.050?M oxalic acid is used to simultaneously fractionate 88.0?wt% of hemicellulose and 89.2?wt% of lignin in corn stover, while cellulose is not obviously degraded. H2O dissolves hemicellulose, G unit and those with ?-O-4 linkage of lignin; whereas ethanol extracts G and S units as well as the skeleton with ...

  17. Multivariate data analysis for finding the relevant fatty acids contributing to the melting fractions of cream

    Buldo, Patrizia; Larsen, Mette Krogh; Wiking, Lars

    2013-01-01

    :0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:1) in milk fat, whereas it decreased the amount of stearic acid (C18:0) and C18:1 trans fatty acid. Average data on the melting behaviour of cream separated the farms into two groups where the main differences in feeding were the amounts of maize silage and rapeseed cake used. CONCLUSION......BACKGROUND: The melting behaviour and fatty acid composition of cream from a total of 33 cows from four farms were analysed. Multivariate data analysis was used to identify the fatty acids that contributed most to the melting points and to differentiate between creams from different practical...... feeding regimes. RESULTS: It was demonstrated that the melting point of the medium melting fraction of milk fat was positively correlated with palmitic acid (C16:0), whereas it was negatively correlated with oleic acid (C18:1 cis9), conjugated linoleic acid (CLA cis9 trans11), vaccenic acid (C18:1 trans11...

  18. Two-stage acid saccharification of fractionated Gelidium amansii minimizing the sugar decomposition.

    Jeong, Tae Su; Kim, Young Soo; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2011-11-01

    Two-stage acid hydrolysis was conducted on easy reacting cellulose and resistant reacting cellulose of fractionated Gelidium amansii (f-GA). Acid hydrolysis of f-GA was performed at between 170 and 200 °C for a period of 0-5 min, and an acid concentration of 2-5% (w/v, H2SO4) to determine the optimal conditions for acid hydrolysis. In the first stage of the acid hydrolysis, an optimum glucose yield of 33.7% was obtained at a reaction temperature of 190 °C, an acid concentration of 3.0%, and a reaction time of 3 min. In the second stage, a glucose yield of 34.2%, on the basis the amount of residual cellulose from the f-GA, was obtained at a temperature of 190 °C, a sulfuric acid concentration of 4.0%, and a reaction time 3.7 min. Finally, 68.58% of the cellulose derived from f-GA was converted into glucose through two-stage acid saccharification under aforementioned conditions. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues of polycythemic rats during long-term fractionated irradiation

    Mushkacheva, G.S.; Murzina, L.D.

    1980-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of long-term fractionated exposure with a daily dose of 50 R on the nucleic acid metabolism in hemopoietic tissues (bone marrow and spleen) of rats with erythropoiesis selectively inhibited by posttransfusion polycythemia. The comparison of present and previously obtained results enables us to conclude that the pathways of changes in the nucleic acid metabolism, which is responsible for hemopoiesis compensation during long-term exposure, are, in the main, similar for both white and red compartments of hemopoiesis

  20. A structured understanding of cellobiohydrolase I binding to poplar lignin fractions after dilute acid pretreatment.

    Yao, Lan; Yoo, Chang Geun; Meng, Xianzhi; Li, Mi; Pu, Yunqiao; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Yang, Haitao

    2018-01-01

    Cellulase adsorption to lignin is considered a cost barrier for bioethanol production; however, its detailed association mechanism is still not fully understood. In this study, two natural poplar variants with high and low sugar release performance were selected as the low and high recalcitrant raw materials (named L and H , respectively). Three different lignin fractions were extracted using ethanol, followed by p -dioxane and then cellulase treatment from the dilute acid pretreated poplar solids (fraction 1, 2, and 3, respectively). Each lignin fraction had different physicochemical properties. Ethanol-extracted lignin had the lowest weight average molecular weight, while the molecular weights for the other two lignin fractions were similar. 31 P NMR analysis revealed that lignin fraction with higher molecular weight contained more aliphatic hydroxyl groups and less phenolic hydroxyl groups. Semi-quantitative analysis by 2D HSQC NMR indicated that the lignin fractions isolated from the natural variants had different contents of syringyl (S), guaiacyl (G) and interunit linkages. Lignin extracted by ethanol contained the largest amount of S units, the smallest amounts of G and p -hydroxybenzoate (PB) subunits, while the contents of these lignin subunits in the other two lignin fractions were similar. The lignin fraction obtained after cellulase treatment was primarily comprised of β- O -4 linkages with small amounts of β-5 and β-β linkages. The binding strength of these three lignin fractions obtained by Langmuir equations were in the order of L 1  >  L 3  >  L 2 for the low recalcitrance poplar and H 1  >  H 2  >  H 3 for the high recalcitrance poplar. Overall, adsorption ability of lignin was correlated with the sugar release of poplar. Structural features of lignin were associated with its binding to CBH. For natural poplar variants, lignin fractions with lower molecular weight and polydispersity index (PDI) exhibited more CBH adsorption

  1. Interleukin-6 and Cyclooxygenase-2 downregulation by fatty-acid fractions of Ranunculus constantinopolitanus.

    Fostok, Sabreen F; Ezzeddine, Rima A; Homaidan, Fadia R; Al-Saghir, Jamal A; Salloum, Ralph G; Saliba, Najat A; Talhouk, Rabih S

    2009-11-16

    Medicinal plants represent alternative means for the treatment of several chronic diseases, including inflammation. The genus Ranunculus, a representative of the Ranunculaceae family, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal activities, possibly due to the presence of anemonin and other. Different studies have shown the occurrence of unusual fatty acids (FAs) in Ranunculaceae; however, their therapeutic role has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential anti-inflammatory bioactivities in Ranunculus constantinopolitanus D'Urv., traditionally used in Eastern Mediterranean folk medicine. The aerial part of R. constantinopolitanus was subjected to methanol (MeOH) extraction and solvent fractionation. The bioactive fraction (I.2) was further fractionated using column chromatography, and the biologically active subfraction (Y2+3) was identified using infrared (IR) spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The effects of I.2 and Y2+3 on cell viability were studied in mouse mammary epithelial SCp2 cells using trypan blue exclusion method. To study the anti-inflammatory activities of I.2 and Y2+3, their ability to reduce interleukin (IL)-6 levels was assessed in endotoxin (ET)-stimulated SCp2 cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In addition, the ability of Y2+3 to reduce cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 expression was studied in IL-1-treated mouse intestinal epithelial Mode-K cells via western blotting. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK), Tukey HSD, two-sample t-test and Dunnett t-tests for multiple comparisons. The chloroform fraction (I.2) derived from crude MeOH extract of the plant, in addition to Y2+3, a FA mix isolated from this fraction and containing palmitic acid, C18:2 and C18:1 isomers and stearic acid (1:5:8:1 ratio), reduced ET-induced IL-6

  2. Interleukin-6 and Cyclooxygenase-2 downregulation by fatty-acid fractions of Ranunculus constantinopolitanus

    Al-Saghir Jamal A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medicinal plants represent alternative means for the treatment of several chronic diseases, including inflammation. The genus Ranunculus, a representative of the Ranunculaceae family, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, antibacterial, antiparasitic and antifungal activities, possibly due to the presence of anemonin and other. Different studies have shown the occurrence of unusual fatty acids (FAs in Ranunculaceae; however, their therapeutic role has not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to characterize potential anti-inflammatory bioactivities in Ranunculus constantinopolitanus D'Urv., traditionally used in Eastern Mediterranean folk medicine. Methods The aerial part of R. constantinopolitanus was subjected to methanol (MeOH extraction and solvent fractionation. The bioactive fraction (I.2 was further fractionated using column chromatography, and the biologically active subfraction (Y2+3 was identified using infrared (IR spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. The effects of I.2 and Y2+3 on cell viability were studied in mouse mammary epithelial SCp2 cells using trypan blue exclusion method. To study the anti-inflammatory activities of I.2 and Y2+3, their ability to reduce interleukin (IL-6 levels was assessed in endotoxin (ET-stimulated SCp2 cells using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. In addition, the ability of Y2+3 to reduce cyclooxygenase (COX-2 expression was studied in IL-1-treated mouse intestinal epithelial Mode-K cells via western blotting. Data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls (SNK, Tukey HSD, two-sample t-test and Dunnett t-tests for multiple comparisons. Results The chloroform fraction (I.2 derived from crude MeOH extract of the plant, in addition to Y2+3, a FA mix isolated from this fraction and containing palmitic acid, C18:2 and C18:1 isomers and stearic acid

  3. Characterization of isolated fractions of dissolved organic matter derived from municipal solid waste compost.

    Yu, Minda; He, Xiaosong; Liu, Jiaomei; Wang, Yuefeng; Xi, Beidou; Li, Dan; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Chao

    2018-04-14

    Understanding the heterogeneous evolution characteristics of dissolved organic matter fractions derived from compost is crucial to exploring the composting biodegradation process and the possible applications of compost products. Herein, two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy integrated with reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography and size exclusion chromatography were utilized to obtain the molecular weight (MW) and polarity evolution characteristics of humic acid (HA), fulvic acid (FA), and the hydrophilic (HyI) fractions during composting. The high-MW humic substances and building blocks in the HA fraction degraded faster during composting than polymers, proteins, and organic colloids. Similarly, the low MW acid FA factions transformed faster than the low weight neutral fractions, followed by building blocks, and finally polymers, proteins, and organic colloids. The evolutions of HyI fractions during composting occurred first for building blocks, followed by low MW acids, and finally low weight neutrals. With the progress of composting, the hydrophobic properties of the HA and FA fractions were enhanced. The degradation/humification process of the hydrophilic and transphilic components was faster than that of the hydrophobic component. Compared with the FA and HyI fractions, the HA fraction exhibited a higher MW and increased hydrophobicity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantum chemical and thermodynamic calculations of fulvic and humic copper complexes in reactions of malachite and azurite formation

    Fomin, Vitaliy N.; Gogol, Daniil B.; Rozhkovoy, Ivan E.; Ponomarev, Dmitriy L.

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a thermodynamic evaluation of the reactions of humic and fulvic acids in the process of malachite and azurite mineralogenesis. Semi-empirical methods AM/1, MNDO, PM3, PM5, PM6 and PM7 were used to compute the heat of formation, enthalpy and entropy for thermodynamic calculations of the reactions performed on the basis of Hess's law. It is shown that methods PM6 and PM7 in the MOPAC software package provide good compliance with experimental and calculated heats of formation for copper complexes and alkaline earth metal complexes with organic acids. It is found that the malachite and azurite formation processes involving humus complexing substances are thermodynamically possible. - Highlights: • Copper and alkali-earth metal complexes with humic and fulvic acids are considered. • Quantum chemical calculation of thermodynamics for the structures was performed. • Semi-empirical methods PM6 and PM7 provide best correlation for the properties. • Parameters of basic copper carbonate formation reactions were obtained by Hess's law. • Processes of malachite and azurite formation from humus complexes are possible.

  5. Investigation of adsorptive fractionation of humic acid on graphene oxide using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC.

    Lee, Bo-Mi; Seo, Young-Soo; Hur, Jin

    2015-04-15

    In this study, the adsorptive fractionation of a humic acid (HA, Elliott soil humic acid) on graphene oxide (GO) was examined at pH 4 and 6 using absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM)-parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). The extent of the adsorption was greater at pH 4.0 than at pH 6.0. Aromatic molecules within the HA were preferentially adsorbed onto the GO surface, and the preferential adsorption was more pronounced at pH 6, which is above the zero point of charge of GO. A relative ratio of two PARAFAC humic-like components (ex/em maxima at 270/510 nm and at (250, 265)/440 nm) presented an increasing trend with larger sizes of ultrafiltered humic acid fractions, suggesting the potential for using fluorescence EEM-PARAFAC for tracking the changes in molecular sizes of aromatic HA molecules. The individual adsorption behaviors of the two humic-like components revealed that larger sized aromatic components within HA had a higher adsorption affinity and more nonlinear isotherms compared to smaller sized fractions. Our results demonstrated that adsorptive fractionation of HA occurred on the GO surface with respect to their aromaticity and the sizes, but the degree was highly dependent on solution pH as well as the amount of adsorbed HS (or available surface sites). The observed adsorption behaviors were reasonably explained by a combination of different mechanisms previously suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Investigating organic molecules responsible of auxin-like activity of humic acid fraction extracted from vermicompost

    Scaglia, Barbara, E-mail: barbara.scaglia@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Nunes, Ramom Rachide; Rezende, Maria Olímpia Oliveira [Laboratório de Química Ambiental, Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Química de São Carlos, Avenida Trabalhador São Carlense, 400, São Carlos (Brazil); Tambone, Fulvia [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy); Adani, Fabrizio, E-mail: fabrizio.adani@unimi.it [Gruppo Ricicla Labs – DiSAA, Università degli Studi di Milano, Via Celoria 2 (Italy)

    2016-08-15

    This work studied the auxin-like activity of humic acids (HA) obtained from vermicomposts produced using leather wastes plus cattle dung at different maturation stages (fresh, stable and mature). Bioassays were performed by testing HA concentrations in the range of 100–6000 mg carbon L{sup −1}. {sup 13}C CPMAS-NMR and GC–MS instrumental methods were used to assess the effect of biological processes and starting organic mixtures on HA composition. Not all HAs showed IAA-like activity and in general, IAA-like activity increased with the length of the vermicomposting process. The presence of leather wastes was not necessary to produce the auxin-like activity of HA, since HA extracted from a mix of cattle manure and sawdust, where no leather waste was added, showed IAA-like activity as well. CPMAS {sup 13}CNMR revealed that HAs were similar independently of the mix used and that the humification process involved the increasing concentration of pre-existing alkali soluble fractions in the biomass. GC/MS allowed the identification of the molecules involved in IAA-like effects: carboxylic acids and amino acids. The concentration of active molecules, rather than their simple presence in HA, determined the bio-stimulating effect, and a good linear regression between auxin-like activity and active stimulating molecules concentration was found (R{sup 2} = − 0.85; p < 0.01, n = 6). - Highlights: • Vermicomposting converts waste into organic fertilizer. • Vermicomposts can have biostimulating effect for the presence of hormone-like molecules. • Auxine-like activity was associated to the vermicompost humic acid fraction (HA). • HA carboxylic acids and amino acids, were reported to act as auxin-like molecules. • A linear regression was found between molecules and auxin-like activity.

  7. Molybdenum isotope fractionation during acid leaching of a granitic uranium ore

    Migeon, Valérie; Bourdon, Bernard; Pili, Eric; Fitoussi, Caroline

    2018-06-01

    As an attempt to prevent illicit trafficking of nuclear materials, it is critical to identify the origin and transformation of uranium materials from the nuclear fuel cycle based on chemical and isotope tracers. The potential of molybdenum (Mo) isotopes as tracers is considered in this study. We focused on leaching, the first industrial process used to release uranium from ores, which is also known to extract Mo depending on chemical conditions. Batch experiments were performed in the laboratory with pH ranging from 0.3 to 5.5 in sulfuric acid. In order to span a large range in uranium and molybdenum yields, oxidizers such as nitric acid, hydrogen peroxide and manganese dioxide were also added. An enrichment in heavy Mo isotopes is produced in the solution during leaching of a granitic uranium ore, when Mo recovery is not quantitative. At least two Mo reservoirs were identified in the ore: ∼40% as Mo oxides soluble in water or sulfuric acid, and ∼40% of Mo hosted in sulfides soluble in nitric acid or hydrogen peroxide. At pH > 1.8, adsorption and/or precipitation processes induce a decrease in Mo yields with time correlated with large Mo isotope fractionations. Quantitative models were used to evaluate the relative importance of the processes involved in Mo isotope fractionation: dissolution, adsorption, desorption, precipitation, polymerization and depolymerization. Model best fits are obtained when combining the effects of dissolution/precipitation, and adsorption/desorption onto secondary minerals. These processes are inferred to produce an equilibrium isotope fractionation, with an enrichment in heavy Mo isotopes in the liquid phase and in light isotopes in the solid phase. Quantification of Mo isotope fractionation resulting from uranium leaching is thus a promising tool to trace the origin and transformation of nuclear materials. Our observations of Mo leaching are also consistent with observations of natural Mo isotope fractionation taking place during

  8. The influence of naphthenic acids and their fractions onto cell membrane permeability

    Pavlović Ksenija

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of naphthenic acids (NAs mixture and their narrow fractions (called NA pH 4, pH 8 and pH 10 onto permeability of beetroot cell membrane is examined. The results showed that the effect depends on treatment duration, concentration and NAs structure. Longer treatment of plant cell membranes with sodium naphthenate (Na-naph resulted in the increase of membrane permeability (e.g. 4-hour treatment with Na-naph (C=100 μmol L-1 increased membrane permeability about 3 times, while prolongation of treatment to 24 hour resulted in the 18 times increasing of the effect. NAs in the concentration range from 0.1 to 10 μmol L-1 does not change membrane permeability, while membrane permeability is increasing linearly with concentration increasing from 10-100 μmol L-1. The strongest effect expressed fraction pH 8, where bi- and tricyclic carboxylic acids are the most abundant. These structures are predominant in the total NAs mixture as well. Thereby could be explained their closest, but a little bit weaker effect, comparing to NAs present in fraction pH 8. The effect of NAs onto beetroot cell membrane is between the effects of anionic (SDS and LS and non-ionic surfactants (Triton X-100. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172006. i br. TR31036

  9. Complex forming properties of natural organic acids. Pt. 2

    Ephraim, J.H.; Mathuthu, A.S.; Marinsky, J.A.

    1990-07-01

    An ultrafiltration technique combined with ion-selective-electrode and atomic absorption methods have been employed to obtain information on the complex forming properties of fulvic acid with iron and calcium. A model for interpreting complexation of metal ions to fulvic acid at any pH, medium ionic strength and metal to fulvic acid ratio developed earlier has been used in an attempt to predict the nature of iron and calcium interaction to Armadale Horizon Bh fulvic acid. Binding of calcium to fulvic acid which is enhanced at pHs greater than 6.0 has reasonably been predicted by the model taking into consideration complications due to the polyelectrolyte nature and the heterogeneity of the fulvic acid. The lack of agreement observed between the model predicted binding behavior and the experimentally observed results for the fulvic acid-iron system has been attributed to the formation of metal-induced aggregation. Reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by the fulvic acid as reported by other workers is corroborated. (orig.)

  10. Influence of different nominal molecular weight fractions of humic acids on phenol oxidation by permanganate.

    He, Di; Guan, Xiaohong; Ma, Jun; Yu, Min

    2009-11-01

    The effects of humic acid (HA) and its different nominal molecular weight (NMW) fractions on the phenol oxidation by permanganate were studied. Phenol oxidation by permanganate was enhanced by the presence of HA at pH 4-8, while slightly inhibited at pH 9-10. The effects of HA on phenol oxidation by permanganate were dependent on HA concentration and permanganate/phenol molar ratios. The high NMW fractions of HA enhanced phenol oxidation by permanganate at pH 7 more significantly than the low fractions of HA. The apparent second-order rate constants of phenol oxidation by permanganate in the presence of HA correlated well with their specific ultraviolet absorption (SUVA) at 254 nm and specific violet absorption (SVA) at 465 or 665 nm. High positive correlation coefficients (R(2) > 0.72) implied that pi-electrons of HA strongly influenced the reactivity of phenol towards permanganate oxidation which agreed well with the information provided by fluorescence spectroscopy. The FTIR analysis indicated that the HA fractions rich in aliphatic character, polysaccharide-like substances, and the amount of carboxylate groups had less effect on phenol oxidation by permanganate. The negative correlation between the rate constants of phenol oxidation by permanganate and O/C ratios suggested that the oxidation of phenol increased with a decrease in the content of oxygen-containing functional groups.

  11. Fractionation of SWNT/nucleic acid complexes by agarose gel electrophoresis

    Vetcher, Alexandre A; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Vetcher, Ivan A; Abramov, Semen M; Kozlov, Mikhail; Baughman, Ray H; Levene, Stephen D

    2006-01-01

    We show that aqueous dispersions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared with the aid of nucleic acids (NAs) such as RNA or DNA, can be separated into fractions using agarose gel electrophoresis. In a DC electric field, SWNT/NA complexes migrate in the gel in the direction of positive potential to form well-defined bands. Raman spectroscopy as a function of band position shows that nanotubes having different spectroscopic properties possess different electrophoretic mobilities. The migration patterns for SWNT/RNA and SWNT/DNA complexes differ. Parallel elution of the SWNT/NA complexes from the gel during electrophoresis and subsequent characterization by AFM reveals differences in nanotube diameter, length and curvature. The results suggest that fractionation of nanotubes can be achieved by this procedure. We discuss factors affecting the mobility of the nanotube complexes and propose analytical applications of this technique

  12. Fractionation of SWNT/nucleic acid complexes by agarose gel electrophoresis

    Vetcher, Alexandre A [Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology and Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi [Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology and Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Vetcher, Ivan A [Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology and Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Abramov, Semen M [NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Kozlov, Mikhail [NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Baughman, Ray H [NanoTech Institute, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States); Levene, Stephen D [Institute of Biomedical Sciences and Technology and Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75083 (United States)

    2006-08-28

    We show that aqueous dispersions of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), prepared with the aid of nucleic acids (NAs) such as RNA or DNA, can be separated into fractions using agarose gel electrophoresis. In a DC electric field, SWNT/NA complexes migrate in the gel in the direction of positive potential to form well-defined bands. Raman spectroscopy as a function of band position shows that nanotubes having different spectroscopic properties possess different electrophoretic mobilities. The migration patterns for SWNT/RNA and SWNT/DNA complexes differ. Parallel elution of the SWNT/NA complexes from the gel during electrophoresis and subsequent characterization by AFM reveals differences in nanotube diameter, length and curvature. The results suggest that fractionation of nanotubes can be achieved by this procedure. We discuss factors affecting the mobility of the nanotube complexes and propose analytical applications of this technique.

  13. Fractionation for further conversion: from raw corn stover to lactic acid

    He, Ting; Jiang, Zhicheng; Wu, Ping; Yi, Jian; Li, Jianmei; Hu, Changwei

    2016-12-01

    Fractionation is considered to be one promising strategy to utilize raw biomass to its fullest and produce chemicals with high selectivity. Herein, ethanol/H2O (1/1, v/v) co-solvent with 0.050 M oxalic acid is used to simultaneously fractionate 88.0 wt% of hemicellulose and 89.2 wt% of lignin in corn stover, while cellulose is not obviously degraded. H2O dissolves hemicellulose, G unit and those with β-O-4 linkage of lignin; whereas ethanol extracts G and S units as well as the skeleton with β-5 and β-β linkages of lignin. Oxalic acid effectively catalyzes the hydrolysis of hemicellulose and breaks the intermolecular linkages between hemicellulose and lignin, therefore further promotes the release of lignin. The dissolved hemicelluloses derivatives are reprocessed to produce lactic acid obtaining a high yield of 79.6 wt% with 90% selectivity by the catalysis of MgO. The remained cellulose and recovered lignin can be used further as feedstock to produce chemicals.

  14. Fractionation for further conversion: from raw corn stover to lactic acid

    He, Ting; Jiang, Zhicheng; Wu, Ping; Yi, Jian; Li, Jianmei; Hu, Changwei

    2016-01-01

    Fractionation is considered to be one promising strategy to utilize raw biomass to its fullest and produce chemicals with high selectivity. Herein, ethanol/H2O (1/1, v/v) co-solvent with 0.050 M oxalic acid is used to simultaneously fractionate 88.0 wt% of hemicellulose and 89.2 wt% of lignin in corn stover, while cellulose is not obviously degraded. H2O dissolves hemicellulose, G unit and those with β-O-4 linkage of lignin; whereas ethanol extracts G and S units as well as the skeleton with β-5 and β-β linkages of lignin. Oxalic acid effectively catalyzes the hydrolysis of hemicellulose and breaks the intermolecular linkages between hemicellulose and lignin, therefore further promotes the release of lignin. The dissolved hemicelluloses derivatives are reprocessed to produce lactic acid obtaining a high yield of 79.6 wt% with 90% selectivity by the catalysis of MgO. The remained cellulose and recovered lignin can be used further as feedstock to produce chemicals. PMID:27917955

  15. DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION DURING AMINO ACID FORMATION BY PHOTOLYSIS OF INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS CONTAINING DEUTERATED METHANOL

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira [Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, N19W8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0819 (Japan); Takano, Yoshinori, E-mail: oba@lowtem.hokudai.ac.jp [Department of Biogeochemistry, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC), 2-15 Natsushima, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 237-0061 (Japan)

    2016-08-10

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH{sub 2}DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α -alanine, β -alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α -alanine and β -alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  16. DEUTERIUM FRACTIONATION DURING AMINO ACID FORMATION BY PHOTOLYSIS OF INTERSTELLAR ICE ANALOGS CONTAINING DEUTERATED METHANOL

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira; Takano, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    Deuterium (D) atoms in interstellar deuterated methanol might be distributed into complex organic molecules through molecular evolution by photochemical reactions in interstellar grains. In this study, we use a state-of-the-art high-resolution mass spectrometer coupled with a high-performance liquid chromatography system to quantitatively analyze amino acids and their deuterated isotopologues formed by the photolysis of interstellar ice analogs containing singly deuterated methanol CH 2 DOH at 10 K. Five amino acids (glycine, α -alanine, β -alanine, sarcosine, and serine) and their deuterated isotopologues whose D atoms are bound to carbon atoms are detected in organic residues formed by photolysis followed by warming up to room temperature. The abundances of singly deuterated amino acids are in the range of 0.3–1.1 relative to each nondeuterated counterpart, and the relative abundances of doubly and triply deuterated species decrease with an increasing number of D atoms in a molecule. The abundances of amino acids increase by a factor of more than five upon the hydrolysis of the organic residues, leading to decreases in the relative abundances of deuterated species for α -alanine and β -alanine. On the other hand, the relative abundances of the deuterated isotopologues of the other three amino acids did not decrease upon hydrolysis, indicating different formation mechanisms of these two groups upon hydrolysis. The present study facilitates both qualitative and quantitative evaluations of D fractionation during molecular evolution in the interstellar medium.

  17. Estimate of serum immunoglobulin G concentration using refractometry with or without caprylic acid fractionation.

    Morrill, K M; Polo, J; Lago, A; Campbell, J; Quigley, J; Tyler, H

    2013-07-01

    Objectives of this study were to develop a rapid calf-side test to determine serum IgG concentrations using caprylic acid (CA) fractionation, followed by refractometry of the IgG-rich supernatant and compare the accuracy of this method with results obtained using refractometry using raw serum. Serum samples (n=200) were obtained from 1-d-old calves, frozen (-20°C), and shipped to the laboratory. Samples were allowed to thaw for 1h at room temperature. Fractionation with CA was conducted by adding 1mL of serum to a tube containing 45, 60, or 75µL of CA and 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5mL of 0.06 M acetic acid. The tube contents were mixed well, allowed to react for 1 min, and then centrifuged at 3,300 × g for 0, 10, or 20 min at 25°C. The %Brix and refractive index of the fractionated supernatant were determined using a digital refractometer. Nonfractionated serum was analyzed for %Brix (BRn), refractive index (nDn), and IgG concentration by radial immunodiffusion. The mean serum IgG concentration was 19.0 mg/mL [standard deviation (SD)=9.7], with a range of 3.5 to 47.0 mg/mL. The mean serum BRn was 8.6 (SD=0.91), with a range of 6.8 to 11.0. The mean serum nDn was 1.34566 (SD=0.00140), with a range of 1.34300 to 1.34930. Serum nDn was positively correlated with IgG concentration (correlation coefficient=0.86; n=185). Fractionated samples treated with 1mL 0.6 M acetic acid and 60µL of CA and not centrifuged before analysis resulted in a strong relationship between the refractive index of the fractionated supernatant and IgG (correlation coefficient=0.80; n=45). Regression was used to determine cut points indicative of 10, 12, and 14 mg of IgG/mL to determine the sensitivity and specificity of refractometry to identify failure of passive transfer (serum IgG refractometry of nonfractionated calf serum provides a strong estimate of IgG concentration and 7.8% Brix may be used as the cut point to identify failure of passive transfer in 1-d-old calves. Copyright © 2013 American

  18. Organic matter fractions in areas Oxisol under different management systems in Cerrado the State of Goiás, Brazil

    Roni Fernandes Guareschi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the physical and chemical fractions of soil organic matter (SOM, as well as perform the spectroscopic analysis in ultraviolet-visible humic acid in a Oxisol under no-tillage system (NTS with different years of implementation, and compare them to areas of native cerrado and pasture. Was evaluated five areas namely: native cerrado (CE, planted pasture (PA with Brachiaria decumbens; NTS with 3 (NTS 3 years of implementation; NTS with 15 years (NTS 15 of implementation and NTS with more than 20 (NTS 20 years of implementation. The levels and total carbon stocks and humic fractions of SOM, increased with deployment time the NTS at all depths analyzed, with the humic fractions presented the following order: fraction fulvic acid > fraction humic acid > humin fraction. The results showed that depending on the time of implementation of the NTS was observed an increase of more stable fractions of humic substances and physical fractions of SOM, providing greater stability of this system. There is increasing the E4/E6 ratio of humic acids according on the time of implementation of the NTS, demonstrating an increase of aliphatic structures. The area evaluated PA had the lowest concentrations and inventories of humic fractions, carbon associated with minerals (CAM and E4/E6 ratio, demonstrating to be in an advanced stage of degradation relative to the other areas assessed.

  19. Estimate of colostral immunoglobulin G concentration using refractometry without or with caprylic acid fractionation.

    Morrill, K M; Conrad, E; Polo, J; Lago, A; Campbell, J; Quigley, J; Tyler, H

    2012-07-01

    Our objectives were to evaluate the use of refractometry as a means of estimating immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration of bovine maternal colostrum (MC) and determine if fractionation of MC using caprylic acid (CA) improved estimates of IgG. Samples (n=85) of MC were collected from a single dairy in California and used to determine the method of CA fraction that produced the best prediction of IgG based on CA fractionation followed by refractometry. Subsequently, samples of MC (n=827) were collected from 67 farms in 12 states to compare refractometry with or without CA fractionation as methods to estimate IgG concentration. Samples were collected from the feeding pool and consisted of fresh (n=196), previously frozen (n=479), or refrigerated (n=152) MC. Samples were further classified by the number freeze-thaw cycles before analysis. Fractionation with CA was conducted by adding 1 mL of MC to a tube containing 75 μL of CA and 1 mL of 0.06 M acetic acid. The tube was shaken and allowed to react for 1 min. Refractive index of the IgG-rich supernatant (nDf) was determined using a digital refractometer. Whole, nonfractionated MC was analyzed for IgG by radial immunodiffusion (RID) and refractive index (nDw). The relationship between nDf and IgG (r=0.53; n=805) was weak, whereas that between nDw and IgG was stronger (r=0.73; n=823). Fresh samples analyzed by refractometry that subsequently went through 1 freeze-thaw cycle before RID analysis resulted in the strongest relationship between IgG and nDf or nDw (r=0.93 and 0.90, respectively). The MC samples collected fresh on the farm but frozen 2 or more times before analysis by refractometry or RID had low correlations between IgG and nDf and nDw (r=0.09 and 0.01). Samples refrigerated or frozen on the farm before analysis had weaker relationships between RID and nDf or nDw (r=0.38 to 0.80), regardless of the number of freeze-thaw cycles. Breed and lactation number did not affect the accuracy of either test. These

  20. Temporal change in the distribution patterns of hexachlorobenzene and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane among various soil organic matter fractions

    Zhang Jingjing; Wen Bei; Shan Xiaoquan; Zhang Shuzhen; Khan, Shahamat U.

    2007-01-01

    Residence time-dependent distribution patterns of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) among different soil organic matter fractions of three Chinese soils were investigated. Soil organic matter (SOM) was fractionated into fulvic acid (FA), humic acid (HA), bound-humic acid (BHA), lipid, and insoluble residue (IR) fractions using methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK) method. Results revealed that as the residence time prolonged, the amounts of HCB and DDT in the FA, HA and BHA fractions decreased, while those in the lipid and IR fractions increased. One- and two-compartment first order, and one- and two-parameter pore-diffusion kinetic models were used to describe the mobility of HCB and DDT from the FA, HA and BHA fractions. The results suggest that excellent agreements were achieved between the experimental data and fits to the two-compartment first order kinetic model (R 2 > 0.97). The transfer rates of HCB and DDT followed the order FA > HA > BHA. - HCB and DDT tend to transfer from FA, HA and BHA fractions to lipid and IR fractions with increasing residence time

  1. Isotopic fractionation of NBS oxalic acid and its influence in the calculated age of materials

    Nehmi, V.A.

    1979-10-01

    The intensity of the isotopic fractionation during the oxidation of NBS oxalic acid to carbon dioxide was checked. 30 reactions of oxidation of NBS oxalic acid with potassium permanganate were made. The resultant isotopic composition of CO 2 has been determined with a mass-spectrometer. A conclusion has been reached that the average of Δ 13 C is - 18.9% o with variation between - 17.7 and - 21.2%o. For values of Δ 13 C equal to - 22.0%o, the calculated age with isotopic correction shows the following deviations in relation to non-corrected age: 4% for materials of 1,000 years and 0.3% for 20,000 years.(Author) [pt

  2. Theoretical isotopic fractionation between structural boron in carbonates and aqueous boric acid and borate ion

    Balan, Etienne; Noireaux, Johanna; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Saldi, Giuseppe D.; Montouillout, Valérie; Blanchard, Marc; Pietrucci, Fabio; Gervais, Christel; Rustad, James R.; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérôme

    2018-02-01

    The 11B/10B ratio in calcite and aragonite is an important proxy of oceanic water pH. However, the physico-chemical mechanisms underpinning this approach are still poorly known. In the present study, we theoretically determine the equilibrium isotopic fractionation properties of structural boron species in calcium carbonates, BO33-, BO2(OH)2- and B(OH)4- anions substituted for carbonate groups, as well as those of B(OH)4- and B(OH)3 species in vacuum. Significant variability of equilibrium isotopic fractionation properties is observed among these structural species which is related to their contrasted coordination state, Bsbnd O bond lengths and atomic-scale environment. The isotopic composition of structural boron does not only depend on its coordination number but also on its medium range environment, i.e. farther than its first coordination shell. The isotopic fractionation between aqueous species and their counterparts in vacuum are assessed using previous investigations based on similar quantum-mechanical modeling approaches. At 300 K, the equilibrium isotope composition of structural trigonal species is 7-15‰ lighter than that of aqueous boric acid molecules, whereas substituted tetrahedral borate ions are heavier than their aqueous counterparts by 10-13‰. Although significant uncertainties are known to affect the theoretical prediction of fractionation factors between solids and solutions, the usually assumed lack of isotopic fractionation during borate incorporation in carbonates is challenged by these theoretical results. The present theoretical equilibrium fractionation factors between structural boron and aqueous species differ from those inferred from experiments which may indicate that isotopic equilibrium, unlike chemical equilibrium, was not reached in most experiments. Further research into the isotopic fractionation processes at the interface between calcium carbonates and aqueous solution as well as long duration experiments aimed at

  3. Fractionation of equine antivenom using caprylic acid precipitation in combination with cationic ion-exchange chromatography.

    Raweerith, Rutai; Ratanabanangkoon, Kavi

    2003-11-01

    A combined process of caprylic acid (CA) precipitation and ion-exchange chromatography on SP-Sepharose was studied as a means to fractionate pepsin-digested horse antivenom F(ab')(2) antibody. In the CA precipitation, the optimal concentration for fractionation of F(ab')(2) from pepsin-digested horse plasma was 2%, in which 89.61% of F(ab')(2) antibody activity was recovered in the supernatant with 1.5-fold purification. A significant amount of pepsin was not precipitated and remained active under these conditions. An analytical cation exchanger Protein-Pak SP 8HR HPLC column was tested to establish optimal conditions for the effective separation of IgG, albumin, pepsin and CA from the F(ab')(2) product. From these results, the supernatant from CA precipitation of pepsin-digested plasma was subjected to a SP-Sepharose column chromatography using a linear salt gradient. With stepwise elution, a peak containing F(ab')(2) antibody could be obtained by elution with 0.25 M NaCl. The total recovery of antibody was 65.56% with 2.91-fold purification, which was higher than that achieved by ammonium sulfate precipitation. This process simultaneously and effectively removed residual pepsin, high molecular weight aggregates and CA in the final F(ab')(2) product, and should be suitable for large-scale fractionation of therapeutic equine antivenoms.

  4. Carbon-13 fractionation observed in thermal decarboxylation of pure phenylpropiolic acid (PPA) dissolved in phenylacetylene

    Zielinska, A.; Zielinski, M.; Papiernik-Zielinska, H.

    2003-01-01

    The determinations of the 13 C fractionation in the decarboxylation of pure phenylpropiolic acid (PPA) above its melting point has been extended to higher degrees of decomposition of PPA by carrying out two-step decarboxylations to establish the maximum possible yield of carbon dioxide in the temperature interval of 423-475 K (58%). The result was compared with the yields of CO 2 for decarboxylation of PPA in phenylacetylene solvent (PA) (much smaller, temperature dependent, and equal to 11% at 406 K). The ratios of carbon isotope ratios, R so /R pf , all smaller than 1.009 in the temperature interval 405-475 K, have been analyzed formally within the branched decomposition scheme of PPA, providing carbon dioxide and a decarboxylation resistant solid chemical compound enriched in 13 C with respect to CO 2 . A general discussion of the 13 C fractionation in the decarboxylation of pure PPA and PPA dissolved in PA is supplemented by the model calculation of the maximized skeletal 13 C KIEs, in the linear chain propagation of the acetylene polymerization process. Further studies of the 13 C fractionation in condensed phases and in different hydrogen deficient and hydrogen rich media have been suggested. (author)

  5. Enhancement of oleic acid in butter oil by high oleic fraction of moringa oleifera oil

    Nadeem, M.; Ullah, R.

    2016-01-01

    Oleic acid in butter oil (BO) was enhanced by a high oleic acid fraction (HOF) of Moringa oleifera oil (MOO). HOF was blended with BO at four different concentrations i.e. 5%, 10 percent, 15% and 20% (HOF-5, HOF-10, HOF-15 and HOF-20, respectively), compared with a control (BO). The oleic acid in HOF increased from 71.55 percent to 80.25%. DPPH free radical scavenging activity and total flavonoid content of HOF was 76.88% and 34.52 mg/100 g. Supplementation of butter oil with 20% HOF, decreased the cholesterol from 224 to 177 mg/100 g. Peroxide value of three months stored HOF-20 was 1.18 (meqO/sub 2/ kg) as compared to control, 3.15 (meqO/sub 2/kg). Induction period of HOF-20 was 4.07 h greater than control. These results evidenced that oleic acid in butter oil can be substantially increased by HOF of MOO. (author)

  6. Bioassay-directed fractionation of a blood coagulation factor Xa inhibitor, betulinic acid from Lycopus lucidus

    Tan Yin-Feng

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thrombosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide and plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of several cardiovascular disorders, including acute coronary syndrome, unstable angina, myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac death, peripheral arterial occlusion, ischemic stroke, deep-vein thrombosis, and pulmonary embolism. Anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and fibrinolytics can reduce the risks of these clinical events. Especially, the blood coagulation factor Xa (FXa inhibitor is a proven anticoagulant. Promoting blood circulation, using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, for the treatment of these diseases has been safely used for thousands of years in clinical practice. Therefore, highly safe and effective anticoagulant ingredients, including FXa inhibitors, could be found in TCM for activating the blood circulation. One FXa inhibitor, a pentacyclic triterpene (compound 1, betulinic acid characterized by IR, MS and NMR analyses, was isolated from the ethyl acetate fraction of Lycopus lucidus by bioassay-directed fractionation. Compound 1 exhibited an inhibitory effect on FXa with IC50 25.05 μmol/L and reduced the thrombus weight in an animal model at 25-100 mg/kg. These results indicate that betulinic acid could be the potential for anticoagulant therapy.

  7. Low acid hydrothermal fractionation of Giant Miscanthus for production of xylose-rich hydrolysate and furfural.

    Kim, Tae Hyun; Ryu, Hyun Jin; Oh, Kyeong Keun

    2016-10-01

    Low acid hydrothermal (LAH) fractionation was developed for the effective recovery of hemicellulosic sugar (mainly xylose) from Miscanthus sacchariflorus Goedae-Uksae 1 (M. GU-1). The xylose yield was maximized at 74.75% when the M. GU-1 was fractionated at 180°C and 0.3wt.% of sulfuric acid for 10min. At this condition, the hemicellulose (mainly xylan) degradation was 86.41%. The difference between xylan degradation and xylose recovery yield, i.e., xylan loss, was 11.66%, as indicated by the formation of decomposed products. The furfural, the value added biochemical product, was also obtained by 0.42g/L at this condition, which was 53.82% of furfural production yield based on the xylan loss. After then, the furfural production continued to increase to a maximum concentration of 1.87g/L, at which point the xylan loss corresponded to 25.87%. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Microwave Acid Extraction to Analyze K and Mg Reserves in the Clay Fraction of Soils

    Araína Hulmann Batista

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Extraction of K and Mg with boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system for predicting K and Mg uptake by plants is a method of low reproducibility. The aim of this study was to compare the extraction capacity of different acid methods relative to hydrofluoric acid extraction for K and Mg. A further objective was to develop a chemical extraction method using a closed system (microwave for nonexchangeable and structural forms of these nutrients in order to replace the traditional method of extraction with boiling HNO3 on a hot plate (open system. The EPA 3051A method can be used to estimate the total content of K in the clay fraction of soils developed from carbonate and phyllite/mica schist rocks. In the clay fraction of soils developed from basalt, recoveries of K by the EPA 3051A (pseudo-total method were higher than for the EPA 3052 (total hydrofluoric extraction method. The relative abundance of K and Mg for soils in carbonate rocks, phyllite/mica schist, granite/gneiss, and basalt determined by aqua regia digestion is unreliable. The method using 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an closed system (microwave showed potential for replacing the classical method of extraction of nonexchangeable forms of K (boiling 1 mol L-1 HNO3 in an open system - hot plate and reduced the loss of Si by volatilization.

  9. Acid-base properties of Baltic Sea dissolved organic matter

    Hammer, Karoline; Schneider, Bernd; Kuliński, Karol; Schulz-Bull, Detlef E.

    2017-09-01

    Calculations related to the marine CO2 system that are based on alkalinity data may be strongly biased if the contributions of organic compounds are ignored. In coastal seas, concentrations of dissolved organic matter (DOM) are frequently high and alkalinity from inorganic compounds is low. In this study, based on measurements of total alkalinity, total CO2, and pH, we determined the organic alkalinity, Aorg, in water from the central Baltic Sea. The maximum Aorg measured in the surface mixed layer during the spring bloom was > 50 μmol/kg-SW but the Aorg decreased with depth and approached zero below the permanent halocline. This behavior could be attributed to the decreased pH of deeper water layers. The data were used to calculate the bulk dissociation constant, KDOM, for marine DOM and the fraction f of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) that acts as a carrier for acid-base functional groups. The p KDOM (7.27) agreed well with the value (7.34) previously estimated in a preliminary study of organic alkalinity in the Baltic Sea. The fraction of carbon atoms carrying acid-base groups was 17% and was somewhat higher than previously reported (12%). Spike experiments performed using artificial seawater and three different humic/fulvic substances tested whether the acid-base properties of these substances explain the results of our field study. Specifically, Aorg was determined at different concentrations (DOC) of the added humic/fulvic substances. The relationship between Aorg and the DOC concentrations indicated that humic/fulvic substances are more acidic (p KDOM < 6.5) than the bulk DOC natural occurring in the Baltic Sea.

  10. Ultraviolet-B radiation mobilizes uranium from uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes in aquatic systems, demonstrated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation.

    Nehete, Sachin Vilas; Christensen, Terje; Salbu, Brit; Teien, Hans-Christian

    2017-05-05

    Humic substances have a tendency to form complexes with metal ions in aquatic medium, impacting the metal mobility, decreasing bioavailability and toxicity. Ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation exposure degrades the humic substance, changes their molecular weight distribution and their metal binding capacity in aquatic medium. In this study, we experimented the effect of UV-B radiation on the uranium complexed with fulvic acids and humic acids in a soft water system at different pH, uranium concentrations and radiant exposure. The concentration and distribution of uranium in a complexed form were investigated by asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to multi detection technique (AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS). The major concentration of uranium present in complexes was primarily associated with average and higher molecular weight fulvic and humic acids components. The concentration of uranium in a complexed form increased with increasing fulvic and humic acid concentrations as well as pH of the solution. The higher molecular weight fraction of uranium was degraded due to the UV-B exposure, transforming about 50% of the uranium-dissolved organic carbon complexes into low molecular weight uranium species in complex form with organic ligands and/or free form. The result also suggests AsFlFFF-UV-ICP-MS to be an important separation and detection technique for understanding the interaction of radionuclides with dissolved organic matter, tracking size distribution changes during degradation of organic complexes for understanding mobility, bioavailability and ecosystem transfer of radionuclides as well as metals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The free fractions of circulating docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentenoic acid as optimal end-point of measure in bioavailability studies on n-3 fatty acids.

    Scarsi, Claudia; Levesque, Ann; Lisi, Lucia; Navarra, Pierluigi

    2015-05-01

    The high complexity of n-3 fatty acids absorption process, along with the huge amount of endogenous fraction, makes bioavailability studies with these agents very challenging and deserving special consideration. In this paper we report the results of a bioequivalence study between a new formulation of EPA+DHA ethyl esters developed by IBSA Institut Biochimique and reference medicinal product present on the Italian market. Bioequivalence was demonstrated according to the criteria established by the EMA Guideline on the Investigation of Bioequivalence. We found that the free fractions represent a better and more sensitive end-point for bioequivalence investigations on n-3 fatty acids, since: (i) the overall and intra-subject variability of PK parameters was markedly lower compared to the same variability calculated on the total DHA and EPA fractions; (ii) the absorption process was completed within 4h, and the whole PK profile could be drawn within 12-15 h from drug administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic potential of phenolic acids and flavonoid fractions isolated from Lolium multiflorum.

    Choi, Ki-Choon; Son, Young-Ok; Hwang, Jung-Min; Kim, Beom-Tae; Chae, Minseon; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2017-12-01

    Interest has recently renewed in using Lolium multiflorum Lam. (Poaceae) (called Italian ryegrass; IRG) silage as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory diet. This study investigated the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic potential of IRG silage and identified the primary components in IRG active fractions. Total 16 fractions were separated from the chloroform-soluble extract of IRG aerial part using Sephadex LH-20 column before HPLC analysis. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities of the fractions at doses of 0-100 μg/mL were investigated using various cell-free and cell-mediated assay systems. To explore anti-septic effect of IRG fractions, female ICR and BALB/c mice orally received 40 mg/kg of phenolic acid and flavonoid-rich active fractions F 7 and F 8 every other day for 10 days, respectively, followed by LPS challenge. The active fractions showed greater antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potential compared with other fractions. IC 50 values of F 7 and F 8 to reduce LPS-stimulated NO and TNF-α production were around 15 and 30 μg/mL, respectively. Comparison of retention times with authentic compounds through HPLC analysis revealed the presence of caffeic acid, ferulic acid, myricetin and kaempferol in the fractions as primary components. These fractions inhibited LPS-stimulated MAPK and NF-κB activation. Supplementation with F 7 or F 8 improved the survival rates of mice to 70 and 60%, respectively, in LPS-injected mice and reduced near completely serum TNF-α and IL-6 levels. This study highlights antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-septic activities of IRG active fractions, eventually suggesting their usefulness in preventing oxidative damage and inflammatory disorders.

  13. Occurrence of non extractable pesticide residues in physical and chemical fractions of two soils

    Andreou, Kostas; Semple, Kirk; Jones, Kevin

    2010-05-01

    Soils are considered to be a significant sink for organic contaminants, including pesticides, in the environment. Understanding the distribution and localisation of aged pesticide residues in soil is of great importance for assessing the mobility and availability of these chemicals in the environment. This study aimed to characterise the distribution of radiolabeled herbicide isoproturon and the radiolabeled insecticides diazinon and cypermethrin in two organically managed soils. The soils were spiked and aged under laboratory conditions for 17 months. The labile fraction of the pesticides residues was recovered in CaCl2 (0.01M) and then subjected to physical size fractionation using sedimentation and centrifugation steps, with >20μm, 20-2μm and 2-0.1μm soil factions collected. Further, the distribution of the pesticide residues in the organic matter of the fractionated soil was investigated using a sequential alkaline extraction (0.1N NaOH) into humic and fulvic acid and humin. Soil fractions of 20-2μm and 2-0.1μm had the largest burden of the 14C-residues. Different soil constituents have different capacities to form non-extractable residues. Soil solid fractions of 20-2 µm and 20 µm). Fulvic acid showed to play a vital role in the formation and stabilisation of non-extractable 14C-pesticide residues in most cases.Assessment of the likelihood of the pesticide residues to become available to soil biota requires an understanding of the structure of the SOM matrix and the definition of the kinetics of the pesticide residues in different SOM pools as a function of the time.

  14. Chemical Composition, Nitrogen Fractions and Amino Acids Profile of Milk from Different Animal Species

    Saima Rafiq

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Milk composition is an imperative aspect which influences the quality of dairy products. The objective of study was to compare the chemical composition, nitrogen fractions and amino acids profile of milk from buffalo, cow, sheep, goat, and camel. Sheep milk was found to be highest in fat (6.82%±0.04%, solid-not-fat (11.24%±0.02%, total solids (18.05%±0.05%, protein (5.15%±0.06% and casein (3.87%±0.04% contents followed by buffalo milk. Maximum whey proteins were observed in camel milk (0.80%±0.03%, buffalo (0.68%±0.02% and sheep (0.66%±0.02% milk. The non-protein-nitrogen contents varied from 0.33% to 0.62% among different milk species. The highest r-values were recorded for correlations between crude protein and casein in buffalo (r = 0.82, cow (r = 0.88, sheep (r = 0.86 and goat milk (r = 0.98. The caseins and whey proteins were also positively correlated with true proteins in all milk species. A favorable balance of branched-chain amino acids; leucine, isoleucine, and valine were found both in casein and whey proteins. Leucine content was highest in cow (108±2.3 mg/g, camel (96±2.2 mg/g and buffalo (90±2.4 mg/g milk caseins. Maximum concentrations of isoleucine, phenylalanine, and histidine were noticed in goat milk caseins. Glutamic acid and proline were dominant among non-essential amino acids. Conclusively, current exploration is important for milk processors to design nutritious and consistent quality end products.

  15. Effects of olive oil and its fractions on oxidative stress and the liver's fatty acid composition in 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid-treated rats

    Ellouz Meriem

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive oil's beneficial effects are not only related to its high content of oleic acid, but also to the antioxidant potential of its polyphenols. In this study, we assess the effects of virgin olive oil and its fractions on 2,4-D- induced oxidative damage in the liver of rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly divided into eight groups of ten each: (C a control group, (D group that received 2,4-D (5 mg/kg b.w., (D/EVOO group treated with 2,4-D plus extra virgin olive oil, (D/OOHF group that received 2,4-D plus hydrophilic fraction, (D/OOLF group treated with 2,4-D plus lipophilic fraction, (EVOO group that received only extra virgin olive oil, (OOHF group given hydrophilic fraction and (OOLF group treated with lipophilic fraction. These components were daily administered by gavage for 4 weeks. Results A significant liver damage was observed in rats treated with 2,4-D via increased serum levels of transaminases and alkaline phosphatase, hepatic lipid peroxidation and decreased hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities, namely, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. The liver's fatty acid composition was also significantly modified with 2,4-D exposure. However, extra virgin olive oil and hydrophilic fraction intake during 2,4-D treatment induced a significant increase in the antioxidant enzyme activities and a decrease in the conjugated dienes (CD and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARs levels in the liver. The lipophilic fraction supplemented to 2,4-D- treated rats did not show any improvement in the liver oxidative status while a marked improvement was detected in the hepatic fatty acid composition of rats supplemented with olive oil and the two fractions. Conclusion We concluded that the protective effect of olive oil against oxidative damage induced by 2,4-D is mainly related to the antioxidant potential of its hydrophilic fraction.

  16. Effect of alkaline and acidic fractions of industrial effluents on some lymphoid cells of the fish Rasbora daniconius

    Elizabeth, T K; Balasubramanian, N K; John, P A

    1981-01-01

    The percentage frequency of the different types of lymphoid cell found in the head-kidney of Rasbora daniconius exposed for 24 h to lc/sub 50/ levels of the ammonia (alkali), phosphoric and sulphuric acid fractions of the effluent from a fertiliser factory was determined by the imprint method. 'T' tests showed that both the alkaline and the acidic fractions could significantly affect the composition of the lymphoid cell population. Different types of lymphoid cell reacted differently to the different fractions; some cell types increased in number while others decreased. Some cell types were not affected. This indicated some sort of specificity in the action of the fractions on the lymphoid cells.

  17. Calcium isotope fractionation in liquid chromatography with benzo-18-crown-6 resin in aqueous hydrobromic acid medium

    Sato, Takuya; Oi, Takao

    2015-01-01

    Liquid chromatography operated in a breakthrough mode was employed to study calcium isotope fractionation in the aqueous hydrobromic acid medium. Highly porous silica beads, the inner pores of which were embedded with a benzo-18-crown-6 ether resin, were used as column packing material. Enrichment of heavier isotopes of calcium was observed in the frontal part of respective calcium chromatograms. The values of the isotope fractionation coefficient were on the order of 10 -3 . The observed isotope fractionation coefficient was dependent on the concentration of hydrobromic acid in the calcium feed solution; a higher HBr concentration resulted in a smaller fractionation coefficient value. The present calcium isotope effects were most probably mass-dependent, indicating that they mostly came from isotope effects based on molecular vibration. Molecular orbital calculations supported the present experimental results in a qualitative fashion. Chromatography operated in aqueous HBr media is a better system of Ca isotope separation than that operated in aqueous HCl media. (author)

  18. Omega-3 fatty acids and oxidative stability of ice cream supplemented with olein fraction of chia (Salvia hispanica L.) oil.

    Ullah, Rahman; Nadeem, Muhammad; Imran, Muhammad

    2017-02-07

    Chia (Salvia hispanica L.) has been regarded as good source of polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids with cardiac, hepatic, hypotensive, antiallergic and antidiabetic role. Concentration of omega-3 fatty acids in chia oil can be enhanced by fractionation. Olein/low melting fraction of chia oil has higher concentration of omega-3 fatty acids. Therefore, main objective of current investigation was determination of various concentration effect of olein fraction of chia oil on omega-3 fatty acids, oxidative stability and sensory characteristics of ice cream. Ice cream samples were prepared by partially replacing the milk fat with olein fraction of chia oil at 5, 10, 15 and 20% concentrations (T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 ), respectively. Ice cream prepared from 100% milk fat was kept as control. Ice cream samples stored at -18 °C for 60 days were analysed at 0, 30 and 60 days of the storage period. Fatty acid profile, total phenolic contents, total flavonoids, free fatty acids, peroxide value, anisidine value and sensory characteristics of ice cream samples was studied. Concentration of α-linolenic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in T 4 was 13.24, 0.58, 0.42 and 0.31%, respectively. Total phenolic contents of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were recorded 0.12, 1.65, 3.17, 5.19 and 7.48 mg GAE/mL, respectively. Total flavonoid content of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 were found 0.08, 0.64, 1.87, 3.16 and 4.29 mg Quercetin Equivalent/mL. 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical scavenging activity of control, T 1 , T 2 , T 3 and T 4 was noted 5.61, 17.43, 36.84, 51.17 and 74.91%, respectively. After 60 days of storage period, the highest peroxide value of 1.84 (MeqO 2 /kg) was observed in T 4 , which was much less than allowable limit of 10 (MeqO 2 /kg). Flavour score was non-significant after 30 days of storage period. Supplementation of ice cream with olein fraction of chia oil enhanced the concentration of

  19. Characteristics of Lignin Fractions from Dilute Acid Pretreated Switchgrass and Their Effect on Cellobiohydrolase from Trichoderma longibrachiatum

    Lan Yao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the interactions between acid pretreated switchgrass lignin and cellobiohydrolase (CBH, three different lignin fractions were isolated from dilute acid pretreated switchgrass by (i ethanol extraction, followed by (ii dioxane/H2O extraction, and (iii cellulase treatment, respectively. Structural properties of each lignin fraction were elucidated by GPC, 13C-NMR, and 2D-HSQC NMR analyses. The adsorptions of CBH to the isolated lignin fractions were also studied by Langmuir adsorption isotherms. Ethanol-extractable lignin fraction, mainly composed of syringyl (S and guaiacyl (G units, had the lowest molecular weight, while dioxane/H2O-extracted lignin fraction had the lowest S/G ratio with higher content of p-coumaric acid (pCA unit. The residual lignin fraction after enzymatic treatment had the highest S/G ratio without hydroxyphenyl (H unit. Strong associations were found between lignin properties such as lignin composition and S/G ratio and its non-productive enzyme adsorption factors including the maximum adsorption capacity and binding strength.

  20. Measurement of renal function by calculation of fractional uptake of technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid

    Beatovic, S.Lj.; Jaksic, E. D.; Hari, R. S.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to set up normal values of the fractional uptake (FU) of technetium-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid in adults and in the pediatric population, as well as to evaluate the validity of this parameter at different levels of renal function. A total of 86 subjects was divided into seven groups. In group A there were 23 potential kidney donors and in group B, 18 children in remission after a first urinary tract infection. Another three groups consisted of patients with diabetes i.e. group C, seven patients with normal values of albuminuria, group D, 16 patients with microalbuminuria and group E, five patients with macroalbuminuria. In group F, there were ten patients with a well-functioning transplanted kidney and in group G, seven patients with suspected acute rejection. The procedure began with the quantification of the doses of 99m Tc-DMSA to be injected and the measurement of the empty syringe lying on the gamma camera collimator. Thereafter, four planar views of the kidneys were acquired three hours after the injection. The counts from the posterior and anterior views were subtracted for background and corrected for radioactive decay time and patient thickness. The FU was calculated by the geometric mean of counts per second from the posterior and anterior view. It was expressed as a fraction of the injected dose. The mean values of FU in healthy adults were 0.227 ± 0.077 for one kidney and 0.454 ± 0.146 for both kidneys. The mean values of FU for the left and right kidney were 0.225± 0.071 and 0.229 ± 0.079, respectively. In children, the mean values were 0.220 ± 0.092 for one kidney and 0.432 ± 0.094 for both kidneys. The highest values of FU of 0.322 ± 0.078 (0.644 ± 0.138 for both kidneys) were measured in group C. In group D, FU was 0.185 ± 0.065 (0.361 ± 0.125 for both kidneys) and in group E 0.082 ± 0.040 (0.163 ± 0.080 total). In patients with a transplanted kidney, fractional uptake was 0.162 ± 0.039 in group F and 0

  1. Fluorescence of soil humic acids and their fractions obtained by tandem size exclusion chromatography-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    Trubetskaya, O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow Region (Russian Federation). Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Inst. of Bioorganic Chemistry; Trubetskoj, O. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow Region (Russian Federation). Inst. of Basic Biological Problems; Guyot, G.; Richard, C. [UMR CNRS 6505, Aubiere (France). Lab. de Photochimie Moleculaire et Macromoleculaire; Andreux, F. [Centre des Sciences de la Terre, Dijon (France)

    2002-07-01

    Humic acids (HAs) extracted from soils of different origin (chernozem, ferralsol and ranker) and their fractions (A, B and C+D) obtained by tandem size exclusion chromatography-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were investigated by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy in the emission mode. Independently of HA source, high molecular size fractions A and B are shown to be weakly fluorescent. The main fluorophores, especially those emitting at long wavelength (around 500-510 nm), are contained in the polar and low molecular size fractions C+D. As indicated by the observed pH effect, aromatic structures bearing carboxylate and OH substituents may be involved in these longer wavelength emissions. [author].

  2. Influence of multi-step washing using Na2EDTA, oxalic acid and phosphoric acid on metal fractionation and spectroscopy characteristics from contaminated soil.

    Wei, Meng; Chen, Jiajun

    2016-11-01

    A multi-step soil washing test using a typical chelating agent (Na 2 EDTA), organic acid (oxalic acid), and inorganic weak acid (phosphoric acid) was conducted to remediate soil contaminated with heavy metals near an arsenic mining area. The aim of the test was to improve the heavy metal removal efficiency and investigate its influence on metal fractionation and the spectroscopy characteristics of contaminated soil. The results indicated that the orders of the multi-step washing were critical for the removal efficiencies of the metal fractions, bioavailability, and potential mobility due to the different dissolution levels of mineral fractions and the inter-transformation of metal fractions by XRD and FT-IR spectral analyses. The optimal soil washing options were identified as the Na 2 EDTA-phosphoric-oxalic acid (EPO) and phosphoric-oxalic acid-Na 2 EDTA (POE) sequences because of their high removal efficiencies (approximately 45 % for arsenic and 88 % for cadmium) and the minimal harmful effects that were determined by the mobility and bioavailability of the remaining heavy metals based on the metal stability (I R ) and modified redistribution index ([Formula: see text]).

  3. Impact of sole cropping and multiple cropping on soil humified carbon fractions

    Radhakrishnan, R.; Lee, I.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study was planned to improve our understanding how crop rotation can enhance humified C fractions. A long term experiment was conducted on Vanmeter farm of the Ohio State University South Centers at Piketon Ohio, USA from 2002 to 2007. Crop rotation treatments included were continuous corn (CC), corn-soybean (CS) and corn-soybean-wheat-cowpea (CSW) rotations. Randomized complete block design with 6 replications was used under natural field conditions. The findings of this long-term study revealed that multiple cropping had significantly improved humified carbon fractions compared to mono-cropping system. Although total humified carbon (THOC), sugar free humified carbon (HOC) concentration were non-significant however, humin (NH) contents, humic (HA), fulvic acids (FA), humic and fulvic acid associated glucose (HA-NH and FA-NH) were significantly affected by various crop rotations within five years. The soil under CC had 22-52% significantly greater NH concentration than CSW and CS rotations respectively. Similarly all crop rotations had shown 5-16 increase in HA and 5-17% decreased in FA over time. Likewise soil under CC had 16 and 54% greater HA-NH concentration as compared to CSW and CS rotations. The FA-NH concentration increased significantly by 27- 51% in soil under all treatments over time. The soil under CSW had greater HA/FA (1.6) fallowed by CC (1.4) and CS (1.1). Soils under CSW had significantly greater HA/HOC (12-18%) as compare to CC and CS respectively. Conversely, the value of FA/HOC decreased (1-23%) in soil under all crop rotation treatments within five years. Degree of humification (DH) had shown a significant increase (7-12%) in soil under all treatments as compared to 2002. Irrespective of crop rotation THOC, HOC, NH, humin, HA, HR and FA/HOC concentration decreased significantly with increase in soil depth. While fulvic acid concentration HA/HOC in all crop rotation increased with increase in soil depth. The effect of crop rotation

  4. A comparative study of the character and complexation properties of in-situ and extracted humic and fulvic substances

    Warwick, P.; Hall, A.; Patterson, M.

    1992-12-01

    The character and complexation properties of humic and fulvic acids, derived from a moorland water, have been studied, both under ''in-situ'' conditions and also after extraction. The characterisation studies involved determinations of UV-visible properties, fluorescence properties. size ranges, molecular weights and proton capacities. Complexation studies were conducted using High Performance Size Exclusion Chromatography, Fluorescence Reduction and the Schubert Ion Exchange Method. A strong and weak site ligand model was used to interpret the data. The effects of pH, ionic strength, side reactions, ligand type, purity and nature of the cation were considered. No major differences in the character or complexation properties of the in-situ and extracted materials were found. (Author)

  5. Comparison of the protein and fatty acid fraction of Balkan donkey and human milk

    Jasmina Gubić

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the protein and fatty acid fractions of Balkan donkey and human milk in the early lactation stage (40 and 90 day. This study revealed that donkey milk contains αs1-casein (1.38-1.89 g/L and higher concentration of β-casein (0.1-0.55 g/L in comparison to human milk. The concentration of α-lactalbumin increased during the lactation phases from 40 to 90 days in both types of milk. Donkey milk contained β-lactoglobulin in low concentrations which decreased to 90th day of lactation. Donkey milk was particularly rich in two whey proteins, lactoferrin and lysozyme, which were found to have molecular weight of approximately 76 kDa and 14.9-15.4 kDa, respectively. The content of lysozyme in donkey milk ranged from 2.39 to 2.97 g/L, while human milk contained 30-50 times lower concentrations of lysozyme in comparison to donkey milk. Thus, donkey milk contained also a higher concentration of lactoferrin (0.012-0.25 g/L than it was found in the human milk. Lysozyme and lactoferrin content in donkey milk increased during the period from 40th to 90th day of lactation. The percentage of total SFA, MUFA and PUFA was similar in donkey and human milk. The content of essential fatty acids increased during 40-90 days of lactation and was approximately 2.5 times higher in comparison to human milk.

  6. Treatment of acidic mine water at uranium mine No. 711 by barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process

    Yang Chaowen; Wang Benyi; Ding Tongsen; Zhong Pingru; Liao Yongbing; Li Xiaochu; Lu Guohua

    1994-01-01

    The barium chloride-sludge recycle-fractional neutralization process for disposal of acidic mine water at Uranium Mine No. 711 was checked through laboratory and enlarged tests and one-year industrial trial-run. The results showed that the presented technology can meet the requirements of production and environmental protection

  7. Stratospheric sulfuric acid fraction and mass estimate for the 1982 volcanic eruption of El Chichon

    Hofmann, D. J.; Rosen, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    The stratospheric sulfuric acid fraction and mass for the 1982 volcanic eruptions of El Chichon are investigated using data from balloon soundings at Laramie (41 deg N) and in southern Texas (27-29 deg N). The total stratospheric mass of these eruptions is estimated to be approximately 8 Tg about 6.5 months after the eruption with possibly as much as 20 Tg in the stratosphere about 45 days after the eruption. Observations of the aerosol in Texas revealed two primary layers, both highly volatile at 150 C. Aerosol in the upper layer at about 25 km was composed of an approximately 80 percent H2SO4 solution while the lower layer at approximately 18 km was composed of a 60-65 percent H2SO4 solution aerosol. It is calculated that an H2SO4 vapor concentration of at least 3 x 10 to the 7th molecules/cu cm is needed to sustain the large droplets in the upper layer. An early bi-modal nature in the size distribution indicates droplet nucleation from the gas phase during the first 3 months, while the similarity of the large particle profiles 2 months apart shows continued particle growth 6.5 months after the explosion.

  8. A review of fractional-order techniques applied to lithium-ion batteries, lead-acid batteries, and supercapacitors

    Zou, Changfu; Zhang, Lei; Hu, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhenpo; Wik, Torsten; Pecht, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Electrochemical energy storage systems play an important role in diverse applications, such as electrified transportation and integration of renewable energy with the electrical grid. To facilitate model-based management for extracting full system potentials, proper mathematical models are imperative. Due to extra degrees of freedom brought by differentiation derivatives, fractional-order models may be able to better describe the dynamic behaviors of electrochemical systems. This paper provides a critical overview of fractional-order techniques for managing lithium-ion batteries, lead-acid batteries, and supercapacitors. Starting with the basic concepts and technical tools from fractional-order calculus, the modeling principles for these energy systems are presented by identifying disperse dynamic processes and using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Available battery/supercapacitor models are comprehensively reviewed, and the advantages of fractional types are discussed. Two case studies demonstrate the accuracy and computational efficiency of fractional-order models. These models offer 15-30% higher accuracy than their integer-order analogues, but have reasonable complexity. Consequently, fractional-order models can be good candidates for the development of advanced battery/supercapacitor management systems. Finally, the main technical challenges facing electrochemical energy storage system modeling, state estimation, and control in the fractional-order domain, as well as future research directions, are highlighted.

  9. Bioprospecting the Curculigoside-Cinnamic Acid-Rich Fraction from Molineria latifolia Rhizome as a Potential Antioxidant Therapeutic Agent

    Der Jiun Ooi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence from both experimental and clinical studies depicts the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of various diseases. Specifically, disruption of homeostatic redox balance in accumulated body fat mass leads to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. Strategies for the restoration of redox balance, potentially by exploring potent plant bioactives, have thus become the focus of therapeutic intervention. The present study aimed to bioprospect the potential use of the curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction from Molineria latifolia rhizome as an antioxidant therapeutic agent. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF isolated from M. latifolia rhizome methanolic extract (RME contained the highest amount of phenolic compounds, particularly curculigoside and cinnamic acid. EAF demonstrated glycation inhibitory activities in both glucose- and fructose-mediated glycation models. In addition, in vitro chemical-based and cellular-based antioxidant assays showed that EAF exhibited high antioxidant activities and a protective effect against oxidative damage in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Although the efficacies of individual phenolics differed depending on the structure and concentration, a correlational study revealed strong correlations between total phenolic contents and antioxidant capacities. The results concluded that enriched phenolic contents in EAF (curculigoside-cinnamic acid-rich fraction contributed to the overall better reactivity. Our data suggest that this bioactive-rich fraction warrants therapeutic potential against oxidative stress-related disorders.

  10. Compositional and functional features of humic acid-like fractions from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung

    Li Xiaowei [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing Meiyan, E-mail: xmy5000@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Yang Jian; Huang Zhidong [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2011-01-30

    The chemical changes occurring in five different substrates of sewage sludge spiked with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia foetida for 90 days were investigated. Their humic acid-like (HAL) fractions were isolated to determine the elemental and functional composition, and structural and functional characteristics using ultraviolet/visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy. After vermicomposting, the total organic C and C/N ratio decreased, and the total extractable C and humic acid (HA) C increased in all substrates. In the HAL fractions, the C and H contents, C/N and C/O and aliphatic structures, proteinaceous components and carbohydrates decreased, while the O and N and acidic functional group contents and C/H ratio, aromaticity and polycondensation structures increased. Further, the results suggest that the addition of cow dung to sewage sludge could improve the quality of organic matter humification of the substrates. The structures of HAL fractions in vermicomposts resembled those typical of soil HA, especially the vermicompost of cow dung alone. Scanning electron microscopy showed the microstructure of HAL fraction in final product became close-grained and lumpy. Overall results indicate that vermicomposting was an efficient technology for promoting organic matter (OM) humification in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, improving their quality and environmental safety as a soil OM resource for utilization as soil amendments.

  11. Compositional and functional features of humic acid-like fractions from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung.

    Li, Xiaowei; Xing, Meiyan; Yang, Jian; Huang, Zhidong

    2011-01-30

    The chemical changes occurring in five different substrates of sewage sludge spiked with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia foetida for 90 days were investigated. Their humic acid-like (HAL) fractions were isolated to determine the elemental and functional composition, and structural and functional characteristics using ultraviolet/visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy. After vermicomposting, the total organic C and C/N ratio decreased, and the total extractable C and humic acid (HA) C increased in all substrates. In the HAL fractions, the C and H contents, C/N and C/O and aliphatic structures, proteinaceous components and carbohydrates decreased, while the O and N and acidic functional group contents and C/H ratio, aromaticity and polycondensation structures increased. Further, the results suggest that the addition of cow dung to sewage sludge could improve the quality of organic matter humification of the substrates. The structures of HAL fractions in vermicomposts resembled those typical of soil HA, especially the vermicompost of cow dung alone. Scanning electron microscopy showed the microstructure of HAL fraction in final product became close-grained and lumpy. Overall results indicate that vermicomposting was an efficient technology for promoting organic matter (OM) humification in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, improving their quality and environmental safety as a soil OM resource for utilization as soil amendments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Compositional and functional features of humic acid-like fractions from vermicomposting of sewage sludge and cow dung

    Li Xiaowei; Xing Meiyan; Yang Jian; Huang Zhidong

    2011-01-01

    The chemical changes occurring in five different substrates of sewage sludge spiked with different proportions of cow dung after vermicomposting with Eisenia foetida for 90 days were investigated. Their humic acid-like (HAL) fractions were isolated to determine the elemental and functional composition, and structural and functional characteristics using ultraviolet/visible, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and fluorescence spectroscopies and scanning electron microscopy. After vermicomposting, the total organic C and C/N ratio decreased, and the total extractable C and humic acid (HA) C increased in all substrates. In the HAL fractions, the C and H contents, C/N and C/O and aliphatic structures, proteinaceous components and carbohydrates decreased, while the O and N and acidic functional group contents and C/H ratio, aromaticity and polycondensation structures increased. Further, the results suggest that the addition of cow dung to sewage sludge could improve the quality of organic matter humification of the substrates. The structures of HAL fractions in vermicomposts resembled those typical of soil HA, especially the vermicompost of cow dung alone. Scanning electron microscopy showed the microstructure of HAL fraction in final product became close-grained and lumpy. Overall results indicate that vermicomposting was an efficient technology for promoting organic matter (OM) humification in sewage sludge and cow dung alone, as well as in mixtures of both materials, improving their quality and environmental safety as a soil OM resource for utilization as soil amendments.

  13. Elucidating Adsorptive Fractions of Natural Organic Matter on Carbon Nanotubes.

    Ateia, Mohamed; Apul, Onur G; Shimizu, Yuta; Muflihah, Astri; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Karanfil, Tanju

    2017-06-20

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is a heterogeneous mixture of organic compounds that is omnipresent in natural waters. To date, the understanding of the adsorption of NOM components by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is limited because of the limited number of comprehensive studies in the literature examining the adsorption of NOM by CNTs. In this study, 11 standard NOM samples from various sources were characterized, and their adsorption behaviors on four different CNTs were examined side-by-side using total organic carbon, fluorescence, UV-visible spectroscopy, and high-performance size-exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) analysis. Adsorption was influenced by the chemical properties of the NOM, including aromaticity, degree of oxidation, and carboxylic acidity. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) analysis showed preferential adsorption of decomposed and terrestrial-derived NOM compared to freshly produced and microbial-derived NOM. HPSEC analysis revealed preferential adsorption of fractions in the molecular weight range of 0.5-2 kDa for humic acids but in the molecular weight range of 1-3 kDa for all fulvic acids and reverse-osmosis isolates. However, the smallest characterized fraction (MW < 0.4 kDa) in all samples did not adsorb on the CNTs.

  14. Enhanced characterization of oil sands acid-extractable organics fractions using electrospray ionization-high-resolution mass spectrometry and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy.

    Bauer, Anthony E; Frank, Richard A; Headley, John V; Peru, Kerry M; Hewitt, L Mark; Dixon, D George

    2015-05-01

    The open pit oil sands mining operations north of Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, are accumulating tailings waste at a rate approximately equal to 4.9 million m(3) /d. Naphthenic acids are among the most toxic components within tailings to aquatic life, but structural components have largely remained unidentified. In the present study, electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) were used to characterize fractions derived from the distillation of an acid-extractable organics (AEO) mixture isolated from oil sands process-affected water (OSPW). Mean molecular weights of each fraction, and their relative proportions to the whole AEO extract, were as follows: fraction 1: 237 Da, 8.3%; fraction 2: 240 Da, 23.8%; fraction 3: 257 Da, 26.7%; fraction 4: 308 Da, 18.9%; fraction 5: 355 Da, 10.0%. With increasing mean molecular weight of the AEO fractions, a concurrent increase occurred in the relative abundance of nitrogen-, sulfur-, and oxygen-containing ions, double-bond equivalents, and degree of aromaticity. Structures present in the higher-molecular-weight fractions (fraction 4 and fraction 5) suggested the presence of heteroatoms, dicarboxyl and dihydroxy groups, and organic acid compounds with the potential to function as estrogens. Because organic acid compositions become dominated by more recalcitrant, higher-molecular-weight acids during natural degradation, these findings are important in the context of oil sands tailings pond water remediation. © 2015 SETAC.

  15. Chemical composition of fatty acid and unsaponifiable fractions of leaves, stems and roots of Arbutus unedo and in vitro antimicrobial activity of unsaponifiable extracts.

    Diba, Mohamed Amine; Paolini, Julien; Bendahou, Mourad; Varesi, Laurent; Allali, Hocine; Desjobert, Jean-Marie; Tabti, Boufeldja; Costa, Jean

    2010-07-01

    The chemical composition of the fatty acid and unsaponifiable fractions of the leaves, stems and roots of Arbutus unedo L. were determined using gas chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The fatty acid fractions of the leaves, stems and roots contained 38.5%, 31.3% and 14.1% palmitic acid, respectively, along with other long-chain fatty acids (up to C22). The chemical composition of the unsaponifiable fractions differed: the leaf and stem fractions contained high levels of aliphatic (32.1% and 62.6%, respectively) and terpenic compounds (49.6% and 25.7%, respectively), and the root fraction mainly contained esters, of which the most abundant was benzyl cinnamate (36.6%). The antimicrobial activities of the unsaponifiable fractions against nine species of microorganisms were assessed. The unsaponifiable leaf and stem extracts inhibited the growth of Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis and Candida albicans.

  16. Pretreatment of various feedstocks for lactic acid production: detection of sugars, organic acids and furanics in liquid fractions

    Harmsen, P.F.H.; Lips, S.J.J.; Bakker, R.R.C.

    2012-01-01

    Barley straw, sugarcane bagasse and empty fruit bunches were pretreated under acid- and alkaline conditions. Solid phase was separated from the liquid phase and the concentration of dissolved monomeric sugars, organic acids and furanics was determined. Acid hydrolysis yielded monomeric xylose

  17. Characterization of the organic fractions in the leachate from a municipal solid waste landfill. Application of different adsorption-flocculation methods for colour removal in the influent and the effluent of a treatment plant; Caracterizacion de las fracciones organicas de lixiviados en una EDAR de un vertedero de RSU. Aplicacion de distintos metodods de adsorcion-floculacion para eliminar el color del lixiviado y del efluente

    Pelaez, A. I.; Almendros, G.; Fernandez, E.; Sastre, H.; Rodicio, M. R.; Sanchez, J.

    2002-07-01

    We have studied the quantitative and qualitative changes in the organic matter from the water at different stages of the biological treatment in a bioreactor processing the leachate released by a municipal solid waste landfill. The biological processes were responsible for the production of high amount of biomass into the bioreactor and led to the formation of colloidal and soluble metabolites, with a noticeable increase of the colloidal fraction with high molecular weight, and properties comparable to those of humic acids. After the biological treatment and the ultrafiltration step the concentration of the effluent organic matter is reduced at about 50%, most of the remaining organic fractions consisting of fulvic acids (low molecular weight). The chemical composition of the colloidal fractions substantially changed in the course of the biological treatment, which caused an increase in the relative proportion of aromatic constituents.A wide range of adsorption and flocculation agents, alone or combined at different concentrations have been checked for their ability to remove the yellow colour of the effluent produced by the fulvic acid fraction. The most effective products were Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Al{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 3} FeCl{sub 3} and activated charcoal in addition to mixtures of the former with the latter. The above compounds were also tested on the influent, producing a partial clarification of the liquid. (Author) 5 refs.

  18. Membrane fractionation of herring marinade for separation and recovery of fats, proteins, amino acids, salt, acetic acid and water

    Fjerbæk Søtoft, Lene; Lizarazu, Juncal Martin; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz

    2015-01-01

    In the production of marinated herring, nearly one ton of acidic saline marinade is produced per 1.5 tons herring fillet. This spent marinade contains highly valuable compounds such as proteins and amino acids. Membranes are suited to recover these substances. In this work, six membrane stages...... containing sugars, amino acids and smaller peptides and a NF permeate containing salt and acetic acid ready for reuse. 42% of the spent marinade is recovered to substitute fresh water and chemicals. The Waste water amount is reduced 62.5%. Proteins are concentrated 30 times, while amino acids and smaller...

  19. Releasing Pattern of Applied Phosphorus and Distribution Change of Phosphorus Fractions in the Acid Upland Soils with Successive Resin Extraction

    Arief Hartono

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The releasing pattern of applied P in the acid upland soils and the soil properties influencing the pattern were studied. Surface horizons of six acid upland soils from Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan were used in this study. The releasing pattern of applied P (300 mg P kg-1 of these soils were studied by successive resin extraction. P fractionation was conducted to evaluate which fractions released P to the soil solution after successive resin extraction. The cumulative of resin-Pinorganic (Pi release of soils was fitted to the first order kinetic. Regression analyses using factor scores obtained from the previous principal components analyses was applied to determine soil properties influencing P releasing pattern. The results suggested that the maximum P release was significantly (P < 0.05 increased by acidity plus 1.4 nm mineral-related factor (PC2 i.e. exchangeable Al and 1.4 nm minerals (smectite and vermiculite and decreased by oxide related factor (PC1 i.e. aluminum (Al plus 1/2 iron (Fe (by ammonium oxalate, crystalline Al and Fe oxides, cation exchange capacity, and clay content. P fractionation analysis after successive resin extraction showed that both labile and less labile in the form of NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi fractions, respectively, can be transformed into resin-Pi when in the most labile resin-Pi is depleted. Most of P released in high oxides soils were from NaOH-Pi fraction while in low oxides soils were from NaHCO3-Pi. P release from the former fraction resulted in the maximum P release lower than that of the latter one. When NaHCO3-Pi was high, NaOH-Pi was relatively more stable than NaHCO3-Pi despite resin-Pi removal. NaHCO3-Pi and NaOH-Pi are very important P fractions in replenishing resin-Pi in these acid upland soils.

  20. Radiocarbon enrichment of soil organic matter fractions in New Zealand soils

    Goh, K.M.; Stout, J.D.; Rafter, T.A.

    1977-01-01

    Soil organic matter was extracted using the classical procedure and fractionated into humin (nonextractable), humic acid, and fulvic acid. The masses of total organic carbon in the whole soil samples and in the fractions, together with their 14 C content and 13 C/ 12 C ratios, were also determined. The following New Zealand soils were studied: a Fluvaquent, with experimental pasture plots, formed from deeply mixing subsoils of low organic carbon content; a Typic Fragiaqualf and a Typic Dystrochrept with moderately productive pastures; and an Umbric Vitrandept at two sites under native tussock and under introduced grasses of low productivity. The degree of radiocarbon enrichment of the different fractions in both topsoil and subsoil samples was examined in relation to differences in soil type, soil biological activity, and vegetation history. There was variation in the distribution and enrichment of the organic matter fractions both within the same soil type and between soil types, as well as between the topsoil and subsoil of the same soil. Differences appeared to be primarily a function of the stage of decomposition and translocation of the fractions through the soil rather than due to vegetation differences

  1. Evaluation of soluble fraction and enzymatic residual fraction of dilute dry acid, ethylenediamine, and steam explosion pretreated corn stover on the enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose.

    Qin, Lei; Liu, Li; Li, Wen-Chao; Zhu, Jia-Qing; Li, Bing-Zhi; Yuan, Ying-Jin

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed to examine the inhibition of soluble fraction (SF) and enzymatic residual fraction (ERF) in dry dilute acid (DDA), ethylenediamine (EDA) and steam explosion (SE) pretreated corn stover (CS) on the enzymatic digestibility of cellulose. SF of DDA, EDA and SE pretreated CS has high xylose, soluble lignin and xylo-oligomer content, respectively. SF of EDA pretreated CS leads to the highest inhibition, followed by SE and DDA pretreated CS. Inhibition of ERF of DDA and SE pretreated CS is higher than that of EDA pretreated CS. The inhibition degree (A0/A) of SF is 1.76 and 1.21 times to that of ERF for EDA and SE pretreated CS, respectively. The inhibition degree of ERF is 1.05 times to that of SF in DDA pretreated CS. The quantitative analysis shows that SF of EDA pretreated CS, SF and ERF of SE pretreated CS cause significant inhibition during enzymatic hydrolysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Total organic carbon and humus fractions in restored soils from limestone quarries in semiarid climate, SE Spain

    Luna Ramos, Lourdes; Miralles Mellado, Isabel; Ángel Domene Ruiz, Miguel; Solé Benet, Albert

    2016-04-01

    Mining activities generate erosion and loss of plant cover and soil organic matter (SOM), especially in arid and semiarid Mediterranean regions. A precondition for ecosystem restoration in such highly disturbed areas is the development of functional soils with sufficient organic matter. But the SOM quality is also important to long-term C stabilization. The resistance to biodegradation of recalcitrant organic matter fractions has been reported to depend on some intrinsic structural factors of humic acid substances and formation of amorphous organo-mineral recalcitrant complexes. In an experimental soil restoration in limestone quarries in the Sierra de Gádor (Almería), SE Spain, several combinations of organic amendments (sewage sludge and compost from domestic organic waste) and mulches (gravel and woodchip) were added in experimental plots using a factorial design. In each plot, 75 native plants (Anthyllis cytisoides, A. terniflora and Macrochloa tenacissima) were planted and five years after the start of the experiment total organic carbon (TOC), physico-chemical soil properties and organic C fractions (particulate organic matter, H3PO4-fulvic fraction, fulvic acids (FA), humic acids (HA) and humin) were analyzed. We observed significant differences between treatments related to the TOC content and the HA/FA ratio. Compost amendments increased the TOC, HA content and HA/FA ratio, even higher than in natural undisturbed soils, indicating an effective clay humus-complex pointing to progressively increasing organic matter quality. Soils with sewage sludge showed the lowest TOC and HA/FA ratio and accumulated a lower HA proportion indicating poorer organic matter quality and comparatively lower resilience than in natural soils and soils amended with compost.

  3. Pt.3. Carbon-13 fractionation in the decomposition of formic acid initiated by phosphoric anhydride. 13C fractionation in the decomposition of HCOOH initiated by P2O5

    Zielinski, M.; Zielinska, A.

    1998-01-01

    13 C isotope effects in the decarbonylation of formic acid of natural isotopic composition initiated by phosphorus pentoxide have been studied in a large temperature range (-5 o C) - (+90 o C). The 13 C fractionation in the carbon monooxide production at -5 o C increased from a low value of 1.2% characteristic of the first fractions of consecutively controlled portions of carbon monooxide to higher values of 13 C KIE observed in the decarbonylation of pure formic acid at corresponding temperatures. The temperature and time dependences of the measured 13 C fractionation are functions of the relative number of milimoles of formic acid and the dehydrating phosphoric anhydride, P 2 O 5 . The addition of metaphosphoric acid reagent to unreacted formic acid containing H 3 PO 4 significantly increased the 13 C fractionation in subsequent decarbonylations at 70.4 o C but to a slightly less degree than expected ( 13 C KIE = 1.0503 instead 1.0535). The addition of metaphosphoric acid reagent to formic acid saturated with NaCl results in the experimental 13 C fractionation of the value of 1.0534 very close to the theoretical one. An explanation of the low values of 13 C KIE in the initial stages of HCOOH/P 2 O 5 decarbonylations has been presented. (author)

  4. Influence of humic fractions on retention of isoproturon residues in two Moroccan soils.

    Elkhattabi, Kaouakeb; Bouhaouss, Ahmed; Scrano, Laura; Lelario, Filomena; Bufo, Sabino A

    2007-01-01

    The influence of different fractions of soil organic matter on the retention of the herbicide isoproturon (IPU) has been evaluated. Water and methanol extractable residues of (14)C labeled isoproturon have been determined in two Moroccan soils by beta -counting-liquid chromatography. The quantification of bound residues in soil and in different fractions of soil humic substances has been performed using pyrolysis/scintillation-detected gas-chromatography. Microbial mineralization of the herbicide and soil organic matter has been also monitored. Retention of isoproturon residues after 30-days incubation ranged from 22% to 32% (non-extractable fraction). The radioactivity extracted in an aqueous environment was from 20% to 33% of the amount used for the treatment; meanwhile, methanol was able to extract another 48%. Both soils showed quantities of bound residues into the humin fraction higher than humic and fulvic acids. The total amount of residues retained into the organic matter of the soils was about 65 % of non-extractable fraction, and this percentage did not change with incubation time; on the contrary, the sorption rate of the retention reaction is mostly influenced by the clay fraction and organic content of the soil. Only a little part of the herbicide was mineralized during the experimental time.

  5. Development of preparative and analytical methods of the hop bitter acid oxide fraction and chemical properties of its components.

    Taniguchi, Yoshimasa; Matsukura, Yasuko; Taniguchi, Harumi; Koizumi, Hideki; Katayama, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    The bitter acids in hops (Humulus lupulus L.) and beer, such as α-, β-, and iso-α-acids, are known to affect beer quality and display various physiological effects. However, these compounds readily oxidize, and the effect of the oxides on the properties of beer or their potential health benefits are not well understood. In this study, we developed a simple preparative method for the bitter acid oxide fraction derived from hops and designated the constituents as matured hop bitter acids (MHBA). HPLC-PDA-ESI/HRMS and MS(2) revealed that MHBA are primarily composed of α-acid-derived oxides, which possess a common β-tricarbonyl moiety in their structures similar to α-, β-, and iso-α-acids. We also developed a quantitative analytical method of whole MHBA by HPLC, which showed high precision and reproducibility. Using our newly developed method, the concentration of whole MHBA in several commercial beers was evaluated. Our results will promote the study of bitter acid oxides.

  6. Fractionation of (137)Cs and Pu in natural peatland.

    Mihalík, Ján; Bartusková, Miluše; Hölgye, Zoltán; Ježková, Tereza; Henych, Ondřej

    2014-08-01

    High Cs-137 concentrations in plants growing on peatland inspired us to investigate the quantity of its bioavailable fraction in natural peat. Our investigation aims to: a) estimate the quantity of bioavailable Cs-137 and Pu present in peat, b) verify the similarity of Cs-137 and K-40 behaviours, and c) perform a quantification of Cs-137 and Pu transfer from peat to plants. We analysed the vertical distribution of Cs-137 and Pu isotopes in the peat and their concentrations in plants growing on these places. Bioavailability of radionuclides was investigated by sequential extraction. Sequential analyses revealed that it was the upper layer which contained the majority of Cs-137 in an available form while deeper layers retained Cs-137 in immobile fractions. We can conclude that 18% of all Cs-137 in the peat is still bioavailable. Despite of the low quantity of bioavailable fraction of Cs-137 its transfer factor reached extremely high values. In the case of Pu, 64% of its total amount was associated with fulvic/humic acids which resulted in the high transfer factor from peat to plants. 27 years after the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the significant part of radionuclides deposited in peatland is still bioavailable. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of anti-HIV active dicaffeoylquinic- and tricaffeoylquinic acids in Helichrysum populifolium by NMR-based metabolomic guided fractionation.

    Heyman, Heino Martin; Senejoux, François; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; Maharaj, Vinesh Jaichand; Meyer, Jacobus Johannes Marion

    2015-06-01

    South Africa being home to more than 35% of the world's Helichrysum species (c.a. 244) of which many are used in traditional medicine, is seen potentially as a significant resource in the search of new anti-HIV chemical entities. It was established that five of the 30 Helichrysum species selected for this study had significant anti-HIV activity ranging between 12 and 21 μg/mL (IC50) by using an in-house developed DeCIPhR method on a full virus model. Subsequent toxicity tests also revealed little or no toxicity for these active extracts. With the use of NMR-based metabolomics, the search for common chemical characteristics within the plant extract was conducted, which resulted in specific chemical shift areas identified that could be linked to the anti-HIV activity of the extracts. The NMR chemical shifts associated with the activity were identified to be 2.56-3.08 ppm, 5.24-6.28 ppm, 6.44-7.04 ppm and 7.24-8.04 ppm. This activity profile was then used to guide the fractionation process by narrowing down and focusing the fractionation and purification processes to speed up the putative identification of five compounds with anti-HIV activity in the most active species, Helichrysum populifolium. The anti-HIV compounds identified for the first time from H. populifolium were three dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, i.e. 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid as well as two tricaffeoylquinic acid derivatives i.e. 1,3,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and either 5-malonyl-1,3,4-tricaffeoylquinic or 3-malonyl-1,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid, with the latter being identified for the first time in the genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characteristics of organic phosphorus fractions in different trophic sediments of lakes from the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River region and Southwestern Plateau, China

    Zhang Runyu; Wu Fengchang; Liu Congqiang; Fu Pingqing; Li Wen; Wang Liying; Liao Haiqing; Guo Jianyang

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the characteristics of organic phosphorus (P o ) fractions in sediments of six lakes from the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River region and Southwestern China Plateau, China were investigated using a soil P o fractionation scheme, and the relationships between P o , inorganic phosphorus (P i ) and pollution status were also discussed. The results show that the rank order of P o fractions was: residual P o > HCl-P o > fulvic acid-P > humic acid-P > NaHCO 3 -P o , with their average relative proportion 8.7:4.6:3.2:2.1:1.0. P o fractions, especially nonlabile P o , were significantly correlated with organic matter, P o and NaOH-P i . Different distribution patterns of P fractions were observed in those two different regions. P o fractions in the heavily polluted sediments were higher than those in moderately and no polluted sediments, it is suggested that P o should be paid more attention in the lake eutrophication investigation. - Organic phosphorus fractions in sediments from 6 different trophic Chinese lakes were characterized using an improved fractionation scheme

  9. Sorption-desorption of imidacloprid onto a lacustrine Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid fractions.

    Kandil, Mahrous M; El-Aswad, Ahmed F; Koskinen, William C

    2015-01-01

    Sorption-desorption of the insecticide imidacloprid 1-[(6-chloro-3-pyridinyl)-methyl]-N-nitro-2-imidazolidinimine onto a lacustrine sandy clay loam Egyptian soil and its clay and humic acid (HA) fractions was investigated in 24-h batch equilibrium experiments. Imidacloprid (IMDA) sorption-desorption isotherms onto the three sorbents were found to belong to a non-linear L-type and were best described by the Freundlich model. The value of the IMDA adsorption distribution coefficient, Kd(ads), varied according to its initial concentration and was ranged 40-84 for HA, 14-58 for clay and 1.85-4.15 for bulk soil. Freundlich sorption coefficient, Kf(ads), values were 63.0, 39.7 and 4.0 for HA, clay and bulk soil, respectively. The normalized soil Koc value for imidacloprid sorption was ∼800 indicating its slight mobility in soils. Nonlinear sorption isotherms were indicated by 1/n(ads) values imidacloprid sorption process with all tested sorbents. Gibbs free energy (ΔG) values indicated a spontaneous and physicosorption process for IMDA and a more favorable sorption to HA than clay and soil. In conclusion, although the humic acid fraction showed the highest capacity and affinity for imidacloprid sorption, the clay fraction contributed to approximately 95% of soil-sorbed insecticide. Clay and humic acid fractions were found to be the major two factors controlling IMDA sorption in soils. The slight mobility of IMDA in soils and the hysteresis phenomenon associated with the irreversibility of its sorption onto, mainly, clay and organic matter of soils make its leachability unlikely to occur.

  10. Lipid and fatty acid fractions in Lingula anatina (Brachiopoda): an intertidal benthic fauna in the West Bengal-Orissa coast, India

    Samaresh Samanta; Tapas Kumar Das; Amalesh Choudhury; Susanta Kumar Chakraborty

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To record the fractional components of lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids of Lingula anatina (L. anatina), a Precambrian intertidal benthic brachiopod, giving emphasis on -ω series group especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) alongside assessing their biotransformation within the population and mangrove-estuarine associated community. Methods: Different biological samples after being collected from three contrasting study sites viz. ...

  11. Amino Acid Composition, Molecular Weight Distribution and Gel Electrophoresis of Walnut (Juglans regia L. Proteins and Protein Fractionations

    Xiaoying Mao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a by-product of oil production, walnut proteins are considered as an additional source of plant protein for human food. To make full use of the protein resource, a comprehensive understanding of composition and characteristics of walnut proteins are required. Walnut proteins have been fractionated and characterized in this study. Amino acid composition, molecular weight distribution and gel electrophoresis of walnut proteins and protein fractionations were analyzed. The proteins were sequentially separated into four fractions according to their solubility. Glutelin was the main component of the protein extract. The content of glutelin, albumin, globulin and prolamin was about 72.06%, 7.54%, 15.67% and 4.73% respectively. Glutelin, albumin and globulin have a balanced content of essential amino acids, except for methionine, with respect to the FAO pattern recommended for adults. SDS-PAGE patterns of albumin, globulin and glutelin showed several polypeptides with molecular weights 14.4 to 66.2 kDa. The pattern of walnut proteins in two-dimension electrophoresis (2-DE showed that the isoelectric point was mainly in the range of 4.8–6.8. The results of size exclusion chromatogram indicated molecular weight of the major components of walnut proteins were between 3.54 and 81.76 kDa.

  12. Comparison of chemical characteristics of high oleic acid fraction of moringa oleifera oil with some vegetable oils

    Rahman, F.; Nadeem, M.; Zahoor, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical characteristics of High oleic acid fraction (HOF) of Moringa oleifera oil (MOO) was compared with sunflower, soybean and canola oils. HOF of MOO was obtained by dry fractionation at 0 degree C. Iodine value and C18:1 in HOF increased from 61.55 to 82.47 points and 70.29% to 81.15%, respectively. Cloud point of HOF was 1.1 degree C as compared to 10.2 degree C in MOO. The induction period of HOF was greater than all the vegetable oils tested in this investigation. HOF can be used as a source of edible oil with better health attributes and superior storage stability. (author)

  13. Investigation of the impact of trace elements on anaerobic volatile fatty acid degradation using a fractional factorial experimental design.

    Jiang, Ying; Zhang, Yue; Banks, Charles; Heaven, Sonia; Longhurst, Philip

    2017-11-15

    The requirement of trace elements (TE) in anaerobic digestion process is widely documented. However, little is understood regarding the specific requirement of elements and their critical concentrations under different operating conditions such as substrate characterisation and temperature. In this study, a flask batch trial using fractional factorial design is conducted to investigate volatile fatty acids (VFA) anaerobic degradation rate under the influence of the individual and combined effect of six TEs (Co, Ni, Mo, Se, Fe and W). The experiment inoculated with food waste digestate, spiked with sodium acetate and sodium propionate both to 10 g/l. This is followed by the addition of a selection of the six elements in accordance with a 2 6-2 fractional factorial principle. The experiment is conducted in duplicate and the degradation of VFA is regularly monitored. Factorial effect analysis on the experimental results reveals that within these experimental conditions, Se has a key role in promoting the degradation rates of both acetic and propionic acids; Mo and Co are found to have a modest effect on increasing propionic acid degradation rate. It is also revealed that Ni shows some inhibitory effects on VFA degradation, possibly due to its toxicity. Additionally, regression coefficients for the main and second order effects are calculated to establish regression models for VFA degradation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fractional filling with the microdepot technique as an alternative to bolus hyaluronic acid injections in facial volume restoration.

    Lim, Adrian C; Lowe, Patricia M

    2011-05-01

    For volume restoration of the face, hyaluronic acid is conventionally injected through long, large-bore, 18-gauge needles because of the higher viscosity subtypes required. These hyaluronic acids are either more highly cross-linked or larger in particle size than the less-viscous subtypes. The microdepot injection technique involves using the 31-gauge BD insulin syringe (Becton-Dickinson, North Ryde, NSW Australia) to deposit small amounts of filler (0.05-0.1 mL) throughout the area of volume loss. The procedure is extremely well tolerated, requiring only topical and ice anaesthesia. Using this method, volume restoration can be achieved naturally and progressively over a period of time. Fractional filling every 3-4 months is continued until the desired level of volume correction is attained. Patients undergoing fractional filling followed over a 12-month period did not indicate any observable compromise in filler longevity, even when highly viscous hyaluronic acid fillers were injected through small-bore, 31-gauge insulin syringes. © 2011 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2011 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  15. Phytochemical Profiling of Flavonoids, Phenolic Acids, Terpenoids, and Volatile Fraction of a Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L.) Extract.

    Mena, Pedro; Cirlini, Martina; Tassotti, Michele; Herrlinger, Kelli A; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Del Rio, Daniele

    2016-11-19

    This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the phytochemical profile of a proprietary rosemary ( Rosmarinus officinalis L.) extract rich in carnosic acid. A characterization of the (poly)phenolic and volatile fractions of the extract was carried out using mass spectrometric techniques. The (poly)phenolic composition was assessed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS n ) and a total of 57 compounds were tentatively identified and quantified, 14 of these being detected in rosemary extract for the first time. The rosemary extract contained 24 flavonoids (mainly flavones, although flavonols and flavanones were also detected), 5 phenolic acids, 24 diterpenoids (carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol derivatives), 1 triterpenoid (betulinic acid), and 3 lignans (medioresinol derivatives). Carnosic acid was the predominant phenolic compound. The volatile profile of the rosemary extract was evaluated by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) linked to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Sixty-three volatile molecules (mainly terpenes, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and ketones) were identified. This characterization extends the current knowledge on the phytochemistry of Rosmarinus officinalis and is, to our knowledge, the broadest profiling of its secondary metabolites to date. It can assist in the authentication of rosemary extracts or rosemary-containing products or in testing its bioactivity. Moreover, this methodological approach could be applied to the study of other plant-based food ingredients.

  16. Phytochemical Profiling of Flavonoids, Phenolic Acids, Terpenoids, and Volatile Fraction of a Rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. Extract

    Pedro Mena

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comprehensive analysis of the phytochemical profile of a proprietary rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract rich in carnosic acid. A characterization of the (polyphenolic and volatile fractions of the extract was carried out using mass spectrometric techniques. The (polyphenolic composition was assessed by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MSn and a total of 57 compounds were tentatively identified and quantified, 14 of these being detected in rosemary extract for the first time. The rosemary extract contained 24 flavonoids (mainly flavones, although flavonols and flavanones were also detected, 5 phenolic acids, 24 diterpenoids (carnosic acid, carnosol, and rosmanol derivatives, 1 triterpenoid (betulinic acid, and 3 lignans (medioresinol derivatives. Carnosic acid was the predominant phenolic compound. The volatile profile of the rosemary extract was evaluated by head space solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME linked to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Sixty-three volatile molecules (mainly terpenes, alcohols, esters, aldehydes, and ketones were identified. This characterization extends the current knowledge on the phytochemistry of Rosmarinus officinalis and is, to our knowledge, the broadest profiling of its secondary metabolites to date. It can assist in the authentication of rosemary extracts or rosemary-containing products or in testing its bioactivity. Moreover, this methodological approach could be applied to the study of other plant-based food ingredients.

  17. An investigation of inorganic antimony species and antimony associated with soil humic acid molar mass fractions in contaminated soils

    Steely, Sarah; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing Baoshan

    2007-01-01

    The presence of antimony compounds is often suspected in the soil of apple orchards contaminated with lead arsenate pesticide and in the soil of shooting ranges. Nitric acid (1 M) extractable Sb from the shooting range (8300 μg kg -1 ) and the apple orchard (69 μg kg -1 ) had considerably higher surface Sb levels than the control site ( -1 ), and Sb was confined to the top ∼30 cm soil layer. Sb(V) was the principal species in the shooting range and the apple orchard surface soils. Size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS) analysis of humic acids isolated from the two contaminated soils demonstrated that Sb has complexed to humic acid molar mass fractions. The results also indicate that humic acids have the ability to arrest the mobility of Sb through soils and would be beneficial in converting Sb(III) to a less toxic species, Sb(V), in contaminated areas. - The soil surface and depth distribution Sb(V) and Sb(III) species in a contaminated apple orchard and a shooting range, and the effect soil humic acids on inorganic antimony species is reported

  18. White clover fractions as protein source for monogastrics: dry matter digestibility and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid scores.

    Stødkilde, Lene; Damborg, Vinni K; Jørgensen, Henry; Laerke, Helle N; Jensen, Søren K

    2018-05-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the use of white clover as an alternative protein source for monogastrics. White clover plant and leaves were processed using a screw-press resulting in a solid pulp and a juice from which protein was acid-precipitated. The chemical composition of all fractions was determined and digestibility of dry matter (DM) and protein was assessed in an experiment with growing rats. Protein concentrates were produced with crude protein (CP) contents of 451 g kg -1 and 530 g kg -1 DM for white clover plant and leaves, respectively, and a pulp with CP contents of 313 and 374 g kg -1 DM from plant and leaves, respectively. The amino acid composition ranged from 4.72 to 6.49 g per 16 g of nitrogen (N) for lysine, 1.82-2.6 g per 16 g N for methionine and cysteine, and 3.66-5.24 g per 16 g N for threonine. True faecal digestibility of protein varied from 0.81 to 0.88, whereas DM digestibility was in the range 0.72-0.80. Methionine and cysteine were found to be limiting in all fractions, regardless of the reference group used. A high digestibility of white clover protein was found irrespective of the physical fractionation. Together with a well-balanced amino acid composition, this makes white clover a promising protein source for monogastrics. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. In vitro release of arachidonic acid and in vivo responses to respirable fractions of cotton dust

    Thomson, T.A.; Edwards, J.H.; Al-Zubaidy, T.S.; Brown, R.C.; Poole, A.; Nicholls, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    It was considered that the fall in lung function seen after exposure to cotton dust may be attributable in part to the activity of arachidonic acid metabolites, such as leucotrienes as well as to the more established release of histamine by cotton dust. However, we found that cotton and barley dusts elicited poor release of arachidonic acid from an established macrophage like cell line compared with that observed with other organic dusts. In the experimental animal, pulmonary cellular responses to both cotton and barley dust were similar to those evoked by moldy hay and pigeon dropping dusts, although after multiple doses a more severe response was seen to cotton and barley. Since both moldy hay and pigeon droppings elicit a greater arachidonic acid release than cotton or barley, a role for arachidonic acid in inducing the cellular response is less likely than other factors. There are limitations to our conclusions using this system, i.e., the arachidonic acid may be released in a nonmetabolized form, although it is noted that the two dusts with the greatest arachidonic acid release produce their clinical responses in humans largely by hypersensitivity mechanisms

  20. White clover fractions as protein source for monogastrics - Dry matter digestibility and Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Scores

    Stødkilde, Lene; Damborg, Vinni K; Jørgensen, Henry

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim was to evaluate white clover as an alternative protein source for monogastrics. White clover plant and leaves were processed using a screw-press resulting in a solid pulp and a juice from which protein was acid-precipitated. The chemical composition of all fractions...... was determined and digestibility of dry matter (DM) and protein was assessed in an experiment with growing rats. RESULTS: Protein concentrates were produced with crude protein (CP) content of 451 g/kg DM and 530 g/kg DM for white clover plant and leaves, respectively and a pulp with CP content of 313 and 374 g...

  1. Fatty acid profile and composition of milk protein fraction in dairy cows fed long-chain unsaturated fatty acids during the transition period

    Francisco Palma Rennó

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the utilization of different sources of unsaturated long-chain fatty acids in diets for dairy cows during the transition period and early lactation on the milk fatty acid profile and composition of the protein fraction. Thirty-six Holstein cows were divided into three groups, fed the following diets: control (C; soybean oil (SO; and calcium salts of long-chain unsaturated fatty acids (CS. The milk samples utilized for analysis were obtained weekly from parturition to twelve weeks of lactation; each one of the samples originated from two daily milkings. Milk composition and total nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen and non-casein nitrogen levels were analyzed. The cows receiving the diet with calcium salts had lower concentrations of non-protein nitrogen (%CP in milk compared with the animals fed the diet with soybean oil. There was a decrease in concentration of medium-chain fatty acids C12-C16, and a concomitant increase in concentrations of long-chain fatty acids >C18 in milk fat for the animals fed the diets CS and SO when compared with diet C. Soybean oil and CS diets increased milk-fat concentrations of the acids C18: 1 trans-11, C18: 2 cis-9, trans-11 and C18: 2 trans-10 cis-12 in relation to diet C. The utilization of sources of long-chain fatty acids in the diet of dairy cows increases the biological value of milk in early lactation due to higher concentrations of specific fatty acids such as CLA C18: 2cis-9, trans-11.

  2. Changes in the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle under lactic acid bacterial fermentation using a Lactobacillus Acidophilus starter culture (ESP

    Luis J. Elizondo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle was evaluated. The non-protein fraction increased progressively with corresponding decreases in the percentage protein (dry weight indicating proteolytic activity during fermentation. Significant increases in the percentages of the amino acids cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and tyrosine were observed after two months of fermentation. Percentages of arginine decreased significantly after one week and again after two months of fermentation.

  3. Changes in the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle under lactic acid bacterial fermentation using a Lactobacillus Acidophilus starter culture (ESP)

    Elizondo, Luis J.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on the protein fraction of Merluccius bilinearis muscle was evaluated. The non-protein fraction increased progressively with corresponding decreases in the percentage protein (dry weight) indicating proteolytic activity during fermentation. Significant increases in the percentages of the amino acids cystine, isoleucine, phenylalanine and tyrosine were observed after two months of fermentation. Percentages of arginine decreased significantly aft...

  4. Study of the Changes in Protein Fractions and Amino Acids of an ...

    Many studies have been conducted on the changes of the proteins in fermented sausages, which is aided by the proteolytic enzymes or lactic acid producing organisms. Information on the changes brought about by the meat enzymes and drying process as such is still unknown. We report results in this respect as observed ...

  5. Effect of soaking and phytase treatment on phytic acid, calcium, iron and zinc in rice fractions

    Liang, J.; Han, B.Z.; Nout, M.J.R.; Hamer, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    With the aim to maximise phytic acid removal and minimise losses of dry matter and minerals (Ca, Fe, Zn) in rice, three products (whole kernels and flour milled from white and brown rice; and bran, all from the same batch of variety Kenjian 90-31) were soaked in demineralized water at 10 °C (SDW),

  6. Quantitative determination of acid oils in low-temperature coal tar by means of fractional distillation

    Jaeger, A

    1950-01-01

    The aromatic hydroxy compounds in low-temperature tar were separated, and 75 compounds in the boiling range 180/sup 0/ to 320/sup 0/ isolated by means of fractional distillation in packed columns of at least 45 theoretical plates. Mixtures not separable by fractionation were separated by means of other physicochemical or chemical methods. Hydroxy compounds with boiling point up to 230/sup 0/C were detemined quantitatively, as were the phenols present in low-temperature carbonization liquors. With the Krupp-Lurgi process of low-temperature carbonization, 1.8% phenol, 1.8% o-cresol, and 3.6% m-p-cresols were formed. The tar contained up to 1.3% 1:3:5-xylenol and up to 0.9% 1:2:4-xylenol. Of the 12.1% v/v of phenol, cresols, and xylenols present in tar, 11.2% were determined quantitatively, and 9 hydroxy compounds were identified in the remaining 0.9%. On the basis of these investigations, a technical plant that permitted the recovery of pure low-temperature tar phenols and the preparation of a number of different phenol resins from the mixtures was erected.

  7. ORGANIC MATTER AND HUMIC FRACTIONS OF A HAPLIC ACRISOL AS AFFECTED BY COMPOSTED PIG SLURRY

    Ana Cristina Lüdtke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to investigate the effect of composted pig slurry (PS on the organic matter concentration and distribution of humic acid (HA, fulvic acid (FA and humin (HU fractions. The fractions were quantified following the addition of composted PS to the soil, which was produced with no acidification (T2 or with acidification with H3PO4 (T3; and in soil without compost addition (T1. The HA chemical composition was analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy. The addition of the two composts did not change the soil carbon concentration but affected the distribution of the humic fractions. For the three treatments, the carbon concentration of humic substances increased until 52 days following compost addition, with more pronounced increases with the addition of non-acidified PS compost (14.5 g kg-1 and acidified PS compost (15.1 g kg-1. This increase was reflected in both the FA and HA concentrations. The addition of compost with PS acidification resulted in the formation of larger humic micelles (HA with higher aromatic content and fewer functional groups than the non-acidified PS compost. These findings, together with a lower proportion of carbohydrate-type structures, indicated the presence of more stable humic micelles in the soil treated with acidified PS compost.

  8. SOIL ORGANIC CARBON FRACTIONS AS INFLUENCED BY SOYBEAN CROPPING IN THE HUMID PAMPA OF ARGENTINA

    Marta E. Conti

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The sustainability of continuous cropping systems depends heavily on the years of intensive agricultural production and the choice of crop sequence that alters the fractions of soil organic matter. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of continuous soybean cultivation on fractions of organic carbon in the vertic Argiudolls of the Argentinean Pampas. Total organic carbon (TOC, particulate organic carbon (POC , fulvic acids (FA, humic acids (HA, humin (H and carbon produced by microbial respiration (Cresp were assessed in plots with continuous production of soybean for over 15 years (SP and grassland plots that were considered the change control (GP. A significant reduction of TOC and POC variables in cultured soybean SP plots, relative to grassland GP, was observed. The POC / TOC and Cresp / TOC ratios were significantly lower in soybean plots than in grasslands used as controls. These ratios were interpreted as a preferential tendency to maintain high rates of mineralization of labile carbon forms and increased biological stability of humified forms in cultured soybean plots. The shapes of the humic fractions of less complexity, FA and HA, were significantly reduced in the latter plots compared with grasslands, while no significant changes occurred in the more stable and recalcitrant forms of carbon, such as humin, in either plot type.

  9. Comparison of inferred fractions of n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids in feral domestic cat diets with those in commercial feline extruded diets.

    Backus, Robert C; Thomas, David G; Fritsche, Kevin L

    2013-04-01

    To compare presumed fatty acid content in natural diets of feral domestic cats (inferred from body fat polyunsatrated fatty acids content) with polyunsaturated fatty acid content of commercial feline extruded diets. Subcutaneous and intra-abdominal adipose tissue samples (approx 1 g) from previously frozen cadavers of 7 adult feral domestic cats trapped in habitats remote from human activity and triplicate samples (200 g each) of 7 commercial extruded diets representing 68% of market share obtained from retail stores. Lipid, triacylglycerol, and phospholipid fractions in adipose tissue samples and ether extracts of diet samples were determined by gas chromatography of methyl esters. Triacylglycerol and phospholipid fractions in the adipose tissue were isolated by thin-layer chromatography. Diet samples were also analyzed for proximate contents. For the adipose tissue samples, with few exceptions, fatty acids fractions varied only moderately with lipid fraction and site from which tissue samples were obtained. Linoleic, α-linolenic, arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic acid fractions were 15.0% to 28.2%, 4.5% to 18.7%, 0.9% to 5.0%, feral cat diets, in which dietary n-3 and possibly n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids were more abundant. The impact of this difference on the health of pet cats is not known.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy of chernozem humic acid and their fractions obtained by coupled size exclusion chromatography-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SEC-PAGE).

    Sanchez-Cortes, S; Corrado, G; Trubetskaya, O E; Trubetskoj, O A; Hermosin, B; Saiz-Jimenez, C

    2006-01-01

    A humic acid extracted from a chernozem soil was fractionated combining size exclusion chromatography and polyacrylamide electrophoresis (SEC-PAGE). Three fractions named A, B, and C+D, with different electrophoretic mobilities and molecular sizes (MS), were obtained and subsequently characterized by thermochemolysis and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The data confirmed that fraction A, with the higher MS, was more aliphatic than fractions B and C+D and, in turn, fractions with lower MS (B and C+D) denoted an enrichment in lignin residues. These structural features explain conformational changes when varying the pH in the humic fraction A and indicated that combination of the two techniques is a good approach for characterizing humic substances.

  11. Antiulcerogenic activity of crude extract, fractions and populnoic acid isolated from Austroplenckia populnea (Celastraceae).

    Andrade, Sérgio F; Antoniolli, Daiane; Comunello, Eros; Cardoso, Luis G V; Carvalho, José C T; Bastos, Jairo K

    2006-01-01

    Many plant crude extracts and their isolated compounds are the most attractive sources of new drugs and show promising results for the treatment of gastric ulcers. Austroplenckia populnea is commonly known as "marmelinho-do campo, mangabeira-brava, mangabarana and vime" and it has been used in folk medicine as anti-dysenteric and anti-rheumatic. Powdered bark wood (3.25 kg) was macerated with aqueous ethanol (96%) and the extract was concentrated under reduced pressure to yield 406 g of crude hydralcoholic extract. The hydralcoholic extract was suspended in aqueous methanol and partitioned with hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate (EtOAc) in sequence, yielding 8.0 g, 9.5 g and 98.17 g of crude extracts, respectively. Chromatography of the hexane extract over a silica gel column led to the isolation of the triterpene populnoic acid. The oral administration of hydralcoholic, hexane, chloroform and EtOAc extracts (200 mg/kg) decreased the ulcer lesion index (ULI) by 83.15%, 46.87%, 32.2%, 68.12%, respectively. Oral administration of populnoic acid (100 mg/kg) diminished the ULI by 55.29%. All the obtained results were significant in comparison with the negative control, with exception of the chloroform extract.

  12. Chemical characterization of fractions of dissolved humic substances from a marginal sea—a case from the Southern Yellow Sea

    Zhang, Yaoling; Yang, Keli; Du, Jinzhou; Zhang, Fenfen; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu

    2018-03-01

    Marine dissolved organic matter (DOM) is one of the largest dynamic pools of organic carbon in the global carbon cycle, yet DOM is still chemically poorly characterized. To better understand the origin, composition, and cycling of DOM in the China marginal sea, dissolved humic substances (DHS) were isolated from seawaters in two locations in the Southern Yellow Sea. The DHS were subdivided into fulvic acids (FAs), humic acids (HAs) and the XAD-4 fractions. Complementary analytical approaches were used to characterize the isolated DHS samples including stable carbon isotopic composition, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and pyrolysis gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS). The results demonstrated that both DHS samples encountered the influences from marine source, indicating that algal and microbial-derived materials are the predominant precursors for the studied samples. The three fractions of DHS showed different properties. FAs presented more aromatic features, whereas HAs contained more aliphatic lipids and proteinaceous materials. The XAD-4 fractions were enriched in 13C and contained more carbohydrates but less aromatic compounds. The lower molecular weight and higher heteroatom content and number of carboxyl groups for the XAD-4 fractions may give them considerable geochemical significance for aspects of trace metal species, bioavailability of pollutants, mineral weathering and water acidification in marine environments.

  13. Comprehensive comparison of the chemical and structural characterization of landfill leachate and leonardite humic fractions.

    Tahiri, Abdelghani; Richel, Aurore; Destain, Jacqueline; Druart, Philippe; Thonart, Philippe; Ongena, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Humic substances (HS) are complex and heterogeneous mixtures of organic compounds that occur everywhere in the environment. They represent most of the dissolved organic matter in soils, sediments (fossil), water, and landfills. The exact structure of HS macromolecules has not yet been determined because of their complexity and heterogeneity. Various descriptions of HS are used depending on specific environments of origin and research interests. In order to improve the understanding of the structure of HS extracted from landfill leachate (LHS) and commercial HS from leonardite (HHS), this study sought to compare the composition and characterization of the structure of LHS and HHS using elemental composition, chromatographic (high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)), and spectroscopic techniques (UV-vis, FTIR, NMR, and MALDI-TOF). The results showed that LHS molecules have a lower molecular weight and less aromatic structure than HHS molecules. The characteristics of functional groups of both LHS and HHS, however, were basically similar, but there was some differences in absorbance intensity. There were also less aliphatic and acidic functional groups and more aromatic and polyphenolic compounds in the humic acid (HA) fraction than in the fulvic acid (FA) and other molecules (OM) fractions of both origins. The differences between LHS and HHS might be due to the time course of humification. Combining the results obtained from these analytical techniques cold improve our understanding of the structure of HS of different origins and thus enhance their potential use.

  14. Enantiomeric fractioning, degradation and metabolite formation of Mecoprop in subsoils with a phenoxy acid contamination history

    Frkova, Zuzana; Johansen, Anders; Karlson, Ulrich G.

    2015-01-01

    for their ability to degrade mecoprop under natural and amended conditions. Degradation of mecoprop was studied at elevated and environmentally relevant mecoprop concentrations as affected by nitrate and glucose at nitrate-reducing conditions and at a presence of oxygen (mimicking purging the soil with air. Results......As persistence and toxicity of the enantiomers of chiral pesticides are different a more comprehensive understanding of the fate of enantiomers of agrochemicals in the environment is necessary. Subsoils sampled vertically (2.5-6 m) at a site with a history of phenoxy acid contamination were used...... and enantioselectivity. Glucose hinders mecoprop degradation and changes the EF. Changing EF confirmed enzymatic dgradation of mecoprop in soils, which was well interpreted using the Michaelis-Menten kinetic model. The highest mecoprop degradation rate was measured in soils incubated at nitrate-reducing conditions...

  15. [SPECTRAL AND ACID-BASE PROPERTIES OF HEMOLYMPH PLASMA AND ITS FRACTIONS FROM GASTROPOD PULMONATE MOLLUSC ACHATINA FULICA].

    Petrova, T A; Lianguzov, A Yu; Malygina, N M

    2016-01-01

    The set of normal biochemical indicators of the hemolymph plasma of gastropod pulmonate mollusc Achatinafulica is described. Comparative analysis of the whole plasma and its subfractions enriched and depleted of oxygen-carrying protein hemocyanin was performed by spectrophotometry and spectrofluorimetry methods. Individual features of the absorption spectra were analyzed using fourth derivatives. The optimum method for estimating protein concentration was chosen. To characterize acid-base properties of plasma hemolymph and its sub-fractions we calculated buffer capacity, equivalence points and pK values of dominant buffer groups. It is shown that the major role in maintaining the buffer capacity of hemolymph belongs to the bicarbonate system. These results are compared with data for Helix pomatia available in literature. In the future the indicators studied in this work will be used to develop ecotoxicological criteria for the environmental assessment.

  16. Effects of Acetone Fraction From Buchenavia tomentosa Aqueous Extract and Gallic Acid on Candida albicans Biofilms and Virulence Factors

    Guilherme R. Teodoro

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A promising anti-Candida activity of Buchenavia tomentosa extracts was recently described. In the present work, experiments were carried out to determine the fraction with higher antifungal activity from a B. tomentosa extract. Acetone fraction (AF was obtained from the aqueous extract from dried leaves (5 min/100°C and it was the most effective one. Gallic acid (GA was identified by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI–MS and also chosen to perform antifungal tests due to its promising activity on Candida albicans. Minimal inhibitory and fungicidal concentrations (MIC and MFC were determined by broth microdilution technique. The effect on virulence factors of C. albicans was evaluated, and the cytotoxicity was determined. MIC50 and MIC90 values were both equal to 0.625 mg ml-1 for AF and 2.5 and 5 mg ml-1, respectively, for GA. AF and GA showed ability to inhibit C. albicans adherence and to disrupt 48 h-biofilm. AF and GA were effective in reducing the formation of hyphae of C. albicans SC5314. AF and GA decreased adherence of C. albicans to oral epithelial cells. AF and GA showed slight to moderate toxicity to Vero cells. This result suggests further studies for topic use of these compounds. AF, which contains a combination of several molecules, presented greater potential of antimicrobial activity than GA, with lower values of MIC and lower cytoxicity.

  17. Fractionation of acid lime essential oil using ethanol/water mixtures: Effect of the process on the aroma profile

    Gonçalves, Daniel; Costa, Patrícia; Rodrigues, Christianne E.C.; Rodrigues, Alírio E.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Fractionation of crude acid lime essential oil using ethanol/water mixtures. • Extract phases were enriched in aroma-active components. • Predicted compositions of liquid phases fitted well with the experimental data. • Aroma-active components were separated from terpenes, keeping the original acid lime essential oil odour. • The water content in the solvent did not affect the aroma profile of the phases from the liquid–liquid equilibrium. - Abstract: This study aims to separate aroma-active components of the crude Citrus latifolia essential oil (EO) from the unstable terpene hydrocarbons using ethanol/water mixtures through liquid–liquid equilibrium (LLE) and to evaluate the aroma profiles of the crude EO and the LLE phases. For this purpose, the liquid compositions of the crude EOs and the LLE phases were found by gas chromatography analysis. The compositions of the liquid phases were predicted using the NRTL model and compared to the experimental data. Afterwards, the concentrations of the components in the vapour phases above the liquid mixtures were obtained by headspace analysis and the odour intensity of each component was estimated using the Stevens’ power law concept. Finally, the classification into olfactory families was evaluated through the Perfumery Radar methodology. The solvent extraction technique made it possible to obtain extract phases enriched in citral and poor in monoterpenes, with aromas profiles similar to that of the crude EO and classified as herbaceous and citrus scent, with floral, woody, and oriental nuances. The extract phase obtained from ethanol with 50% water was found to be a promising fraction for industrial applications. Furthermore, the results proved that the NRTL parameters can be efficiently used to predict the compositions of the phases from the LLE.

  18. Evaluation of the antifungal activity and mode of action of Lafoensia pacari A. St.-Hil., Lythraceae, stem-bark extracts, fractions and ellagic acid

    Iberê F. Silva Junior

    Full Text Available Stem-bark extracts, fractions and the isolated constituent, ellagic acid of Lafoensia pacari St. Hil. (Lythraceae were in vitro assayed for antifungal activity against a panel of yeasts, hialohyphomycetes as well as dermatophytes with the microbroth dilution method. The EtOH extract and its fractions and ellagic acid exhibited activity against Candida spp and Saccharomyces cerevisiae with MIC values between 250-1000 µg/mL, but they showed no action against filamentous fungi and dermatophytes (MIC>1000 µg/mL. Active extracts were evaluated in Neurospora crassa hyphal growth inhibition and sorbitol assays and then the effect of ergosterol on the MIC of ellagic acid was studied. The active extracts and its fractions and ellagic acid showed a blotchy zone around the paper disk and induced malformations of the hypha. Besides, MIC of the ellagic acid against the Saccharomyces cerevisiae was raised from 62 to 250 µg/mL in the presence of sorbitol 0.8 M, suggesting that the ellagic acid would probably exert its action on fungal cell wall. These results indicate that ellagic acid might be the main active antifungal compound of Lafoensia pacari and further suggest that the mode of antifungal action of these extracts and ellagic acid could be associated with the inhibition of fungal cell wall.

  19. Distribution of soil arsenic species, lead and arsenic bound to humic acid molar mass fractions in a contaminated apple orchard

    Newton, Kimberly; Amarasiriwardena, Dulasiri; Xing, Baoshan

    2006-01-01

    Excessive application of lead arsenate pesticides in apple orchards during the early 1900s has led to the accumulation of lead and arsenic in these soils. Lead and arsenic bound to soil humic acids (HA) and soil arsenic species in a western Massachusetts apple orchard was investigated. The metal-humate binding profiles of Pb and As were analyzed with size exclusion chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (SEC-ICP-MS). It was observed that both Pb and As bind 'tightly' to soil HA molar mass fractions. The surface soils of the apple orchard contained a ratio of about 14:1 of water soluble As (V) to As (III), while mono-methyl (MMA) and di-methyl arsenic (DMA) were not detectable. The control soil contained comparatively very low levels of As (III) and As (V). The analysis of soil core samples demonstrated that As (III) and As (V) species are confined to the top 20 cm of the soil. - The distribution of arsenic species [i.e., As (III), As (V), and methylated arsenic species (DMA, MMA)] on the soil surface and in a depth profile as well as those associated with humic acids is discussed

  20. Antiulcer effects of aqueous extract and a fraction of phyllanthus embelic fruit on gastric acid secretion and mucosal defence factors in albino rats

    Akhtar, M.S.; Zaman, R.U.; Khan, M.S.

    2004-01-01

    Phyllanthus emblica (Euphorbiaceae) fruit has been empirically used since centuries in folkloric medicine to treat gastrointestinal disorders including the gastric ulcers. In the present study, anti-ulcerogenic properties of the fruit, its aqueous extract and a purified fraction were determined in albino rats. Aqueous extract of the fruit protected rats against gastric ulcers induced by indomethacin. Partition of the water extract yielded fractions for which anti-ulcerogenic activity evaluation studies were conducted to find out the most effective fraction. Thin layer chromatography yielded the most purified active fraction, which was found to exert anti-ulcerogenic activity in the chemically induced and stress-induced gastric ulcers in albino rats. In addition, effect of the purified fraction on gastric secretion volume, pH, acid output, ulcer index, mucus secretion and peptic activity revealed it to be the most potent anti-ulcer fraction with efficacy comparable to the reference drug, famotidine. It may be suggested that anti-ulcerogenic activities of P. emblica fruit, Its aqueous extract and the purified fraction could be due to elevation of gastric mucus secretion and inhibition of gastric acid secretion. (author)

  1. Distribution of sorbed phenanthrene and pyrene in different humic fractions of soils and importance of humin

    Pan, B.; Xing, B.S.; Liu, W.X.; Tao, S.; Lin, X.M.; Zhang, X.M.; Zhang, Y.X.; Xiao, Y.; Dai, H.C.; Yuan, H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Contributions of fulvic-humic acids (FA/HA) and humin (HM) to sorption of phenanthrene (PHE) and pyrene (PYR) in a soil were differentiated using a humic separation procedure after multi-concentration sorption experiments. It was found that the amount of solutes in FA/HA did not change significantly after 48 h, while that in HM increased continuously and slowly up to the end of the experimental period (720 h), indicating that HM was the main region for slow sorption. Based on the fitting results using Freundlich equation, it was found that nonlinearity of both solutes was greater in HM than in FA/HA, consistent with the sorption characteristics of individually extracted HA and HM in a separate experiment. The observed nonlinearity of the solute distribution was confirmed by using three other soil samples with organic carbon contents ranging from 0.7 to 7.9%. Distribution dynamics of PHE and PYR among various fractions were also discussed. - Humic fractionation after sorption experiment revealed that humin fraction is the main region for slow and nonlinear sorption of phenanthrene and pyrene

  2. Chemical characterization of the inorganic fraction of aerosols and mechanisms of the neutralization of atmospheric acidity in Athens, Greece

    E. T. Karageorgos

    2007-06-01

    + and Cl, while SO42−, Ca2+ and NH4+ were the major ionic components of the fine fraction. In the fine particles, a low molar ratio of NH4+/SO42− indicated an ammonium-poor ambient air, and together with inter-ionic correlations suggested that atmospheric ammonia is the major neutralizing agent of sulfate, while being insufficient to neutralize it to full extend. The formation of NH4NO3 is therefore not favored and additional contribution to the neutralization of acidity has been shown to be provided by Ca2+ and Mg2+. In the coarse particle fraction, the predominantly abundant Ca2+ has been found to correlate well with NO3 and SO42−, indicating its role as important neutralizing agent in this particle size range. The proximity of the location under study to the sea explains the important concentrations of salts with marine origin like NaCl and MgCl2 that were found in the coarse fraction, while chloride depletion in the gaseous phase was found to be limited to the fine particulate fraction. Total analyzed inorganic mass (elemental+ionic was found to be ranging between approximately 25–33% of the total coarse particle mass and 35–42% of the total fine particle mass.

  3. Lipid and fatty acid fractions in Lingula anatina (Brachiopoda: an intertidal benthic fauna in the West Bengal-Orissa coast, India

    Samaresh Samanta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To record the fractional components of lipid and polyunsaturated fatty acids of Lingula anatina (L. anatina, a Precambrian intertidal benthic brachiopod, giving emphasis on -ω series group especially eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA alongside assessing their biotransformation within the population and mangrove-estuarine associated community. Methods: Different biological samples after being collected from three contrasting study sites viz. SI, SII and SIII at Talsari (Longitude 87°5′ E to 88°5′ E and Latitude 20°30′ N to 22°2′ N were stored at -20 °C until analyzed. Total lipids were extracted from each sample following Bligh and Dryer method. Identification and conformation of fatty acids were done by following Ackman method. Results: On analyzing different collected samples, muscles of L. anatina exhibited the highest amount of total lipids (2.95% of which 54.03% belongs to phospholipid groups. Different body parts of studied species contained appreciable and greater amount of EPA and DHA than α-linolenic acid. Conclusions: Different collected samples exhibited variabilities in respect of total lipids and its fractional fatty acid components. The muscles of L. anatina showed maximum storage of lipids and fatty acids. Differential occurrences of EPA and DHA in different body parts of L. anatina are supposed to be due to the biotransformation process converting the α-linolenic acid from its primary food sources.

  4. Fulvic acid-like organic compounds control nucleation of marine calcite under suboxic conditions

    Neuweiler, F.; D'Orazio, M.; Immenhauser, A.M.; Geipel, G.; Heise, K.H.; Cocozza, C.; Miano, T.M.

    2003-01-01

    Intracrystalline organic compounds, enclosed within in situprecipitated marine microcrystalline calcite (automicrite), might represent either an inclusion or the catalyst of such precipitation. We use evidence from a Lower Cretaceous deep-water carbonate mound to show (1) the original source, (2)

  5. Photochemical release of humic and fulvic acid-bound metals from simulated soil and streamwater

    Porcal, Petr; Amirbahman, A.; Kopáček, Jiří; Novák, František; Norton, S. A.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2009), s. 1064-1071 ISSN 1464-0325 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/06/0410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517; CEZ:AV0Z60660521 Keywords : dissolved organic matter * irradiation * iron * aluminium Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.225, year: 2009

  6. Dynamics of phosphorus fractions in the rhizosphere of fababean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) grown in calcareous and acid soils

    Li, G.; Li, Haigang; Leffelaar, P.A.; Shen, J.; Zhang, F.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of soil phosphorus (P) fractions were investigated, in the rhizosphere of fababean (Vicia faba L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) grown in calcareous and acid soils. Plants were grown in a mini-rhizotron with a thin (3 mm) soil layer, which was in contact with the root-mat, and considered as

  7. Analysis of electrophoretic soil humic acids fractions by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography with on-line absorbance and fluorescence detection.

    Trubetskoj, Oleg A; Richard, Claire; Guyot, Ghislain; Voyard, Guillaume; Trubetskaya, Olga E

    2012-06-22

    A combination of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP HPLC) with on-line absorbance and fluorescence detection was used for analysis of chernozem soil humic acids (HAs) and their fractions A, B and C+D with different electrophoretic mobility (EM) and molecular size (MS). Samples were injected onto the column at the identical volume and absorbance. All chromatograms exhibit the resolution of seven peaks. The estimation of relative recovery of HAs and fractions from the reverse-phase column has been done. High MS fraction A, which possesses the low EM, is essentially more hydrophobic (73% of the fraction amount remained adsorbed on the column) and aliphatic than medium MS and EM fraction B (33% of the fraction amount remained adsorbed on the column). The most hydrophilic and aromatic properties belong to low MS fraction C+D, which possess the highest EM and practically was not adsorbed on the column. The hydrophobicity of the bulk HAs lies within the range of fractions hydrophobicity. The absorption spectra of bulk HAs, electrophoretic fractions A, B, C+D and corresponding RP HPLC peaks were featureless but had differences in the values of absorbance ratio at 300 and 400 nm (A3/A4). For fractions A and B this ratio gradually decreased from peak 1 to 7 (from 3.05 to 2.80 and 3.00 to 2.40, respectively). This trend was less pronounced in HAs and practically absent in fraction C+D, where ratio A3/A4 varied within a small range. The strong relationship between fluorescence properties, EM, MS, polarity and aliphaticity/aromaticity of HAs fractions was found. Humic and protein-like fluorescence had different polarity nature. The protein-like fluorescence is located in humic material which irreversibly adsorbed on the reverse-phase column and not subjected to RP HPLC characterization. The humic-like fluorescence at Ex/Em 270/450 nm is mostly located in the hydrophilic peak of low MS fraction C+D. Taking into account that high MS fraction A consisted

  8. MIKROEMULSIFIKASI FRAKSI TIDAK TERSABUNKAN DISTILAT ASAM LEMAK MINYAK SAWIT [Microemulsification of Unsaponifiable Fractions of Palm Fatty Acid Distillate

    Teti Estiasih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD is a by-product of palm oil refining that contains valuable bioactive compounds such as phytosterols, tocopherol, tocotrienols, and squalene which acummulates in unsaponifiable fraction (USF. In emulsion form, USF will be convenient and easy to use as food supplements or fortificants. Microemulsion is a type of emulsion that has stable droplet sizes of less than 10 m. Hence, the best emulsifier for USF microemulsion is important to be determined. The USF microemulsion was prepared by homogenizing the sample mixtures at 12.000 rpm for 20 min at USF concentration of 10% (w/v with lecithin and tween 80 as the emulsifiers at concentratiosn of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% (w/v. The microemulsions were analyzed for their viscosity, stability, and particle size distributions, as well as microstructures. The results showed that characteristics of microemulsion were affected by emulsifier types and concentrations. Tween 80 produced better microemulsion than lecithin as indicated by more stable emulsions, smaller droplet sizes, and narrower ranges of droplet size distributions. Increasing lectihin concentrations resulted in a narrower droplet size distribution but the average droplet size was not always smaller. Conversely, increasing tween 80 concentrations increased the average droplet sizes and ranges of particle size distributions. The most suitable emulsifier for USF microemulsion was tween 80 at concentration of 0.5%. This microemulsion contained bioactive compounds derived from USF, namely vitamin E (mainly tocotrienols, phytosterols, and squalene.

  9. Comparative analysis of the effects of CO2 fractional laser and sonophoresis on human skin penetration with 5-aminolevulinic acid.

    Choi, J H; Shin, E J; Jeong, K H; Shin, M K

    2017-11-01

    Successful delivery of a photosensitizer into the skin is an important factor for effective photodynamic therapy (PDT). The effective method to increase drug penetration within short incubation time overcoming skin barrier have been investigated. This study was performed to analyze and compare the effectiveness of ablative fractional laser (FXL) pretreatment and/or sonophoresis for enhancing the penetration of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) into human skin in vivo. Twenty-four identical 1 × 1 cm 2 treatment areas were mapped on the backs of ten healthy male subjects. Each area received FXL pretreatment and/or sonophoresis with different energy settings and ALA incubation times. After treatments, porphyrin fluorescence reflecting the ALA penetration were measured. Application of ablative CO 2 FXL pretreatment resulted to higher fluorescence intensities than the non-treatment group. Incubation times were positively correlated with the increments of ALA penetration. However, increasing pulse energy or combining with sonophoresis did not show additional positive effects on ALA penetration. Ablative CO 2 FXL pretreatment effectively facilitated ALA penetration in human skin in vivo. Ablative CO 2 FXL alone without sonophoresis setting pulse energy of 10 and 20 mJ with more than 60 min of ALA incubation time could be an ideal setting for ALA penetration.

  10. [Comparative characteristics of the amino acid composition of the protein fractions of the hydrogen bacteria Hydrogenomonas eutropha in meat and wheat].

    Barashkov, V A; Trubachev, I N; Gitel'zon, I I

    1976-01-01

    An attempt was made to compare the biological value of the biological mass of the hydrogen bacteria Tydrogenomas eutropha, of meat and wheat on the ground of the fractional and amino acids composition of their proteins. Substantial differences in the distribution of proteins and amino acids in all of the three objects examined were revealed. It is shown that more than one half of the entire protein contained in the biological mass of the hydrogen bacteria is made up of poorly soluble structural proteins difficultly amenable to the action of digestive enzymes. It is this fraction where the bulk of essential amino acids is concentrated. The data obtained imply that the biological value of the biological mass of hydrogen bacteria is higher than in wheat, but lower than in meat.

  11. The dynamics of acid-soluble phosphorus compounds in the course of winter and spring wheat germination under various thermic conditions. Part II. Labile phosphorus after hydrolysis of the acid-soluble fraction

    A. Barbaro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The changes in labile phosphorus compounds content during germination of wheat were investigated. These compounds were determined in acid-soluble germ extracts separated into fractions according to the solubility of their barium salts. Low germination temperature was found to raise the labile phosphorus content in the fraction of insoluble barium salts. If we assume that labile P of this fraction consisted mainly of adenosinedi- and triphosphates, it would seem that the rise, in the ATP and ADP level under the influence of low temperature may be essential for initiating flowering in winter varieties.

  12. New insights into the molecular mechanism of Boletus edulis ribonucleic acid fraction (BE3) concerning antiproliferative activity on human colon cancer cells.

    Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Ribeiro, Miguel; Marques, Guilhermina; Nunes, Fernando Milheiro; Pożarowski, Piotr; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2017-05-24

    One of the relatively new and promising strategies of cancer treatment is chemoprevention, which involves the use of natural or synthetic compounds to block, inhibit or reverse carcinogenesis. A valuable and still untapped source of chemopreventive compounds seems to be edible mushrooms belonging to higher Basidiomycetes. Boletus edulis biopolymers extracted with hot water and purified by anion-exchange chromatography showed antiproliferative activity in colon cancer cells, but only fraction BE3, mostly composed of ribonucleic acids, was able to inhibit DNA synthesis in HT-29 cells. The present work aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of this Boletus edulis ribonucleic acid fraction and in this sense flow cytometry and western blotting were applied to cell cycle analysis in HT-29 cells. We found that the antiproliferative ability of fraction BE3 observed in HT-29 cells was associated with the modulation of expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins (Cyclin D1, Cyclin A, p21 and p27) leading to cell accumulation in the S phase of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the BE3 fraction showed effective silencing of the signal transduction in an MAPK/Erk pathway in HT-29 and LS180 colon cancer cell lines. Thus, the previously and currently obtained results indicate that the BE3 fraction from Boletus edulis has great potential and needs to be further exploited through animal and clinical studies in order to develop a new efficient and safe therapeutic strategy for people who have been threatened by or suffered from colon cancer.

  13. Incorporation of 14CO2 and 15NH4 into amino acids of the two subunits of fraction 1 protein in spinach leaves

    Sano, Chiaki; Ito, Osamu; Yoneyama, Tadakatsu; Kumazawa, Kikuo

    1978-01-01

    14 Co 2 and 15 NH 4 were applied to spinach leaf discs, and the incorporation of 14 C and 15 N into the constituent amino acids of subunits in Fraction 1 protein was traced. The solution containing NaH 14 CO 3 and ( 15 NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 was vacuum-infiltrated into leaf discs, which were then incubated under light condition for 8 hr. The leaf discs were immediately frozen with liquid nitrogen after the incubation. The Fraction 1 protein was isolated and purified according to Kawashima's method, and separated into two subunits by his method. These subunits were hydrolyzed, and the hydrolyzates were analyzed by amino acid analyzer. The determination of 14 C activity and 15 N content in each amino acid was performed as previously described. Glycine and aspartic acid showed the highest 14 C specific activity among free amino acids. The distribution pattern of 14 C in bound amino acids almost reflected the distribution in free amino acids, though the 14 C specific activity in the former was lower than that in the latter. There was some difference in the 14 C specific activity of large and small subunits. The 15 N content of glutamine was the highest among free amino acids. This result coincides with the previous conclusion that when ammonium was applied to the free cells separated from spinach leaves, it was initially incorporated into glutamine in the sequence of its assimilation. Glutamic acid and serine showed the highest 15 N content among bound amino acids. (Kobatake, H.)

  14. Selective fermentation of carbohydrate and protein fractions of Scenedesmus, and biohydrogenation of its lipid fraction for enhanced recovery of saturated fatty acids.

    Lai, YenJung Sean; Parameswaran, Prathap; Li, Ang; Aguinaga, Alyssa; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-02-01

    Biofuels derived from microalgae have promise as carbon-neutral replacements for petroleum. However, difficulty extracting microalgae-derived lipids and the co-extraction of non-lipid components add major costs that detract from the benefits of microalgae-based biofuel. Selective fermentation could alleviate these problems by managing microbial degradation so that carbohydrates and proteins are hydrolyzed and fermented, but lipids remain intact. We evaluated selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass in batch experiments buffered at pH 5.5, 7, or 9. Carbohydrates were fermented up to 45% within the first 6 days, protein fermentation followed after about 20 days, and lipids (measured as fatty acid methyl esters, FAME) were conserved. Fermentation of the non-lipid components generated volatile fatty acids, with acetate, butyrate, and propionate being the dominant products. Selective fermentation of Scenedesmus biomass increased the amount of extractable FAME and the ratio of FAME to crude lipids. It also led to biohydrogenation of unsaturated FAME to more desirable saturated FAME (especially to C16:0 and C18:0), and the degree of saturation was inversely related to the accumulation of hydrogen gas after fermentation. Moreover, the microbial communities after selective fermentation were enriched in bacteria from families known to perform biohydrogenation, i.e., Porphyromonadaceae and Ruminococcaceae. Thus, this study provides proof-of-concept that selective fermentation can improve the quantity and quality of lipids that can be extracted from Scenedesmus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Humic and fluvic acids and organic colloidal materials in the environment

    Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Clark, S.B. [Univ. of Georgia, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Humic substances are ubiquitous in the environment, occurring in all soils, waters, and sediments of the ecosphere. Humic substances arise from the decomposition of plant and animal tissues yet are more stable than their precursors. Their size, molecular weight, elemental composition, structure, and the number and position of functional groups vary, depending on the origin and age of the material. Humic and fulvic substances have been studied extensively for more than 200 years; however, much remains unknown regarding their structure and properties. Humic substances are those organic compounds found in the environment that cannot be classified as any other chemical class of compounds. They are traditionally defined according to their solubilities. Fulvic acids are those organic materials that are soluble in water at all pH values. Humic acids are those materials that are insoluble at acidic pH values (pH < 2) but are soluble at higher pH values. Humin is the fraction of natural organic materials that is insoluble in water at all pH values. These definitions reflect the traditional methods for separating the different fractions from the original mixture. The humic content of soils varies from 0 to almost 10%. In surface waters, the humic content, expressed as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), varies from 0.1 to 50 ppm in dark-water swamps. In ocean waters, the DOC varies from 0.5 to 1.2 ppm at the surface, and the DOC in samples from deep groundwaters varies from 0.1 to 10 ppm. In addition, about 10% of the DOC in surface waters is found in suspended matter, either as organic or organically coated inorganic particulates. Humic materials function as surfactants, with the ability to bind both hydrophobic and hydrophyllic materials, making numic and fluvic materials effective agents in transporting both organic and inorganic contaminants in the environment.

  16. Complexation of metal ions with humic acid: charge neutralization model

    Kim, J.I.; Czerwinski, K.R.

    1995-01-01

    A number of different approaches are being used for describing the complexation equilibrium of actinide ions with humic or fulvic acid. The approach chosen and verified experimentally by Tu Muenchen will be discussed with notable examples from experiment. This approach is based on the conception that a given actinide ion is neutralized upon complexation with functional groups of humic or fulvic acid, e.g. carboxylic and phenolic groups, which are known as heterogeneously cross-linked polyelectrolytes. The photon energy transfer experiment with laser light excitation has shown that the actinide ion binding with the functional groups is certainly a chelation process accompanied by metal ion charge neutralization. This fact is in accordance with the experimental evidence of the postulated thermodynamic equilibrium reaction. The experimental results are found to be independent of origin of humic or fulvic acid and applicable for a broad range of pH. (authors). 23 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  17. Sorption of selected organic compounds from water to a peat soil and its humic-acid and humin fractions: Potential sources of the sorption nonlinearity

    Chiou, C.T.; Kile, D.E.; Rutherford, D.W.; Sheng, G.; Boyd, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    The sorption isotherms of ethylene dibromide (EDB), diuron (DUN), and 3,5-dichlorophenol (DCP) from water on the humic acid and humin fractions of a peat soil and on the humic-acid of a muck soil have been measured. The data were compared with those of the solutes with the whole peat from which the humic-acid (HA) and humin (HM) fractions were derived and on which the sorption of the solutes exhibited varying extents of nonlinear capacities at low relative concentrations (C(e)/S(w)). The HA fraction as prepared by the density-fractionated method is relatively pure and presumably free of high- surface-area carbonaceous material (HSACM) that is considered to be responsible for the observed nonlinear sorption for nonpolar solutes (e.g., EDB) on the peat; conversely, the base-insoluble HM fraction as prepared is presumed to be enriched with HSACM, as manifested by the greatly higher BET- (N2) surface area than that of the whole peat. The sorption of EDB on HA exhibits no visible nonlinear effect, whereas the sorption on HM shows an enhanced nonlinearity over that on the whole peat. The sorption of polar DUN and DCP on HA and HM display nonlinear effects comparable with those on the whole peat; the effects are much more significant than those with nonpolar EDB. These results conform to the hypothesis that adsorption onto a small amount of strongly adsorbing HSACM is largely responsible for the nonlinear sorption of nonpolar solutes on soils and that additional specific interactions with the active groups of soil organic matter are responsible for the generally higher nonlinear sorption of the polar solutes.

  18. Fatty acids in serum lipid fractions as indicators of fat intake in 5-year-old children in the STRIP project

    Hagström, Hanna; Jokinen, Eero; Seppänen, Ritva; Salo, Pia; Viikari, Jorma; Rönnemaa, Tapani; Helenius, Hans; Simell, Olli

    1998-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the association between dietary fat composition and the proportion of fatty acids in serum lipid fractions as biomarkers of previous dietary fat quality in 5-year-old children. Using 4-consecutive-day food records, the food consumption of half (n=50) of a group of randomly selected children who are participating in a prospective randomized coronary risk factor intervention project (STRIP; n=1062 at recruitment at 7 months of age) was estim...

  19. ORGANIC MATTER FRACTIONS OF AN IRRIGATED OXISOL UNDER NO - TILL AND CONVENTIONAL TILLAGE IN THE BRAZILIAN SEMI - ARID REGION

    RAFAEL PEREIRA SALES

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The replacement of natural vegetation by crop systems directly impacts the soil organic matter fractions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the total organic carbon (TOC and nitrogen (TN contents in different fractions of the soil organic matter (SOM of an Oxisol of the Brazilian semiarid region under different irrigated crops and different soil management systems. Seven treatments were evaluated, which consisted of two soil management systems (no - till and conventional tillage and three crops (maize, sunflower and sorghum, using as reference the soil under a native forest (NF. The summer crops preceded common bean crops in the autumn - winter. The total organic carbon content, total nitrogen, carbon content in humic substances and their constituents (fulvic acids, humic acids and humin and labile, non - labile and water - soluble carbon contents were evaluated two years and three months after the experiment implementation to determine the carbon lability (L lability index (LI, partitioning index (CPI and management index (CMI. The greatest carbon, nitrogen and organic matter contents in the soil surface layer (0.00 - 0.05 m were found in crops under no - till system (NTS, especially maize. The crops under NTS presented greater carbon content in humic substances than the conventional tillage system (CTS ones in the layer 0.05 - 0.10 m. The crops under NTS presented greater sustainability in the Brazilian semiarid region compared with those under CTS, as shown by their higher CMI in the soil surface layer.

  20. Nature differences of humic acids fractions induced by extracted sequence as explanatory factors for binding characteristics of heavy metals.

    Shi, Wenjing; Lü, Changwei; He, Jiang; En, He; Gao, Manshu; Zhao, Boyi; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Haijun; Liu, Hualin; Zhang, Yu

    2018-06-15

    The composition and structure of Humic acid (HA) is so heterogeneous that it brings significant barriers to investigate the interaction between HA and heavy metal ions. The isolation of HA with relatively homogeneity is a key to reveal the binding mechanisms between HA and heavy metals. In this work, ten HA fractions (HAs) were obtained by sequential alkali extraction procedure and nature differences of the extracted HAs were considered as explanatory factors for binding characteristics of Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ . The results indicate that more large molecular weight (MW) HA subunits, less carboxyl and phenolic group contents, weaker aromaticity and polarity were measured with increasing extractions, inducing weaker binding capacity of HAs. Ligand binding and bi-Langmuir models indicated that the sorption capacity and binding affinity of earlier extracted HAs were higher than the latter ones. The peak area changes at 3427, 1599, and 619 cm -1 pre- and post-adsorption in FTIR spectra suggested carboxyl, phenolic and nitrogen-containing groups were involved in the adsorption process. At the same time, the peak area difference between HAs and HAs-metal (ΔS) of phenolic groups were 8.22-20.50, 6.81-21.11 and 10.66-19.80% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively, ΔS of carboxyl groups 6.64-17.03, 8.96-16.82 and 9.45-17.85% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively, ΔS of nitrogen-containing groups 0.33-0.48, 0.20-1.38 and 0.31-0.59% for Cu 2+ , Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively. ΔS of phenolic and carboxyl groups were larger than those of nitrogen-containing groups, implying that these two groups were the predominant binding sites suppliers for metal ions, which were also supported by the results of correlation analysis. This work is helpful to insight the environmental impacts of natural organic matter and the fate of heavy metals in natural environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fractional Ablative Laser Followed by Transdermal Acoustic Pressure Wave Device to Enhance the Drug Delivery of Aminolevulinic Acid: In Vivo Fluorescence Microscopy Study.

    Waibel, Jill S; Rudnick, Ashley; Nousari, Carlos; Bhanusali, Dhaval G

    2016-01-01

    Topical drug delivery is the foundation of all dermatological therapy. Laser-assisted drug delivery (LAD) using fractional ablative laser is an evolving modality that may allow for a greater precise depth of penetration by existing topical medications, as well as more efficient transcutaneous delivery of large drug molecules. Additional studies need to be performed using energy-driven methods that may enhance drug delivery in a synergistic manner. Processes such as iontophoresis, electroporation, sonophoresis, and the use of photomechanical waves aid in penetration. This study evaluated in vivo if there is increased efficacy of fractional CO2 ablative laser with immediate acoustic pressure wave device. Five patients were treated and biopsied at 4 treatment sites: 1) topically applied aminolevulinic acid (ALA) alone; 2) fractional ablative CO2 laser and topical ALA alone; 3) fractional ablative CO2 laser and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device delivery system; and 4) topical ALA with transdermal delivery system. The comparison of the difference in the magnitude of diffusion with both lateral spread of ALA and depth diffusion of ALA was measured by fluorescence microscopy. For fractional ablative CO2 laser, ALA, and transdermal acoustic pressure wave device, the protoporphyrin IX lateral fluorescence was 0.024 mm on average vs 0.0084 mm for fractional ablative CO2 laser and ALA alone. The diffusion for the acoustic pressure wave device was an order of magnitude greater. We found that our combined approach of fractional ablative CO2 laser paired with the transdermal acoustic pressure wave device increased the depth of penetration of ALA.

  2. The influence of different matrices on the nature and content of haloacetic acids precursors in ozonized water

    Molnar Jelena J.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the influence of different matrices (groundwater a realistic natural matrix and commercial humic acid solution a synthetic matrix on the nature and content of haloacetic acid (HAA precursors in ozonized water (0.4 to 3.0 mg O3/mg DOC; pH 6. Natural organic matter (NOM characterization of the natural matrix showed it was largely of hydrophobic character (65% fulvic and 14% humic acids, with the hydrophilic fractions HPIA and HPI-NA at 12% and 9%, respectively. At approximately the same dissolved organic carbon (DOC content of the investigated matrices (~10 mg /L, a greater degree of hydrophobicity was seen in the humic acid solution than in the natural matrix, resulting in a higher content of HAA precursors (559 ± 21 μg/L in the synthetic matrix compared to 309 ± 15 μg/L in the natural matrix. By applying different ozone doses (0.4 to 3.0 mg O3/mg DOC, the DOC content of the studied matrices was reduced by 6-22%, with a maximum process efficacy being achieved with 3.0 mg O3/mg DOC. Ozonation also lead to changes in the NOM structure, i.e. complete oxidation of the humic acid fractions in both investigated matrices. After oxidation, hydrophilic structures dominate the natural water matrix (65%, whereas the synthetic matrix has an equal distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic fractions (~50%. Changes in the content and structure of NOM during ozonation resulted in the reduction of the total HAA precursors content (63-85%, using 3.0 mg O3/mg DOC. Detailed analysis of the reactivity of the residual HAA precursor materials shows that ozonation using 3.0 mg O3/mg DOC reduced the reactivity of the NOM fractions in comparison to the raw water. By contrast, HAA precursor material present in the commercial HA solution was transformed after ozonation into other reactive compounds, i.e. precursors which originated from the fulvic acid and hydrophilic fractions. The results of the laboratory testing indicate that the

  3. Characterization of Time-Dependent Contact Angles for Oleic Acid Mixed Sands with Different Particle Size Fractions

    Wijewardana, Y. N. S.; Kawamoto, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    ) mixed sands representing four different particle size fractions ranging from 0.105 to 0.84 mm. Initial soil-water contact angle (αi), and the time dependence of contact angle were measured by the sessile drop method. Results showed that the αi value for fine and middle sand fractions increased rapidly...... in contact angle (α), well captured the time dependence of α....

  4. Extraction Kinetics and Molecular Size Fractionation of Humic Substances From Two Brazilian Soils

    Dick Deborah Pinheiro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the extraction behaviour of humic substances (HS from an Oxisol and a Mollisol from South Brazil, by using 0.1 and 0.5 mol L-1 NaOH and 0.15 mol L-1 neutral pyrophosphate solutions, respectively, was systematically studied. The kinetics and efficiency of HS extraction were evaluated by means of UV/Vis spectroscopy. The isolated humic acids (HA and fulvic acids (FA were size-classified by multistage ultrafiltration (six fractions in the molecular weight range of 1 to 100 kDa. The obtained data show that the HS extraction yield depended not only on the extractant, but also on the soil type. Within 3 h approximately 90% of the soluble HS could be extracted following complex extraction kinetics by both methods and none or little structural modification was verified as observed from their stable extinction ratio E350/E550. In the Mollisol the pyrophosphate extraction was more effective, suggesting that a great part of HS occurred as macromolecules bonded to clay minerals and aggregated between themselves through cationic bridges. In the Oxisol a higher HS yield was verified with the alkaline method, presumably due to HS fixation onto the oxide surface by H-bonds and/or surface complexation reactions. In general, HS extracted by the pyrophosphate procedure showed higher molecular weights than those extracted by NaOH.

  5. In situ acidity and pH of size-fractionated aerosols during a recent smoke-haze episode in Southeast Asia.

    Behera, Sailesh N; Cheng, Jinping; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of aerosol acidity has received increased attention in recent years due to its influence on atmospheric visibility, climate change and human health. Distribution of water soluble inorganic (WSI) ions in 12 different size fractions of aerosols was investigated under two different atmospheric conditions (smoke-haze and non-haze periods) in 2012 using the Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) and nano-MOUDI for the first time in Singapore. To estimate the in situ acidity ([H(+)]Ins) and in situ aerosol pH (pHIS), the Aerosol Inorganic Model version-IV under deliquescent mode of airborne particles was used at prevailing ambient temperature and relative humidity. The study revealed an increase in the levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) mass and concentrations of WSI ions for all size fractions during the smoke-haze period, which was caused by the trans-boundary transport of biomass burning-impacted air masses from Indonesia. A bimodal distribution was observed for concentrations of SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-), K(+) and Na(+), whereas concentrations of NH4(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) showed a single mode distribution. The concentration of WSI ions in PM1.8 during the smoke-haze period increased by 3.8 (for SO4(2-)) to 10.5 (for K(+)) times more than those observed during the non-haze period. The pHIS were observed to be lower during the smoke-haze period than that during the non-haze period for all size fractions of PM, indicating that atmospheric aerosols were more acidic due to the influence of biomass burning emissions. The particles in the accumulation mode were more acidic than those in the coarse mode.

  6. A Comparison between the Effects of Glucantime, Topical Trichloroacetic Acid 50% plus Glucantime, and Fractional Carbon Dioxide Laser plus Glucantime on Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Lesions

    Fariba Jaffary

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic disease in Iran. Pentavalent antimonial drugs have been the first line of therapy in cutaneous leishmaniasis for many years. However, the cure rate of these agents is still not favorable. This study was carried out to compare the efficacies of intralesional glucantime with topical trichloroacetic acid 50% (TCA 50% + glucantime and fractional carbon dioxide laser + glucantime in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis. Methods. A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into three groups of 30 to be treated with intralesional injection of glucantime, a combination of topical TCA 50% and glucantime, or a combination of fractional laser and glucantime. The overall clinical improvement and changes in sizes of lesions and scars were assessed and compared among three groups. Results. The mean duration of treatment was 6.1±2.1 weeks in all patients (range: 2–12 weeks and 6.8±1.7, 5.2±1.0, and 6.3±3.0 weeks in glucantime, topical TCA plus glucantime, and fractional laser plus glucantime groups, respectively (P=0.011. Complete improvement was observed in 10 (38.5%, 27 (90%, and 20 (87% patients of glucantime, glucantime + TCA, and glucantime + laser groups, respectively (P<0.001. Conclusion. Compared to glucantime alone, the combination of intralesional glucantime and TCA 50% or fractional CO2 laser had significantly higher and faster cure rate in patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  7. The effect of different replications of humic acid fertilization on yield ...

    Jane

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... herbage yield (3045 kg ha-1) and plant height (61 cm) was obtained from soil 100% ... Key words: Crude protein, fertilization, fulvic acid, humic acid and vetch. .... The treatment material used in this study is liquid humic acid.

  8. Simultaneous removal of humic acid/fulvic acid and lead from landfill leachate using magnetic graphene oxide

    Zhang, Jing [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Gong, Ji-Lai, E-mail: jilaigong@gmail.com [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Zenga, Guang-Ming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Ou, Xiao-Ming [China National Engineering Research Center for Agrochemicals, Hunan Research Institute of Chemical Industry, Changsha 410014 (China); Jiang, Yan; Chang, Ying-Na; Guo, Min; Zhang, Chang; Liu, Hong-Yu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Ministry of Education, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Highlights: • Magnetic graphene oxide was synthesized and used to simultaneously remove HA/FA and Pb(II) from landfill leachate. • In HA-Pb(II) system, Pb(II) removal rapidly increased to the maximum (about 87%) and considerably decreased with increasing HA concentration. However, in FA-Pb(II) system, Pb(II) removal slightly increased and remained constant as FA concentration increased. • In binary system, the removal efficiency of HA/FA by MGO was enhanced due to the increase of Pb(II) concentration. • In landfill leachate, MGO showed considerable removal efficiency for both Pb(II) and HA/FA. - Abstract: The elimination of organic matters and heavy metals in landfill leachate remains a longstanding challenge in wastewater treatment. In this study, magnetic graphene oxide (MGO) was synthesized and investigated to explore the possibility of applying in the simultaneous removal of HA/FA and Pb(II) from landfill leachate. MGO was characterized by Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscope. In single system, the sorption isotherm for FA on MGO at 25 °C were better described by Freundlich model than Langmuir and Temkin models with a maximum adsorption capacity of 72.38 mg/g. The isotherm data for HA at 25 °C was fitted well both Freundlich and Temkin models with a maximum adsorption capacity of 98.82 mg/g, while the isotherm data for Pb(II) at 25 °C was fitted well both Langmuir and Temkin models with a maximum adsorption capacity of 58.43 mg/g. In binary system, results showed that TOC removal (both in HA and FA) enhanced with increasing Pb(II). Furthermore, TOC removal enhancement caused by the increase of Pb(II) in HA-Pb(II) system was greater than that in FA-Pb(II), which was caused by HA possessing more substantial aromatic rings than FA. Noticeably, Pb(II) removal steeply increased to the maximum (about 87%) with increasing concentration of HA, when HA concentration was less than 110 mg/L, and considerably decreased with increasing concentration of HA, when HA concentration was greater than 110 mg/L. However, Pb(II) removal slightly increased and remained a considerable percentage with a little fluctuation as the FA concentration increased. The regenerated MGO still had high efficiency both for HA/FA and for Pb(II) in the third cycle. The removal efficiencies of Pb(II), HA/FA in real water and in landfill leachate were almost analogues to that in ultrapure water. The successful application of MGO for removing HA/FA and Pb(II) in tap water and landfill leachate provided a possibility of MGO used for real wastewaters treatment.

  9. Soil Organic Matter Accumulation and Carbon Fractions along a Moisture Gradient of Forest Soils

    Ewa Błońska

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to present effects of soil properties, especially moisture, on the quantity and quality of soil organic matter. The investigation was performed in the Czarna Rózga Reserve in Central Poland. Forty circular test areas were located in a regular grid of points (100 × 300 m. Each plot was represented by one soil profile located at the plot’s center. Sample plots were located in the area with Gleysols, Cambisols and Podzols with the water table from 0 to 100 cm. In each soil sample, particle size, total carbon and nitrogen content, acidity, base cations content and fractions of soil organic matter were determined. The organic carbon stock (SOCs was calculated based on its total content at particular genetic soil horizons. A Carbon Distribution Index (CDI was calculated from the ratio of the carbon accumulation in organic horizons and the amount of organic carbon accumulation in the mineral horizons, up to 60 cm. In the soils under study, in the temperate zone, moisture is an important factor in the accumulation of organic carbon in the soil. The highest accumulation of carbon was observed in soils of swampy variant, while the lowest was in the soils of moist variant. Large accumulation of C in the soils with water table 80–100 cm results from the thick organic horizons that are characterized by lower organic matter decomposition and higher acidity. The proportion of carbon accumulation in the organic horizons to the total accumulation in the mineral horizons expresses the distribution of carbon accumulated in the soil profile, and is a measure of quality of the organic matter accumulated. Studies have confirmed the importance of moisture content in the formation of the fractional organic matter. With greater soil moisture, the ratio of humic to fulvic acids (HA/FA decreases, which may suggest an increase in carbon mobility in soils.

  10. Differences in partitioning of meal fatty acids into blood lipid fractions: a comparison of linoleate, oleate, and palmitate

    Hodson, Leanne; McQuaid, Siobh?n E.; Karpe, Fredrik; Frayn, Keith N.; Fielding, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    There has been much interest in the health effects of dietary fat, but few studies have comprehensively compared the acute metabolic fate of specific fatty acids in vivo. We hypothesized that different classes of fatty acids would be variably partitioned in metabolic pathways and that this would become evident over 24 h. We traced the fate of fatty acids using equal amounts of [U-13C]linoleate, [U-13C]oleate, and [U-13C]palmitate given in a test breakfast meal in 12 healthy subjects. There wa...

  11. Effects of organic ligands on fractionation of rare earth elements (REEs) in hydroponic plants: an application to the determination of binding capacities by humic acid for modeling.

    Ding, ShiMing; Liang, Tao; Zhang, ChaoSheng; Yan, JunCai; Zhang, ZiLi

    2006-12-01

    Previous studies have revealed the fractionation processes of rare earth elements (REEs) in hydroponic plants, with a heavy REE (HREE, the elements from Gd to Lu) enrichment in leaves. In this study, effects on the HREE enrichment in soybean leaves with additions of carboxylic acids (acetate, malate, citrate, NTA, EDTA and DTPA) and two soil humic acids (HAs) were investigated. REE speciation in carboxylic acid and HA solutions was simulated using Visual MINTEQ and Model V, respectively. The results showed that the effects caused by carboxylic acids were strongly dependent on the differences between their binding strengths for light REEs (LREEs, the elements from La to Eu) and those for HREEs. A good correlation existed between these effects and the changes of free REE ions in solutions. This relationship was also observed for the HA treatments, provided that the intrinsic equilibrium constants of REEs for cation-proton exchange with HA (i.e., pK(MHA)) in Model V were estimated using a free-energy relationship with the stability constants for REE complexation with lactic acid. It is suggested that this set of pK(MHA) values is more suitable for use in Model V for the simulation of REE complexation with HA.

  12. Interactive effects of elevated CO2 and nitrogen deposition on fatty acid molecular and isotope composition of above- and belowground tree biomass and forest soil fractions.

    Griepentrog, Marco; Eglinton, Timothy I; Hagedorn, Frank; Schmidt, Michael W I; Wiesenberg, Guido L B

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and reactive nitrogen (N) concentrations have been increasing due to human activities and impact the global carbon (C) cycle by affecting plant photosynthesis and decomposition processes in soil. Large amounts of C are stored in plants and soils, but the mechanisms behind the stabilization of plant- and microbial-derived organic matter (OM) in soils are still under debate and it is not clear how N deposition affects soil OM dynamics. Here, we studied the effects of 4 years of elevated (13C-depleted) CO2 and N deposition in forest ecosystems established in open-top chambers on composition and turnover of fatty acids (FAs) in plants and soils. FAs served as biomarkers for plant- and microbial-derived OM in soil density fractions. We analyzed above- and belowground plant biomass of beech and spruce trees as well as soil density fractions for the total organic C and FA molecular and isotope (δ13C) composition. FAs did not accumulate relative to total organic C in fine mineral fractions, showing that FAs are not effectively stabilized by association with soil minerals. The δ13C values of FAs in plant biomass increased under high N deposition. However, the N effect was only apparent under elevated CO2 suggesting a N limitation of the system. In soil fractions, only isotope compositions of short-chain FAs (C16+18) were affected. Fractions of 'new' (experimental-derived) FAs were calculated using isotope depletion in elevated CO2 plots and decreased from free light to fine mineral fractions. 'New' FAs were higher in short-chain compared to long-chain FAs (C20-30), indicating a faster turnover of short-chain compared to long-chain FAs. Increased N deposition did not significantly affect the quantity of 'new' FAs in soil fractions, but showed a tendency of increased amounts of 'old' (pre-experimental) C suggesting that decomposition of 'old' C is retarded by high N inputs. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Direct nuclear magnetic resonance identification and quantification of geometric isomers of conjugated linoleic acid in milk lipid fraction without derivatization steps: Overcoming sensitivity and resolution barriers

    Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G.; Skarlas, Theodore; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The first NMR quantification of four geometric 18:2 CLA isomers has been achieved. • Sensitivity and resolution NMR barriers have been overcome. • Selective suppression and reduced 13 C spectral width have been utilized. • The method is applied in the milk lipid fraction without derivatization steps. • The method is selective, sensitive with very good analytical characteristics. - Abstract: We report the first successful direct and unequivocal identification and quantification of four minor geometric (9-cis, 11-trans) 18:2, (9-trans, 11-cis) 18:2, (9-cis, 11-cis) 18:2 and (9-trans, 11-trans) 18:2 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) isomers in lipid fractions of lyophilized milk samples with the combined use of 1D 1 H-NMR, 2D 1 H- 1 H TOCSY and 2D 1 H- 13 C HSQC NMR. The significant sensitivity barrier has been successfully overcome under selective suppression of the major resonances, with over 10 4 greater equilibrium magnetization of the -(CH 2 ) n - 1 H spins compared to that of the 1 H spins of the conjugated bonds of the CLA isomers. The resolution barrier has been significantly increased using reduced 13 C spectral width in the 2D 1 H- 13 C HSQC experiment. The assignment was confirmed with spiking experiments with CLA standard compounds and the method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction. The proposed method is selective, sensitive and compares favorably with the GS-MS method of analysis

  14. Production of furfural from xylose, water-insoluble hemicelluloses and water-soluble fraction of corncob via a tin-loaded montmorillonite solid acid catalyst.

    Li, Huiling; Ren, Junli; Zhong, Linjie; Sun, Runcang; Liang, Lei

    2015-01-01

    The conversion of xylose, water-insoluble hemicelluloses (WIH) and water-soluble fraction (WSF) of corncob to furfural was performed using montmorillonite with tin ions (Sn-MMT) containing double acid sites as a solid acid catalyst. The co-existence of Lewis acids and Brønsted acids in Sn-MMT was shown to improve the furfural yield and selectivity. 76.79% furfural yield and 82.45% furfural selectivity were obtained from xylose using Sn-MMT as a catalyst in a biphasic system with 2-s-butylphenol (SBP) as the organic extracting layer and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the co-solvent in contact with an aqueous phase saturated with NaCl (SBP/NaCl-DMSO) at 180°C for 30min. Furthermore, Sn-MMT also demonstrated the excellent catalytic performance in the conversion of pentose-rich materials of corncob and 39.56% and 54.15% furfural yields can be directly obtained from WIH and WSF in the SBP/NaCl-DMSO system, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipids and Fatty Acids in Algae: Extraction, Fractionation into Lipid Classes, and Analysis by Gas Chromatography Coupled with Flame Ionization Detector (GC-FID).

    Guihéneuf, Freddy; Schmid, Matthias; Stengel, Dagmar B

    2015-01-01

    Despite the number of biochemical studies exploring algal lipids and fatty acid biosynthesis pathways and profiles, analytical methods used by phycologists for this purpose are often diverse and incompletely described. Potential confusion and potential variability of the results between studies can therefore occur due to change of protocols for lipid extraction and fractionation, as well as fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) preparation before gas chromatography (GC) analyses. Here, we describe a step-by-step procedure for the profiling of neutral and polar lipids using techniques such as solid-liquid extraction (SLE), thin-layer chromatography (TLC), and gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). As an example, in this protocol chapter, analyses of neutral and polar lipids from the marine microalga Pavlova lutheri (an EPA/DHA-rich haptophyte) will be outlined to describe the distribution of fatty acid residues within its major lipid classes. This method has been proven to be a reliable technique to assess changes in lipid and fatty acid profiles in several other microalgal species and seaweeds.

  16. Investigation on the Protein Degradation, Free Fatty Acid Content and Area Fraction of Poosti Cheese, Iranian Traditional Cheese Ripened in Skin

    Mojgan Hemmatian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: In this study, the proteolysis and lipolysis of Poosti cheese produced from raw sheep milk in mountainous eastern regions of Iran were investigated during 90 days of ripening. Materials and Methods: Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis for proteolysis (SDS-PAGE and gas chromatography (GC for free fatty acids (FFAs were applied to investigate the intensity of lipid degradation. To evaluate the Poosti cheese microstructural changes, the area fraction parameter of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM micrographs was also calculated by the Image J software. Results: The most alteration in protein profile was occurred in the first month of aging for high activity of the proteolytic microorganisms in this period. The amount of free fatty acids was depended on their length due to the variety of involved mechanisms. In addition, the microstructural parameter was considerably affected by the aging as a consequence of the effect of salt on the activity of raw milk and skin micro flora. Conclusions: The decline in proteolysis rate during the last stage of aging could be correlated with the inhibitory effects of salt on the engaged microorganisms, and increase in the pore fraction of the microstructure during the first month of Poosti cheese aging could be due to casein rearrangement and gas release by the fermentative activity of microorganisms. Keywords: Proteolysis, Lipolysis, Poosti cheese, Raw sheep milk.

  17. Degradation and enantiomeric fractionation of mecoprop in soil previously exposed to phenoxy acid herbicides - New insights for bioremediation

    Frková, Zuzana; Johansen, A.; de Jonge, L.W.; Olsen, P.; Gosewinkel, U.; Bester, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 569, November (2016), s. 1457-1465 ISSN 0048-9697 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : phenoxy acids * nitrate-reducing conditions * herbicide biodegradation * enantioselectivity * biostimulation Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides Impact factor: 4.900, year: 2016

  18. Humic acids: Structural properties and multiple functionalities for novel technological developments.

    de Melo, Bruna Alice Gomes; Motta, Fernanda Lopes; Santana, Maria Helena Andrade

    2016-05-01

    Humic acids (HAs) are macromolecules that comprise humic substances (HS), which are organic matter distributed in terrestrial soil, natural water, and sediment. HAs differ from the other HS fractions (fulvic acid and humins) in that they are soluble in alkaline media, partially soluble in water, and insoluble in acidic media. Due to their amphiphilic character, HAs form micelle-like structures in neutral to acidic conditions, which are useful in agriculture, pollution remediation, medicine and pharmaceuticals. HAs have undefined compositions that vary according to the origin, process of obtainment, and functional groups present in their structures, such as quinones, phenols, and carboxylic acids. Quinones are responsible for the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HAs, which are useful for wound healing and have fungicidal/bactericidal properties. Phenols and carboxylic acids deprotonate in neutral and alkaline media and are responsible for various other functions, such as the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties of HAs. In particular, the presence of phenolic groups in HAs provides antioxidant properties due to their free radical scavenging capacity. This paper describes the main multifunctionalities of HAs associated with their structures and properties, focusing on human health applications, and we note perspectives that may lead to novel technological developments. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review to address this topic from this approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Extraction and characterisation of aqueous organic acids from natural waters

    Smith, B.; Moody, P.M.; Higgo, J.J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Humic and fulvic acids were extracted from large volumes of groundwater associated with the Broubster and Needle's Eye natural analogue sites, and the BGS research site at Drigg in Cumbria. Extractions were performed by both batchwise extraction and radial flow chromatography using DEAE-cellulose. Retained humic substances were eluted using NaOH and separated into humic and fulvic components by acidification to pH 1. After separation the humic component was purified by repetitive precipitation and dissolution whilst the fulvic component was purified by absorption chromatography. The resulting humic substances were shown to be of high purity with respect to metallic elements, with less than 1% of available sites being occupied. During elution the association of trace elements with humic substances was monitored and a high degree of association between humic substances, U and the Rare Earth Elements was noted. (author)

  20. Attenuation of dermal wounds via downregulating oxidative stress and inflammatory markers by protocatechuic acid rich n-butanol fraction of Trianthema portulacastrum Linn. in wistar albino rats.

    Yadav, Ekta; Singh, Deepika; Yadav, Pankajkumar; Verma, Amita

    2017-12-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation contribute as a key factor for retarding the process of dermal wound healing. Trianthema portulcastrum Linn. (TP) leaves reported to possess antioxidant, antifungal, anti-inflammatory and antibacterial properties, which could make TP a promising wound healing agent. The current study was aimed to estimate the antioxidant potential of the fractionated hydroethanolic extract of TP leaves and evaluate wound healing activity by excision and incision wound models along with the assessment of possible underlying mechanism. Ethyl acetate, chloroform and n-butanol fractions of the hydroethanolic extract of TP leaves were examined for in vitro antioxidant ability by DPPH method. Strongest antioxidant activity bearing n-butanol fraction (nBuTP) was further analyzed quantitatively by High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Diode Array Detector (HPLC-DAD). Wound healing potential of nBUTP using excision and incision wound model was studied. Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into four groups, containing six animals in each group; group I served as control treated with simple ointment base, group II was standard group, treated with povidone-iodine ointment USP (5%), group III treated with nBuTP 5% w/w ointment, and group IV treated with nBuTP 10%w/w ointment. All the groups were topically applied their respective ointments, once daily, till the complete healing achieved. Wound healing was assessed by analyzing % wound closure, hydroxyproline content, epithelialization period, tensile strength, enzymatic antioxidative status and inflammatory markers. Total phenolic and flavonoid content of the extract was estimated to be 112.32±1.12 and 84.42±0.47mg/g, respectively. HPLC-DAD of nBuTP confirmed the presence of chlorogenic acid (20.74±0.03), protocatechuic acid (34.45±0.02mg/g), caffeic acid (4.31±0.03mg/g) and ferulic acid (1.43±0.01mg/g). 5% and 10%w/w nBuTP ointment significantly accelerated the wound healing process

  1. Incorporation of 14C-amino acids in hormone-active hypophysis fractions in various physiological situations

    Langer, P.; Gschwendtova, K.; Listiakova, M.; Hegedus, L.

    1973-07-01

    The incorporation was studied of 14 C-leucine and 3 H-glucosamine in the individual protein fractions of the hypophysis of rats following various invasions of the endocrine system with the aim of localizing the individual hormonally active proteins of the hypophysis, especially the thyrotropic hormone and gonadotropins on a polyacrylamide gel. The probable localization of the thyrotropic hormone was determined on the basis of changes in the incorporation of 3 H-glucosamine in the zone above the growth hormone in thyroidectomized animals to whom thyroxine had been administered at different intervals before sacrificing. This localization roughly agrees with data in the literature and has been experimentally verified. (J.P.)

  2. Ethanol production from residual wood chips of cellulose industry: acid pretreatment investigation, hemicellulosic hydrolysate fermentation, and remaining solid fraction fermentation by SSF process.

    Silva, Neumara Luci Conceição; Betancur, Gabriel Jaime Vargas; Vasquez, Mariana Peñuela; Gomes, Edelvio de Barros; Pereira, Nei

    2011-04-01

    Current research indicates the ethanol fuel production from lignocellulosic materials, such as residual wood chips from the cellulose industry, as new emerging technology. This work aimed at evaluating the ethanol production from hemicellulose of eucalyptus chips by diluted acid pretreatment and the subsequent fermentation of the generated hydrolysate by a flocculating strain of Pichia stipitis. The remaining solid fraction generated after pretreatment was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis, which was carried out simultaneously with glucose fermentation [saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process] using a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The acid pretreatment was evaluated using a central composite design for sulfuric acid concentration (1.0-4.0 v/v) and solid to liquid ratio (1:2-1:4, grams to milliliter) as independent variables. A maximum xylose concentration of 50 g/L was obtained in the hemicellulosic hydrolysate. The fermentation of hemicellulosic hydrolysate and the SSF process were performed in bioreactors and the final ethanol concentrations of 15.3 g/L and 28.7 g/L were obtained, respectively.

  3. HUMIC SUBSTANCES AND PHOSPHORUS FRACTIONS IN AREAS WITH CROP-LIVESTOCK INTEGRATION, PASTURE AND NATURAL CERRADO VEGETATION IN GOIÁS, BRAZIL

    Sidinei Julio Beutler

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Crop-livestock integration (CLI coupled with a no-till planting system (NTS has proven to be an important alternative farming system, promoting efficient land use and soil conservation by maintaining soil organic matter (SOM. The present study quantified the humic fractions of SOM and soil P fractions and analyzed their relationship in CLI, pasture and natural Cerrado areas in Goiás, Brazil. The samples were obtained from a pasture area (covered with Urochloa decumbens grass for 15 years; a CLI area (planted in annual rotation with Urochloa ruziziensis for 13 years; and a native Cerrado area, sampled for comparison purposes. Total organic carbon (TOC and carbon in the fulvic acid fraction (C-FAF, humic acid fraction (C-HAF and humin (C-HUM were evaluated at a depth of 0‑5; 5‑10; 10‑20 and 20‑40 cm; and inorganic (IP and organic (OP P fractions at a depth of 0‑5 and 5‑10 cm. The highest TOC values, humic fractions and OP were found in the Cerrado area. Similarities in relation to the humic fractions and TOC were found between CLI and pasture areas in all the layers between 0 and 40cm. The area currently managed with CLI, but originally covered by Cerrado, had already developed chemical stability (C-FAF, C-HAF, C-HUM and TOC that was similar to that found in the Cerrado area at a depth of 20-40 cm and with higher C-FAF and C-HUM accumulation compared to the pasture area. Compared to pasture and Cerrado, the CLI system favored the increase in labile, moderately labile and moderately resistant P, both for total P (TP and IP. IP fractions were found in areas treated with high doses of phosphate fertilizer, whereas OP fractions corresponded to those under low or null anthropogenic influence. Organic P fractions were directly related to the humic SOM fractions.

  4. GRANULOMETRIC AND HUMIC FRACTIONS CARBON STOCKS OF SOIL ORGANIC MATTER UNDER NO-TILLAGE SYSTEM IN UBERABA, BRAZIL

    Marcos Gervasio Pereira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The cover plant use preceding grain crops in Cerrado soil can increase the carbon stocks of chemical and physical fractions of soil organic matter (SOM. The present study aimed to quantify the carbon stocks of SOM granulometric and humic fractions in a Cerrado area under no-tillage system with different cover plant, and compare the results with those from conventional tillage and fallow areas, in Uberaba, MG, Brazil. The implemented cover crops were: millet, tropical grass and sunn hemp. Furthermore, an area was used in fallow and another as a control area (conventional tillage. After cover crop removal, the areas were subdivided for the corn and soybean plantation. Soil samples were collected in the 0.0-0.025, 0.025-0.05, 0.05-0.10 and 0.10-0.20 m depths, with posterior quantification of total organic carbon (TOC levels and chemical and granulometric fractionation of SOM. Humic acid carbon (C-HAF, fulvic acids (C-FAF and humin (C-HUM were quantified through these fractionations. The granulometric fractions consisted in particulate organic matter (POM and mineral organic matter (MOM. Using the carbon levels for each fraction, the respective stocks for each depth were calculated, including the 0.0-0.20 m layer. In the 0.0-0.20 m layer, TOC had the highest stocks for the millet area. The highest POM stocks were found for the corn plantation over sunn hemp and the fallow and soybean area over millet and tropical grass (0.0-0.20 m. In relation to the MOM stocks, the highest values were observed in the areas with millet, sunn hemp and tropical (palisade grass, all superior to those found in the conventional tillage and fallow areas, independent of evaluated culture (0.10-0.20 m. The highest C-HUM stocks were observed in the area with tropical grass (0.025-0.05 m and areas with tropical grass and sunn hemp (0.10-0.20 m, when compared to conventional tillage, independent of evaluated culture (corn and soybean. The highest C-FAH stocks in the depth of 0

  5. Minipool Caprylic Acid Fractionation of Plasma Using Disposable Equipment: A Practical Method to Enhance Immunoglobulin Supply in Developing Countries

    El-Ekiaby, Magdy; Vargas, Mariángela; Sayed, Makram; Gorgy, George; Goubran, Hadi; Radosevic, Mirjana; Burnouf, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Background Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is an essential plasma-derived medicine that is lacking in developing countries. IgG shortages leave immunodeficient patients without treatment, exposing them to devastating recurrent infections from local pathogens. A simple and practical method for producing IgG from normal or convalescent plasma collected in developing countries is needed to provide better, faster access to IgG for patients in need. Methodology/Principal Findings IgG was purified from 10 consecutive minipools of 20 plasma donations collected in Egypt using single-use equipment. Plasma donations in their collection bags were subjected to 5%-pH5.5 caprylic acid treatment for 90 min at 31°C, and centrifuged to remove the precipitate. Supernatants were pooled, then dialyzed and concentrated using a commercial disposable hemodialyzer. The final preparation was filtered online by gravity, aseptically dispensed into storage transfusion bags, and frozen at 5 logs reduction of HIV, BVDV, and PRV infectivity in less than 15 min of caprylic acid treatment. Conclusions/Significance 90% pure, virally-inactivated immunoglobulins can be prepared from plasma minipools using simple disposable equipment and bag systems. This easy-to-implement process could be used to produce immunoglobulins from local plasma in developing countries to treat immunodeficient patients. It is also relevant for preparing hyperimmune IgG from convalescent plasma during infectious outbreaks such as the current Ebola virus episode. PMID:25719558

  6. Minipool caprylic acid fractionation of plasma using disposable equipment: a practical method to enhance immunoglobulin supply in developing countries.

    Magdy El-Ekiaby

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin G (IgG is an essential plasma-derived medicine that is lacking in developing countries. IgG shortages leave immunodeficient patients without treatment, exposing them to devastating recurrent infections from local pathogens. A simple and practical method for producing IgG from normal or convalescent plasma collected in developing countries is needed to provide better, faster access to IgG for patients in need.IgG was purified from 10 consecutive minipools of 20 plasma donations collected in Egypt using single-use equipment. Plasma donations in their collection bags were subjected to 5%-pH5.5 caprylic acid treatment for 90 min at 31°C, and centrifuged to remove the precipitate. Supernatants were pooled, then dialyzed and concentrated using a commercial disposable hemodialyzer. The final preparation was filtered online by gravity, aseptically dispensed into storage transfusion bags, and frozen at 5 logs reduction of HIV, BVDV, and PRV infectivity in less than 15 min of caprylic acid treatment.90% pure, virally-inactivated immunoglobulins can be prepared from plasma minipools using simple disposable equipment and bag systems. This easy-to-implement process could be used to produce immunoglobulins from local plasma in developing countries to treat immunodeficient patients. It is also relevant for preparing hyperimmune IgG from convalescent plasma during infectious outbreaks such as the current Ebola virus episode.

  7. 14C-labeled organic amendments: Characterization in different particle size fractions and humic acids in a long-term field experiment.

    Tatzber, Michael; Stemmer, Michael; Spiegel, Heide; Katzlberger, Christian; Landstetter, Claudia; Haberhauer, Georg; Gerzabek, Martin H

    2012-05-01

    Knowledge about the stabilization of organic matter input to soil is essential for understanding the influence of different agricultural practices on turnover characteristics in agricultural soil systems. In this study, soil samples from a long-term field experiment were separated into silt- and clay-sized particles. In 1967, 14 C labeled farmyard manure was applied to three different cropping systems: crop rotation, monoculture and permanent bare fallow. Humic acids (HAs) were extracted from silt- and clay-sized fractions and characterized using photometry, mid-infrared and fluorescence spectroscopy. Remaining 14 C was determined in size fractions as well as in their extracted HAs. Yields of carbon and remaining 14 C in HAs from silt-sized particles and C org in clay-sized particles decreased significantly in the order: crop rotation > monoculture ≫ bare fallow. Thus, crop rotation not only had the largest overall C-pool in the experiment, but it also best stabilized the added manure. Mid-infrared spectroscopy could distinguish between HAs from different particle size soil fractions. With spectroscopic methods significant differences between the cropping systems were detectable in fewer cases compared to quantitative results of HAs (yields, 14 C, C org and N t ). The trends, however, pointed towards increased humification of HAs from bare fallow systems compared to crop rotation and monoculture as well as of HAs from clay-sized particles compared to silt-sized particles. Our study clearly shows that the largest differences were observed between bare fallow on one hand and monoculture and crop rotation on the other.

  8. Characterization of the dissolved organic carbon in landfill leachate-polluted groundwater

    Christensen, Jette B.; Jensen, Dorthe Lærke; Grøn, Christian

    1998-01-01

    Samples of dissolved organic carbon (DOG) were obtained from landfill leachate-polluted groundwater at Vejen Landfill, Denmark. The humic acids, fulvic acids and the hydrophilic fraction were isolated and purified. Based on DOC measurements, the fulvic acid fraction predominated, accounting...

  9. APMP.QM-S8: determination of mass fraction of benzoic acid, methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben in soy sauce

    Teo, Tang Lin; Gui, Ee Mei; Lu, Ting; Sze Cheow, Pui; Giannikopoulou, Panagiota; Kakoulides, Elias; Lampi, Evgenia; Choi, Sik-man; Yip, Yiu-chung; Chan, Pui-kwan; Hui, Sin-kam; Wollinger, Wagner; Carvalho, Lucas J.; Garrido, Bruno C.; Rego, Eliane C. P.; Ahn, Seonghee; Kim, Byungjoo; Li, Xiuqin; Guo, Zhen; Styarini, Dyah; Aristiawan, Yosi; Putri Ramadhaningtyas, Dillani; Aryana, Nurhani; Ebarvia, Benilda S.; Dacuaya, Aaron; Tongson, Alleni; Aganda, Kim Christopher; Junvee Fortune, Thippaya; Tangtrirat, Pradthana; Mungmeechai, Thanarak; Ceyhan Gören, Ahmet; Gündüz, Simay; Yilmaz, Hasibe

    2017-01-01

    The supplementary comparison APMP.QM-S8: determination of mass fraction of benzoic acid, methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben in soy sauce was coordinated by the Health Sciences Authority, Singapore under the auspices of the Organic Analysis Working Group (OAWG) of the Comité Consultatif pour la Quantité de Matière (CCQM). Ten national metrology institutes (NMIs) or designated institutes (DIs) participated in the comparison. All the institutes participated in the comparison for benzoic acid, while six NMIs/DIs participated in the comparison for methyl paraben and n-butyl paraben. The comparison was designed to enable participating institutes to demonstrate their measurement capabilities in the determination of common preservatives in soy sauce, using procedure(s) that required simple sample preparation and selective detection in the mass fraction range of 50 to 1000 mg/kg. The demonstrated capabilities can be extended to include other polar food preservatives (e.g. sorbic acid, propionic acid and other alkyl benzoates) in water, aqueous-based beverages (e.g. fruit juices, tea extracts, sodas, sports drinks, etc) and aqueous-based condiments (e.g. vinegar, fish sauce, etc). Liquid--liquid extraction and/or dilution were applied, followed by instrumental analyses using LC-MS/MS, LC-MS, GC-MS (with or without derivatisation) or HPLC-DAD. Isotope dilution mass spectrometry was used for quantification, except in the case of a participating institute, where external calibration method was used for quantification of all three measurands. The assigned Supplementary Comparison Reference Values (SCRVs) were the medians of ten results for benzoic acid, six results for methyl paraben and six results for n-butyl paraben. Benzoic acid was assigned a SCRV of 154.55 mg/kg with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.94 mg/kg, methyl paraben was assigned a SCRV of 100.95 mg/kg with a combined standard uncertainty of 0.40 mg/kg, and n-butyl paraben was assigned a SCRV of 99.05 mg

  10. FRACTIONAL BANKING

    Maria Klimikova

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the reasons of the present financial problems lies In understanding the substance of fractional reserve banking. The substance of fractional banking is in lending more money than the bankers have. Banking of partial reserves is an alternative form which links deposit banking and credit banking. Fractional banking is causing many unfavorable economic impacts in the worldwide system, specifically an inflation.

  11. Sorption mechanisms of phenanthrene, lindane, and atrazine with various humic acid fractions from a single soil sample.

    Wang, Xilong; Guo, Xiaoying; Yang, Yu; Tao, Shu; Xing, Baoshan

    2011-03-15

    The sorption behavior of organic compounds (phenanthrene, lindane, and atrazine) to sequentially extracted humic acids and humin from a peat soil was examined. The elemental composition, XPS and (13)C NMR data of sorbents combined with sorption isotherm data of the tested compounds show that nonspecific interactions govern sorption of phenanthrene and lindane by humic substances. Their sorption is dependent on surface and bulk alkyl carbon contents of the sorbents, rather than aromatic carbon. Sorption of atrazine by these sorbents, however, is regulated by polar interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding). Carboxylic and phenolic moieties are key components for H-bonding formation. Thermal analysis reveals that sorption of apolar (i.e., phenanthrene and lindane) and polar (i.e., atrazine) compounds by humic substances exhibit dissimilar relationships with condensation and thermal stability of sorption domains, emphasizing the major influence of domain spatial arrangement on sorption of organic compounds with distinct polarity. Results of pH-dependent sorption indicate that reduction in sorption of atrazine by the tested sorbents is more evident than phenanthrene with increasing pH, supporting the dependence of organic compound sorption on its polarity and structure. This study highlights the different interaction mechanisms of apolar and polar organic compounds with humic substances.

  12. Gallic Acid Enriched Fraction of Phyllanthus emblica Potentiates Indomethacin-Induced Gastric Ulcer Healing via e-NOS-Dependent Pathway

    Ananya Chatterjee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The healing activity of gallic acid enriched ethanolic extract (GAE of Phyllanthus emblica fruits (amla against the indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration in mice was investigated. The activity was correlated with the ability of GAE to alter the cyclooxygenase- (COX- dependent healing pathways. Histology of the stomach tissues revealed maximum ulceration on the 3rd day after indomethacin (18 mg/kg, single dose administration that was associated with significant increase in inflammatory factors, namely, mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO activity and inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS expression. Proangiogenic parameters such as the levels of prostaglandin (PG E2, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, von Willebrand Factor VIII, and endothelial NOS (e-NOS were downregulated by indomethacin. Treatment with GAE (5 mg/kg/day and omeprazole (3 mg/kg/day for 3 days led to effective healing of the acute ulceration, while GAE could reverse the indomethacin-induced proinflammatory changes of the designated biochemical parameters. The ulcer healing activity of GAE was, however, compromised by coadministration of the nonspecific NOS inhibitor, N-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME, but not the i-NOS-specific inhibitor, L-N6-(1-iminoethyl lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL. Taken together, these results suggested that the GAE treatment accelerates ulcer healing by inducing PGE2 synthesis and augmenting e-NOS/i-NOS ratio.

  13. Profile of Free Fatty Acids and Fractions of Phospholipids, Cholesterol Esters and Triglycerides in Serum of Obese Youth with and without Metabolic Syndrome.

    Bermúdez-Cardona, Juliana; Velásquez-Rodríguez, Claudia

    2016-02-15

    The study evaluated the profile of circulating fatty acids (FA) in obese youth with and without metabolic syndrome (MetS) to determine its association with nutritional status, lifestyle and metabolic variables. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 96 young people, divided into three groups: obese with MetS (OBMS), obese (OB) and appropriate weight (AW). FA profiles were quantified by gas chromatography; waist circumference (WC), fat folds, lipid profile, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, glucose, insulin, the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA index), food intake and physical activity (PA) were assessed. The OBMS group had significantly greater total free fatty acids (FFAs), palmitic-16:0 in triglyceride (TG), palmitoleic-16:1n-7 in TG and phospholipid (PL); in the OB group, these FAs were higher than in the AW group. Dihomo-gamma-linolenic (DHGL-20:3n-6) was higher in the OBMS than the AW in PL and FFAs. Linoleic-18:2n-6 in TG and PL had the lowest proportion in the OBMS group. WC, PA, total FFA, linoleic-18:2n-6 in TG and DHGL-20:3n-6 in FFAs explained 62% of the HOMA value. The OB group presented some higher proportions of FA and biochemical values than the AW group. The OBMS had proportions of some FA in the TG, PL and FFA fractions that correlated with disturbances of MetS.

  14. Characterization of commercial humic acid samples and their impact on growth of fungi and plants

    Asma Lodhi, Shermeen Tahir, Zafar Iqbal, Ansar Mahmood, Muhammad Akhtar, Tariq Mahmood Qureshi, Muhammad Yaqub and Asif Naeem

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring humates like leonardite and brown coal or lignite are marketed under different brand names e.g. Pak Humates, Humate Fertilizer, Pak Humax, Humkara and Humide etc. However, their efficacy is needed to be confirmed before their use. Different studies were conducted for the comparison of four commercial humates for their physico-chemical, optical properties, plant growth promoting ability in terms of seed germination and seedling vigour in wheat (cv Sehr, mung bean (Mung-54, maize (C-12 and sesbania and their effect on growth of some fungi. Moisture content of four humates varied from 0.52 to 71.11%, while solubility in water varied from 30.2 to 98.2% and density differed from 1.67 to 4.17. A 2% solution of humates had pH and EC varying from 5.39 to 10.11 and 3.140 to 1.143 mS cm-1, respectively. Carbon and nitrogen concentrations varied from 22.95 to 36.56% and 0.658 to 1.183, respectively with a C/N ratio of 30.91 to 44.16. Humates dissolved in 0.1N NaOH were partitioned into humic acid and fulvic acid fractions. Of the total C in humates, 40.3 to 77.5% was ranged in humic acid and 22.5 to 59.7% in fulvic acid fraction. The HA was also studied for optical properties at 400, 500, 600, and 700 nm besides that at 465 and 665 to calculate E4/E6 (extinction coefficient; the later varied between 3.64 and 5.48. Optical density of the humic acid decreased at increasing wavelength and was correlated significantly with the carbon contents of humic compounds. Three fungi, Trichoderma harzianum, T. hamatum and Alternaria alternata showed maximum growth at 0.025% HA in the growth medium on the basis of colony diameter. Humates inhibited seed germination in wheat, maize and mung bean except for sesbania. Root length and shoot dry matter increased in wheat and maize but no effect was found in mung bean and sesbania. The studies revealed that humates available in the market vary widely and therefore some sort of quality monitoring is required

  15. Fractional thermoelasticity

    Povstenko, Yuriy

    2015-01-01

    This book is devoted to fractional thermoelasticity, i.e. thermoelasticity based on the heat conduction equation with differential operators of fractional order. Readers will discover how time-fractional differential operators describe memory effects and space-fractional differential operators deal with the long-range interaction. Fractional calculus, generalized Fourier law, axisymmetric and central symmetric problems and many relevant equations are featured in the book. The latest developments in the field are included and the reader is brought up to date with current research.  The book contains a large number of figures, to show the characteristic features of temperature and stress distributions and to represent the whole spectrum of order of fractional operators.  This work presents a picture of the state-of-the-art of fractional thermoelasticity and is suitable for specialists in applied mathematics, physics, geophysics, elasticity, thermoelasticity and engineering sciences. Corresponding sections of ...

  16. Interaction of Eu, Th and U with bentonite colloids in presence of humic acid: a flow-field flow fractionation study

    Bouby, M.; Geckeis, H.; Schaefer, Th.; Mihai, S.; Fanghaenell, Th.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The actinide mobility in the far-field of a repository site can be strongly influenced by the presence of colloidal species. Field migration experiments at the Grimsel Test Site under low ionic strength (I=10 -3 mol/L) and high pH (∼9.6) conditions have demonstrated a considerable clay colloid-mediated actinide(III/IV) migration [1]. However, those studies rendered it necessary to take the kinetics of notably the actinide-colloid interaction and colloid stability into account [2]. In the present study, we examine the stability of bentonite clay colloids in natural Grimsel groundwater and their interaction with Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) (conc. ∼ 10 -8 mol/L). Experiments cover 12 months contact times and are performed under anoxic conditions. Humic acid (Gohy-573) is added after different contact times as a competing ligand and the time dependent metal ion desorption is followed. Dedicated experiments and thermodynamic speciation calculations are performed to estimate the metal ion speciation within the colloid system. As the experimental metal ion speciation (i.e. differentiation of clay-colloid bound, humic colloid bound and dissolved metal ion species) at the given low concentration conditions is hardly possible by spectroscopic methods, we use Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation coupled to UV-Vis spectrophotometry and ICP-MS detection. Unexpectedly, it is found that small-sized bentonite colloids ( d -values, Cs and U do not interact significantly with bentonite colloids, while Th and Eu do. Eu desorption from clay colloids by humic acid is delayed significantly upon increasing the clay colloid-Eu contact time up to several months. Nevertheless, estimated equilibrium conditions are attained after 7 months desorption time. However, it appears that significant fractions of clay colloid borne Th(IV) do not desorb in presence of humic acid and equilibrium conditions estimated from calculation and experiments are not

  17. Cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester and metabolite effects on rat epididymal stromal vascular fraction differentiation of adipose tissue

    Campioli, Enrico [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Duong, Tam B. [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Deschamps, François [Synthèse AptoChem Inc., Montréal, Québec (Canada); Papadopoulos, Vassilios, E-mail: vassilios.papadopoulos@mcgill.ca [Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre (Canada); Department of Medicine, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada); Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics, McGill University, Montréal, Québec (Canada)

    2015-07-15

    Plastics are generally mixed with additives like plasticizers to enhance their flexibility, pliability, and elasticity proprieties. Plasticizers are easily released into the environment and are absorbed mainly through ingestion, dermal contact, and inhalation. One of the main classes of plasticizers, phthalates, has been associated with endocrine and reproductive diseases. In 2002, 1,2-cyclohexane dicarboxylic acid diisononyl ester (DINCH) was introduced in the market for use in plastic materials and articles intended to come into contact with food, and it received final approval from the European Food Safety Authority in 2006. At present, there is limited knowledge about the safety and potential metabolic and endocrine-disrupting properties of DINCH and its metabolites. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biological effects of DINCH and its active metabolites, cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid (CHDA) and cyclohexane-1,2-dicarboxylic acid mono isononyl ester (MINCH), on rat primary stromal vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue. DINCH and its metabolite, CHDA, were not able to directly affect SVF differentiation. However, exposure of SVF to 50 μM and 100 μM concentrations of MINCH affected the expression of Cebpa and Fabp4, thus inducing SVF preadipocytes to accumulate lipids and fully differentiate into mature adipocytes. The effect of MINCH was blocked by the specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α antagonist, GW6471. Taken together, these results suggest that MINCH is a potent PPAR-α agonist and a metabolic disruptor, capable of inducing SVF preadipocyte differentiation, that may interfere with the endocrine system in mammals. - Highlights: • DINCH and CHDA did not affect the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH affected the adipogenesis of the SVF. • MINCH effect was blocked by the specific PPAR-α antagonist GW6471. • MINCH exerted a similar effect as MEHP on SVF adipogenesis. • DINCH/MINCH are potential metabolic

  18. Effects of organic matter fraction and compositional changes on distribution of cadmium and zinc in long-term polluted paddy soils

    Zhou, Tong; Wu, Longhua; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Soil particulate organic matter (POM) has rapid turnover and metal enrichment, but the interactions between organic matter (OM) and metals have not been well studied. The present study aimed to investigate changes in the OM concentration and composition of the POM fraction and their corresponding effects on metal distribution and extractability in long-term polluted paddy soils. Soil 2000–53 μm POM size fractions had higher contents of C–H and C=O bonds, C–H/C=O ratios and concentrations of fulvic acid (FA), humic acid (HA), cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) than the bulk soils. Cadmium and Zn stocks in soil POM fractions were 24.5–27.9% and 7.12–16.7%, respectively, and were more readily EDTA-extractable. Compared with the control soil, the 2000–250 μm POM size fractions had higher organic carbon concentrations and C/N ratios in the polluted soils. However, there were no significant differences in the contents in C–H and C=O bonds or C–H/C=O ratios of POM fractions among the control, slightly and highly polluted soils. In accordance with the lower contents of C=O bonds and FA and HA concentrations, the Cd and Zn concentrations in 250–53 μm POM size fractions were lower than those in 2000–250 μm POM size fractions. Enrichment of Cd in POM fractions increased with increasing soil pollution level. These results support the view that changes in the OM concentration and the size and composition of POM fractions play a key role in determining the distribution of Cd and Zn in paddy soils. - Highlights: • The OC and FA contents and C/N in POM (2000–250 μm) increased in polluted soil. • Enrichment of Cd and Zn decreased with decreasing POM size. • No significant change in content of C=O group in POM was observed in polluted soil. • Changes in the size and composition of soil POM affected the Cd and Zn distribution. - Interactions between soil organic matter and metals.

  19. Chemical attributes, total organic carbon stock and humified fractions of organic matter soil submitted to different systems of sugarcane management

    Jean Sérgio Rosset

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mechanized harvesting maintenance of trash from cane sugar and soil application of waste as vinasse and filter cake can improve the system of crop yield. Thus, this study aimed to evaluate the changes in the chemical, the stock of total organic carbon and humified organic matter fractions in an Oxisol cultivated with cane sugar with the following management systems: with sugarcane vinasse application (CCV, without application of burnt cane waste (CQS, with burnt cane vinasse application (CQV, with application of burnt cane filter cake (CQTF and burnt cane with joint application of vinasse and filter cake (CQVTF. For reference we used an area of natural vegetation (NV, Cerrado sensu stricto. Treatment CQVTF showed improvement in soil chemical properties, increased inventory levels of total organic carbon – TOC (values ranging from 21.28 to 40.02 Mg ha-1 and humified fractions of soil organic matter in relation to other treatments. The CQS area at a depth of 0-0.05 m, showed the greatest losses of soil TOC stocks (56.3% compared to NV. The adoption of management presented CCV and chemical attributes of the soil TOC stocks equivalent to those observed in areas with CQV CQTF and despite the short period of adoption (3 years. The TOC correlated with the sum of bases (r = 0.76 **, cation exchange capacity (r = 0.59 ** and base saturation (r = 0.63 **, while the humic acids (r = 0.40 ** fulvic acids (r = 0.49 ** and humin (r = 0.59 ** correlated with the cation exchange capacity of the soil. These results indicate that the preservation of trash in the management of cane sugar added to the application of vinasse and filter cake increases the TOC stocks promoting improvement in soil chemical properties.

  20. A Substantial Fraction of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L. Low Phytic Acid Mutations Have Little or No Effect on Yield across Diverse Production Environments

    Victor Raboy

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The potential benefits of the low phytic acid (lpa seed trait for human and animal nutrition, and for phosphorus management in non-ruminant animal production, are well documented. However, in many cases the lpa trait is associated with impaired seed or plant performance, resulting in reduced yield. This has given rise to the perception that the lpa trait is tightly correlated with reduced yield in diverse crop species. Here we report a powerful test of this correlation. We measured grain yield in lines homozygous for each of six barley (Hordeum vulgare L. lpa mutations that greatly differ in their seed phytic acid levels. Performance comparisons were between sibling wild-type and mutant lines obtained following backcrossing, and across two years in five Idaho (USA locations that greatly differ in crop yield potential. We found that one lpa mutation (Hvlpa1-1 had no detectable effect on yield and a second (Hvlpa4-1 resulted in yield losses of only 3.5%, across all locations. When comparing yields in three relatively non-stressful production environments, at least three lpa mutations (Hvlpa1-1, Hvlpa3-1, and Hvlpa4-1 typically had yields similar to or within 5% of the wild-type sibling isoline. Therefore in the case of barley, lpa mutations can be readily identified that when simply incorporated into a cultivar result in adequately performing lines, even with no additional breeding for performance within the lpa line. In conclusion, while some barley lpa mutations do impact field performance, a substantial fraction appears to have little or no effect on yield.

  1. Non-catalytic oxidation of water-slurried coal with oxygen: Identification of fulvic acids and acute toxicity

    Bergh, JJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available ) ? adhesions: black, between liver and pancreas (1) Control * lung: congestion (1) & * no specific lesions petechiae (2) FAS * lung: petechiae (1) * mild brain lesions (8) pH = 4.84 * heart: necrotic areas (1) & dark...

  2. Interaction of Eu, Th and U with bentonite colloids in presence of humic acid: a flow-field flow fractionation study

    Bouby, M.; Geckeis, H.; Schaefer, Th. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mihai, S. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]|[Politehnica University, Faculty of Industrial Chemistry, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest 78122 (Romania); Fanghaenell, Th. [Institut fuer Nukleare Entsorgung, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Postfach 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)]|[Physikalisch-Chemisches Institut, Ruprecht-Karls-Universitaet, Im Neuenheimer Feld 253, D- 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: The actinide mobility in the far-field of a repository site can be strongly influenced by the presence of colloidal species. Field migration experiments at the Grimsel Test Site under low ionic strength (I=10{sup -3} mol/L) and high pH ({approx}9.6) conditions have demonstrated a considerable clay colloid-mediated actinide(III/IV) migration [1]. However, those studies rendered it necessary to take the kinetics of notably the actinide-colloid interaction and colloid stability into account [2]. In the present study, we examine the stability of bentonite clay colloids in natural Grimsel groundwater and their interaction with Cs(I), Eu(III), Th(IV) and U(VI) (conc. {approx} 10{sup -8} mol/L). Experiments cover 12 months contact times and are performed under anoxic conditions. Humic acid (Gohy-573) is added after different contact times as a competing ligand and the time dependent metal ion desorption is followed. Dedicated experiments and thermodynamic speciation calculations are performed to estimate the metal ion speciation within the colloid system. As the experimental metal ion speciation (i.e. differentiation of clay-colloid bound, humic colloid bound and dissolved metal ion species) at the given low concentration conditions is hardly possible by spectroscopic methods, we use Asymmetric Flow-Field Flow Fractionation coupled to UV-Vis spectrophotometry and ICP-MS detection. Unexpectedly, it is found that small-sized bentonite colloids (< 50 nm) not visible by light scattering (PCS) analysis agglomerate and finally reach a steady-state colloid size distribution (50-200 nm) after {approx} 3 months. As estimated from known thermodynamic data and experimentally determined K{sub d}-values, Cs and U do not interact significantly with bentonite colloids, while Th and Eu do. Eu desorption from clay colloids by humic acid is delayed significantly upon increasing the clay colloid-Eu contact time up to several months. Nevertheless, estimated

  3. Fractional charges

    Saminadayar, L.

    2001-01-01

    20 years ago fractional charges were imagined to explain values of conductivity in some materials. Recent experiments have proved the existence of charges whose value is the third of the electron charge. This article presents the experimental facts that have led theorists to predict the existence of fractional charges from the motion of quasi-particles in a linear chain of poly-acetylene to the quantum Hall effect. According to the latest theories, fractional charges are neither bosons nor fermions but anyons, they are submitted to an exclusive principle that is less stringent than that for fermions. (A.C.)

  4. DGT/DET Gel partition features of humic acid/metal species

    Veeken, van der P.L.R.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2010-01-01

    Gel layer based sensors are increasingly employed for dynamic trace metal speciation analysis in aquatic and soil media, in which humic and fulvic acid species are generally known to be relevant. In DGT (diffusive gradient in thin film), polyacrylamide hydrogels are commonly used for the diffusive

  5. Heavy metal / polyacid interaction : an electrochemical study of the binding of Cd(II), Pb(II) and Zn(II) to polycarboxylic and humic acids

    Cleven, R.F.M.J.

    1984-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with model polycarboxylic acids have been described, in order to establish the relevance of these effects in the interaction of heavy metal ions with naturally occurring humic and fulvic acids. The model systems consisted of Cd(II),

  6. Fractional fermions

    Jackiw, R.; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge

    1984-01-01

    The theory of fermion fractionization due to topologically generated fermion ground states is presented. Applications to one-dimensional conductors, to the MIT bag, and to the Hall effect are reviewed. (author)

  7. [Apply fourier transform infrared spectra coupled with two-dimensional correlation analysis to study the evolution of humic acids during composting].

    Bu, Gui-jun; Yu, Jing; Di, Hui-hui; Luo, Shi-jia; Zhou, Da-zhai; Xiao, Qiang

    2015-02-01

    The composition and structure of humic acids formed during composting play an important influence on the quality and mature of compost. In order to explore the composition and evolution mechanism, municipal solid wastes were collected to compost and humic and fulvic acids were obtained from these composted municipal solid wastes. Furthermore, fourier transform infrared spectra and two-dimensional correlation analysis were applied to study the composition and transformation of humic and fulvic acids during composting. The results from fourier transform infrared spectra showed that, the composition of humic acids was complex, and several absorbance peaks were observed at 2917-2924, 2844-2852, 2549, 1662, 1622, 1566, 1454, 1398, 1351, 990-1063, 839 and 711 cm(-1). Compared to humic acids, the composition of fulvci acids was simple, and only three peaks were detected at 1725, 1637 and 990 cm(-1). The appearance of these peaks showed that both humic and fulvic acids comprised the benzene originated from lignin and the polysaccharide. In addition, humic acids comprised a large number of aliphatic and protein which were hardly detected in fulvic acids. Aliphatic, polysaccharide, protein and lignin all were degraded during composting, however, the order of degradation was different between humic and fulvci acids. The result from two-dimensional correlation analysis showed that, organic compounds in humic acids were degraded in the following sequence: aliphatic> protein> polysaccharide and lignin, while that in fulvic acids was as following: protein> polysaccharide and aliphatic. A large number of carboxyl, alcohols and ethers were formed during the degradation process, and the carboxyl was transformed into carbonates. It can be concluded that, fourier transform infrared spectra coupled with two-dimensional correlation analysis not only can analyze the function group composition of humic substances, but also can characterize effectively the degradation sequence of these

  8. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity, Antioxidant Properties, Phenolic Content and Amino Acid Profiles of Fucus spiralis L. Protein Hydrolysate Fractions

    Lisete Paiva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Food protein-derived hydrolysates with multi-bioactivities such as antihypertensive and antioxidant properties have recently received special attention since both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. This study reports, for the first time, the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE-inhibition and antioxidant properties of ultrafiltrate fractions (UF with different molecular weight ranges (<1, 1–3 and ≥3 kDa obtained from Fucus spiralis protein hydrolysate (FSPH digested with cellulase–bromelain. The amino acids profile, recovery yield, protein, peptide and total phenolic contents of these FSPH-UF, and the in vitro digestibility of F. spiralis crude protein were also investigated. FSPH-UF ≥3 kDa presented remarkably higher ACE-inhibition, yield, peptide and polyphenolic (phlorotannins contents. Antioxidant analysis showed that FSPH-UF <1 kDa and ≥3 kDa exhibited significantly higher scavenging of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC activity. FSPH-UF ≥3 kDa had also notably higher ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP. Strong correlations were observed between ACE-inhibition and antioxidant activities (FIC and FRAP. The results suggest that ACE-inhibition and antioxidant properties of FSPH-UF may be due to the bioactive peptides and polyphenols released during the enzymatic hydrolysis. In conclusion, this study shows the potential use of defined size FSPH-UF for the prevention/treatment of hypertension and/or oxidative stress-related diseases.

  9. Circulating miR-126 and miR-499 reflect progression of cardiovascular disease; correlations with uric acid and ejection fraction

    Masoud Khanaghaei

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aim of this study was to assess plasma levels of endothelium- and heart-associated microRNAs (miRNAs miR-126 and miR-499, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction.MethodsA two-step analysis was conducted on 75 patients undergoing off-pomp coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery. Five biomarkers of inflammation and cardiac injury were assessed in addition to the above-mentioned miRNAs.ResultsPlasma concentrations of miRNAs were found to be significantly correlated with plasma levels of cardiac troponin I (cTnI (miR-499, r 0.49, p~0.002; miR-126, r = 0.30, p~0.001, indicating cardiac damage. Data analysis revealed that miR-499 had higher sensitivity and specificity for cardiac injury than miR-126, which reflects more endothelial activation. Interestingly, a strong correlation was observed between both miRNAs and uric acid (UA levels with ventricular contractility measured as ejection fraction (EF (miR-499/EF%, r = 0.58, p~0.004; UA/EF%, r = -0.6, p~0.006; UA/miR-499, r = -0.34; UA/miR-126, r = 0.5, p~0.01.ConclusionsIn patients undergoing CABG, circulating miR-126/499 is associated with presentation of traditional risk factors and reflects post-operative response to injury. Plasma pool of miRNAs likely reflects extracellular miRNAs which are proportional to intracellular miRNA levels. Therefore, circulating levels of these miRNAs have prognostic implications in detection of higher risk of future cardiovascular events.

  10. Extraction of hyaluronic acid (HA) from rooster comb and characterization using flow field-flow fractionation (FlFFF) coupled with multiangle light scattering (MALS).

    Kang, Dong Young; Kim, Won-Suk; Heo, In Sook; Park, Young Hun; Lee, Seungho

    2010-11-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) was extracted in a relatively large scale from rooster comb using a method similar to that reported previously. The extraction method was modified to simplify and to reduce time and cost in order to accommodate a large-scale extraction. Five hundred grams of frozen rooster combs yielded about 500 mg of dried HA. Extracted HA was characterized using asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AsFlFFF) coupled online to a multiangle light scattering detector and a refractive index detector to determine the molecular size, molecular weight (MW) distribution, and molecular conformation of HA. For characterization of HA, AsFlFFF was operated by a simplified two-step procedure, instead of the conventional three-step procedure, where the first two steps (sample loading and focusing) were combined into one to avoid the adsorption of viscous HA onto the channel membrane. The simplified two-step AsFlFFF yielded reasonably good separations of HA molecules based on their MWs. The weight average MW (M(w) ) and the average root-mean-square (RMS) radius of HA extracted from rooster comb were 1.20×10(6) and 94.7 nm, respectively. When the sample solution was filtered through a 0.45 μm disposable syringe filter, they were reduced down to 3.8×10(5) and 50.1 nm, respectively. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Preclinical evaluation of caprylic acid-fractionated IgG antivenom for the treatment of Taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus envenoming in Papua New Guinea.

    Mariángela Vargas

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Snake bite is a common medical emergency in Papua New Guinea (PNG. The taipan, Oxyuranus scutellatus, inflicts a large number of bites that, in the absence of antivenom therapy, result in high mortality. Parenteral administration of antivenoms manufactured in Australia is the current treatment of choice for these envenomings. However, the price of these products is high and has increased over the last 25 years; consequently the country can no longer afford all the antivenom it needs. This situation prompted an international collaborative project aimed at generating a new, low-cost antivenom against O. scutellatus for PNG.A new monospecific equine whole IgG antivenom, obtained by caprylic acid fractionation of plasma, was prepared by immunising horses with the venom of O. scutellatus from PNG. This antivenom was compared with the currently used F(ab'(2 monospecific taipan antivenom manufactured by CSL Limited, Australia. The comparison included physicochemical properties and the preclinical assessment of the neutralisation of lethal neurotoxicity and the myotoxic, coagulant and phospholipase A(2 activities of the venom of O. scutellatus from PNG. The F(ab'(2 antivenom had a higher protein concentration than whole IgG antivenom. Both antivenoms effectively neutralised, and had similar potency, against the lethal neurotoxic effect (both by intraperitoneal and intravenous routes of injection, myotoxicity, and phospholipase A(2 activity of O. scutellatus venom. However, the whole IgG antivenom showed a higher potency than the F(ab'(2 antivenom in the neutralisation of the coagulant activity of O. scutellatus venom from PNG.The new whole IgG taipan antivenom described in this study compares favourably with the currently used F(ab'(2 antivenom, both in terms of physicochemical characteristics and neutralising potency. Therefore, it should be considered as a promising low-cost candidate for the treatment of envenomings by O. scutellatus in PNG, and is

  12. Action of Bothrops moojeni venom and its L-amino acid oxidase fraction, treated with 60Co gamma rays, in Leishmania spp

    Cardoso, Andre Gustavo Tempone

    1999-01-01

    Bothrops moojeni venom showed an anti leishmania activity in vitro, as determined by a cell viability assay using the reduction of MTT. After venom purification, by chromatography techniques, the fractions with anti leishmania and L-amino acid oxidase activities, eluted in the same positions. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 140 kDa by molecular exclusion chromatography, and 69 kDa, by SDS-PAGE, migrating as a single band, with an isoelectric point of 4.8 as determined by isoelectric focusing. The purified LAO from B. moojeni venom, 135-fold more active than crude venom, showed homo dimeric constitution, and was active against Leishmania spp from the New World, with an effective concentration against L(L). amazonensis of 1.80 μg/ml (EC 50 ), L.(V.) panamensis (0.78 |μg/ml) and L.(L.) chagasi (0.63 (μg/ml). Ultrastructural studies of promastigotes affected by LAO demonstrated cell death, with edema in several organelles such as mitochondria and nuclear membrane, before cell disruption and necrosis. The action of LAO was demonstrated to be hydrogen peroxide-dependent. Studies with LLCMK-2 cells, treated with LAO, showed a toxic effect, with an EC 50 of 11|μg/ml. Irradiation of LAO with 6 0C o gamma rays, did not affect its whole oxidative activity, neither detoxified the enzyme. Amastigotes treated with LAO were not affected by its hydrogen peroxide, otherwise, the exogenous product, killed amastigotes with an EC 50 of 0.67mM. These data could be of help in the development of alternative therapeutic approaches to the treatment of leishmaniasis. (author)

  13. Effect of selenium-enriched organic material amendment on selenium fraction transformation and bioavailability in soil.

    Wang, Dan; Dinh, Quang Toan; Anh Thu, Tran Thi; Zhou, Fei; Yang, Wenxiao; Wang, Mengke; Song, Weiwei; Liang, Dongli

    2018-05-01

    To exploit the plant byproducts from selenium (Se) biofortification and reduce environmental risk of inorganic Se fertilizer, pot experiment was conducted in this study. The effects of Se-enriched wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) straw (WS + Se) and pak choi (Brassica chinensis L.) (P + Se) amendment on organo-selenium speciation transformation in soil and its bioavailability was evaluated by pak choi uptake. The Se contents of the cultivated pak choi in treatments amended with the same amount of Se-enriched wheat straw and pak choi were 1.7 and 9.7 times in the shoots and 2.3 and 6.3 times in the roots compared with control treatment. Soil respiration rate was significantly increased after all organic material amendment in soil (p organic materials and thus resulted in soluble Se (SOL-Se), exchangeable Se (EX-Se), and fulvic acid-bound Se (FA-Se) fraction increasing by 25.2-29.2%, 9-13.8%, and 4.92-8.28%, respectively. In addition, both Pearson correlation and cluster analysis showed that EX-Se and FA-Se were better indicators for soil Se availability in organic material amendment soils. The Marquardt-Levenberg Model well described the dynamic kinetics of FA-Se content after Se-enriched organic material amendment in soil mainly because of the mineralization of organic carbon and organo-selenium. The utilization of Se in P + Se treatment was significantly higher than those in WS + Se treatment because of the different mineralization rates and the amount of FA-Se in soil. Se-enriched organic materials amendment can not only increase the availability of selenium in soil but also avoid the waste of valuable Se source. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. FRACTIONATION AND CHARACTERISATION OF TECHNICAL AMMONIUM LIGNOSULPHONATE

    Cheryl Ann Leger

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to use lignin in any analytical methodology without reducing its considerable polydispersity by fractionation. An ammonium lignosulphonate sample was fractionated using a method of partial solubility in solutions of isopropanol increasingly diluted with distilled water, effectively fractionating by polarity. Selected fractions were characterised by gravimetric determination of the fractions, and determination of acid insoluble lignin, soluble lignin, and carbohydrate contents. Acid-insoluble lignin content was very low, and soluble lignin provided the majority of the lignin content, as should be expected from sulphonated lignin. Carbohydrate contents were also fairly low, the highest percentage at 14.5 being in Fraction 2, with the bulk lignin and Fraction 3 having 6.5% and 3.2%, respectively. Differences in the composition of each fraction support the efficacy of the fractionation process and permitted selection of fractions for use in subsequent studies.

  15. Mystery Fractions

    Bhattacharyya, Sonalee; Namakshi, Nama; Zunker, Christina; Warshauer, Hiroko K.; Warshauer, Max

    2016-01-01

    Making math more engaging for students is a challenge that every teacher faces on a daily basis. These authors write that they are constantly searching for rich problem-solving tasks that cover the necessary content, develop critical-thinking skills, and engage student interest. The Mystery Fraction activity provided here focuses on a key number…

  16. VITAMIN-E, LIPID FRACTIONS, AND FATTY-ACID COMPOSITION OF COLOSTRUM, TRANSITIONAL MILK, AND MATURE MILK - AN INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE-STUDY

    BOERSMA, ER; OFFRINGA, PJ; MUSKIET, FAJ; CHASE, WM; SIMMONS, IJ

    Triglycerides, cholesterol, fatty acid composition, and tocopherols were determined in colostrum, transitional milk, and mature milk in St Lucia. With progress of lactation, triglycerides and percentage medium-chain fatty acids increased whereas tocopherols, cholesterol, and percentage longchain

  17. Influence of variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) with the change of organic modifier fraction on QSRRs of hydrophobicity and RP-HPLC retention of weakly acidic compounds.

    Han, Shu-ying; Liang, Chao; Zou, Kuan; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Ge, Xin

    2012-11-15

    The variation in mobile phase pH and ionizable solute dissociation constant (pK(a)) with the change of organic modifier fraction in hydroorganic mobile phase has seemingly been a troublesome problem in studies and applications of reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Most of the early studies regarding the RP-HPLC of acid-base compounds have to measure the actual pH of the mixed mobile phase rigorously, sometimes bringing difficulties in the practices of liquid chromatographic separation. In this paper, the effect of this variation on the apparent n-octanol/water partition coefficient (K(ow)″) and the related quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w), the logarithm of retention factor of analytes in neat aqueous mobile phases, was investigated for weakly acidic compounds. This QSRR is commonly used as a classical method for K(ow) measurement by RP-HPLC. The theoretical and experimental derivation revealed that the variation in mobile phase pH and solute pK(a) will not affect the QSRRs of acidic compounds. This conclusion is proved to be suitable for various types of ion-suppressors, i.e., strong acid (perchloric acid), weak acid (acetic acid) and buffer salt (potassium dihydrogen phosphate/phosphoric acid, PBS). The QSRRs of logK(ow)″ vs. logk(w) were modeled by 11 substituted benzoic acids using different types of ion-suppressors in a binary methanol-water mobile phase to confirm our deduction. Although different types of ion-suppressor all can be used as mobile phase pH modifiers, the QSRR model obtained by using perchloric acid as the ion-suppressor was found to have the best result, and the slightly inferior QSRRs were obtained by using acetic acid or PBS as the ion-suppressor. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Response of saprotrophic microfungi degrading the fulvic fraction of soil organic matter to different n fertilization intensities, different plant species cover and elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration

    Strnadová, Veronika; Hršelová, Hana; Kolařík, Miroslav; Gryndler, Milan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2004), s. 563-568 ISSN 0015-5632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/03/0188; GA ČR GD206/03/H137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : saprotrophic microfungi * soil organic matter Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.034, year: 2004

  19. The Pattern of Fatty Acids Displaced by EPA and DHA Following 12 Months Supplementation Varies between Blood Cell and Plasma Fractions

    Walker, Celia G.; West, Annette L.; Browning, Lucy M.; Madden, Jackie; Gambell, Joanna M.; Jebb, Susan A.; Calder, Philip C.

    2015-01-01

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are increased in plasma lipids and blood cell membranes in response to supplementation. Whilst arachidonic acid (AA) is correspondingly decreased, the effect on other fatty acids (FA) is less well described and there may be site-specific differences. In response to 12 months EPA + DHA supplementation in doses equivalent to 0–4 portions of oily fish/week (1 portion: 3.27 g EPA+DHA) multinomial regression analysis was used to identify...

  20. Fraction Reduction through Continued Fractions

    Carley, Holly

    2011-01-01

    This article presents a method of reducing fractions without factoring. The ideas presented may be useful as a project for motivated students in an undergraduate number theory course. The discussion is related to the Euclidean Algorithm and its variations may lead to projects or early examples involving efficiency of an algorithm.

  1. Differences in bitumen and kerogen-bound fatty acid fractions during diagenesis and early catagenesis in a maturity series of New Zealand coals

    Glombitza, Clemens; Mangelsdorf, Kai; Horsfield, Brian

    2016-01-01

    network. Application of the carbon preference index for fatty acids (CPIFA) of bitumen and kerogen-bound acids revealed a linear correlation to the Tmax maturity parameter. This shows that the CPIFA has a clear relation to thermal stability and, thus, reactivity of the buried organic matter....... The difference in slopes of CPIFA vs. Tmax for short and long chain as well as bitumen and kerogen-bound acids may indicate their different degradation susceptibilities. The short chain fatty acids of the bitumen show the highest susceptibility whereas the kerogen-bound long chain fatty acids seem to be most...

  2. Acid-base properties of humic substances from composted and thermally-dried sewage sludges and amended soils as determined by potentiometric titration and the NICA-Donnan model.

    Fernández, José M; Plaza, César; Senesi, Nicola; Polo, Alfredo

    2007-09-01

    The acid-base properties of humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs) isolated from composted sewage sludge (CS), thermally-dried sewage sludge (TS), soils amended with either CS or TS at a rate of 80 t ha(-1)y(-1) for 3y and the corresponding unamended soil were investigated by use of potentiometric titrations. The non-ideal competitive adsorption (NICA)-Donnan model for a bimodal distribution of proton binding sites was fitted to titration data by use of a least-squares minimization method. The main fitting parameters of the NICA-Donnan model obtained for each HA and FA sample included site densities, median affinity constants and widths of affinity distributions for proton binding to low and high affinity sites, which were assumed to be, respectively, carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups. With respect to unamended soil HA and FA, the HAs and FAs from CS, and especially TS, were characterized by smaller acidic functional group contents, larger proton binding affinities of both carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups, and smaller heterogeneity of carboxylic and phenolic-type groups. Amendment with CS or TS led to a decrease of acidic functional group contents and a slight increase of proton binding affinities of carboxylic- and phenolic-type groups of soil HAs and FAs. These effects were more evident in the HA and FA fractions from CS-amended soil than in those from TS-amended soil.

  3. New strategy for the determination of gliadins in maize- or rice-based foods matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry: fractionation of gliadins from maize or rice prolamins by acidic treatment.

    Hernando, Alberto; Valdes, Israel; Méndez, Enrique

    2003-08-01

    A procedure for determining small quantities of gliadins by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOFMS) in gluten-free foods containing relatively large amounts of prolamin proteins from maize or rice is described. We report for the first time that gliadins, the ethanol-soluble wheat prolamin fraction, can be quantitatively solubilized in 1.0 M acetic acid, while the corresponding ethanol-soluble maize or rice prolamin fraction remains insoluble in acetic acid. We describe a methodology for the detection of gliadins in maize and rice foods based on a two-step procedure of extraction (60% aqueous ethanol followed by 1 M acetic acid). Subsequent MALDI-TOFMS analysis of the resulting acidic extract from these gluten-free foods clearly confirms the presence of a typical mass pattern corresponding to gliadin components, ranging from 30 to 45 kDa. Depending on the percentages of maize or rice flours employed in the elaboration of these foods, the combined procedure enables levels of gliadins from 100 to 400 ppm to be detected. The efficiency of this combined procedure corroborates enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay data for a large number of maize/rice gluten-free foods by means of direct visualization of the characteristic gliadin mass pattern in maize or rice foods. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Biosynthesis of acid phosphatase of baker's yeast . Characterization of a protoplast-bound fraction containing precursors of the exo-enzyme

    Boer, Pieter; Rijn, Herman J.M. van; Reinking, A.; Steyn-Parvé, Elizabeth P.

    1975-01-01

    1. 1.|Yest protoplasts, secreting acid phosphatase (orthophosphoric-monoester phosphohydrolase (acid optimum) EC 3.1.3.2) contain a small amount of firmly bound enzyme, even after lysis (Van Rijn, H.J.M.; Boer, P. and Steyn-Parvé, E.P. (1972) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 268, 431–441). The major part

  5. Soil fertility, humic fractions and natural abundance of "1"3C and "1"5N in soil under different land use in Parana State, Southern Brazil

    Loss, Arcangelo; Pereia, Marcos Gervasio; Costa, Elias Mendes; Beutler, Sidinei Julio; Piccolo, Marisa de Cassia

    2016-01-01

    Humic fractions of soil organic matter (SOM) and measurements of "1"3C and "1"5N isotope can be used to highlight differences between management systems with different intensities of land use. This study characterized soil fertility, quantified carbon levels in the humic fractions and evaluated the natural abundance of "1"3C and "1"5N in systems cultivated under no-tillage system (NTS) and conventional tillage system (CTS) or used with secondary forest or perennial pasture in Marmeleiro, Parana State, Southern Brazil. NTS was more efficient than the conventional tillage system (CTS) in increasing pH (0.0-0.10 m layer), Ca (0.0-0.05 m layer), P (except 0.05-0.10 m layer) and N (0.0-0.10 m) levels, total organic carbon (TOC) stocks (0.0-0.20 and 0.0-0.40 m layers); carbon of the humin fraction (C-HUM) in 0.0-0.40 m; the fulvic acid fraction (C-FAF) and humic acid (C-HAF) in 0.0-0.05 m. The use of grasses, in NTS and pasture, increased TOC stocks compared to the other soil use or management systems evaluated in the 0.0-0.40 m layer. In the topsoil layer, the anthropogenic influence of plowing and harrowing in CTS promoted greater loss of carbon in C-HUM, C-FAF and C-HAF than NTS, forest and pasture. In CTS, growing corn for 42 years after the removal of forest cover did not alter the "1"3C at 0.0-0.40 m. In pasture, the absence of legumes, constant deposition of cattle manure and a more stable organic matter favored high "1"5N levels (except at 0.0-0.05 m in CTS). The decrease in "1"5N values from the 0.0-0.10 to 0.10-0.20 m layer in CTS indicates that soil turnover (by plowing and harrowing) has the potential to disturb the depth-related variation in soil "1"5N, accelerating decomposition and compromising N transformations. Among the variables analyzed, the determination of carbon in humic fractions and "1"5N values were efficient in identifying soil changes produced by land use or management systems

  6. Antioxidant activity of cod (Gadus morhua) protein hydrolysates: Fractionation and characterisation of peptide fractions

    Farvin Habebullah, Sabeena; Andersen, Lisa Lystbæk; Otte, Jeanette

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to characterise peptide fractions (>5 kDa, 3–5 kDa and fractions were dominated by Ala, Gly, Glu and Ser. The total amino acid composition had high proportions of Lys, Ala...... and Glu. The 3–5 kDa and fractions were further fractionated by size exclusion chromatography. All sub-fractions showed high Fe2+ chelating activity. The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the 3–5 kDa fraction was exerted mainly by one sub-fraction dominated by peptides with masses below 600 Da....... The DPPH radical-scavenging activity of the fraction was exerted by sub-fractions with low molecular weight. The highest reducing power was found in a sub-fraction containing peptides rich in Arg, Tyr and Phe. Both free amino acids and low molecular weight peptides thus seemed to contribute...

  7. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on resting heart rate, heart rate recovery after exercise, and heart rate variability in men with healed myocardial infarctions and depressed ejection fractions.

    O'Keefe, James H; Abuissa, Hussam; Sastre, Antonio; Steinhaus, David M; Harris, William S

    2006-04-15

    We explored possible mechanisms by which recommended intakes of omega-3 fatty acids may decrease the risk for sudden cardiac death in patients with documented coronary heart disease. The cardioprotective effects of omega-3 fatty acids have been documented in epidemiologic and randomized controlled trials. These fatty acids are presumed to decrease susceptibility to fatal arrhythmias, but whether this is mediated by classic risk factors or direct cardiac mechanisms is not known. Eighteen white men with a history of myocardial infarction and ejection fractions <40% were randomized to placebo or omega-3 fatty acids (585 mg of docosahexaenoic acid and 225 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid) for two 4-month periods in a crossover design. At the end of each period, heart rate (HR), HR variability, and rate of HR recovery after exercise were determined, as were effects on arterial compliance, blood pressure, cardiac function, and fasting serum levels of lipids and inflammatory markers. Omega-3 fatty acids decreased HR at rest from 73 +/- 13 to 68 +/- 13 beats/min (p <0.0001) and improved 1-minute HR recovery after exercise (-27 +/- 10 to -32 +/- 12 beats/min, p <0.01). HR variability in the high-frequency band increased (p <0.02), but no change was noted in overall HR variability. There were no significant effects on blood pressure, arterial compliance, lipids, or inflammatory markers. These changes are consistent with an increase in vagal activity and may in part explain the observed decrease in risk for sudden cardiac death seen with omega-3 fatty acid supplementation.

  8. Exposure of Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) to a combination of resin acids and a water soluble fraction of diesel fuel oil: A model to investigate the chemical causes of pigmented salmon syndrome

    Croce, B.; Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, Aberdeen; Stagg, R.M.

    1997-01-01

    Pigmented salmon syndrome is a pollutant-induced hemolytic anemia and hyperbilirubinemia. As part of an investigation of this condition, S2 Atlantic salmon parr (Salmo salar) were exposed to a diesel fuel oil, water soluble fraction (WSF) in combination with a mixture of three resin acids (isopimaric, dehydroabietic, and abietic acids) in a continuous-flow freshwater system. The total nominal concentrations of resin acids in the exposure tanks were 10, 50, and 100 microg/L; the diesel WSF was generated in situ and provided a mean hydrocarbon concentration of 2.0 ± 0.1 mg/L (n = 12) during the 9-d exposure period. Exposure to the diesel WSF alone depressed liver bilirubin UDP-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT) activity and induced phenol UDPGT activity. Exposure to the diesel WSF in the absence or presence of resin acids induced liver cytochrome P4501A and increased the concentrations in the plasma of the enzymes lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase, and glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase. The combined exposure to diesel WSF with either 50 or 100 microg/L total resin acid caused significant elevations in the concentrations of bilirubin in the plasma and many of these fish had yellow pigmentation on the ventral surface and around the gill arches. The results demonstrate that exposure to combinations of two groups of contaminants can result in the manifestation of toxic effects not apparent from exposure to either of these chemicals in isolation

  9. Cardiovascular Ultrasound of Neonatal Long Evans Rats Exposed Prenatally to Trichloroacetic Acid: Effects on Heart Rate, Ejection Fraction, and Cardiac Output

    This abstract describes the use of a relatively new technology, cardiovascular ultrasound (echocardiography) for evaluating developmental toxicity affecting heart development. The abstract describes the effects of two known cardiac teratogens, trichloroacetic acid and dimethadio...

  10. The Pattern of Fatty Acids Displaced by EPA and DHA Following 12 Months Supplementation Varies between Blood Cell and Plasma Fractions

    Celia G. Walker

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA are increased in plasma lipids and blood cell membranes in response to supplementation. Whilst arachidonic acid (AA is correspondingly decreased, the effect on other fatty acids (FA is less well described and there may be site-specific differences. In response to 12 months EPA + DHA supplementation in doses equivalent to 0–4 portions of oily fish/week (1 portion: 3.27 g EPA+DHA multinomial regression analysis was used to identify important FA changes for plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC, cholesteryl ester (CE and triglyceride (TAG and for blood mononuclear cells (MNC, red blood cells (RBC and platelets (PLAT. Dose-dependent increases in EPA + DHA were matched by decreases in several n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA in PC, CE, RBC and PLAT, but were predominantly compensated for by oleic acid in TAG. Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC. Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%–64% of placebo in the four portions group. We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

  11. The Pattern of Fatty Acids Displaced by EPA and DHA Following 12 Months Supplementation Varies between Blood Cell and Plasma Fractions.

    Walker, Celia G; West, Annette L; Browning, Lucy M; Madden, Jackie; Gambell, Joanna M; Jebb, Susan A; Calder, Philip C

    2015-08-03

    Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are increased in plasma lipids and blood cell membranes in response to supplementation. Whilst arachidonic acid (AA) is correspondingly decreased, the effect on other fatty acids (FA) is less well described and there may be site-specific differences. In response to 12 months EPA + DHA supplementation in doses equivalent to 0-4 portions of oily fish/week (1 portion: 3.27 g EPA+DHA) multinomial regression analysis was used to identify important FA changes for plasma phosphatidylcholine (PC), cholesteryl ester (CE) and triglyceride (TAG) and for blood mononuclear cells (MNC), red blood cells (RBC) and platelets (PLAT). Dose-dependent increases in EPA + DHA were matched by decreases in several n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) in PC, CE, RBC and PLAT, but were predominantly compensated for by oleic acid in TAG. Changes were observed for all FA classes in MNC. Consequently the n-6:n-3 PUFA ratio was reduced in a dose-dependent manner in all pools after 12 months (37%-64% of placebo in the four portions group). We conclude that the profile of the FA decreased in exchange for the increase in EPA + DHA following supplementation differs by FA pool with implications for understanding the impact of n-3 PUFA on blood lipid and blood cell biology.

  12. Biosynthetic origin of acetic acid using SNIF-NMR; Determinacao da origem biossintetica de acido acetico atraves da tecnica 'Site Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation Studied by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SNIF-NMR)'

    Boffo, Elisangela Fabiana; Ferreira, Antonio Gilberto [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2006-05-15

    The main purpose of this work is to describe the use of the technique Site-Specific Natural Isotopic Fractionation of hydrogen (SNIF-NMR), using {sup 2}H and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy, to investigate the biosynthetic origin of acetic acid in commercial samples of Brazilian vinegar. This method is based on the deuterium to hydrogen ratio at a specific position (methyl group) of acetic acitained by fermentation, through different biosynthetic mechanisms, which result in different isotopic ratios. We measured the isotopic ratio of vinegars obtained through C{sub 3}, C{sub 4}, and CAM biosynthetic mechanisms, blends of C{sub 3} and C{sub 4} (agrins) and synthetic acetic acid. (author)

  13. Kinetic and Modeling Investigation to Provide Design Guidelines for the NREL Dilute-Acid Process Aimed at Total Hydrolysis/Fractionation of Lignocellulosic Biomass: July 1998

    Lee, Y. Y.; Iyer, P.; Xiang, Q.; Hayes, J.

    2004-08-01

    Following up on previous work, subcontractor investigated three aspects of using NREL ''pretreatment'' technology for total hydrolysis (cellulose as well as hemicellulose) of biomass. Whereas historic hydrolysis of biomass used either dilute acid or concentrated acid technology for hydrolysis of both hemicellulose and cellulose, NREL has been pursuing very dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose followed by enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose. NREL's countercurrent shrinking-bed reactor design for hemicellulose hydrolysis (pretreatment) has, however, shown promise for total hydrolysis. For the first task, subcontractor developed a mathematical model of the countercurrent shrinking bed reactor operation and, using yellow poplar sawdust as a feedstock, analyzed the effect of: initial solid feeding rate, temperature, acid concentration, acid flow rate, Peclet number (a measure of backmixing in liquid flow), and bed shrinking. For the second task, subcontractor used laboratory trials, with yellow poplar sawdust and 0.07 wt% sulfuric acid at various temperatures, to verify the hydrolysis of cellulose to glucose (desired) and decomposition of glucose (undesired) and determine appropriate parameters for use in kinetic models. Unlike cellulose and hemicellulose, lignins, the third major component of biomass, are not carbohydrates that can be broken down into component sugars. They are, however, aromatic complex amorphous phenolic polymers that can likely be converted into low-molecular weight compounds suitable for production of fuels and chemicals. Oxidative degradation is one pathway for such conversion and hydrogen peroxide would be an attractive reagent for this, as it would leave no residuals. For the third task, subcontractor reacted lignin with hydrogen peroxide under various conditions and analyzed the resulting product mix.

  14. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  15. Schinus terebinthifolius scale-up countercurrent chromatography (Part I): High performance countercurrent chromatography fractionation of triterpene acids with off-line detection using atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    Vieira, Mariana Neves; Costa, Fernanda das Neves; Leitão, Gilda Guimarães; Garrard, Ian; Hewitson, Peter; Ignatova, Svetlana; Winterhalter, Peter; Jerz, Gerold

    2015-04-10

    'Countercurrent chromatography' (CCC) is an ideal technique for the recovery, purification and isolation of bioactive natural products, due to the liquid nature of the stationary phase, process predictability and the possibility of scale-up from analytical to preparative scale. In this work, a method developed for the fractionation of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi berries dichloromethane extract was thoroughly optimized to achieve maximal throughput with minimal solvent and time consumption per gram of processed crude extract, using analytical, semi-preparative and preparative 'high performance countercurrent chromatography' (HPCCC) instruments. The method using the biphasic solvent system composed of n-heptane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water (6:1:6:1, v/v/v/v) was volumetrically scaled up to increase sample throughput up to 120 times, while maintaining separation efficiency and time. As a fast and specific detection alternative, the fractions collected from the CCC-separations were injected to an 'atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometer' (APCI-MS/MS) and reconstituted molecular weight MS-chromatograms of the APCI-ionizable compounds from S. terebinthifolius were obtained. This procedure led to the direct isolation of tirucallane type triterpenes such as masticadienonic and 3β-masticadienolic acids. Also oleanonic and moronic acids have been identified for the first time in the species. In summary, this approach can be used for other CCC scale-up processes, enabling MS-target-guided isolation procedures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aluminium (Al) fractionation and speciation: getting closer to describing the factors influencing Al(sup3+) in water impacted by acid mine drainage

    Chamier, J

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Acid mine drainage (AMD) severely impacts the water chemistry of a receiving resource, changing the occurrence, speciation and toxicity of metals such as Aluminium (Al). The toxicity of Al is determined by its speciation represented by the labile...

  17. A placebo-controlled randomized study on the clinical effectiveness, immunohistochemical changes and protoporphyrin IX accumulation in fractionated 5-aminolaevulinic acid-photodynamic therapy in patients with psoriasis.

    Smits, T.; Kleinpenning, M.M.; Erp, P.E.J. van; Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Gerritsen, M.J.P.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical 5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT) for the treatment of psoriasis has been evaluated in a few studies. In these studies different treatment parameters were used, there was a variable clinical response, and a nonhomogeneous fluorescence was seen after

  18. Fractional Schroedinger equation

    Laskin, Nick

    2002-01-01

    Some properties of the fractional Schroedinger equation are studied. We prove the Hermiticity of the fractional Hamilton operator and establish the parity conservation law for fractional quantum mechanics. As physical applications of the fractional Schroedinger equation we find the energy spectra of a hydrogenlike atom (fractional 'Bohr atom') and of a fractional oscillator in the semiclassical approximation. An equation for the fractional probability current density is developed and discussed. We also discuss the relationships between the fractional and standard Schroedinger equations

  19. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  20. Geochemical processes assessed by Rare Earth Elements fractionation at “Laguna Verde” acidic-sulphate crater lake (Azufral volcano, Colombia)

    Inguaggiato, Claudio; Burbano, Viviana; Rouwet, Dmitri; Garzón, Gustavo

    2017-01-01

    The geochemical behaviour of major elements, Fe, Al, Mn, and Rare Earth Elements (REE) was investigated in the “Laguna Verde” acidic crater lake of Azufral volcano (Colombia). The cold lake water (T close to 10 °C) is sulphate-dominated, due to absorption and oxidation of H_2S (pH 2.1–2.7, Eh 196–260 mV), and Na-enriched (Total Dissolved Solids 0.79 g L"−"1). The total amount of REE dissolved in the lake ranges from 3.3 to 9.1 ppb. The REE patterns normalized to the local rocks show a Light Rare Earth Elements (LREE) depletion quite constant in the 15 samples. Similar patterns were already found in the acidic sulphate springs of Nevado del Ruiz volcano-hydrothermal system, caused by the precipitation of alunite and jarosite, absorbing LREE and hence removing them from solution. Alunite and jarosite minerals are not oversaturated at chemical-physical conditions within the lake itself, but alunite becomes oversaturated for temperatures above ≈100 °C, reigning in the underlying hydrothermal system. Water temperatures close to 75 °C were found in the northern part of the lake. Coupling the distribution of REE in lake water (LREE depleted) and the saturation indexes, we suggest that the distribution of REE in the lake water is the result of the alunite precipitation in the northern part of the lake and/or in the deeper hydrothermal system. The acidic hydrothermal fluids mobilize the REE with contents up to ≈5 orders of magnitude higher than seawater; acidic-hydrothermal systems, such as acidic crater lakes, can hence be considered potential REE “reservoirs”. - Highlights: • Acidic crater lakes can be considered potential Rare Earth Elements reservoirs. • Alunite precipitation removes Light Rare Earth Elements. • Rare Earth Elements identify geochemical processes in volcano-hydrothermal systems.

  1. Human plasma-derived immunoglobulin G fractionated by an aqueous two-phase system, caprylic acid precipitation, and membrane chromatography has a high purity level and is free of detectable in vitro thrombogenic activity.

    Vargas, M; Segura, Á; Wu, Y-W; Herrera, M; Chou, M-L; Villalta, M; León, G; Burnouf, T

    2015-02-01

    Instituto Clodomiro Picado has developed an immunoglobulin G (IgG) plasma fractionation process combining a polyethylene glycol/phosphate aqueous two-phase system (ATPS), caprylic acid precipitation and anion-exchange membrane chromatography. We evaluated the purity and in vitro thrombogenicity of such IgG, in line with current international requirements. Contributions of the different production steps to reduce thrombogenicity were assessed at 0·2 l-scale, and then the methodology was scaled-up to a 10 l-scale and final products (n = 3) were analysed. Purity, immunoglobulin composition, and subclass distribution were determined by electrophoretic and immunochemical methods. The in vitro thrombogenic potential was determined by a thrombin generation assay (TGA) using a Technothrombin fluorogenic substrate. Prekallikrein activator (PKA), plasmin, factor Xa, thrombin and thrombin-like activities were assessed using S-2302, S-2251, S-2222, S-2238 and S-2288 chromogenic substrates, respectively, and FXI by an ELISA. The thrombogenicity markers were reduced mostly during the ATPS step and were found to segregate mostly into the discarded liquid upper phase. The caprylic acid precipitation eliminated the residual procoagulant activity. The IgG preparations made from the 10 l-batches contained 100% gamma proteins, low residual IgA and undetectable IgM. The IgG subclass distribution was not substantially affected by the process. TGA and amidolytic activities revealed an undetectable in vitro thrombogenic risk and the absence of proteolytic enzymes in the final product. Fractionating human plasma by an ATPS combined with caprylic acid and membrane chromatography resulted in an IgG preparation of high purity and free of a detectable in vitro thrombogenic risk. © 2014 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  2. Novel integrated mechanical biological chemical treatment (MBCT) systems for the production of levulinic acid from fraction of municipal solid waste: A comprehensive techno-economic analysis.

    Sadhukhan, Jhuma; Ng, Kok Siew; Martinez-Hernandez, Elias

    2016-09-01

    This paper, for the first time, reports integrated conceptual MBCT/biorefinery systems for unlocking the value of organics in municipal solid waste (MSW) through the production of levulinic acid (LA by 5wt%) that increases the economic margin by 110-150%. After mechanical separation recovering recyclables, metals (iron, aluminium, copper) and refuse derived fuel (RDF), lignocelluloses from remaining MSW are extracted by supercritical-water for chemical valorisation, comprising hydrolysis in 2wt% dilute H2SO4 catalyst producing LA, furfural, formic acid (FA), via C5/C6 sugar extraction, in plug flow (210-230°C, 25bar, 12s) and continuous stirred tank (195-215°C, 14bar, 20min) reactors; char separation and LA extraction/purification by methyl isobutyl ketone solvent; acid/solvent and by-product recovery. The by-product and pulping effluents are anaerobically digested into biogas and fertiliser. Produced biogas (6.4MWh/t), RDF (5.4MWh/t), char (4.5MWh/t) are combusted, heat recovered into steam generation in boiler (efficiency: 80%); on-site heat/steam demand is met; balance of steam is expanded into electricity in steam turbines (efficiency: 35%). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Polyphenol fraction of extra virgin olive oil protects against endothelial dysfunction induced by high glucose and free fatty acids through modulation of nitric oxide and endothelin-1

    Carolina Emilia Storniolo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological and clinical studies have reported that olive oil reduces the incidence of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect have not been delineated. The endothelium plays an important role in blood pressure regulation through the release of potent vasodilator and vasoconstrictor agents such as nitric oxide (NO and endothelin-1 (ET-1, respectively, events that are disrupted in type 2 diabetes. Extra virgin olive oil contains polyphenols, compounds that exert a biological action on endothelial function. This study analyzes the effects of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction using an in vitro model that simulates the conditions of type 2 diabetes. Our findings show that high glucose and linoleic and oleic acids decrease endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, and consequently intracellular NO levels, and increase ET-1 synthesis by ECV304 cells. These effects may be related to the stimulation of reactive oxygen species production in these experimental conditions. Hydroxytyrosol and the polyphenol extract from extra virgin olive oil partially reversed the above events. Moreover, we observed that high glucose and free fatty acids reduced NO and increased ET-1 levels induced by acetylcholine through the modulation of intracellular calcium concentrations and endothelial NO synthase phosphorylation, events also reverted by hydroxytyrosol and polyphenol extract. Thus, our results suggest a protective effect of olive oil polyphenols on endothelial dysfunction induced by hyperglycemia and free fatty acids.

  4. Transient cultivation and fallow land in forests. Measurements of the specific activity of the carbon in organic matter fractions for the purpose of studying the renewal of the store of organic matter in an equatorial forest environment

    Turenne, J.F.; Rapaire, J.L.

    1979-01-01

    Different conditions of forest-type fallow land and of clearings in the equatorial forests of the Amazon region provide a basis for determining the nature, the direction and the magnitude of the transformations of the organic matter of the soil when cultivated, using the variations in the specific activity of atmospheric carbon. Calculations of the renewal rates of surface horizon organic matter show that there are two groups of products, (a) humin, a labile fraction with a high renewal rate, and (b) humic and fulvic products with a lower renewal rate. The effect of clearing is generally to retard these renewal rates. The dynamics which become established in forest fallow land mainly involve the fulvic products, and the return to forest equilibrium can be considered to occur between 60 and 100 years after clearing. (author)

  5. Effect of Vermicompost Extract and Vermicompost-Derived Humic Acids on Seed Germination and Seedling Growth of Hemp

    Ievinsh Gederts

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Hemp (Cannabis sativa L. cultivars grown for industrial use have recently emerged as a sustainable alternative source of industrial fibre and bioenergy, and is a highly valuable food and animal feed resource. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of vermicompost extract, vermicompost mineral nutrient composition, and vermicompost-derived humic and fulvic acids on seed germination and growth of hemp seedlings. In general, separate application of all vermicompost components stimulated seed germination and hypocotyl and radicle growth, as well as increased chlorophyll concentration in cotyledons. Effective concentration range and the degree of stimulation varied significantly between the treatments. For practical purposes, application of vermicompost and vermicompost-derived extracts for stimulation of hemp growth could be useful at concentrations 5%, 0.05 mg·mL−1 and 1%, for vermicompost extract, humic acids and fulvic acids, respectively.

  6. Fractional Vector Calculus and Fractional Special Function

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Fractional vector calculus is discussed in the spherical coordinate framework. A variation of the Legendre equation and fractional Bessel equation are solved by series expansion and numerically. Finally, we generalize the hypergeometric functions.

  7. In vitro versus in vivo protein digestibility techniques for calculating PDCAAS (protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score) applied to chickpea fractions.

    Tavano, Olga Luisa; Neves, Valdir Augusto; da Silva Júnior, Sinézio Inácio

    2016-11-01

    Seven different in vitro methods to determine the protein digestibility for chickpea proteins were considered and also the application of these methodologies for calculating PDCAAS (protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score), seeking their correlations with the in vivo methodology. In vitro digestibility of raw and heated samples were determined using pepsin-pancreatin hydrolysis, considering soluble nitrogen via Kjeldahl (ppKJ) and hydrolysed peptide linkages using trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid and o-phthaldialdehyde. In vitro digestibility was also determined using trypsin, chymotrypsin and peptidase (3-Enz) or trypsin, chymotrypsin, peptidase and pronase solution (4-Enz). None of the correlations between in vitro and in vivo digestibilities were significant (at p<0.0500), but, strong correlations were observed between PDCAAS calculated by in vitro and in vivo results. PDCAAS-ppKJ, PDCAAS-3-Enz and PDCAAS-4-Enz presented the highest correlations with in vivo method, r=0.9316, 0.9442 and 0.9649 (p<0.0500), respectively. The use of in vitro methods for calculating PDCAAS may be promising and deserves more discussions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The stimulation of the vaginal immune system with short-term administration of a vaginal gel containing fraction of Propionibacterium acnes, hyaluronic acid and polycarbophil is efficacious in vaginal infections dependent on disorders in the vaginal ecosystem.

    Melis, Gian Benedetto; Piras, Bruno; Marotto, Maria Francesca; Neri, Manuela; Corda, Valentina; Vallerino, Valerio; Saba, Alessandra; Lello, Stefano; Pilloni, Monica; Zedda, Pierina; Paoletti, Anna Maria; Mais, Valerio

    2018-04-12

    The vaginal immune system (VIS) is the first defense against antigens recognized as foreign. Substances capable of locally activating the VIS could be a valid strategy to treat vulvo-vaginal infections (VVI), caused by changes in the vaginal ecosystem, such as bacterial vaginosis (BV), vulvo-vaginal candidiasis (CA), and mixed vaginitis (MV). Bacterial lysates, obtained by crushing bacterial cultures, exert immuno-modulatory activities. The parietal fraction from Propionibacterium acnes is a patent of Depofarma (MoglianoVeneto, Italy). The preparation that associates such fraction to hyaluronic acid and polycarbophil is a registered trademark, commercially available in Italy as vaginal gel, Immunovag ® . The study aimed to evaluate whether a 5-day-treatment with Immunovag ® improves the symptoms and signs of VVI, in 60 women with Gardnerella vaginalis (GV), 154 with CA, 95 with MV, diagnosed with vulvar vaginal swab (VVS), and in 283 with BV, diagnosed with the Amsel criteria. At the end of the treatment (visit 2), the symptoms and signs of VVI disappeared in a significant number of subjects (χ 2 p < .02 vs pre-treatment) in all VVI groups, and their intensity was significantly (p < .0002) reduced in the subjects in which they were still present. Immunovag ® represents a valid treatment of VVI induced by changes in the vaginal ecosystem.

  9. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activities of an anthocyanin-rich fraction from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) and 5-aminosalicylic acid in a TNBS-induced colitis rat model.

    Pereira, Sónia R; Pereira, Rita; Figueiredo, Isabel; Freitas, Victor; Dinis, Teresa C P; Almeida, Leonor M

    2017-01-01

    Despite the actual therapeutic approaches for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), efficient and secure alternative options remain a research focus. In this context, anthocyanins seem promising natural anti-inflammatory agents, but their action mechanisms and efficacy as compared with established drugs still require more clarification. The main aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory action of a chemically characterized anthocyanin-rich fraction (ARF), obtained from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), with that of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a first-line drug in IBD, in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis rat model. Such fraction showed a high content and great molecular diversity of anthocyanins, with malvidin-3-galactoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside in the highest concentrations. After daily administration by intragastric infusion for 8 days, ARF, at a molar anthocyanin concentration about 30 times lower than 5-ASA, showed a higher effectiveness in counteracting the intestinal inflammation, as assessed by i) body weight variation and colon damage score, ii) reduction in leukocyte infiltration, iii) increase in antioxidant defenses and iv) by downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in colon tissue homogenates. The strong inhibition of COX-2 expression seems to be a crucial anti-inflammatory mechanism common to both ARF and 5-ASA, but the additional higher abilities of anthocyanins to downregulate iNOS and to decrease leukocytes infiltration and to increase antioxidant defenses in colon may account for the much higher anti-inflammatory action of anthocyanins. These data may contribute to the development of a promising natural approach in IBD management.

  10. Comparison of anti-inflammatory activities of an anthocyanin-rich fraction from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L. and 5-aminosalicylic acid in a TNBS-induced colitis rat model.

    Sónia R Pereira

    Full Text Available Despite the actual therapeutic approaches for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, efficient and secure alternative options remain a research focus. In this context, anthocyanins seem promising natural anti-inflammatory agents, but their action mechanisms and efficacy as compared with established drugs still require more clarification. The main aim of this study was to compare the anti-inflammatory action of a chemically characterized anthocyanin-rich fraction (ARF, obtained from Portuguese blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L., with that of 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA, a first-line drug in IBD, in a 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS-induced colitis rat model. Such fraction showed a high content and great molecular diversity of anthocyanins, with malvidin-3-galactoside and petunidin-3-arabinoside in the highest concentrations. After daily administration by intragastric infusion for 8 days, ARF, at a molar anthocyanin concentration about 30 times lower than 5-ASA, showed a higher effectiveness in counteracting the intestinal inflammation, as assessed by i body weight variation and colon damage score, ii reduction in leukocyte infiltration, iii increase in antioxidant defenses and iv by downregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in colon tissue homogenates. The strong inhibition of COX-2 expression seems to be a crucial anti-inflammatory mechanism common to both ARF and 5-ASA, but the additional higher abilities of anthocyanins to downregulate iNOS and to decrease leukocytes infiltration and to increase antioxidant defenses in colon may account for the much higher anti-inflammatory action of anthocyanins. These data may contribute to the development of a promising natural approach in IBD management.

  11. Safety of protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and

    Gertjan Schaafsma

    2009-01-01

    This paper evaluates the safety for humans with regard to consumption of protein hydrolysates and fractions thereof, including bioactive peptides. The available literature on the safety of protein, protein hydrolysates, fractions thereof and free amino acids on relevant food legislation is reviewed

  12. Characterization and complexation of humic acid

    Kim, J.I.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.; Rhee, D.S.; Wimmer, H.

    1990-05-01

    This paper summarizes the research contributions to the CEC project MIRAGE II, particularly the research area: complexation and colloids (COCO). The first part of the paper comprises the characterization of humic and fulvic acids from different origins: a commercial product from Aldrich Co. used as a reference humic acid and site specific humic acids from Gorleben (FRG), Boom Clay (B) and Fanay Augeres (F) aquifer systems. The second part includes the complexation of trivalent actinides: Am(III) and Cm(III) with various humic acids. A number of different methods have been applied for the complexation study: spectrophotometry, ultrafiltration, laser-indused photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and time resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The evaluation process of complexation constant is discussed extensively and the well consolidated results are presented, which can be directly used for the geochemical modelling of the radionuclide migration. (orig.)

  13. Modification of chemical properties, Cu fractionation and enzymatic activities in an acid vineyard soil amended with winery wastes: A field study.

    Rodríguez-Salgado, Isabel; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; Gómez-Armesto, Antía; Díaz-Raviña, Montserrat; Nóvoa-Muñoz, Juan Carlos; Arias-Estévez, Manuel; Fernández-Calviño, David

    2017-11-01

    The effects of adding two winery wastes, perlite waste (PW) and bentonite waste (BW), to an acid vineyard soil were assessed using some chemical and biological soil properties in a field study that lasted 18 months. The addition of PW (up to 81 Mg ha -1 ) had neither significant nor permanent effects on soil characteristics such as the pH, organic matter content or nutrient concentrations, the amounts of copper or zinc, or the electrical conductivity. Moreover, no persistent negative effects were found on the enzymatic activities after PW application. In contrast, soil that was amended with up to 71 Mg BW ha -1 showed increases in its soil pH values, exchangeable potassium and water soluble potassium and phosphorus contents. In addition, it caused significant increases in the electrical conductivity and water-soluble Cu. In addition, the phosphomonoesterase enzymatic activity decreased significantly (up to 28%) in response to the amendment with 71 Mg BW ha -1 . These results showed that adding BW and PW to the soil may be a good agronomic practice for recycling these types of wastes. However, in the case of PW, its use as a soil amendment must be performed with caution to control its possible harmful effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Fractional quantum mechanics

    Laskin, Nick

    2018-01-01

    Fractional quantum mechanics is a recently emerged and rapidly developing field of quantum physics. This is the first monograph on fundamentals and physical applications of fractional quantum mechanics, written by its founder. The fractional Schrödinger equation and the fractional path integral are new fundamental physical concepts introduced and elaborated in the book. The fractional Schrödinger equation is a manifestation of fractional quantum mechanics. The fractional path integral is a new mathematical tool based on integration over Lévy flights. The fractional path integral method enhances the well-known Feynman path integral framework. Related topics covered in the text include time fractional quantum mechanics, fractional statistical mechanics, fractional classical mechanics and the α-stable Lévy random process. The book is well-suited for theorists, pure and applied mathematicians, solid-state physicists, chemists, and others working with the Schrödinger equation, the path integral technique...

  15. Fractional vector calculus and fractional Maxwell's equations

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2008-01-01

    The theory of derivatives and integrals of non-integer order goes back to Leibniz, Liouville, Grunwald, Letnikov and Riemann. The history of fractional vector calculus (FVC) has only 10 years. The main approaches to formulate a FVC, which are used in the physics during the past few years, will be briefly described in this paper. We solve some problems of consistent formulations of FVC by using a fractional generalization of the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. We define the differential and integral vector operations. The fractional Green's, Stokes' and Gauss's theorems are formulated. The proofs of these theorems are realized for simplest regions. A fractional generalization of exterior differential calculus of differential forms is discussed. Fractional nonlocal Maxwell's equations and the corresponding fractional wave equations are considered

  16. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1985-01-01

    The authors suggest that the origin of the odd-denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which govern quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics do not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus, no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  17. Distribuição da matéria orgânica e características de ácidos húmicos em solos com adição de resíduos de origem urbana Distribution of the organic matter and humic acid characteristic in soils with addition of residues of urban origin

    Luciano Pasqualoto Canellas

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi o de verificar possíveis alterações na distribuição das frações humificadas da matéria orgânica e das características estruturais de ácidos húmicos em amostras do horizonte superficial de dois solos (Latossolo Vermelho-Amarelo, e Argissolo Vermelho-Amarelo que receberam o equivalente a 80 t ha-1 de composto de lixo urbano e lodo da estação de tratamento de esgoto. A distribuição das frações humificadas das amostras de solos com adição de resíduos urbanos foi alterada. Houve aumento do conteúdo de ácidos fúlvicos, implicando a diminuição da relação ácidos húmicos/ácidos fúlvicos e a qualidade do húmus do solo. Os ácidos húmicos estudados sofreram modificações nas suas características estruturais, principalmente com a diminuição do conteúdo de carbono em longas cadeias alquílicas e aumento no conteúdo de C atribuído a polissacarídeos incorporados às estruturas dos ácidos húmicos.The aim of this work was to determine potential changes in the distribution of humified fractions of the organic matter together with the structural features of humic acids in samples from the superficial horizon of two soils (Ultisol and Oxisol to which 80 ton ha-1 of both compost of municipal residues and sewage sludge were added. An increase in the fulvic acids content was found which implies both a decrease in the humic/fulvic acid ratio and also in the quality of the humus in the soils. The humic acids studied underwent structural changes, mainly the decrease in the long alkyl chain content along with an increase in the C content related to polysaccharides incorporated to the humic acids.

  18. Initialized Fractional Calculus

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the need for a nonconstant initialization for the fractional calculus and establishes a basic definition set for the initialized fractional differintegral. This definition set allows the formalization of an initialized fractional calculus. Two basis calculi are considered; the Riemann-Liouville and the Grunwald fractional calculi. Two forms of initialization, terminal and side are developed.

  19. Tempered fractional calculus

    Sabzikar, Farzad, E-mail: sabzika2@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Meerschaert, Mark M., E-mail: mcubed@stt.msu.edu [Department of Statistics and Probability, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48823 (United States); Chen, Jinghua, E-mail: cjhdzdz@163.com [School of Sciences, Jimei University, Xiamen, Fujian, 361021 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  20. Tempered fractional calculus

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-07-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series.

  1. Tempered fractional calculus

    Sabzikar, Farzad; Meerschaert, Mark M.; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrals are convolutions with a power law. Multiplying by an exponential factor leads to tempered fractional derivatives and integrals. Tempered fractional diffusion equations, where the usual second derivative in space is replaced by a tempered fractional derivative, govern the limits of random walk models with an exponentially tempered power law jump distribution. The limiting tempered stable probability densities exhibit semi-heavy tails, which are commonly observed in finance. Tempered power law waiting times lead to tempered fractional time derivatives, which have proven useful in geophysics. The tempered fractional derivative or integral of a Brownian motion, called a tempered fractional Brownian motion, can exhibit semi-long range dependence. The increments of this process, called tempered fractional Gaussian noise, provide a useful new stochastic model for wind speed data. A tempered fractional difference forms the basis for numerical methods to solve tempered fractional diffusion equations, and it also provides a useful new correlation model in time series

  2. Higher fractions theory of fractional hall effect

    Kostadinov, I.Z.; Popov, V.N.

    1985-07-01

    A theory of fractional quantum Hall effect is generalized to higher fractions. N-particle model interaction is used and the gap is expressed through n-particles wave function. The excitation spectrum in general and the mean field critical behaviour are determined. The Hall conductivity is calculated from first principles. (author)

  3. A comparison of the compositional differences between humic fractions isolated by the IHSS and exhaustive extraction procedures

    Chang, R. R.; Mylotte, R.; Hayes, M. H. B.; Mclnerney, R.; Tzou, Y. M.

    2014-03-01

    Humic substances (HSs), consisting, on the basis of solubilities in aqueous acid and basic media, of humic acids (HAs), fulvic acids (FAs), and humin (Hu), are the major components of soil organic matter (SOM). Most studies of soil/natural organic matter (SOM/NOM) have been carried out on extracts of soils in dilute sodium hydroxide solutions, the solvent used to extract the Standards of the International Humic Substances Society (IHSS). However, Hu, the major component in the classical definition of HSs, is insoluble in aqueous base and is not isolated by the traditional IHSS method. Recently, a sequential exhaustive extraction (SEE) process has been shown to be capable of isolating and separating the major components of the classically defined HSs from the soils of the temperate and tropical regions. The SEE system was used in the present study to isolate the HA/FA and Hu fractions from a subtropical volcanic Taiwanese soil. Chemical and compositional properties of these extracts were then compared with similarly obtained isolates from soils from the different climatic regions. Increases in the aliphatic relative to aromatic carbon contents were observed for both the HA and FA fractions when the pH values of the extraction media were increased. HAs and FAs isolated using the SEE method have spectroscopic profiles similar to those from the IHSS isolate; however, the cumulative extraction efficiency (%) of the SEE method (65 %) for the volcanic soil was much higher than for the traditional IHSS method (33 %). When the residual volcanic soil, following extractions once, three, and eight times with 0.1 M NaOH were then extracted with dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) plus concentrated sulphuric acid (the final solvent in the SEE sequence) it was seen that the content of crystalline polymethylene hydrocarbon (33 ppm 13C-NMR resonance in the Hu (or DMSO/acid)) extract increased relative to the amorphous methylene (30 ppm). That highlights the difficulty in dissolving the more

  4. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    2016-10-01

    the newly formulated CHD-FA-Zn. Our initial results demonstrated that CHD-FA-Zn reduced microbial burdens of susceptible and drug- resistant planktonic...wound-associated drug resistant bacteria and fungi. Rat models of wound infection (open, and burn model) will be established with healthy animals ...Establish MIC90s for CHD-FA with clinical isolates of major drug resistant pathogens Assess CHD-FA in animal models of wound infection for major

  5. Effect of fulvic acid on adsorptive removal of Cr(VI) and As(V) from groundwater by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    Uwamariya, V.; Uwamariya, V.; Petrusevski, B.; Slokar, Y. M.; Aubry, Cyril; Lens, P. N L; Amy, Gary L.; Amy, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Natural contamination has become a challenging problem in drinking water production due to metal contamination of groundwater throughout the world, and arsenic and chromium are well-known toxic elements. In this study, iron oxide

  6. Evaluation of Carbohydrate-Derived Fulvic Acid (CHD-FA) as a Topical Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial for Drug-Resistant Wound Infections

    2015-10-01

    Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically ; Approved Standard – Eighth Edition” was used to determine the CHD-FA MIC values at a pH range of 3.0 to...preventing absorption of active compound (See Figure 13.) Also the topical cream formulation has been approved for 24 vaginitis to help control...Institute (CLSI) protocol M07-A9 “Methods for Dilution Antimicrobial Susceptibility Tests for Bacteria That Grow Aerobically ; Approved Standard

  7. Efficacy and safety of two whole IgG polyvalent antivenoms, refined by caprylic acid fractionation with or without beta-propiolactone, in the treatment of Bothrops asper bites in Colombia.

    Otero, Rafael; León, Guillermo; Gutiérrez, José María; Rojas, Gustavo; Toro, María Fabiola; Barona, Jacqueline; Rodríguez, Verónica; Díaz, Abel; Núñez, Vitelbina; Quintana, Juan Carlos; Ayala, Shirley; Mosquera, Diana; Conrado, Lesdy L; Fernández, Diego; Arroyo, Yobana; Paniagua, Carlos A; López, Mercedes; Ospina, Carlos E; Alzate, Claudia; Fernández, Jorge; Meza, Jazmín J; Silva, Juan F; Ramírez, Patricia; Fabra, Patricia E; Ramírez, Eugenio; Córdoba, Elkin; Arrieta, Ana B; Warrell, David A; Theakston, R David G

    2006-12-01

    The efficacy and safety of two whole IgG polyvalent antivenoms (A and B) were compared in a randomised, blinded clinical trial in 67 patients systemically envenomed by Bothrops asper in Colombia. Both antivenoms were fractionated by caprylic acid precipitation and had similar neutralising potencies, protein concentrations and aggregate contents. Antivenom B was additionally treated with beta-propiolactone to lower its anticomplementary activity. Analysing all treatment regimens together, there were no significant differences between the two antivenoms (A=34 patients; B=33 patients) in the time taken to reverse venom-induced bleeding and coagulopathy, to restore physiological fibrinogen concentrations and to clear serum venom antigenaemia. Blood coagulability was restored within 6-24 h in 97% of patients, all of whom had normal coagulation and plasma fibrinogen levels 48 h after the start of antivenom treatment. Two patients (3.0%) had recurrent coagulopathy and eight patients suffered recurrence of antigenaemia within 72 h of treatment. None of the dosage regimens of either antivenom used guaranteed resolution of venom-induced coagulopathy within 6 h, nor did they prevent recurrences. A further dose of antivenom at 6 h also did not guarantee resolution of coagulopathy within 12-24 h in all patients. The incidence of early adverse reactions (all mild) was similar for both antivenoms (15% and 24%; P>0.05).

  8. Characterization of Coconut Oil Fractions Obtained from Solvent Fractionation Using Acetone.

    Sonwai, Sopark; Rungprasertphol, Poonyawee; Nantipipat, Nantinee; Tungvongcharoan, Satinee; Laiyangkoon, Nantikan

    2017-09-01

    This work was aimed to study the solvent fraction of coconut oil (CNO). The fatty acid and triacylglycerol compositions, solid fat content (SFC) and the crystallization properties of CNO and its solid and liquid fractions obtained from fractionation at different conditions were investigated using various techniques. CNO was dissolved in acetone (1:1 w/v) and left to crystallize isothermally at 10°C for 0.5, 1 and 2 h and at 12°C for 2, 3 and 6 h. The solid fractions contained significantly lower contents of saturated fatty acids of ≤ 10 carbon atoms but considerably higher contents of saturated fatty acids with > 12 carbon atoms with respect to those of CNO and the liquid fractions. They also contained higher contents of high-melting triacylglycerol species with carbon number ≥ 38. Because of this, the DSC crystallization onset temperatures and the crystallization peak temperatures of the solid fractions were higher than CNO and the liquid fractions. The SFC values of the solid fractions were significantly higher than CNO at all measuring temperatures before reaching 0% just below the body temperature with the fraction obtained at 12°C for 2 h exhibiting the highest SFC. On the contrary, the SFC values of the liquid fractions were lower than CNO. The crystallization duration exhibited strong influence on the solid fractions. There was no effect on the crystal polymorphic structure possibly because CNO has β'-2 as a stable polymorph. The enhanced SFC of the solid fractions would allow them to find use in food applications where a specific melting temperature is desired such as sophisticated confectionery fats, and the decreased SFC of the liquid fractions would provide them with a higher cold stability which would be useful during extended storage time.

  9. Characterization of humic substances from deep groundwaters in granitic bedrock in Sweden

    Pettersson, C.; Ephraim, J.; Allard, B.; Boren, H.

    1990-06-01

    Humic substances were isolated from deep groundwaters sampled at depths between 100 and 800 m at Finnsjoen, Fjaellveden, Forsmark, Gidea, Lansjaerv, Stripa and Aespoe. The humic fraction, which largely consisted of fulvic acid in all the samples, was characterized with respect to elemental composition, molecular weight, acid capacity (COOH and OH) as well as age ( 14 C). The differences in composition and capacity between old (1270-9675 y) and fresh (reference fulvic acid from surface water, Bersbo) were minor. (orig.)

  10. Asphalt chemical fractionation

    Obando P, Klever N.

    1998-01-01

    Asphalt fractionation were carried out in the Esmeraldas Oil Refinery using n-pentane, SiO 2 and different mixture of benzene- methane. The fractions obtained were analyzed by Fourier's Transformed Infrared Spectrophotometry (FTIR)

  11. Smarandache Continued Fractions

    Ibstedt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The theory of general continued fractions is developed to the extent required in order to calculate Smarandache continued fractions to a given number of decimal places. Proof is given for the fact that Smarandache general continued fractions built with positive integer Smarandache sequences baving only a finite number of terms equal to 1 is convergent. A few numerical results are given.

  12. Fractional smith chart theory

    Shamim, Atif

    2011-03-01

    For the first time, a generalized Smith chart is introduced here to represent fractional order circuit elements. It is shown that the standard Smith chart is a special case of the generalized fractional order Smith chart. With illustrations drawn for both the conventional integer based lumped elements and the fractional elements, a graphical technique supported by the analytical method is presented to plot impedances on the fractional Smith chart. The concept is then applied towards impedance matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  13. Fractional factorial plans

    Dey, Aloke

    2009-01-01

    A one-stop reference to fractional factorials and related orthogonal arrays.Presenting one of the most dynamic areas of statistical research, this book offers a systematic, rigorous, and up-to-date treatment of fractional factorial designs and related combinatorial mathematics. Leading statisticians Aloke Dey and Rahul Mukerjee consolidate vast amounts of material from the professional literature--expertly weaving fractional replication, orthogonal arrays, and optimality aspects. They develop the basic theory of fractional factorials using the calculus of factorial arrangements, thereby providing a unified approach to the study of fractional factorial plans. An indispensable guide for statisticians in research and industry as well as for graduate students, Fractional Factorial Plans features: * Construction procedures of symmetric and asymmetric orthogonal arrays. * Many up-to-date research results on nonexistence. * A chapter on optimal fractional factorials not based on orthogonal arrays. * Trend-free plans...

  14. Fractional Dynamics and Control

    Machado, José; Luo, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Fractional Dynamics and Control provides a comprehensive overview of recent advances in the areas of nonlinear dynamics, vibration and control with analytical, numerical, and experimental results. This book provides an overview of recent discoveries in fractional control, delves into fractional variational principles and differential equations, and applies advanced techniques in fractional calculus to solving complicated mathematical and physical problems.Finally, this book also discusses the role that fractional order modeling can play in complex systems for engineering and science. Discusses how fractional dynamics and control can be used to solve nonlinear science and complexity issues Shows how fractional differential equations and models can be used to solve turbulence and wave equations in mechanics and gravity theories and Schrodinger’s equation  Presents factional relaxation modeling of dielectric materials and wave equations for dielectrics  Develops new methods for control and synchronization of...

  15. Dividing Fractions: A Pedagogical Technique

    Lewis, Robert

    2016-01-01

    When dividing one fraction by a second fraction, invert, that is, flip the second fraction, then multiply it by the first fraction. To multiply fractions, simply multiply across the denominators, and multiply across the numerators to get the resultant fraction. So by inverting the division of fractions it is turned into an easy multiplication of…

  16. Partitioning of uranyl between ferrihydrite and humic substances at acidic and circum-neutral pH

    Dublet, Gabrielle; Lezama Pacheco, Juan; Bargar, John R.; Fendorf, Scott; Kumar, Naresh; Lowry, Gregory V.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2017-10-01

    As part of a larger study of the reactivity and mobility of uranyl (U(VI)O22+) cations in subsurface environments containing natural organic matter (NOM) and hydrous ferric oxides, we have examined the effect of reference humic and fulvic substances on the sorption of uranyl on 2-line ferrihydrite (Fh), a common, naturally occurring nano-Fe(III)-hydroxide. Uranyl was reacted with Fh at pH 4.6 and 7.0 in the presence and absence of Elliott Soil Humic Acid (ESHA) (0-835 ppm) or Suwanee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA) (0-955 ppm). No evidence was found for reduction of uranyl by either form of NOM after 24 h of exposure. The following three size fractions were considered in this study: (1) ≥0.2 μm (Fh-NOM aggregates), (2) 0.02-0.2 μm (dispersed Fh nanoparticles and NOM macro-molecules), and (3) <0.02 μm (dissolved). The extent to which U(VI) is sorbed in aggregates or dispersed as colloids was assessed by comparing U, Fe, and NOM concentrations in these three size fractions. Partitioning of uranyl between Fh and NOM was determined in size fraction (1) using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Uranyl sorption on Fh-NOM aggregates was affected by the presence of NOM in different ways depending on pH and type of NOM (ESHA vs. SRFA). The presence of ESHA in the uranyl-Fh-NOM ternary system at pH 4.6 enhanced uranyl uptake more than the presence of SRFA. In contrast, neither form of NOM affected uranyl sorption at pH 7.0 over most of the NOM concentration range examined (0-500 ppm); at the highest NOM concentrations (500-955 ppm) uranyl uptake in the aggregates was slightly inhibited at pH 7.0, which is interpreted as being due to the dispersion of Fh aggregates. XAS at the U LIII-edge was used to characterize molecular-level changes in uranyl complexation as a result of sorption to the Fh-NOM aggregates. In the absence of NOM, uranyl formed dominantly inner-sphere, mononuclear, bidentate sorption complexes on Fh. However, when NOM concentration was increased at pH 4.6, the

  17. Eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) envenomation in dogs and cats: Clinical signs, coagulation changes, brown snake venom antigen levels and treatment with a novel caprylic acid fractionated bivalent whole IgG equine antivenom.

    Padula, A M; Leister, E

    2017-11-01

    This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of 16 confirmed cases of snakebite from the Australian eastern brown snake (Pseudonaja textilis) in dogs and cats. The clinical signs, brown snake venom antigen concentrations, coagulation parameters, and treatment outcomes following administration of an experimental caprylic acid fractionated bivalent whole IgG antivenom are documented. A brown snake venom antigen specific sandwich ELISA was used to retrospectively quantify venom levels in serum and urine. The characteristic clinical signs of envenomation in all cases were neurotoxicity to a variable extent and coagulation disturbances. The median serum venom concentration at presentation was 122 ng/mL and ranged from 1.9 to 3607 ng/mL. The median urine venom concentration at presentation was 55 ng/mL and ranged from 3.3 to 2604 ng/mL. Mechanical ventilation was used to successfully support respiration in three severely paralysed cases for 1-30 h. In four cases where serum samples were available post-antivenom treatment, venom was no longer detectable. Coagulation parameters measured on citrated plasma samples collected prior to antivenom from each case were abnormally prolonged to variable degrees in all cases. Three cases (2 dogs; 1 cat) were euthanized within four hours of presentation for either cost based reasons (2) or poor prognosis (1). One dog developed massive and potentially fatal pulmonary haemorrhage and was euthanazed. In vitro testing of the venom procoagulant neutralising efficacy of the experimental antivenom demonstrated it was 9.6-72 times more effective when compared to two other commercial veterinary antivenom products. This is the first detailed report of a case series of P. textilis envenomation in dogs and cats. The envenomation syndrome in dogs and cats differed to that reported humans, dominated by neurotoxicity and coagulopathy; unlike in humans, where coagulopathy is of primary clinical significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

  18. Differentiation and characterization of isotopically modified silver nanoparticles in aqueous media using asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation coupled to optical detection and mass spectrometry

    Gigault, Julien [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive Stop 8520, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States); Hackley, Vincent A., E-mail: vince.hackley@nist.gov [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Material Measurement Laboratory, 100 Bureau Drive Stop 8520, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8520 (United States)

    2013-02-06

    Highlights: ► Isotopically modified and unmodified AgNPs characterization by A4F-DAD-MALS–DLS-ICP-MS. ► Size-resolved characterization and speciation in simple or complex media. ► Capacity to detect stable isotope enriched AgNPs in a standard estuarine sediment. ► New opportunities to monitor and study fate and transformations of AgNPs. -- Abstract: The principal objective of this work was to develop and demonstrate a new methodology for silver nanoparticle (AgNP) detection and characterization based on asymmetric-flow field flow fractionation (A4F) coupled on-line to multiple detectors and using stable isotopes of Ag. This analytical approach opens the door to address many relevant scientific challenges concerning the transport and fate of nanomaterials in natural systems. We show that A4F must be optimized in order to effectively fractionate AgNPs and larger colloidal Ag particles. With the optimized method one can accurately determine the size, stability and optical properties of AgNPs and their agglomerates under variable conditions. In this investigation, we couple A4F to optical absorbance (UV–vis spectrometer) and scattering detectors (static and dynamic) and to an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer. With this combination of detection modes it is possible to determine the mass isotopic signature of AgNPs as a function of their size and optical properties, providing specificity necessary for tracing and differentiating labeled AgNPs from their naturally occurring or anthropogenic analogs. The methodology was then applied to standard estuarine sediment by doping the suspension with a known quantity of isotopically enriched {sup 109}AgNPs stabilized by natural organic matter (standard humic and fulvic acids). The mass signature of the isotopically enriched AgNPs was recorded as a function of the measured particle size. We observed that AgNPs interact with different particulate components of the sediment, and also self-associate to form

  19. Fractional distillation of oil

    Jones, L D

    1931-10-31

    A method of dividing oil into lubricating oil fractions without substantial cracking by introducing the oil in a heated state into a fractionating column from which oil fractions having different boiling points are withdrawn at different levels, while reflux liquid is supplied to the top of the column, and additional heat is introduced into the column by contacting with the oil therein a heated fluid of higher monlecular weight than water and less susceptible to thermal decomposition than is the highest boiling oil fraction resulting from the distillation, or of which any products produced by thermal decomposition will not occur in the highest boiling distillate withdrawn from the column.

  20. Characterization and complexation of humic acids. Part 1

    Kim, J.L.; Buckau, G.; Klenze, R.; Rhee, D.S.; Wimmer, H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper summarizes the research contributions to the CEC Mirage II project, particularly the research area on complexation and colloids (COCO). The first part of the paper comprises the characterization of humic and fulvic acids from different origins: a commercial product from the Aldrich Co. used as a reference humic acid and site-specific humic acids from Gorleben (Germany), Boom Clay (Belgium) and Fanay Augeres (France) aquifer systems. The second part includes the complexation of trivalent actinides: Am(III) and Cm(III) with various humic acids. A number of different methods have been applied for the complexation study: spectrophotometry, ultrafiltration, laser-induced photo-acoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). The evaluation process of complexation constant is discussed extensively and the well consolidated results are presented, which can be directly used for the geochemical modelling of the radionuclide migration

  1. Humic acid from Shilajit – a physico-chemical and spectroscopic characterization

    SURAJ P. AGARWAL

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Shilajit is a blackish–brown exudation, consisting of organic substances, metal ions and minerals, from different formations, commonly found in the Himalayan region (1000–3000 m from Nepal to Kashmir. Shilajit can also be collected throughout the mountain regions in Afghanistan, Bhutan, China, Bajkal, throughout Ural, Caucasus and Altai mountains also, at altitudes between 1000 to 5000 m. The major physiological action of shilajit has been attributed to the presence of bioactive dibenzo-α-pyrones together with humic and fulvic acids, which act as carrier molecules for the active ingredients. In this work, the aim was to extract humic acid from Shilajit from various sources and characterised these humic acids based on their physicochemical properties, elemental analysis, UV/Vis and FTIR spectra, X-ray diffraction pattern and DSC thermograms. The spectral features obtained from UV/Vis, FTIR, XRD and DSC studies for samples of different origins showed a distinct similarity amongst themselves and in comparison to soil humic acids. The surfactant properties of the extracted fulvic acids were investigated by determining the effect of increasing concentration on the surface tension of water. The study demonstrated that humic acids extracted from shilajit indeed possessed surfactant properties.

  2. Fractional Poisson process (II)

    Wang Xiaotian; Wen Zhixiong; Zhang Shiying

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic process W H (t)(H-bar (12,1)) which we call fractional Poisson process. The process W H (t) is self-similar in wide sense, displays long range dependence, and has more fatter tail than Gaussian process. In addition, it converges to fractional Brownian motion in distribution

  3. An Appetite for Fractions

    Wilkerson, Trena L.; Bryan, Tommy; Curry, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This article describes how using candy bars as models gives sixth-grade students a taste for learning to represent fractions whose denominators are factors of twelve. Using paper models of the candy bars, students explored and compared fractions. They noticed fewer different representations for one-third than for one-half. The authors conclude…

  4. Can Kindergartners Do Fractions?

    Cwikla, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics professor Julie Cwikla decided that she needed to investigate young children's understandings and see what precurricular partitioning notions young minds bring to the fraction table. Cwikla realized that only a handful of studies have examined how preschool-age and early elementary school-age students solve fraction problems (Empson…

  5. Fractional bosonic strings

    Diaz, Victor Alfonzo; Giusti, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a simple generalization of bosonic string theory in the framework of the theory of fractional variational problems. Specifically, we present a fractional extension of the Polyakov action, for which we compute the general form of the equations of motion and discuss the connection between the new fractional action and a generalization the Nambu-Goto action. Consequently, we analyze the symmetries of the modified Polyakov action and try to fix the gauge, following the classical procedures. Then we solve the equations of motion in a simplified setting. Finally, we present a Hamiltonian description of the classical fractional bosonic string and introduce the fractional light-cone gauge. It is important to remark that, throughout the whole paper, we thoroughly discuss how to recover the known results as an "integer" limit of the presented model.

  6. Efeito da adubação orgânica sobre as frações de carbono de solos cultivados com alfacen americana Organic fertilizer effects upon carbon fractions from soils cultivated with iceberg lettuce

    Edilene Carvalho Santos Marchi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se, neste estudo, o efeito da aplicação de adubos orgânicos, minerais e calagem, nas frações húmica, fúlvica e nos teores de carbono orgânico de um Latossolo Vermelho e de um Cambissolo, cultivados com alface (americana. O experimento, realizado no Departamento de Ciência do Solo da Universidade Federal de Lavras, foi constituído de cinco doses de material húmico (0, 20, 40, 100 e 200 L ha-1, três tipos de adubação (composto orgânico, esterco de aves e mineral e calagem (com e sem uso de calcário, em cinco repetições. No Cambissolo, a calagem contribuiu para a diminuição do teor de C orgânico nas áreas adubadas com fertilizante mineral e composto, e aumentou o armazenamento de C no solo adubado com esterco de aves. Em relação à adubação mineral, o uso de adubo orgânico aumentou os teores de C-fração ácido húmico e a relação C-húmico/fúlvico. No Latossolo, independente do tipo de adubação, o uso da calagem propiciou o armazenamento no solo de mais C do que o observado na área sem correção da acidez. Os efeitos da calagem e das fontes de nutrientes variaram em função da fração orgânica analisada ou das relações entre seus teores de carbono.This study evaluated the effects of organic and mineral fertilizers and liming, on humic, fulvic, and organic carbon fractions of an Inceptisol and an Oxisol grown with lettuce. The experiment was carried out at the Soil Science Department of Federal University of Lavras, Minas Gerais state, Brazil. It was performed with 5 levels of soil conditioner (0, 20, 40, 100, 200 L ha-1, 3 fertilizers (organic compost, chicken manure and mineral, and liming (present or absent using five replications. In the Inceptisol essay, the liming contributed to a decrease in the organic-C content in the mineral and compost fertilized plots, and increased C-accumulation in the treatments under chicken manure. The organic fertilizer increased the content of C-humic acid and the

  7. Fractional Order Generalized Information

    José Tenreiro Machado

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper formulates a novel expression for entropy inspired in the properties of Fractional Calculus. The characteristics of the generalized fractional entropy are tested both in standard probability distributions and real world data series. The results reveal that tuning the fractional order allow an high sensitivity to the signal evolution, which is useful in describing the dynamics of complex systems. The concepts are also extended to relative distances and tested with several sets of data, confirming the goodness of the generalization.

  8. Fractional finite Fourier transform.

    Khare, Kedar; George, Nicholas

    2004-07-01

    We show that a fractional version of the finite Fourier transform may be defined by using prolate spheroidal wave functions of order zero. The transform is linear and additive in its index and asymptotically goes over to Namias's definition of the fractional Fourier transform. As a special case of this definition, it is shown that the finite Fourier transform may be inverted by using information over a finite range of frequencies in Fourier space, the inversion being sensitive to noise. Numerical illustrations for both forward (fractional) and inverse finite transforms are provided.

  9. Social Trust and Fractionalization:

    Bjørnskov, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper takes a closer look at the importance of fractionalization for the creation of social trust. It first argues that the determinants of trust can be divided into two categories: those affecting individuals' trust radii and those affecting social polarization. A series of estimates using...... a much larger country sample than in previous literature confirms that fractionalization in the form of income inequality and political diversity adversely affects social trust while ethnic diversity does not. However, these effects differ systematically across countries, questioning standard...... interpretations of the influence of fractionalization on trust....

  10. Fractionation and analysis of allergenicity of allergens from Prosopis juliflora pollen.

    Thakur, I S

    1989-01-01

    Prosopis juliflora pollen allergen extract was prepared, and its crude allergen extract was fractionated by Sephadex G-100 gel filtration. Six different fractions were obtained which was confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Protein and carbohydrate content of each fraction were estimated. Fraction E (MW 20,000) showed a 25% carbohydrate concentration. The amino acid analysis indicated that this fraction was rich in glutamic acid and alanine. Antigenicity or allergenicity of fractionated allergens were checked by gel diffusion test, rocket immunoelectrophoresis, skin prick test, and radioallergosorbent test. All these test indicate that fraction E consisted mainly of allergenic molecules (MW 20,000) of P. juliflora pollen.

  11. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    Sead Rešić

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers. Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered, which are essentially related to visualizing operations with fractions.

  12. Fractional Stochastic Field Theory

    Honkonen, Juha

    2018-02-01

    Models describing evolution of physical, chemical, biological, social and financial processes are often formulated as differential equations with the understanding that they are large-scale equations for averages of quantities describing intrinsically random processes. Explicit account of randomness may lead to significant changes in the asymptotic behaviour (anomalous scaling) in such models especially in low spatial dimensions, which in many cases may be captured with the use of the renormalization group. Anomalous scaling and memory effects may also be introduced with the use of fractional derivatives and fractional noise. Construction of renormalized stochastic field theory with fractional derivatives and fractional noise in the underlying stochastic differential equations and master equations and the interplay between fluctuation-induced and built-in anomalous scaling behaviour is reviewed and discussed.

  13. Discrete fractional calculus

    Goodrich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    This text provides the first comprehensive treatment of the discrete fractional calculus. Experienced researchers will find the text useful as a reference for discrete fractional calculus and topics of current interest. Students who are interested in learning about discrete fractional calculus will find this text to provide a useful starting point. Several exercises are offered at the end of each chapter and select answers have been provided at the end of the book. The presentation of the content is designed to give ample flexibility for potential use in a myriad of courses and for independent study. The novel approach taken by the authors includes a simultaneous treatment of the fractional- and integer-order difference calculus (on a variety of time scales, including both the usual forward and backwards difference operators). The reader will acquire a solid foundation in the classical topics of the discrete calculus while being introduced to exciting recent developments, bringing them to the frontiers of the...

  14. Fractional smith chart theory

    Shamim, Atif; Radwan, Ahmed Gomaa; Salama, Khaled N.

    2011-01-01

    matching networks, where the fractional approach proves to be much more versatile and results in a single element matching network for a complex load as compared to the two elements in the conventional approach. © 2010 IEEE.

  15. Intracellular Cadmium Isotope Fractionation

    Horner, T. J.; Lee, R. B.; Henderson, G. M.; Rickaby, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent stable isotope studies into the biological utilization of transition metals (e.g. Cu, Fe, Zn, Cd) suggest several stepwise cellular processes can fractionate isotopes in both culture and nature. However, the determination of fractionation factors is often unsatisfactory, as significant variability can exist - even between different organisms with the same cellular functions. Thus, it has not been possible to adequately understand the source and mechanisms of metal isotopic fractionation. In order to address this problem, we investigated the biological fractionation of Cd isotopes within genetically-modified bacteria (E. coli). There is currently only one known biological use or requirement of Cd, a Cd/Zn carbonic anhydrase (CdCA, from the marine diatom T. weissfloggii), which we introduce into the E. coli genome. We have also developed a cleaning procedure that allows for the treating of bacteria so as to study the isotopic composition of different cellular components. We find that whole cells always exhibit a preference for uptake of the lighter isotopes of Cd. Notably, whole cells appear to have a similar Cd isotopic composition regardless of the expression of CdCA within the E. coli. However, isotopic fractionation can occur within the genetically modified E. coli during Cd use, such that Cd bound in CdCA can display a distinct isotopic composition compared to the cell as a whole. Thus, the externally observed fractionation is independent of the internal uses of Cd, with the largest Cd isotope fractionation occurring during cross-membrane transport. A general implication of these experiments is that trace metal isotopic fractionation most likely reflects metal transport into biological cells (either actively or passively), rather than relating to expression of specific physiological function and genetic expression of different metalloenzymes.

  16. Fractional laser skin resurfacing.

    Alexiades-Armenakas, Macrene R; Dover, Jeffrey S; Arndt, Kenneth A

    2012-11-01

    Laser skin resurfacing (LSR) has evolved over the past 2 decades from traditional ablative to fractional nonablative and fractional ablative resurfacing. Traditional ablative LSR was highly effective in reducing rhytides, photoaging, and acne scarring but was associated with significant side effects and complications. In contrast, nonablative LSR was very safe but failed to deliver consistent clinical improvement. Fractional LSR has achieved the middle ground; it combined the efficacy of traditional LSR with the safety of nonablative modalities. The first fractional laser was a nonablative erbium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Er:YAG) laser that produced microscopic columns of thermal injury in the epidermis and upper dermis. Heralding an entirely new concept of laser energy delivery, it delivered the laser beam in microarrays. It resulted in microscopic columns of treated tissue and intervening areas of untreated skin, which yielded rapid reepithelialization. Fractional delivery was quickly applied to ablative wavelengths such as carbon dioxide, Er:YAG, and yttrium scandium gallium garnet (2,790 nm), providing more significant clinical outcomes. Adjustable laser parameters, including power, pitch, dwell time, and spot density, allowed for precise determination of percent surface area, affected penetration depth, and clinical recovery time and efficacy. Fractional LSR has been a significant advance to the laser field, striking the balance between safety and efficacy.

  17. Series expansion in fractional calculus and fractional differential equations

    Li, Ming-Fan; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhu, Tao

    2009-01-01

    Fractional calculus is the calculus of differentiation and integration of non-integer orders. In a recently paper (Annals of Physics 323 (2008) 2756-2778), the Fundamental Theorem of Fractional Calculus is highlighted. Based on this theorem, in this paper we introduce fractional series expansion method to fractional calculus. We define a kind of fractional Taylor series of an infinitely fractionally-differentiable function. Further, based on our definition we generalize hypergeometric functio...

  18. A comparison of analytic procedures for measurement of fractional dextran clearances

    Hemmelder, MH; de Jong, PE; de Zeeuw, D

    Fractional dextran clearances have been extensively used to study glomerular size selectivity. We report on an analysis of different laboratory procedures involved in measuring fractional dextran clearances. The deproteinization of plasma samples by 20% trichloroacetic acid (TCA) revealed a protein

  19. FRACTIONS: CONCEPTUAL AND DIDACTIC ASPECTS

    Sead Rešić; Ismet Botonjić; Maid Omerović

    2016-01-01

    Fractions represent the manner of writing parts of whole numbers (integers). Rules for operations with fractions differ from rules for operations with integers. Students face difficulties in understanding fractions, especially operations with fractions. These difficulties are well known in didactics of Mathematics throughout the world and there is a lot of research regarding problems in learning about fractions. Methods for facilitating understanding fractions have been discovered...

  20. Fractional-order devices

    Biswas, Karabi; Caponetto, Riccardo; Mendes Lopes, António; Tenreiro Machado, José António

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on two specific areas related to fractional order systems – the realization of physical devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, usually called fractional-order elements (FOEs); and the characterization of vegetable tissues via electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) – and provides readers with new tools for designing new types of integrated circuits. The majority of the book addresses FOEs. The interest in these topics is related to the need to produce “analogue” electronic devices characterized by non-integer order impedance, and to the characterization of natural phenomena, which are systems with memory or aftereffects and for which the fractional-order calculus tool is the ideal choice for analysis. FOEs represent the building blocks for designing and realizing analogue integrated electronic circuits, which the authors believe hold the potential for a wealth of mass-market applications. The freedom to choose either an integer- or non-integer-order analogue integrator...

  1. Metal mobilization from metallurgical wastes by soil organic acids.

    Potysz, Anna; Grybos, Malgorzata; Kierczak, Jakub; Guibaud, Gilles; Fondaneche, Patrice; Lens, Piet N L; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2017-07-01

    Three types of Cu-slags differing in chemical and mineralogical composition (historical, shaft furnace, and granulated slags) and a matte from a lead recovery process were studied with respect to their susceptibility to release Cu, Zn and Pb upon exposure to organic acids commonly encountered in soil environments. Leaching experiments (24-960 h) were conducted with: i) humic acid (20 mg/L) at pH t 0  = 4.4, ii) fulvic acid (20 mg/L) at pH t 0  = 4.4, iii) an artificial root exudates (ARE) (17.4 g/L) solution at pH t 0  = 4.4, iv) ARE solution at pH t 0  = 2.9 and v) ultrapure water (pH t 0  = 5.6). The results demonstrated that the ARE contribute the most to the mobilization of metals from all the wastes analyzed, regardless of the initial pH of the solution. For example, up to 14%, 30%, 24% and 5% of Cu is released within 960 h from historical, shaft furnace, granulated slags and lead matte, respectively, when exposed to the artificial root exudates solution (pH 2.9). Humic and fulvic acids were found to have a higher impact on granulated and shaft furnace slags as compared to the ultrapure water control and increased the release of metals by a factor up to 37.5 (Pb) and 20.5 (Cu) for granulated and shaft furnace slags, respectively. Humic and fulvic acids amplified the mobilization of metals by a maximal factor of 13.6 (Pb) and 12.1 (Pb) for historical slag and lead matte, respectively. The studied organic compounds contributed to different release rates of metallic contaminants from individual metallurgical wastes under the conditions tested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fractionation of gamma-emitting fission products absorbed by red kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    D'Souza, T.J.; Mistry, K.B.

    1980-01-01

    The gamma-emitting fission product nuclides 106 Ru, 125 Sb, 137 Cs and 144 Ce that accumulated in the edible pods of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) plants grown in nutrient culture were subjected to chemical fractionation. The results indicated that the largest fraction of 106 Ru, 125 Sb and 144 Ce was associated with ionic forms including salts of organic acids, phosphates, carbonates and some protein-bound forms extracted with dilute mineral acids (acid fraction). The association of these radionuclides with lipids including lipophyllic pigments, free amino acids and amino sugars (ethanol fraction) was next in significance. The association of 137 Cs was, however, greater with the ethanol fraction than with the acid fraction. Considerably reduced amounts of the fission products were present in the pectates, proteins, polysaccharides and nucleic acids. (U.K.)

  3. Fractional gradient and its application to the fractional advection equation

    D'Ovidio, M.; Garra, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a definition of fractional gradient operators, related to directional derivatives. We develop a fractional vector calculus, providing a probabilistic interpretation and mathematical tools to treat multidimensional fractional differential equations. A first application is discussed in relation to the d-dimensional fractional advection-dispersion equation. We also study the connection with multidimensional L\\'evy processes.

  4. Sweet Work with Fractions

    Vinogradova, Natalya; Blaine, Larry

    2013-01-01

    Almost everyone loves chocolate. However, the same cannot be said about fractions, which are loved by markedly fewer. Middle school students tend to view them with wary respect, but little affection. The authors attempt to sweeten the subject by describing a type of game involving division of chocolate bars. The activity they describe provides a…

  5. Fermion Number Fractionization

    Srimath

    1 . In tro d u ctio n. T he N obel P rize in C hem istry for the year 2000 w as aw arded to A lan J H ... soliton, the ground state of the ferm ion-soliton system can have ..... probability density,in a heuristic w ay that a fractional ferm ion num ber m ay ...

  6. Momentum fractionation on superstrata

    Bena, Iosif; Martinec, Emil; Turton, David; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Superstrata are bound states in string theory that carry D1, D5, and momentum charges, and whose supergravity descriptions are parameterized by arbitrary functions of (at least) two variables. In the D1-D5 CFT, typical three-charge states reside in high-degree twisted sectors, and their momentum charge is carried by modes that individually have fractional momentum. Understanding this momentum fractionation holographically is crucial for understanding typical black-hole microstates in this system. We use solution-generating techniques to add momentum to a multi-wound supertube and thereby construct the first examples of asymptotically-flat superstrata. The resulting supergravity solutions are horizonless and smooth up to well-understood orbifold singularities. Upon taking the AdS_3 decoupling limit, our solutions are dual to CFT states with momentum fractionation. We give a precise proposal for these dual CFT states. Our construction establishes the very nontrivial fact that large classes of CFT states with momentum fractionation can be realized in the bulk as smooth horizonless supergravity solutions.

  7. Fractional Differential Equation

    Moustafa El-Shahed

    2007-01-01

    where 2<α<3 is a real number and D0+α is the standard Riemann-Liouville fractional derivative. Our analysis relies on Krasnoselskiis fixed point theorem of cone preserving operators. An example is also given to illustrate the main results.

  8. Vapor liquid fraction determination

    1980-01-01

    This invention describes a method of measuring liquid and vapor fractions in a non-homogeneous fluid flowing through an elongate conduit, such as may be required with boiling water, non-boiling turbulent flows, fluidized bed experiments, water-gas mixing analysis, and nuclear plant cooling. (UK)

  9. Brewing with fractionated barley

    Donkelaar, van L.H.G.

    2016-01-01

    Brewing with fractionated barley

    Beer is a globally consumed beverage, which is produced from malted barley, water, hops and yeast. In recent years, the use of unmalted barley and exogenous enzymes have become more popular because they enable simpler processing and reduced environmental

  10. Fractionation and rectification apparatus

    Sauerwald, A

    1932-05-25

    Fractionation and rectifying apparatus with a distillation vessel and a stirring tube, drainage tubes leading from its coils to a central collecting tube, the drainage tubes being somewhat parallel and attached to the outer half of the stirring tube and partly on the inner half of the central collecting tube, whereby distillation and rectification can be effected in a single apparatus.

  11. Fractional charge search

    Innes, W.; Klein, S.; Perl, M.; Price, J.C.

    1982-06-01

    A device to search for fractional charge in matter is described. The sample is coupled to a low-noise amplifier by a periodically varying capacitor and the resulting signal is synchronously detected. The varying capacitor is constructed as a rapidly spinning wheel. Samples of any material in volumes of up to 0.05 ml may be searched in less than an hour

  12. -Dimensional Fractional Lagrange's Inversion Theorem

    F. A. Abd El-Salam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using Riemann-Liouville fractional differential operator, a fractional extension of the Lagrange inversion theorem and related formulas are developed. The required basic definitions, lemmas, and theorems in the fractional calculus are presented. A fractional form of Lagrange's expansion for one implicitly defined independent variable is obtained. Then, a fractional version of Lagrange's expansion in more than one unknown function is generalized. For extending the treatment in higher dimensions, some relevant vectors and tensors definitions and notations are presented. A fractional Taylor expansion of a function of -dimensional polyadics is derived. A fractional -dimensional Lagrange inversion theorem is proved.

  13. Nanoparticles in natural systems I: The effective reactive surface area of the natural oxide fraction in field samples

    Hiemstra, Tjisse; Antelo, Juan; Rahnemaie, Rasoul; van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2010-01-01

    fraction of ˜80%. The average mass density of such a NOM-mineral association is ˜1700 ± 100 kg/m 3 (i.e. high-density NOM). The amount of reversibly bound phosphate is rather close to the amount of phosphate that is extractable with oxalate. The phosphate loading varies remarkably ( Γ ≈ 1-3 μmol/m 2 oxide) in the samples. As discussed in part II of this paper series ( Hiemstra et al., 2010), the phosphate loading ( Γ) of field samples is suppressed by surface complexation of NOM, where hydrophilic, fulvic, and humic acids act as a competitor for (an)ions via site competition and electrostatic interaction.

  14. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-01-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  15. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske, E-mail: matheuslazo@furg.br [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica - FURG, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil)

    2011-09-26

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators. -- Highlights: → We propose a fractional Lagrangian formulation for fractional Maxwell's fields. → We obtain gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields. → Our generalized fractional Maxwell's field is spatially symmetrical. → We discuss the non-causality of the theory.

  16. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Adem Kılıçman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objective of this article is to discuss the Laplace transform method based on operational matrices of fractional derivatives for solving several kinds of linear fractional differential equations. Moreover, we present the operational matrices of fractional derivatives with Laplace transform in many applications of various engineering systems as control system. We present the analytical technique for solving fractional-order, multi-term fractional differential equation. In other words, we propose an efficient algorithm for solving fractional matrix equation.

  17. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    Large variations in light element isotope ratios (H, N, C) are routinely observed in meteorite organic matter. The origin of these so-called anomalies is not accounted for by the classical theory of isotope fractionation. In the case of H, micrometer-size areas within the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from meteorites by acid treatment, exhibit extreme deuterium enrichment. They are generally interpreted as components exogenous to the solar system and attributed to surviving interste...

  18. The Local Fractional Bootstrap

    Bennedsen, Mikkel; Hounyo, Ulrich; Lunde, Asger

    We introduce a bootstrap procedure for high-frequency statistics of Brownian semistationary processes. More specifically, we focus on a hypothesis test on the roughness of sample paths of Brownian semistationary processes, which uses an estimator based on a ratio of realized power variations. Our...... new resampling method, the local fractional bootstrap, relies on simulating an auxiliary fractional Brownian motion that mimics the fine properties of high frequency differences of the Brownian semistationary process under the null hypothesis. We prove the first order validity of the bootstrap method...... and in simulations we observe that the bootstrap-based hypothesis test provides considerable finite-sample improvements over an existing test that is based on a central limit theorem. This is important when studying the roughness properties of time series data; we illustrate this by applying the bootstrap method...

  19. Fractionalization and Entrepreneurial Activities

    Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of the literature on ethnicity and entrepreneurship focuses on the construct of ethnic entrepreneurship. However, very little is known about how ethnic heterogeneity affects entrepreneurship. This study attempts to fill the gap, and thus examines the effect of ethnic heterogeneity on entrepreneurial activities in a cross-section of 90 countries. Using indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization, we show that ethnic heterogeneity negatively influences entrepreneurship....

  20. Fractional Number Operator and Associated Fractional Diffusion Equations

    Rguigui, Hafedh

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, we study the fractional number operator as an analog of the finite-dimensional fractional Laplacian. An important relation with the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process is given. Using a semigroup approach, the solution of the Cauchy problem associated to the fractional number operator is presented. By means of the Mittag-Leffler function and the Laplace transform, we give the solution of the Caputo time fractional diffusion equation and Riemann-Liouville time fractional diffusion equation in infinite dimensions associated to the fractional number operator.

  1. Antibacterial and antifungal activities of the polyphenolic fractions isolated from the seed coat of Abrus precatorius and Caesalpinia crista.

    Mobin, Lubna; Saeed, Syed Asad; Ali, Rashida; Saeed, Syed Ghufran; Ahmed, Rahil

    2017-09-26

    Crude seed coat extracts from Abrus precatorius and Caesalpinia crista were purified into four different fractions namely phenolic acids, flavonols, flavanols and anthocyanin which were then examined for their polyphenol contents and antimicrobial potentials. The fractions derived from seed coat of A. precatorius were found more potent with high phenolic and flavonoid contents as compared to C. crista fractions. The significant antibacterial activity was observed against all strain tested by the fractions of both samples apart from anthocyanin fraction. It was interesting to note that the phenolic acid fractions of both samples was found more active against gram-negative bacteria, while gram-positive bacteria were found to be more sensitive towards flavonol fractions. The phenolic acid and flavonol fractions being potent antibacterial were selected to demonstrate the antifungal capacity of two samples. Among them, phenolic acid fraction of both samples was found active towards all the fungal strain.

  2. Gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic fields

    Lazo, Matheus Jatkoske

    2011-09-01

    Fractional derivatives and integrations of non-integers orders was introduced more than three centuries ago but only recently gained more attention due to its application on nonlocal phenomenas. In this context, several formulations of fractional electromagnetic fields was proposed, but all these theories suffer from the absence of an effective fractional vector calculus, and in general are non-causal or spatially asymmetric. In order to deal with these difficulties, we propose a spatially symmetric and causal gauge invariant fractional electromagnetic field from a Lagrangian formulation. From our fractional Maxwell's fields arose a definition for the fractional gradient, divergent and curl operators.

  3. Fracionamento químico e físico da matéria orgânica de um argissolo vermelho sob diferentes sistemas de uso Physical and chemical fractionation of organic matter of an alfisol under different use systems

    Daiane Carvalho dos Santos

    2013-05-01

    minerals (CAM were obtained by physical fractionation. The free light fraction (FLL, light occluded (FLO and heavy (FP were obtained by densimetric physical fractionation. The non-humicfractions (NH, fulvic acid (AF, humic acid (HA and humin (HU were obtained by chemical fractionation. The Eucalyptus grandis system promoted higher total organic carbon, CFG, FLL and FLO and AF. In the surface layer, the protective recalcitrance mechanisms by organic matter molecular and chemical stabilization are overlapping stability which result from aggregates occlusion. As is difficult to form aggregates due to sandy soil matrix, carbon youth which enter the system is decomposed by microorganisms going to a more advanced stage of decomposition, forming in this case associations with silt and clay particles. This occurs in soils where the clay percentage is low. Through the fractionation it was observed that most of the soil organic matter is stored in the form of HU.

  4. The Extended Fractional Subequation Method for Nonlinear Fractional Differential Equations

    Zhao, Jianping; Tang, Bo; Kumar, Sunil; Hou, Yanren

    2012-01-01

    An extended fractional subequation method is proposed for solving fractional differential equations by introducing a new general ansätz and Bäcklund transformation of the fractional Riccati equation with known solutions. Being concise and straightforward, this method is applied to the space-time fractional coupled Burgers’ equations and coupled MKdV equations. As a result, many exact solutions are obtained. It is shown that the considered method provides a very effective, convenient, and powe...

  5. Functional Fractional Calculus

    Das, Shantanu

    2011-01-01

    When a new extraordinary and outstanding theory is stated, it has to face criticism and skeptism, because it is beyond the usual concept. The fractional calculus though not new, was not discussed or developed for a long time, particularly for lack of its application to real life problems. It is extraordinary because it does not deal with 'ordinary' differential calculus. It is outstanding because it can now be applied to situations where existing theories fail to give satisfactory results. In this book not only mathematical abstractions are discussed in a lucid manner, with physical mathematic

  6. Fractional Reserve Banking

    Andreasen, Niels; Bjerregaard, Mads; Lund, Jonas; Olsen, Ove Bitsch; Rasmussen, Andreas Dalgas

    2012-01-01

    Projektet er bygget op omkring kritisk realisme, som er det gennemgående videnskabelige fundament til undersøgelsen af hvilke strukturelle grunde der er til finansiel ustabilitet i Danmark. Projektet går i dybden med Fractional Reserve Banking og incitamentsstrukturen i banksystemet. Vi bevæger os både på det makro- og mikroøkonomiske niveau i analysen. På makro niveau bruger vi den østrigske skole om konjunktur teori (The Positive Theory of the Cycle). På mikro niveau arbejder vi med princip...

  7. Plasma fractionation issues.

    Farrugia, Albert; Evers, Theo; Falcou, Pierre-Francois; Burnouf, Thierry; Amorim, Luiz; Thomas, Sylvia

    2009-04-01

    Procurement and processing of human plasma for fractionation of therapeutic proteins or biological medicines used in clinical practice is a multi-billion dollar international trade. Together the private sector and public sector (non-profit) provide large amounts of safe and effective therapeutic plasma proteins needed worldwide. The principal therapeutic proteins produced by the dichotomous industry include gamma globulins or immunoglobulins (including pathogen-specific hyperimmune globulins, such as hepatitis B immune globulins) albumin, factor VIII and Factor IX concentrates. Viral inactivation, principally by solvent detergent and other processes, has proven highly effective in preventing transmission of enveloped viruses, viz. HBV, HIV, and HCV.

  8. Characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) seed protein fractions.

    Rubio, Luis A; Pérez, Alicia; Ruiz, Raquel; Guzmán, M Ángeles; Aranda-Olmedo, Isabel; Clemente, Alfonso

    2014-01-30

    Legume seed proteins have to be chemically characterized in order to properly link their nutritional effects with their chemical structure. Vicilin and albumin fractions devoid of cross-contamination, as assessed by mass peptide fingerprinting analysis, were obtained from defatted pea (Pisum sativum cv. Bilbo) meal. The extracted protein fractions contained 56.7-67.7 g non-starch polysaccharides kg⁻¹. The vicilin fraction was higher than legumins in arginine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and lysine. The most abundant amino acids in the albumin fraction were aspartic acid, glutamic acid, lysine and arginine, and the amounts of methionine were more than double than those in legumins and vicilins. The pea albumin fraction showed a clear enrichment of protease inhibitory activity when compared with the seed meal. In vitro digestibility values for pea proteins were 0.63 ±  0.04, 0.88 ±  0.04 and 0.41 ±  0.23 for legumins, vicilins and albumins respectively. Vicilin and albumin fractions devoid of cross-contamination with other proteins were obtained from pea seed meal. The vicilin fraction also contained low amounts of soluble non-starch polysaccharides and was enriched in isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine and lysine. In vitro digestibility values for pea proteins were similar or even numerically higher than those for control proteins. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Advances in robust fractional control

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  10. Search for fractional charge

    Turner, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    A search was made for fractional charges of the form Z plus two-thirds e, where Z is an integer. It was assumed that the charges exist in natural form bound with other fractional charges in neutral molecules. It was further assumed that these neutral molecules are present in air. Two concentration schemes were employed. One sample was derived from the waste gases from a xenon distillation plant. This assumes that high mass, low vapor pressure components of air are concentrated along with the xenon. The second sample involved ionizing air, allowing a brief recombination period, and then collecting residual ions on the surface of titanium discs. Both samples were analyzed at the University of Rochester in a system using a tandem Van de Graff to accelerate particles through an essentially electrostatic beam handling system. The detector system employed both a Time of Flight and an energy-sensitive gas ionization detector. In the most sensitive mode of analysis, a gas absorber was inserted in the beam path to block the intense background. The presence of an absorber limited the search to highly penetrating particles. Effectively, this limited the search to particles with low Z and masses greater than roughly fifty GeV. The final sensitivities attained were on the order of 1 x 10 -20 for the ionized air sample and 1 x 10 -21 for the gas sample. A discussion of the caveats that could reduce the actual level of sensitivity is included

  11. Fractional Reserve in Banking System

    Valkonen, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This thesis is aimed to provide understanding of the role of the fractional reserve in the mod-ern banking system worldwide and particularly in Finland. The fractional reserve banking is used worldwide, but the benefits of this system are very disputable. On the one hand, experts say that the fractional reserve is a necessary instrument for the normal business and profit making. On the other hand, sceptics openly criticize the fractional reserve system and blame it for fiat money (money n...

  12. On matrix fractional differential equations

    Adem Kılıçman; Wasan Ajeel Ahmood

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article is to study the matrix fractional differential equations and to find the exact solution for system of matrix fractional differential equations in terms of Riemann–Liouville using Laplace transform method and convolution product to the Riemann–Liouville fractional of matrices. Also, we show the theorem of non-homogeneous matrix fractional partial differential equation with some illustrative examples to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new methodology. The main objec...

  13. Fractional Hopfield Neural Networks: Fractional Dynamic Associative Recurrent Neural Networks.

    Pu, Yi-Fei; Yi, Zhang; Zhou, Ji-Liu

    2017-10-01

    This paper mainly discusses a novel conceptual framework: fractional Hopfield neural networks (FHNN). As is commonly known, fractional calculus has been incorporated into artificial neural networks, mainly because of its long-term memory and nonlocality. Some researchers have made interesting attempts at fractional neural networks and gained competitive advantages over integer-order neural networks. Therefore, it is naturally makes one ponder how to generalize the first-order Hopfield neural networks to the fractional-order ones, and how to implement FHNN by means of fractional calculus. We propose to introduce a novel mathematical method: fractional calculus to implement FHNN. First, we implement fractor in the form of an analog circuit. Second, we implement FHNN by utilizing fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, and further analyze its attractors. Third, we perform experiments to analyze the stability and convergence of FHNN, and further discuss its applications to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. The main contribution of our work is to propose FHNN in the form of an analog circuit by utilizing a fractor and the fractional steepest descent approach, construct its Lyapunov function, prove its Lyapunov stability, analyze its attractors, and apply FHNN to the defense against chip cloning attacks for anticounterfeiting. A significant advantage of FHNN is that its attractors essentially relate to the neuron's fractional order. FHNN possesses the fractional-order-stability and fractional-order-sensitivity characteristics.

  14. The random continued fraction transformation

    Kalle, Charlene; Kempton, Tom; Verbitskiy, Evgeny

    2017-03-01

    We introduce a random dynamical system related to continued fraction expansions. It uses random combinations of the Gauss map and the Rényi (or backwards) continued fraction map. We explore the continued fraction expansions that this system produces, as well as the dynamical properties of the system.

  15. How Weird Are Weird Fractions?

    Stuffelbeam, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    A positive rational is a weird fraction if its value is unchanged by an illegitimate, digit-based reduction. In this article, we prove that each weird fraction is uniquely weird and initiate a discussion of the prevalence of weird fractions.

  16. Do Children Understand Fraction Addition?

    Braithwaite, David W.; Tian, Jing; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many children fail to master fraction arithmetic even after years of instruction. A recent theory of fraction arithmetic (Braithwaite, Pyke, & Siegler, in press) hypothesized that this poor learning of fraction arithmetic procedures reflects poor conceptual understanding of them. To test this hypothesis, we performed three experiments…

  17. On fractional Fourier transform moments

    Alieva, T.; Bastiaans, M.J.

    2000-01-01

    Based on the relation between the ambiguity function represented in a quasi-polar coordinate system and the fractional power spectra, the fractional Fourier transform moments are introduced. Important equalities for the global second-order fractional Fourier transform moments are derived and their

  18. Fractional dynamic calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales

    Georgiev, Svetlin G

    2018-01-01

    Pedagogically organized, this monograph introduces fractional calculus and fractional dynamic equations on time scales in relation to mathematical physics applications and problems. Beginning with the definitions of forward and backward jump operators, the book builds from Stefan Hilger’s basic theories on time scales and examines recent developments within the field of fractional calculus and fractional equations. Useful tools are provided for solving differential and integral equations as well as various problems involving special functions of mathematical physics and their extensions and generalizations in one and more variables. Much discussion is devoted to Riemann-Liouville fractional dynamic equations and Caputo fractional dynamic equations.  Intended for use in the field and designed for students without an extensive mathematical background, this book is suitable for graduate courses and researchers looking for an introduction to fractional dynamic calculus and equations on time scales. .

  19. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    Wang Xiaotian [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China)]. E-mail: swa001@126.com; Zhang Shiying [School of Management, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Fan Shen [Computer and Information School, Zhejiang Wanli University, Ningbo 315100 (China)

    2007-01-15

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function {lambda}(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W{sub H}{sup (j)}(t)

  20. Nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes

    Wang Xiaotian; Zhang Shiying; Fan Shen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a class of non-Gaussian stationary increment processes, named nonhomogeneous fractional Poisson processes W H (j) (t), which permit the study of the effects of long-range dependance in a large number of fields including quantum physics and finance. The processes W H (j) (t) are self-similar in a wide sense, exhibit more fatter tail than Gaussian processes, and converge to the Gaussian processes in distribution in some cases. In addition, we also show that the intensity function λ(t) strongly influences the existence of the highest finite moment of W H (j) (t) and the behaviour of the tail probability of W H (j) (t)

  1. Membrane Assisted Enzyme Fractionation

    Yuan, Linfeng

    to the variation in size of the proteins and a reasonable separation factor can be observed only when the size difference is in the order of 10 or more. This is partly caused by concentration polarization and membrane fouling which hinders an effective separation of the proteins. Application of an electric field...... across the porous membrane has been demonstrated to be an effective way to reduce concentration polarization and membrane fouling. In addition, this technique can also be used to separate the proteins based on difference in charge, which to some extent overcome the limitations of size difference...... of proteins on the basis of their charge, degree of hydrophobicity, affinity or size. Adequate purity is often not achieved unless several purification steps are combined thereby increasing cost and reducing product yield. Conventional fractionation of proteins using ultrafiltration membranes is limited...

  2. Fraction Reduction in Membrane Systems

    Ping Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fraction reduction is a basic computation for rational numbers. P system is a new computing model, while the current methods for fraction reductions are not available in these systems. In this paper, we propose a method of fraction reduction and discuss how to carry it out in cell-like P systems with the membrane structure and the rules with priority designed. During the application of fraction reduction rules, synchronization is guaranteed by arranging some special objects in these rules. Our work contributes to performing the rational computation in P systems since the rational operands can be given in the form of fraction.

  3. Thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions

    Belkina, T.V.; Privalov, V.E.; Stepanenko, atM.A.

    1979-08-01

    Research on the nature of thermochemical transformations of anthracite fractions and the possibility of increasing their activity and identifying conditions for their use in the electrode pitch process is described. From research done on different anthracite fractions processed at varying temperatures it was concluded that accumulations of condensates from heating anthracite fractions occur significantly slower in comparison with pitch. As a result the electrode pitch process is prolonged. Thermal treatment of an anthracite fraction causes the formation and accumulation of condensates and promotes thermochemical transformations. Lastly, the use of thermally treated anthracite fractions apparently intensifies the electrode pitch process and improves its quality. (16 refs.) (In Russian)

  4. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  5. Misonidazole in fractionated radiotherapy: are many small fractions best

    Denekamp, J.; McNally, N.J.; Fowler, J.F.; Joiner, M.C.

    1980-01-01

    The largest sensitizing effect is always demonstrated with six fractions, each given with 2 g/m 2 of misonidazole. In the absence of reoxygenation a sensitizer enhancement ratio of 1.7 is predicted, but this falls to 1.1-1.2 if extensive reoxygenation occurs. Less sensitization is observed with 30 fractions, each with 0.4 g/m 2 of drug. However, for clinical use, the important question is which treatment kills the maximum number of tumour cells. Many of the simulations predict a marked disadvantage of reducing the fraction number for X rays alone. The circumstances in which this disadvantage is offset by the large Sensitizer enhancement ratio values with a six-fraction schedule are few. The model calculations suggest that many small fractions, each with a low drug dose, are safest unless the clinician has some prior knowledge that a change in fraction number is not disadvantageous. (author)

  6. Fractional statistics and fractional quantized Hall effect. Revision

    Tao, R.; Wu, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    We suggest that the origin of the odd denominator rule observed in the fractional quantized Hall effect (FQHE) may lie in fractional statistics which governs quasiparticles in FQHE. A theorem concerning statistics of clusters of quasiparticles implies that fractional statistics does not allow coexistence of a large number of quasiparticles at fillings with an even denominator. Thus no Hall plateau can be formed at these fillings, regardless of the presence of an energy gap. 15 references

  7. Digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products

    Lashkari, Saman; Taghizadeh, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    The present experiment was carried out to determine the digestion kinetics of carbohydrate fractions of citrus by-products. Grapefruit pulp (GP), lemon pulp (LE), lime pulp (LI) and orange pulp (OP) were the test feed. Digestion kinetic of whole citrus by-products and neutral detergent fiber (NDF......) fraction and acid detergent fiber (ADF) fractions of citrus by-products were measured using the in vitro gas production technique. Fermentation kinetics of the neutral detergent soluble carbohydrates (NDSC) fraction and hemicelluloses were calculated using a curve subtraction. The fermentation rate...... of whole was the highest for the LE (p by-products lag time was longer for hemicellulose than other carbohydrate fractions. There was no significant difference among potential gas production (A) volumes of whole test feeds (p

  8. Antioxidant Activity of Coconut (Cocos nucifera L.) Protein Fractions.

    Li, Yan; Zheng, Yajun; Zhang, Yufeng; Xu, Jianguo; Gao, Gang

    2018-03-20

    Coconut cake is an abundant and good potential edible protein source. However, until now it has not been extensively used in the food industry. To promote its usage, the characterization, nutrition value and antioxidant activity of coconut cake protein fractions (albumin, globulin, prolamine, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2) were studied. Results revealed that all the albumin, globulin, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2 fractions showed a high nutrition value. The prolamine, glutelin-1 and glutelin-2 all exhibited good radical scavenging activity and reducing power, and the globulin and prolamine showed high ion chelating ability (89.14-80.38%). Moreover, all the fractions except glutelin-2 could effectively protect DNA against oxidative damage. Several peptides containing five to eight amino acids with antioxidant activity were also identified by LC-MS/MS from the globulin and glutelin-2 fractions. The results demonstrated that the coconut cake protein fractions have potential usages in functional foods.

  9. Fractionation of Pb and Cu in the fine fraction (landfill.

    Kaczala, Fabio; Orupõld, Kaja; Augustsson, Anna; Burlakovs, Juris; Hogland, Marika; Bhatnagar, Amit; Hogland, William

    2017-11-01

    The fractionation of metals in the fine fraction (landfill was carried out to evaluate the metal (Pb and Cu) contents and their potential towards not only mobility but also possibilities of recovery/extraction. The fractionation followed the BCR (Community Bureau of Reference) sequential extraction, and the exchangeable (F1), reducible (F2), oxidizable (F3) and residual fractions were determined. The results showed that Pb was highly associated with the reducible (F2) and oxidizable (F3) fractions, suggesting the potential mobility of this metal mainly when in contact with oxygen, despite the low association with the exchangeable fraction (F1). Cu has also shown the potential for mobility when in contact with oxygen, since high associations with the oxidizable fraction (F3) were observed. On the other hand, the mobility of metals in excavated waste can be seen as beneficial considering the circular economy and recovery of such valuables back into the economy. To conclude, not only the total concentration of metals but also a better understanding of fractionation and in which form metals are bound is very important to bring information on how to manage the fine fraction from excavated waste both in terms of environmental impacts and also recovery of such valuables in the economy.

  10. Fractional variational calculus in terms of Riesz fractional derivatives

    Agrawal, O P

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents extensions of traditional calculus of variations for systems containing Riesz fractional derivatives (RFDs). Specifically, we present generalized Euler-Lagrange equations and the transversality conditions for fractional variational problems (FVPs) defined in terms of RFDs. We consider two problems, a simple FVP and an FVP of Lagrange. Results of the first problem are extended to problems containing multiple fractional derivatives, functions and parameters, and to unspecified boundary conditions. For the second problem, we present Lagrange-type multiplier rules. For both problems, we develop the Euler-Lagrange-type necessary conditions which must be satisfied for the given functional to be extremum. Problems are considered to demonstrate applications of the formulations. Explicitly, we introduce fractional momenta, fractional Hamiltonian, fractional Hamilton equations of motion, fractional field theory and fractional optimal control. The formulations presented and the resulting equations are similar to the formulations for FVPs given in Agrawal (2002 J. Math. Anal. Appl. 272 368, 2006 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 10375) and to those that appear in the field of classical calculus of variations. These formulations are simple and can be extended to other problems in the field of fractional calculus of variations

  11. Modelling altered fractionation schedules

    Fowler, J.F.

    1993-01-01

    The author discusses the conflicting requirements of hyperfractionation and accelerated fractionation used in radiotherapy, and the development of computer modelling to predict how to obtain an optimum of tumour cell kill without exceeding normal-tissue tolerance. The present trend is to shorten hyperfractionated schedules from 6 or 7 weeks to give overall times of 4 or 5 weeks as in new schedules by Herskovic et al (1992) and Harari (1992). Very high doses are given, much higher than can be given when ultrashort schedules such as CHART (12 days) are used. Computer modelling has suggested that optimum overall times, to yield maximum cell kill in tumours ((α/β = 10 Gy) for a constant level of late complications (α/β = 3 Gy) would be X or X-1 weeks, where X is the doubling time of the tumour cells in days (Fowler 1990). For median doubling times of about 5 days, overall times of 4 or 5 weeks should be ideal. (U.K.)

  12. Accessible solitons of fractional dimension

    Zhong, Wei-Ping, E-mail: zhongwp6@126.com [Department of Electronic and Information Engineering, Shunde Polytechnic, Guangdong Province, Shunde 528300 (China); Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Belić, Milivoj [Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Zhang, Yiqi [Key Laboratory for Physical Electronics and Devices of the Ministry of Education & Shaanxi Key Lab of Information Photonic Technique, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China)

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrate that accessible solitons described by an extended Schrödinger equation with the Laplacian of fractional dimension can exist in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media. The soliton solutions of the model are constructed by two special functions, the associated Legendre polynomials and the Laguerre polynomials in the fraction-dimensional space. Our results show that these fractional accessible solitons form a soliton family which includes crescent solitons, and asymmetric single-layer and multi-layer necklace solitons. -- Highlights: •Analytic solutions of a fractional Schrödinger equation are obtained. •The solutions are produced by means of self-similar method applied to the fractional Schrödinger equation with parabolic potential. •The fractional accessible solitons form crescent, asymmetric single-layer and multilayer necklace profiles. •The model applies to the propagation of optical pulses in strongly nonlocal nonlinear media.

  13. Fractional Calculus and Shannon Wavelet

    Carlo Cattani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An explicit analytical formula for the any order fractional derivative of Shannon wavelet is given as wavelet series based on connection coefficients. So that for any 2(ℝ function, reconstructed by Shannon wavelets, we can easily define its fractional derivative. The approximation error is explicitly computed, and the wavelet series is compared with Grünwald fractional derivative by focusing on the many advantages of the wavelet method, in terms of rate of convergence.

  14. Fractional variational principles in action

    Baleanu, Dumitru [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Faculty of Art and Sciences, Cankaya University, 06530 Ankara (Turkey); Institute of Space Sciences, PO Box MG-23, R 76900, Magurele-Bucharest (Romania)], E-mail: dumitru@cankaya.edu.tr

    2009-10-15

    The fractional calculus has gained considerable importance in various fields of science and engineering, especially during the last few decades. An open issue in this emerging field is represented by the fractional variational principles area. Therefore, the fractional Euler-Lagrange and Hamilton equations started to be examined intensely during the last decade. In this paper, we review some new trends in this field and we discuss some of their potential applications.

  15. Fractional quiver W-algebras

    Kimura, Taro; Pestun, Vasily

    2018-04-01

    We introduce quiver gauge theory associated with the non-simply laced type fractional quiver and define fractional quiver W-algebras by using construction of Kimura and Pestun (Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1072-1; Lett Math Phys, 2018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s11005-018-1073-0) with representation of fractional quivers.

  16. On the Fractional Mean Value

    Hosseinabadi, Abdolali Neamaty; Nategh, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    This work, dealt with the classical mean value theorem and took advantage of it in the fractional calculus. The concept of a fractional critical point is introduced. Some sufficient conditions for the existence of a critical point is studied and an illustrative example rele- vant to the concept of the time dilation effect is given. The present paper also includes, some connections between convexity (and monotonicity) with fractional derivative in the Riemann-Liouville sense.

  17. Fractionated Spacecraft Architectures Seeding Study

    Mathieu, Charlotte; Weigel, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    .... Models were developed from a customer-centric perspective to assess different fractionated spacecraft architectures relative to traditional spacecraft architectures using multi-attribute analysis...

  18. Atributos de fertilidade e frações húmicas de um Latossolo Vermelho no Cerrado Fertility properties and humic fractions in a Rhodic Ferralsol in Brazilian Cerrado

    Ademir Fontana

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os atributos de fertilidade e as frações de matéria orgânica, ácido fúlvico, ácido húmico e humina, em um Latossolo Vermelho distroférrico, sob diferentes sistemas de cultivo no Cerrado. Os experimentos foram conduzidos no período de 1993 a 2003. Os tratamentos foram divididos em quatro grupos: lavoura (1 e 7, rotação lavoura/pastagem (3 e 5, rotação pastagem/lavoura (4 e 6 e pastagem contínua (2 e 8, todos em plantio direto. A avaliação do solo foi feita após dez anos de cultivo, com análises químicas de amostras da profundidade de 0-20 cm. Foi observado que os teores de Ca2+ variaram de 4,6 cmol c kg-1 (lavoura a 6,20 cmol c kg-1 (pastagem contínua, e os de P disponível, de 1 a 6 mg kg-1. Os teores de Mg2+ variaram de 3 cmol c kg-1, sob lavoura/pastagem, a 3,8 cmol c kg-1 em pastagem contínua, e os de K+, de 0,28 cmol c kg-1 sob pastagem contínua, a 1,10 cmol c kg-1 em lavoura/pastagem. Os teores de C orgânico variaram de 16,6 g kg-1 na lavoura a 28,0 g kg-1 sob lavoura/pastagem. A fração humina apresenta os maiores valores entre as frações da matéria orgânica.The objective of this study was to evaluate fertility attributes and the fractions of organic matter, fulvic acid, humic acid, and humina, in a Rhodic Ferralsol, under different cultivation systems in Brazilian Cerrado. The experiments were carried out from 1993 to 2003. The treatments were divided in four groups: tillage (1 and 7, rotation tillage/pasture (3 and 5, rotation pasture/tillage (4 and 6, and continuous pasture (2 and 8, all in no-tillage system. Chemical analyses of soil samples were made for the depth of 0-20 cm, after ten years of cultivation. It was observed that Ca2+ content varied from 4.6 cmol c kg-1 (tillage to 6.20 cmol c kg-1 (continuous pasture, and available P from 1 to 6 mg kg-1. The Mg2+ content varied from 3 cmol c kg-1, under tillage/pasture, to 3.8 cmol c kg-1 in continuous pasture, and K

  19. Homogenization versus homogenization-free method to measure muscle glycogen fractions.

    Mojibi, N; Rasouli, M

    2016-12-01

    The glycogen is extracted from animal tissues with or without homogenization using cold perchloric acid. Three methods were compared for determination of glycogen in rat muscle at different physiological states. Two groups of five rats were kept at rest or 45 minutes muscular activity. The glycogen fractions were extracted and measured by using three methods. The data of homogenization method shows that total glycogen decreased following 45 min physical activity and the change occurred entirely in acid soluble glycogen (ASG), while AIG did not change significantly. Similar results were obtained by using "total-glycogen-fractionation methods". The findings of "homogenization-free method" indicate that the acid insoluble fraction (AIG) was the main portion of muscle glycogen and the majority of changes occurred in AIG fraction. The results of "homogenization method" are identical with "total glycogen fractionation", but differ with "homogenization-free" protocol. The ASG fraction is the major portion of muscle glycogen and is more metabolically active form.

  20. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    S.O. Bader

    1999-10-18

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  1. COMMERCIAL SNF ACCIDENT RELEASE FRACTIONS

    S.O. Bader

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this design analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that are released from an accident event at the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions will be used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the MGR. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total CSNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. The radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses. This subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Potential accidents may involve waste forms that are characterized as either bare (unconfined) fuel assemblies or confined fuel assemblies. The confined CSNF assemblies at the MGR are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or disposal containers (waste packages). In contrast to the bare fuel assemblies, the container that confines the fuel assemblies has the potential of providing an additional barrier for diminishing the total release fraction should the fuel rod cladding breach during an accident. However, this analysis will not take credit for this additional bamer and will establish only the total release fractions for bare unconfined CSNF assemblies, which may however be

  2. Structural analysis of acidic oligosaccharides derived from the methylated, acidic polysaccharide associated with coccoliths of Emiliania huxleyi (lohmann) kamptner

    Fichtinger-Schepman, A.M.J.; Kamerling, J.P.; Versluis, C.; Vliegenthart, J.F.G.

    1980-01-01

    A series of acidic oligosaccharides was obtained by graded, acid hydrolysis of the methylated, acidic polysaccharide associated with the coccoliths of the alga Emiliania huxleyi (Lohmann) Kamptner. After fractionation by ion-exchange chromatography, the structures of the oligosaccharides were

  3. The Fractionation and Enrichment of La Content by Precipitation

    Suyanti; Purwani, MV

    2007-01-01

    The fractionation and enrichment of La content by precipitation have been done. The feed was La hydroxide by product of monazite sand. La hydroxide was diluted in HNO 3 and was precipitated with ammonia. For to obtain La, diluent was precipitated at pH 8 and the filtrate was precipitated with oxalic acid. The precipitant of La concentrated was more rich than the feed. This process was done continue and fractionally. The best yield of enrichment of La was obtained at dilution of 25 gram La Hydroxide in 20 ml HNO 3 . The efficient degree of fractionation was XV. The average weight of La concentrate was obtained at every fraction was 1 gram. The total sum weight from fraction I until fraction XV 13.5 grams. The average of La content was 48%, average fractionation efficiency of La for every step of fractionation was 48 %. Total efficiency all process was 100%. The average ratio of La/Nd was 2 and the ratio of La/Ce almost infinite. Before processed La/Ce was 7.86, and after process increase to 26.92 - to approach ∞. Before processed ratio of La/Nd was 2.79, after processed increased to 4.4 - to approach ∞. (author)

  4. Luminescence from {gamma}-irradiated humic acid

    Goraczko, Wieslaw [Faculty of Chemical Technology, Radio- and Photochemistry Department, Poznan University of Technology, ul. Piotrowo 3, 60-965 Poznan (Poland); Slawinski, Janusz [Institute of Ecotechnology, State Higher Vocational School, ul. Ks. Kard. S.Wyszynskiego 38, 62-200 Gniezno (Poland)

    2008-07-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the ultraweak delayed radiochemiluminescence (RCL) spectra, kinetics and spectroscopic properties of humic acids (HAs) after {gamma}-radiation exposure (absorbed doses of 1-10 kGy, Co-60) in model systems. The kinetics and spectral distribution of RCL (340-650 nm) were measured using the single photon counting (SPC) method and cut-off filters. The intensity of fluorescence ({lambda}{sub ex}=390, 440, 490 and 540 nm) covering the spectral range 400-580 nm was heavily dependent on the {lambda}{sub ex} and slightly increased with the absorbed dose of {gamma}-radiation. Absorption spectra (the range 240-800 nm) and color coefficients E{sub 2.6/4} and E{sub 4/6} of irradiated solutions indicated that post-radiative degradation/polymerization processes take place in the HA, changing their macromolecule size or properties. Comparison of FTIR spectra and elemental analysis proved an increased O and decreased C atoms in irradiated samples. The data indicate on the radiolysis-induced degradation of native HA into fulvic-like acids with higher hydrophilicity and lower molecular size.

  5. Luminescence from γ-irradiated humic acid

    Goraczko, Wieslaw; Slawinski, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the ultraweak delayed radiochemiluminescence (RCL) spectra, kinetics and spectroscopic properties of humic acids (HAs) after γ-radiation exposure (absorbed doses of 1-10 kGy, Co-60) in model systems. The kinetics and spectral distribution of RCL (340-650 nm) were measured using the single photon counting (SPC) method and cut-off filters. The intensity of fluorescence (λ ex =390, 440, 490 and 540 nm) covering the spectral range 400-580 nm was heavily dependent on the λ ex and slightly increased with the absorbed dose of γ-radiation. Absorption spectra (the range 240-800 nm) and color coefficients E 2.6/4 and E 4/6 of irradiated solutions indicated that post-radiative degradation/polymerization processes take place in the HA, changing their macromolecule size or properties. Comparison of FTIR spectra and elemental analysis proved an increased O and decreased C atoms in irradiated samples. The data indicate on the radiolysis-induced degradation of native HA into fulvic-like acids with higher hydrophilicity and lower molecular size

  6. Fractions, Number Lines, Third Graders

    Cramer, Kathleen; Ahrendt, Sue; Monson, Debra; Wyberg, Terry; Colum, Karen

    2017-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) (CCSSI 2010) outlines ambitious goals for fraction learning, starting in third grade, that include the use of the number line model. Understanding and constructing fractions on a number line are particularly complex tasks. The current work of the authors centers on ways to successfully…

  7. Unwrapping Students' Ideas about Fractions

    Lewis, Rebecca M.; Gibbons, Lynsey K.; Kazemi, Elham; Lind, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Supporting students to develop an understanding of the meaning of fractions is an important goal of elementary school mathematics. This involves developing partitioning strategies, creating representations, naming fractional quantities, and using symbolic notation. This article describes how teachers can use a formative assessment problem to…

  8. Understanding Magnitudes to Understand Fractions

    Gabriel, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Fractions are known to be difficult to learn and difficult to teach, yet they are vital for students to have access to further mathematical concepts. This article uses evidence to support teachers employing teaching methods that focus on the conceptual understanding of the magnitude of fractions.

  9. Financial Planning with Fractional Goals

    Goedhart, Marc; Spronk, Jaap

    1995-01-01

    textabstractWhen solving financial planning problems with multiple goals by means of multiple objective programming, the presence of fractional goals leads to technical difficulties. In this paper we present a straightforward interactive approach for solving such linear fractional programs with multiple goal variables. The approach is illustrated by means of an example in financial planning.

  10. Deterministic ratchets for suspension fractionation

    Kulrattanarak, T.

    2010-01-01

    Driven by the current insights in sustainability and technological development in
    biorefining natural renewable resources, the food industry has taken an interest in
    fractionation of agrofood materials, like milk and cereal crops. The purpose of fractionation
    is to split the raw

  11. Fermion fractionization and index theorem

    Hirayama, Minoru; Torii, Tatsuo

    1982-01-01

    The relation between the fermion fractionization and the Callias-Bott-Seeley index theorem for the Dirac operator in the open space of odd dimension is clarified. Only the case of one spatial dimension is discussed in detail. Sum rules for the expectation values of various quantities in fermion-fractionized configurations are derived. (author)

  12. A new fractional wavelet transform

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-03-01

    The fractional Fourier transform (FRFT) is a potent tool to analyze the time-varying signal. However, it fails in locating the fractional Fourier domain (FRFD)-frequency contents which is required in some applications. A novel fractional wavelet transform (FRWT) is proposed to solve this problem. It displays the time and FRFD-frequency information jointly in the time-FRFD-frequency plane. The definition, basic properties, inverse transform and reproducing kernel of the proposed FRWT are considered. It has been shown that an FRWT with proper order corresponds to the classical wavelet transform (WT). The multiresolution analysis (MRA) associated with the developed FRWT, together with the construction of the orthogonal fractional wavelets are also presented. Three applications are discussed: the analysis of signal with time-varying frequency content, the FRFD spectrum estimation of signals that involving noise, and the construction of fractional Harr wavelet. Simulations verify the validity of the proposed FRWT.

  13. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoë daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17 degrees C nights, 23 degrees C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4 per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in (13)C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0 per thousand at 27 degrees C/33 degrees C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process

  14. Temperature dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in CAM plants

    Deleens, E.; Treichel, I.; O' Leary, M.H.

    1985-09-01

    The carbon isotope fractionation associated with nocturnal malic acid synthesis in Kalanchoe daigremontiana and Bryophyllum tubiflorum was calculated from the isotopic composition of carbon-4 of malic acid, after appropriate corrections. In the lowest temperature treatment (17/sup 0/C nights, 23/sup 0/C days), the isotope fractionation for both plants is -4% per thousand (that is, malate is enriched in /sup 13/C relative to the atmosphere). For K. daigremontiana, the isotope fractionation decreases with increasing temperature, becoming approximately 0% per thousand at 27/sup 0/C/33/sup 0/C. Detailed analysis of temperature effects on the isotope fractionation indicates that stomatal aperture decreases with increasing temperature and carboxylation capacity increases. For B. tubiflorum, the temperature dependence of the isotope fractionation is smaller and is principally attributed to the normal temperature dependences of the rates of diffusion and carboxylation steps. The small change in the isotopic composition of remaining malic acid in both species which is observed during deacidification indicates that malate release, rather than decarboxylation, is rate limiting in the deacidification process. 28 references, 1 figure, 4 tables.

  15. Generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space-time fractional derivatives

    Wang Shaowei; Xu Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    In this paper the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation with space and time fractional derivatives is constructed. The equation is solved for free particle and for a square potential well by the method of integral transforms, Fourier transform and Laplace transform, and the solution can be expressed in terms of Mittag-Leffler function. The Green function for free particle is also presented in this paper. Finally, we discuss the relationship between the cases of the generalized fractional Schroedinger equation and the ones in standard quantum

  16. Permutation entropy of fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise

    Zunino, L.; Perez, D.G.; Martin, M.T.; Garavaglia, M.; Plastino, A.; Rosso, O.A.

    2008-01-01

    We have worked out theoretical curves for the permutation entropy of the fractional Brownian motion and fractional Gaussian noise by using the Bandt and Shiha [C. Bandt, F. Shiha, J. Time Ser. Anal. 28 (2007) 646] theoretical predictions for their corresponding relative frequencies. Comparisons with numerical simulations show an excellent agreement. Furthermore, the entropy-gap in the transition between these processes, observed previously via numerical results, has been here theoretically validated. Also, we have analyzed the behaviour of the permutation entropy of the fractional Gaussian noise for different time delays

  17. Oxidative decarboxylation of glycolic and phenylacetic acids with cerium(4) catalyzed by silver ions in the sulfuric acid media

    Venkatesvar Rao, G.; Nagardzhun Rao, Ch.; Sajprakash, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Oxidative decarboxylation of glycolic and phenylacetic acids by cerium (4) in the presence of Ag + ions is studied. The Ce(4) order equals 1, glycolic acid order in the absence of a catalyst also equals 1 and is fractional (0.5) for a catalytic reaction. The phenylacetic acid order is fractional (0.75). The Ag + ion reaction order is fractional and constitutes 0.32 for glycolic and 0.36 for phenylacetic acids. The reaction mechanism is proposed [ru

  18. Sensory and chromatographic evaluations of water soluble fractions from air-dried sausages

    Henriksen, Anders Peter; Stahnke, Marie Louise Heller

    1997-01-01

    Low molecular weight water soluble compounds were extracted from Danish salami, Italian sausage, and Spanish Chorizo. The extracts were fractionated by gel filtration chromatography revealing peptides with a molecular weight less than 4200 Dalton. Fractions consisting of smaller peptides and free...... amino acids had enhanced savory taste impressions described as mainly bouillon, bitter, sour, salty and plastic with odor notes of boiled potato. Determination of amino acids in the fractions before and after hydrolysis revealed the presence of mainly hydrophilic peptides in all fractions. Partial least...

  19. Epizootic rabbit enteropathy inoculum (TEC4): antibiograms and antibiotic fractionation.

    Huybens, Nathalie; Houeix, Julien; Licois, Dominique; Mainil, Jacques; Marlier, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Epizootic rabbit enteropathy (ERE) emerged and spread in Europe within the last 13 years causing major economical loss. The aims of the study was to evaluate antibiograms of TEC4, an inoculum composed of an extract of intestinal content of affected rabbits, and to test the potential of different antibiotic-based TEC4 fractions to reproduce the disease. Twenty nine different antibiotic discs were incubated for determining bacteria resistance. In a complementary study, nine tubes of liquid medium were inoculated with TEC4, incubated and added individually with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, bacitracin, ceftiofur, doxycycline, novobiocin, streptomycyin, tylosin, vancomycin and 0.9% saline solution as control. The content of each tube was washed by centrifugation and suspended in saline. The three most effective antibiotics are florfenicol, amoxycillin/clavulanic acid and tylosin. A high concentration of Clostridium sordelli and Bacillus firmus were isolated in all fractions. Species never cultured from TEC4 were identified as Fusobacterium necrogenes (in vancomycin fraction), Cellulomonas sp (in novobiocin fraction) and Bacteroides distasonis (in doxycycline fraction). The ERE was reproduced when bacitracin, doxycycline and 0.9% fractions were inoculated. Rabbits showed ERE clinical signs with the specific drop in daily weight gain.

  20. Hypoglycemic Effects Of Whole And Fractionated Azadirachta Indica ...

    Hypoglycemic Effects Of Whole And Fractionated Azadirachta Indica (Neem) Seed Oils On Alloxan-Induced Diabetes In New Zealand White Rabbits. ... The data suggests that the whole neem seed oil and the acidic portion of the neem seed oil could be of benefit in controlling the blood sugar in subjects presenting with ...

  1. Interaction between Al3+ and acrylic acid and polyacrylic acid in acidic aqueous solution: a model experiment for the behavior of Al3+ in acidified soil solution.

    Etou, Mayumi; Masaki, Yuka; Tsuji, Yutaka; Saito, Tomoyuki; Bai, Shuqin; Nishida, Ikuko; Okaue, Yoshihiro; Yokoyama, Takushi

    2011-01-01

    From the viewpoint of the phytotoxicity and mobility of Al(3+) released from soil minerals due to soil acidification, the interaction between Al(3+) and acrylic acid (AA) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) as a model compound of fulvic acid was investigated. The interaction was examined at pH 3 so as to avoid the hydrolysis of Al(3+). The interaction between Al(3+) and AA was weak. However, the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA was strong and depended on the initial (COOH in PAA)/Al molar ratio (R(P)) of the solution. For the range of 1/R(P), the interaction between Al(3+) and PAA can be divided into three categories: (1) 1:1 Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to a carboxyl group), (2) intermolecular Al-PAA-complex (an Al(3+) combines to more than 2 carboxyl groups of other Al-PAA-complexes) in addition to the 1:1 Al-PAA-complex and (3) precipitation of intermolecular complexes. In conclusion, R(P) is an important factor affecting the behavior of Al(3+) in acidic soil solution.

  2. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Tarasov, Vasily E

    2014-01-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity. (papers)

  3. Chemical research of lipophilic fractions of sickle alfalfa herbs

    S. V. Kovalev

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Lipophilic fraction (LF of known medicinal plants are still less studied, despite the fact that they have a unique group of biological active compounds (BAC. The main active substances of LF are chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols, sterols, unsaturated fatty acids, phospholipids, and other bioactive substances that exhibit a wide spectrum of pharmacological action. In this regard, a comprehensive study of advanced plant of flora of Ukraine to increase the assortments of herbal remedies is an urgent problem. The aim of this work was to obtain and chemical research of lipophilic fractions of sickle alfalfa herbs. The alfalfa herb harvested throughout the growing season in Kharkov and Poltava regions in 2011-2012. Lipophilic fraction was obtained by extraction with chloroform in a Soxhlet apparatus. Detection of carotenoids and chlorophylls by thin layer chromatography (TLC on plates of "Silufol" in one-dimensional and two-dimensional variants, the solvent system were: hexane: acetone (6:2 - I way, hexane-acetone (6:4 - II way. Assay of the lipophilic fraction by three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy (3DF-spectroscopy was used for the analysis of mixtures containing fluorescent components. 3DF-spectres, that have the appearance of the surface, are characterized by a functions I = f (λexc, λem, recorded in the ultraviolet and visible ranges. Assay of the carotenoids and chlorophylls carried out by spectrophotometry. The reference solution was chloroform. Assay of fatty acids was performed by gas-liquid chromatography (GLC of methyl esters of fatty acids via chromatograph with flame ionization detector "Shimadzu GC-14B". 20.0 g crushed sickle alfalfa herbs were exhaustively extracted with chloroform in a Soxhlet apparatus for produce a lipophilic fractions. The chloroform extract was evaporated in order to remove the extractant. The percentage of lipophilic fraction in the herbs was 7.5%. Quantity of the carotenoids and chlorophylls

  4. [Screening of hepatotoxicity fraction of Genkwa Flos and study on UPLC fingerprint of hepatotoxicity fraction].

    Yuan, Yang; Geng, Lu-Lu; Zhuang, He-Fei; Meng, Xia; Peng, Ying; Bi, Kai-Shun; Chen, Xiao-Hui

    2013-01-01

    To look for the active fraction of ethanol extract of Genkwa Flos (EGF) induced hepatotoxicity and develop an UPLC fingerprint of the active fraction. Target fraction of EGF induced hepatotoxicity was guided by the serum biochemical and histopathology methods. The UPLC method was applied to establish the chromatographic fingerprint. The separation was achieved on a BEH C18 column (2.1 mm x 50 mm, 1.7 microm) with a mobile phase consisting of acetonitrile and water containing 0.05% phosphate acid running gradient elution. The detection was carried out at 210 nm and the analysis was finished within 10 min. The chloroform phase of EGF could be responsible for the hepatotoxicity of this herb. The common mode of the UPLC fingerprint was set up under the established condition. There were 17 common peaks in fourteen batches of herbs, eight of which were identified, and the similar degrees of the fourteen batches to the common mode were between 0.890-0.999. It is easy to locate the chloroform extraction of EGF with hepatotoxicity. And the UPLC fingerprint was developed for the above fraction, which could provide valuable references for safe and effective clinical use of EGF.

  5. Role of Organic Acids in Bioformation of Kaolinite: Results of Laboratory Experiments

    Bontognali, T. R. R.; Vasconcelos, C.; McKenzie, J. A.

    2012-04-01

    Clay minerals and other solid silica phases have a broad distribution in the geological record and greatly affect fundamental physicochemical properties of sedimentary rocks, including porosity. An increasing number of studies suggests that microbial activity and microbially produced organic acids might play an important role in authigenic clay mineral formation, at low temperatures and under neutral pH conditions. In particular, early laboratory experiments (Linares and Huertas, 1971) reported the precipitation of kaolinite in solutions of SiO2 and Al2O3 with different molar ratios SiO2/Al2O3, together with fulvic acid (a non-characterized mixture of many different acids containing carboxyl and phenolate groups) that was extracted from peat soil. Despite many attempts, these experiments could not be reproduced until recently. Fiore et al. (2011) hypothesized that the non-sterile fulvic acid might have contained microbes that participated in the formation of kaolinite. Using solutions saturated with Si and Al and containing oxalate and/or mixed microbial culture extracted from peat-moss soil, they performed incubation experiments, which produced kaolinite exclusively in solutions containing oxalate and microbes. We proposed to test the role of specific organic acids for kaolinite formation, conducting laboratory experiments at 25˚C, with solutions of sodium silicate, aluminum chloride and various organic compounds (i.e. EDTA, citric acid, succinic acid and oxalic acid). Specific organic acids may stabilize aluminum in octahedral coordination positions, which is crucial for the initial nucleation step. In our experiments, a poorly crystalline mineral that is possibly a kaolinite precursor formed exclusively in the presence of succinic acid. In experiments with other organic compounds, no incorporation of Al was observed, and amorphous silica was the only precipitated phase. In natural environments, succinic acid is produced by a large variety of microbes as an

  6. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    Agambayev, Agamyrat

    2017-07-25

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  7. Ferroelectric Fractional-Order Capacitors

    Agambayev, Agamyrat; Patole, Shashikant P.; Farhat, Mohamed; Elwakil, Ahmed; Bagci, Hakan; Salama, Khaled N.

    2017-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride)-based polymers and their blends are used to fabricate electrostatic fractional-order capacitors. This simple but effective method allows us to precisely tune the constant phase angle of the resulting fractional-order capacitor by changing the blend composition. Additionally, we have derived an empirical relation between the ratio of the blend constituents and the constant phase angle to facilitate the design of a fractional order capacitor with a desired constant phase angle. The structural composition of the fabricated blends is investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques.

  8. On Generalized Fractional Differentiator Signals

    Hamid A. Jalab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available By employing the generalized fractional differential operator, we introduce a system of fractional order derivative for a uniformly sampled polynomial signal. The calculation of the bring in signal depends on the additive combination of the weighted bring-in of N cascaded digital differentiators. The weights are imposed in a closed formula containing the Stirling numbers of the first kind. The approach taken in this work is to consider that signal function in terms of Newton series. The convergence of the system to a fractional time differentiator is discussed.

  9. Short-term measurement of carbon isotope fractionation in plants

    O'Leary, M.H.; Treichel, I.; Rooney, M.

    1986-01-01

    Combustion-based studies of the carbon-13 content of plants give only an integrated, long-term value for the isotope fractionation associated with photosynthesis. A method is described here which permits determination of this isotope fractionation in 2 to 3 hours. To accomplish this, the plant is enclosed in a glass chamber, and the quantity and isotopic content of the CO 2 remaining in the atmosphere are monitored during photosynthesis. Isotope fractionation studies by this method give results consistent with what is expected from combustion studies of C 3 , C 4 , and Crassulacean acid metabolism plants. This method will make possible a variety of new studies of environmental and species effects in carbon isotope fractionation

  10. Bioassay-guided fractionation of Melastoma malabathricum Linn. leaf solid phase extraction fraction and its anticoagulant activity.

    Khoo, Li Teng; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abas, Faridah; Tohit, Eusni Rahayu Mohd; Hamid, Muhajir

    2015-02-24

    The aims of this study were to examine the bioactive component(s) responsible for the anticoagulant activity of M. malabathricum Linn. leaf hot water crude extract via bioassay-guided fractionation and to evaluate the effect of bioactive component(s) on the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway. The active anticoagulant fraction of F3 was subjected to a series of chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analyses. Furthermore, the effect of the bioactive component(s) on the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway was studied through immediate and time incubation mixing studies. Through Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) assay-guided fractionation, Subfraction B was considered the most potent anticoagulant fraction. Characterisation of Subfraction B indicated that anticoagulant activity could partly be due to the presence of cinnamic acid and a cinnamic acid derivative. APTT assays for both the immediate and time incubation mixing were corrected back into normal clotting time range (35.4-56.3 s). In conclusion, cinnamic acid and cinnamic acid derivative from Subfraction B were the first such compounds to be discovered from M. malabathricum Linn. leaf hot water crude extract that possess anticoagulant activity. This active anticoagulant Subfraction B prolonged blood clotting time by causing factor(s) deficiency in the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway.

  11. Physico-Chemical Properties of Kaolin-Organic Acid

    Yeo S.W.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil with more than 20% of organic content is classified as organic soil in Malaysia. Contents of organic soil consist of different types of organic and inorganic matter. Each type of organic matter has its own characteristic and its effect on the properties of the soil is different. Hence, a good understanding on the effect of specific organic and inorganic matter on the physico-chemical characteristic of organic soils can serve as a guide for predicting the properties of organic soils. The main objective is to unveil the effect of organic acid on the physico-chemical properties of soil. Artificial organic soil (kaolin mixed with organic acid was utilized in order to minimize the geochemical variability of studied soil. The organic acid which consists of humic acid and fulvic acid was extracted from highly humificated plant–based compost. The effect of organic acid on the physico-chemical properties of soil was determined by varying the concentration of organic acid. The specific gravity, Atterberg limits, pH, bulk chemical composition and the functional group of kaolin-organic acid were determined. It was found that the plasticity index, specific gravity and pH value were decreased with lowered concentration of organic acid. However, the liquid limits and plastic limits were found to be increased with the concentration decrement of organic acid. The analysis of XRF on the bulk chemical composition and analysis of FTIR spectra on the functional group of artificial organic soils with different concentration have confirmed little geochemical variability between samples.

  12. Chemical structure investigation on SFEF fractions of Dagang vacuum residue

    Zhang, Z.; Yan, G.; Zhao, S.; Guo, S. [China Univ. of Petroleum, Beijing (China). State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing; Zhang, Z. [Beijing Aeronautical Technology Research Center, Beijing (China)

    2006-07-01

    One of the most important problems in petroleum chemistry is the molecular structure and composition of heavy oil fractions and its importance in applications pertaining to the recovery, refining, and upgrading of petroleum. This paper presented an investigation into the chemical structure on supercritical fluid extraction and fraction (SFEF) factions of Dagang vacuum residue. Dagang vacuum residue was cut into sixteen fractions and a tailing with SFEF instrument. Then, using a chromatography, all SFEF fractions were further separated into four group compositions, notably saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes (SARA). Last, the chemical structure was explored through a thorough analysis of the products from the ruthenium ions-catalyzed oxidation (RICO) reaction of those aromatics, resins and asphaltenes. The paper discussed the experiment in terms of samples and chemicals; supercritical fluid extraction and fraction; SARA separation; and RICO. The results and discussions focused on alkyl side chains attached to aromatic carbon; polymethylene bridges connecting two aromatic units; benzenecarboxylic acids an aromatic units; and others. The study has brought to light useful characterization on covalent molecular structure of two typical SFEF fractions, notably the tenth and fifteen fraction. 17 refs., 6 tabs., 16 figs., 1 appendix.

  13. On generalized fractional vibration equation

    Dai, Hongzhe; Zheng, Zhibao; Wang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents a generalized fractional vibration equation for arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. • Some classical vibration equations can be derived from the developed equation. • The analytic solution of developed equation is derived under some special cases. • The generalized equation is particularly useful for developing new fractional equivalent linearization method. - Abstract: In this paper, a generalized fractional vibration equation with multi-terms of fractional dissipation is developed to describe the dynamical response of an arbitrary viscoelastically damped system. It is shown that many classical equations of motion, e.g., the Bagley–Torvik equation, can be derived from the developed equation. The Laplace transform is utilized to solve the generalized equation and the analytic solution under some special cases is derived. Example demonstrates the generalized transfer function of an arbitrary viscoelastic system.

  14. Physcicists rewarded for 'fractional electrons'

    Ball, P

    1998-01-01

    The 1998 Nobel prize for physics has been awarded to Horst Stormer, Daniel Tsui and Robert Laughlin.Stormer and Tsui were the first to observe the fractional quantum Hall effect and Laughlin provided the theory shortly afterwards (1 page).

  15. Ultracentrifugation for ultrafine nanodiamond fractionation

    Koniakhin, S. V.; Besedina, N. A.; Kirilenko, D. A.; Shvidchenko, A. V.; Eidelman, E. D.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we propose a method for ultrafine fractionation of nanodiamonds using the differential centrifugation in the fields up to 215000g. The developed protocols yield 4-6 nm fraction giving main contribution to the light scattering intensity. The desired 4-6 nm fraction can be obtained from various types of initial nanodiamonds: three types of detonation nanodiamonds differing in purifying methods, laser synthesis nanodiamonds and nanodiamonds made by milling. The characterization of the obtained hydrosols was conducted with Dynamic Light Scattering, Zeta potential measurements, powder XRD and TEM. According to powder XRD and TEM data ultracentrifugation also leads to a further fractionation of the primary diamond nanocrystallites in the hydrosols from 4 to 2 nm.

  16. Antibacterial, Antibiofilm Effect of Burdock (Arctium lappa L.) Leaf Fraction and Its Efficiency in Meat Preservation.

    Lou, Zaixiang; Li, Cheng; Kou, Xingran; Yu, Fuhao; Wang, Hongxin; Smith, Gary M; Zhu, Song

    2016-08-01

    First, the antibacterial, antibiofilm effect and chemical composition of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) leaf fractions were studied. Then, the efficiency of burdock leaf fractions in pork preservation was evaluated. The results showed that burdock leaf fraction significantly inhibited the growth and biofilm development of Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. MICs of burdock leaf fractions on E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium were both 2 mg/ml. At a concentration of 2.0 mg/ml, the inhibition rates of the fraction on growth and development of E. coli and Salmonella Typhimurium biofilms were 78.7 and 69.9%, respectively. During storage, the log CFU per gram of meat samples treated with burdock leaf fractions decreased 2.15, compared with the samples without treatment. The shelf life of pork treated with burdock leaf fractions was extended 6 days compared with the pork without treatment, and the sensory property was obviously improved. Compared with the control group, burdock leaf fraction treatment significantly decreased the total volatile basic nitrogen value and pH of the meat samples. Chemical composition analysis showed that the burdock leaf fraction consisted of chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, rutin, cynarin, crocin, luteolin, arctiin, and quercetin. As a vegetable with an abundant source, burdock leaf is safe, affordable, and efficient in meat preservation, indicating that burdock leaf fraction is a promising natural preservative for pork.

  17. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    J. Schulz

    2004-11-05

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M&O 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  18. Commercial SNF Accident Release Fractions

    Schulz, J.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to specify and document the total and respirable fractions for radioactive materials that could be potentially released from an accident at the repository involving commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a dry environment. The total and respirable release fractions are used to support the preclosure licensing basis for the repository. The total release fraction is defined as the fraction of total commercial SNF assembly inventory, typically expressed as an activity inventory (e.g., curies), of a given radionuclide that is released to the environment from a waste form. Radionuclides are released from the inside of breached fuel rods (or pins) and from the detachment of radioactive material (crud) from the outside surfaces of fuel rods and other components of fuel assemblies. The total release fraction accounts for several mechanisms that tend to retain, retard, or diminish the amount of radionuclides that are available for transport to dose receptors or otherwise can be shown to reduce exposure of receptors to radiological releases. The total release fraction includes a fraction of airborne material that is respirable and could result in inhalation doses; this subset of the total release fraction is referred to as the respirable release fraction. Accidents may involve waste forms characterized as: (1) bare unconfined intact fuel assemblies, (2) confined intact fuel assemblies, or (3) canistered failed commercial SNF. Confined intact commercial SNF assemblies at the repository are contained in shipping casks, canisters, or waste packages. Four categories of failed commercial SNF are identified: (1) mechanically and cladding-penetration damaged commercial SNF, (2) consolidated/reconstituted assemblies, (3) fuel rods, pieces, and debris, and (4) nonfuel components. It is assumed that failed commercial SNF is placed into waste packages with a mesh screen at each end (CRWMS M andO 1999). In contrast to bare unconfined fuel assemblies, the

  19. Fractional Reserve Banking: Some Quibbles

    Bagus, Philipp; Howden, David

    2010-01-01

    We explore several unaddressed issues in George Selgin’s (1988) claim that the best monetary system to maintain monetary equilibrium is a fractional reserve free banking one. The claim that adverse clearing balances would limit credit expansion in a fractional reserve free banking system is more troublesome than previously reckoned. Both lengthened clearing periods and interbank agreements render credit expansion unrestrained. “The theory of free banking” confuses increases in money held with...

  20. Intelligent fractions learning system: implementation

    Smith, Andrew C

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Conference Proceedings Paul Cunningham and Miriam Cunningham (Eds) IIMC International Information Management Corporation, 2011 ISBN: 978-1-905824-24-3 An Intelligent Fractions Learning System: Implementation Andrew Cyrus SMITH1, Teemu H. LAINE2 1CSIR... to fractions. Our aim with the current research project is to extend the existing UFractions learning system to incorporate automatic data capturing. ?Intelligent UFractions? allows a teacher to remotely monitor the children?s progress during...

  1. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    Zahnle, Kevin; Pollack, James B.; Kasting, James F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. Beginning with Ozima and Nakazawa's (1980) hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals, it is pointed out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. It is shown that enough fractionated Xe to supply the earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and Martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, the present hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula.

  2. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-06-04

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles.

  3. Fractional Charge Definitions and Conditions

    Goldhaber, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Fractional charge is known through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects carrying fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, and the difference of baryon and lepton numbers B-L. With a few simple assumptions all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which medium correlations yield familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, or sometimes nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. Fractional charges may be carried by fundamental particles or fundamental solitons. Either picture works for the simplest fractional-quantum-Hall-effect quasiholes, though the particle description is far more general. The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d = 1), the vortex (d = 2), and the magnetic monopole (d = 3). Further, for a charge not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles

  4. Xenon fractionation in porous planetesimals

    Zahnle, K.; Pollack, J.B.; Kasting, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    The distinctively fractionated Xe on Mars and Earth may have its root in a common source from which both planets accreted. We begin with Ozima and Nakazawa's hypothesis that terrestrial Xe fractionation was caused by gravitational separation of adsorbed solar nebular gases inside large porous planetesimals. We point out that Xe would have been trapped as the planetesimal grew and pores were squeezed shut by lithostatic pressure. We show that enough fractionated Xe to supply the Earth could have been trapped this way. The degree of fractionation is controlled by the lithostatic pressure at the pore-closing front and so would have been roughly the same for all large planetesimals. The predicted degree of fractionation agrees well with that preserved in terrestrial and martian Xe. Relative to Xe, this source is strongly depleted in other noble gases. In contrast to the original Ozima and Nakazawa hypothesis, our hypothesis predicts the observed fractionation, and it allows planetary accretion to occur after the dissipation of the solar nebula. The required planetesimals are large, representing a class of object now extinct in the solar system

  5. Fractional Diffusion Equations and Anomalous Diffusion

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto; Kaminski Lenzi, Ervin

    2018-01-01

    Preface; 1. Mathematical preliminaries; 2. A survey of the fractional calculus; 3. From normal to anomalous diffusion; 4. Fractional diffusion equations: elementary applications; 5. Fractional diffusion equations: surface effects; 6. Fractional nonlinear diffusion equation; 7. Anomalous diffusion: anisotropic case; 8. Fractional Schrödinger equations; 9. Anomalous diffusion and impedance spectroscopy; 10. The Poisson–Nernst–Planck anomalous (PNPA) models; References; Index.

  6. Conformable Fractional Bessel Equation and Bessel Functions

    Gökdoğan, Ahmet; Ünal, Emrah; Çelik, Ercan

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the fractional power series solutions around regular singular point x=0 of conformable fractional Bessel differential equation and fractional Bessel functions. Then, we compare fractional solutions with ordinary solutions. In addition, we present certain property of fractional Bessel functions.

  7. Discrete fractional solutions of a Legendre equation

    Yılmazer, Resat

    2018-01-01

    One of the most popular research interests of science and engineering is the fractional calculus theory in recent times. Discrete fractional calculus has also an important position in fractional calculus. In this work, we acquire new discrete fractional solutions of the homogeneous and non homogeneous Legendre differential equation by using discrete fractional nabla operator.

  8. Antioxidant Capacities of Fractions of Bamboo Shaving Extract and Their Antioxidant Components.

    Gong, Jinyan; Huang, Jun; Xiao, Gongnian; Chen, Feng; Lee, Bolim; Ge, Qing; You, Yuru; Liu, Shiwang; Zhang, Ying

    2016-07-30

    This research was conducted for evaluation of antioxidant activities of four fractions from bamboo shavings extract (BSE) and their antioxidant components. The antioxidant capacities of BSE and four fractions on ABTS, DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays exhibited the following descending order: DF > n-butanol fraction (BF) > BSE ≈ ethyl acetate fraction (AF) > water fraction (WF). Among the identified phenolic compounds, caffeic acid exhibited the highest antioxidant capacities on DPPH, FRAP and total antioxidant capacity assays. An extremely significant positive correlation between the antioxidant activities with the contents of total flavonoids, total phenolic acids, or total phenolics was observed in this study. The result indicated that the bamboo shaving extract and its solvent fractions could act as natural antioxidants in light of their potent antioxidant activities.

  9. [Soil organic carbon fractionation methods and their applications in farmland ecosystem research: a review].

    Zhang, Guo; Cao, Zhi-ping; Hu, Chan-juan

    2011-07-01

    Soil organic carbon is of heterogeneity in components. The active components are sensitive to agricultural management, while the inert components play an important role in carbon fixation. Soil organic carbon fractionation mainly includes physical, chemical, and biological fractionations. Physical fractionation is to separate the organic carbon into active and inert components based on the density, particle size, and its spatial distribution; chemical fractionation is to separate the organic carbon into various components based on the solubility, hydrolizability, and chemical reactivity of organic carbon in a variety of extracting agents. In chemical fractionation, the dissolved organic carbon is bio-available, including organic acids, phenols, and carbohydrates, and the acid-hydrolyzed organic carbon can be divided into active and inert organic carbons. Simulated enzymatic oxidation by using KMnO4 can separate organic carbon into active and non-active carbon. Biological fractionation can differentiate microbial biomass carbon and potential mineralizable carbon. Under different farmland management practices, the chemical composition and pool capacity of soil organic carbon fractions will have different variations, giving different effects on soil quality. To identify the qualitative or quantitative relationships between soil organic carbon components and carbon deposition, we should strengthen the standardization study of various fractionation methods, explore the integrated application of different fractionation methods, and sum up the most appropriate organic carbon fractionation method or the appropriate combined fractionation methods for different farmland management practices.

  10. Fractional governing equations of transient groundwater flow in confined aquifers with multi-fractional dimensions in fractional time

    M. L. Kavvas; T. Tu; A. Ercan; J. Polsinelli

    2017-01-01

    Using fractional calculus, a dimensionally consistent governing equation of transient, saturated groundwater flow in fractional time in a multi-fractional confined aquifer is developed. First, a dimensionally consistent continuity equation for transient saturated groundwater flow in fractional time and in a multi-fractional, multidimensional confined aquifer is developed. For the equation of water flux within a multi-fractional multidimensional confined aquifer, a dimensionally...

  11. Determination of reactivity rates of silicate particle-size fractions

    Angélica Cristina Fernandes Deus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of sources used for soil acidity correction depends on reactivity rate (RR and neutralization power (NP, indicated by effective calcium carbonate (ECC. Few studies establish relative efficiency of reactivity (RER for silicate particle-size fractions, therefore, the RER applied for lime are used. This study aimed to evaluate the reactivity of silicate materials affected by particle size throughout incubation periods in comparison to lime, and to calculate the RER for silicate particle-size fractions. Six correction sources were evaluated: three slags from distinct origins, dolomitic and calcitic lime separated into four particle-size fractions (2, 0.84, 0.30 and <0.30-mm sieves, and wollastonite, as an additional treatment. The treatments were applied to three soils with different texture classes. The dose of neutralizing material (calcium and magnesium oxides was applied at equal quantities, and the only variation was the particle-size material. After a 90-day incubation period, the RER was calculated for each particle-size fraction, as well as the RR and ECC of each source. The neutralization of soil acidity of the same particle-size fraction for different sources showed distinct solubility and a distinct reaction between silicates and lime. The RER for slag were higher than the limits established by Brazilian legislation, indicating that the method used for limes should not be used for the slags studied here.

  12. Using fractional extraction method to separate Mo from U in high concentration solution

    Zhao Pinzhi; Cheng Guangrong; Ma Xiuhua

    1996-01-01

    The author presents investigation on separating Mo from U in acid high concentration lixivium with fractional extraction of secondary amine (7203) and D2EHPA and preparing qualified products of ammonium molybdate and sodium diuranate

  13. Bio-guided fractionation of methanol extract of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. (bark and effect of the most active fraction on cancer cell lines

    Richard Simo Tagne

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the anticancer and antioxidant potential of methanol bark extract of Ziziphus mauritiana (Z. mauritiana, which is used by traditional healers to cure some cases of cancer in Cameroon. Methods: The methanol crude extract of Z. mauritiana has the antiproliferative activity on four cancer cell lines and its antioxidant activity. The extract was partitioned in five different solvents, and each fraction was tested. The effect of the most antiproliferative fraction on cell cycle was determined. Bio-guided fractionation was performed on the fraction with the highest antiproliferative and the highest antioxidant activities. Results: Z. mauritiana methanol extract was active on all tested cells, and showed promising antioxidant activity. All fractions except hexane fraction were active with the dichloromethane fraction being the most active and showed S and G2-M phase arrest (P<0.01 on cell cycle progression of NCI-H460 and MCF-7, respectively. Bio-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane fraction led to lupeol and betulinic acid. The greatest antioxidant activity was recorded with ethyl acetate fraction and its fractionation led to catechin and epigallocatechin. Conclusions: Overall, this study showed that Z. mauritiana barks has benefits as a chemoprevention agent cancer.

  14. Fractionation of lead-acid battery soil amended with Biochar ...

    Mobile (bio)available metal concentration in contaminated soils can be minimized through biological immobilization and stabilization methods using a range of organic compounds, such as “biochar.” Biochar has a high surface area, highly porous, variable – charge organic material that has the potential to increase soil ...

  15. Fractional charge definitions and conditions

    Goldhaber, Alfred Scharff

    2003-01-01

    The phenomenon of fractional charge has come to prominence in recent decades through theoretical and experimental discoveries of isolable objects which carry fractions of familiar charge units--electric charge Q, spin S, baryon number B and lepton number L. It is shown here on the basis of a few simple assumptions that all these effects may be described using a generalized version of charge renormalization for locally conserved charges, in which many-body correlations can produce familiar adiabatic, continuous renormalization, and in some circumstances nonadiabatic, discrete renormalization. The fractional charges may be carried either by fundamental particles or by fundamental solitons. This excludes nontopological solitons and also skyrmions: The only known fundamental solitons in three or fewer space dimensions d are the kink (d=1), the vortex (d=2), and the magnetic monopole (d=3). Further, for a charge which is not intrinsically coupled to the topological charge of a soliton, only the kink and the monopole may carry fractional values. The same reasoning enforces fractional local values of B-L for electrically charged elementary particles

  16. Fractionation of whey protein isolate with supercritical carbon dioxide – process modeling and cost estimation

    An economical and environmentally friendly whey protein fractionation process was developed using supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) as an acid to produce enriched fractions of alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-La) and beta-lactoglobulin (beta-Lg) from a commercial whey protein isolate (WPI) containing 55% ...

  17. REFractions: The Representing Equivalent Fractions Game

    Tucker, Stephen I.

    2014-01-01

    Stephen Tucker presents a fractions game that addresses a range of fraction concepts including equivalence and computation. The REFractions game also improves students' fluency with representing, comparing and adding fractions.

  18. dimensional generalised time-fractional Hirota equation

    Youwei Zhang

    2018-02-09

    Feb 9, 2018 ... Fractional calculus has attracted much attention in ... cally proved that the fractional calculus theory is non- ... calculus and various definitions of fractional integration .... basic features of the tanh-expansion are outlined as.

  19. Relative age and age sequence of fractions of soil organic matter

    Scharpenseel, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    Natural radiocarbon measurements on soil fractions provide information regarding the chances of separating the ''old biologically inert carbon'' out of samples of recent soil material. Beyond this, the relative fraction ages are scrutinized for the sequential order of the origin of the fractions within the biosynthetic reaction chain of soil humic matter. Among all fractions compared (classic humic matter fractionation by alkali and acid treatment; successive extraction with organic solvents of increasing polarity; separation according to particle size by Sephadex gel filtration; hydrolysis residue) the 6 n HCl hydrolysis residue shows the most consistent significant age increment. Repeated exhaustive hydrolysis treatment of the same sample material is still pending. All other fraction types indicate an age pattern under strong predetermination by method of origin, e.g., existence or lack of hydromorphy, without an evident enrichment of the ''old biologically inert carbon''. Among the organic extracts, no persistent age hierarchy is noticeable, whereas the classical fractions follow an age sequence mainly parallel to an increase of the molecular weight. Hymatomelanic acids appear rejuvenated by relics of recent carbon derived from the extractant ethanol. Grey humic acids are older than the brown humic acids, humines from fully terrestrial soil environment are older than humic acids, while in hydromorphic soils, cold alkali insoluble young C-compounds seem to be conserved which are liable to falsify rejuvenation of the humines

  20. AKTIVITAS ANTIBAKTERI FRAKSI-FRAKSI EKSTRAK SIRIH HIJAU (Piper betle Linn TERHADAP PATOGEN PANGAN [Antibacterial Activity of Fractionated Green Sirih (Piper betle Linn Extract Against Food Pathogenic Bacteria

    Maggy T. Suhartono

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fractionation of green sirih (Piper betle Linn extract by chromatography colom using the mixture of several solvents i.e. chloroform, ethanol and acetic acid (4:1:1 resulted in 17 fractions. All fractions showed antibacterial activities but only 2 fractions (fraction 3 and fraction 4 showed the highest inhibition towards the six tested bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella Typhimurium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus and Listeria monocytogenes. Among the tested bacteria, all fractions of green sirih extracts showed the most effective inhibition against, Salmonella Typhimurium with inhibition zone diameters ranging from 10 mm to 26 mm. Identification using GC-MS found that fraction 3 and fraction 4 contained chavicol; dodecanoic acid, myristic, palmitic and oleic acid.