WorldWideScience

Sample records for fully printed high-frequency

  1. Fully Printed High-Frequency Phased-Array Antenna on Flexible Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihong; Lu, Xuejun

    2010-01-01

    To address the issues of flexible electronics needed for surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back-to-Earth communications necessary for manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, a room-temperature printing process has been developed to create active, phased-array antennas (PAAs) on a flexible Kapton substrate. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proven feasible for phased-array antenna systems. The carrier mobility of an individual CNT is estimated to be at least 100,000 sq cm/V(dot)s. The CNT network in solution has carrier mobility as high as 46,770 sq cm/V(dot)s, and has a large current-density carrying capacity of approx. 1,000 mA/sq cm , which corresponds to a high carrying power of over 2,000 mW/ sq cm. Such high carrier mobility, and large current carrying capacity, allows the achievement of high-speed (>100 GHz), high-power, flexible electronic circuits that can be monolithically integrated on NASA s active phasedarray antennas for various applications, such as pressurized rovers, pressurized habitats, and spacesuits, as well as for locating beacon towers for lunar surface navigation, which will likely be performed at S-band and attached to a mobile astronaut. A fully printed 2-bit 2-element phasedarray antenna (PAA) working at 5.6 GHz, incorporating the CNT FETs as phase shifters, is demonstrated. The PAA is printed out at room temperature on 100-mm thick Kapton substrate. Four CNT FETs are printed together with microstrip time delay lines to function as a 2-bit phase shifter. The FET switch exhibits a switching speed of 0.2 ns, and works well for a 5.6-GHz RF signal. The operating frequency is measured to be 5.6 GHz, versus the state-of-the-art flexible FET operating frequency of 52 MHz. The source-drain current density is measured to be over 1,000 mA/sq cm, while the conventional organic FETs, and single carbon nanotube-based FETs, are typically in the m

  2. Self-shielding printed circuit boards for high frequency amplifiers and transmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, D.

    1969-01-01

    Printed circuit boards retaining as much copper as possible provide electromagnetic shielding between stages of the high frequency amplifiers and transmitters. Oscillation is prevented, spurious output signals are reduced, and multiple stages are kept isolated from each other, both thermally and electrically.

  3. On the high frequency perpendicular propagating waves in ultra-relativistic fully degenerate electron plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noureen, S.; Abbas, G.; Farooq, H.

    2017-09-01

    Using Vlasov-Maxwell's equations, the spectra of the perpendicular propagating Bernstein wave and Extraordinary wave in ultra-relativistic fully degenerate electron plasma are studied. The equilibrium particle distribution function is assumed to be isotropic Fermian. The analysis of high frequency spectra of the waves is carried out in the weak propagation limit Ω≫k .v and in the weak magnetic field limit |ω-k .v | ≫Ω and graphically observed.

  4. A fully printed ferrite nano-particle ink based tunable antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-11-02

    Inkjet printing or printing in general has emerged as a very attractive method for the fabrication of low cost and large size electronic systems. However, most of the printed designs rely on nano-particle based metallic inks which are printed on conventional microwave substrates. In order to have a fully printed fabrication process, the substrate also need to be printed. In this paper, a fully printed multi-layer process utilizing custom Fe2O3 based magnetic ink and a silver organic complex (SOC) ink is demonstrated for tunable antennas applications. The ink has been characterized for high frequency and magnetostatic properties. Finally as a proof of concept, a microstrip patch antenna is realized using the proposed fabrication technique which shows a tuning range of 12.5 %.

  5. Fully inkjet-printed microwave passive electronics

    KAUST Repository

    Mckerricher, Garret

    2017-01-30

    Fully inkjet-printed three-dimensional (3D) objects with integrated metal provide exciting possibilities for on-demand fabrication of radio frequency electronics such as inductors, capacitors, and filters. To date, there have been several reports of printed radio frequency components metallized via the use of plating solutions, sputtering, and low-conductivity pastes. These metallization techniques require rather complex fabrication, and do not provide an easily integrated or versatile process. This work utilizes a novel silver ink cured with a low-cost infrared lamp at only 80 °C, and achieves a high conductivity of 1×107 S m−1. By inkjet printing the infrared-cured silver together with a commercial 3D inkjet ultraviolet-cured acrylic dielectric, a multilayer process is demonstrated. By using a smoothing technique, both the conductive ink and dielectric provide surface roughness values of <500 nm. A radio frequency inductor and capacitor exhibit state-of-the-art quality factors of 8 and 20, respectively, and match well with electromagnetic simulations. These components are implemented in a lumped element radio frequency filter with an impressive insertion loss of 0.8 dB at 1 GHz, proving the utility of the process for sensitive radio frequency applications.

  6. Fully printed flexible carbon nanotube photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Suoming; Cai, Le; Wang, Tongyu; Miao, Jinshui; Sepúlveda, Nelson; Wang, Chuan

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report fully printed flexible photodetectors based on single-wall carbon nanotubes and the study of their electrical characteristics under laser illumination. Due to the photothermal effect and the use of high purity semiconducting carbon nanotubes, the devices exhibit gate-voltage-dependent photoresponse with the positive photocurrent or semiconductor-like behavior (conductivity increases at elevated temperatures) under positive gate biases and the negative photocurrent or metal-like behavior (conductivity decreases at elevated temperatures) under negative gate biases. Mechanism for such photoresponse is attributed to the different temperature dependencies of carrier concentration and carrier mobility, which are two competing factors that ultimately determine the photothermal effect-based photoresponse. The photodetectors built on the polyimide substrate also exhibit superior mechanical compliance and stable photoresponse after thousands of bending cycles down to a curvature radius as small as 3 mm. Furthermore, due to the low thermal conductivity of the plastic substrate, the devices show up to 6.5 fold improvement in responsivity compared to the devices built on the silicon substrate. The results presented here provide a viable path to low cost and high performance flexible photodetectors fabricated entirely by the printing process.

  7. Printed silver nanowire antennas with low signal loss at high-frequency radio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Natsuki; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Kohno, Kazuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Kanji

    2012-05-21

    Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those obtained using etched copper foil antennas, because their surfaces were much smoother than those of etched copper foil antennas. This was the case even though the resistivity of silver nanowire lines was 43-71 μΩ cm, which is much higher than that of etched copper foil (2 μΩ cm). When printed silver nanowire antennas were heated at 100 °C, they achieved signal losses that were much lower than those of silver paste antennas comprising microparticles, nanoparticles, and flakes. Furthermore, using a low temperature process, we succeeded in remotely controlling a commercialized radio-controlled car by transmitting a 2.45 GHz signal via a silver nanowire antenna printed on a polyethylene terephthalate film.

  8. Printed silver nanowire antennas with low signal loss at high-frequency radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komoda, Natsuki; Nogi, Masaya; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Kohno, Kazuo; Akiyama, Yutaka; Otsuka, Kanji

    2012-05-01

    Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those obtained using etched copper foil antennas, because their surfaces were much smoother than those of etched copper foil antennas. This was the case even though the resistivity of silver nanowire lines was 43-71 μΩ cm, which is much higher than that of etched copper foil (2 μΩ cm). When printed silver nanowire antennas were heated at 100 °C, they achieved signal losses that were much lower than those of silver paste antennas comprising microparticles, nanoparticles, and flakes. Furthermore, using a low temperature process, we succeeded in remotely controlling a commercialized radio-controlled car by transmitting a 2.45 GHz signal via a silver nanowire antenna printed on a polyethylene terephthalate film.Silver nanowires are printable and conductive, and are believed to be promising materials in the field of printed electronics. However, the resistivity of silver nanowire printed lines is higher than that of metallic particles or flakes even when sintered at high temperatures of 100-400 °C. Therefore, their applications have been limited to the replacement of transparent electrodes made from high-resistivity materials, such as doped metallic oxides, conductive polymers, carbon nanotubes, or graphenes. Here we report that using printed silver nanowire lines, signal losses obtained in the high-frequency radio were lower than those

  9. Fully Integrated, Miniature, High-Frequency Flow Probe Utilizing MEMS Leadless SOI Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ned, Alex; Kurtz, Anthony; Shang, Tonghuo; Goodman, Scott; Giemette. Gera (d)

    2013-01-01

    This work focused on developing, fabricating, and fully calibrating a flowangle probe for aeronautics research by utilizing the latest microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), leadless silicon on insulator (SOI) sensor technology. While the concept of angle probes is not new, traditional devices had been relatively large due to fabrication constraints; often too large to resolve flow structures necessary for modern aeropropulsion measurements such as inlet flow distortions and vortices, secondary flows, etc. Mea surements of this kind demanded a new approach to probe design to achieve sizes on the order of 0.1 in. (.3 mm) diameter or smaller, and capable of meeting demanding requirements for accuracy and ruggedness. This approach invoked the use of stateof- the-art processing techniques to install SOI sensor chips directly onto the probe body, thus eliminating redundancy in sensor packaging and probe installation that have historically forced larger probe size. This also facilitated a better thermal match between the chip and its mount, improving stability and accuracy. Further, the leadless sensor technology with which the SOI sensing element is fabricated allows direct mounting and electrical interconnecting of the sensor to the probe body. This leadless technology allowed a rugged wire-out approach that is performed at the sensor length scale, thus achieving substantial sensor size reductions. The technology is inherently capable of high-frequency and high-accuracy performance in high temperatures and harsh environments.

  10. Fully Printed, Flexible, Phased Array Antenna for Lunar Surface Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Harish; Hen, Ray T.; Lu, Xuejun; Chen, Maggie Yihong

    2013-01-01

    NASAs future exploration missions focus on the manned exploration of the Moon, Mars, and beyond, which will rely heavily on the development of a reliable communications infrastructure from planetary surface-to-surface, surface-to-orbit, and back to Earth. Flexible antennas are highly desired in many scenarios. Active phased array antennas (active PAAs) with distributed control and processing electronics at the surface of an antenna aperture offer numerous advantages for radar communications. Large-area active PAAs on flexible substrates are of particular interest in NASA s space radars due to their efficient inflatable package that can be rolled up during transportation and deployed in space. Such an inflatable package significantly reduces stowage volume and mass. Because of these performance and packaging advantages, large-area inflatable active PAAs are highly desired in NASA s surface-to-orbit and surface-to-relay communications. To address the issues of flexible electronics, a room-temperature printing process of active phased-array antennas on a flexible Kapton substrate was developed. Field effect transistors (FETs) based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), with many unique physical properties, were successfully proved feasible for the PAA system. This innovation is a new type of fully inkjet-printable, two-dimensional, high-frequency PAA on a flexible substrate at room temperature. The designed electronic circuit components, such as the FET switches in the phase shifter, metal interconnection lines, microstrip transmission lines, etc., are all printed using a special inkjet printer. Using the developed technology, entire 1x4, 2x2, and 4x4 PAA systems were developed, packaged, and demonstrated at 5.3 GHz. Several key solutions are addressed in this work to solve the fabrication issues. The source/drain contact is developed using droplets of silver ink printed on the source/drain areas prior to applying CNT thin-film. The wet silver ink droplets allow the silver to

  11. A Flexible Proximity Sensor Fully Fabricated by Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Tsan Wang

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A flexible proximity sensor fully fabricated by inkjet printing is proposed in this paper. The flexible proximity sensor is composed of a ZnO layer sandwiched in between a flexible aluminum sheet and a web-shaped top electrode layer. The flexible aluminum sheet serves as the bottom electrode. The material of the top electrode layer is nano silver. Both the ZnO and top electrode layers are deposited by inkjet printing. The fully inkjet printing process possesses the advantages of direct patterning and low-cost. It does not require photolithography and etching processes since the pattern is directly printed on the flexible aluminum sheet. The prototype demonstrates that the presented flexible sensor is sensitive to the human body. It may be applied to proximity sensing or thermal eradiation sensing.

  12. Fully printed flexible and disposable wireless cyclic voltammetry tag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Younsu; Park, Hyejin; Park, Jin-Ah; Noh, Jinsoo; Choi, Yunchang; Jung, Minhoon; Jung, Kyunghwan; Pyo, Myungho; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-01-29

    A disposable cyclic voltammetry (CV) tag is printed on a plastic film by integrating wireless power transmitter, polarized triangle wave generator, electrochemical cell and signage through a scalable gravure printing method. By proximity of 13.56 MHz RF reader, the printed CV tag generates 320 mHz of triangular sweep wave from +500 mV to -500 mV which enable to scan a printed electrochemical cell in the CV tag. By simply dropping any specimen solution on the electrochemical cell in the CV tag, the presence of solutes in the solution can be detected and shown on the signage of the CV tag in five sec. 10 mM of N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD) was used as a standard solute to prove the working concept of fully printed disposable wireless CV tag. Within five seconds, we can wirelessly diagnose the presence of TMPD in the solution using the CV tag in the proximity of the 13.56 MHz RF reader. This fully printed and wirelessly operated flexible CV tag is the first of its kind and marks the path for the utilization of inexpensive and disposable wireless electrochemical sensor systems for initial diagnose hazardous chemicals and biological molecules to improve public hygiene and health.

  13. A Fully Inkjet Printed 3D Honeycomb Inspired Patch Antenna

    KAUST Repository

    Mckerricher, Garret

    2015-07-16

    The ability to inkjet print three-dimensional objects with integrated conductive metal provides many opportunities for fabrication of radio frequency electronics and electronics in general. Both a plastic material and silver conductor are deposited by inkjet printing in this work. This is the first demonstration of a fully 3D Multijet printing process with integrated polymer and metal. A 2.4 GHz patch antenna is successfully fabricated with good performance proving the viability of the process. The inkjet printed plastic surface is very smooth, with less than 100 nm root mean square roughness. The printed silver nanoparticles are laser sintered to achieve adequate conductivity of 1e6 S/m while keeping the process below 80oC and avoiding damage to the polymer. The antenna is designed with a honeycomb substrate which minimizes material consumption. This reduces the weight, dielectric constant and dielectric loss which are all around beneficial. The antenna is entirely inkjet printed including the ground plane conductor and achieves an impressive 81% efficiency. The honeycomb substrate weighs twenty times less than a solid substrate. For comparison the honeycomb antenna provides an efficiency nearly 15% greater than a similarly fabricated antenna with a solid substrate.

  14. Multi-fluid approach to high-frequency waves in plasmas: I. Small-amplitude regime in fully ionized medium

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Gómez, David; Terradas, Jaume

    2016-01-01

    Ideal MHD provides an accurate description of low-frequency Alfv\\'en waves in fully ionized plasmas. However, higher frequency waves in many plasmas of the solar atmosphere cannot be correctly described by ideal MHD and a more accurate model is required. Here, we study the properties of small-amplitude incompressible perturbations in both the low and the high frequency ranges in plasmas composed of several ionized species. We use a multi-fluid approach and take into account the effects of collisions between ions and the inclusion of Hall's term in the induction equation. Through the analysis of the corresponding dispersion relations and numerical simulations we check that at high frequencies ions of different species are not as strongly coupled as in the low frequency limit. Hence, they cannot be treated as a single fluid. In addition, elastic collisions between the distinct ionized species are not negligible for high frequency waves since an appreciable damping is obtained. Furthermore, Coulomb collisions be...

  15. Printed Circuit Board Embedded Inductors for Very High Frequency Switch-Mode Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    The paper describes the design of three different structures for printed circuit board embedded inductors. Direct comparison of spirals, solenoids and toroids are made with regard to inductance, dc and ac resistance, electromagnetic field and design flexibility. First the equations for the impeda......The paper describes the design of three different structures for printed circuit board embedded inductors. Direct comparison of spirals, solenoids and toroids are made with regard to inductance, dc and ac resistance, electromagnetic field and design flexibility. First the equations...

  16. Pad-printed thick-film transducers for high-frequency and high-power applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, Wanda W.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.; Levassort, Franck; Lou-Moeller, Rasmus; Filoux, Erwan; Mamou, Jonathan; Silverman, Ronald H.; Lethiecq, Marc

    2011-03-01

    High-frequency-ultrasound transducers are widely used but are typically based either on planar piezoceramic sections that are lapped down to smaller thicknesses or on piezopolymers that may be deformed into more complex geometries. Piezoceramics then require dicing to obtain arrays or can be fractured into spherical geometries to achieve focusing. Piezopolymers are not as efficient for very small element sizes and are normally available only in discrete thicknesses. Thick-film (TF) transducers provide a means of overcoming these limits because the piezoelectric film is deposited with the required thickness, size and geometry, thus avoiding any subsequent machining. Thick-film transducers offer the potential of a wide range of geometries such as single-elements and annular or linear arrays. Here, a single-element focused transducer was developed using a piezoceramic composition adapted to high-power operation which is commonly used at standard MHz frequencies. After fabrication, the transducer was characterized. Using specific transmit-receive electronics and a water tank adapted to high-frequency devices, the transducer was excited using a short pulse to evaluate its bandwidth and imaging capabilities. Finally, it was excited by a one-period sine wave using several power levels to evaluate its capacity to produce high-intensity focused ultrasound at frequencies over 20 MHz.

  17. High-Resolution Transfer Printing of Graphene Lines for Fully Printed, Flexible Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Donghoon; Mahajan, Ankit; Secor, Ethan B; Hersam, Mark C; Francis, Lorraine F; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2017-07-25

    Pristine graphene inks show great promise for flexible printed electronics due to their high electrical conductivity and robust mechanical, chemical, and environmental stability. While traditional liquid-phase printing methods can produce graphene patterns with a resolution of ∼30 μm, more precise techniques are required for improved device performance and integration density. A high-resolution transfer printing method is developed here capable of printing conductive graphene patterns on plastic with line width and spacing as small as 3.2 and 1 μm, respectively. The core of this method lies in the design of a graphene ink and its integration with a thermally robust mold that enables annealing at up to ∼250 °C for precise, high-performance graphene patterns. These patterns exhibit excellent electrical and mechanical properties, enabling favorable operation as electrodes in fully printed electrolyte-gated transistors and inverters with stable performance even following cyclic bending to a strain of 1%. The high resolution coupled with excellent control over the line edge roughness to below 25 nm enables aggressive scaling of transistor dimensions, offering a compelling route for the scalable manufacturing of flexible nanoelectronic devices.

  18. Compact printed two dipole array antenna with a high front-back ratio for ultra-high-frequency radio-frequency identification handheld reader applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Qi; Zhang, Shuai; He, Sailing

    2015-01-01

    A printed two-dipole array antenna with a high front-back ratio is proposed for ultra-high-frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification handheld readers. The proposed antenna is a parasitic dual-element array with the ends of both elements folded back towards each other for additional coupling...

  19. Fully Printed Memristors from Cu-SiO2 Core-Shell Nanowire Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catenacci, Matthew J.; Flowers, Patrick F.; Cao, Changyong; Andrews, Joseph B.; Franklin, Aaron D.; Wiley, Benjamin J.

    2017-07-01

    This article describes a fully printed memory in which a composite of Cu-SiO2 nanowires dispersed in ethylcellulose acts as a resistive switch between printed Cu and Au electrodes. A 16-cell crossbar array of these memristors was printed with an aerosol jet. The memristors exhibited moderate operating voltages (˜3 V), no degradation over 104 switching cycles, write speeds of 3 μs, and extrapolated retention times of 10 years. The low operating voltage enabled the programming of a fully printed 4-bit memristor array with an Arduino. The excellent performance of these fully printed memristors could help enable the creation of fully printed RFID tags and sensors with integrated data storage.

  20. Fully Printed Flexible Single-Chip RFID Tag with Light Detection Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Aniello; Salmerón, Jose F.; Loghin, Florin C.; Lugli, Paolo; Rivadeneyra, Almudena

    2017-01-01

    A printed passive radiofrequency identification (RFID) tag in the ultra-high frequency band for light and temperature monitoring is presented. The whole tag has been manufactured by printing techniques on a flexible substrate. Antenna and interconnects are realized with silver nanoparticles via inkjet printing. A sprayed photodetector performs the light monitoring, whereas temperature measurement comes from an in-built sensor in the silicon RFID chip. One of the advantages of this system is the digital read-out and transmission of the sensors information on the RFID tag that ensures reliability. Furthermore, the use of printing techniques allows large-scale manufacturing and the direct fabrication of the tag on the desired surface. This work proves for the first time the feasibility of the embedment of large-scale organic photodetectors onto inkjet printed RFID tags. Here, we solve the problem of integration of different manufacturing techniques to develop an optimal final sensor system. PMID:28282850

  1. Fully Printed Flexible Single-Chip RFID Tag with Light Detection Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniello Falco

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A printed passive radiofrequency identification (RFID tag in the ultra-high frequency band for light and temperature monitoring is presented. The whole tag has been manufactured by printing techniques on a flexible substrate. Antenna and interconnects are realized with silver nanoparticles via inkjet printing. A sprayed photodetector performs the light monitoring, whereas temperature measurement comes from an in-built sensor in the silicon RFID chip. One of the advantages of this system is the digital read-out and transmission of the sensors information on the RFID tag that ensures reliability. Furthermore, the use of printing techniques allows large-scale manufacturing and the direct fabrication of the tag on the desired surface. This work proves for the first time the feasibility of the embedment of large-scale organic photodetectors onto inkjet printed RFID tags. Here, we solve the problem of integration of different manufacturing techniques to develop an optimal final sensor system.

  2. Variable temperature performance of a fully screen printed transistor switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambou, Serges; Magunje, Batsirai; Rhyme, Setshedi; Walton, Stanley D.; Idowu, M. Florence; Unuigbe, David; Britton, David T.; Härting, Margit

    2016-12-01

    This article reports on the variable temperature performance of a flexible printed transistor which works as a current driven switch. In this work, electronic ink is formulated from nanostructured silicon produced by milling polycrystalline silicon. The study of the silicon active layer shows that its conductivity is based on thermal activation of carriers, and could be used as active layers in active devices. We further report on the transistors switching operation and their electrical performance under variable temperature. The reliability of the transistors at constant current bias was also investigated. Analysis of the electrical transfer characteristics from 340 to 10 K showed that the printed devices' current ON/OFF ratio increases as temperature decreases making it a better switch at lower temperatures. A constant current bias on a terminal for up to six hours shows extraordinary stability in electrical performance of the device.

  3. Fully printed 3 microns thick dielectric elastomer actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, A.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present a new fabrication technique to print thin dielectric elastomer actuators (DEAs), reducing the driving voltage below 300 V while keeping good actuation performance. With operation voltages in the kV-range, standard DEAs are limited in terms of potential applications. Using thinner membranes is one of the few existing methods to achieve lower operation voltages. Typical DEAs have membranes in the 20-100 μm range, values below which membrane fabrication becomes challenging and the membrane quality and uniformity degrade. Using pad printing we produced thin silicone elastomer membranes, on which we pad-printed compliant electrodes. We then fabricated DEAs by assembling two membranes back to back. We obtain an actuation strain of 7.5% at only 245 V on a 3 μm thick DEA. In order to investigate the stiffening impact of the electrodes we developed a simple DEA model that includes their mechanical properties. We also developed a strain-mapping algorithm based on optical correlation. The simulation results and the strain-mapping measurements confirm that the stiffening impact of the electrodes increases for thinner membranes. Electrodes are an important element that cannot be neglected in the design and optimization of ultra-thin DEAs.

  4. A ferrite nano-particles based fully printed process for tunable microwave components

    KAUST Repository

    Ghaffar, Farhan A.

    2016-08-15

    With the advent of nano-particles based metallic inks, inkjet printing emerged as an attractive medium for fast prototyping as well as for low cost and flexible electronics. However, at present, it is limited to printing of metallic inks on conventional microwave substrates. For fully printed designs, ideally, the substrate must also be printed. In this work, we demonstrate a fully printed process utilizing a custom Fe2O3 based magnetic ink for functional substrate printing and a custom silver-organo-complex (SOC) ink for metal traces printing. Due to the magnetic nature of the ink, this process is highly suitable for tunable microwave components. The printed magnetic substrate is characterized for the magnetostatic as well as microwave properties. The measured B(H) curve shows a saturation magnetization and remanence of 1560 and 350 Gauss respectively. As a proof of concept, a patch antenna is implemented in the proposed stack up which shows a tuning range of 4 % around the center frequency. © 2016 IEEE.

  5. Printed high-frequency RF identification antenna on ultrathin polymer film by simple production process for soft-surface adhesive device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayata, Hiroki; Okamoto, Marin; Takeoka, Shinji; Iwase, Eiji; Fujie, Toshinori; Iwata, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we present a simple method for manufacturing electronic devices using ultrathin polymer films, and develop a high-frequency RF identification. To expand the market for flexible devices, it is important to enhance their adhesiveness and conformability to surfaces, to simplify their fabrication, and to reduce their cost. We developed a method to design an antenna for use on an operable RF identification whose wiring was subjected to commercially available inkjet or simple screen printing, and successfully fabricated the RF identification. By using ultrathin films made of polystyrene-block-polybutadiene-block-polystyrene (SBS) as substrates — less than 750 nm — the films could be attached to various surfaces, including soft surfaces, by van der Waals force and without using glue. We succeeded in the simple fabrication of an ultrathin RF identification including a commercial or simple printing process.

  6. Inkjet-printing- and electroless-plating- based fabrication of RF circuit structures on high-frequency substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sridhar, A.; Reiding, J.; Adelaar, H.; Achterhoek, F.; Dijk, van D.J.; Akkerman, R.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a method to fabricate radio frequency (RF) circuit structures is described. This method involves inkjet printing of a silver nanoparticle-based ink on a functional substrate material to create the seed track (i.e., the seed layer), onto which copper is subsequently deposited by an ele

  7. Fabrication of Fully Inkjet-Printed Vias and SIW Structures on Thick Polymer Substrates

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Sangkil

    2016-02-11

    In this paper, a novel fully inkjet-printed via fabrication technology and various inkjet-printed substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) structures on thick polymer substrates are presented. The electrical properties of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) are thoroughly studied up to 8 GHz utilizing the T-resonator method, and inkjet-printable silver nanoparticle ink on PMMA is characterized. A long via fabrication process up to 1 mm utilizing inkjet-printing technology is demonstrated, and its characteristics are presented for the first time. The inkjet-printed vias on 0.8-mm-thick substrate have a resistance of ∼ 0.2~ Ω . An equivalent circuit model of the inkjet-printed stepped vias is also discussed. An inkjet-printed microstrip-to-SIW interconnect and an SIW cavity resonator utilizing the proposed inkjet-printed via fabrication process are also presented. The design of the components and the fabrication steps are discussed, and the measured performances over the microwave frequency range of the prototypes are presented.

  8. The Innovated Flexible Surface Acoustic Wave Devices on Fully InkJet Printing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cha’o-Kuang Chen

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An innovated fabricated process of the flexible surface acoustic wave (SAW device is proposed in this study. Fully inkjet printing and sol-gel technology are used in this fabricated process. The flexible SAW device is composed of a ZnO layer sandwiched in between a flexible polyimide plastic sheet and two sets of interdigital transducers layer. The material of the top interdigital transducer layer is nano silver. The ZnO solution is prepared by sol-gel technology. Both the ZnO and top interdigital transducer layers are deposited by inkjet printing. The fully inkjet printing process possesses the advantages of direct patterning and low-cost. It does not require photolithography and etching processes since the pattern is directly printed on the flexible sheet. The center frequency of this prototype is matched with the design frequency. The prototype demonstrates that the presented flexible SAW device is available for the possible application in future. It may be applied to the sensing on curve surface.

  9. Fully printed, highly sensitive multifunctional artificial electronic whisker arrays integrated with strain and temperature sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shingo; Honda, Wataru; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-04-22

    Mammalian-mimicking functional electrical devices have tremendous potential in robotics, wearable and health monitoring systems, and human interfaces. The keys to achieve these devices are (1) highly sensitive sensors, (2) economically fabricated macroscale devices on flexible substrates, and (3) multifunctions beyond mammalian functions. Although highly sensitive artificial electronic devices have been reported, none have been fabricated using cost-effective macroscale printing methods and demonstrate multifunctionalities of artificial electronics. Herein we report fully printed high-sensitivity multifunctional artificial electronic whiskers (e-whisker) integrated with strain and temperature sensors using printable nanocomposite inks. Importantly, changing the composition ratio tunes the sensitivity of strain. Additionally, the printed temperature sensor array can be incorporated with the strain sensor array beyond mammalian whisker functionalities. The sensitivity for the strain sensor is impressively high (∼59%/Pa), which is the best sensitivity reported to date (>7× improvement). As the proof-of-concept for a truly printable multifunctional artificial e-whisker array, two- and three-dimensional space and temperature distribution mapping are demonstrated. This fully printable flexible sensor array should be applicable to a wide range of low-cost macroscale electrical applications.

  10. Probing individal subcells of fully printed and coated polymer tandem solar cells using multichromatic opto-electronic characterization methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Andersen, Thomas Rieks; Dam, Henrik Friis

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a method to opto-electronically probe the individual junctions and carrier transport across interfaces in fully printed and coated tandem polymer solar cells is described, enabling the identification of efficiency limiting printing/coating defects. The methods used are light beam...

  11. Layer-by-layer fully printed Zn-MnO2 batteries with improved internal resistance and cycle life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B.; Winslow, R.; Lin, I.; Gururangan, K.; Evans, J.; Wright, P.

    2015-12-01

    This research created direct layer-by-layer printed zinc-based secondary batteries with an ionic liquid-based gel polymer electrolyte to power micro- and meso-scale devices. The use of a gel polymer electrolyte composed of [BMIM][Otf] ionic liquid, ZnOtf salt, and PVDF-HFP polymer binder enabled direct layer-by-layer printing of functional cells. The effects of additive printing methods on cell discharge capacity, cycle life, and internal resistance are discussed. Fully printed cells have demonstrated average discharge capacities of 0.548 mAh/cm2, energy densities of 8.20 mWh/cm3, and specific energies of 2.46 mWh/g with some cells achieving over 1000 cycles without catastrophic failure. Layer-by-layer printed devices exhibited decreased DC internal resistance and longer cycle life over previous mechanically assembled cells.

  12. Direct fabrication of electrically functional microstructures by fully voltage-controlled electrohydrodynamic jet printing of silver nano-ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Stark, John P. W.

    2010-06-01

    We report electrohydrodynamic jet (E-jet) printing of a commercialised silver nano-ink in fully voltage-controlled fashion. Metallic pads and conducting tracks with hundred-micron feature size were drop-on-demands produced on Si substrates. Layer-by-layer printing was further performed, demonstrating a capability in creating 3D multistructures. Planar pattern with a large inductance of 2.5 μH and an excellent resistivity of 4.2×10-8 Ω m was fabricated, showing a true inductive device. Our result demonstrates a feasibility of E-jet printing in the application of smart electronic devices fabrication.

  13. A fully roll-to-roll gravure-printed carbon nanotube-based active matrix for multi-touch sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wookyu; Koo, Hyunmo; Sun, Junfeng; Noh, Jinsoo; Kwon, Kye-Si; Yeom, Chiseon; Choi, Younchang; Chen, Kevin; Javey, Ali; Cho, Gyoujin

    2015-12-01

    Roll-to-roll (R2R) printing has been pursued as a commercially viable high-throughput technology to manufacture flexible, disposable, and inexpensive printed electronic devices. However, in recent years, pessimism has prevailed because of the barriers faced when attempting to fabricate and integrate thin film transistors (TFTs) using an R2R printing method. In this paper, we report 20 × 20 active matrices (AMs) based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with a resolution of 9.3 points per inch (ppi) resolution, obtained using a fully R2R gravure printing process. By using SWCNTs as the semiconducting layer and poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) as the substrate, we have obtained a device yield above 98%, and extracted the key scalability factors required for a feasible R2R gravure manufacturing process. Multi-touch sensor arrays were achieved by laminating a pressure sensitive rubber onto the SWCNT-TFT AM. This R2R gravure printing system overcomes the barriers associated with the registration accuracy of printing each layer and the variation of the threshold voltage (Vth). By overcoming these barriers, the R2R gravure printing method can be viable as an advanced manufacturing technology, thus enabling the high-throughput production of flexible, disposable, and human-interactive cutting-edge electronic devices based on SWCNT-TFT AMs.

  14. Fully inkjet printed RF inductors and capacitors using polymer dielectric and silver conductive ink with through vias

    KAUST Repository

    Mckerricher, Garret

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, fully inkjet printed multilayer capacitors and inductors are fabricated and characterized using poly 4-vinylphenol (PVP) ink as the dielectric layer and silver nanoparticle ink as the conductor. Inkjet printed through vias, created with a novel dissolving method are used to make RF structures in a multilayer inkjet printing process. The vias have been realized in a 350-nm PVP film and exhibit resistance better than 0.1 Ω. Spiral inductors from 10 to 75 nH have been realized with maximum quality factors around five. The 10-nH inductor exhibits a self-resonant frequency slightly below 1 GHz. Metal-insulator-metal capacitors are realized with densities of 50 pF/mm-2. These capacitors demonstrate values ranging from 16 to 50 pF. The 16-pF capacitor shows a self-resonant frequency over 1.5 GHz. The successful implementation of inductors and capacitors in an all inkjet printed multilayer process with vias is an important step toward fully inkjet-printed large area and flexible RF systems.

  15. Fully roll-to-roll gravure printed rectenna on plastic foils for wireless power transmission at 13.56 MHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyejin; Kang, Hwiwon; Lee, Yonggil; Park, Yongsu; Noh, Jinsoo; Cho, Gyoujin

    2012-08-31

    Wireless power transmission to inexpensive and disposable smart electronic devices is one of the key issues for the realization of a ubiquitous society where sensor networks such as RFID tags, price tags, smart logos, signage and sensors could be fully interconnected and utilized by DC power of less than 0.3 W. This DC power can be provided by inductively coupled AC from a 13.56 MHz power transmitter through a rectenna, consisting of an antenna, a diode and a capacitor, which would be cheap to integrate with inexpensive smart electronic devices. To integrate the rectenna with a minimum cost, a roll-to-roll (R2R) gravure printing process has been considered to print the rectenna on plastic foils. In this paper, R2R gravure printing systems including printing condition and four different nanoparticle based inks will be reported to print the rectenna (antenna, diode and capacitor) on plastic foils at a printing speed of 8 m min(-1) and more than 90% device yield for a wireless power transmission of 0.3 W using a standard 13.56 MHz power transmitter.

  16. Fully Printed Halide Perovskite Light-Emitting Diodes with Silver Nanowire Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bade, Sri Ganesh R; Li, Junqiang; Shan, Xin; Ling, Yichuan; Tian, Yu; Dilbeck, Tristan; Besara, Tiglet; Geske, Thomas; Gao, Hanwei; Ma, Biwu; Hanson, Kenneth; Siegrist, Theo; Xu, Chengying; Yu, Zhibin

    2016-02-23

    Printed organometal halide perovskite light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported that have indium tin oxide (ITO) or carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the transparent anode, a printed composite film consisting of methylammonium lead tribromide (Br-Pero) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) as the emissive layer, and printed silver nanowires as the cathode. The fabrication can be carried out in ambient air without humidity control. The devices on ITO/glass have a low turn-on voltage of 2.6 V, a maximum luminance intensity of 21014 cd m(-2), and a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 1.1%, surpassing previous reported perovskite LEDs. The devices on CNTs/polymer were able to be strained to 5 mm radius of curvature without affecting device properties.

  17. Microwave properties of sphere-, flake-, and disc-shaped BaFe12O19 nanoparticle inks for high-frequency applications on printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myllymäki, S.; Maček Kržmanc, M.; Sloma, M.; Juuti, J.; Nelo, M.; Teirikangas, M.; Jakubowska, M.; Suvorov, D.; Jantunen, H.

    2016-12-01

    Spherical (diameter 50-200 nm), flake- (diameter 40-200 nm), and disc-shaped (diameter 10-20 nm) BaFe12O19 nanoparticles were synthesized with a wet chemical method, and their permittivity, electric loss tangent, permeability, and magnetic loss tangent were measured in the 0.045-10 GHz range. The materials were prepared using a solution of 12% PMMA resin in a butyldiglycol solvent for 10-50 wt% filling content. Microstrip transmission-line perturbation was used to measure complex permeability and the split post dielectric resonator method was employed to measure dielectric properties. The frequency dependence of the permeability and permittivity spectra of the composites was affected by their shape and filling fraction. The composites made with spherical particles had higher permeability values (1.4-1.75) at 1 GHz than the composites made with flake (1.25-1.6) or disc particles (1.1-1.3), but the spherical particles caused more losses. The flake particle composite provided permeability and magnetic loss characteristics at both 1 GHz and 7 GHz superior to those of the sphere particle composite in low-loss RF applications. The magnetic loss tangent of PMMA/BaFe12O19 was 0.2-0.3 at 1 GHz, being lower than that of state-of-the-art PANI/BaFe12O19 composites. The sphere composite inks showed permeability values less than 1 at 1-4 GHz ferromagnetic resonance (FMR); they could be used as a tunable material in microwave applications. The sphere and flake composite inks also had sufficient printing quality for the screen-printing fabrication method.

  18. Microwave properties of sphere-, flake-, and disc-shaped BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticle inks for high-frequency applications on printed electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myllymäki, S. [Microelectronics Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu 90014 (Finland); Maček Kržmanc, M. [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sloma, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) Department of Silicon Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Juuti, J.; Nelo, M.; Teirikangas, M. [Microelectronics Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu 90014 (Finland); Jakubowska, M. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology (ITME) Department of Silicon Technology, 133 Wolczynska Street, 01-919 Warsaw (Poland); Suvorov, D. [Josef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Jantunen, H. [Microelectronics Research Unit, University of Oulu, Oulu 90014 (Finland)

    2016-12-01

    Spherical (diameter 50–200 nm), flake- (diameter 40–200 nm), and disc-shaped (diameter 10–20 nm) BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles were synthesized with a wet chemical method, and their permittivity, electric loss tangent, permeability, and magnetic loss tangent were measured in the 0.045–10 GHz range. The materials were prepared using a solution of 12% PMMA resin in a butyldiglycol solvent for 10–50 wt% filling content. Microstrip transmission-line perturbation was used to measure complex permeability and the split post dielectric resonator method was employed to measure dielectric properties. The frequency dependence of the permeability and permittivity spectra of the composites was affected by their shape and filling fraction. The composites made with spherical particles had higher permeability values (1.4–1.75) at 1 GHz than the composites made with flake (1.25–1.6) or disc particles (1.1–1.3), but the spherical particles caused more losses. The flake particle composite provided permeability and magnetic loss characteristics at both 1 GHz and 7 GHz superior to those of the sphere particle composite in low-loss RF applications. The magnetic loss tangent of PMMA/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} was 0.2–0.3 at 1 GHz, being lower than that of state-of-the-art PANI/BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} composites. The sphere composite inks showed permeability values less than 1 at 1–4 GHz ferromagnetic resonance (FMR); they could be used as a tunable material in microwave applications. The sphere and flake composite inks also had sufficient printing quality for the screen-printing fabrication method.

  19. A simple and low-cost fully 3D-printed non-planar emulsion generator

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jiaming

    2015-12-23

    Droplet-based microfluidic devices provide a powerful platform for material, chemical and biological applications based on droplet templates. The technique traditionally utilized to fabricate microfluidic emulsion generators, i.e. soft-lithography, is complex and expensive for producing three-dimensional (3D) structures. The emergent 3D printing technology provides an attractive alternative due to its simplicity and low-cost. Recently a handful of studies have already demonstrated droplet production through 3D-printed microfluidic devices. However, these devices invariably use purely two-dimensional (2D) flow structures. Herein we apply 3D printing technology to fabricate simple and low-cost 3D miniaturized fluidic devices for droplet generation (single emulsion) and droplet-in-droplet (double emulsion) without need for surface treatment of the channel walls. This is accomplished by varying the channel diameters at the junction, so the inner liquid does not touch the outer walls. This 3D-printed emulsion generator has been successfully tested over a range of conditions. We also formulate and demonstrate, for the first time, uniform scaling laws for the emulsion drop sizes generated in different regimes, by incorporating the dynamic contact angle effects during the drop formation. Magnetically responsive microspheres are also produced with our emulsion templates, demonstrating the potential applications of this 3D emulsion generator in chemical and material engineering.

  20. Fully inkjet printed wide band cantor fractal antenna for RF energy harvesting application

    KAUST Repository

    Bakytbekov, Azamat

    2017-06-07

    Energy harvesting from ambient RF signals is feasible, particularly from the GSM bands such as 900MHz, 1800MHz and the 3G band at 2.1GHz. This requires a wideband receive antenna which can cover all these bands with decent gain performance and an omnidirectional radiation pattern. In this work, a novel Cantor fractal antenna has been designed which fulfills the above mentioned performance requirements. Antenna has been realized through a combination of 3D inkjet printing of plastic substrate and 2D inkjet printing of metallic nanoparticles based ink. The stable impedance and radiation performance of the antenna over a bandwidth of 0.8GHz to 2.2GHz (93 %) shows the feasibility of its employment in wide band energy harvesting applications.

  1. Fully porous 3D printed titanium femoral stem to reduce stress-shielding following total hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabnejad, Sajad; Johnston, Burnett; Tanzer, Michael; Pasini, Damiano

    2016-09-24

    Current hip replacement femoral implants are made of fully solid materials which all have stiffness considerably higher than that of bone. This mechanical mismatch can cause significant bone resorption secondary to stress shielding, which can lead to serious complications such as peri-prosthetic fracture during or after revision surgery. In this work, a high strength fully porous material with tunable mechanical properties is introduced for use in hip replacement design. The implant macro geometry is based off of a short stem taper-wedge implant compatible with minimally invasive hip replacement surgery. The implant micro-architecture is fine-tuned to locally mimic bone tissue properties which results in minimum bone resorption secondary to stress shielding. We present a systematic approach for the design of a 3D printed fully porous hip implant that encompasses the whole activity spectrum of implant development, from concept generation, multiscale mechanics of porous materials, material architecture tailoring, to additive manufacturing, and performance assessment via in vitro experiments in composite femurs. We show that the fully porous implant with an optimized material micro-structure can reduce the amount of bone loss secondary to stress shielding by 75% compared to a fully solid implant. This result also agrees with those of the in vitro quasi-physiological experimental model and the corresponding finite element model for both the optimized fully porous and fully solid implant. These studies demonstrate the merit and the potential of tuning material architecture to achieve a substantial reduction of bone resorption secondary to stress shielding. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  2. Fully printed flexible fingerprint-like three-axis tactile and slip force and temperature sensors for artificial skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Shingo; Kanao, Kenichiro; Yamamoto, Yuki; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji; Takei, Kuniharu

    2014-12-23

    A three-axis tactile force sensor that determines the touch and slip/friction force may advance artificial skin and robotic applications by fully imitating human skin. The ability to detect slip/friction and tactile forces simultaneously allows unknown objects to be held in robotic applications. However, the functionalities of flexible devices have been limited to a tactile force in one direction due to difficulties fabricating devices on flexible substrates. Here we demonstrate a fully printed fingerprint-like three-axis tactile force and temperature sensor for artificial skin applications. To achieve economic macroscale devices, these sensors are fabricated and integrated using only printing methods. Strain engineering enables the strain distribution to be detected upon applying a slip/friction force. By reading the strain difference at four integrated force sensors for a pixel, both the tactile and slip/friction forces can be analyzed simultaneously. As a proof of concept, the high sensitivity and selectivity for both force and temperature are demonstrated using a 3×3 array artificial skin that senses tactile, slip/friction, and temperature. Multifunctional sensing components for a flexible device are important advances for both practical applications and basic research in flexible electronics.

  3. 19.4%-efficient large-area fully screen-printed silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatz, Sebastian; Hannebauer, Helge; Hesse, Rene; Werner, Florian; Schmidt, Arne; Dullweber, Thorsten; Bothe, Karsten [Institute for Solar Energy Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Schmidt, Jan; Brendel, Rolf [Institute for Solar Energy Hamelin (ISFH), Am Ohrberg 1, 31860 Emmerthal (Germany); Institute of Solid-State Physics, University of Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    We demonstrate industrially feasible large-area solar cells with passivated homogeneous emitter and rear achieving energy conversion efficiencies of up to 19.4% on 125 x 125 mm{sup 2} p-type 2-3 {omega} cm boron-doped Czochralski silicon wafers. Front and rear metal contacts are fabricated by screen-printing of silver and aluminum paste and firing in a conventional belt furnace. We implement two different dielectric rear surface passivation stacks: (i) a thermally grown silicon dioxide/silicon nitride stack and (ii) an atomic-layer-deposited aluminum oxide/silicon nitride stack. The dielectrics at the rear result in a decreased surface recombination velocity of S{sub rear} = 70 cm/s and 80 cm/s, and an increased internal IR reflectance of up to 91% corresponding to an improved J{sub sc} of up to 38.9 mA/cm{sup 2} and V{sub oc} of up to 664 mV. We observe an increase in cell efficiency of 0.8% absolute for the cells compared to 18.6% efficient reference solar cells featuring a full-area aluminum back surface field. To our knowledge, the energy conversion efficiency of 19.4% is the best value reported so far for large area screen-printed solar cells. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Microwave Radiometer - high frequency

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Microwave Radiometer-High Frequency (MWRHF) provides time-series measurements of brightness temperatures from two channels centered at 90 and 150 GHz. These two...

  5. High-frequency ECG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragardh, Elin; Schlegel, Todd T.

    2006-01-01

    The standard ECG is by convention limited to 0.05-150 Hz, but higher frequencies are also present in the ECG signal. With high-resolution technology, it is possible to record and analyze these higher frequencies. The highest amplitudes of the high-frequency components are found within the QRS complex. In past years, the term "high frequency", "high fidelity", and "wideband electrocardiography" have been used by several investigators to refer to the process of recording ECGs with an extended bandwidth of up to 1000 Hz. Several investigators have tried to analyze HF-QRS with the hope that additional features seen in the QRS complex would provide information enhancing the diagnostic value of the ECG. The development of computerized ECG-recording devices that made it possible to record ECG signals with high resolution in both time and amplitude, as well as better possibilities to store and process the signals digitally, offered new methods for analysis. Different techniques to extract the HF-QRS have been described. Several bandwidths and filter types have been applied for the extraction as well as different signal-averaging techniques for noise reduction. There is no standard method for acquiring and quantifying HF-QRS. The physiological mechanisms underlying HF-QRS are still not fully understood. One theory is that HF-QRS are related to the conduction velocity and the fragmentation of the depolarization wave in the myocardium. In a three-dimensional model of the ventricles with a fractal conduction system it was shown that high numbers of splitting branches are associated with HF-QRS. In this experiment, it was also shown that the changes seen in HF-QRS in patients with myocardial ischemia might be due to the slowing of the conduction velocity in the region of ischemia. This mechanism has been tested by Watanabe et al by infusing sodium channel blockers into the left anterior descending artery in dogs. In their study, 60 unipolar ECGs were recorded from the entire

  6. High frequency electromagnetic dosimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Hernández, David A

    2009-01-01

    Along with the growth of RF and microwave technology applications, there is a mounting concern about the possible adverse effects over human health from electromagnetic radiation. Addressing this issue and putting it into perspective, this groundbreaking resource provides critical details on the latest advances in high frequency electromagnetic dosimetry.

  7. High frequency electromagnetic tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, W.; Ramirez, A.; Ueng, T.; Latorre, R.

    1989-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in G Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site to evaluate high frequency electromagnetic tomography as a candidate for in situ monitoring of hydrology in the near field of a heater placed in densely welded tuff. Tomographs of 200 MHz electromagnetic permittivity were made for several planes between boreholes. Data were taken before the heater was turned on, during heating and during cooldown of the rockmass. This data is interpreted to yield maps of changes in water content of the rockmass as a function of time. This interpretation is based on laboratory measurement of electromagnetic permittivity as a function of water content for densely welded tuff. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  8. High Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AC Bryan

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency oscillatory (HFO ventilation using low tidal volume and peak airway pressures is extremely efficient at eliminating carbon dioxide and raising pH in the newborn infant with acute respiratory failure. Improvement in oxygenation requires a strategy of sustained or repetitive inflations to 25 to 30 cm H2O in order to place the lung on the deflation limb of the pressure-volume curve. This strategy has also been shown to decrease the amount of secondary lung injury in animal models. Experience of the use of HFO ventilation as a rescue therapy as well as several published controlled trials have shown improved outcomes and a decrease in the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation when it has been used in newborns.

  9. Upscaling of Perovskite Solar Cells: Fully Ambient Roll Processing of Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells with Printed Back Electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Thomas Mikael; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Carlé, Jon Eggert

    2015-01-01

    A scaling effort on perovskite solar cells is presented where the device manufacture is progressed onto fl exible substrates using scalable techniques such as slot-die roll coating under ambient conditions. The printing of the back electrode using both carbon and silver is essential to the scaling...... device type and active area realized using slot-die coating on fl exible ITO-polyethyleneterphthalate (PET) with a printed back electrode gives a PCE of 4.9%....

  10. Advanced Extremely High Frequency Satellite (AEHF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    High Frequency Satellite (AEHF) is a joint service satellite communications system that provides global , survivable, secure, protected, and jam...three satellites fully integrated into the Milstar constellation. October 2014: On October 16, 2014, the program received PEO certification for the...Combined Orbital Operation, Logistics Sustainment ( COOLS ) contract, it will be completed and coordinated in CY 2016. The AEHF system being sustained

  11. Fully inkjet-printed microfluidics: a solution to low-cost rapid three-dimensional microfluidics fabrication with numerous electrical and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenjing; Cook, Benjamin S.; Fang, Yunnan; Tentzeris, Manos M.

    2016-10-01

    As the needs for low-cost rapidly-produced microfluidics are growing with the trend of Lab-on-a-Chip and distributed healthcare, the fully inkjet-printing of microfluidics can be a solution to it with numerous potential electrical and sensing applications. Inkjet-printing is an additive manufacturing technique featuring no material waste and a low equipment cost. Moreover, similar to other additive manufacturing techniques, inkjet-printing is easy to learn and has a high fabrication speed, while it offers generally a great planar resolution down to below 20 µm and enables flexible designs due to its inherent thin film deposition capabilities. Due to the thin film feature, the printed objects also usually obtain a high vertical resolution (such as 4.6 µm). This paper introduces a low-cost rapid three-dimensional fabrication process of microfluidics, that relies entirely on an inkjet-printer based single platform and can be implemented directly on top of virtually any substrates.

  12. Extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Vigliano, David; Coleman, Phillip Dale; Williams, Jeffery Thomas; Wouters, Gregg A.; Bacon, Larry Donald; Mar, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this work was to understand the fundamental physics of extremely high frequency RF effects on electronics. To accomplish this objective, we produced models, conducted simulations, and performed measurements to identify the mechanisms of effects as frequency increases into the millimeter-wave regime. Our purpose was to answer the questions, 'What are the tradeoffs between coupling, transmission losses, and device responses as frequency increases?', and, 'How high in frequency do effects on electronic systems continue to occur?' Using full wave electromagnetics codes and a transmission-line/circuit code, we investigated how extremely high-frequency RF propagates on wires and printed circuit board traces. We investigated both field-to-wire coupling and direct illumination of printed circuit boards to determine the significant mechanisms for inducing currents at device terminals. We measured coupling to wires and attenuation along wires for comparison to the simulations, looking at plane-wave coupling as it launches modes onto single and multiconductor structures. We simulated the response of discrete and integrated circuit semiconductor devices to those high-frequency currents and voltages, using SGFramework, the open-source General-purpose Semiconductor Simulator (gss), and Sandia's Charon semiconductor device physics codes. This report documents our findings.

  13. Flexible hybrid circuit fully inkjet-printed: Surface mount devices assembled by silver nanoparticles-based inkjet ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrese, J.; Vescio, G.; Xuriguera, E.; Medina-Rodriguez, B.; Cornet, A.; Cirera, A.

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, inkjet-printed devices such as transistors are still unstable in air and have poor performances. Moreover, the present electronics applications require a high degree of reliability and quality of their properties. In order to accomplish these application requirements, hybrid electronics is fulfilled by combining the advantages of the printing technologies with the surface-mount technology. In this work, silver nanoparticle-based inkjet ink (AgNP ink) is used as a novel approach to connect surface-mount devices (SMDs) onto inkjet-printed pads, conducted by inkjet printing technology. Excellent quality AgNP ink-junctions are ensured with high resolution picoliter drop jetting at low temperature (˜150 °C). Electrical, mechanical, and morphological characterizations are carried out to assess the performance of the AgNP ink junction. Moreover, AgNP ink is compared with common benchmark materials (i.e., silver epoxy and solder). Electrical contact resistance characterization shows a similar performance between the AgNP ink and the usual ones. Mechanical characterization shows comparable shear strength for AgNP ink and silver epoxy, and both present higher adhesion than solder. Morphological inspections by field-emission scanning electron microscopy confirm a high quality interface of the silver nanoparticle interconnection. Finally, a flexible hybrid circuit on paper controlled by an Arduino board is manufactured, demonstrating the viability and scalability of the AgNP ink assembling technique.

  14. Fully solution-processed organic light-emitting electrochemical cells (OLEC) with inkjet-printed micro-lenses for disposable lab-on-chip applications at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Zhe; Pabst, Oliver; Beckert, Erik; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Microfluidic lab-on-chip devices can be used for chemical and biological analyses such as DNA tests or environmental monitoring. Such devices integrate most of the basic functionalities needed for scientific analysis on a microfluidic chip. When using such devices, cost and space-intensive lab equipment is no longer necessary. However, in order to make a monolithic and cost-efficient/disposable microfluidic sensing device, direct integration of the excitation light source for fluorescent sensing is often required. To achieve this, we introduce a fully solution processable deviation of OLEDs, organic light-emitting electrochemical cells (OLECs), as a low-cost excitation light source for a disposable microfluidic sensing platform. By mixing metal ions and a solid electrolyte with light-emitting polymers as active materials, an in-situ doping and in-situ PN-junction can be generated within a three layer sandwich device. Thanks to this doping effect, work function adaptation is not necessary and air-stable electrode can be used. An ambient manufacturing process for fully solution-processed OLECs is presented, which consist of a spin-coated blue light-emitting polymer plus dopants on an ITO cathode and an inkjet-printed PEDOT:PSS transparent top anode. A fully transparent blue OLEC is able to obtain light intensity > 2500 cd/m2 under pulsed driving mode and maintain stable after 1000 cycles, which fulfils requirements for simple fluorescent on-chip sensing applications. However, because of the large refractive index difference between substrates and air, about 80% of emitted light is trapped inside the device. Therefore, inkjet printed micro-lenses on the rear side are introduced here to further increase light-emitting brightness.

  15. High-frequency magnetic components

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2009-01-01

    If you are looking for a complete study of the fundamental concepts in magnetic theory, read this book. No other textbook covers magnetic components of inductors and transformers for high-frequency applications in detail. This unique text examines design techniques of the major types of inductors and transformers used for a wide variety of high-frequency applications including switching-mode power supplies (SMPS) and resonant circuits. It describes skin effect and proximity effect in detail to provide you with a sound understanding of high-frequency phenomena. As well as this, you will disco

  16. A Fully Developed Flow Thermofluid Model for Topology Optimization of 3D-Printed Air-Cooled Heat Exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haertel, Jan Hendrik Klaas; Nellis, Gregory F.

    2017-01-01

    . The conductance of the heat exchanger is maximized for a prescribed pressure drop and prescribed air-side temperature change across the heat exchanger. Polymer with infilled thermally conducting metal filaments is considered as the heat exchanger material which allows cost effective additive manufacturing...... optimized slot channel model in order to demonstrate the superior performance of the topology optimized designs. Thus, this work demonstrates the usefulness of topology optimization to fully exploit the design freedom afforded by additive manufacturing technologies....

  17. High-frequency seafloor acoustics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jackson, D. R; Richardson, M. D

    2007-01-01

    This title provides access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics...

  18. Geographies of High Frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grindsted, Thomas Skou

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the geographies of high frequency trading. Today shares shift hands within micro seconds, giving rise to a form of financial geographies termed algorithmic capitalism. This notion refers to the different spatio-temporalities produced by high frequency trading, under...... the valuation of time. As high frequency trading accelerates financial markets, the paper examines the spatio-temporalities of automated trading by the ways in which the speed of knowledge exploitation in financial markets is not only of interest, but also the expansion between different temporalities....... The paper demonstrates how the intensification of time-space compression produces radical new dynamics in the financial market and develops information rent in HFT as convertible to a time rent and a spatio-temporal rent. The final section discusses whether high frequency trading only responds to crises...

  19. High-frequency Trader Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian; Lange, Ann-Christina

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we examine the recent shift in financial markets toward high-frequency trading (HFT). This turn is being legitimized with reference to how algorithms are allegedly more rational and efficient than human traders, and less prone to emotionally motivated decisions. We argue...... that although HFT does not render humans irrelevant, it is leading to a reconfiguration of both the ideal trading subject and the human–machine relations. Drawing on interviews with and ethnographic observations of high-frequency traders, as well as HFT ‘how to’ books, we analyze the subjectivity and self......-techniques of the ideal high-frequency trader. We demonstrate that these traders face the challenge of avoiding emotional interference in their algorithms and that they deploy a set of disciplinary self-techniques to curb the importance of emotional attachment....

  20. High-frequency complex pitch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Harmonics in a complex tone are typically considered unresolved when they interact with neighboring harmonics in the cochlea and cannot be heard out separately. Recent studies have suggested that the low pitch evoked by unresolved high-frequency harmonics may be coded via temporal fine-structure ......Harmonics in a complex tone are typically considered unresolved when they interact with neighboring harmonics in the cochlea and cannot be heard out separately. Recent studies have suggested that the low pitch evoked by unresolved high-frequency harmonics may be coded via temporal fine...

  1. High-frequency Trading, Algorithmic Finance, and the Flash Crash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The Flash Crash of 6 May 2010 has an interesting status in discussions of high-frequency trading, i.e. fully automated, superfast computerized trading: it is invoked both as an important illustration of how this field of algorithmic trading operates and, more often, as an example of how fully aut...

  2. Scalable single point power extraction for compact mobile and stand-alone solar harvesting power sources based on fully printed organic photovoltaic modules and efficient high voltage DC/DC conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia Valverde, Rafael; Villarejo, José A.; Hösel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Patterns for fully printed polymer solar cells are presented that inherently enable scaling of the power output with single point electrical energy connection is presented. Connection is made to only one end of the printed foil that can be rolled out for light energy harvesting. The power level...... is simply increased/decreased by increasing/decreasing the length of the foil with a corresponding increase/decrease in operating voltage. The current flow runs in both directions along the printed foil thus alleviating the need for post process addition of complex busbar topologies. The power conversion...... takes place in a HVDC–DC converter that is tailored specifically for operation with polymer solar cells by regulation on the input side. The system charges a lithium-polymer battery thus enabling storage of 82 Wh for a printed OPV foil measuring 0.305 m×9 m having a nominal power output of at least 15 W...

  3. High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, Darrell R

    2007-01-01

    High-Frequency Seafloor Acoustics is the first book in a new series sponsored by the Office of Naval Research on the latest research in underwater acoustics. This exciting new title provides ready access to experimental data, theory, and models relevant to high-frequency seafloor acoustics and will be of interest to sonar engineers and researchers working in underwater acoustics. The physical characteristics of the seafloor affecting acoustic propagation and scattering are covered, including physical and geoacoustic properties and surface roughness. Current theories for acoustic propagation in sediments are presented along with corresponding models for reflection, scattering, and seafloor penetration. The main text is backed up by an extensive bibliography and technical appendices.

  4. High frequency trading and fragility

    OpenAIRE

    Cespa, Giovanni; Vives, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    We show that limited dealer participation in the market, coupled with an informational friction resulting from high frequency trading, can induce demand for liquidity to be upward sloping and strategic complementarities in traders’ liquidity consumption decisions: traders demand more liquidity when the market becomes less liquid, which in turn makes the market more illiquid, fostering the initial demand hike. This can generate market instability, where an initial dearth of liquidity degenerat...

  5. High-frequency magnetic components

    CERN Document Server

    Kazimierczuk, Marian K

    2013-01-01

    A unique text on the theory and design fundaments of inductors and transformers, updated with more coverage on the optimization of magnetic devices and many new design examples The first edition is popular among a very broad audience of readers in different areas of engineering and science. This book covers the theory and design techniques of the major types of high-frequency power inductors and transformers for a variety of applications, including switching-mode power supplies (SMPS) and resonant dc-to-ac power inverters and dc-to-dc power converters. It describes eddy-current phenomena (su

  6. Plasma effects in high frequency radiative transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, C. T.

    1981-02-01

    A survey of collective plasma processes which can affect the transfer of high frequency radiation in a hot dense plasma is given. For pedagogical reasons plasma processes are examined by relating them to a particular reference plasma which consists of fully ionized carbon at a temperature kT = 1 KeV (ten million degrees Kelvin) and an electron density N = 3 x 10 to the 23rd power/cu cm, (which corresponds to a mass density rho = 1 gm/cu cm) and an ion density N sub i = 5 x 10 to the 22nd power/cu cm. The transport of photons, ranging from 1 eV to 1 KeV in energy, in such plasmas is considered. Such photons are to be used as diagnostic probes of hot dense laboratory plasmas.

  7. High frequency welded (ERW) casing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duisberg, J. (Hoesch Roehrenwerke A.G., Hamm (Germany, F.R.))

    1980-09-01

    Due to the up-to-date standard in welding and testing techniques, the significance of ERW-casing is growing rapidly. The basic items of ERW-pipe are explained in detail. The forming mechanism, the high frequency welding by induction and contact welding processes is explained in detail as well as destructive and non-destructive testing methods. Finishing the ends as threading, thread control (gauging), power tight connection, pressure test and final quality control are rounding up the picture of the production of ERW-casing. Last but not least the test results from the joint strength- and collapse tests which are of outstanding interest for casings, are compared with API requirements in order to demonstrate compliance with API requirements.

  8. High Frequency Linacs for Hadrontherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaldi, Ugo; Braccini, Saverio; Puggioni, Paolo

    The use of radiofrequency linacs for hadrontherapy was proposed about 20 years ago, but only recently has it been understood that the high repetition rate together with the possibility of very rapid energy variations offers an optimal solution to the present challenge of hadrontherapy: "paint" a moving tumor target in three dimensions with a pencil beam. Moreover, the fact that the energy, and thus the particle range, can be electronically adjusted implies that no absorber-based energy selection system is needed, which, in the case of cyclotron-based centers, is the cause of material activation. On the other side, a linac consumes less power than a synchrotron. The first part of this article describes the main advantages of high frequency linacs in hadrontherapy, the early design studies, and the construction and test of the first high-gradient prototype which accelerated protons. The second part illustrates some technical issues relevant to the design of copper standing wave accelerators, the present developments, and two designs of linac-based proton and carbon ion facilities. Superconductive linacs are not discussed, since nanoampere currents are sufficient for therapy. In the last two sections, a comparison with circular accelerators and an overview of future projects are presented.

  9. Econometrics of financial high-frequency data

    CERN Document Server

    Hautsch, Nikolaus

    2011-01-01

    This book covers major approaches in high-frequency econometrics. It discusses implementation details, provides insights into properties of high-frequency data as well as institutional settings and presents applications.

  10. High Frequency Chandler Wobble Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, F.; Stuck, J.; Thomas, M.

    2003-04-01

    and OMCT forcing fields give no hint for increased excitation power in the Chandler band. Thus it is assumed, that continuous high frequency excitation due to stochastic weather phenomena is responsible for the perpetuation of the Chandler wobble.

  11. Very High Frequency Switch-Mode Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre

    The importance of technology and electronics in our daily life is constantly increasing. At the same time portability and energy efficiency are currently some of the hottest topics. This creates a huge need for power converters in a compact form factor and with high efficiency, which can supply...... these electronic devices. This calls for new technologies in order to miniaturize the power electronics of today. One way to do this is by increasing the switching frequency dramatically and develop very high frequency switch mode power supplies. If these converters can be designed to operate efficiently, a huge...... of technologies for very high frequency switch mode power supplies. At these highly elevated frequencies normal bulky magnetics with heavy cores consisting of rare earth materials, can be replaced by air core inductors embedded in the printed circuit board. This is investigated thoroughly and both spirals...

  12. 78 FR 70567 - Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-26

    ...] Nationwide Use of High Frequency and Ultra High Frequency Active SONAR Technology; Final Programmatic... Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) for the Nationwide Use of High Frequency (HF) and Ultra High Frequency (UHF) Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR) Technology and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI...

  13. Overview of the Advanced High Frequency Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the competencies, selected areas of research and technology development activities, and current external collaborative efforts of the NASA Glenn Research Center's Advanced High Frequency Branch.

  14. High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gaoyang; ZHANG Zhijing; ZHANG Weimin; TANG Xinglun

    2007-01-01

    In the process of machining ultrathin metal structure parts,the signal composition of high frequency group pulse,the influence of frequency to reverse current,and the design of the cathode in high frequency group pulse electrochemical machining (HGPECM) are discussed.The experiments on process were carried out.Results indicate that HGPECM can greatly improve the characteristics of the inter-electrode gap flow field,reduce electrode passivation,and obtain high machining quality.The machining quality is obviously improved by increasing the main pulse frequency.The dimensional accuracy reaches 30-40 pro and the roughness attained is at 0.30-0.35 μm.High frequency group pulse electrochemical machining can be successfully used in machining micro-parts.

  15. High frequency and pulse scattering physical acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Pierce, Allan D

    1992-01-01

    High Frequency and Pulse Scattering investigates high frequency and pulse scattering, with emphasis on the phenomenon of echoes from objects. Geometrical and catastrophe optics methods in scattering are discussed, along with the scattering of sound pulses and the ringing of target resonances. Caustics and associated diffraction catastrophes are also examined.Comprised of two chapters, this volume begins with a detailed account of geometrically based approximation methods in scattering theory, focusing on waves transmitted through fluid and elastic scatterers and glory scattering; surface ray r

  16. Inkjet printing of UHF antennas on corrugated cardboards for packaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowade, Enrico, E-mail: enrico.sowade@mb.tu-chemnitz.de [Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany); Göthel, Frank [Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany); Zichner, Ralf [Department Printed Functionalities, Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Chemnitz (Germany); Baumann, Reinhard R. [Digital Printing and Imaging Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, Chemnitz (Germany); Department Printed Functionalities, Fraunhofer Institute for Electronic Nano Systems (ENAS), Chemnitz (Germany)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • Inkjet printing of UHF antennas on cardboard substrates. • Development of primer layer to compensate the absorptiveness of the cardboard and the rough surface. • Manufacturing of UHF antennas in a fully digital manner for packaging applications. - Abstract: In this study, a method based on inkjet printing has been established to develop UHF antennas on a corrugated cardboard for packaging applications. The use of such a standardized, paper-based packaging substrate as material for printing electronics is challenging in terms of its high surface roughness and high ink absorption rate, especially when depositing very thin films with inkjet printing technology. However, we could obtain well-defined silver layers on the cardboard substrates due to a primer layer approach. The primer layer is based on a UV-curable ink formulation and deposited as well as the silver ink with inkjet printing technology. Industrial relevant printheads were chosen for the deposition of the materials. The usage of inkjet printing allows highest flexibility in terms of pattern design. The primer layer was proven to optimize the surface characteristics of the substrate, mainly reducing the surface roughness and water absorptiveness. Thanks to the primer layer approach, ultra-high-frequency (UHF) radio-frequency identification (RFID) antennas were deposited by inkjet printing on the corrugated cardboards. Along with the characterization and interpretation of electrical properties of the established conductive antenna patterns, the performance of the printed antennas were analyzed in detail by measuring the scattering parameter S{sub 11} and the antenna gain.

  17. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Zhao, Yiping; Holland, Herman J.; Burger, Johannes Faas; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency

  18. Investigation of high-frequency pipe welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Nikolai A.; Lakhno, Nikolay I.; Gushchin, A. G.; Putryk, N. D.; Kovalenko, Vladimir I.; Galkina, V. A.; Veselovsky, Vladimir B.; Furmanov, Valeri B.; Kovika, Nikolai D.; Novikov, Leonid V.; Shcherbina, V. N.

    1993-01-01

    For investigation of a pipe welding process at high-frequency heating aimed at increasing of pipe quality and decreasing of spoilage, the use of high-speed recording and TV-technique is considered to be effective. The authors have created a visual inspection system for pipe welding process studies at a tube mill of the Novomoskovsk Pipe Plant.

  19. High frequency dynamics in centrifugal compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twerda, A.; Meulendijks, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.; Handel, R. van den; Lier, L.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Problems with centrifugal compressors relating to high frequency, i.e. Blade passing frequency (BPF) are increasing. Pulsations and vibrations generated in centrifugal compressors can lead to nuisance, due to strong tonal noise, and even breakdown. In several cases the root cause of a failure or a

  20. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, Srinivas; ter Brake, Hermanus J.M.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Zhao, Yiping; Holland, Herman J.; Burger, Johannes Faas; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pre

  1. High frequency dynamics in centrifugal compressors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Twerda, A.; Meulendijks, D.; Smeulers, J.P.M.; Handel, R. van den; Lier, L.J. van

    2008-01-01

    Problems with centrifugal compressors relating to high frequency, i.e. Blade passing frequency (BPF) are increasing. Pulsations and vibrations generated in centrifugal compressors can lead to nuisance, due to strong tonal noise, and even breakdown. In several cases the root cause of a failure or a n

  2. High Frequency Trading, Information, and Takeovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphery-Jenner, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper (1) proposes new variables to detect informed high-frequency trading (HFT), (2) shows that HFT can help to predict takeover targets, and (3) shows that HFT in uences target announcement announcement returns. Prior literature suggests that informed trade may occur before takeovers, but has

  3. High frequency pressure oscillator for microcryocoolers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanapalli, S.; Brake, ter H.J.M.; Jansen, H.V.; Zhao, Y.; Holland, H.J.; Burger, J.F.; Elwenspoek, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    Microminiature pulse tube cryocoolers should operate at a frequency of an order higher than the conventional macro ones because the pulse tube cryocooler operating frequency scales inversely with the square of the pulse tube diameter. In this paper, the design and experiments of a high frequency pre

  4. Essays on high frequency financial econometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    X. Yang

    2015-01-01

    It has long been demonstrated that continuous-time methods are powerful tools in financial modeling. Yet only in recent years, their counterparts in empirical analysis—high frequency econometrics—began to emerge with the availability of intra-day data and relevant statistical tools. This dissertatio

  5. Essays on high frequency financial econometrics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been demonstrated that continuous-time methods are powerful tools in financial modeling. Yet only in recent years, their counterparts in empirical analysis—high frequency econometrics—began to emerge with the availability of intra-day data and relevant statistical tools. This

  6. High frequency III-V nanowire MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Erik

    2016-09-01

    III-V nanowire transistors are promising candidates for very high frequency electronics applications. The improved electrostatics originating from the gate-all-around geometry allow for more aggressive scaling as compared with planar field-effect transistors, and this can lead to device operation at very high frequencies. The very high mobility possible with In-rich devices can allow very high device performance at low operating voltages. GaN nanowires can take advantage of the large band gap for high voltage operation. In this paper, we review the basic physics and device performance of nanowire field- effect transistors relevant for high frequency performance. First, the geometry of lateral and vertical nanowire field-effect transistors is introduced, with special emphasis on the parasitic capacitances important for nanowire geometries. The basic important high frequency transistor metrics are introduced. Secondly, the scaling properties of gate-all-around nanowire transistors are introduced, based on geometric length scales, demonstrating the scaling possibilities of nanowire transistors. Thirdly, to model nanowire transistor performance, a two-band non-parabolic ballistic transistor model is used to efficiently calculate the current and transconductance as a function of band gap and nanowire size. The intrinsic RF metrics are also estimated. Finally, experimental state-of-the-art nanowire field-effect transistors are reviewed and benchmarked, lateral and vertical transistor geometries are explored, and different fabrication routes are highlighted. Lateral devices have demonstrated operation up to 350 GHz, and vertical devices up to 155 GHz.

  7. High Frequency Trading, Information, and Takeovers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphery-Jenner, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper (1) proposes new variables to detect informed high-frequency trading (HFT), (2) shows that HFT can help to predict takeover targets, and (3) shows that HFT in uences target announcement announcement returns. Prior literature suggests that informed trade may occur before takeovers, but has

  8. Factors controlling high-frequency radiation from extended ruptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresnev, Igor A.

    2017-09-01

    Small-scale slip heterogeneity or variations in rupture velocity on the fault plane are often invoked to explain the high-frequency radiation from earthquakes. This view has no theoretical basis, which follows, for example, from the representation integral of elasticity, an exact solution for the radiated wave field. The Fourier transform, applied to the integral, shows that the seismic spectrum is fully controlled by that of the source time function, while the distribution of final slip and rupture acceleration/deceleration only contribute to directivity. This inference is corroborated by the precise numerical computation of the full radiated field from the representation integral. We compare calculated radiation from four finite-fault models: (1) uniform slip function with low slip velocity, (2) slip function spatially modulated by a sinusoidal function, (3) slip function spatially modulated by a sinusoidal function with random roughness added, and (4) uniform slip function with high slip velocity. The addition of "asperities," both regular and irregular, does not cause any systematic increase in the spectral level of high-frequency radiation, except for the creation of maxima due to constructive interference. On the other hand, an increase in the maximum rate of slip on the fault leads to highly amplified high frequencies, in accordance with the prediction on the basis of a simple point-source treatment of the fault. Hence, computations show that the temporal rate of slip, not the spatial heterogeneity on faults, is the predominant factor forming the high-frequency radiation and thus controlling the velocity and acceleration of the resulting ground motions.

  9. A fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of the Metabolic Tumor Volume from PET images: validation on 3D printed anthropomorphic oncological lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallivanone, F.; Interlenghi, M.; Canervari, C.; Castiglioni, I.

    2016-01-01

    18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a standard functional diagnostic technique to in vivo image cancer. Different quantitative paramters can be extracted from PET images and used as in vivo cancer biomarkers. Between PET biomarkers Metabolic Tumor Volume (MTV) has gained an important role in particular considering the development of patient-personalized radiotherapy treatment for non-homogeneous dose delivery. Different imaging processing methods have been developed to define MTV. The different proposed PET segmentation strategies were validated in ideal condition (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration), while the majority of cancer lesions doesn't fulfill these requirements. In this context, this work has a twofold objective: 1) to implement and optimize a fully automatic, threshold-based segmentation method for the estimation of MTV, feasible in clinical practice 2) to develop a strategy to obtain anthropomorphic phantoms, including non-spherical and non-uniform objects, miming realistic oncological patient conditions. The developed PET segmentation algorithm combines an automatic threshold-based algorithm for the definition of MTV and a k-means clustering algorithm for the estimation of the background. The method is based on parameters always available in clinical studies and was calibrated using NEMA IQ Phantom. Validation of the method was performed both in ideal (e.g. in spherical objects with uniform radioactivity concentration) and non-ideal (e.g. in non-spherical objects with a non-uniform radioactivity concentration) conditions. The strategy to obtain a phantom with synthetic realistic lesions (e.g. with irregular shape and a non-homogeneous uptake) consisted into the combined use of standard anthropomorphic phantoms commercially and irregular molds generated using 3D printer technology and filled with a radioactive chromatic alginate. The proposed segmentation algorithm was feasible in a

  10. High-current, high-frequency capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renz, D. D.

    1983-06-01

    The NASA Lewis high-current, high-frequency capacitor development program was conducted under a contract with Maxwell Laboratories, Inc., San Diego, California. The program was started to develop power components for space power systems. One of the components lacking was a high-power, high-frequency capacitor. Some of the technology developed in this program may be directly usable in an all-electric airplane. The materials used in the capacitor included the following: the film is polypropylene, the impregnant is monoisopropyl biphenyl, the conductive epoxy is Emerson and Cuming Stycast 2850 KT, the foil is aluminum, the case is stainless steel (304), and the electrode is a modified copper-ceramic.

  11. High frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Abukari

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on theoretical analysis of high frequency conductivity in carbon nanotubes. Using the kinetic equation with constant relaxation time, an analytical expression for the complex conductivity is obtained. The real part of the complex conductivity is initially negative at zero frequency and become more negative with increasing frequency, until it reaches a resonance minimum at ω ∼ ωB for metallic zigzag CNs and ω < ωB for armchair CNs. This resonance enhancement is indicative for terahertz gain without the formation of current instabilities induced by negative dc conductivity. We noted that due to the high density of states of conduction electrons in metallic zigzag carbon nanotubes and the specific dispersion law inherent in hexagonal crystalline structure result in a uniquely high frequency conductivity than the corresponding values for metallic armchair carbon nanotubes. We suggest that this phenomenon can be used to suppress current instabilities that are normally associated with a negative dc differential conductivity.

  12. High-Frequency Percussive Ventilation Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    physiologic and clin- ical outcomes. Pediatric and adult inhalational injury studies have linked HFPV to an improvement in static lung compliance...sedation–analgesic combinations (usually fentanyl with the individual or combined use of midazolam and propofol and/or dexmedetomidine), patient...1998;84:1174–7. 34. Frantz ID III, Close RH. Alveolar pressure swings during high frequency ventilation in rabbits. Pediatr Res 1985;19:162–6. 35. Pillow

  13. Ionospheric modifications in high frequency heating experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Spencer P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Polytechnic School of Engineering, New York University, 5 MetroTech Center, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Featured observations in high-frequency (HF) heating experiments conducted at Arecibo, EISCAT, and high frequency active auroral research program are discussed. These phenomena appearing in the F region of the ionosphere include high-frequency heater enhanced plasma lines, airglow enhancement, energetic electron flux, artificial ionization layers, artificial spread-F, ionization enhancement, artificial cusp, wideband absorption, short-scale (meters) density irregularities, and stimulated electromagnetic emissions, which were observed when the O-mode HF heater waves with frequencies below foF2 were applied. The implication and associated physical mechanism of each observation are discussed and explained. It is shown that these phenomena caused by the HF heating are all ascribed directly or indirectly to the excitation of parametric instabilities which instigate anomalous heating. Formulation and analysis of parametric instabilities are presented. The results show that oscillating two stream instability and parametric decay instability can be excited by the O-mode HF heater waves, transmitted from all three heating facilities, in the regions near the HF reflection height and near the upper hybrid resonance layer. The excited Langmuir waves, upper hybrid waves, ion acoustic waves, lower hybrid waves, and field-aligned density irregularities set off subsequent wave-wave and wave-electron interactions, giving rise to the observed phenomena.

  14. High-Frequency Rayleigh-Wave Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianghai Xia; Richard D Millerg; Xu Yixian; Luo Yinhe; Chen Chao; Liu Jiangping; Julian Ivanov; Chong Zeng

    2009-01-01

    High-frequency (≥2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave data acquired with a multichannei recording sys-tem have been utilized to determine shear (S)-wave velocities in near-surface geophysics since the early 1980s. This overview article discusses the main research results of high-frequency surface-wave tech-niques achieved by research groups at the Kansas Geological Survey and China University of Geosciences in the last 15 years. The multichannel analysis of surface wave (MASW) method is a nou-iuvasive acoustic approach to estimate near-surface S-wave velocity. The differences between MASW results and direct borehole measurements are approximately 15% or less and random. Studies show that simultaneous inversion with higher modes and the fundamental mode can increase model resolution and an investigation depth. The other important seismic property, quality factor (Q), can also be estimated with the MASW method by inverting attenuation coefficients of Rayleigh waves. An inverted model (S-wave velocity or Q) obtained using a damped least-squares method can be assessed by an optimal damping vector in a vicinity of the inverted model determined by an objective function, which is the trace of a weighted sum of model-resolution and model-covariance matrices. Current developments include modeling high-frequency Rayleigh-waves in near-surface media, which builds a foundation for shallow seismic or Rayleigh-wave inversion in the time-offset domain; imaging dispersive energy with high resolution in the frequency-velocity domain and possibly with data in an arbitrary acquisition geometry, which opens a door for 3D surface-wave techniques; and successfully separating surface-wave modes, which provides a valuable tool to perform S-wave velocity profiling with high-horizontal resolution.

  15. Evolution of Very High Frequency Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Kamby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in radio frequency transmission equipment helps to overcome those. However those circuits were not designed to meet the same requirements as power converters. This paper summarizes the contributions in recent years in application of very high frequency (VHF) technologies in power electronics, shows results......The ongoing demand for smaller and lighter power supplies is driving the motivation to increase the switching frequencies of power converters. Drastic increases however come along with new challenges, namely the increase of switching losses in all components. The application of power circuits used...

  16. Advances in Very High Frequency Power Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Milovan

    . Excellent performance and small size of magnetic components and capacitors at very high frequencies, along with constant advances in performance of power semiconductor devices, suggests a sizable shift in consumer power supplies market into this area in the near future. To operate dc-dc converter power...... to be applied, especially at low power levels where gating loss becomes a significant percentage of the total loss budget. Various resonant gate drive methods have been proposed to address this design challenge, with varying size, cost, and complexity. This dissertation presents a self-oscillating resonant gate...

  17. Cultures of High-frequency Trading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lange, Ann-Christina; Lenglet, Marc; Seyfert, Robert

    2016-01-01

    As part of ongoing work to lay a foundation for social studies of high-frequency trading (HFT), this paper introduces the culture(s) of HFT as a sociological problem relating to knowledge and practice. HFT is often discussed as a purely technological development, where all that matters is the speed...... of allocating, processing and transmitting data. Indeed, the speed at which trades are executed and data transmitted is accelerating, and it is fair to say that algorithms are now the primary interacting agents operating in the financial markets. However, we contend that HFT is first and foremost a cultural...

  18. The LASI high-frequency ellipticity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternberg, B.K.; Poulton, M.M. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A high-frequency, high-resolution, electromagnetic (EM) imaging system has been developed for environmental geophysics surveys. Some key features of this system include: (1) rapid surveying to allow dense spatial sampling over a large area, (2) high-accuracy measurements which are used to produce a high-resolution image of the subsurface, (3) measurements which have excellent signal-to-noise ratio over a wide bandwidth (31 kHz to 32 MHz), (4) large-scale physical modeling to produce accurate theoretical responses over targets of interest in environmental geophysics surveys, (5) rapid neural network interpretation at the field site, and (6) visualization of complex structures during the survey.

  19. Vertical Nanowire High-Frequency Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores a novel transistor technology based on vertical InAs nanowires, which could be considered both for low-power high-frequency analog applications and for replacing Si CMOS in the continued scaling of digital electronics. The potential of this device - the vertical InAs nanowire MOSFET – lies in the combination of the outstanding transport properties of InAs and the improved electrostatic control of the gate-all-around geometry. Three generations of the vertical InAs nanowir...

  20. Vertical Nanowire High-Frequency Transistors

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores a novel transistor technology based on vertical InAs nanowires, which could be considered both for low-power high-frequency analog applications and for replacing Si CMOS in the continued scaling of digital electronics. The potential of this device - the vertical InAs nanowire MOSFET – lies in the combination of the outstanding transport properties of InAs and the improved electrostatic control of the gate-all-around geometry. Three generations of the vertical InAs nano...

  1. Leaf Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Charles W.

    1985-01-01

    Using many different media, students can turn leaves into images which can be used for study, bulletin boards, collections, and identification. The simple techniques described include pastel printing, smoke prints, ink or tempura printing, bleach printing on t-shirts, ditto machine printing using carbon paper, and making cutouts. (DH)

  2. High frequency characterization of conductive inks embedded within a structural composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pa, Peter; McCauley, Raymond; Larimore, Zachary; Mills, Matthew; Yarlaggada, Shridhar; Mirotznik, Mark S.

    2015-06-01

    Woven fabric composites provide an attractive platform for integrating electromagnetic functionality—such as conformal load-bearing antennas and frequency selective surfaces—into a structural platform. One practical fabrication method for integrating conductive elements within a woven fabric composite system involves using additive manufacturing systems such as screen printing. While screen printing is an inherently scalable, flexible and cost effective method, little is known about the high frequency electrical properties of its conductive inks when they are embedded within the woven fabric composite. Thus, we have completed numerical and experimental studies to determine the electrical conductivity of screen printable conductive inks that are embedded within this composite. We have also performed mechanical studies to evaluate how printing affects the structural performance of the composite.

  3. Parametric nanomechanical amplification at very high frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabalin, R B; Feng, X L; Roukes, M L

    2009-09-01

    Parametric resonance and amplification are important in both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here we report very high frequency (VHF) parametric resonators and mechanical-domain amplifiers based on nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS). Compound mechanical nanostructures patterned by multilayer, top-down nanofabrication are read out by a novel scheme that parametrically modulates longitudinal stress in doubly clamped beam NEMS resonators. Parametric pumping and signal amplification are demonstrated for VHF resonators up to approximately 130 MHz and provide useful enhancement of both resonance signal amplitude and quality factor. We find that Joule heating and reduced thermal conductance in these nanostructures ultimately impose an upper limit to device performance. We develop a theoretical model to account for both the parametric response and nonequilibrium thermal transport in these composite nanostructures. The results closely conform to our experimental observations, elucidate the frequency and threshold-voltage scaling in parametric VHF NEMS resonators and sensors, and establish the ultimate sensitivity limits of this approach.

  4. Solar coronal observations at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Katsiyannis, A C; Phillips, K J H; Williams, D R; Keenan, F P

    2001-01-01

    The Solar Eclipse Coronal Imaging System (SECIS) is a simple and extremely fast, high-resolution imaging instrument designed for studies of the solar corona. Light from the corona (during, for example, a total solar eclipse) is reflected off a heliostat and passes via a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope and beam splitter to two CCD cameras capable of imaging at 60 frames a second. The cameras are attached via SCSI connections to a purpose-built PC that acts as the data acquisition and storage system. Each optical channel has a different filter allowing observations of the same events in both white light and in the green line (Fe XIV at 5303 A). Wavelet analysis of the stabilized images has revealed high frequency oscillations which may make a significant contribution on the coronal heating process. In this presentation we give an outline of the instrument and its future development.

  5. High-frequency micromechanical columnar resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Kehrbusch, Elena A Ilin, Peter Bozek, Bernhard Radzio and Egbert Oesterschulze

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency silicon columnar microresonators are fabricated using a simple but effective technological scheme. An optimized fabrication scheme was invented to obtain mechanically protected microcolumns with lateral dimensions controlled on a scale of at least 1 μm. In this paper, we investigate the influence of the environmental conditions on the mechanical resonator properties. At ambient conditions, we observed a frequency stability δf/f of less than 10−6 during 5 h of operation at almost constant temperature. However, varying the temperature shifts the frequency by approximately −173 Hz °C− 1. In accordance with a viscous damping model of the ambient gas, we perceived that the quality factor of the first flexural mode decreased with the inverse of the square root of pressure. However, in the low-pressure regime, a linear dependence was observed. We also investigated the influence of the type of the immersing gas on the resonant frequency.

  6. High-frequency lunar teleseismic events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, J.; Duennebier, F.; Ewing, M.; Lammlein, D.; Latham, G.

    1974-01-01

    A small number of seismic signals, including some of the strongest observed to date, have been identified as representing a fourth principal category of natural lunar seismic events with characteristics distinct from those produced by normal meteoroid impacts, deep moonquakes, and thermal moonquakes. These signals are much richer in high frequencies than other events observed at comparable distances, and display relatively impulsive P- and S-wave beginnings, indicating negligible seismic-wave scattering near the source. Source depths of these events may range between 0 and perhaps 300 km. These and other characteristics could represent either (1) meteoroids impacting upon outcrops of competent lunar crystal rock, (2) rare impacting objects that penetrate to competent rock below a scattering zone, or (3) shallow tectonic moonquakes.

  7. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zweiphenning, W. J E M; van 't Klooster, M. A.; van Diessen, E.; van Klink, N. E C; Huiskamp, G. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074463640; Gebbink, T. A.; Leijten, F. S S|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/152243054; Gosselaar, P. H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304813990; Otte, W. M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/168455706; Stam, C. J.; Braun, K. P J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/207237239; Zijlmans, G. J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304819581

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High frequency oscillations (HFOs; > 80 Hz), especially fast ripples (FRs, 250-500 Hz), are novel biomarkers for epileptogenic tissue. The pathophysiology suggests enhanced functional connectivity within FR generating tissue. Our aim was to determine the relation between brain areas

  8. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.J.E.M. Zweiphenning

    2016-01-01

    Significance: ‘Baseline’ high-frequency network parameters might help intra-operative recognition of epileptogenic tissue without the need for waiting for events. These findings can increase our understanding of the ‘architecture’ of epileptogenic networks and help unravel the pathophysiology of HFOs.

  9. Using Silver Nano-Particle Ink in Electrode Fabrication of High Frequency Copolymer Ultrasonic Transducers: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adit Decharat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High frequency polymer-based ultrasonic transducers are produced with electrodes thicknesses typical for printed electrodes obtained from silver (Ag nano-particle inks. An analytical three-port network is used to study the acoustic effects imposed by a thick electrode in a typical layered transducer configuration. Results from the network model are compared to experimental findings for the implemented transducer configuration, to obtain a better understanding of acoustical effects caused by the additional printed mass loading. The proposed investigation might be supportive of identification of suitable electrode-depositing methods. It is also believed to be useful as a feasibility study for printed Ag-based electrodes in high frequency transducers, which may reduce both the cost and production complexity of these devices.

  10. High-frequency graphene voltage amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shu-Jen; Jenkins, Keith A; Valdes Garcia, Alberto; Franklin, Aaron D; Bol, Ageeth A; Haensch, Wilfried

    2011-09-14

    While graphene transistors have proven capable of delivering gigahertz-range cutoff frequencies, applying the devices to RF circuits has been largely hindered by the lack of current saturation in the zero band gap graphene. Herein, the first high-frequency voltage amplifier is demonstrated using large-area chemical vapor deposition grown graphene. The graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has a 6-finger gate design with gate length of 500 nm. The graphene common-source amplifier exhibits ∼5 dB low frequency gain with the 3 dB bandwidth greater than 6 GHz. This first AC voltage gain demonstration of a GFET is attributed to the clear current saturation in the device, which is enabled by an ultrathin gate dielectric (4 nm HfO(2)) of the embedded gate structures. The device also shows extrinsic transconductance of 1.2 mS/μm at 1 V drain bias, the highest for graphene FETs using large-scale graphene reported to date.

  11. High frequency band crossings in ^168Lu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, D. G.; Li, Y.; Ma, W. C.; Amro, H.; Thompson, J.; Winger, J.; Hagemann, G.; Herskind, B.; Jensen, D.; Sletten, G.; Wilson, J.; Fallon, P.; Diamond, R.; Goergen, A.; Machiavelli, A.; Ward, D.; Hübel, H.; Domscheit, J.

    2003-10-01

    High spin states in ^168Lu were populated using the ^123Sb(^48Ca,3n) reaction at 203 MeV. The beam was provided by the 88" cyclotron at LBNL, and coincident gamma rays were detected with the Gammasphere spectrometer array. An analysis of the data which had been sorted into three- and four- dimensional histograms confirmed the four previously known (J.H.Ha et al. J. Phys. Soc. Japan 71 (2002) 1663-1671) pairs of signature partner bands and extended them to considerably higher spins (in one case up to a tentative 50 hbar). In addition, a new pair of signature partners, as well as a new doubly decoupled band were found. On the basis of the present data, the configuration of one of the known bands, previously assigned π d_3/2 øtimes ν i_13/2 was reassigned as π d_5/2 øtimes ν i_13/2. High frequency band crossings, beyond the first ν i_13/2 alignment, were observed for the first time. These results will be discussed with reference to Cranking Shell Model calculations.

  12. Plant Responses to High Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Vian

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency nonionizing electromagnetic fields (HF-EMF that are increasingly present in the environment constitute a genuine environmental stimulus able to evoke specific responses in plants that share many similarities with those observed after a stressful treatment. Plants constitute an outstanding model to study such interactions since their architecture (high surface area to volume ratio optimizes their interaction with the environment. In the present review, after identifying the main exposure devices (transverse and gigahertz electromagnetic cells, wave guide, and mode stirred reverberating chamber and general physics laws that govern EMF interactions with plants, we illustrate some of the observed responses after exposure to HF-EMF at the cellular, molecular, and whole plant scale. Indeed, numerous metabolic activities (reactive oxygen species metabolism, α- and β-amylase, Krebs cycle, pentose phosphate pathway, chlorophyll content, terpene emission, etc. are modified, gene expression altered (calmodulin, calcium-dependent protein kinase, and proteinase inhibitor, and growth reduced (stem elongation and dry weight after low power (i.e., nonthermal HF-EMF exposure. These changes occur not only in the tissues directly exposed but also systemically in distant tissues. While the long-term impact of these metabolic changes remains largely unknown, we propose to consider nonionizing HF-EMF radiation as a noninjurious, genuine environmental factor that readily evokes changes in plant metabolism.

  13. Calculation of Leakage Inductance for High Frequency Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Ziwei; Jun, Zhang; Hurley, William Gerard

    2015-01-01

    Frequency dependent leakage inductance is often observed. High frequency eddy current effects cause a reduction in leakage inductance. The proximity effect between adjacent layers is responsible for the reduction of leakage inductance. This paper gives a detailed analysis of high frequency leakage...... inductance and proposes an accurate prediction methodology. High frequency leakage inductances in several interleaved winding configurations are also discussed. Interleaved winding configurations actually give a smaller degree of reduction of leakage induction at high frequency. Finite Element Analysis (FEA...

  14. Where is the value in high frequency trading?

    OpenAIRE

    Álvaro Cartea; José Penalva

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the impact of high frequency trading in financial markets based on a model with three types of traders: liquidity traders, market makers, and high frequency traders. Our four main findings are: i) The price impact of the liquidity trades is higher in the presence of the high frequency trader and is increasing with the size of the trade. In particular, we show that the high frequency trader reduces (increases) the prices that liquidity traders receive when selling (buying) their equ...

  15. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Bolanča, Stanislav; Majnarić, Igor; Golubović, Kristijan

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid print...

  16. 3D printed electromagnetic transmission and electronic structures fabricated on a single platform using advanced process integration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbaugh, Paul Issac

    3D printing has garnered immense attention from many fields including in-office rapid prototyping of mechanical parts, outer-space satellite replication, garage functional firearm manufacture, and NASA rocket engine component fabrication. 3D printing allows increased design flexibility in the fabrication of electronics, microwave circuits and wireless antennas and has reached a level of maturity which allows functional parts to be printed. Much more work is necessary in order to perfect the processes of 3D printed electronics especially in the area of automation. Chapter 1 shows several finished prototypes of 3D printed electronics as well as newly developed techniques in fabrication. Little is known about the RF and microwave properties and applications of the standard materials which have been developed for 3D printing. Measurement of a wide variety of materials over a broad spectrum of frequencies up to 10 GHz using a variety of well-established measurement methods is performed throughout chapter 2. Several types of high frequency RF transmission lines are fabricated and valuable model-matched data is gathered and provided in chapter 3 for future designers' use. Of particular note is a fully 3D printed stripline which was automatically fabricated in one process on one machine. Some core advantages of 3D printing RF/microwave components include rapid manufacturing of complex, dimensionally sensitive circuits (such as antennas and filters which are often iteratively tuned) and the ability to create new devices that cannot be made using standard fabrication techniques. Chapter 4 describes an exemplary fully 3D printed curved inverted-F antenna.

  17. High frequency oscillations and high frequency functional network characteristics in the intraoperative electrocorticogram in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweiphenning, W J E M; van 't Klooster, M A; van Diessen, E; van Klink, N E C; Huiskamp, G J M; Gebbink, T A; Leijten, F S S; Gosselaar, P H; Otte, W M; Stam, C J; Braun, K P J; Zijlmans, G J M

    2016-01-01

    High frequency oscillations (HFOs; > 80 Hz), especially fast ripples (FRs, 250-500 Hz), are novel biomarkers for epileptogenic tissue. The pathophysiology suggests enhanced functional connectivity within FR generating tissue. Our aim was to determine the relation between brain areas showing FRs and 'baseline' functional connectivity within EEG networks, especially in the high frequency bands. We marked FRs, ripples (80-250 Hz) and spikes in the electrocorticogram of 14 patients with refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. We assessed 'baseline' functional connectivity in epochs free of epileptiform events within these recordings, using the phase lag index. We computed the Eigenvector Centrality (EC) per channel in the FR and gamma band network. We compared EC between channels that did or did not show events at other moments in time. FR-band EC was higher in channels with than without spikes. Gamma-band EC was lower in channels with ripples and FRs. We confirmed previous findings of functional isolation in the gamma-band and found a first proof of functional integration in the FR-band network of channels covering presumed epileptogenic tissue. 'Baseline' high-frequency network parameters might help intra-operative recognition of epileptogenic tissue without the need for waiting for events. These findings can increase our understanding of the 'architecture' of epileptogenic networks and help unravel the pathophysiology of HFOs.

  18. Inkjet-Printed Memristor: Printing Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelo, Mikko; Sloma, Marcin; Kelloniemi, Jaakko; Puustinen, Jarkko; Saikkonen, Teuvo; Juuti, Jari; Häkkinen, Juha; Jakubowska, Malgorzata; Jantunen, Heli

    2013-05-01

    In the last five years, research on memristive devices has been under ever increasing interest. Additionally, recent development in printed techniques provides new approaches to fabricate also memristive devices in inexpensive and flexible manner. Thus their research is an important effort towards fully printed electronics applications. In this work, an organometallic precursor solution for a memristive layer was synthesised and formulated for inkjet-printable form. Layers of the solution were determined with surface profilometry in order to find feasible layer thickness for memristive behaviour. Memristors were inkjet-printed on copper- and titanium-coated glass sheets, and various heat-treatments were carried out. The influence of the heat-treatments on the durability and resistance values of the memristors was evaluated. Microstructural and phase changes in the memristive layer were observed with X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  19. High-frequency multimodal atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian P. Nievergelt

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifrequency atomic force microscopy imaging has been recently demonstrated as a powerful technique for quickly obtaining information about the mechanical properties of a sample. Combining this development with recent gains in imaging speed through small cantilevers holds the promise of a convenient, high-speed method for obtaining nanoscale topography as well as mechanical properties. Nevertheless, instrument bandwidth limitations on cantilever excitation and readout have restricted the ability of multifrequency techniques to fully benefit from small cantilevers. We present an approach for cantilever excitation and deflection readout with a bandwidth of 20 MHz, enabling multifrequency techniques extended beyond 2 MHz for obtaining materials contrast in liquid and air, as well as soft imaging of delicate biological samples.

  20. Extremely high-frequency micro-Doppler measurements of humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Silvious, Jerry L.; Dietlein, Charles R.; Green, Jeremy A.; Wikner, David A.

    2014-05-01

    The development of sensors that are capable of penetrating smoke, dust, fog, clouds, and rain is critical for maintaining situational awareness in degraded visual environments and for providing support to the Warfighter. Atmospheric penetration properties, the ability to form high-resolution imagery with modest apertures, and available source power make the extremely high-frequency (EHF) portion of the spectrum promising for the development of radio frequency (RF) sensors capable of penetrating visual obscurants. Comprehensive phenomenology studies including polarization and backscatter properties of relevant targets are lacking at these frequencies. The Army Research Laboratory (ARL) is developing a fully-polarimetric frequency-modulated continuous-wave (FMCW) instrumentation radar to explore polarization and backscatter properties of in-situ rain, scattering from natural and man-made surfaces, and the radar cross section and micro-Doppler signatures of humans at EHF frequencies, specifically, around the 220 GHz atmospheric window. This work presents an overview of the design and construction of the radar system, hardware performance, data acquisition software, and initial results including an analysis of human micro-Doppler signatures.

  1. High-Frequency Axial Fatigue Test Procedures for Spectrum Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-20

    REPORT NO: NAWCADPAX/TIM-2016/49 HIGH - FREQUENCY AXIAL FATIGUE TEST PROCEEDURES FOR SPECTRUM LOADING by David T. Rusk, AIR...OF THE NAVY NAVAL AIR WARFARE CENTER AIRCRAFT DIVISION PATUXENT RIVER, MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TIM-2016/49 20 July 2016 HIGH - FREQUENCY AXIAL...Technical Information Memorandum 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE High - Frequency Axial Fatigue Test Procedures for Spectrum Loading

  2. Anomalous waiting times in high-frequency financial data

    CERN Document Server

    Scalas, E; Luckock, H; Mainardi, F; Mantelli, M; Raberto, M; Scalas, Enrico; Gorenflo, Rudolf; Luckock, Hugh; Mainardi, Francesco; Mantelli, Maurizio; Raberto, Marco

    2004-01-01

    In high-frequency financial data not only returns, but also waiting times between consecutive trades are random variables. Therefore, it is possible to apply continuous-time random walks (CTRWs) as phenomenological models of the high-frequency price dynamics. An empirical analysis performed on the 30 DJIA stocks shows that the waiting-time survival probability for high-frequency data is non-exponential. This fact imposes constraints on agent-based models of financial markets.

  3. Parametric macromodelling of linear high-frequency systems using multiple frequency scaling and sequential sampling

    OpenAIRE

    Chemmangat Manakkal Cheriya, Krishnan; Ferranti, Francesco; Dhaene, Tom; Knockaert, Luc

    2014-01-01

    An enhanced parametric macromodelling scheme is presented for linear high-frequency systems based on the use of multiple frequency scaling coefficients and a sequential sampling algorithm to fully automate the entire modelling process. The proposed method is applied on a ring resonator bandpass filter example and compared with another state-of-the-art macromodelling method to show its improved modelling capability and reduced setup time.

  4. Influence of Smoking on Ultra-High-Frequency Auditory Sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhu, Prashanth; Varma, Gowtham; Dutta, Kristi Kaveri; Kumar, Prajwal; Goyal, Swati

    2017-04-01

    In this study, an attempt was made to determine the effect of smoking on ultra-high-frequency auditory sensitivity. The study also attempted to determine the relationship between the nature of smoking and ultra-high-frequency otoacoustic emissions (OAEs) and thresholds. The study sample included 25 smokers and 25 non-smokers. A detailed history regarding their smoking habits was collected. High-frequency audiometric thresholds and amplitudes of high-frequency distortion-product OAEs were analyzed for both ears from all participants. The results showed that the ultra-high-frequency thresholds were elevated and that there was reduction in the amplitudes of ultra-high-frequency OAEs in smokers. There was an increased risk of auditory damage with chronic smoking. The study results highlight the application of ultra-high-frequency OAEs and ultra-high-frequency audiometry for the early detection of auditory impairment. However, similar studies should be conducted on a larger population for better generalization of the results.

  5. Special Information on High-Frequency Radar. Part 15

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-06-01

    NRL Memorandum Report 2265 f Special Information on High-Frequency Radar Part XV J. M. HEADRICK, W. C. HEADRICK, J. M. HUDNALL AND J. F. THOMASON...20390 3. REPORT TITLE SPECIAL INFORMATION ON HIGH-FREQUENCY RADAR, PART XV (U) 4. DESCRIPTIVE NOTES(Type of report and inclhsive dates) This is a final

  6. The Application of Digital Printing System in College Education

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tsung-Yu Hao

    2004-01-01

    Digital printing brings the tremendous impacts not only to the printing industry but also to the publishing industry. Colleges could establish a "Printing and Publishing Center" to adopt the development of digital printing technology. It is necessary to build up a printing and publishing system to apply the digital printing's characteristics to fulfill the functions of college education. This system must contain the functions of digital right management (DRM), Internet, and database management system (DBMS). It could print the partial chapters of one of more particular textbooks and publish the books by using the digital printing press in order to present the most updating information. It could fully use the benefits of print-on-demand, variable-data printing, and a short-run printing of digital printing. For the system, it could satisfy the needs of teachers and students in teaching and learning in college.

  7. Catchment Very-High Frequency Hydrochemistry: the Critex Chemical House

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floury, P.; Gaillardet, J.; Tallec, G.; Blanchouin, A.; Ansart, P.

    2015-12-01

    Exploring the variations of river quality at very high frequency is still a big challenge that has fundamental implications both for understanding catchment ecosystems and for water quality monitoring. Within the French Critical Zone program CRITEX, we have proposed to develop a prototype called "Chemical House", applying the "lab on field" concept to one of the stream of the Orgeval Critical Zone Observatory. The Orgeval catchment (45 km2) is part of the Critical Zone RBV ("Réseau des bassins versants") network. It is a typical temperate agricultural catchment that has been intensively monitored for the last 50 years for hydrology and nutrient chemistry. Agricultural inputs and land use are also finely monitored making Orgeval an ideal basin to test the response of the Critical Zone to agricultural forcing. Geology consists of a typical sedimentary basin of Cenozoic age with horizontal layers of limestones, silcrete and marls, covered by a thin loamy layer. Two main aquifers are present within the catchment: the Brie and the Champigny aquifers. Mean runoff is 780 mm/yr. The Chemical House is a fully automated lab and installed directly along the river, which performs measurement of all major dissolved elements such as Na, Cl, Mg, Ca, NO3, SO4 and K every half hour. It also records all physical parameters (Temperature, pH, conductivity, O2 dissolved, Turbidity) of the water every minute. Orgeval Chemical House started to measure river chemistry on June 12, 2015 and has successfully now recorded several months of data. We will present the architecture of the Chemical House and the first reproducibility and accuracy tests made during the summer drought 2015 period. Preliminary results show that the chemical house is recoding significant nychtemeral (day/night) cycles for each element. We also observe that each element has its own behaviour along a day. First results open great prospects.

  8. Extended high frequency audiometry in secretory otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepika; Munjal, Sanjay K; Panda, Naresh K

    2012-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the status of extended high frequencies in subjects with secretory otitis media. The study evaluated 30 ears of 20 subjects with secretory otitis media in the age group of 15-30 years. This data was compared with 20 ears of 10 volunteers of the same age group with clinically normal hearing. Pure tone air conduction thresholds were analyzed in three frequency groups: low frequency (LF: 0.25, 0.5, and 1 kHz), high frequency (HF: 2, 4, and 8 kHz) and extended high frequency (EHF: 10, 12, and 16 kHz). The results showed elevated extended high frequency thresholds (EHFG) as compared to control group and comparatively better thresholds at high frequencies(HFG)s as compared to low (LFG)and extended high frequencies(EHFG) in the study group. This validates the importance of including an extended high frequency audiometry in the test battery of patients with secretory otitis media.

  9. High-frequency energy in singing and speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Brian Bruce

    While human speech and the human voice generate acoustical energy up to (and beyond) 20 kHz, the energy above approximately 5 kHz has been largely neglected. Evidence is accruing that this high-frequency energy contains perceptual information relevant to speech and voice, including percepts of quality, localization, and intelligibility. The present research was an initial step in the long-range goal of characterizing high-frequency energy in singing voice and speech, with particular regard for its perceptual role and its potential for modification during voice and speech production. In this study, a database of high-fidelity recordings of talkers was created and used for a broad acoustical analysis and general characterization of high-frequency energy, as well as specific characterization of phoneme category, voice and speech intensity level, and mode of production (speech versus singing) by high-frequency energy content. Directionality of radiation of high-frequency energy from the mouth was also examined. The recordings were used for perceptual experiments wherein listeners were asked to discriminate between speech and voice samples that differed only in high-frequency energy content. Listeners were also subjected to gender discrimination tasks, mode-of-production discrimination tasks, and transcription tasks with samples of speech and singing that contained only high-frequency content. The combination of these experiments has revealed that (1) human listeners are able to detect very subtle level changes in high-frequency energy, and (2) human listeners are able to extract significant perceptual information from high-frequency energy.

  10. SINGLE PHASE HIGH FREQUENCY AC CONVERTER FOR INDUCTION HEATING APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A INAYATHULLAAH,

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The proposed topology reduces the total harmonic distortion (THD of a high frequency AC/AC Converter well below the acceptable limit. This paper deals with a novel single phase AC/DC/AC soft switching utility frequency AC to high frequency AC converter. In this paper a single phase full bridge inverter with Vienna rectifier as front end is used instead of conventional diode bridge rectifier to provide continuous sinusoidal input current with nearly unity power factor at the source side with extremely low distortion.. This power converter is more suitable and acceptable for cost effective high frequency (HF consumer induction heating applications.

  11. Printed Circuit Board Embedded Inductors for Very High Frequency Switch-Mode Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    for the impedances are given and an example of the achievable impedances are given. Prototypes are then made and measured. The differences between the three structures and the accuracy of the formulas are evaluated. Finite element simulations are used to investigate the magnetic field around the structure, in order...... and implementation in a complete design. At the end of the paper a summary of pros and cons of the three structures are listed....

  12. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  13. Digital printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobotka, Werner K.

    1997-02-01

    Digital printing is described as a tool to replace conventional printing machines completely. Still this goal was not reached until now with any of the digital printing technologies to be described in the paper. Productivity and costs are still the main parameters and are not really solved until now. Quality in digital printing is no problem anymore. Definition of digital printing is to transfer digital datas directly on the paper surface. This step can be carried out directly or with the use of an intermediate image carrier. Keywords in digital printing are: computer- to-press; erasable image carrier; image carrier with memory. Digital printing is also the logical development of the new digital area as it is pointed out in Nicholas Negropotes book 'Being Digital' and also the answer to networking and Internet technologies. Creating images text and color in one country and publishing the datas in another country or continent is the main advantage. Printing on demand another big advantage and last but not least personalization the last big advantage. Costs and being able to coop with this new world of prepress technology is the biggest disadvantage. Therefore the very optimistic growth rates for the next few years are really nonexistent. The development of complete new markets is too slow and the replacing of old markets is too small.

  14. High-Frequency Microwave Processing of Materials Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Conducts research on high-frequency microwave processing of materials using a highpower, continuous-wave (CW), 83-GHz, quasi-optical beam system for rapid,...

  15. Conditions of the Classical Transmission Line Equations at High Frequency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    New transmission line equations are deduced applying Maxwell's equations in this paper. The conditions of the classical transmission line equations have been discussed, which is important to solve the EM problems in high frequency case.

  16. High Temperature, High Frequency Fuel Metering Valve Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Active Signal Technologies and its subcontractor Moog propose to develop a high-frequency actuator driven valve intended to achieve TRL 6 by the end of Phase II....

  17. Quantum inductance and high frequency oscillators in graphene nanoribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begliarbekov, Milan; Strauf, Stefan; Search, Christopher P

    2011-04-22

    Here we investigate high frequency AC transport through narrow graphene nanoribbons with top-gate potentials that form a localized quantum dot. We show that as a consequence of the finite dwell time of an electron inside the quantum dot (QD), the QD behaves like a classical inductor at sufficiently high frequencies ω ≥ GHz. When the geometric capacitance of the top-gate and the quantum capacitance of the nanoribbon are accounted for, the admittance of the device behaves like a classical serial RLC circuit with resonant frequencies ω ∼ 100-900 GHz and Q-factors greater than 10(6). These results indicate that graphene nanoribbons can serve as all-electronic ultra-high frequency oscillators and filters, thereby extending the reach of high frequency electronics into new domains.

  18. High frequency modeling for quantum-well laser diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO JianJun

    2009-01-01

    High frequency modeling of quantum-well (OW) laser diodes for optoelectronic integrated circuit (OEIC) design is discussed in this paper. Modeling of the intrinsic device and the extrinsic components is discussed by accounting for important physical effects at both de and high frequency. The concepts of equivalent circuits representing both intrinsic and extrinsic components in a QW laser diode are ana-lyzed to obtain a physics-based high frequency model. The model is based on the physical rate equa-tions, and is versatile in that it permits both small-and large-signal simulations to be performed. Sev-eral procedures of the high frequency model parameter extraction are also discussed. Emphasis here is placed on validating the model via a comparison of simulated results with measured data of the small-signal modulation response, obtained over a wide range of optical output powers.

  19. High frequency ultrasound with color Doppler in dermatology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcaui, Elisa de Oliveira; Carvalho, Antonio Carlos Pires; Lopes, Flavia Paiva Proença Lobo; Piñeiro-Maceira, Juan; Barcaui, Carlos Baptista

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a method of imaging that classically is used in dermatology to study changes in the hypoderma, as nodules and infectious and inflammatory processes. The introduction of high frequency and resolution equipments enabled the observation of superficial structures, allowing differentiation between skin layers and providing details for the analysis of the skin and its appendages. This paper aims to review the basic principles of high frequency ultrasound and its applications in different areas of dermatology. PMID:27438191

  20. Basis of Ionospheric Modification by High-Frequency Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    for conducting ionospheric heating experiments in Gakona, Alaska, as part of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ) [5], is being...upgraded. The upgraded HAARP HF transmitting system will be a phased-array antenna of 180 elements. Each element is a cross dipole, which radiates a...supported by the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program ( HAARP ), the Air Force Research Laboratory at Hanscom Air Force Base, MA, and by the Office

  1. Recent trends in print portals and Web2Print applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    case, the ordering process is, of course, not fully automated. Standardized products, on the other hand, are easily identified and the cost charged to the print buyer can be retrieved from predefined price lists. Typically, higher volumes will result in more attractive prices. An additional advantage of this type of products is that they are often defined such that they can be produced in bulk using conventional printing techniques. If one wants to automate the ganging, a connection must be established between the on-line ordering and the production planning system. (For digital printing, there typically is no need to gang products since they can be produced more effectively separately.) Many of the on-line print solutions support additional features also available in general purpose e-commerce sites. We here think of the availability of virtual shopping baskets, the connectivity with payment gateways and the support of special facilities for interfacing with courier services (bar codes, connectivity to courier web sites for tracking shipments etc.). Supporting these features also assumes an intimate link with the print production system. Another development that goes beyond the on-line ordering of printed material and the submission of full pages and/or documents, is the interactive, on-line definition of the content itself. Typical applications in this respect are, e.g., the creation of business cards, leaflets, letter heads etc. On a more professional level, we also see that more and more publishing organizations start using on-line publishing platforms to organize their work. These professional platforms can also be connected directly to printing portals and thus enable extra automation. In this paper, we will discuss for each of the different applications presented above (traditional Print Portals, Web2Print applications and professional, on-line publishing platforms) how they interact with prepress and print production systems and how they contribute to the

  2. All-Printed Flexible and Stretchable Electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed G; Kramer, Rebecca

    2017-05-01

    A fully automated additive manufacturing process that produces all-printed flexible and stretchable electronics is demonstrated. The printing process combines soft silicone elastomer printing and liquid metal processing on a single high-precision 3D stage. The platform is capable of fabricating extremely complex conductive circuits, strain and pressure sensors, stretchable wires, and wearable circuits with high yield and repeatability. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Forecasting Value-at-Risk Using High-Frequency Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiyu Huang

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available in the prediction of quantiles of daily Standard&Poor’s 500 (S&P 500 returns we consider how to use high-frequency 5-minute data. We examine methods that incorporate the high frequency information either indirectly, through combining forecasts (using forecasts generated from returns sampled at different intraday interval, or directly, through combining high frequency information into one model. We consider subsample averaging, bootstrap averaging, forecast averaging methods for the indirect case, and factor models with principal component approach, for both direct and indirect cases. We show that in forecasting the daily S&P 500 index return quantile (Value-at-Risk or VaR is simply the negative of it, using high-frequency information is beneficial, often substantially and particularly so, in forecasting downside risk. Our empirical results show that the averaging methods (subsample averaging, bootstrap averaging, forecast averaging, which serve as different ways of forming the ensemble average from using high-frequency intraday information, provide an excellent forecasting performance compared to using just low-frequency daily information.

  4. Printing Pioneer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Wang Xuan,inventor of a laser typesetting system for Chinese characters,ushers in a new age in the printing industry Anyone who reads a book or newspaper in Chinese is indebted to Wang Xuan, a pioneer in modem Chinese-language printing, just as one can thank Thomas Edison for inventing the electric light bulb. Wang invented a computerized laser photocomposition system for Chinese char-

  5. Low and high frequency fatigue tests of nodular cast irons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vaško

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the comparison of fatigue properties of nodular cast iron at low and high frequency cyclic loading. The specimens from three melts of nodular cast iron with different microstructure and mechanical properties were used for experiments. Fatigue tests were carried out at low and high frequency sinusoidal cyclic push-pull loading (stress ratio R = –1 at ambient temperature (T = 20 ± 5 °C. Low frequency fatigue tests were carried out using the fatigue experimental machine Zwick/Roell Amsler 150HFP 5100 at frequency f ≈ 120 Hz; high frequency fatigue tests were carried out using the ultrasonic fatigue testing device KAUP-ZU at frequency f ≈ 20 kHz.

  6. Condenser Microphone Protective Grid Correction for High Frequency Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Erik; Bennett, Reginald

    2010-01-01

    Use of a protective grid on small diameter microphones can prolong the lifetime of the unit, but the high frequency effects can complicate data interpretation. Analytical methods have been developed to correct for the grid effect at high frequencies. Specifically, the analysis pertains to quantifying the microphone protective grid response characteristics in the acoustic near field of a rocket plume noise source. A frequency response function computation using two microphones will be explained. Experimental and instrumentation setup details will be provided. The resulting frequency response function for a B&K 4944 condenser microphone protective grid will be presented, along with associated uncertainties

  7. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siria, A; Dhez, O; Schwartz, W; Torricelli, G; Comin, F; Chevrier, J

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  8. Extended High Frequency Audiometry in Secretory Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Deepika; Munjal, Sanjay K.; Panda, Naresh K.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine the status of extended high frequencies in subjects with secretory otitis media. The study evaluated 30 ears of 20 subjects with secretory otitis media in the age group of 15–30 years. This data was compared with 20 ears of 10 volunteers of the same age group with clinically normal hearing. Pure tone air conduction thresholds were analyzed in three frequency groups: low frequency (LF: 0.25, 0.5, and 1 kHz), high frequency (HF: 2, 4, and 8 kH...

  9. Posture Estimation by Using High Frequency Markers and Kernel Regressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Yuya; Iwai, Yoshio; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    Recently, research fields of augmented reality and robot navigation are actively investigated. Estimating a relative posture between an object and a camera is an important task in these fields. In this paper, we propose a novel method for posture estimation by using high frequency markers and kernel regressions. The markers are embedded in an object's texture in the high frequency domain. We observe the change of spatial frequency of object's texture to estimate a current posture of the object. We conduct experiments to show the effectiveness of our method.

  10. Testing the efficiency of high-frequency foreign exchange market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Mastný

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the efficiency of the high-frequency foreign exchange market. The objective of this paper is to investigate whether standard statistical tests give the same results for time series resampled at intervals of 15.30 and 60 min. The data used for the purpose of this paper contain major currency pairs such as EUR/USD, GBP/USD and JPY/USD. The results of statistical tests indicate that the high frequency intervals (15-minute are not random and should not be considered independent. On the other hand, tests with lower frequency rates (30 and 60 min indicate rising randomness of the market.

  11. Casimir force between δ -δ' mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Alessandra N.; Silva, Jeferson Danilo L.; Alves, Danilo T.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in 1 +1 dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac δ -δ' point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified δ -δ' point interaction that enables full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified δ -δ' model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  12. A MEMS-based high frequency x-ray chopper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siria, A; Schwartz, W; Chevrier, J [Institut Neel, CNRS-Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Dhez, O; Comin, F [ESRF, 6 rue Jules Horowitz, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Torricelli, G [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-29

    Time-resolved x-ray experiments require intensity modulation at high frequencies (advanced rotating choppers have nowadays reached the kHz range). We here demonstrate that a silicon microlever oscillating at 13 kHz with nanometric amplitude can be used as a high frequency x-ray chopper. We claim that using micro-and nanoelectromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS), it will be possible to achieve higher frequencies in excess of hundreds of megahertz. Working at such a frequency can open a wealth of possibilities in chemistry, biology and physics time-resolved experiments.

  13. Influence of statistical surface models on dynamic scattering of high-frequency signals from the ocean surface (A)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum-Niese, Christian; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1994-01-01

    Temporal variations of scattering of high-frequency, monochromatic signals from the ocean surface has been studied numerically. In the high-frequency domain the dynamic scattering can be modeled by a coherence function of the scattered pressure field, which is based on the Kirchhoff integral...... for the Pierson–Moskowitz spectrum (for a fully developed sea) with computations for the JONSWAP spectrum (for fetch-limited seas). The following results, among other issues, have been obtained: As the fetch decreases, the surface waves become shorter, leading to increasing frequency shifting of the scattered...... signal. [Work sponsored by the Danish Technical Research Council and the EU/MAST programme.]...

  14. Suppressing high-frequency temperature oscillations in microchannels with surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yangying; Antao, Dion S.; Bian, David W.; Rao, Sameer R.; Sircar, Jay D.; Zhang, Tiejun; Wang, Evelyn N.

    2017-01-01

    Two-phase microchannel heat sinks are attractive for thermal management of high heat flux electronic devices, yet flow instability which can lead to thermal and mechanical fatigue remains a significant challenge. Much work has focused on long-timescale (˜seconds) flow oscillations which are usually related to the compressible volume in the loop. The rapid growth of vapor bubbles which can also cause flow reversal, however, occurs on a much shorter timescale (˜tens of milliseconds). While this high-frequency oscillation has often been visualized with high-speed imaging, its effect on the instantaneous temperature has not been fully investigated due to the typical low sampling rates of the sensors. Here, we investigate the temperature response as a result of the high-frequency flow oscillation in microchannels and the effect of surface microstructures on this temperature oscillation with a measurement data acquisition rate of 1000 Hz. For smooth surface microchannels, fluid flow oscillated between complete dry-out and rewetting annular flow due to the short-timescale flow instability, which caused high-frequency and large amplitude temperature oscillations (10 °C in 25 ms). In comparison, hydrophilic surface structures on the microchannel promoted capillary flow which delayed and suppressed dry-out in each oscillation cycle, and thus significantly reduced the temperature oscillation at high heat fluxes. This work suggests that promoting capillary wicking via surface structures is a promising technique to reduce thermal fatigue in high heat flux two-phase microchannel thermal management devices.

  15. Efficient estimation for ergodic diffusions sampled at high frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael

    A general theory of efficient estimation for ergodic diffusions sampled at high fre- quency is presented. High frequency sampling is now possible in many applications, in particular in finance. The theory is formulated in term of approximate martingale estimating functions and covers a large class...

  16. Modelling financial high frequency data using point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautsch, Nikolaus; Bauwens, Luc

    In this chapter written for a forthcoming Handbook of Financial Time Series to be published by Springer-Verlag, we review the econometric literature on dynamic duration and intensity processes applied to high frequency financial data, which was boosted by the work of Engle and Russell (1997...

  17. Very High Frequency Interleaved Self-Oscillating Resonant SEPIC Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacevic, Milovan; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes analysis and design procedure of an interleaved, self-oscillating resonant SEPIC converter, suitable for operation at very high frequencies (VHF) ranging from 30 MHz to 300 MHz. The presented circuit consists of two resonant SEPIC DC-DC converters, and a capacitive...

  18. High-frequency hearing in seals and sea lions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kane A; Reichmuth, Colleen

    2016-01-01

    Existing evidence suggests that some pinnipeds (seals, sea lions, and walruses) can detect underwater sound at frequencies well above the traditional high-frequency hearing limits for their species. This phenomenon, however, is not well studied: Sensitivity patterns at frequencies beyond traditional high-frequency limits are poorly resolved, and the nature of the auditory mechanism mediating hearing at these frequencies is unknown. In the first portion of this study, auditory sensitivity patterns in the 50-180 kHz range were measured for one California sea lion (Zalophus californianus), one harbor seal (Phoca vitulina), and one spotted seal (Phoca largha). Results show the presence of two distinct slope-regions at the high-frequency ends of the audiograms of all three subjects. The first region is characterized by a rapid decrease in sensitivity with increasing frequency-i.e. a steep slope-followed by a region of much less rapid sensitivity decrease-i.e. a shallower slope. In the second portion of this study, a masking experiment was conducted to investigate how the basilar membrane of a harbor seal subject responded to acoustic energy from a narrowband masking noise centered at 140 kHz. The measured masking pattern suggests that the initial, rapid decrease in sensitivity on the high-frequency end of the subject's audiogram is not due to cochlear constraints, as has been previously hypothesized, but rather to constraints on the conductive mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Very High Frequency Half Bridge DC/DC Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the first, off chip, class DE (resonant half bridge) converter working in the Very High Frequency (VHF) range. The benefits of using half bridge circuits both in the inverter and rectifier part of a VHF resonant dc/dc converter are analyzed and design equations for all...

  20. Current barriers to confine high frequency common mode currents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moonen, Dominicus Johannes Guilielmus; Buesink, Frederik Johannes Karel; Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2016-01-01

    A commercially produced three phase power line filter is submitted to a Current Barrier (CB) Electro-Magnetic Compatibility (EMC) zoning strategy as an attempt to confine high frequency common mode currents. The intent of the paper is not to show how to build a ’perfect’ filter, since this is known.

  1. Factors Affecting the Benefits of High-Frequency Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Amy R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Dubno, Judy R.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to determine the extent to which high-frequency amplification helped or hindered speech recognition as a function of hearing loss, gain-frequency response, and background noise. Method: Speech recognition was measured monaurally under headphones for nonsense syllables low-pass filtered in one-third-octave steps…

  2. High Frequency State-Variable Biquadratic Active Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dostal

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The state-variable (KHN active RC biquadratic filters with good performance in high frequency range , flexibility of outputs (LP, HP, BP, low sensitivities in novel current and hybrid modes, using current conveyors, transimpedance, trans-admittance and current operational amplifiers, are given in this paper.

  3. Fuzzy and conventional control of high-frequency ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noshiro, M; Matsunami, T; Takakuda, K; Ryumae, S; Kagawa, T; Shimizu, M; Fujino, T

    1994-07-01

    A high-frequency ventilator was developed, consisting of a single-phase induction motor, an unbalanced mass and a mechanical vibration system. Intermittent positive pressure respiration was combined with high-frequency ventilation to measure end-tidal pCO2. Hysteresis was observed between the rotational frequency of the high-frequency ventilator and end-tidal pCO2. A fuzzy proportional plus integral control system, designed on the basis of the static characteristics of the controlled system and a knowledge of respiratory physiology, successfully regulated end-tidal pCO2. The characteristics of gas exchange under high-frequency ventilation was approximated by a first-order linear model. A conventional PI control system, designed on the basis of the approximated model, regulated end-tidal pCO2 with a performance similar to that of the fuzzy PI control system. The design of the fuzzy control system required less knowledge about the controlled system than that of the conventional control system.

  4. Modelling financial high frequency data using point processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hautsch, Nikolaus; Bauwens, Luc

    In this chapter written for a forthcoming Handbook of Financial Time Series to be published by Springer-Verlag, we review the econometric literature on dynamic duration and intensity processes applied to high frequency financial data, which was boosted by the work of Engle and Russell (1997......) on autoregressive duration models...

  5. Piping system subjected to seismic hard rock high frequencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydell, Cecilia, E-mail: cecilia.rydell@byv.kth.se [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Vattenfall AB, SE-169 92 Stockholm (Sweden); Malm, Richard; Ansell, Anders [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A study of the influence of support gaps in the analysis of a piping system. • Piping system located within a nuclear power plant reactor containment building. • Piping system subjected to a seismic hard rock high-frequency load. • Comparison of low- and high-frequency seismic loads. • The influence on the stress response of piping and acceleration response of valves. - Abstract: This paper addresses the influence of support gaps in the analyses of a piping system when subjected to a seismic hard rock high-frequency load. The system is located within the reactor containment building of a nuclear power plant and is assessed to be susceptible to high-frequency loads. The stress response of the pipe and the acceleration response of the valves are evaluated for different support gap sizes. It is shown that the inclusion of the support gaps in the analyses reduces the stress response for almost all pipe elements. On the other hand, the acceleration response of the valves is not necessarily reduced by the consideration of the gaps.

  6. High frequency ultrasound imaging of a single-species biofilm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shemesh, H.; Goertz, D. E.; van der Sluis, L. W. M.; de Jong, N.; Wu, M. K.; Wesselink, P. R.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the feasibility of a high frequency ultrasound scan to examine the 3D morphology of Streptococcus mutans biofilms grown in vitro. Methods: Six 2-day S. mutans biofilms and six 7-day biofilms were grown on tissue culture membranes and on bovine dentine discs. A sterile

  7. Free-field calibration of measurement microphones at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrera Figueroa, Salvador; Rasmussen, Knud; Torras Rosell, Antoni;

    2011-01-01

    Measurement microphones are typically calibrated in a free field at frequencies up to 50 kHz. This is a sufficiently high frequency for the most of sound measurement applications related with noise assessment. However, other applications such as assessment of the noise emitted by ultrasound clean...

  8. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; Wu, Dawei; Shung, K Kirk

    2011-02-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the current status of the piezoelectric films and recent progress in the development of high frequency ultrasonic transducers will be discussed. Then details for preparation and structure of the materials derived from piezoelectric thick film technologies will be described. Both chemical and physical methods are included in the discussion, namely, the sol-gel approach, aerosol technology and hydrothermal method. The electric and piezoelectric properties of the piezoelectric films, which are very important for transducer applications, such as permittivity and electromechanical coupling factor, are also addressed. Finally, the recent developments in the high frequency transducers and arrays with piezoelectric ZnO and PZT thick film using MEMS technology are presented. In addition, current problems and further direction of the piezoelectric films for very high frequency ultrasound application (up to GHz) are also discussed.

  9. Vacuum amplification of the high-frequency electromagnetic radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Vilkovisky, G. A.

    1998-01-01

    When an electrically charged source is capable of both emitting the electromagnetic waves and creating charged particles from the vacuum, its radiation gets so much amplified that only the backreaction of the vacuum makes it finite. The released energy and charge are calculated in the high-frequency approximation. The technique of expectation values is advanced and employed.

  10. On the high frequency spectrum of a classical accretion disc

    CERN Document Server

    Balbus, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    We derive simple and explicit expressions for the high frequency spectrum of a classical accretion disc. Both stress-free and finite stress inner boundaries are considered. A classical accretion disc spectrum with a stress-free inner boundary departs from a Wien spectrum at large $\

  11. Practical techniques for enhancing the high-frequency MASW method

    Science.gov (United States)

    For soil exploration in the vadose zone, a high-frequency multi-channel analysis of surface waves (HF-MASW) method has been developed. In the study, several practical techniques were applied to enhance the overtone image of the HF-MASW method. They included (1) the self-adaptive MASW method using a ...

  12. Fact or friction: jumps at ultra high frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Christensen; R. Oomen; M. Podolskij

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that jumps in financial asset prices are not nearly as common as generally thought, and that they account for only a very small proportion of total return variation. We base our investigation on an extensive set of ultra high-frequency equity and foreign exchange rate d

  13. Influence of pore roughness on high-frequency permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortis, A.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Guermond, J.L.; Lafarge, D.

    2003-01-01

    The high-frequency behavior of the fluid velocity patterns for smooth and corrugated pore channels is studied. The classical approach of Johnson et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 176, 379 (1987)] for smooth geometries is obtained in different manners, thus clarifying differences with Sheng and Zhou [Phys. Rev.

  14. Collocations of High Frequency Noun Keywords in Prescribed Science Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Sujatha; Mukundan, Jayakaran

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyses the discourse of science through the study of collocational patterns of high frequency noun keywords in science textbooks used by upper secondary students in Malaysia. Research has shown that one of the areas of difficulty in science discourse concerns lexis, especially that of collocations. This paper describes a corpus-based…

  15. Occupational exposure to anaesthetic gases and high-frequency audiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgianni, Concetto; Gangemi, Silvia; Tanzariello, Maria Giuseppina; Barresi, Gaetano; Miceli, Ludovica; D'Arrigo, Graziella; Spatari, Giovanna

    2015-09-01

    Occupational exposure to anaestethic gases has been suggested to induce auditory damages. The aim of this study is to investigate high-frequency audiometric responses in subjects exposed to anaesthetic gases, in order to highlight the possible effects on auditory system. The study was performed on a sample of 30 medical specialists of Messina University Anaesthesia and Intensive care. We have used tonal audiometry as well as high-frequency one. We have compared the responses with those obtained in a similar control group not exposed to anaesthetic gases. Results were compared statistically. Results show a strong correlation (p = 0.000) between left and right ear responses to all the audiometric tests. The exposed and the control group run though the standard audiometry analysis plays different audiometric responses up only to higher frequencies (2000 HZ p = 0.009 and 4000 Hz p = 0.04); in high-frequency audiometry, as all other frequencies, the attention is drew to the fact that the sample groups distinguish themselves in a significantly statistic way (10,000 Hz p = 0.025, 12,000 Hz p = 0.008, 14,000 Hz p = 0.026, 16,000 Hz p = 0.08). The highest values are the ones related to exposed subjects both in standard (2000 Hz p = 0.01, 4000 Hz p = 0.02) and in high-frequency audiometry (10,000 Hz p = 0.011, 12,000 Hz p = 0.004, 14,000 Hz p = 0.012, 16,000 Hz p = 0.004). Results, even if preliminary and referred to a low-range sample, show an involvement of the anatomic structure responsible for the perception of high-frequency audiometric responses in subjects exposed to anaesthetic gases. © The Author(s) 2012.

  16. Excitation and Ionisation dynamics in high-frequency plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, D.

    2008-07-01

    excitation and sustainment of the discharge. As the pressure decreases the discharge operates in so-called 'alpha-mode' where the sheath expansion is responsible for discharge sustainment. Decreasing the pressure towards the limit of operation (below 1 Pa) the discharge operates in a regime where kinetic effects dominate plasma sustainment. Wave particle interactions resulting from the flux of highly energetic electrons interacting with thermal bulk electrons give rise to a series of oscillations in the electron excitation phase space at the sheath edge. This instability is responsible for a significant energy deposit in the plasma when so-called 'ohmic heating' is no longer efficient. In addition to this an interesting electron acceleration mechanism occurs during the sheath collapse. The large sheath width, due to low plasma densities at the lower pressure, and electron inertia allows the build up of a local electric field accelerating electrons towards the electrode. Multi-frequency plasmas, provide additional process control for technological applications, and through investigating the excitation dynamics in such discharges the limitations of functional separation is observed. Non-linear frequency coupling is observed in plasma boundary sheaths governed by two frequencies simultaneously. In an alpha-operated discharge the sheath edge velocity governs the excitation and ionisation within the plasma, and it will be shown that this is determined by the time varying sheath width. The nature of the coupling effects strongly depends on the ratio of the applied voltages. Under technologically relevant conditions (low frequency voltage >> high frequency voltage) interesting phenomena depending on the phase relation of the voltages are also observed and will be discussed.

  17. Study of a Particle Based Films Cure Process by High-Frequency Eddy Current Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Patsora

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Particle-based films are today an important part of various designs and they are implemented in structures as conductive parts, i.e., conductive paste printing in the manufacture of Li-ion batteries, solar cells or resistive paste printing in IC. Recently, particle based films were also implemented in the 3D printing technique, and are particularly important for use in aircraft, wind power, and the automotive industry when incorporated onto the surface of composite structures for protection against damages caused by a lightning strike. A crucial issue for the lightning protection area is to realize films with high homogeneity of electrical resistance where an in-situ noninvasive method has to be elaborated for quality monitoring to avoid undesirable financial and time costs. In this work the drying process of particle based films was investigated by high-frequency eddy current (HFEC spectroscopy in order to work out an automated in-situ quality monitoring method with a focus on the electrical resistance of the films. Different types of particle based films deposited on dielectric and carbon fiber reinforced plastic substrates were investigated in the present study and results show that the HFEC method offers a good opportunity to monitor the overall drying process of particle based films. Based on that, an algorithm was developed, allowing prediction of the final electrical resistance of the particle based films throughout the drying process, and was successfully implemented in a prototype system based on the EddyCus® HFEC device platform presented in this work. This prototype is the first solution for a portable system allowing HFEC measurement on huge and uneven surfaces.

  18. Automated screening for high-frequency hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaming, Marcel S M G; MacKinnon, Robert C; Jansen, Marije; Moore, David R

    2014-01-01

    Hearing loss at high frequencies produces perceptual difficulties and is often an early sign of a more general hearing loss. This study reports the development and validation of two new speech-based hearing screening tests in English that focus on detecting hearing loss at frequencies above 2000 Hz. The Internet-delivered, speech-in noise tests used closed target-word sets of digit triplets or consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words presented against a speech-shaped noise masker. The digit triplet test uses the digits 0 to 9 (excluding the disyllabic 7), grouped in quasi-random triplets. The CVC test uses simple words (e.g., "cat") selected for the high-frequency spectral content of the consonants. During testing, triplets or CVC words were identified in an adaptive procedure to obtain the speech reception threshold (SRT) in noise. For these new, high-frequency (HF) tests, the noise was low-pass filtered to produce greater masking of the low-frequency speech components, increasing the sensitivity of the test for HF hearing loss. Individual test tokens (digits, CVCs) were first homogenized using a group of 10 normal-hearing (NH) listeners by equalizing intelligibility across tokens at several speech-in-noise levels. Both tests were then validated and standardized using groups of 24 NH listeners and 50 listeners with hearing impairment. Performance on the new high frequency digit triplet (HF-triplet) and CVC (HF-CVC) tests was compared with audiometric hearing loss, and with that on the unfiltered, broadband digit triplet test (BB-triplet) test, and the ASL (Adaptive Sentence Lists) speech-in-noise test. The HF-triplet and HF-CVC test results (SRT) both correlated positively and highly with high-frequency audiometric hearing loss and with the ASL test. SRT for both tests as a function of high-frequency hearing loss increased at nearly three times the rate as that of the BB-triplet test. The intraindividual variability (SD) on the tests was about 2.1 (HF-triplet) and 1

  19. Childhood Trauma Associated with Enhanced High Frequency Band Powers and Induced Subjective Inattention of Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Hwan Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Childhood trauma can lead to various psychological and cognitive symptoms. It has been demonstrated that high frequency electroencephalogram (EEG powers could be closely correlated with inattention. In this study, we explored the relationship between high frequency EEG powers, inattention, symptoms of adult attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and childhood traumatic experiences. A total of 157 healthy Korean adult volunteers were included and divided into two groups using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ score. The subjective inattention scores, ADHD scale, and anxiety and depression symptom were evaluated. EEG was recorded and quantitative band powers were analyzed. The results were as follows: (1 the high CTQ group showed significantly increased delta, beta1, beta2, beta3 and gamma, and significantly decreased low alpha power compared to the low CTQ group; (2 the high CTQ group had higher inattention score compared to the low CTQ group; (3 the high CTQ group had higher adult ADHD scores; (4 CTQ scores showed significant positive correlations with inattention scores, and adult ADHD scores; (5 unexpectedly, the inattention scores showed significant positive correlations with beta powers and a negative correlation with low alpha power; and (6 the moderated mediation model was confirmed: the depression fully mediated the path from state anxiety to inattention, and the CTQ significantly moderated the pathway between anxiety and depression. Our results show the possibility that childhood adversity may cause subjective inattention and adult ADHD symptoms. Depressive symptoms fully mediated the path from anxiety to inattention, especially in those who report severe childhood traumatic experiences.

  20. [High-frequency ventilation. I. Distribution of alveolar pressure amplitudes during high frequency oscillation in the lung model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theissen, J; Lunkenheimer, P P; Niederer, P; Bush, E; Frieling, G; Lawin, P

    1987-09-01

    The pattern of intrapulmonary pressure distribution was studied during high-frequency ventilation in order to explain the inconsistent results reported in the literature. Methods. Pressure and flow velocity (hot-wire anemometry) were measured in different lung compartments: 1. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of dried pig lungs; 2. In emphysema-simulating airbags sealed to the isolated bronchial trees of dried pig lungs; and 3. In transalveolar chambers sealed to the perforated pleural surfaces of freshly excised pig lungs. Results. 1. The pressure amplitudes change from one area to another and depending on the exciting frequency. 2. High-frequency oscillation is associated with an increase in pressure amplitude when the exciting frequency rises, whereas with conventional high-frequency jet ventilation the pressure amplitude is more likely to decrease with frequency. 3. During high-frequency jet ventilation the local pressure amplitude changes with the position of the tube in the trachea rather than with the exciting frequency. 4. When the volume of the measuring chamber is doubled the resulting pressure amplitude falls to half the control value. 5. The pressure amplitude and mean pressure measured in the transalveolar chamber vary more or less independently from the peak flow velocity. High-frequency ventilation is thus seen to be a frequency-dependant, inhomogeneous mode of ventilation that can essentially be homogenized by systematically changing the exciting frequency. The frequency-dependant response to different lung areas to excitation is likely to result from an intrabronchially-localized aerodynamic effect rather than the mechanical properties of the lung parenchyma.

  1. CHINA PRINT 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Introduction CHINA PRINT 2009, the Seventh Beijing International Printing Technology Exhibition, will be held at New China International Exhibition Center from May 12 to 16, 2009.CHINA PRINT, known as the Olympics of China’s print-ing and printing related business, has been organized onceevery four years since 1984 by PEIAC and CIEC. It has be-come one of the

  2. Slow high-frequency effects in mechanics: problems, solutions, potentials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    Strong high-frequency excitation (HFE) may change the ‘slow’ (i.e. effective or average) properties of mechanical systems, e.g. their stiffness, natural frequencies, equilibriums, equilibrium stability, and bifurcation paths. This tutorial describes three general HFE effects: Stiffening – an appa......Strong high-frequency excitation (HFE) may change the ‘slow’ (i.e. effective or average) properties of mechanical systems, e.g. their stiffness, natural frequencies, equilibriums, equilibrium stability, and bifurcation paths. This tutorial describes three general HFE effects: Stiffening...... and compared: The Method of Direct Separation of Motions, the Method of Averaging, and the Method of Multiple Scales. The tutorial concludes by suggesting that more vibration experts, researchers and students should know about HFE effects, for the benefit not only of general vibration troubleshooting, but also...

  3. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Armitage-Caplan, C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143,217, 353, 545......, these two high frequency channels are calibrated to within 5% and the 353 GHz channel to the percent level. The 100 and217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 ..., and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.07 to 4.06. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively,10, 6 , 12, and 39 µK in the four lowest HFI frequency channels (100-353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy sr-1 in the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Relativeto the 143 GHz channel...

  4. Parametric Study of High Frequency Pulse Detonation Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutler, Anderw D.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes development of high frequency pulse detonation tubes similar to a small pulse detonation engine (PDE). A high-speed valve injects a charge of a mixture of fuel and air at rates of up to 1000 Hz into a constant area tube closed at one end. The reactants detonate in the tube and the products exit as a pulsed jet. High frequency pressure transducers are used to monitor the pressure fluctuations in the device and thrust is measured with a balance. The effects of injection frequency, fuel and air flow rates, tube length, and injection location are considered. Both H2 and C2H4 fuels are considered. Optimum (maximum specific thrust) fuel-air compositions and resonant frequencies are identified. Results are compared to PDE calculations. Design rules are postulated and applications to aerodynamic flow control and propulsion are discussed.

  5. Extraction of ULSI Interconnect Resistance at High Frequencies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Xia; JIAN Duanduan; YAO Suying; ZHANG Shengcai; RUAN Gang

    2005-01-01

    Correct extraction of the ultra-large-scale integrated (ULSI) interconnect components at hight frequencies is very important for evaluating electrical performances of high-speed ULSI circuits.In this paper, the extraction of the interconnect resistance at high frequencies is derived from the Ohm′s law and verified by the software FastHenry.The results are also compared with those of another resistance formula originated from the effective area of the current flowing. The applicability of these two formulae is discussed.The influence of the interconnect geometry on the resistance at high frequencies is studied.The computation indicates that the effect of frequency on the resistance is weak when the skin depth is larger than half of the short side of the rectangular interconnect cross section.With further increase of frequency, the resistance increases obviously. Results imply that conductor with a square cross section exhibits the largest resistance for rectangular conductors of constant cross section area.

  6. Extended High Frequency Audiometry in Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuneyt Kucur

    2013-01-01

    and BMI of PCOS and control groups were comparable. Each subject was tested with low (250–2000 Hz, high (4000–8000 Hz, and extended high frequency audiometry (8000–20000. Hormonal and biochemical values including LH, LH/FSH, testosterone, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, HOMA-I, and CRP were calculated. Results. PCOS patients showed high levels of LH, LH/FSH, testosterone, fasting insulin, glucose, HOMA-I, and CRP levels. The hearing thresholds of the groups were similar at frequencies of 250, 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz; statistically significant difference was observed in 8000–14000 Hz in PCOS group compared to control group. Conclusion. PCOS patients have hearing impairment especially in extended high frequencies. Further studies are needed to help elucidate the mechanism behind hearing impairment in association with PCOS.

  7. On the high frequency polarization of pulsar radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Von Hoensbroech, A; Krawczyk, A

    1998-01-01

    We have analyzed the polarization properties of pulsars at an observing frequency of 4.9 GHz. Together with low frequency data, we are able to trace polarization profiles over more than three octaves into an interesting frequency regime. At those high frequencies the polarization properties often undergo important changes such as significant depolarization. A detailed analysis allowed us to identify parameters, which regulate those changes. A significant correlation was found between the integrated degree of polarization and the loss of rotational energy E^dot. The data were also used to review the widely established pulsar profile classification scheme of core- and cone-type beams. We have discovered the existence of pulsars which show a strongly increasing degree of circular polarization towards high frequencies. Previously unpublished average polarization profiles, recorded at the 100m Effelsberg radio telescope, are presented for 32 radio pulsars at 4.9 GHz. The data were used to derive polarimetric param...

  8. Propagation of high frequency waves in the quiet solar atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analyzed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  9. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andić, A.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20 mHz have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting for partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences were taken by using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT, Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analysed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis was performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observed the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10 mHz to 13 mHz. We also observed propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in the regions where magnetic structures are present.

  10. How high frequency trading affects a market index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenett, Dror Y; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H Eugene; Gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale.

  11. Skyrmion-based high-frequency signal generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shijiang; Zhang, Yue; Shen, Maokang; Ou-Yang, Jun; Yan, Baiqian; Yang, Xiaofei; Chen, Shi; Zhu, Benpeng; You, Long

    2017-03-01

    Many concepts for skyrmion-based devices have been proposed, and most of their possible applications are based on the motion of skyrmions driven by a dc current in an area with a constricted geometry. However, skyrmion motion driven by a pulsed current has not been investigated so far. In this work, we propose a skyrmion-based high-frequency signal generator based on the pulsed-current-driven circular motion of skyrmions in a square-shaped film by micromagnetic simulation. The results indicate that skyrmions can move in a closed curve with central symmetry. The trajectory and cycle period can be adjusted by tuning the size of the film, the current density, the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction constant, and the local in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The period can be tuned from several nanoseconds to tens of nanoseconds, which offers the possibility to prepare high-frequency signal generator based on skyrmions.

  12. High-frequency Oscillations in Eyewalls of Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weibiao; Chen, Shumin

    2017-04-01

    High-frequency oscillations, with periods of about 2 hours, are first identified by applying wavelet analysis to observed minutely wind speeds around the eye and eyewall of tropical cyclones (TCs). Analysis of a model simulation of Typhoon Hagupit (2008) shows that the oscillations also occur in the intensity of TC, vertical motion, convergence activity and air density around the eyewall. Sequences of oscillations in these variables follow a certain order. In a typical cycle, the drop of density in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) is followed by an increase in the inward radial wind; this enhanced frictional convergence causes increase in density, followed by a decrease in the inward radial wind. The increase in convergence in the PBL causes increase of updraft at the top of the PBL, followed by high vertical velocity at high altitude of 8-10 km, then the increase of the maximum wind speed, and vice versa. Key words: tropical cyclone, high-frequency oscillations, eyewall, intensity

  13. Propagation of High Frequency Waves in the Quiet Solar Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Andić, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency waves (5 mHz to 20mHz) have previously been suggested as a source of energy accounting partial heating of the quiet solar atmosphere. The dynamics of previously detected high-frequency waves is analysed here. Image sequences are taken using the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT), Observatorio del Teide, Izana, Tenerife, with a Fabry-Perot spectrometer. The data were speckle reduced and analyzed with wavelets. Wavelet phase-difference analysis is performed to determine whether the waves propagate. We observe the propagation of waves in the frequency range 10mHz to 13mHz. We also observe propagation of low-frequency waves in the ranges where they are thought to be evanescent in regions where magnetic structures are present.

  14. Peripheral Circulatory Features during High-Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kontorovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the results of a study of peripheral circulatory features during high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV. The main specific features of peripheral circulation and oxygen transport during HFJV are formulated on the basis of a study of cardiac output (impedance cardiography, peripheral vascular resistance, peripheral vascular blood filling (photoplethysmogram analysis, adaptive peripheral blood flow reactions (spectral analysis of peripheral vascular pulsation. HFJV gives rise to the peculiar pattern of peripheral hemodynamics and tissue gas exchange, which is characterized by higher oxygen uptake without a decrease in mixed venous blood saturation, with normal extraction coefficient and preserved low peripheral vascular resistance. During HFJV, unlike traditional ventilation, the main peripheral hemodynamic feature is the increased capillary bed blood volume caused by the blood flow involvement of reserve capillaries under control of volume (parasympathetic regulation of adaptive peripheral hemodynamic reactions. Key words: high-frequency jet ventilation, oxygen transport, peripheral hemodynamics.

  15. Generation of sheet currents by high frequency fast MHD waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Núñez, Manuel, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.es

    2016-07-01

    The evolution of fast magnetosonic waves of high frequency propagating into an axisymmetric equilibrium plasma is studied. By using the methods of weakly nonlinear geometrical optics, it is shown that the perturbation travels in the equatorial plane while satisfying a transport equation which enables us to predict the time and location of formation of shock waves. For plasmas of large magnetic Prandtl number, this would result into the creation of sheet currents which may give rise to magnetic reconnection and destruction of the original equilibrium. - Highlights: • Regular solutions of quasilinear hyperbolic systems may evolve into shocks. • The shock location is found for high frequency fast MHD waves. • The result is applied to static axisymmetric equilibria. • The previous process may lead to the formation of sheet currents and destruction of the equilibrium.

  16. High Frequency Amplitude Detector for GMI Magnetic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktham Asfour

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new concept of a high-frequency amplitude detector and demodulator for Giant-Magneto-Impedance (GMI sensors is presented. This concept combines a half wave rectifier, with outstanding capabilities and high speed, and a feedback approach that ensures the amplitude detection with easily adjustable gain. The developed detector is capable of measuring high-frequency and very low amplitude signals without the use of diode-based active rectifiers or analog multipliers. The performances of this detector are addressed throughout the paper. The full circuitry of the design is given, together with a comprehensive theoretical study of the concept and experimental validation. The detector has been used for the amplitude measurement of both single frequency and pulsed signals and for the demodulation of amplitude-modulated signals. It has also been successfully integrated in a GMI sensor prototype. Magnetic field and electrical current measurements in open- and closed-loop of this sensor have also been conducted.

  17. How High Frequency Trading Affects a Market Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenett, Dror Y.; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Stanley, H. Eugene; gur-Gershgoren, Gitit

    2013-01-01

    The relationship between a market index and its constituent stocks is complicated. While an index is a weighted average of its constituent stocks, when the investigated time scale is one day or longer the index has been found to have a stronger effect on the stocks than vice versa. We explore how this interaction changes in short time scales using high frequency data. Using a correlation-based analysis approach, we find that in short time scales stocks have a stronger influence on the index. These findings have implications for high frequency trading and suggest that the price of an index should be published on shorter time scales, as close as possible to those of the actual transaction time scale. PMID:23817553

  18. Piezoelectric films for high frequency ultrasonic transducers in biomedical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Qifa; Lau, Sienting; WU, DAWEI; Shung, K. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Piezoelectric films have recently attracted considerable attention in the development of various sensor and actuator devices such as nonvolatile memories, tunable microwave circuits and ultrasound transducers. In this paper, an overview of the state of art in piezoelectric films for high frequency transducer applications is presented. Firstly, the basic principles of piezoelectric materials and design considerations for ultrasound transducers will be introduced. Following the review, the curr...

  19. Strange effects of strong high-frequency excitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2003-01-01

    Three general effects of mechanical high-frequency excitation (HFE) are described: Stiffening - an apparent change in the stiffness associated with an equilibrium; Biasing - a tendency for a system to move towards a particular state which does not exist or is unstable without HFE; and Smoothening...... - a tendency for discontinuities to be apparently smeared out by HFE. Studies of specific physical systems as well as more general models are described....

  20. Modeling high-frequency capacitance in SOI MOS capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiak, Lidia; Jasiński, Jakub; Beck, Romuald B.; Ikraiam, Fawzi A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a model of high frequency capacitance of a SOI MOSCAP. The capacitance in strong inversion is described with minority carrier redistribution in the inversion layer taken into account. The efficiency of the computational process is significantly improved. Moreover, it is suitable for the simulation of thin-film SOI structures. It may also be applied to the characterization of non-standard SOI MOSCAPS e.g. with nanocrystalline body.

  1. Measurements Of High Frequency Electromagnetic Waves In Center Of Mus

    OpenAIRE

    etem, taha; ABBASOV, Teymuraz

    2016-01-01

    All electrically powered devices cause electromagnetic wave exposure onhuman body and we use them nearly every moment in a day. Mobile phones,computers, televisions, hair dryers, lighting systems, etc. they all useelectricity and naturally radiate electromagnetic waves. Effects ofelectromagnetic waves are not clear but international organizations definelimit values depending on epidemiological studies in this field. In this studywe measure high frequency electromagnetic waves in city center o...

  2. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have...

  3. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO)

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Petrozzino S.; Gatta A.; Bona S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO) in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to resp...

  4. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Fan; Ying LI; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K. Kirk

    2012-01-01

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be eas...

  5. Non-linear high-frequency waves in the magnetosphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Moolla; R Bharuthram; S V Singh; G S Lakhina

    2003-12-01

    Using fluid theory, a set of equations is derived for non-linear high-frequency waves propagating oblique to an external magnetic field in a three-component plasma consisting of hot electrons, cold electrons and cold ions. For parameters typical of the Earth’s magnetosphere, numerical solutions of the governing equations yield sinusoidal, sawtooth or bipolar wave-forms for the electric field.

  6. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavdar, U.; Gulsahin, I.

    2014-10-01

    The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM) compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW) were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined. (Author)

  7. High-frequency audibility: benefits for hearing-impaired listeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, C A; Turner, C W

    1998-07-01

    The present study was a systematic investigation of the benefit of providing hearing-impaired listeners with audible high-frequency speech information. Five normal-hearing and nine high-frequency hearing-impaired listeners identified nonsense syllables that were low-pass filtered at a number of cutoff frequencies. As a means of quantifying audibility for each condition, Articulation Index (AI) was calculated for each condition for each listener. Most hearing-impaired listeners demonstrated an improvement in speech recognition as additional audible high-frequency information was provided. In some cases for more severely impaired listeners, increasing the audibility of high-frequency speech information resulted in no further improvement in speech recognition, or even decreases in speech recognition. A new measure of how well hearing-impaired listeners used information within specific frequency bands called "efficiency" was devised. This measure compared the benefit of providing a given increase in speech audibility to a hearing-impaired listener to the benefit observed in normal-hearing listeners for the same increase in speech audibility. Efficiencies were calculated using the old AI method and the new AI method (which takes into account the effects of high speech presentation levels). There was a clear pattern in the results suggesting that as the degree of hearing loss at a given frequency increased beyond 55 dB HL, the efficacy of providing additional audibility to that frequency region was diminished, especially when this degree of hearing loss was present at frequencies of 4000 Hz and above. A comparison of analyses from the "old" and "new" AI procedures suggests that some, but not all, of the deficiencies of speech recognition in these listeners was due to high presentation levels.

  8. High-frequency capillary waves excited by oscillating microbubbles

    CERN Document Server

    Pommella, Angelo; Poulichet, Vincent; Garbin, Valeria

    2013-01-01

    This fluid dynamics video shows high-frequency capillary waves excited by the volumetric oscillations of microbubbles near a free surface. The frequency of the capillary waves is controlled by the oscillation frequency of the microbubbles, which are driven by an ultrasound field. Radial capillary waves produced by single bubbles and interference patterns generated by the superposition of capillary waves from multiple bubbles are shown.

  9. Significance of High-frequency Electrical Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Akiyama, Tomoyuki; Agari, Takashi; Sasaki, Tatsuya; Shibata, Takashi; Hanaoka, Yoshiyuki; Akiyama, Mari; Endoh, Fumika; Oka, Makio; Date, Isao

    2017-06-01

     Electroencephalogram (EEG) data include broadband electrical brain activity ranging from infra-slow bands (frequency bands (e.g., the approx. 10 Hz alpha rhythm) to high-frequency bands of up to 500 Hz. High-frequency oscillations (HFOs) including ripple and fast ripple oscillations (80-200 Hz and>200 / 250 Hz, respectively) are particularly of note due to their very close relationship to epileptogenicity, with the possibility that they could function as a surrogate biomarker of epileptogenicity. In contrast, physiological high-frequency activity plays an important role in higher brain functions, and the differentiation between pathological / epileptic and physiological HFOs is a critical issue, especially in epilepsy surgery. HFOs were initially recorded with intracranial electrodes in patients with intractable epilepsy as part of a long-term invasive seizure monitoring study. However, fast oscillations (FOs) in the ripple and gamma bands (40-80 Hz) are now noninvasively detected by scalp EEG and magnetoencephalography, and thus the scope of studies on HFOs /FOs is rapidly expanding.

  10. Clinical Implications High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: patients with neuromuscular diseases presents an high incidence of respiratory infections favoured by stagnation of deep bronchial secretions and deficit of cough. The aim of the study is to evaluate the correct treatment of this condition and the role of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO in helping the removal of bronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections in patients with neuromuscular disease.Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and neuromuscular disease. PCEF (Peak Cough Expiratory Flow is used as a standardized indicator of efficiency of cough.Results: the High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO is useful, in cases of increased production of mucus and impairment of muco-ciliary clearance, to remove the tracheobronchial secretions and reduce the incidence of infections.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients with neuromuscular disease and frequent respiratory infections is focused on treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions. High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST has a central role in treatment of cough ineffective and management of bronchial secretions reducing respiratory infections.

  11. Occupational hearing loss: tonal audiometry X high frequencies audiometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauris, José Roberto Pereira

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Studies on the occupational exposure show that noise has been reaching a large part of the working population around the world, and NIHL (noise-induced hearing loss is the second most frequent disease of the hearing system. Objective: To review the audiometry results of employees at the campus of the University of São Paulo, Bauru. Method: 40 audiometry results were analyzed between 2007 and 2008, whose ages comprised between 32 and 59 years, of both sexes and several professions: gardeners, maintenance technicians, drivers etc. The participants were divided into 2 groups: those with tonal thresholds within acceptable thresholds and those who presented auditory thresholds alterations, that is tonal thresholds below 25 dB (NA in any frequency (Administrative Rule no. 19 of the Ministry of Labor 1998. In addition to the Conventional Audiologic Evaluation (250Hz to 8.000Hz we also carried out High Frequencies Audiometry (9000Hz, 10000Hz, 11200Hz, 12500Hz, 14000Hz and 16000Hz. Results: According to the classification proposed by FIORINI (1994, 25.0% (N=10 they presented with NIHL suggestive audiometric configurations. The results of high frequencies Audiometry confirmed worse thresholds than those obtained in the conventional audiometry in the 2 groups evaluated. Conclusion: The use of high frequencies audiometry proved to be an important register as a hearing alteration early detection method.

  12. All printed antenna based on silver nanoparticles for 1.8 GHz applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Arshad; Ali, Shawkat; Bae, Jinho; Lee, Chong Hyun

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel printed antenna for 1.8 GHz band applications. The proposed antenna is made of silver nanoparticle-based radiating element and 0.04-mm thin, transparent and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. The proposed antenna is designed and simulated by finite-element-method-based high-frequency structure simulator (HFSS). We obtain reflection coefficient of -23 dB, gain of 2.72 dBi and efficiency of 93.33 %. The resonance frequency of the antenna is also verified through national instrument (NI) Multisim simulation on the proposed equivalent circuit. We realize the antenna in a single process by commercial Dimatix material inkjet printer (DMP-3000) at ambient condition and characterize it by using vector network analyzer and spectrum analyzer. The measured reflection coefficient and -10 dB bandwidth are -32.2 dB and 190.5 MHz, respectively, which shows good agreement with HFSS and NI Multisim results. The proposed compact and optimum antenna printed on thin, transparent and fully bendable PET substrate becomes very attractive since it can overcome the limits of cost and size. These results suggest that the proposed antenna is well suitable for electronic devices operating over 1.8 GHz band such as Telos-B and other wearable printed devices.

  13. Frequency dependence of lung volume changes during superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation and high-frequency jet ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sütterlin, R; Priori, R; Larsson, A; LoMauro, A; Frykholm, P; Aliverti, A

    2014-01-01

    Superimposed high-frequency jet ventilation (SHFJV) has proved to be safe and effective in clinical practice. However, it is unclear which frequency range optimizes ventilation and gas exchange. The aim of this study was to systematically compare high-frequency jet ventilation (HFJV) with HFJV by assessing chest wall volume variations (ΔEEV(CW)) and gas exchange in relation to variable high frequency. SHFJV or HFJV were used alternatively to ventilate the lungs of 10 anaesthetized pigs (21-25 kg). The low-frequency component was kept at 16 min(-1) in SHFJV. In both modes, high frequencies ranging from 100 to 1000 min(-1) were applied in random order and ventilation was maintained for 5 min in all modalities. Chest wall volume variations were obtained using opto-electronic plethysmography. Airway pressures and arterial blood gases were measured repeatedly. SHFJV increased ΔEEV(CW) compared with HFJV; the difference ranged from 43 to 68 ml. Tidal volume (V(T)) was always >240 ml during SHFJV whereas during HFJV ranged from 92 ml at the ventilation frequency of 100 min(-1) to negligible values at frequencies >300 min(-1). We observed similar patterns for Pa(O₂) and Pa(CO₂). SHFJV provided generally higher, frequency-independent oxygenation (Pa(O₂) at least 32.0 kPa) and CO₂ removal (Pa(CO₂) ∼5.5 kPa), whereas HFJV led to hypoxia and hypercarbia at higher rates (Pa(O₂) 10 kPa at f(HF)>300 min(-1)). In a porcine model, SHFJV was more effective in increasing end-expiratory volume than single-frequency HFJV, but both modes may provide adequate ventilation in the absence of airway obstruction and respiratory disease, except for HFJV at frequencies ≥300 min(-1).

  14. New Approaches for Printed Electronics Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Ankit

    In printed electronics, electronic inks are patterned onto flexible substrates using roll-to-roll (R2R) compatible graphic printing methods. For applications where large-area, conformal electronics are necessary, printed electronics holds a competitive advantage over rigid, semiconductor circuitry, which does not scale efficiently to large areas. However, in order to fully realize the true potential of printed electronics, several manufacturing hurdles need to be overcome. Firstly, minimum feature sizes produced by graphic printing methods are typically greater than 25 microm, which is at least an order of magnitude higher for dense, high performing electronics. In this thesis, conductive features down to 1.5 microm are demonstrated using a novel inkjet printing-based process. Secondly, high-resolution printed conductors usually have poor current-carrying capacity, especially for longer wires in large-area applications. This thesis explores the fundamentals of aerosol-jet printing and reveals the regime for printing high-resolution lines with excellent current carrying capacity. Additionally, a novel manufacturing process is demonstrated, which can process 2.5 microm wide conductive wires with linear resistances as small as 5 O mm -1. Another challenge for printed electronics manufacturing is to deal with topography produced on the substrate surface by printed features. Besides complicating the subsequent use of contact-printing methods, surface topography is a source of poor device yields as well. This thesis describes two novel methodologies of creating topography-free printed surfaces. In the first method, nanometer-level smooth, planarized silver lines are obtained using a transfer printing approach. In the second method, open microchannels, imprinted in plastic substrates, are filled with a controlled amount of metal using liquid-based additive processes, to obtain conductive wires flush with the substrate surface. Finally, this thesis addresses the issue of

  15. Digital Inkjet Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Meichun

    2017-01-01

    Digital inkjet textile printing is an emerging technology developed with the rise of the digital world. It offers a possibility to print high-resolution images with unlimited color selection on fabrics. Digital inkjet printing brings a revolutionary chance for the textile printing industry. The history of textile printing shows the law how new technology replaces the traditional way of printing. This indicates the future of digital inkjet textile printing is relatively positive. Differen...

  16. Digital Textile Printing

    OpenAIRE

    Moltchanova, Julia

    2011-01-01

    Rapidly evolving technology of digital printing opens new opportunities on many markets. One of them is the printed fabric market where printing companies as well as clients benefit from new printing methods. This thesis focuses on the digital textile printing technology and its implementation for fabric-on-demand printing service in Finland. The purpose of this project was to study the technology behind digital textile printing, areas of application of this technology, the requirements ...

  17. Propagation Impact on Modern HF (High Frequency) Communications System Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-03-01

    US Gvt Printing Office, Washington DC. Piggot, W.R., Rawer, K. (1972). URSI Handbook for lonogram Interpretation and... Handbook ", Communications Research Centre Report No. 1255, 1974. Widrow B., Mantey P.E., Griffiths L.J. and Goode B.B., "Adaptive Antenna Systems...implemented in modified form by the terminal node controller (TNC). In the U.S., Amateur Radio Relay League ( ARRL ) radio amateurs have held four annual

  18. Contents of Physics Related E-Print Archives

    OpenAIRE

    Prakasan, E. R.; Kumar, Anil; Sagar, Anil; Mohan, Lalit; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Kalyane, V. L.; Kumar, Vijai

    2003-01-01

    The frontiers of physics related e-print archives (1994-2002) at http://www.arxiv.org/archives/physics web service are explored from 7770 submissions. No. of e-prints in the six research disciplines besides physics (5390) were: Condensed matter(754), Quantum physics(279), Astrophysics(222), Chemical physics(129), High energy physics Phenomenology(118), and High energy physics-Theory(100)). By keyword contents following major sub-fields have high frequency: Atomic physics(1258), General physic...

  19. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  20. High Frequency Ground Motion from Finite Fault Rupture Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crempien, Jorge G. F.

    There are many tectonically active regions on earth with little or no recorded ground motions. The Eastern United States is a typical example of regions with active faults, but with low to medium seismicity that has prevented sufficient ground motion recordings. Because of this, it is necessary to use synthetic ground motion methods in order to estimate the earthquake hazard a region might have. Ground motion prediction equations for spectral acceleration typically have geometric attenuation proportional to the inverse of distance away from the fault. Earthquakes simulated with one-dimensional layered earth models have larger geometric attenuation than the observed ground motion recordings. We show that as incident angles of rays increase at welded boundaries between homogeneous flat layers, the transmitted rays decrease in amplitude dramatically. As the receiver distance increases away from the source, the angle of incidence of up-going rays increases, producing negligible transmitted ray amplitude, thus increasing the geometrical attenuation. To work around this problem we propose a model in which we separate wave propagation for low and high frequencies at a crossover frequency, typically 1Hz. The high-frequency portion of strong ground motion is computed with a homogeneous half-space and amplified with the available and more complex one- or three-dimensional crustal models using the quarter wavelength method. We also make use of seismic coda energy density observations as scattering impulse response functions. We incorporate scattering impulse response functions into our Green's functions by convolving the high-frequency homogeneous half-space Green's functions with normalized synthetic scatterograms to reproduce scattering physical effects in recorded seismograms. This method was validated against ground motion for earthquakes recorded in California and Japan, yielding results that capture the duration and spectral response of strong ground motion.

  1. Engineering Graphene Conductivity for Flexible and High-Frequency Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Alexander J; Carey, J David

    2015-10-14

    Advances in lightweight, flexible, and conformal electronic devices depend on materials that exhibit high electrical conductivity coupled with high mechanical strength. Defect-free graphene is one such material that satisfies both these requirements and which offers a range of attractive and tunable electrical, optoelectronic, and plasmonic characteristics for devices that operate at microwave, terahertz, infrared, or optical frequencies. Essential to the future success of such devices is therefore the ability to control the frequency-dependent conductivity of graphene. Looking to accelerate the development of high-frequency applications of graphene, here we demonstrate how readily accessible and processable organic and organometallic molecules can efficiently dope graphene to carrier densities in excess of 10(13) cm(-2) with conductivities at gigahertz frequencies in excess of 60 mS. In using the molecule 3,6-difluoro-2,5,7,7,8,8-hexacyanoquinodimethane (F2-HCNQ), a high charge transfer (CT) of 0.5 electrons per adsorbed molecule is calculated, resulting in p-type doping of graphene. n-Type doping is achieved using cobaltocene and the sulfur-containing molecule tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) with a CT of 0.41 and 0.24 electrons donated per adsorbed molecule, respectively. Efficient CT is associated with the interaction between the π electrons present in the molecule and in graphene. Calculation of the high-frequency conductivity shows dispersion-less behavior of the real component of the conductivity over a wide range of gigahertz frequencies. Potential high-frequency applications in graphene antennas and communications that can exploit these properties and the broader impacts of using molecular doping to modify functional materials that possess a low-energy Dirac cone are also discussed.

  2. Computation of High-Frequency Waves with Random Uncertainty

    KAUST Repository

    Malenova, Gabriela

    2016-01-06

    We consider the forward propagation of uncertainty in high-frequency waves, described by the second order wave equation with highly oscillatory initial data. The main sources of uncertainty are the wave speed and/or the initial phase and amplitude, described by a finite number of random variables with known joint probability distribution. We propose a stochastic spectral asymptotic method [1] for computing the statistics of uncertain output quantities of interest (QoIs), which are often linear or nonlinear functionals of the wave solution and its spatial/temporal derivatives. The numerical scheme combines two techniques: a high-frequency method based on Gaussian beams [2, 3], a sparse stochastic collocation method [4]. The fast spectral convergence of the proposed method depends crucially on the presence of high stochastic regularity of the QoI independent of the wave frequency. In general, the high-frequency wave solutions to parametric hyperbolic equations are highly oscillatory and non-smooth in both physical and stochastic spaces. Consequently, the stochastic regularity of the QoI, which is a functional of the wave solution, may in principle below and depend on frequency. In the present work, we provide theoretical arguments and numerical evidence that physically motivated QoIs based on local averages of |uE|2 are smooth, with derivatives in the stochastic space uniformly bounded in E, where uE and E denote the highly oscillatory wave solution and the short wavelength, respectively. This observable related regularity makes the proposed approach more efficient than current asymptotic approaches based on Monte Carlo sampling techniques.

  3. A 300 Hz high frequency thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU ShangLong; YU GuoYao; ZHANG XiaoDong; DAI Wei; LUO ErCang; ZHOU Yuan

    2008-01-01

    This article introduces the latest progress of a 300 Hz thermoacoustically driven pulse tube cooler. Based on the experience of former experiments, improvements have been made in the standing-wave engine, pulse tube cooler and their coupling mechanism. An inlet pressure ratio of 1.248 was obtained with the mean pressure and heating power of 4.13 MPa and 1760 W, respectively. A lowest no-load temperature of 69.5 K has been reached under this condition. This is the first time for thermoacousti-cally driven pulse tube coolers to reach the temperature below 76 K with such a high frequency.

  4. On the Ongoing Evolution of Very High Frequency Power Supplies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Toke Meyer; Kamby, Peter

    2013-01-01

    in radio frequency transmission equipment helps to overcome those. However those circuits were not designed to meet the same requirements as power converters. This paper summarizes the contributions in recent years in application of very high frequency (VHF) technologies in power electronics, describes......The ongoing demand for smaller and lighter power supplies is driving the motivation to increase the switching frequencies of power converters. Drastic increases however come along with new challenges, namely the increase of switching losses in all components. The application of power circuits used...

  5. Articulated pipes conveying fluid pulsating with high frequency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard

    1999-01-01

    Stability and nonlinear dynamics of two articulated pipes conveying fluid with a high-frequency pulsating component is investigated. The non-autonomous model equations are converted into autonomous equations by approximating the fast excitation terms with slowly varying terms. The downward hanging...... pipe position will lose stability if the mean flow speed exceeds a certain critical value. Adding a pulsating component to the fluid flow is shown to stabilize the hanging position for high values of the ratio between fluid and pipe-mass, and to marginally destabilize this position for low ratios...

  6. High frequency microphone measurements for transition detection on airfoils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Døssing, Mads

    Time series of pressure fluctuations has been obtained using high frequency microphones distributed over the surface of airfoils undergoing wind tunnel tests in the LM Windtunnel, owned by ’LM Glasfiber’, Denmark. The present report describes the dataanalysis, with special attention given...... pressure) and Tollmien-Schlichting frequencies. The tests were made at Reynolds and Mach numbers corresponding to the operating conditions of a typical horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). The Risø B1-18, Risø C2-18 and NACA0015 profiles were tested and the measured transition points are reported....

  7. High frequency chest compression therapy: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, S; O'Neill, B

    1995-01-01

    A new device, the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System, enables patients with cystic fibrosis to self-administer the technique of high frequency chest compression (HFCC) to assist with mucociliary clearance. We review the literature on HFCC and outline a case study of a patient currently using the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System. While mucociliary clearance and lung function may be enhanced by HFCC therapy, more research is needed to determine its efficacy, cost benefits, and optimum treatment guidelines. Although our initial experience with the patient using this device has been positive, we were unable to accurately evaluate the ThAIRapy Bronchial Drainage System.

  8. Acoustic trapping with a high frequency linear phased array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fan; Li, Ying; Hsu, Hsiu-Sheng; Liu, Changgeng; Tat Chiu, Chi; Lee, Changyang; Ham Kim, Hyung; Shung, K Kirk

    2012-11-19

    A high frequency ultrasonic phased array is shown to be capable of trapping and translating microparticles precisely and efficiently, made possible due to the fact that the acoustic beam produced by a phased array can be both focused and steered. Acoustic manipulation of microparticles by a phased array is advantageous over a single element transducer since there is no mechanical movement required for the array. Experimental results show that 45 μm diameter polystyrene microspheres can be easily and accurately trapped and moved to desired positions by a 64-element 26 MHz phased array.

  9. Dynamics and sensitivity analysis of high-frequency conduction block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, D. Michael; Bhadra, Niloy; Gerges, Meana; Thomas, Peter J.

    2011-10-01

    The local delivery of extracellular high-frequency stimulation (HFS) has been shown to be a fast acting and quickly reversible method of blocking neural conduction and is currently being pursued for several clinical indications. However, the mechanism for this type of nerve block remains unclear. In this study, we investigate two hypotheses: (1) depolarizing currents promote conduction block via inactivation of sodium channels and (2) the gating dynamics of the fast sodium channel are the primary determinate of minimal blocking frequency. Hypothesis 1 was investigated using a combined modeling and experimental study to investigate the effect of depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents on high-frequency block. The results of the modeling study show that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing currents play an important role in conduction block and that the conductance to each of three ionic currents increases relative to resting values during HFS. However, depolarizing currents were found to promote the blocking effect, and hyperpolarizing currents were found to diminish the blocking effect. Inward sodium currents were larger than the sum of the outward currents, resulting in a net depolarization of the nodal membrane. Our experimental results support these findings and closely match results from the equivalent modeling scenario: intra-peritoneal administration of the persistent sodium channel blocker ranolazine resulted in an increase in the amplitude of HFS required to produce conduction block in rats, confirming that depolarizing currents promote the conduction block phenomenon. Hypothesis 2 was investigated using a spectral analysis of the channel gating variables in a single-fiber axon model. The results of this study suggested a relationship between the dynamical properties of specific ion channel gating elements and the contributions of corresponding conductances to block onset. Specifically, we show that the dynamics of the fast sodium inactivation gate are

  10. High-Frequency-Induced Cathodic Breakdown during Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nominé, A.; Nominé, A. V.; Braithwaite, N. St. J.; Belmonte, T.; Henrion, G.

    2017-09-01

    The present communication shows the possibility of observing microdischarges under cathodic polarization during plasma electrolytic oxidation at high frequency. Cathodic microdischarges can ignite beyond a threshold frequency found close to 2 kHz. The presence (respectively, absence) of an electrical double layer is put forward to explain how the applied voltage can be screened, which therefore prevents (respectively, promotes) the ignition of a discharge. Interestingly, in the conditions of the present study, the electrical double layer requires between 175 and 260 μ s to form. This situates the expected threshold frequency between 1.92 and 2.86 kHz, which is in good agreement with the value obtained experimentally.

  11. High Frequency Modulation Method for Measuring of Birefringence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šulc M.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A method of optical birefringence measurement is presented. It uses an el ectro-optic modulator for the high frequency modulation of polarization of the laser beam. The developed optical apparatus exhibits high sensitivity. It is able to measure very small birefringence of samples down to 10-3 rad. The accuracy and sensitivity of the method was checked by measurement of calibrated Sol eil – Babi net compensator. Method can be also used for online and accurate measurement of an optical components birefringence. This application was developed with the aim to measure Cotton-Mouton effect in air and nitrogen.

  12. High-frequency electric field amplification in a magnetized plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, Aleksandr V [Russian Research Centre ' Kurchatov Institute' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-11-30

    In the investigation of cyclotron ion heating in systems designed for plasma isotope separation, the high-frequency (HF) electric field amplification effect was found to occur in equilibrium plasma. In the present article this effect is treated as a result of the interaction of the plasma placed in a constant external magnetic field with the HF modes of the vacuum chamber. Consistent elaboration of this approach allowed obtaining a clear interpretation of the HF electric field amplification effect and constructing a simple model of HF field excitation in a plasma column embedded in the external magnetic field. (methodological notes)

  13. Inference from high-frequency data: A subsampling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Podolskij, Mark; Thamrongrat, Nopporn

    -definite by construction. Moreover, the subsampler is to some extent automatic, as it does not exploit explicit knowledge about the structure of the asymptotic covariance. It therefore tends to adapt to the problem at hand and be robust against misspecification of the noise process. As such, this paper facilitates...... copies of the original statistic based on local stretches of high-frequency data, and then it studies the sampling variation of these. We show that our estimator is consistent both in frictionless markets and models with additive microstructure noise. We derive a rate of convergence for it and are also...

  14. A SYNCHRONIZATION ALGORITHM FOR HF (HIGH FREQUENCY) BROADBAND OFDM SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Lei; Zhang You'ai

    2008-01-01

    In this letter, a kind of associated synchronization algorithm which is suitable for HF (High Frequency) broadband OFDM (Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing) system is presented based on describing and constructing the GMW (Gorden, Mills and Welch) sequence. The algorithm is based on the Schmidl and Minn's symbol timing principle, the constructed GMW sequence is transmitted and disposed, and the synchronization is adjudicated using the correlation of GMW sequence. The simulation result indicates that this algorithm has high performance synchronization ability under the low SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio) at two different kinds of channel models.

  15. High frequency sampling of a continuous-time ARMA process

    CERN Document Server

    Brockwell, Peter J; Klüppelberg, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Continuous-time autoregressive moving average (CARMA) processes have recently been used widely in the modeling of non-uniformly spaced data and as a tool for dealing with high-frequency data of the form $Y_{n\\Delta}, n=0,1,2,...$, where $\\Delta$ is small and positive. Such data occur in many fields of application, particularly in finance and the study of turbulence. This paper is concerned with the characteristics of the process $(Y_{n\\Delta})_{n\\in\\bbz}$, when $\\Delta$ is small and the underlying continuous-time process $(Y_t)_{t\\in\\bbr}$ is a specified CARMA process.

  16. The wave buoy analogy - estimating high-frequency wave excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik Dam

    2008-01-01

    The paper deals with the wave buoy analogy where a ship is considered as a wave buoy, so that measured ship responses are used as a basis to estimate wave spectra and associated sea state parameters. The study presented follows up on a previous paper, Nielsen [Nielsen UD. Response-based estimation...... processes are carried out in the present paper; however with one of the responses being the relative motion which is a type of response that is sensitive to high-frequency excitations. Based on the present study it is shown that by including the relative motion, the frequency-wise energy distribution can...

  17. 10 K high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sixue; Chen, Liubiao; Wu, Xianlin; Zhou, Yuan; Wang, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    A high frequency pulse tube cryocooler with precooling (HPTCP) has been developed and tested to meet the requirement of weak magnetic signals measurement, and the performance characteristics are presented in this article. The HPTCP is a two-stage pulse tube cryocooler with the precooling-stage replaced by liquid nitrogen. Two regenerators completely filled with stainless steel (SS) meshes are used in the cooler. Together with cold inertance tubes and cold gas reservoir, a cold double-inlet configuration is used to control the phase relationship of the HPTCP. The experimental result shows that the cold double-inlet configuration has improved the performance of the cooler obviously. The effects of operation parameters on the performance of the cooler are also studied. With a precooling temperature of 78.5 K, the maximum refrigeration capacity is 0.26 W at 15 K and 0.92 W at 20 K when the input electric power are 174 W and 248 W respectively, and the minimum no-load temperature obtained is 10.3 K, which is a new record on refrigeration temperature for high frequency pulse tube cryocooler reported with SS completely used as regenerative matrix.

  18. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  19. A perspective on high-frequency ultrasound for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamou, Jonathan; Aristizába, Orlando; Silverman, Ronald H.; Ketterling, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    High-frequency ultrasound (HFU, >15 MHz) is a rapidly developing field. HFU is currently used and investigated for ophthalmologic, dermatologic, intravascular, and small-animal imaging. HFU offers a non-invasive means to investigate tissue at the microscopic level with resolutions often better than 100 μm. However, fine resolution is only obtained over the limited depth-of-field (˜1 mm) of single-element spherically-focused transducers typically used for HFU applications. Another limitation is penetration depth because most biological tissues have large attenuation at high frequencies. In this study, two 5-element annular arrays with center frequencies of 17 and 34 MHz were fabricated and methods were developed to obtain images with increased penetration depth and depth-of-field. These methods were used in ophthalmologic and small-animal imaging studies. Improved blood sensitivity was obtained when a phantom mimicking a vitreous hemorrhage was imaged. Central-nervous systems of 12.5-day-old mouse embryos were imaged in utero and in three dimensions for the first time.

  20. High-frequency Pulse-tube Refrigerator for 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaeva, I. A.; Klaasse Bos, C. G.; de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2006-04-01

    At present pulse-tube refrigerators (PTRs), used for the important temperature region of 4 K, are of the Gifford-McMahon (GM)-type. The main sources of losses in GM-type PTRs are the compressor and the rotary valve. The efficiency of the combination of the compressor and the rotary valve is only about 30%. In addition to that GM-type compressors are heavy and need periodic maintenance. The main goal of this research is to develop a Stirling-type 4-K pulse-tube refrigerator. This implies higher operating frequencies, compared to the usual 1-2 Hz. At higher frequencies a number of properties of a pulse-tube system, such as length-to-diameter ratios of the pulse tubes and the regenerator, volume and configuration of a regenerator material, phase-shift control method, etc., change significantly, and, therefore, require detailed study. The interactions between various parameters of the pulse tube and of the linear compressor are very complicated. Therefore, as a first part of this research, we study the pulse tube at high frequencies, independent of the compressor. We generate high-frequency pressure oscillations, using a GM-type compressor and a special type of rotary valve, which enables us to operate at frequencies up to 20 Hz. Results of this work are described in this contribution.

  1. Design of a high frequency low voltage CMOS operational amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakoty

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented in this paper for the design of a high frequency CMOS operational amplifier (Op-Amp which operates at 3V power supply using tsmc 0.18 micron CMOS technology. The OPAMPdesigned is a two-stage CMOS OPAMP followed by an output buffer. This Operational Transconductance Amplifier (OTA employs a Miller capacitor and is compensated with a current buffer compensation technique. The unique behaviour of the MOS transistors in saturation region not only allows a designer to work at a low voltage, but also at a high frequency. Designing of two-stage op-ampsis a multi-dimensional-optimization problem where optimization of one or more parameters may easily result into degradation of others. The OPAMP is designed to exhibit a unity gain frequency of 2.02GHzand exhibits a gain of 49.02dB with a 60.50 phase margin. As compared to the conventional approach, the proposed compensation method results in a higher unity gain frequency under the same load condition.Design has been carried out in Tanner tools. Simulation results are verified using S-edit and W-edit.

  2. Design of a high frequency low voltage CMOS operational amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Kakoty

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A method is presented in this paper for the design of a high frequency CMOS operational amplifier (Op-Amp which operates at 3V power supply using tsmc 0.18 micron CMOS technology. The OPAMPdesigned is a two-stage CMOS OPAMP followed by an output buffer. This OperationalTransconductance Amplifier (OTA employs a Miller capacitor and is compensated with a current buffercompensation technique. The unique behaviour of the MOS transistors in saturation region not onlyallows a designer to work at a low voltage, but also at a high frequency. Designing of two-stage op-ampsis a multi-dimensional-optimization problem where optimization of one or more parameters may easilyresult into degradation of others. The OPAMP is designed to exhibit a unity gain frequency of 2.02GHzand exhibits a gain of 49.02dB with a 60.50 phase margin. As compared to the conventional approach, theproposed compensation method results in a higher unity gain frequency under the same load condition.Design has been carried out in Tanner tools. Simulation results are verified using S-edit and W-edit.

  3. Corrosion monitoring using high-frequency guided waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, P.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion can develop due to adverse environmental conditions during the life cycle of a range of industrial structures, e.g., offshore oil platforms, ships, and desalination plants. Generalized corrosion leading to wall thickness loss can cause the reduction of the strength and thus degradation of the structural integrity. The monitoring of corrosion damage in difficult to access areas can be achieved using high frequency guided waves propagating along the structure from accessible areas. Using standard ultrasonic wedge transducers with single sided access to the structure, guided wave modes were selectively generated that penetrate through the complete thickness of the structure. The wave propagation and interference of the different guided wave modes depends on the thickness of the structure. Laboratory experiments were conducted for wall thickness reduction due to milling of the steel structure. From the measured signal changes due to the wave mode interference the reduced wall thickness was monitored. Good agreement with theoretical predictions was achieved. The high frequency guided waves have the potential for corrosion damage monitoring at critical and difficult to access locations from a stand-off distance.

  4. Efficient Design of Sierpinski Fractal Antenna for High Frequency Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajdeep Singh

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A wideband published slot antenna appropriate for wireless code division multiple access (WCDMA and sustaining the international interoperability for microwave access (WiMAX applications is planned here. The antenna is fractal line fed and its construction is based on fractal geometry where the resonance frequency of antenna is dropped by applying iteration methods. Fractal antennas are the most suited for aerospace and UWB applications because of their low profile, light weight and low power handling capacity. They can be designed in a variety of shapes in order to obtain enhanced gain and bandwidth, dual band and circular polarization to even ultra-wideband operation. For the simulation process ANSOFT HFSS (high frequency structure simulator has been used. The effect of antenna dimensions and substrate parameters on the performance of antenna have been discussed. The antenna has been designed using the Arlon substrate with relative permittivity of 1.3 and a substrate of Sierpinski Carpet shaped placed on it. Feed used is the fractal line feed. The designed antenna is a low profile, small size and multiband antenna since it can be operated at different frequencies within the frequency range of 4.3GHz to 11GHz. It includes the frequencies used for wireless WCDMA application and used to receive and transmit a high-frequency signal.

  5. Planck 2013 results. VI. High Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Armitage-Caplan, C.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Atrio-Barandela, F.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bobin, J.; Bock, J.J.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bowyer, J.W.; Bridges, M.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R. -R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, L. -Y; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Church, S.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J. -M.; Désert, F. -X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Galeotta, S.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Giardino, G.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herent, O.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hou, Z.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Lasenby, A.; Laureijs, R.J.; Lawrence, C.R.; Jeune, M. Le; Leonardi, R.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; MacTavish, C.J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Matthai, F.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Mottet, S.; Munshi, D.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orieux, F.; Osborne, S.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Poutanen, T.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J. -L.; Rachen, J.P.; Racine, B.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Ricciardi, S.; Riller, T.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Sanselme, L.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savini, G.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Starck, J. -L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sureau, F.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Sygnet, J. -F.; Tauber, J.A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Techene, S.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 531 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (hereafter HFI), which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 473 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.7 to 4.6 arcmin. The detector noise per (effective) beam solid angle is respectively, 10, 6, 12 and 39 microKelvin in HFI four lowest frequency channel (100--353 GHz) and 13 and 14 kJy/sr for the 545 and 857 GHz channels. Using the 143 GHz channel as a reference, these two high frequency channels are intercalibrated within 5% and the 353 GHz relative calibration is at the percent level. The 100 and 217 GHz channels, which together with the 143 GHz channel determine the high-multipole part of the CMB power spectrum (50 < l <2500), are intercalibrated at better than 0.2 %.

  6. Advances in high frequency ultrasound separation of particulates from biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Pablo; Augustin, Mary Ann; Xu, Xin-Qing; Mawson, Raymond; Knoerzer, Kai

    2017-03-01

    In recent years the use of high frequency ultrasound standing waves (megasonics) for droplet or cell separation from biomass has emerged beyond the microfluidics scale into the litre to industrial scale applications. The principle for this separation technology relies on the differential positioning of individual droplets or particles across an ultrasonic standing wave field within the reactor and subsequent biomass material predisposition for separation via rapid droplet agglomeration or coalescence into larger entities. Large scale transducers have been characterised with sonochemiluminescence and hydrophones to enable better reactor designs. High frequency enhanced separation technology has been demonstrated at industrial scale for oil recovery in the palm oil industry and at litre scale to assist olive oil, coconut oil and milk fat separation. Other applications include algal cell dewatering and milk fat globule fractionation. Frequency selection depends on the material properties and structure in the biomass mixture. Higher frequencies (1 and 2MHz) have proven preferable for better separation of materials with smaller sized droplets such as milk fat globules. For palm oil and olive oil, separation has been demonstrated within the 400-600kHz region, which has high radical production, without detectable impact on product quality. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Microfluidic pumping through miniaturized channels driven by ultra-high frequency surface acoustic waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shilton, Richie J., E-mail: richard.shilton@iit.it [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Travagliati, Marco [Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Beltram, Fabio [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Center for Nanotechnology Innovation @ NEST, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Cecchini, Marco, E-mail: marco.cecchini@nano.cnr.it [NEST, Scuola Normale Superiore and Istituto Nanoscienze-CNR, Piazza San Silvestro 12, 56127 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-08-18

    Surface acoustic waves (SAWs) are an effective means to pump fluids through microchannel arrays within fully portable systems. The SAW-driven acoustic counterflow pumping process relies on a cascade phenomenon consisting of SAW transmission through the microchannel, SAW-driven fluid atomization, and subsequent coalescence. Here, we investigate miniaturization of device design, and study both SAW transmission through microchannels and the onset of SAW-driven atomization up to the ultra-high-frequency regime. Within the frequency range from 47.8 MHz to 754 MHz, we show that the acoustic power required to initiate SAW atomization remains constant, while transmission through microchannels is most effective when the channel widths w ≳ 10 λ, where λ is the SAW wavelength. By exploiting the enhanced SAW transmission through narrower channels at ultra-high frequencies, we discuss the relevant frequency-dependent length scales and demonstrate the scaling down of internal flow patterns and discuss their impact on device miniaturization strategies.

  8. Co/Ti-substituted M-type hexagonal ferrites for high-frequency multilayer inductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bierlich, S.; Reimann, T. [University of Applied Sciences Jena, Department of SciTec, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany); Bartsch, H. [Technical University Ilmenau, IMN MacroNano, G.-Kirchhoff-Str. 7, 98693 Ilmenau (Germany); Töpfer, J., E-mail: joerg.toepfer@fh-jena.de [University of Applied Sciences Jena, Department of SciTec, Carl-Zeiss-Promenade 2, 07745 Jena (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The sintering behavior, microstructure and permeability of Co/Ti-substituted M-type hexagonal ferrites BaCo{sub x}Ti{sub x}Fe{sub 12−2x}O{sub 19} (1.0≤x≤1.4) was studied for applications as multilayer inductors in the high-frequency range up to 2 GHz. Single-phase M-type ferrites were obtained after calcination at 1000 °C. The saturation magnetization and coercivity decrease with x and hysteresis measurements illustrate a gradual transition of the anisotropy from uniaxial to planar. Addition of 5 wt% of a BBSZ glass allows densification at 900 °C through liquid-phase sintering. The permeability of samples sintered at 900 °C increases with the Co/Ti substitution and reaches its maximum of µ′=16 at 1 MHz at x=1.3 with a resonance frequency f{sub r}≥1 GHz. Monolithic ferrite multilayer inductors were fabricated with printed Ag coil patterns by co-firing at 900 °C. It is shown that Co/Ti-substituted hexagonal M-type ferrite is an excellent material for the high-frequency multilayer inductors. - Highlights: • Saturation magnetization and coercivity of Co–Ti substituted M-type hexaferrites BaFe{sub 12−2x}Co{sub x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 19} decrease with x. • Ferrites were sintered at low-temperature of T=900 °C using a BBSZ glass additive. • Large initial permeability of µ′=17 was obtained at x=1.3 for low-temperature sintered Co/Ti-substituted ferrites. • Monolithic ferrite multilayer inductor with Co/Ti substituted M-type ferrite layers and Ag metallization was cofired at 900 °C. • Demonstrates, that monolithic ferrite multilayer based on Co/Ti substituted hexagonal ferrites can be operated up to high frequency of 1 GHz.

  9. High Frequency Yoga Breathing: A Review of Nervous System Effects and Adjunctive Therapeutic and Premeditation Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Andaházy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High frequency yoga breathing (HFYB results in a shifting of the autonomic nervous system balance towards sympathetic nervous system dominance. In an effort to more fully understand the complex effects of this form of yogic breath-work, tests are being conducted on practitioners’ physiological and neurological response processes. Studies on heart rate variability (HRV indicating cardiac autonomic control have shown a resulting reduction of vagal activity following HFYB, leading to passive sympathetic dominance without overt excitation or exhaustion. Comparative cognitive tests taken after the practice have shown that HFYB results in reduced auditory and visual reaction times, and a decrease in optical illusion. The vigilant, wakeful, yet relaxed state induced by HFYB has been associated with improvements in attention, memory, sensorimotor performance, and mood. As breathing bridges conscious and unconscious functions, the potential role of HFYB as an adjunctive therapeutic intervention as well as its possible application in preparation for meditation is considered.

  10. Microscale capillary wave turbulence excited by high frequency vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Jeremy; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2013-03-19

    Low frequency (O(10 Hz-10 kHz)) vibration excitation of capillary waves has been extensively studied for nearly two centuries. Such waves appear at the excitation frequency or at rational multiples of the excitation frequency through nonlinear coupling as a result of the finite displacement of the wave, most often at one-half the excitation frequency in so-called Faraday waves and twice this frequency in superharmonic waves. Less understood, however, are the dynamics of capillary waves driven by high-frequency vibration (>O(100 kHz)) and small interface length scales, an arrangement ideal for a broad variety of applications, from nebulizers for pulmonary drug delivery to complex nanoparticle synthesis. In the few studies conducted to date, a marked departure from the predictions of classical Faraday wave theory has been shown, with the appearance of broadband capillary wave generation from 100 Hz to the excitation frequency and beyond, without a clear explanation. We show that weak wave turbulence is the dominant mechanism in the behavior of the system, as evident from wave height frequency spectra that closely follow the Rayleigh-Jeans spectral response η ≈ ω(-17/12) as a consequence of a period-halving, weakly turbulent cascade that appears within a 1 mm water drop whether driven by thickness-mode or surface acoustic Rayleigh wave excitation. However, such a cascade is one-way, from low to high frequencies. The mechanism of exciting the cascade with high-frequency acoustic waves is an acoustic streaming-driven turbulent jet in the fluid bulk, driving the fundamental capillary wave resonance through the well-known coupling between bulk flow and surface waves. Unlike capillary waves, turbulent acoustic streaming can exhibit subharmonic cascades from high to low frequencies; here it appears from the excitation frequency all the way to the fundamental modes of the capillary wave at some four orders of magnitude in frequency less than the excitation frequency

  11. High frequency oscillations are associated with cognitive processing in human recognition memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucewicz, Michal T; Cimbalnik, Jan; Matsumoto, Joseph Y; Brinkmann, Benjamin H; Bower, Mark R; Vasoli, Vincent; Sulc, Vlastimil; Meyer, Fred; Marsh, W R; Stead, S M; Worrell, Gregory A

    2014-08-01

    High frequency oscillations are associated with normal brain function, but also increasingly recognized as potential biomarkers of the epileptogenic brain. Their role in human cognition has been predominantly studied in classical gamma frequencies (30-100 Hz), which reflect neuronal network coordination involved in attention, learning and memory. Invasive brain recordings in animals and humans demonstrate that physiological oscillations extend beyond the gamma frequency range, but their function in human cognitive processing has not been fully elucidated. Here we investigate high frequency oscillations spanning the high gamma (50-125 Hz), ripple (125-250 Hz) and fast ripple (250-500 Hz) frequency bands using intracranial recordings from 12 patients (five males and seven females, age 21-63 years) during memory encoding and recall of a series of affectively charged images. Presentation of the images induced high frequency oscillations in all three studied bands within the primary visual, limbic and higher order cortical regions in a sequence consistent with the visual processing stream. These induced oscillations were detected on individual electrodes localized in the amygdala, hippocampus and specific neocortical areas, revealing discrete oscillations of characteristic frequency, duration and latency from image presentation. Memory encoding and recall significantly modulated the number of induced high gamma, ripple and fast ripple detections in the studied structures, which was greater in the primary sensory areas during the encoding (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = 0.002) and in the higher-order cortical association areas during the recall (Wilcoxon rank sum test, P = 0.001) of memorized images. Furthermore, the induced high gamma, ripple and fast ripple responses discriminated the encoded and the affectively charged images. In summary, our results show that high frequency oscillations, spanning a wide range of frequencies, are associated with memory processing and

  12. Automation of printing machine

    OpenAIRE

    Sušil, David

    2016-01-01

    Bachelor thesis is focused on the automation of the printing machine and comparing the two types of printing machines. The first chapter deals with the history of printing, typesettings, printing techniques and various kinds of bookbinding. The second chapter describes the difference between sheet-fed printing machines and offset printing machines, the difference between two representatives of rotary machines, technological process of the products on these machines, the description of the mac...

  13. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amekpewu, M., E-mail: mamek219@gmail.com [Department of Applied Physics, University for Development Studies, Navrongo (Ghana); Mensah, S.Y. [Department of Physics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana); Musah, R. [Department of Applied Physics, University for Development Studies, Navrongo (Ghana); Mensah, N.G. [Department of Mathematics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana); Abukari, S.S.; Dompreh, K.A. [Department of Physics, College of Agriculture and Natural Sciences, U.C.C. (Ghana)

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac–dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons’ source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  14. Planck early results. VI. The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucher, M.; Castex, G.; Colley, J.-M.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 336 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545...... and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4′. The white noise level is around 1.5 μK degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217 GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies between 100 and 353 GHz and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created...... to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be able to achieve, or exceed, the science goals of the Planck project. © ESO, 2011....

  15. Gravitational-wave astronomy: the high-frequency window

    CERN Document Server

    Andersson, N; Andersson, Nils; Kokkotas, Kostas D

    2004-01-01

    This contribution is divided in two parts. The first part provides a text-book level introduction to gravitational radiation. The key concepts required for a discussion of gravitational-wave physics are introduced. In particular, the quadrupole formula is applied to the anticipated ``bread-and-butter'' source for detectors like LIGO, GEO600, EGO and TAMA300: inspiralling compact binaries. The second part provides a brief review of high frequency gravitational waves. In the frequency range above (say) 100Hz, gravitational collapse, rotational instabilities and oscillations of the remnant compact objects are potentially important sources of gravitational waves. Significant and unique information concerning the various stages of collapse, the evolution of protoneutron stars and the details of the supranuclear equation of state of such objects can be drawn from careful study of the gravitational-wave signal. As the amount of exciting physics one may be able to study via the detections of gravitational waves from ...

  16. High frequency techniques an introduction to RF and microwave engineering

    CERN Document Server

    White, Joseph F

    2004-01-01

    A practical guide for today's wireless engineerHigh Frequency Techniques: An Introduction to RF and Microwave Engineering is a clearly written classical circuit and field theory text illustrated with modern computer simulation software. The book's ten chapters cover: *The origins and current uses of wireless transmission *A review of AC analysis, Kirchhoff's laws, RLC elements, skin effect, and introduction to the use of computer simulation software*Resonators, Q definitions, and Q-based impedance matching *Transmission lines, waves, VSWR, reflection phenomena, Fano's reflection bandwidth limits, telegrapher, and impedance transformation equations*Development and in-depth use of the Smith Chart *Matrix algebra with Z, Y, ABCD, S, and T matrix applications*An unusually thorough introduction to electromagnetic field theory, step-by-step development of vector calculus, Maxwell's equations, waveguides, propagation, and antennas*Backward wave, branch line, rat race and Wilkinson couplers, impedance measurements, a...

  17. High Frequency Stochastic Resonance in Periodically Driven Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dykman, M I

    1993-01-01

    Abstract: High frequency stochastic resonance (SR) phenomena, associated with fluctuational transitions between coexisting periodic attractors, have been investigated experimentally in an electronic model of a single-well Duffing oscillator bistable in a nearly resonant field of frequency $\\omega_F$. It is shown that, with increasing noise intensity, the signal/noise ratio (SNR) for a signal due to a weak trial force of frequency $\\Omega decreases again at higher noise intensities: behaviour similar to that observed previously for conventional (low frequency) SR in systems with static bistable potentials. The stochastic enhancement of the SNR of an additional signal at the mirror-reflected frequency $\\vert Ømega - 2 ømega_F \\vert$ is also observed, in accordance with theoretical predictions. Relationships with phenomena in nonlinear optics are discussed.

  18. High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-05-01

    High frequency conductivity of hot electrons in undoped single walled achiral Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) under the influence of ac-dc driven fields was considered. We investigated semi-classically Boltzmann's transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons' source by deriving the current densities in CNTs. Plots of the normalized current density versus frequency of ac-field revealed an increase in both the minimum and maximum peaks of normalized current density at lower frequencies as a result of a strong injection of hot electrons. The applied ac-field plays a twofold role of suppressing the space-charge instability in CNTs and simultaneously pumping an energy for lower frequency generation and amplification of THz radiations. These have enormous promising applications in very different areas of science and technology.

  19. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated. Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used, an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency, which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system. Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well. Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal, an experimental imaging system is also built. Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz. Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  20. HIGH FREQUENCY INDUCTION WELDING OF HIGH SILICON STEEL TUBES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Miranda Alé

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available High-Si steel is a low cost alternative for the fabrication of tubular structures resistant to atmospheric corrosion. However, the literature has often pointed out that steels presenting a higher Si content and/or a lower Mn/Si ratio have higher susceptibility to defects at the weld bond line during HFIW (High Frequency Induction Welding process, which has been widely used for manufacturing small diameter tubes. In this study the effect of the HFIW conditions on the quality of steel tubes with high-Si content and low Mn/Si ratio is investigated. The quality of welded tubes was determined by flare test and the defects in the bond line were identified by SEM. It has been found that higher welding speeds, V-convergence angles and power input should be applied in welding of high-Si steel, when compared to similar strength C-Mn steel.

  1. MHD waves generated by high-frequency photospheric vortex motions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Fedun

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss simulations of MHD wave generation and propagation through a three-dimensional open magnetic flux tube in the lower solar atmosphere. By using self-similar analytical solutions for modelling the magnetic field in Cartesian coordinate system, we have constructed a 3-D magnetohydrostatic configuration which is used as the initial condition for non-linear MHD wave simulations. For a driver we have implemented a high-frequency vortex-type motion at the footpoint region of the open magnetic flux tube. It is found that the implemented swirly source is able to excite different types of wave modes, i.e. sausage, kink and torsional Alfvén modes. Analysing these waves by magneto-seismology tools could provide insight into the magnetic structure of the lower solar atmosphere.

  2. High frequency nano-optomechanical disk resonators in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, E; Nguyen, D T; Hease, W; Lemaître, A; Ducci, S; Leo, G; Favero, I

    2015-01-01

    Vibrating nano- and micromechanical resonators have been the subject of research aiming at ultrasensitive mass sensors for mass spectrometry, chemical analysis and biomedical diagnosis. Unfortunately, their merits diminish dramatically in liquids due to dissipative mechanisms like viscosity and acoustic losses. A push towards faster and lighter miniaturized nanodevices would enable improved performances, provided dissipation was controlled and novel techniques were available to efficiently drive and read-out their minute displacement. Here we report on a nano-optomechanical approach to this problem using miniature semiconductor disks. These devices combine mechanical motion at high frequency above the GHz, ultra-low mass of a few picograms, and moderate dissipation in liquids. We show that high-sensitivity optical measurements allow to direct resolve their thermally driven Brownian vibrations, even in the most dissipative liquids. Thanks to this novel technique, we experimentally, numerically and analytically...

  3. Dynamical Structures of High-Frequency Financial Data

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, K; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y; Yoon, S M; Chang, Ki-Ho; Kim, Kyungsik; Kim, Soo Yong; Kim, Yup; Yoon, Seong-Min

    2005-01-01

    We study the dynamical behavior of high-frequency data from the Korean Stock Price Index (KOSPI) using the movement of returns in Korean financial markets. The dynamical behavior for a binarized series of our models is not completely random. The conditional probability is numerically estimated from a return series of KOSPI tick data. Non-trivial probability structures can be constituted from binary time series of autoregressive (AR), logit, and probit models, for which the Akaike Information Criterion shows a minimum value at the 15th order. From our results, we find that the value of the correct match ratio for the AR model is slightly larger than the findings of other models.

  4. High-Frequency Acoustic Sediment Classification in Shallow Water

    CERN Document Server

    Bentrem, F W; Kalcic, M T; Duncan, M E; Bentrem, Frank W.; Sample, John; Kalcic, Maria T.; Duncan, Michael E.

    2002-01-01

    A geoacoustic inversion technique for high-frequency (12 kHz) multibeam sonar data is presented as a means to classify the seafloor sediment in shallow water (40-300 m). The inversion makes use of backscattered data at a variety of grazing angles to estimate mean grain size. The need for sediment type and the large amounts of multibeam data being collected with the Naval Oceanographic Office's Simrad EM 121A systems, have fostered the development of algorithms to process the EM 121A acoustic backscatter into maps of sediment type. The APL-UW (Applied Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington) backscattering model is used with simulated annealing to invert for six geoacoustic parameters. For the inversion, three of the parameters are constrained according to empirical correlations with mean grain size, which is introduced as an unconstrained parameter. The four unconstrained (free) parameters are mean grain size, sediment volume interaction, and two seafloor roughness parameters. Acoustic sediment cla...

  5. High frequency modeling of power transformers. Stresses and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerkan, Eilert

    2005-05-15

    In this thesis a reliable, versatile and rigorous method for high frequency power transformer modeling is searched and established. The purpose is to apply this model to sensitivity analysis of FRA (Frequency Response Analysis) which is a quite new diagnostic method for assessing the mechanical integrity of power transformer windings on-site. The method should be versatile in terms of being able to estimate internal and external over voltages and resonances. Another important aspect is that the method chosen is suitable for real transformer geometries. In order to verify the suitability of the model for real transformers, a specific test-object is used. This is a 20MVA transformer, and details are given in chapter 1.4. The high frequency power transformer model is established from geometrical and constructional information from the manufacturer, together with available material characteristics. All circuit parameters in the lumped circuit representation are calculated based on these data. No empirical modifications need to be performed. Comparison shows capability of reasonable accuracy in the range from 10 khz to 1 MHz utilizing a disc-to-disc representation. A compromise between accuracy of model due to discretization and complexity of the model in a turn-to-turn representation is inevitable. The importance of the iron core is emphasized through a comparison of representations with/without the core included. Frequency-dependent phenomena are accurately represented using an isotropic equivalent for windings and core, even with a coarse mesh for the FEM-model. This is achieved through a frequency-dependent complex permeability representation of the materials. This permeability is deduced from an analytical solution of the frequency-dependent magnetic field inside the conductors and the core. The importance of dielectric losses in a transformer model is also assessed. Since published data on the high frequency properties of press board are limited, some initial

  6. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  7. Electrostatic Instabilities at High Frequency in a Plasma Shock Front

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LV Jian-Hong; HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei

    2007-01-01

    New electrostatic instabilities in the plasma shock front are reported.These instabilities are driven by the electrostatic field which is caused by charge separation and the parameter gradients in a plasma shock front.The linear analysis to the high frequency branch of electrostatic instabilities has been carried out and the dispersion relations are obtained numerically.There are unstable disturbing waves in both the parallel and perpendicular directions of shock propagation.The real frequencies of both unstable waves are similar to the electron electrostatic wave,and the unstable growth rate in the parallel direction is much greater than the one in the perpendicular direction.The dependence of growth rates on the electric field and parameter gradients is also presented.

  8. High-frequency supersonic heating of hydrogen for propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonneville, Jacques M.

    1963-03-15

    The possibility of increasing the specific impulse of hydrogen by supersonic heating is shown on the basis of thermodynamics. The application of high-frequency electric fields to heat the gas permits a control over the heating rates in the nozzle, and results in a reduction in energy losses to walls, electrodes, etc. The efficiencies of the various energy transfer processes are considered in some detail. A simple process of expansion and heating is presented. Results of calculations of heat transfer rates to the nozzle wall are given. A consistent set of electron densities and electric fields are also calculated and presented. Some qualitative results of experimental work previously carried out are included. It is concluded that the process should increase the specific impulse of hydrogen appreciably, in a reasonably efficient manner, and that further experimental work is indicated. (auth)

  9. High-frequency thermal processes in harmonic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A

    2016-01-01

    We consider two high-frequency thermal processes in uniformly heated harmonic crystals relaxing towards equilibrium: (i) equilibration of kinetic and potential energies and (ii) redistribution of energy among spatial directions. Equation describing these processes with deterministic initial conditions is derived. Solution of the equation shows that characteristic time of these processes is of the order of ten periods of atomic vibrations. After that time the system practically reaches the stationary state. It is shown analytically that in harmonic crystals temperature tensor is not isotropic even in the stationary state. As an example, harmonic triangular lattice is considered. Simple formula relating the stationary value of the temperature tensor and initial conditions is derived. The function describing equilibration of kinetic and potential energies is obtained. It is shown that the difference between the energies (Lagrangian) oscillates around zero. Amplitude of these oscillations decays inversely proport...

  10. High-frequency shear-horizontal surface acoustic wave sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branch, Darren W

    2013-05-07

    A Love wave sensor uses a single-phase unidirectional interdigital transducer (IDT) on a piezoelectric substrate for leaky surface acoustic wave generation. The IDT design minimizes propagation losses, bulk wave interferences, provides a highly linear phase response, and eliminates the need for impedance matching. As an example, a high frequency (.about.300-400 MHz) surface acoustic wave (SAW) transducer enables efficient excitation of shear-horizontal waves on 36.degree. Y-cut lithium tantalate (LTO) giving a highly linear phase response (2.8.degree. P-P). The sensor has the ability to detect at the pg/mm.sup.2 level and can perform multi-analyte detection in real-time. The sensor can be used for rapid autonomous detection of pathogenic microorganisms and bioagents by field deployable platforms.

  11. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli ( E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  12. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U.; Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K.; Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J.

    2017-03-01

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O2) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H2O2 dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H2O2 addition with O2 injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH•, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O2 injected and H2O2 added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  13. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge application in antibacterial activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, M. W.; Choi, S.; Lyakhov, K.; Shaislamov, U. [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Mongre, R. K.; Jeong, D. K. [Jeju National University, Faculty of Biotechnology (Korea, Republic of); Suresh, R.; Lee, H. J., E-mail: hjlee@jejunu.ac.kr [Jeju National University, Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    Plasma discharge is a novel disinfection and effectual inactivation approach to treat microorganisms in aqueous systems. Inactivation of Gram-negative Escherichia coli (E. coli) by generating high-frequency, high-voltage, oxygen (O{sub 2}) injected and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) added discharge in water was achieved. The effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose and oxygen injection rate on electrical characteristics of discharge and E. coli disinfection has been reported. Microbial log reduction dependent on H{sub 2}O{sub 2} addition with O{sub 2} injection was observed. The time variation of the inactivation efficiency quantified by the log reduction of the initial E. coli population on the basis of optical density measurement was reported. The analysis of emission spectrum recorded after discharge occurrence illustrated the formation of oxidant species (OH{sup •}, H, and O). Interestingly, the results demonstrated that O{sub 2} injected and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} added, underwater plasma discharge had fabulous impact on the E. coli sterilization. The oxygen injection notably reduced the voltage needed for generating breakdown in flowing water and escalated the power of discharge pulses. No impact of hydrogen peroxide addition on breakdown voltage was observed. A significant role of oxidant species in bacterial inactivation also has been identified. Furthermore the E. coli survivability in plasma treated water with oxygen injection and hydrogen peroxide addition drastically reduced to zero. The time course study also showed that the retardant effect on E. coli colony multiplication in plasma treated water was favorable, observed after long time. High-frequency underwater plasma discharge based biological applications is technically relevant and would act as baseline data for the development of novel antibacterial processing strategies.

  14. Trans-Ionospheric High Frequency Signal Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.; Gillespie, R. J.

    2012-09-01

    All electromagnetic radiation undergoes refraction as it propagates through the atmosphere. Tropospheric refraction is largely governed by interaction of the radiation with bounded electrons; ionospheric refraction is primarily governed by free electron interactions. The latter phenomenon is important for propagation and refraction of High Frequency (HF) through Extremely High Frequency (EHF) signals. The degree to which HF to EHF signals are bent is dependent upon the integrated refractive effect of the ionosphere: a result of the signal's angle of incidence with the boundaries between adjacent ionospheric regions, the magnitude of change in electron density between two regions, as well as the frequency of the signal. In the case of HF signals, the ionosphere may bend the signal so much that it is directed back down towards the Earth, making over-the-horizon HF radio communication possible. Ionospheric refraction is a major challenge for space-based geolocation applications, where the ionosphere is typically the biggest contributor to geolocation error. Accurate geolocation requires an algorithm that accurately reflects the physical process of a signal transiting the ionosphere, and an accurate specification of the ionosphere at the time of the signal transit. Currently implemented solutions are limited by both the algorithm chosen to perform the ray trace and by the accuracy of the ionospheric data used in the calculations. This paper describes a technique for adapting a ray tracing algorithm to run on a General-Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU or GPU), and using a physics-based model specifying the ionosphere at the time of signal transit. This technique allows simultaneous geolocation of significantly more signals than an equivalently priced Central Processing Unit (CPU) based system. Additionally, because this technique makes use of the most widely accepted numeric algorithm for ionospheric ray tracing and a timely physics-based model of the ionosphere

  15. High Frequency Plant Regeneration of Musa paradisiaca cv. Karibale Monthan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shashi Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available High frequency plant regeneration protocol has been standardized from banana cultivar Musa paradisiaca cv. Karibale Monthan, an endemic cultivar of Malnad region of Karnataka. The fruits are used as glomerular protective to solve kidney problems. To minimize the microbial contamination and to promote healthy growth, explants were treated with 70 % absolute alcohol for 6 min, 0.1 % Mercuric chloride for 10 min and 0.2 % for 10 min, 1 % Sodium hypochlorite for 15 min, 0.1 % Cefotaxime for 5 min and 0.05 % Gentamicin for 5 min. The high frequency shoot initiation (93.33 % was recorded at 5 mg/l BAP. The synergetic effect of BAP (4 to 6 mg/l, TDZ (0.1 to 1.2 mg/l and coconut water (0.1 to 0.9 ml/l induced multiple shoot buds and it was optimized at the concentration of 5 mg/l BAP, 0.5 mg/l TDZ and 0.5 ml/l coconut water with 15.90 ± 1.66 frequency of shoots per propagule. Supplementation of 1.0 mg/l IBA induced 5.33 ± 1.21 numbers of roots with a mean root length of 7.50 ± 1.87 roots. The 99% of plantlets with distinct roots and shoots were successfully acclimatized in the green house and transferred to the field to evaluate the agro-morphological variations. The weight of the bunch (kg, number of hands in a bunch, number of fingers in a hand, length of the finger (cm, girth of the finger (cm and girth of the pseudostem (cm exhibited by in vitro plants were higher than the in vivo plants.

  16. Three-dimensional metrology for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Vadim; Harding, Kevin

    2017-05-01

    Novel materials and printing technologies can enable rapid and low cost prototyping and manufacturing of electronic devices with increased flexibility and complexity. However, robust and on-demand printing of circuits will require accurate metrology methods that can measure micron level patterns to verify proper production. This paper presents an evaluation of a range of optical gaging tools ranging from confocal to area 3D systems to determine metrological capability for a range of key parameters from trace thickness to solder paste volumes. Finally, this paper will present a select set of optimized measurement tools detailing both capabilities and gaps in the available technologies needed to fully realize the potential of printed electronics.

  17. High frequency modeling of power transformers. Stresses and diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjerkan, Eilert

    2005-05-15

    In this thesis a reliable, versatile and rigorous method for high frequency power transformer modeling is searched and established. The purpose is to apply this model to sensitivity analysis of FRA (Frequency Response Analysis) which is a quite new diagnostic method for assessing the mechanical integrity of power transformer windings on-site. The method should be versatile in terms of being able to estimate internal and external over voltages and resonances. Another important aspect is that the method chosen is suitable for real transformer geometries. In order to verify the suitability of the model for real transformers, a specific test-object is used. This is a 20MVA transformer, and details are given in chapter 1.4. The high frequency power transformer model is established from geometrical and constructional information from the manufacturer, together with available material characteristics. All circuit parameters in the lumped circuit representation are calculated based on these data. No empirical modifications need to be performed. Comparison shows capability of reasonable accuracy in the range from 10 khz to 1 MHz utilizing a disc-to-disc representation. A compromise between accuracy of model due to discretization and complexity of the model in a turn-to-turn representation is inevitable. The importance of the iron core is emphasized through a comparison of representations with/without the core included. Frequency-dependent phenomena are accurately represented using an isotropic equivalent for windings and core, even with a coarse mesh for the FEM-model. This is achieved through a frequency-dependent complex permeability representation of the materials. This permeability is deduced from an analytical solution of the frequency-dependent magnetic field inside the conductors and the core. The importance of dielectric losses in a transformer model is also assessed. Since published data on the high frequency properties of press board are limited, some initial

  18. 40 MHz high-frequency ultrafast ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chih-Chung; Chen, Pei-Yu; Peng, Po-Hsun; Lee, Po-Yang

    2017-06-01

    Ultrafast high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging based on coherent-plane-wave compounding has been developed for many biomedical applications. Most coherent-plane-wave compounding systems typically operate at 3-15 MHz, and the image resolution for this frequency range is not sufficient for visualizing microstructure tissues. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to implement a high-frequency ultrafast ultrasound imaging operating at 40 MHz. The plane-wave compounding imaging and conventional multifocus B-mode imaging were performed using the Field II toolbox of MATLAB in simulation study. In experiments, plane-wave compounding images were obtained from a 256 channel ultrasound research platform with a 40 MHz array transducer. All images were produced by point-spread functions and cyst phantoms. The in vivo experiment was performed from zebrafish. Since high-frequency ultrasound exhibits a lower penetration, chirp excitation was applied to increase the imaging depth in simulation. The simulation results showed that a lateral resolution of up to 66.93 μm and a contrast of up to 56.41 dB were achieved when using 75-angles plane waves in compounding imaging. The experimental results showed that a lateral resolution of up to 74.83 μm and a contrast of up to 44.62 dB were achieved when using 75-angles plane waves in compounding imaging. The dead zone and compounding noise are about 1.2 mm and 2.0 mm in depth for experimental compounding imaging, respectively. The structure of zebrafish heart was observed clearly using plane-wave compounding imaging. The use of fewer than 23 angles for compounding allowed a frame rate higher than 1000 frames per second. However, the compounding imaging exhibits a similar lateral resolution of about 72 μm as the angle of plane wave is higher than 10 angles. This study shows the highest operational frequency for ultrafast high-frame-rate ultrasound imaging. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  19. The comparison of three high-frequency chest compression devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong W; Lee, Jongwon; Warwick, Warren J

    2008-01-01

    High-frequency chest compression (HFCC) is shown to enhance clearance of pulmonary airway secretions. Several HFCC devices have been designed to provide this therapy. Standard equipment consists of an air pulse generator attached by lengths of tubing to an adjustable, inflatable vest/jacket (V/J) garment. In this study, the V/Js were fitted over a mannequin. The three device air pulse generators produced characteristic waveform patterns. The variations in the frequency and pressure setting of devices were consistent with specific device design features. These studies suggest that a better understanding of the effects of different waveform, frequency, and pressure combinations may improve HFCC therapeutic efficacy of three different HFCC machines. The V/J component of HFCC devices delivers the compressive pulses to the chest wall to produce both airflow through and oscillatory effects in the airways. The V/J pressures of three HFCC machines were measured and analyzed to characterize the frequency, pressure, and waveform patterns generated by each of three device models. The dimensions of all V/Js were adjusted to a circumference of approximately 110% of the chest circumference. The V/J pressures were measured, and maximum, minimum, and mean pressure, pulse pressure, and root mean square of three pulse generators were calculated. Jacket pressures ranged between 2 and 34 mmHg. The 103 and 104 models' pulse pressures increased with the increase in HFCC frequency at constant dial pressure. With the ICS the pulse pressure decreased when the frequency increased. The waveforms of models 103 and 104 were symmetric sine wave and asymmetric sine wave patterns, respectively. The ICS had a triangular waveform. At 20 Hz, both the 103 and 104 were symmetric sine waveform but the ICS remained triangular. Maximum crest factors emerged in low-frequency and high-pressure settings for the ICS and in the high-frequency and low-pressure settings for models 103 and 104. Recognizing the

  20. Influence of the pad printing plate‘ printing element depth on the quality of the printed product

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlović, Živko; Dedijer, Sandra; Pál, Magdolna; Cigula, Tomislav

    2013-01-01

    One of the biggest challenges in mass printing is repeatability and stability of the ink transfer from the printing plate onto the printing substrate. The pad printing is characterised by indirect ink transfer from a gravure printing plate. Beside area of the printing elements, on the pad printing plate one should take into account their depth as it is a factor which directly influences the printing ink quantity, i.e. overall quality of the printed product. The photopolymer pad printing...

  1. Theory of High Frequency Rectification by Silicon Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethe, H. A.

    1942-10-29

    The excellent performance of British "red dot" crystals is explained as due to the knife edge contact against a polished surface. High frequency rectification depends critically on the capacity of the rectifying boundary layer of the crystal, C. For high conversion efficiency, the product of this capacity and of the "forward" (bulk) resistance R {sub b} of the crystal must be small. For a knife edge, this product depends primarily on the breadth of the knife edge and very little upon its length. The contact can therefore have a rather large area which prevents burn-out. For a wavelength of 10 cm. the computations show that the breadth of the knife edge should be less than about 10 {sup -3} cm. For a point contact the radius must be less than 1.5 x 10 {sup -3} cm. and the resulting small area is conducive to burn-out. The effect of "tapping" is probably to reduce the area of contact. (auth)

  2. Refraction of high frequency noise in an arbitrary jet flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavaran, Abbas; Krejsa, Eugene A.

    1994-01-01

    Refraction of high frequency noise by mean flow gradients in a jet is studied using the ray-tracing methods of geometrical acoustics. Both the two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) formulations are considered. In the former case, the mean flow is assumed parallel and the governing propagation equations are described by a system of four first order ordinary differential equations. The 3D formulation, on the other hand, accounts for the jet spreading as well as the axial flow development. In this case, a system of six first order differential equations are solved to trace a ray from its source location to an observer in the far field. For subsonic jets with a small spreading angle both methods lead to similar results outside the zone of silence. However, with increasing jet speed the two prediction models diverge to the point where the parallel flow assumption is no longer justified. The Doppler factor of supersonic jets as influenced by the refraction effects is discussed and compared with the conventional modified Doppler factor.

  3. Ultra high frequency induction welding of powder metal compacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Çavdar, Uǧur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The application of the iron based Powder Metal (PM compacts in Ultra High Frequency Induction Welding (UHFIW were reviewed. These PM compacts are used to produce cogs. This study investigates the methods of joining PM materials enforceability with UHFIW in the industry application. Maximum stress and maximum strain of welded PM compacts were determined by three point bending and strength tests. Microhardness and microstructure of induction welded compacts were determined.Soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia de polvos de metal compactados. Se ha realizado un estudio de la aplicación de polvos de metal (PM de base hierro compactados por soldadura por inducción de ultra alta frecuencia (UHFIW. Estos polvos de metal compactados se utilizan para producir engranajes. Este estudio investiga los métodos de uni.n de los materiales de PM con UHFIW en su aplicación en la industria. La máxima tensión y la máxima deformación de los polvos de metal compactados soldados fueron determinadas por flexión en tres puntos y prueba de resistencia. Se determinó la microdureza y la microestructura de los polvos compactados por soldadura por inducción.

  4. High frequency chest compression effects heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jongwon; Lee, Yong W; Warwick, Warren J

    2007-01-01

    High frequency chest compression (HFCC) supplies a sequence of air pulses through a jacket worn by a patient to remove excessive mucus for the treatment or prevention of lung disease patients. The air pulses produced from the pulse generator propagates over the thorax delivering the vibration and compression energy. A number of studies have demonstrated that the HFCC system increases the ability to clear mucus and improves lung function. Few studies have examined the change in instantaneous heart rate (iHR) and heart rate variability (HRV) during the HFCC therapy. The purpose of this study is to measure the change of HRV with four experimental protocols: (a) without HFCC, (b) during Inflated, (c)HFCC at 6Hz, and (d) HFCC at 21Hz. The nonlinearity and regularity of HRV was assessed by approximate entropy (ApEn), a method used to quantify the complexities and randomness. To compute the ApEn, we sectioned with a total of eight epochs and displayed the ApEn over the each epoch. Our results show significant differences in the both the iHR and HRV between the experimental protocols. The iHR was elevated at both the (c) 6Hz and (d) 21Hz condition from without HFCC (10%, 16%, respectively). We also found that the HFCC system tends to increase the HRV. Our study suggests that monitoring iHR and HRV are very important physiological indexes during HFCC therapy.

  5. High-frequency chest compression: a summary of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosman, Cara F; Jones, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC), summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  6. Improving NASICON Sinterability through Crystallization under High Frequency Electrical Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya eLisenker

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high frequency (HF electric fields on the crystallization and sintering rates of a lithium aluminum germanium phosphate (LAGP ion conducting ceramic was investigated. LAGP with the nominal composition Li1.5Al0.5Ge1.5(PO43 was crystallized and sintered, both conventionally and under effect of electrical field. Electrical field application, of 300V/cm at 1MHz, produced up to a 40% improvement in sintering rate of LAGP that was crystallized and sintered under the HF field. Heat sink effect of the electrodes appears to arrest thermal runaway and subsequent flash behavior. Sintered pellets were characterized using XRD, SEM, TEM and EIS to compare conventionally and field sintered processes. The as-sintered structure appears largely unaffected by the field as the sintering curves tend to converge beyond initial stages of sintering. Differences in densities and microstructure after 1 hour of sintering were minor with measured sintering strains of 31% vs. 26% with and without field, respectively . Ionic conductivity of the sintered pellets was evaluated and no deterioration due to the use of HF field was noted, though capacitance of grain boundaries due to secondary phases was significantly increased.

  7. High frequency of BRAF V600E mutations in ameloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurppa, Kari J; Catón, Javier; Morgan, Peter R; Ristimäki, Ari; Ruhin, Blandine; Kellokoski, Jari; Elenius, Klaus; Heikinheimo, Kristiina

    2014-04-01

    Ameloblastoma is a benign but locally infiltrative odontogenic neoplasm. Although ameloblastomas rarely metastasise, recurrences together with radical surgery often result in facial deformity and significant morbidity. Development of non-invasive therapies has been precluded by a lack of understanding of the molecular background of ameloblastoma pathogenesis. When addressing the role of ERBB receptors as potential new targets for ameloblastoma, we discovered significant EGFR over-expression in clinical samples using real-time RT-PCR, but observed variable sensitivity of novel primary ameloblastoma cells to EGFR-targeted drugs in vitro. In the quest for mutations downstream of EGFR that could explain this apparent discrepancy, Sanger sequencing revealed an oncogenic BRAF V600E mutation in the cell line resistant to EGFR inhibition. Further analysis of the clinical samples by Sanger sequencing and BRAF V600E-specific immunohistochemistry demonstrated a high frequency of BRAF V600E mutations (15 of 24 samples, 63%). These data provide novel insight into the poorly understood molecular pathogenesis of ameloblastoma and offer a rationale to test drugs targeting EGFR or mutant BRAF as novel therapies for ameloblastoma. © 2013 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland.

  8. High frequency acoustic microscopy with Fresnel zoom lens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO DongHai; LI ShunZhou; WANG ChengHao

    2007-01-01

    The acoustic field distributions and the convergent beams generated by the planar-structure Fresnel zone transducers on solid surface are investigated.Because only 0 and 180 degree phase transducers are used,an imaging system with the Fresnel zoom lens could work at very high frequency,which overcomes the frequency limit of the traditional phased array acoustic imaging system.Simulation results are given to illustrate the acoustic field distributions along the focal axis and the whole plane as well.Based on the principle of scanning of the focus with the change of frequency for the excited signal,an experimental imaging system is also built.Acoustic Fresnel zone transducers are fabricated at center frequency of 400 MHz.Measurements and detections of the known hole flaws at different depths of the fused quartz sample are presented to show that the imaging system with Fresnel zoom lens could move its focus by only changing the frequency of the excited signal.

  9. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic High Frequency Axisymmetric Cavity Scars.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt

    2014-10-01

    This report examines the localization of high frequency electromagnetic fi elds in three-dimensional axisymmetric cavities along periodic paths between opposing sides of the cavity. The cases where these orbits lead to unstable localized modes are known as scars. This report treats both the case where the opposing sides, or mirrors, are convex, where there are no interior foci, and the case where they are concave, leading to interior foci. The scalar problem is treated fi rst but the approximations required to treat the vector fi eld components are also examined. Particular att ention is focused on the normalization through the electromagnetic energy theorem. Both projections of the fi eld along the scarred orbit as well as point statistics are examined. Statistical comparisons are m ade with a numerical calculation of the scars run with an axisymmetric simulation. This axisymmetric cas eformstheoppositeextreme(wherethetwomirror radii at each end of the ray orbit are equal) from the two -dimensional solution examined previously (where one mirror radius is vastly di ff erent from the other). The enhancement of the fi eldontheorbitaxiscanbe larger here than in the two-dimensional case. Intentionally Left Blank

  10. Why high-frequency pulse tubes can be tipped

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swift, Gregory W092710 [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The typical low-frequency pulse-tube refrigerator loses significant cooling power when it is tipped with the pulse tube's cold end above its hot end, because natural convection in the pulse tube loads the cold heat exchanger. Yet most high-frequency pulse-tube refrigerators work well in any orientation with respect to gravity. In such a refrigerator, natural convection is suppressed by sufficiently fast velocity oscil1ations, via a nonlinear hydrodynamic effect that tends to align the density gradients in the pulse tube parallel to the oscillation direction. Since gravity's tendency to cause convection is only linear in the pulse tube's end-to-end temperature difference while the oscillation's tendency to align density gradients with oscillating velocity is nonlinear, it is easiest to suppress convection when the end-to-end temperature difference is largest. Simple experiments demonstrate this temperature dependence, the strong dependence on the oscillating velocity, and little dependence on the magnitude or phase of the oscillating pressure. In some circumstances in this apparatus, the suppression of convection is a hysteretic function of oscillating velocity. In some other circumstances, a time-dependent convective state seems more difficult to suppress.

  11. Planck pre-launch status: High Frequency Instrument polarization calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Rosset, C; Ponthieu, N; Ade, P; Catalano, A; Conversi, L; Couchot, F; Crill, B P; Désert, F -X; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Haïssinski, J; Henrot-Versillé, S; Holmes, W; Jones, W C; Lamarre, J -M; Lange, A; Leroy, C; Macías-Pérez, J; Maffei, B; de Marcillac, P; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Montier, L; Noviello, F; Pajot, F; Perdereau, O; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Puget, J -L; Ristorcelli, I; Savini, G; Sudiwala, R; Veneziani, M; Yvon, D

    2010-01-01

    The High Frequency Instrument of Planck will map the entire sky in the millimeter and sub-millimeter domain from 100 to 857 GHz with unprecedented sensitivity to polarization ($\\Delta P/T_{\\tiny cmb} \\sim 4\\cdot 10^{-6}$) at 100, 143, 217 and 353 GHz. It will lead to major improvements in our understanding of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies and polarized foreground signals. Planck will make high resolution measurements of the $E$-mode spectrum (up to $\\ell \\sim 1500$) and will also play a prominent role in the search for the faint imprint of primordial gravitational waves on the CMB polarization. This paper addresses the effects of calibration of both temperature (gain) and polarization (polarization efficiency and detector orientation) on polarization measurements. The specific requirements on the polarization parameters of the instrument are set and we report on their pre-flight measurement on HFI bolometers. We present a semi-analytical method that exactly accounts for the scanning strategy of...

  12. High-frequency acoustic for nanostructure wetting characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sizhe; Lamant, Sebastien; Carlier, Julien; Toubal, Malika; Campistron, Pierre; Xu, Xiumei; Vereecke, Guy; Senez, Vincent; Thomy, Vincent; Nongaillard, Bertrand

    2014-07-01

    Nanostructure wetting is a key problem when developing superhydrophobic surfaces. Conventional methods do not allow us to draw conclusions about the partial or complete wetting of structures on the nanoscale. Moreover, advanced techniques are not always compatible with an in situ, real time, multiscale (from macro to nanoscale) characterization. A high-frequency (1 GHz) acoustic method is used for the first time to characterize locally partial wetting and the wetting transition between nanostructures according to the surface tension of liquids (the variation is obtained by ethanol concentration modification). We can see that this method is extremely sensitive both to the level of liquid imbibition and to the impalement dynamic. We thus demonstrate the possibility to evaluate the critical surface tension of a liquid for which total wetting occurs according to the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We also manage to identify intermediate states according to the height of the nanotexturation. Finally, our measurements revealed that the drop impalement depending on the surface tension of the liquid also depends on the aspect ratio of the nanostructures. We do believe that our method may lead to new insights into nanoscale wetting characterization by accessing the dynamic mapping of the liquid imbibition under the droplet.

  13. High-frequency ultrasonic imaging of thickly sliced specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, Chiaki; Tittmann, Bernhard R.; Chandraratna, Premindra A. N.

    2003-07-01

    It has been reported that a mechanical scanning reflection acoustic microscope (hereinafter called simply "SAM"), using high frequency ultrasonic tone-burst waves, can form a horizontal cross-sectional image (i.e., c-scan image) showing a highly resolved cellular structure of biological tissue. However, the tissue prepared for the SAM has been mostly a thinly sectioned specimen. In this study, the SAM images of specimens thickly sectioned from the tissue were analyzed. Optical and scanning acoustic microscopies were used to evaluate tissues of human small intestine and esophagus. For preparing thin specimens, the tissue was embedded in paraffin, and substantially sectioned at 5-10μm by the microtome. For optical microscopy, the tissue was stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and affixed onto glass substrates. For scanning acoustic microscopy, two types of specimens were prepared: thinly sectioned specimens affixed on the glass substrate, wherein the specimens were deparaffinized in xylene, but not stained, and thickely sectioned specimens. Images of the thick specimens obtained with frequency at 200 MHz revealed cellular structures. The morphology was very similar to that seen in the thinly sectioned specimens with optical and scanning acoustic microscopy. In addition, scanning electron microscopy was used to compare the images of biological tissue. An acoustic lens with frequency at 200 MHz permitted the imaging of surface and/or subsurface of microstructures in the thick sections of small intestine and esophagus.

  14. High-frequency oscillations and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Maxime; Shiri, Zahra; Chen, Li-Yuan; Avoli, Massimo

    2017-01-20

    The interest of epileptologists has recently shifted from the macroscopic analysis of interictal spikes and seizures to the microscopic analysis of short events in the EEG that are not visible to the naked eye but are observed once the signal has been filtered in specific frequency bands. With the use of new technologies that allow multichannel recordings at high sampling rates and the development of computer algorithms that permit the automated analysis of extensive amounts of data, it is now possible to extract high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) between 80 and 500Hz from the EEG; HFOs have been further categorised as ripples (80-200Hz) and fast ripples (250-500Hz). Within the context of epileptic disorders, HFOs should reflect the pathological activity of neural networks that sustain seizure generation, and could serve as biomarkers of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. We review here the presumptive cellular mechanisms of ripples and fast ripples in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. We also focus on recent findings regarding the occurrence of HFOs during epileptiform activity observed in in vitro models of epileptiform synchronization, in in vivo models of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy and in epileptic patients. Finally, we address the effects of anti-epileptic drugs on HFOs and raise some questions and issues related to the definition of HFOs.

  15. Algorithmic and high-frequency trading in Borsa Istanbul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oguz Ersan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the levels of algorithmic trading (AT and high-frequency trading (HFT in an emerging market, Borsa Istanbul (BIST, utilizing a dataset of 354 trading days between January 2013 and May 2014. We find an upward trend in AT by using common proxies: number of messages per minute and algo_trad of Hendershott et al. (2011. Mean algo_trad for BIST 100 index constituents varies between −18 and −13 which is parallel to 2003–2005 levels of NASDAQ large cap stocks. Initially, we measure HFT involvement by detecting linked messages as in the way proposed in Hasbrouck and Saar (2013. Next, we propose an extended HFT measure which captures various HFT strategies. This measure attributes approximately 6% of the orders to HFT. HFT involvement is higher in large orders (11.96%, in orders submitted by portfolio/fund management firms (10.40%, after improvement of BIST's order submission platform and tick size reduction for certain stocks.

  16. Low temperature high frequency coaxial pulse tube for space application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charrier, Aurelia; Charles, Ivan; Rousset, Bernard; Duval, Jean-Marc [SBT, UMR-E CEA / UJF-Grenoble 1, INAC, 17, rue des Martyrs, Grenoble, F-38054 (France); Daniel, Christophe [CNES, 18, avenue Edouard Belin, Toulouse, F-31401 (France)

    2014-01-29

    The 4K stage is a critical step for space missions. The Hershel mission is using a helium bath, which is consumed day by day (after depletion, the space mission is over) while the Plank mission is equipped with one He4 Joule-Thomson cooler. Cryogenic chain without helium bath is a challenge for space missions and 4.2K Pulse-Tube working at high frequency (around 30Hz) is one option to take it up. A low temperature Pulse-Tube would be suitable for the ESA space mission EChO (Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory, expected launch in 2022), which requires around 30mW cooling power at 6K; and for the ESA space mission ATHENA (Advanced Telescope for High ENergy Astrophysics), to pre-cool the sub-kelvin cooler (few hundreds of mW at 15K). The test bench described in this paper combines a Gifford-McMahon with a coaxial Pulse-Tube. A thermal link is joining the intercept of the Pulse-Tube and the second stage of the Gifford-McMahon. This intercept is a separator between the hot and the cold regenerators of the Pulse-Tube. The work has been focused on the cold part of this cold finger. Coupled with an active phase shifter, this Pulse-Tube has been tested and optimized and temperatures as low as 6K have been obtained at 30Hz with an intercept temperature at 20K.

  17. High-frequency (1000 Hz) tympanometry in normal neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kei, Joseph; Allison-Levick, Julie; Dockray, Jacqueline; Harrys, Rachel; Kirkegard, Christina; Wong, Janet; Maurer, Marion; Hegarty, Jayne; Young, June; Tudehope, David

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of high frequency (1000 Hz) acoustic admittance results obtained from normal neonates were described in this study. Participants were 170 healthy neonates (96 boys and 74 girls) aged between 1 and 6 days (mean = 3.26 days, SD = 0.92). Transient evoked otoacoustic emissions (TEOAEs), and 226 Hz and 1000 Hz probe tone tympanograms were obtained from the participants using a Madsen Capella OAE/middle ear analyser. The results showed that of the 170 neonates, 34 were not successfully tested in both ears, 14 failed the TEOAE screen in one or both ears, and 122 (70 boys, 52 girls) passed the TEOAE screen in both ears and also maintained an acceptable probe seal during tympanometry. The 1000 Hz tympanometric data for the 122 neonates (244 ears) showed a single-peaked tympanogram in 225 ears (92.2%), a flat-sloping tympanogram in 14 ears (5.7%), a double-peaked tympanogram in 3 ears (1.2%) and other unusual shapes in 2 ears (0.8%). There was a significant ear effect, with right ears showing significantly higher mean peak compensated static admittance and tympanometric width, but lower mean acoustic admittance at +200 daPa and gradient than left ears. No significant gender effects or its interaction with ear were found. The normative tympanometric data derived from this cohort may serve as a guide for detecting middle ear dysfunction in neonates.

  18. High-Frequency Chest Compression: A Summary of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara F Dosman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present literature summary is to describe high-frequency chest compression (HFCC, summarize its history and outline study results on its effect on mucolysis, mucus transport, pulmonary function and quality of life. HFCC is a mechanical method of self-administered chest physiotherapy, which induces rapid air movement in and out of the lungs. This mean oscillated volume is an effective method of mucolysis and mucus clearance. HFCC can increase independence. Some studies have shown that HFCC leads to more mucus clearance and better lung function compared with conventional chest physiotherapy. However, HFCC also decreases end-expiratory lung volume, which can lead to increased airway resistance and a decreased oscillated volume. Adding positive end-expiratory pressure to HFCC has been shown to prevent this decrease in end-expiratory lung volume and to increase the oscillated volume. It is possible that the HFCC-induced decrease in end-expiratory lung volume may result in more mucus clearance in airways that remain open by reducing airway size. Adjunctive methods, such as positive end-expiratory pressure, may not always be needed to make HFCC more effective.

  19. High-frequency ultrasonic arrays for ocular imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, M. D.; Kline-Schoder, R. J.; Douville, G. M.; Gagne, J. R.; Morrison, K. T.; Audette, W. E.; Kynor, D. B.

    2007-03-01

    High-resolution ultrasound imaging of the anterior portion of the eye has been shown to provide important information for sizing of intraocular lens implants, diagnosis of pathological conditions, and creation of detailed maps of corneal topography to guide refractive surgery. Current ultrasound imaging systems rely on mechanical scanning of a single acoustic element over the surface of the eye to create the three-dimensional information needed by clinicians. This mechanical scanning process is time-consuming and subject to errors caused by eye movement during the scanning period. This paper describes development of linear ultrasound imaging arrays intended to increase the speed of image acquisition and reduce problems associated with ocular motion. The arrays consist of a linear arrangement of high-frequency transducer elements designed to operate in the 50 - 75 MHz frequency range. The arrays are produced using single-crystal lithium niobate piezoelectric material, thin film electrodes, and epoxy-based acoustic layers. The array elements have been used to image steel test structures and bovine cornea.

  20. High frequency guided wave propagation in monocrystalline silicon wafers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzolato, Marco; Masserey, Bernard; Robyr, Jean-Luc; Fromme, Paul

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline silicon wafers are widely used in the photovoltaic industry for solar panels with high conversion efficiency. The cutting process can introduce micro-cracks in the thin wafers and lead to varying thickness. High frequency guided ultrasonic waves are considered for the structural monitoring of the wafers. The anisotropy of the monocrystalline silicon leads to variations of the wave characteristics, depending on the propagation direction relative to the crystal orientation. Full three-dimensional Finite Element simulations of the guided wave propagation were conducted to visualize and quantify these effects for a line source. The phase velocity (slowness) and skew angle of the two fundamental Lamb wave modes (first anti-symmetric mode A0 and first symmetric mode S0) for varying propagation directions relative to the crystal orientation were measured experimentally. Selective mode excitation was achieved using a contact piezoelectric transducer with a custom-made wedge and holder to achieve a controlled contact pressure. The out-of-plane component of the guided wave propagation was measured using a noncontact laser interferometer. Good agreement was found with the simulation results and theoretical predictions based on nominal material properties of the silicon wafer.

  1. High frequency microseismic noise as possible earthquake precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Sović

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Before an earthquake occurs, microseismic noise in high frequency (HF range, i.e. 2-25 Hz, is being generated during preparation process. These signals change the microseismic noise and, consequently, the spectrum of microseismic noise. Time variation of spectra recorded at the same seismological station could imply the change of the state of noise source. We propose the image moment analysis approach to objectively compare microseismic noise spectra. The result could be used for earthquake precursor identification. Expected spectra change is in HF range, so the analysis has been limited to the shallow tectonic earthquakes with epicenters close, up to 15 km, the seismological stations. The method has been tested post festum using four earthquakes in Dinarides which satisfied condition for epicentral distance. The spectra were calculated for noise recorded in time intervals of 10 days before and 6 to 10 days after the earthquakes. Affine moment invariants were calculated for noise spectra which were treated as the input objects. Spectra of the first five days in the series were referent spectra. The classification parameters were Euclidean distances between referent spectra and the spectra for all days in the series, including referent ones. The results have shown that the spectra of the microseismic noise become noticeably different than the other spectra in time intervals one or two days before an earthquake.

  2. Protection circuits for very high frequency ultrasound systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hojong; Shung, K Kirk

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of protection circuits in ultrasound applications is to block noise signals from the transmitter from reaching the transducer and also to prevent unwanted high voltage signals from reaching the receiver. The protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair is widely used due to its simple architecture, however, it may not be suitable for very high frequency (VHF) ultrasound transducer applications (>100 MHz) because of its limited bandwidth. Therefore, a protection circuit using MOSFET devices with unique structure is proposed in this paper. The performance of the designed protection circuit was compared with that of other traditional protection schemes. The performance characteristics measured were the insertion loss (IL), total harmonic distortion (THD) and transient response time (TRT). The new protection scheme offers the lowest IL (-1.0 dB), THD (-69.8 dB) and TRT (78 ns) at 120 MHz. The pulse-echo response using a 120 MHz LiNbO3 transducer with each protection circuit was measured to validate the feasibility of the protection circuits in VHF ultrasound applications. The sensitivity and bandwidth of the transducer using the new protection circuit improved by 252.1 and 50.9 %, respectively with respect to the protection circuit using a resistor and diode pair. These results demonstrated that the new protection circuit design minimizes the IL, THD and TRT for VHF ultrasound transducer applications.

  3. Fantoni’s Tracheostomy using Catheter High Frequency Jet Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Török

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown previously that conventional ventilation delivered through a long cuffed endotracheal tube is associated with a high flow-resistance and frequent perioperative complications. Aim: We attempted to supersede the conventional ventilation by high-frequency jet ventilation through a catheter (HFJV-C and assess safety of the procedure. Material and methods: Using a translaryngeal tracheostomy kit, we performed a translaryngeal (Fantoni tracheostomy (TLT. Subsequently, we introduced a special 2-way prototype ventilatory catheter into the trachea via the TLT under bronchoscopic control. Satisfactory HFJV-C ventilation through the catheter was achieved in 218 patients. Results: There were no significant adverse effects on vital signs observed in the cohort during the study. The pH, SpO2, PaO2, and PaCO2 did not change significantly following the HFJV-C. The intrinsic PEEPi measured in trachea did not exceed 4—5 cm H2O during its application, which was significantly less than during the classical ventilation via the endotracheal tube fluctuating between 12 and 17 cm H2O. No serious medical complications occurred. Conclusion: The HFJV during Fantoni’s tracheostomy using the catheter HFJV-C proved to be a safe and effective method of lung ventilation at the intensive care unit. Key words: Translaryngeal tracheostomy, HFJV via catheter.

  4. Planck early results. VI. The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck HFI Core Team; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Ansari, R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Banday, A. J.; Bartelmann, M.; Bartlett, J. G.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bock, J. J.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bradshaw, T.; Bucher, M.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Castex, G.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chen, X.; Chiang, C.; Church, S.; Clements, D. L.; Colley, J.-M.; Colombi, S.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Cressiot, C.; Crill, B. P.; Crook, M.; de Bernardis, P.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Efstathiou, G.; Filliard, C.; Forni, O.; Fosalba, P.; Ganga, K.; Giard, M.; Girard, D.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gispert, R.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Griffin, M.; Guyot, G.; Haissinski, J.; Harrison, D.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hills, R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Kaplan, J.; Kneissl, R.; Knox, L.; Kunz, M.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lange, A. E.; Lasenby, A.; Lavabre, A.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leroy, C.; Lesgourgues, J.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; MacTavish, C. J.; Maffei, B.; Mandolesi, N.; Mann, R.; Marleau, F.; Marshall, D. J.; Masi, S.; Matsumura, T.; McAuley, I.; McGehee, P.; Melin, J.-B.; Mercier, C.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Mortlock, D.; Murphy, A.; Nati, F.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; North, C.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Osborne, S.; Pajot, F.; Patanchon, G.; Peacocke, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Ponthieu, N.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Reach, W. T.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Riazuelo, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Roudier, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Rusholme, B.; Saha, R.; Santos, D.; Savini, G.; Schaefer, B. M.; Shellard, P.; Spencer, L.; Starck, J.-L.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Thum, C.; Torre, J.-P.; Touze, F.; Tristram, M.; van Leeuwen, F.; Vibert, L.; Vibert, D.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; White, S. D. M.; Wiesemeyer, H.; Woodcraft, A.; Yurchenko, V.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2011-12-01

    We describe the processing of the 336 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545 and 857 GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4'. The white noise level is around 1.5 μK degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217 GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies between 100 and 353 GHz and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created by the HFI Data Processing Centre reach our goals in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and photometric accuracy. They are already sufficiently accurate and well-characterised to allow scientific analyses which are presented in an accompanying series of early papers. At this stage, HFI data appears to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be able to achieve, or exceed, the science goals of the Planck project. Corresponding author: F. R. Bouchet, e-mail: bouchet@iap.fr

  5. Planck Early Results: The High Frequency Instrument data processing

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P A R; Ansari, R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Banday, A J; Bartelmann, M; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bradshaw, T; Bucher, M; Cardoso, J -F; Castex, G; Catalano, A; Challinor, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chen, X; Chiang, C; Church, S; Clements, D L; Colley, J -M; Colombi, S; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Cressiot, C; Crill, B P; Crook, M; de Bernardis, P; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dolag, K; Dole, H; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dunkley, J; Efstathiou, G; Filliard, C; Forni, O; Fosalba, P; Ganga, K; Giard, M; Girard, D; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Gispert, R; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Griffin, M; Guyot, G; Haissinski, J; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Hildebrandt, S R; Hills, R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Kaplan, J; Kneissl, R; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Lagache, G; Lamarre, J -M; Lange, A E; Lasenby, A; Lavabre, A; Lawrence, C R; Jeune, M Le; Leroy, C; Lesgourgues, J; Lewis, A; Macías-Pérez, J F; MacTavish, C J; Maffei, B; Mandolesi, N; Mann, R; Marleau, F; Marshall, D J; Masi, S; Matsumura, T; McAuley, I; McGehee, P; Melin, J -B; Mercier, C; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Mortlock, D; Murphy, A; Nati, F; Netterfield, C B; N\\orgaard-Nielsen, H U; North, C; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Osborne, S; Pajot, F; Patanchon, G; Peacocke, T; Pearson, T J; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Ponthieu, N; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Reach, W T; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Riazuelo, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rusholme, B; Saha, R; Santos, D; Savini, G; Schaefer, B M; Shellard, P; Spencer, L; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sutton, D; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Thum, C; Torre, J -P; Touze, F; Tristram, M; Van Leeuwen, F; Vibert, L; Vibert, D; Wandelt, B D; White, S D M; Wiesemeyer, H; Woodcraft, A; Yurchenko, V; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A

    2011-01-01

    We describe the processing of the 334 billion raw data samples from the High Frequency Instrument (hereafter HFI) which we performed to produce six temperature maps from the first 295 days of Planck-HFI survey data. These maps provide an accurate rendition of the sky emission at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545 and 857GHz with an angular resolution ranging from 9.9 to 4.4 arcmin. The white noise level is around 1.5 microK.degree or less in the 3 main CMB channels (100-217GHz). The photometric accuracy is better than 2% at frequencies lower or equal to 353GHz, and around 7% at the two highest frequencies. The maps created by the HFI Data Processing Centre reach our goals in terms of sensitivity, resolution, and photometric accuracy. They are already sufficiently accurate and well-characterised to allow scientific analyses which are presented in an accompanying series of early papers. At this stage, HFI data appears to be of high quality and we expect that with further refinements of the data processing we should be abl...

  6. Advances to Dynamic Mechanical Analysis: High Frequencies and Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Jonathon

    2002-03-01

    In dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) the sample is deformed and released sinusoidally providing information about the modulus and damping behaviors with respect to temperature, time, oscillation frequency and amplitude of motion. It offers exceptional sensitivity to glass transitions and secondary relaxations. Recent developments have increased the frequency range up to 1000 Hz, which allow properties measurements under actual end-use conditions. Furthermore high frequencies enhance the ability to determine the kinetics of viscoelastic relaxations. Another recent development allows DMA measurements while samples are immersed in fluids or enveloped in gases. Most significant is the ability to alter the furnace control parameters to account for the thermal properties of the environment used. This configuration allows temperature-controlled measurements (both heating and isothermal profiles) on a wide range of sample shapes and sizes. Environmental DMA is easier to interpret than standard DMA (in air or inert gas) on preconditioned samples because such samples often lose the conditioning solvent or gas during the measurement. easy.com/dma_apps.asp>Examples will show real-time property changes from the interaction of unconditioned materials with conditioning environments and experiments on pre-conditioned materials that are heated while immersed in conditioning environments. -------------------------------------------------------------

  7. High frequency production of haploid embryos in asparagus anther culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, X R; Wolyn, D J

    1991-12-01

    A method for obtaining a high frequency of haploid asparagus embryos through anther culture was developed. Flowers collected from plants in the field in July, August and September 1990, for the genotype G203, were stored at 5°C for 24 h. Anthers were placed on Murashige and Skoog medium (MS) containing 500 mg l (-1) casein hydrolysate, 800 mg l(-1) glutamine, 2 mg l (-1) NAA, 1 mg l (-1) BA and 5 % sucrose at 32 °C in the dark for three to four weeks to induce calli. Calli were then grown at 25 °C with a 16 h photoperiod for three to four weeks. Developing embryos and calli were transferred to embryo maturation medium, MS containing 6% sucrose, 0.1 mg l (-1) NAA, 0.1 mg l (-1) kinetin and 0.65 mg l (-1) ancymidol, for four weeks. More than 50% of the recovered mature embryos germinated on MS containing l mg l (-1) GA3. Anthers with microspores at the late-uninucleate stage had the highest frequency of total and embryogenic calli formation, 40% and 15%, respectively. Each embryogenic callus usually produced 10-15 embryos. Aproximately 75 plants per 100 anthers cultured were recovered: 76% haploid, 22% diploid and 2% triploid. High temperature was critical for the induction of embryogenic callus.

  8. High frequency strain measurements with fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, J.; Angelmahr, M.; Schade, W.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years fiber Bragg grating sensors gained interest in structural health monitoring and concepts for smart structures. They are small, lightweight, and immune to electromagnetic interference. Using multiplexing techniques, several sensors can be addressed by a single fiber. Therefore, well-established structures and materials in industrial applications can be easily equipped with fiber optical sensors with marginal influence on their mechanical properties. In return, critical components can be monitored in real-time, leading to reduced maintenance intervals and a great reduction of costs. Beside of generally condition monitoring, the localization of failures in a structure is a desired feature of the condition monitoring system. Detecting the acoustic emission of a sudden event, its place of origin can be determined by analyzing the delay time of distributed sensor signals. To achieve high localization accuracies for the detection of cracks, breaks, and impacts high sampling rates combined with the simultaneous interrogation of several fiber Bragg grating sensors are required. In this article a fiber Bragg grating interrogator for high frequency measurements up to the megahertz range is presented. The interrogator is based on a passive wavelength to intensity conversion applying arrayed waveguide gratings. Light power fluctuations are suppressed by a differential data evaluation, leading to a reduced signal-to-noise ratio and a low strain detection limit. The measurement system is used to detect, inter alia, wire breaks in steel wire ropes for dockside cranes.

  9. Challenges in graphene integration for high-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannazzo, F.; Fisichella, G.; Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art research on graphene (Gr) for high-frequency (RF) devices. After discussing current limitations of lateral Gr RF transistors, novel vertical devices concepts such as the Gr Base Hot Electron Transistor (GBHET) will be introduced and the main challenges in Gr integration within these architectures will be discussed. In particular, a GBHET device based on Gr/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure will be considered. An approach to the fabrication of this heterostructure by transfer of CVD grown Gr on copper to the AlGaN surface will be presented. The morphological and electrical properties of this system have been investigated at nanoscale by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). In particular, local current-voltage measurements by the CAFM probe revealed the formation of a Schottky contact with low barrier height (˜0.41 eV) and excellent lateral uniformity between Gr and AlGaN. Basing on the electrical parameters extracted from this characterization, the theoretical performances of a GBHET formed by a metal/Al2O3/Gr/AlGaN/GaN stack have been evaluated.

  10. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo; Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young; Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon; Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2016-11-01

    Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al2O3 were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al2O3 shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al2O3, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al2O3 on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  11. Tecnologia radio cognitiva en la banda ultra high frequency (UHF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Paz Penagos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile cellular communication companies in Colombia require more spectrum resources to expand their portfolio of services. However, additional frequency bands for that particular purpose are scarce, yet it is well known that there are many underutilized licensed bands. Therefore new radio technologies are being studied in order to solve this problem, e.g. Software Defined Radio SDR Cognitive Radio CR and Dynamic Spectrum Access DSA. These strategies recommend mobility across the radio spectrum to meet various needs and achieve greater efficiency when managing such a scarce resource. In this context, a case study is presented in an attempt to examine the require¬ments that must be met for the implementation of cognitive radio networks in Bogota. The case study includes evaluation for the possibility of migration from cellular communications to cognitive radio since the bands assigned to UltraHigh Frequency UHF television offer possible free-of-interference coexistence between the two services (i.e. Cellular and TV. The study shows feasibility to migration; however, the implementations of cognitive radio need availability of hardware, software and flexible radio platforms.

  12. 77 FR 8222 - Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... COMMISSION Notice Requesting Nominations for the Subcommittee on Automated and High Frequency Trading AGENCY... Automated and High Frequency Trading within the Technology Advisory Committee. SUMMARY: The Commodity... Automated and High Frequency Trading (Subcommittee) under the auspices of the Technology Advisory Committee...

  13. Magnetoencephalography Detection of High-Frequency Oscillations in the Developing Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eLeiken

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence from invasive intracranial recordings suggests that the matured brain generates both physiological and pathological high-frequency signals. The present study was designed to detect high-frequency brain signals in the developing brain using newly developed magnetoencephalography (MEG methods. Twenty healthy children were studied with a high sampling rate MEG system. Functional high-frequency brain signals were evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the index fingers. To determine if the high-frequency neuromagnetic signals are true brain responses in high-frequency range, we analyzed the MEG data using the conventional averaging as well as newly developed time-frequency analysis along with beamforming. The data of healthy children showed that very high-frequency brain signals (> 1000 Hz in the somatosensory cortex in the developing brain could be detected and localized using MEG. The amplitude of very high-frequency brain signals was significantly weaker than that of the low-frequency brain signals. Very high-frequency brain signals showed a much earlier latency than those of a low-frequency. Magnetic source imaging (MSI revealed that a portion of the high-frequency signals was from the somatosensory cortex, another portion of the high-frequency signals was probably from the thalamus. Our results provide evidence that the developing brain generates high-frequency signals that can be detected with the noninvasive technique of MEG. MEG detection of high-frequency brain signals may open a new window for the study of developing brain function.

  14. Electrically Conductive Photopatternable Silver Paste for High-Frequency Ring Resonator and Band-Pass Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umarji, Govind; Qureshi, Nilam; Gosavi, Suresh; Mulik, Uttam; Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Taesung; Amalnerkar, Dinesh

    2017-02-01

    In conventional thick-film technology, there are often problems associated with poor edges, rough surfaces, and reproducibility due to process limitations, especially for high-frequency applications. These difficulties can be circumvented by using thin-film technology, but process cost and complexity remain major concerns. In this context, photopatternable thick-film technology can offer a viable alternative due to its Newtonian rheology, which can facilitate formation of the required sharp edges. We present herein a unique attempt to formulate a photopatternable silver paste with organic (photosensitive polymer) to inorganic (silver and glass) ratio of 30:70, developed in-house by us for fabrication of thick-film-based ring resonator and band-pass filter components. The ring resonator and band-pass component structures were realized by exposing screen-printed film to ultraviolet light at wavelength of 315 nm to 400 nm for 30 s to crosslink the photosensitive polymer. The pattern was subsequently developed using 1% sodium carbonate aqueous solution. For comparison, conventional silver and silver-palladium thick films were produced using in-house formulations. The surface topology and microstructural features were examined by stereomicroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The smoothness and edge definition of the film were assessed by profilometry. The resistivity of the samples was observed and remained in the range from 3.4 μΩ cm to 3.6 μΩ cm. The electrical properties were compared by measuring the insertion loss characteristics. The results revealed that the ring resonator fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste exhibited better high-frequency properties compared with components based on conventional silver or silver-palladium paste, especially in terms of the resonant frequency of 10.1 GHz (versus 10 GHz designed) with bandwidth of 80 MHz. Additionally, the band-pass filter fabricated using the photopatternable silver paste displayed better

  15. A continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap: Wind tunnel and field evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Yang, XingHua; Huo, Wen; Ali, Mamtimin; Zheng, XinQian; Zhou, ChengLong; He, Qing

    2017-09-01

    A new continuously weighing, high frequency sand trap (CWHF) has been designed. Its sampling efficiency is evaluated in a wind tunnel and the potential of the new trap has been demonstrated in field trials. The newly designed sand trap allows fully automated and high frequency measurement of sediment fluxes over extensive periods. We show that it can capture the variations and structures of wind-driven sand transport processes and horizontal sediment flux, and reveal the relationships between sand transport and meteorological parameters. Its maximum sampling frequency can reach 10 Hz. Wind tunnel tests indicated that the sampling efficiency of the CWHF sand trap varies between 39.2 to 64.3%, with an average of 52.5%. It achieved a maximum sampling efficiency of 64.3% at a wind speed of 10 m s- 1. This is largely achieved by the inclusion of a vent hole which leads to a higher sampling efficiency than that of a step-like sand trap at high wind speeds. In field experiments, we show a good agreement between the mass of sediment from the CWHF sand trap, the wind speed at 2 m and the number of saltating particles at 5 cm above the ground surface. According to analysis of the horizontal sediment flux at four heights from the CWHF sand trap (25, 35, 50, and 100 cm), the vertical distribution of the horizontal sediment flux up to a height of 100 cm above the sand surface follows an exponential function. Our field experiments show that the new instrument can capture more detailed information on sediment transport with much reduced labor requirement. Therefore, it has great potential for application in wind-blown sand monitoring and process studies.

  16. Tsunami Arrival Detection with High Frequency (HF Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Barrick

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative real-time observations of a tsunami have been limited to deep-water, pressure-sensor observations of changes in the sea surface elevation and observations of sea level fluctuations at the coast, which are essentially point measurements. Constrained by these data, models have been used for predictions and warning of the arrival of a tsunami, but to date no system exists for local detection of an actual incoming wave with a significant warning capability. Networks of coastal high frequency (HF-radars are now routinely observing surface currents in many countries. We report here on an empirical method for the detection of the initial arrival of a tsunami, and demonstrate its use with results from data measured by fourteen HF radar sites in Japan and USA following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake off Sendai, Japan, on 11 March 2011. The distance offshore at which the tsunami can be detected, and hence the warning time provided, depends on the bathymetry: the wider the shallow continental shelf, the greater this time. We compare arrival times at the radars with those measured by neighboring tide gauges. Arrival times measured by the radars preceded those at neighboring tide gauges by an average of 19 min (Japan and 15 min (USA The initial water-height increase due to the tsunami as measured by the tide gauges was moderate, ranging from 0.3 to 2 m. Thus it appears possible to detect even moderate tsunamis using this method. Larger tsunamis could obviously be detected further from the coast. We find that tsunami arrival within the radar coverage area can be announced 8 min (i.e., twice the radar spectral time resolution after its first appearance. This can provide advance warning of the tsunami approach to the coastline locations.

  17. Semiclassical methods for high frequency wave propagation in periodic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgadillo, Ricardo A.

    We will study high-frequency wave propagation in periodic media. A typical example is given by the Schrodinger equation in the semiclassical regime with a highly oscillatory periodic potential and external smooth potential. This problem presents a numerical challenge when in the semiclassical regime. For example, conventional methods such as finite differences and spectral methods leads to high numerical cost, especially in higher dimensions. For this reason, asymptotic methods like the frozen Gaussian approximation (FGA) was developed to provide an efficient computational tool. Prior to the development of the FGA, the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods provided an alternative asymptotic approach to solving the Schrodinger equation efficiently. Unlike the geometric optics and Gaussian beam methods, the FGA does not lose accuracy due to caustics or beam spreading. In this thesis, we will briefly review the geometric optics, Gaussian beam, and FGA methods. The mathematical techniques used by these methods will aid us in formulating the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. The Bloch-decomposition FGA generalizes the FGA to wave propagation in periodic media. We will establish the convergence of the Bloch-decomposition based FGA to the true solution for Schrodinger equation and develop a gauge-invariant algorithm for the Bloch-decomposition based FGA. This algorithm will avoid the numerical difficulty of computing the gauge-dependent Berry phase. We will show the numerical performance of our algorithm by several one-dimensional examples. Lastly, we will propose a time-splitting FGA-based artificial boundary conditions for solving the one-dimensional nonlinear Schrodinger equation (NLS) on an unbounded domain. The NLS will be split into two parts, the linear and nonlinear parts. For the linear part we will use the following absorbing boundary strategy: eliminate Gaussian functions whose centers are too distant to a fixed domain.

  18. Robust Optimization Design Algorithm for High-Frequency TWTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Chevalier, Christine T.

    2010-01-01

    Traveling-wave tubes (TWTs), such as the Ka-band (26-GHz) model recently developed for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, are essential as communication amplifiers in spacecraft for virtually all near- and deep-space missions. This innovation is a computational design algorithm that, for the first time, optimizes the efficiency and output power of a TWT while taking into account the effects of dimensional tolerance variations. Because they are primary power consumers and power generation is very expensive in space, much effort has been exerted over the last 30 years to increase the power efficiency of TWTs. However, at frequencies higher than about 60 GHz, efficiencies of TWTs are still quite low. A major reason is that at higher frequencies, dimensional tolerance variations from conventional micromachining techniques become relatively large with respect to the circuit dimensions. When this is the case, conventional design- optimization procedures, which ignore dimensional variations, provide inaccurate designs for which the actual amplifier performance substantially under-performs that of the design. Thus, this new, robust TWT optimization design algorithm was created to take account of and ameliorate the deleterious effects of dimensional variations and to increase efficiency, power, and yield of high-frequency TWTs. This design algorithm can help extend the use of TWTs into the terahertz frequency regime of 300-3000 GHz. Currently, these frequencies are under-utilized because of the lack of efficient amplifiers, thus this regime is known as the "terahertz gap." The development of an efficient terahertz TWT amplifier could enable breakthrough applications in space science molecular spectroscopy, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, high-resolution "through-the-wall" imaging, biomedical imaging, and detection of explosives and toxic biochemical agents.

  19. Low and High-Frequency Field Potentials of Cortical Networks ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have become an important, high content in vitro assay for assessing neuronal function. MEA experiments typically examine high- frequency (HF) (>200 Hz) spikes, and bursts which can be used to discriminate between different pharmacological agents/chemicals. However, normal brain activity is additionally composed of integrated low-frequency (0.5-100 Hz) field potentials (LFPs) which are filtered out of MEA recordings. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between HF and LFP neural network signals, and to assess the relative sensitivity of LFPs to selected neurotoxicants. Rat primary cortical cultures were grown on glass, single-well MEA chips. Spontaneous activity was sampled at 25 kHz and recorded (5 min) (Multi-Channel Systems) from mature networks (14 days in vitro). HF (spike, mean firing rate, MFR) and LF (power spectrum, amplitude) components were extracted from each network and served as its baseline (BL). Next, each chip was treated with either 1) a positive control, bicuculline (BIC, 25μM) or domoic acid (DA, 0.3μM), 2) or a negative control, acetaminophen (ACE, 100μM) or glyphosate (GLY, 100μM), 3) a solvent control (H2O or DMSO:EtOH), or 4) a neurotoxicant, (carbaryl, CAR 5, 30μM ; lindane, LIN 1, 10μM; permethrin, PERM 25, 50μM; triadimefon, TRI 5, 65μM). Post treatment, 5 mins of spontaneous activity was recorded and analyzed. As expected posit

  20. Achieving High-Frequency Optical Control of Synaptic Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Skyler L.; Beneduce, Brandon M.; Drew, Iain R.

    2014-01-01

    The optogenetic tool channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) is widely used to excite neurons to study neural circuits. Previous optogenetic studies of synapses suggest that light-evoked synaptic responses often exhibit artificial synaptic depression, which has been attributed to either the inability of ChR2 to reliably fire presynaptic axons or to ChR2 elevating the probability of release by depolarizing presynaptic boutons. Here, we compare light-evoked and electrically evoked synaptic responses for high-frequency stimulation at three synapses in the mouse brain. At synapses from Purkinje cells to deep cerebellar nuclei neurons (PC→DCN), light- and electrically evoked synaptic currents were remarkably similar for ChR2 expressed transgenically or with adeno-associated virus (AAV) expression vectors. For hippocampal CA3→CA1 synapses, AAV expression vectors of serotype 1, 5, and 8 led to light-evoked synaptic currents that depressed much more than electrically evoked currents, even though ChR2 could fire axons reliably at up to 50 Hz. The disparity between optical and electrical stimulation was eliminated when ChR2 was expressed transgenically or with AAV9. For cerebellar granule cell to stellate cell (grc→SC) synapses, AAV1 also led to artificial synaptic depression and AAV9 provided superior performance. Artificial synaptic depression also occurred when stimulating over presynaptic boutons, rather than axons, at CA3→CA1 synapses, but not at PC→DCN synapses. These findings indicate that ChR2 expression methods and light stimulation techniques influence synaptic responses in a neuron-specific manner. They also identify pitfalls associated with using ChR2 to study synapses and suggest an approach that allows optogenetics to be applied in a manner that helps to avoid potential complications. PMID:24872574

  1. Regenerator Operation at Very High Frequencies for Microcryocoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebaugh, Ray; O'Gallagher, Agnes

    2006-04-01

    The size of Stirling and Stirling-type pulse tube cryocoolers is dominated by the size of the pressure oscillator. Such cryocoolers typically operate at frequencies up to about 60 Hz for cold-end temperatures above about 60 K. Higher operating frequencies would allow the size and mass of the pressure oscillator to be reduced for a given power input. However, simply increasing the operating frequency leads to large losses in the regenerator. The simple analytical equations derived here show how the right combination of frequency and pressure, along with optimized regenerator geometry, can lead to successful regenerator operation at frequencies up to 1 kHz. Efficient regenerator operation at such high frequencies is possible only with pressures of about 5 to 8 MPa and with very small hydraulic diameters and lengths. Other geometrical parameters must also be optimized for such conditions. The analytical equations are used to provide guidance to the right combination of parameters. We give example numerical calculations with REGEN3.2 in the paper for 60 Hz, 400 Hz, and 1000 Hz operation of optimized screen regenerators and show that the coefficient of performance at 400 Hz and 1000 Hz is about 78 % and 68 %, respectively, of that for 60 Hz when an average pressure of 7 MPa is used with the higher frequency, compared with 2.5 MPa for 60 Hz operation. The 1000 Hz coefficient of performance for parallel tubes is about the same as that of the screen geometry at 60 Hz. The compressor and cold-end swept volumes are reduced by a factor of 47 at 1000 Hz, compared with the 60 Hz case for the same input acoustic power, which can enable the development of microcryocoolers for MEMS applications.

  2. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W; Craster, Richard V

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector [Formula: see text] and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and [Formula: see text] where Λ=(λ1λ2…λ d ) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors [Formula: see text] the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd ). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  3. Very high frequency plasma reactant for atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Il-Kwon; Yoo, Gilsang; Yoon, Chang Mo [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Hyung; Yeom, Geun Young [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kangsik; Lee, Zonghoon [School Materials Science and Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Hanearl; Lee, Chang Wan [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyungjun, E-mail: hyungjun@yonsei.ac.kr [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han-Bo-Ram, E-mail: hbrlee@inu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Incheon National University, 406-840 Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Fundamental research plasma process for thin film deposition is presented. • VHF plasma source for PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was employed to reduce plasma damage. • The use of VHF plasma improved all of the film qualities and growth characteristics. - Abstract: Although plasma-enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) results in several benefits in the formation of high-k dielectrics, including a low processing temperature and improved film properties compared to conventional thermal ALD, energetic radicals and ions in the plasma cause damage to layer stacks, leading to the deterioration of electrical properties. In this study, the growth characteristics and film properties of PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were investigated using a very-high-frequency (VHF) plasma reactant. Because VHF plasma features a lower electron temperature and higher plasma density than conventional radio frequency (RF) plasma, it has a larger number of less energetic reaction species, such as radicals and ions. VHF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} shows superior physical and electrical properties over RF PE-ALD Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, including high growth per cycle, excellent conformality, low roughness, high dielectric constant, low leakage current, and low interface trap density. In addition, interlayer-free Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on Si was achieved in VHF PE-ALD via a significant reduction in plasma damage. VHF PE-ALD will be an essential process to realize nanoscale devices that require precise control of interfaces and electrical properties.

  4. National High Frequency Radar Network (hfrnet) and Pacific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, L.; Terrill, E. J.; Cook, T.; de Paolo, T.; Otero, M. P.; Rogowski, P.; Schramek, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. High Frequency Radar Network (HFRNet) has been in operation for over ten years with representation from 31 organizations spanning academic institutions, state and local government agencies, and private organizations. HFRNet currently holds a collection from over 130 radar installations totaling over 10 million records of surface ocean velocity measurements. HFRNet is a primary example of inter-agency and inter-institutional partnerships for improving oceanographic research and operations. HF radar derived surface currents have been used in several societal applications including coastal search and rescue, oil spill response, water quality monitoring and marine navigation. Central to the operational success of the large scale network is an efficient data management, storage, access, and delivery system. The networking of surface current mapping systems is characterized by a tiered structure that extends from the individual field installations to local regional operations maintaining multiple sites and on to centralized locations aggregating data from all regions. The data system development effort focuses on building robust data communications from remote field locations (sites) for ingestion into the data system via data on-ramps (Portals or Site Aggregators) to centralized data repositories (Nodes). Centralized surface current data enables the aggregation of national surface current grids and allows for ingestion into displays, management tools, and models. The Coastal Observing Research and Development Center has been involved in international relationships and research in the Philippines, Palau, and Vietnam. CORDC extends this IT architecture of surface current mapping data systems leveraging existing developments and furthering standardization of data services for seamless integration of higher level applications. Collaborations include the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), The Coral Reef Research

  5. High-frequency TRNS reduces BOLD activity during visuomotor learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Saiote

    Full Text Available Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS consist in the application of electrical current of small intensity through the scalp, able to modulate perceptual and motor learning, probably by changing brain excitability. We investigated the effects of these transcranial electrical stimulation techniques in the early and later stages of visuomotor learning, as well as associated brain activity changes using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI. We applied anodal and cathodal tDCS, low-frequency and high-frequency tRNS (lf-tRNS, 0.1-100 Hz; hf-tRNS 101-640 Hz, respectively and sham stimulation over the primary motor cortex (M1 during the first 10 minutes of a visuomotor learning paradigm and measured performance changes for 20 minutes after stimulation ceased. Functional imaging scans were acquired throughout the whole experiment. Cathodal tDCS and hf-tRNS showed a tendency to improve and lf-tRNS to hinder early learning during stimulation, an effect that remained for 20 minutes after cessation of stimulation in the late learning phase. Motor learning-related activity decreased in several regions as reported previously, however, there was no significant modulation of brain activity by tDCS. In opposition to this, hf-tRNS was associated with reduced motor task-related-activity bilaterally in the frontal cortex and precuneous, probably due to interaction with ongoing neuronal oscillations. This result highlights the potential of lf-tRNS and hf-tRNS to differentially modulate visuomotor learning and advances our knowledge on neuroplasticity induction approaches combined with functional imaging methods.

  6. Recent Improvements in High-Frequency Eddy Current Conductivity Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Nabah, Bassam A.; Nagy, Peter B.

    2008-02-01

    Due to its frequency-dependent penetration depth, eddy current measurements are capable of mapping near-surface residual stress profiles based on the so-called piezoresistivity effect, i.e., the stress-dependence of electric conductivity. To capture the peak compressive residual stress in moderately shot-peened (Almen 4-8A) nickel-base superalloys, the eddy current inspection frequency has to go as high as 50-80 MHz. Recently, we have reported the development of a new high-frequency eddy current conductivity measuring system that offers an extended inspection frequency range up to 80 MHz. Unfortunately, spurious self- and stray-capacitance effects render the complex coil impedance variation with lift-off more nonlinear as the frequency increases, which makes it difficult to achieve accurate apparent eddy current conductivity (AECC) measurements with the standard four-point linear interpolation method beyond 25 MHz. In this paper, we will demonstrate that reducing the coil size reduces its sensitivity to capacitive lift-off variations, which is just the opposite of the better known inductive lift-off effect. Although reducing the coil size also reduces its absolute electric impedance and relative sensitivity to conductivity variations, a smaller coil still yields better overall performance for residual stress assessment. In addition, we will demonstrate the benefits of a semi-quadratic interpolation scheme that, together with the reduced lift-off sensitivity of the smaller probe coil, minimizes and in some cases completely eliminates the sensitivity of AECC measurements to lift-off uncertainties. These modifications allow us to do much more robust measurements up to as high as 80-100 MHz with the required high relative accuracy of +/-0.1%.

  7. Castration alters protein balance after high-frequency muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Jennifer L; Fukuda, David H; Rossetti, Michael L; Hoffman, Jay R; Gordon, Bradley S

    2017-02-01

    Resistance exercise increases muscle mass by shifting protein balance in favor of protein accretion. Androgens independently alter protein balance, but it is unknown whether androgens alter this measure after resistance exercise. To answer this, male mice were subjected to sham or castration surgery 7-8 wk before undergoing a bout of unilateral, high-frequency, electrically induced muscle contractions in the fasted or refed state. Puromycin was injected 30 min before euthanasia to measure protein synthesis. The tibialis anterior was analyzed 4 h postcontraction. In fasted mice, neither basal nor stimulated rates of protein synthesis were affected by castration despite lower phosphorylation of mechanistic target of rapamycin in complex 1 (mTORC1) substrates [p70S6K1 (Thr389) and 4E-BP1 (Ser65)]. Markers of autophagy (LC3 II/I ratio and p62 protein content) were elevated by castration, and these measures remained elevated above sham values after contractions. Furthermore, in fasted mice, the protein content of Regulated in Development and DNA Damage 1 (REDD1) was correlated with LC3 II/I in noncontracted muscle, whereas phosphorylation of uncoordinated like kinase 1 (ULK1) (Ser757) was correlated with LC3 II/I in the contracted muscle. When mice were refed before contractions, protein synthesis and mTORC1 signaling were not affected by castration in either the noncontracted or contracted muscle. Conversely, markers of autophagy remained elevated in the muscles of refed, castrated mice even after contractions. These data suggest the castration-mediated elevation in baseline autophagy reduces the absolute positive shift in protein balance after muscle contractions in the refed or fasted states.

  8. High-frequency homogenization for travelling waves in periodic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunyan, Davit; Milton, Graeme W.; Craster, Richard V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider high-frequency homogenization in periodic media for travelling waves of several different equations: the wave equation for scalar-valued waves such as acoustics; the wave equation for vector-valued waves such as electromagnetism and elasticity; and a system that encompasses the Schrödinger equation. This homogenization applies when the wavelength is of the order of the size of the medium periodicity cell. The travelling wave is assumed to be the sum of two waves: a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector k and frequency ω1 plus a modulated Bloch carrier wave having crystal wavevector m and frequency ω2. We derive effective equations for the modulating functions, and then prove that there is no coupling in the effective equations between the two different waves both in the scalar and the system cases. To be precise, we prove that there is no coupling unless ω1=ω2 and (k -m )⊙Λ ∈2 π Zd, where Λ=(λ1λ2…λd) is the periodicity cell of the medium and for any two vectors a =(a1,a2,…,ad),b =(b1,b2,…,bd)∈Rd, the product a⊙b is defined to be the vector (a1b1,a2b2,…,adbd). This last condition forces the carrier waves to be equivalent Bloch waves meaning that the coupling constants in the system of effective equations vanish. We use two-scale analysis and some new weak-convergence type lemmas. The analysis is not at the same level of rigour as that of Allaire and co-workers who use two-scale convergence theory to treat the problem, but has the advantage of simplicity which will allow it to be easily extended to the case where there is degeneracy of the Bloch eigenvalue.

  9. All-printed paper memory

    KAUST Repository

    Lien, Derhsien

    2014-08-26

    We report the memory device on paper by means of an all-printing approach. Using a sequence of inkjet and screen-printing techniques, a simple metal-insulator-metal device structure is fabricated on paper as a resistive random access memory with a potential to reach gigabyte capacities on an A4 paper. The printed-paper-based memory devices (PPMDs) exhibit reproducible switching endurance, reliable retention, tunable memory window, and the capability to operate under extreme bending conditions. In addition, the PBMD can be labeled on electronics or living objects for multifunctional, wearable, on-skin, and biocompatible applications. The disposability and the high-security data storage of the paper-based memory are also demonstrated to show the ease of data handling, which are not achievable for regular silicon-based electronic devices. We envision that the PPMDs manufactured by this cost-effective and time-efficient all-printing approach would be a key electronic component to fully activate a paper-based circuit and can be directly implemented in medical biosensors, multifunctional devices, and self-powered systems. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  10. Processless offset printing plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Mahović Poljaček

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available With the implementation of platesetters in the offset printing plate making process, imaging of the printing plate became more stable and ensured increase of the printing plate quality. But as the chemical processing of the printing plates still highly influences the plate making process and the graphic reproduction workflow, development of printing plates that do not require chemical processing for offset printing technique has been one of the top interests in graphic technology in the last few years. The main reason for that came from the user experience, where majority of the problems with plate making process could be connected with the chemical processing of the printing plate. Furthermore, increased environmental standards lead to reducing of the chemicals used in the industrial processes. Considering these facts, different types of offset printing plates have been introduced to the market today. This paper presents some of the processless printing plates.

  11. Printed organic thin-film transistor-based integrated circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Saumen; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-06-01

    Organic electronics is moving ahead on its journey towards reality. However, this technology will only be possible when it is able to meet specific criteria including flexibility, transparency, disposability and low cost. Printing is one of the conventional techniques to deposit thin films from solution-based ink. It is used worldwide for visual modes of information, and it is now poised to enter into the manufacturing processes of various consumer electronics. The continuous progress made in the field of functional organic semiconductors has achieved high solubility in common solvents as well as high charge carrier mobility, which offers ample opportunity for organic-based printed integrated circuits. In this paper, we present a comprehensive review of all-printed organic thin-film transistor-based integrated circuits, mainly ring oscillators. First, the necessity of all-printed organic integrated circuits is discussed; we consider how the gap between printed electronics and real applications can be bridged. Next, various materials for printed organic integrated circuits are discussed. The features of these circuits and their suitability for electronics using different printing and coating techniques follow. Interconnection technology is equally important to make this product industrially viable; much attention in this review is placed here. For high-frequency operation, channel length should be sufficiently small; this could be achievable with a combination of surface treatment-assisted printing or laser writing. Registration is also an important issue related to printing; the printed gate should be perfectly aligned with the source and drain to minimize parasitic capacitances. All-printed organic inverters and ring oscillators are discussed here, along with their importance. Finally, future applications of all-printed organic integrated circuits are highlighted.

  12. A Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON) for synthesising high-frequency sensor data for validation of deterministic ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Hamilton P; Carey, Cayelan C.; Arvola, Lauri; Arzberger, Peter; Brewer, Carol A.; Cole, Jon J; Gaiser, Evelyn; Hanson, Paul C.; Ibelings, Bas W; Jennings, Eleanor; Kratz, Tim K; Lin, Fang-Pang; McBride, Christopher G.; de Motta Marques, David; Muraoka, Kohji; Nishri, Ami; Qin, Boqiang; Read, Jordan S.; Rose, Kevin C.; Ryder, Elizabeth; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Zhu, Guangwei; Trolle, Dennis; Brookes, Justin D

    2014-01-01

    A Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON; www.gleon.org) has formed to provide a coordinated response to the need for scientific understanding of lake processes, utilising technological advances available from autonomous sensors. The organisation embraces a grassroots approach to engage researchers from varying disciplines, sites spanning geographic and ecological gradients, and novel sensor and cyberinfrastructure to synthesise high-frequency lake data at scales ranging from local to global. The high-frequency data provide a platform to rigorously validate process- based ecological models because model simulation time steps are better aligned with sensor measurements than with lower-frequency, manual samples. Two case studies from Trout Bog, Wisconsin, USA, and Lake Rotoehu, North Island, New Zealand, are presented to demonstrate that in the past, ecological model outputs (e.g., temperature, chlorophyll) have been relatively poorly validated based on a limited number of directly comparable measurements, both in time and space. The case studies demonstrate some of the difficulties of mapping sensor measurements directly to model state variable outputs as well as the opportunities to use deviations between sensor measurements and model simulations to better inform process understanding. Well-validated ecological models provide a mechanism to extrapolate high-frequency sensor data in space and time, thereby potentially creating a fully 3-dimensional simulation of key variables of interest.

  13. Characterization of Microstructure and Molecular Dynamics with High Frequency Oscillatory Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remmler, Torsten; Amin, Samiul; Ferrante, Andrea; Pechhold, Wolfgang

    2009-07-01

    To characterize the rheological behaviour of complex viscoelastic fluids, polymer melts and other soft materials, motor-drive controlled rheometers are mainly used, either at constant stress or strain rate, or in the oscillatory mode. The latter has proved advantageous to discover the viscoelastic functions G*, η*, J* as fingerprints of the material under investigation, it's composition, molecular modelling and applicability. A conclusive analysis of such a viscoelastic spectrum can only be achieved if the amplitudes chosen guarantee linearity and if the frequency range covers more than 6 decades to reach the low kHz-domain. Investigations of many materials with motor-drive controlled rheometers are limited at higher frequencies and reach the above mentioned goal by applying the time-temperature superposition principle, i.e. the mastercurve technique. Since this method is restricted to rheologically simple materials (e.g. some polymer melts), but exclude those of small activation energies and others with temperature-sensitive chemical/physical structures including phase transitions, oscillating rheometry should be extended into higher real-frequency ranges, to establish useful linear viscoelastic spectroscopy. Since complex fluids can have structural arrangement over a wide range of lengthscales and their relaxation mechanisms can impact the dynamics over a wide range of timescales, multiple techniques need to be employed in order to accurately and fully establish the links between rheology, microstructure & dynamics. This is also critical information, required for fully validating developed theory and models. In this talk, advantages and limits of classical oscillatory rheometry will be covered, handling and principle of operation of two high frequency options are introduced and typical examples for real frequency spectra on soft matter, such as polymer melts, polymer solutions and weak gels will be shown. A xanthum gum based system has been investigated not only

  14. Development of high frequency annular array ultrasound transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Emanuel John

    The advantage of ultrasonic annular arrays over conventional single element transducers has been in the ability to transmit focus at multiple points throughout the depth of field, as well as receive dynamic focus. Today, annular, linear and multidimensional array imaging systems are not commercially available at frequencies greater than 20 MHz. The fabrication technology used to develop a high frequency (>50 MHz) annular array transducer is presented. A 9 mum P(VDF-TrFE) film was bonded to gold annuli electrodes on the top layer of a two sided polyimide flexible circuit. Each annulus was separated by a 30 mum kerf and had several electroplated micro vias that connected to electrode traces on the bottom side of the polyimide flexible circuit. The array's performance was evaluated by measuring the electrical impedance, pulse echo response and crosstalk measurement for each element in the array. In order to improve device sensitivity each element was electrically matched to an impedance magnitude of 50 O and 0° phase at resonance. The average round trip insertion loss measured for the array and compensated for diffraction effects was -33.5 dB. The measured average center frequency and bandwidth of an element was 55 MHz and 47 respectively. The measured crosstalk between adjacent elements remained below -29 dB at the center frequency in water. A vertical wire phantom was imaged using a single focus transmit beamformer and dynamic focusing receive beamformer. This image showed a significant improvement in lateral resolution over a range of 9 mm after the dynamic focusing receive algorithm was applied. These results correlated well with predictions from a Field II simulation. After beamforming the minimum lateral resolution (-6 dB) was 108 mum at the focus. Preliminary ultrasound B-mode images of the rabbit eye using this transducer were shown in conjunction with a multi-channel digital beamformer. A feasibility study of designing and fabricating tunable copolymer

  15. A Compact High Frequency Doppler Radio Scatterometer for Coastal Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flament, P. J.; Harris, D.; Flament, M.; Fernandez, I. Q.; Hlivak, R.; Flores-vidal, X.; Marié, L.

    2016-12-01

    A low-power High Frequency Doppler Radar has been designed for large series production. The use of commercial-off-the-shelf components is maximized to minimize overall cost. Power consumption is reduced to 130W in full duty and 20W in stand-by under 20-36 V-DC, thus enabling solar/wind and/or fuel cell operation by default. For 8 channels, commercial components and sub-assemblies cost less than k20 excluding coaxial antenna cables, and less than four man-weeks of technician suffice for integration, testing and calibration, suggesting a final cost of about k36, based on production batches of 25 units. The instrument is integrated into passively-cooled 90x60x20 cm3 field-deployable enclosures, combining signal generation, transmitter, received, A/D converter and computer, alleviating the need for additional protection such as a container or building. It uses frequency-ramped continuous wave signals, and phased-array transmissions to decouple the direct path to the receivers. Five sub-assemblies are controlled by a Linux embedded computer: (i) direct digital synthesis of transmit and orthogonal local oscillator signals, derived from a low phase noise oven-controlled crystal; (ii) distributed power amplifiers totaling 5 W, integrated into λ/8 passive transmit antenna monopoles; (iii) λ/12 compact active receive antenna monopoles with embedded out-of-band rejection filters; (iv) analog receivers based on complex demodulation by double-balanced mixers, translating the HF spectrum to the audio band; (v) 24-bit analog-to-digital sigma-delta conversion at 12 kHz with 512x oversampling, followed by decimation to a final sampling frequency of 750 Hz. Except for the HF interference rejection filters, the electronics can operate between 3 and 50 MHz with no modification. At 13.5 MHz, 5 W transmit power, 15 min integration time, the high signal-to-noise ratio permits a typical range of 120 km for currents measurements with 8-antenna beam-forming. The University of Hawaii HFR

  16. Variable Temperature High-Frequency Response of Heterostructure Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Joy

    1992-01-01

    The development of high performance heterostructure transistors is essential for emerging opto-electronic integrated circuits (OEICs) and monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs). Applications for OEICs and MMICs include the rapidly growing telecommunications and personal communications markets. The key to successful OEIC and MMIC chip sets is the development of high performance, cost-effective technologies. In this work, several different transistor structures are investigated to determine the potential for high speed performance and the physical mechanisms controlling the ultimate device operation. A cryogenic vacuum microwave measurement system has been developed to study the high speed operation of modulation doped field-effect transistors (MODFETs), doped channel metal insulator field-effect transistors (MISFETs), and metal semiconductor field-effect transistors (MESFETs). This study has concluded that the high field velocity and not the low field mobility is what controls high frequency operation of GaAs based field-effect transistors. Both Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs and InP/In_{rm y}Ga _{rm 1-y}As heterostructure bipolar transistors (HBTs) have also been studied at reduced lattice temperatures to understand the role of diffusive transport in the Al_{rm x} Ga_{rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT and nonequilibrium transport in the InP/In _{rm y}Ga_ {rm 1-y}As HBT. It is shown that drift/diffusion formulation must be modified to accurately estimate the base delay time in the conventional Al _{rm x}Ga_ {rm 1-x}As/GaAs HBT. The reduced lattice temperature operation of the InP/In_ {rm y}Ga_{rm 1-y}As HBT demonstrates extreme nonequilibrium transport in the neutral base and collector space charge region with current gain cut-off frequency exceeding 300 GHz, which is the fastest reported transistor to date. Finally, the MODFET has been investigated as a three-terminal negative differential resistance (NDR) transistor. The existence of real space transfer is confirmed by

  17. Tailoring Carbon Nanostructure for High Frequency Supercapacitor Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritesh Hiralal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of enhancing the frequency performance of electrochemical capacitors by tailoring the nanostructure of the carbon electrode to increase electrolyte permeability is demonstrated. Highly porous, vertically oriented carbon electrodes which are in direct electrical contact with the metallic current collector are produced via MPECVD growth on metal foils. The resulting structure has a capacitance and frequency performance between that of an electrolytic capacitor and an electrochemical capacitor. Fully packaged devices are produced on Ni and Cu current collectors and performance compared to state-of-the-art electrochemical capacitors and electrolytic capacitors. The extension of capacitive behavior to the AC regime (~100 Hz opens up an avenue for a number of new applications where physical volume of the capacitor may be significantly reduced.

  18. High frequency oscillations mirror disease activity in patients with focal cortical dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerber, Karolin; LeVan, Pierre; Dümpelmann, Matthias; Fauser, Susanne; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Schulze-Bonhage, Andreas; Jacobs, Julia

    2013-08-01

    The study analyzes the occurrence of high frequency oscillations in different types of focal cortical dysplasia in 22 patients with refractory epilepsy. High frequency oscillations are biomarkers for epileptic tissue, but it is unknown whether they can reflect increasingly dysplastic tissue changes as well as epileptic disease activity. High frequency oscillations (80-450 Hz) were visually marked by two independent reviewers in all channels of intracranial implanted grid, strips, and depth electrodes in patients with focal cortical dysplasia and refractory epilepsy. Rates of high frequency oscillations in patients with pathologically confirmed focal cortical dysplasia of Palmini type 1a and b were compared with those in type 2a and b. Patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 had significantly more seizures than those with type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in patients with focal cortical dysplasia type 2 versus type 1 (p high frequency oscillations were significantly higher in presumed epileptogenic areas than outside (p high frequency oscillations mirrors the higher epileptogenicity of focal cortical dysplasia type 2 lesions compared to type 1 lesions. Therefore, rates of high frequency oscillations can reflect disease activity of a lesion. This has implications for the use of high frequency oscillations as biomarkers for epileptogenic areas, because a detailed analysis of their rates may be necessary to use high frequency oscillations as a predictive tool in epilepsy surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  19. Checking a printed board

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    An 'Interactive Printed Circuit Board Design System' has been developed by a company in a Member-State. Printed circuits are now produced at the SB's surface treatment workshop using a digitized photo-plotter.

  20. Physiological recruitment of motor units by high-frequency electrical stimulation of afferent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Muceli, Silvia; Dosen, Strahinja; Laine, Christopher M; Farina, Dario

    2015-02-01

    Neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) is commonly used in rehabilitation, but electrically evoked muscle activation is in several ways different from voluntary muscle contractions. These differences lead to challenges in the use of NMES for restoring muscle function. We investigated the use of low-current, high-frequency nerve stimulation to activate the muscle via the spinal motoneuron (MN) pool to achieve more natural activation patterns. Using a novel stimulation protocol, the H-reflex responses to individual stimuli in a train of stimulation pulses at 100 Hz were reliably estimated with surface EMG during low-level contractions. Furthermore, single motor unit recruitment by afferent stimulation was analyzed with intramuscular EMG. The results showed that substantially elevated H-reflex responses were obtained during 100-Hz stimulation with respect to a lower stimulation frequency. Furthermore, motor unit recruitment using 100-Hz stimulation was not fully synchronized, as it occurs in classic NMES, and the discharge rates differed among motor units because each unit was activated only after a specific number of stimuli. The most likely mechanism behind these observations is the temporal summation of subthreshold excitatory postsynaptic potentials from Ia fibers to the MNs. These findings and their interpretation were also verified by a realistic simulation model of afferent stimulation of a MN population. These results suggest that the proposed stimulation strategy may allow generation of considerable levels of muscle activation by motor unit recruitment that resembles the physiological conditions.

  1. Experimental study of a very high frequency, 162 MHz, segmented electrode, capacitively coupled plasma discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirse, Nishant; Harvey, Cleo; Gaman, Cezar; Ellingboe, Bert

    2016-09-01

    Radio-frequency capacitively coupled plasma (CCP) discharge operating at a very high frequency, 30-300 MHz, offers many advantages over standard 13.56 MHz CCP. However, there is a limited flexibility on the choice of driving frequency and substrate size due to plasma non-uniformity caused by the standing wave effect and edge effect. To overcome this issue segmented electrode CCP's are proposed and researched. Despite its numerous advantages the power coupling mechanism and plasma chemistry in this type of discharge are not fully understood due to lack of experimental data. In this paper, we present the experimental study of a segmented electrode, 3x4 tile array (10x10 cm square tile with 1 cm tile-to-tile separation), CCP discharge driven at 162 MHz. We measured plasma uniformity and gas temperature using hairpin probe and optical emission spectroscopy respectively. A homemade RF compensated Langmuir probe is employed to measure the Electron Energy Distribution Function (EEDF) by second harmonic technique. Energy resolved quadrupole mass spectrometer is utilized to measure the ion energy distribution. Discharge/plasma properties are investigated for several operating conditions and for power coupling mode in both washer board and checker board configuration. The experimental results show that the uniform plasma density can be maintained over a large area along with highly non-equilibrium condition to produce unique gas phase plasma chemistry.

  2. How to improve the High Frequency capabilities of SRT

    CERN Document Server

    Pisanu, T; Pernechele, C; Buffa, F; Vargiu, G

    2004-01-01

    The SRT (Sardinia Radio Telescope) is a general purpose, fully steerable, active surface equipped, 64 meters antenna, which is in an advanced construction state near Cagliari (Sardinia - Italy). It will be an antenna which could improve a lot the performances of the EVN network, particularly at frequencies higher than 22 GHz. The main antenna geometry consist of a shaped reflector system pair, based on the classical parabola-ellipse Gregorian configuration. It is designed to be able to operate with a good efficiency in a frequency range from 300 MHz up to 100 GHz. This frequency range, is divided in two parts which define also two antenna operational modes, one up to 22 GHz with a minimal amount of accessory instrumentation, and the other up to 100 GHz with a full complement of instrumentation. The goal is to make it possible to build a telescope operable up to 22 GHz, and then upgrade it at a future date to operate at frequencies up to 100 GHz. In order to get these goals, the SRT Metrology group is studying...

  3. Data from: Dispenser printed capacitive proximity sensor on fabric for applications in the creative industries

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a planar capacitive proximity sensor fully dispenser printed on a standard polyester woven fabric using conductive ink. Dispenser printing is a new digital printing technique offering the advantages of complete geometric design flexibility and the ability to direct write multilayer devices without requiring bespoke tooling. A dispenser printer is also capable of printing a wide range of ink viscosities encompassing those of inkjet and screen printable inks. Previous researc...

  4. Dispenser printed capacitive proximity sensor on fabric for applications in the creative industries

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports a planar capacitive proximity sensor fully dispenser printed on a standard polyester woven fabric using conductive ink. Dispenser printing is a new digital printing technique offering the advantages of complete geometric design flexibility and the ability to direct write multilayer devices without requiring bespoke tooling. A dispenser printer is also capable of printing a wide range of ink viscosities encompassing those of inkjet and screen printable inks. Previous researc...

  5. Design of High Frequency Power Oscillator Board Based on Rotary Encoder Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shifen

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and stable high frequency pulse power supply is studied to improve high-speed wedm machine tool's efficiency. Regarding to the shortcomings of traditional digital circuit high frequency oscillator board, we design a high frequency power oscillator board based on rotary encoder control, control accuracy and high-frequency waveform by programming, adjusting the frequency and display. It has six brakes of processing function, it also includes feedback function of emulsification oil. The high frequency will be shutdown and the emulsification oil will be changed if there is too much metal dust in emulsification. It has been proved by practice that high-frequency circuit board is simple and reliable and can greatly increase efficiency of wire cutting.

  6. A New High Frequency Injection Method Based on Duty Cycle Shifting without Maximum Voltage Magnitude Loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Dong; Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand

    2015-01-01

    The conventional high frequency signal injection method is to superimpose a high frequency voltage signal to the commanded stator voltage before space vector modulation. Therefore, the magnitude of the voltage used for machine torque production is limited. In this paper, a new high frequency...... injection method, in which high frequency signal is generated by shifting the duty cycle between two neighboring switching periods, is proposed. This method allows injecting a high frequency signal at half of the switching frequency without the necessity to sacrifice the machine fundamental voltage...... amplitude. This may be utilized to develop new position estimation algorithm without involving the inductance in the medium to high speed range. As an application example, a developed inductance independent position estimation algorithm using the proposed high frequency injection method is applied to drive...

  7. How to improve the High Frequency capabilities of SRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanu, T.; Morsiani, M.; Pernechele, C.; Buffa, F.; Vargiu, G.

    The SRT (Sardinia Radio Telescope) is a general purpose, fully steerable, active surface equipped, 64 meters antenna, which is in an advanced construction state near Cagliari (Sardinia - Italy). It will be an antenna which could improve a lot the performances of the EVN network, particularly at frequencies higher than 22 GHz. The main antenna geometry consist of a shaped reflector system pair, based on the classical parabola-ellipse Gregorian configuration. It is designed to be able to operate with a good efficiency in a frequency range from 300 MHz up to 100 GHz. This frequency range, is divided in two parts which define also two antenna operational modes, one up to 22 GHz with a minimal amount of accessory instrumentation, and the other up to 100 GHz with a full complement of instrumentation. The goal is to make it possible to build a telescope operable up to 22 GHz, and then upgrade it at a future date to operate at frequencies up to 100 GHz. In order to get these goals, the SRT Metrology group is studying and developing different types of strategies, instrumentation, and techniques for measuring and reducing the various components of pointing and efficiency errors, taking advantage also from experiences developed in other radio telescopes, like GBT (Green Bank Telescope, USA), LMT (Large Millimiter Telescope, MEX), and IRAM (Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique, Fr). Many of those system will be installed and tested at the 32 meters radio-telescope in Medicina (Bologna), before of their implementation on SRT. (astro-ph/0412692)

  8. Magnetoencephalography detection of high-frequency oscillations in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiken, Kimberly; Xiang, Jing; Zhang, Fawen; Shi, Jingping; Tang, Lu; Liu, Hongxing; Wang, Xiaoshan

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence from invasive intracranial recordings suggests that the matured brain generates both physiological and pathological high-frequency signals. The present study was designed to detect high-frequency brain signals in the developing brain using newly developed magnetoencephalography (MEG) methods. Twenty healthy children were studied with a high-sampling rate MEG system. Functional high-frequency brain signals were evoked by electrical stimulation applied to the index fingers. To determine if the high-frequency neuromagnetic signals are true brain responses in high-frequency range, we analyzed the MEG data using the conventional averaging as well as newly developed time-frequency analysis along with beamforming. The data of healthy children showed that very high-frequency brain signals (>1000 Hz) in the somatosensory cortex in the developing brain could be detected and localized using MEG. The amplitude of very high-frequency brain signals was significantly weaker than that of the low-frequency brain signals. Very high-frequency brain signals showed a much earlier latency than those of a low-frequency. Magnetic source imaging (MSI) revealed that a portion of the high-frequency signals was from the somatosensory cortex, another portion of the high-frequency signals was probably from the thalamus. Our results provide evidence that the developing brain generates high-frequency signals that can be detected with the non-invasive technique of MEG. MEG detection of high-frequency brain signals may open a new window for the study of developing brain function.

  9. Sonic analogue of black holes and the effects of high frequencies on black hole evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Unruh, W G

    1995-01-01

    The naive calculation of black hole evaporation makes the thermal emission depend on the arbitrary high frequency behaviour of the theory where the theory is certainly wrong. Using the sonic analog to black holes-- dumb holes-- I show numerically that a change in the dispersion relation at high frequencies does not seem to alter the evaporation process, lending weight to the reality of the black hole evaporation process. I also suggest a reason for the insensitivity of the process to high frequency regime.

  10. Analysis of Energy Overshoot of High Frequency Waves with Wavelet Transform

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Fan

    2000-01-01

    A study is made on the overshoot phenomena in wind-generated waves. The surface displace ments of time-growing waves are measured at four fetches in a wind wave channel. The evolution of high frequency waves is displayed with wavelet transform. The results are compared with Sutherland's. It is found that high frequency wave components experience much stronger energy overshoot in the evolution.The energy of high frequency waves decreases greatly after overshoot

  11. High Frequency Excitation for Cavity Flow Control: Combined Experiments and Linear Stability Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-30

    Peto , "Suppression of cav- ity resonance using high frequency forcing - the characteristic signature of effective devices", American Institute of...Aeronautics and Astronautics Paper 2001-2128 (2001). 25 M. Stanek, G. Raman, J. A. Ross, J. Odedra, J. W. Peto , F. Alvi, and V. Kibens, "High frequency...Institute of Aeronautics and 30 Astronautics Paper 2002-2404 (2002). 26 M. Stanek, J. A. Ross, J. Odedra, and J. Peto , "High frequency acoustic

  12. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  13. High-frequency urban measurements of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grant

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 and carbon monoxide (CO were made at an urban site in the United Kingdom (UK from mid-December, 2008 until early March, 2009. Very few measurements of H2 exist in the urban environment, particularly within the UK, but are an essential component in the assessment of anthropogenic emissions of H2 and to a certain extent CO. These data provide detailed information on urban time-series, diurnal cycles as well as sources and sinks of both H2 and CO at urban locations. High-frequency data were found to be strongly influenced by local meteorological conditions of wind speed and temperature. Diurnal cycles were found to follow transport frequency very closely due to the sites proximity to major carriageways, consequently a strong correlation was found between H2 and CO mole fractions. Background subtracted mean and rush hour molar H2/CO emission ratios of 0.53±0.08 and 0.57±0.06 respectively, were calculated from linear fitting of data. The scatter plot of all H2 and CO data displayed an unusual two population pattern, thought to be associated with a large industrial area 85 km to the west of the site. However, the definitive source of this two branch pattern could not be fully elucidated. H2 emissions from transport in the UK were estimated to be 188±39 Gg H2/yr, with 8.1±2.3 Tg/yr of H2 produced from vehicle emissions globally. H2 and CO deposition velocities were calculated during stable night-time inversion events when a clear decay of both species was observed. CO was found to have a much higher deposition velocity than H2, 1.3±0.8×10−3 and 2.2±1.5×10−4 m s−1 (1σ respectively, going against the law of molecular diffusivity. The source of this unusual result was investigated, however no conclusive

  14. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stepehen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2015-01-27

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  15. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen; McGraw, Gregory

    2016-02-02

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print head further includes a first layer further comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  16. Compact organic vapor jet printing print head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest, Stephen R; McGraw, Gregory

    2013-12-24

    A first device is provided. The first device includes a print head, and a first gas source hermetically sealed to the print head. The print header further includes a first layer comprising a plurality of apertures, each aperture having a smallest dimension of 0.5 to 500 microns. A second layer is bonded to the first layer. The second layer includes a first via in fluid communication with the first gas source and at least one of the apertures. The second layer is made of an insulating material.

  17. 3D inkjet printed radio frequency inductors and capacitors

    KAUST Repository

    Vaseem, Mohammad

    2016-12-08

    Inkjet printing has emerged as an ideal method for the fabrication of low cost and efficient electronic systems. However, most of the printed designs at present utilize 2D inkjet printing of metallic inks on conventional substrates. In order to have fully printed RF components, the substrate must also be printed. 3D printing of polymers can be an ideal mechanism for printing substrates, however typically such materials cannot handle high sintering temperatures (>150 0C) required for nanoparticles based metallic inks. In this work, an all-inkjet printed process is demonstrated that utilizes 3D inkjet printing of a UV-cured dielectric material in combination with the printing of a particle free conductive silver organo-complex (SOC) ink for realization of inductors and capacitors. The processing temperature does not exceed 80 0C and still state of the art conductivity of 1×107 S/m is achieved. Both the conductive ink and dielectric have roughness values under 500 nm. The inductor and capacitor exhibit quality factors of 8 and 20 respectively in the high MHz and GHz regime.

  18. Does Phonology Play a Role When Skilled Readers Read High-Frequency Words? Evidence from ERPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Randy Lynn; Jared, Debra; Haigh, Corinne A.

    2012-01-01

    We used event-related brain potentials to clarify the role of phonology in activating the meanings of high-frequency words during skilled silent reading. Target homophones ("meet") in sentences such as "The students arranged to meet in the library to study" were replaced on some trials by either a high-frequency homophone mate…

  19. High frequency electromagnetic processes in induction motors supplied from PWM inverters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Ţilea

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the electromagnetic interference between induction motors and inverters when at high frequency electromagnetic process appears in induction motors having a parallel resonant effect because of parasitic capacitive coupling between windings and ground, using a numerical model in simulink and a high frequency induction motor equivalent circuit model this effect is shown.

  20. Pressure attenuation during high-frequency airway clearance therapy across different size endotracheal tubes: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smallwood, Craig D; Bullock, Kevin J; Gouldstone, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    High-frequency airway clearance therapy is a positive pressure secretion clearance modality used in pediatric and adult applications. However, pressure attenuation across different size endotracheal tubes (ETT) has not been adequately described. This study quantifies attenuation in an in vitro model. The MetaNeb® System was used to deliver high-frequency pressure pulses to 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0mm ID ETTs connected to a test lung during mechanical ventilation. The experimental setup included a 3D-printed trachea model and imbedded pressure sensors. The pressure attenuation (Patt%) was calculated: Patt%=[(Pproximal-Pdistal)/Pproximal]x100. The effect of pulse frequency on Pdistal and Pproximal was quantified. Patt% was inversely and linearly related to ETT ID and (y=-7.924x+74.36; R(2)=0.9917, P=.0042 for 4.0Hz pulse frequency and y=-7.382+9.445, R(2)=0.9964, P=.0018 for 3.0Hz pulse frequency). Patt% across the 3.0, 4.0, 6.0 and 8.0mm I.D. ETTs was 48.88±10.25%, 40.87±5.22%, 27.97±5.29%, and 9.90±1.9% respectively. Selecting the 4.0Hz frequency mode demonstrated higher Pproximal and Pdistal compared to the 3.0Hz frequency mode (P=.0049 and P=.0065). Observed Pdistal was <30cmH2O for all experiments. In an in vitro model, pressure attenuation was linearly related to the inner diameter of the endotracheal tube; with decreasing attenuation as the ETT size increased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Nystagmus induced by high frequency vibrations of the skull in total unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sebastien

    2008-03-01

    The skull vibration-induced nystagmus test (SVINT) is a useful complementary test to the caloric test, which evaluates very low frequencies, and the head shaking test (HST), which explores medium range frequencies. These three tests are fully correlated in total unilateral vestibular lesions (tUVL) with a sensitivity of 98% and a specificity of 94% for the SVINT. The results of the interference of the SVINT with the cold caloric test on the intact ear suggest that different vestibular sensory cells are involved in these two tests. The stimulus location optimization suggests that vibrations directly stimulate the inner ear on the intact side. The aim of this study was to establish the effectiveness of a rapid, non-invasive test used to detect vestibular asymmetry at 30, 60 and 100 Hz stimulation in tUVL. The high frequency vibration test applied to the skull using the SVINT was compared to the results of HST and caloric test in 134 patients and 95 normal subjects: 131 patients had a total unilateral vestibular dysfunction and 3 had a bilateral total lesion (tBVL). The effects of stimulus frequency, topography and head position were studied using a video-nystagmograph. In tUVL, the SVINT always revealed a lesional nystagmus beating toward the healthy side at all frequencies. The mastoid site was more efficient than the cervical and vertex sites (p0.005). The mean skull vibratory nystagmus (SVN) slow phase velocity (SPV) is 10.7 degrees (SD =7.5; n=20). Mastoid stimulation efficiency was not correlated with the side of stimulation. SVN SPV was correlated with the total caloric efficiency on the healthy ear (p=0.03). The interference of the SVINT during the cold caloric test on the intact ear demonstrated a reversal of the caloric nystagmus at each application of the vibrator. In tBVL, SVINT revealed no nystagmus.

  2. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  3. THE FUTURE OF PRINTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As China's economy has boomed, so has its printing industry, making the country one of the leaders in the field. Speaking at the International Printing Forum held in conjunction with the Second China (Shenzhen) International Cultural Industry Fair in May, Long Xinmin, Director of the General Administration of Press and Publication, said there are more than 180,000 printing plants in China with over 3.4 million workers. The total output value of the printing industry is 332.67 billion yuan, accounting for...

  4. Printed circuit board industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDou, Joseph

    2006-05-01

    The printed circuit board is the platform upon which microelectronic components such as semiconductor chips and capacitors are mounted. It provides the electrical interconnections between components and is found in virtually all electronics products. Once considered low technology, the printed circuit board is evolving into a high-technology product. Printed circuit board manufacturing is highly complicated, requiring large equipment investments and over 50 process steps. Many of the high-speed, miniaturized printed circuit boards are now manufactured in cleanrooms with the same health and safety problems posed by other microelectronics manufacturing. Asia produces three-fourths of the world's printed circuit boards. In Asian countries, glycol ethers are the major solvents used in the printed circuit board industry. Large quantities of hazardous chemicals such as formaldehyde, dimethylformamide, and lead are used by the printed circuit board industry. For decades, chemically intensive and often sloppy manufacturing processes exposed tens of thousands of workers to a large number of chemicals that are now known to be reproductive toxicants and carcinogens. The printed circuit board industry has exposed workers to high doses of toxic metals, solvents, acids, and photolithographic chemicals. Only recently has there been any serious effort to diminish the quantity of lead distributed worldwide by the printed circuit board industry. Billions of electronics products have been discarded in every region of the world. This paper summarizes recent regulatory and enforcement efforts.

  5. High-frequency hearing thresholds: effects of age, occupational ultrasound and noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccà, Isabella; Scapellato, Maria Luisa; Carrieri, Mariella; Maso, Stefano; Trevisan, Andrea; Bartolucci, Giovanni Battista

    2015-02-01

    It has been suggested that high-frequency audiometry (HFA) could represent a useful preventive measure in exposed workers. The aim was to investigate the effects of age, ultrasound and noise on high-frequency hearing thresholds. We tested 24 industrial ultrasound-exposed subjects, 113 industrial noise-exposed subjects and 148 non-exposed subjects. Each subject was tested with both conventional-frequency (0.125-8 kHz) and high-frequency (9-18 kHz) audiometry. The hearing threshold at high frequency deteriorated as a function of age, especially in subjects more than 30 years old. The ultrasound-exposed subjects had significantly higher hearing thresholds than the non-exposed ones at the high frequencies, being greatest from 10 to 14 kHz. This hearing loss was already significantly evident in subjects with exposure frequencies 4 and 6 kHz and at the high frequency of 14 kHz. After stratification for age, there was a significant difference between the two groups at 9-10 and 14-15 kHz only for those under 30 years of age. Multivariate analysis indicated that age was the primary predictor, and noise and ultrasound exposure the secondary predictors of hearing thresholds in the high-frequency range. The results suggest that HFA could be useful in the early diagnosis of noise-induced hearing loss in younger groups of workers (under 30 years of age).

  6. High-Frequency Resonant Matrix Converter using IGBT-Based Bidirectional Switches for Induction Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jami Rajesh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a novel type soft switching utility frequency AC- high frequency AC converter using asymmetrical PWM bidirectional active switches which can be defined as high frequency resonant matrix converter.This power frequency changer can directly convert utility frequency AC power to high frequency AC power ranging more than 20kHz up to 100kHz. Only one active edge resonant capacitor-assisted soft switching high frequency load resonant cyclo-converter is based on asymmetrical duty cycle PWM strategy. This high frequency cyclo-converter uses bidirectional IGBTs composed of anti-parallel one-chip reverse blocking IGBTs. This high frequency cycloconverter has some remarkable features as electrolytic capacitorless DC busline link, unity power factor correction and sinewave line current shaping, simple configuration with minimum circuit components and low cost, high efficiency and downsizing. This series load resonant cycloconverter incorporating bidirectional active power switches is developed and implemented for high efficiency consumer induction heated food cooking appliances. Its operating principle is described by using equivalent circuits. Its operating performances as soft switching operating ranges and high frequency effective power regulation characteristics are discussed on the basis of simulation and experimental results.

  7. [Diagnostic accuracy of the immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography in chemical injured eyes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qinghua; Chen, Bing; Wang, Liqiang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Yifei

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the diagnostic accuracy of the immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography, a noninvasive preoperative diagnosis method, in observing the anterior segment in chemical injured eyes. It was a retrospective study. Sixty-three ocular chemical injury patients (63 eyes), who accepted the keratoplasty or the artificial cornea transplant in PLA General Hospital from May 2011 to May 2013, were included in this study. All the injured eyes were examined by ultrasound bio-microscopy (UBM) and immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography, respectively. The images were analyzed and the results were compared with the intraoperative findings. The observation of lens was the main parameter. All the 63 patients were examined with the UBM and the immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography before the surgery. The findings of the cornea, anterior chamber angle, iris from UBM were consistent with those from the immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography. As for the lens observation, in 32 eyes in which the lens were not detected by UBM, the lens were not detected in only 16 eyes, while 3 eyes with normal lens and 13 eyes with lens pacifications (1 eye with pyknotic lens) by immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography. In 17 eyes in which the lens were found normal by UBM, there were only 14 eyes with normal lens and the rest 3 eyes' lens were found intumescent by immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography. In 6 eyes in which lens were detected with suspicious by UBM, 2 eyes' lens were pyknotic and 4 eyes' lens were intumescent or clouded by immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography. The findings of immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography were highly consistent with the intraoperative findings. The lens could be observed accurately by immersion high-frequency B-scan ultrasonography in chemical injured eyes.

  8. Android Fully Loaded

    CERN Document Server

    Huddleston, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Fully loaded with the latest tricks and tips on your new Android! Android smartphones are so hot, they're soaring past iPhones on the sales charts. And the second edition of this muscular little book is equally impressive--it's packed with tips and tricks for getting the very most out of your latest-generation Android device. Start Facebooking and tweeting with your Android mobile, scan barcodes to get pricing and product reviews, download your favorite TV shows--the book is positively bursting with practical and fun how-tos. Topics run the gamut from using speech recognition, location-based m

  9. On Fully Homomorphic Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Fauzi, Prastudy

    2012-01-01

    Fully homomorphic encryption is an encryption scheme where a party can receive encrypted data and perform arbitrary operations on this data efficiently.The data remains encrypted throughout, but the operations can be done regardless, without having to know the decryption key.Such a scheme would be very advantageous, for example in ensuring the privacy of data that is sent to a third-party service.This is in contrast with schemes like Paillier where you can not perform a multiplication of encr...

  10. Study on GNi-WC25 Coating by High Frequency Induction Cladding

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张增志; 韩桂泉; 付跃文; 沈立山

    2002-01-01

    Process and mechanism of high frequency were studied in this paper by means of cold-attachment for the preparation of Gni-WC25 coating . The resu lts show its special distribution law of eddy current while the magnetic transition temperature and electric-resistivity of the coating have been measured .Wear-resistance of the high-frequency induction coating has an advantage over those of laser cladding coating and oxygen-acetylene spraying-fusing coating . Moreover , the Gni-WC25 coating by high-frequency induction claddi ng has smooth surface and even microstructure.

  11. Econometric analysis of realized covariation: high frequency based covariance, regression, and correlation in financial economics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler; Shephard, N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper analyses multivariate high frequency financial data using realized covariation. We provide a new asymptotic distribution theory for standard methods such as regression, correlation analysis, and covariance. It will be based on a fixed interval of time (e.g., a day or week), allowing...... the number of high frequency returns during this period to go to infinity. Our analysis allows us to study how high frequency correlations, regressions, and covariances change through time. In particular we provide confidence intervals for each of these quantities....

  12. A novel variable polarity welding power based on high-frequency pulse modulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu Ling; Yang Chunli; Fan Chenglei; Lin Sanbao; Wu Yun

    2006-01-01

    A new type of variable polarity welding power modulated with high-frequency pulse current is developed.Series of high-frequency pulse current is superimposed on direct-current-electrode-negative (DCEN), which can improve the crystallization process in the weld bead as a result of the electromagnetic force generated by pulse current.Digital signal processor (DSP) is used to realize the closed-loop control of the first inverter, variable polarity output of the second inverter and high-frequency pulse current superposition.

  13. Effect of sintering process on microstructure and magnetic properties of high frequency power ferrite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ke; LAN Zhongwen; CHEN Shengming; SUN Yueming; YU Zhong

    2006-01-01

    An oxide ceramic process was adopted to prepare high frequency manganese-zinc (MnZn) power ferrite. In combination with the microstructure analysis of material, the influences of sintering process on initial permeability (μi) and high frequency loss in unit volume (Pcv) of MnZn power ferrite were investigated. The results show that in order to obtain fine microstructure and high frequency properties, the preferable sintering temperature and atmosphere are 1230 ℃ and oxygen partial pressure ( PO2) of 4%, respectively.

  14. Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grishkov, V. E.; Uryupin, S. A., E-mail: uryupin@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-03-15

    Excitation of plasma waves by nonlinear currents induced by a high-frequency electromagnetic pulse is analyzed within the kinetic approach. It is shown that the most efficient source of plasma waves is the nonlinear current arising due to the gradient of the energy density of the high-frequency field. Generation of plasma waves by the drag current is usually less efficient but not negligibly small at relatively high frequencies of electron–ion collisions. The influence of electron collisions on the excitation of plasma waves by pulses of different duration is described quantitatively.

  15. Unprecedentedly strong and narrow electromagnetic emissions stimulated by high-frequency radio waves in the ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norin, L; Leyser, T B; Nordblad, E; Thidé, B; McCarrick, M

    2009-02-13

    Experimental results of secondary electromagnetic radiation, stimulated by high-frequency radio waves irradiating the ionosphere, are reported. We have observed emission peaks, shifted in frequency up to a few tens of Hertz from radio waves transmitted at several megahertz. These emission peaks are by far the strongest spectral features of secondary radiation that have been reported. The emissions are attributed to stimulated Brillouin scattering, long predicted but hitherto never unambiguously identified in high-frequency ionospheric interaction experiments. The experiments were performed at the High-Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP), Alaska, USA.

  16. A critical review of liquid helium temperature high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Gan, Z. H.

    2013-08-01

    The importance of liquid helium temperature cooling technology in the aerospace field is discussed, and the results indicate that improving the efficiency of liquid helium cooling technologies, especially the liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers, is the principal difficulty to be solved. The state of the art and recent developments of liquid helium high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers are summarized. The main scientific challenges for high frequency pulse tube cryocoolers to efficiently reach liquid helium temperatures are outlined, and the research progress addressing those challenges are reviewed. Additionally some possible solutions to the challenges are pointed out and discussed.

  17. A note for the mechanism of high-frequency oscillation instability resulted from absorbing boundary conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Zhi-nan; LIAO Zhen-peng

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the explanation of the mechanism of high-frequency oscillation instability resulted from absorbing boundary conditions is further improved. And we analytically prove the proposition that for one dimensional dis- crete model of elastic wave motion, the module of reflection factor will be greater than 1 in high frequency band when artificial wave velocity is greater than 1.5 times the ratio of discrete space step to discrete time step. Based on the proof, the frequency band in which instability occurs is discussed in detail, showing such high-frequency waves are meaningless for the numerical simulation of wave motion.

  18. Exfoliated BN shell-based high-frequency magnetic core-shell materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Patel, Ketan; Ren, Shenqiang

    2017-09-14

    The miniaturization of electric machines demands high frequency magnetic materials with large magnetic-flux density and low energy loss to achieve a decreased dimension of high rotational speed motors. Herein, we report a solution-processed high frequency magnetic composite (containing a nanometal FeCo core and a boron nitride (BN) shell) that simultaneously exhibits high electrical resistivity and magnetic permeability. The frequency dependent complex initial permeability and the mechanical robustness of nanocomposites are intensely dependent on the content of BN insulating phase. The results shown here suggest that insulating magnetic nanocomposites have potential for application in next-generation high-frequency electric machines with large electrical resistivity and permeability.

  19. Printing Has a Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Georg Wenke

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing will also be done in the future. Printed items meet basic needs and are deeply anchored in people’s habits. Being able to handle and collect printed matter is highly attractive. And paper is now more alive than ever. It is therefore too shortsighted to disclaim the importance of one of the still large economic sectors just because of a few looming-recession instigated market shifts.The exciting aspect of drupa 2004 is: printing will be reinvented, so to speak. Much more printing will be done in the future than at present. On the one hand, people are concentrating on process optimization and automation to ensure this. Measuring and testing, process control and optimization, and linking up "office software" with printing technology will be very central topics at drupa 2004. Electronics and print are not rivals; a symbiosis exists. And printing is high-tech: hardly any other multifaceted sector which has been so successful for centuries is as computerized as the printing industry.A series of "new chapters" in the variety of printing possibilities will be opened at drupa. Talk will be generated by further technical developments, often the connection between paper/cardboard and electronics, the link between the office world and graphics industry, text databases and their link-up to graphic page production tools, and "on the fly" dynamic printing over networks.All of this and more belongs to future potentialities, which are so substantial overall, the outlook is by no means black for the "black art". Like its predecessors, drupa 2004 is also a product trade fair. However, more than ever before in its history, it is also an "information village". The exhibits are useful, because they occasionally make what this means visible.

  20. Inorganic nanomaterials for printed electronics: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei

    2017-06-08

    Owing to their capability of bypassing conventional high-priced and inflexible silicon based electronics to manufacture a variety of devices on flexible substrates by using large-scale and high-volume printing techniques, printed electronics (PE) have attracted increasing attention in the field of manufacturing industry for electronic devices. This simple and cost-effective approach could enhance current methods of constructing a patterned surface for nanomaterials and offer opportunities for developing fully-printed functional devices, especially offering the possibility of ubiquitous low-cost and flexible devices. This review presents a summary of work to date on the inorganic nanomaterials involved in PE applications, focused on the utilization of inorganic nanomaterials-based inks in the successful preparation of printed conductive patterns, electrodes, sensors, thin film transistors (TFTs) and other micro-/nanoscale devices. The printing techniques, sintering methods and printability of functional inks with their associated challenges are discussed, and we look forward so you can glimpse the future of PE applications.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Flexographic Prints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of paper and flexographic prints madewith different anilox rollers were investigated experimentally.Flexographic prints roughness, breaking force and folding resistancevalues were determined. The results showed that foldingresistance is bigger for machine direction prints than for crossmachine direction prints. Flexographic prints on cardboardsfolding resistance values are different for machine direction andcross machine direction. It was determined that roughness offlexographic prints increases with the amount of ink on aniloxroller. Results were explained by the ink water influence.

  2. Printing Ancient Terracotta Warriors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadecki, Victoria L.

    2010-01-01

    Standing in awe in Xian, China, at the Terra Cotta warrior archaeological site, the author thought of sharing this experience and excitement with her sixth-grade students. She decided to let her students carve patterns of the ancient soldiers to understand their place in Chinese history. They would make block prints and print multiple soldiers on…

  3. Print like an Egyptian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisensee, Marilyn

    1990-01-01

    Describes a relief printmaking unit for sixth graders with the objective of decorating the inside of a pyramid. Ancient Egyptian imagery was used to help students become familiar with the style. Students designed and printed linoleum prints in different colors. They then critiqued their work and made their selection for the pyramid. (KM)

  4. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement

  5. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement fo

  6. Offset Printing, Course Description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bly, Ervin; Anderson, Floyd L.

    Prepared by an instructor and a curriculum development specialist, this course of study was designed to meet the individual needs of the dropout and/or hard-core unemployed youth by providing skill training, related information, and supportive services knowledge about offset printing. The course provides training in offset printing and related…

  7. Hybrid printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.; Smits, E.; Rubingh, E.; Teunissen, P.; Kusters, R.; Abbel, R.; Brand, J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Although many electronic functionalities can be realized by printed or organic electronics, short-term marketable products often require robust, reproducible, and nondisturbing technologies. In this chapter we show how hybrid electronics, a combination of printed circuitry, thin-film electronics,

  8. Inkjet Printed Radio Frequency Passive Components

    KAUST Repository

    McKerricher, Garret

    2015-12-01

    density capacitors of 400 pF/mm2 with self-resonant frequencies into the GHz regime is developed in this thesis. A multilayer fully printed process is demonstrated using PVP dielectric and dissolving type vias, giving better than 0.1 ohm resistance. In the multilayer process, capacitors and inductors have self-resonant frequencies around 1GHz. These fully printed devices have quality factors less than 10. Finally, 3D inkjet-printed UV-cured material is utilized with a novel silver organo-complex ink at 80oC providing conductivity of 1x107 S/m. A lumped element filter is demonstrated with an insertion loss of only 0.8 dB at 1GHz. The combination of inkjet printing 3D polymer and conductive metal together allows for complex shapes. A fully printed antenna with 81% radiation efficiency is shown. With these promising results and future advances in conductive inks and low-loss dielectrics, the performance of inkjet passives could one day overcome conventional fabrication methods.

  9. High frequency wide-band transformer uses coax to achieve high turn ratio and flat response

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Parry, T.

    1966-01-01

    Center-tap push-pull transformer with toroidal core helically wound with a single coaxial cable creates a high frequency wideband transformer. This transformer has a high-turn ratio, a high coupling coefficient, and a flat broadband response.

  10. Low and High-Frequency Field Potentials of Cortical Networks Exhibit Distinct Responses to Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural networks grown on microelectrode arrays (MEAs) have become an important, high content in vitro assay for assessing neuronal function. MEA experiments typically examine high- frequency (HF) (>200 Hz) spikes, and bursts which can be used to discriminate between differ...

  11. Real-time, high frequency QRS electrocardiograph with reduced amplitude zone detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Todd T. (Inventor); DePalma, Jude L. (Inventor); Moradi, Saeed (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Real time cardiac electrical data are received from a patient, manipulated to determine various useful aspects of the ECG signal, and displayed in real time in a useful form on a computer screen or monitor. The monitor displays the high frequency data from the QRS complex in units of microvolts, juxtaposed with a display of conventional ECG data in units of millivolts or microvolts. The high frequency data are analyzed for their root mean square (RMS) voltage values and the discrete RMS values and related parameters are displayed in real time. The high frequency data from the QRS complex are analyzed with imbedded algorithms to determine the presence or absence of reduced amplitude zones, referred to herein as ''RAZs''. RAZs are displayed as ''go, no-go'' signals on the computer monitor. The RMS and related values of the high frequency components are displayed as time varying signals, and the presence or absence of RAZs may be similarly displayed over time.

  12. Laser and high-frequency cauthery gingivectomy in nonperiodontal indications: assessment and comparison of techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartak, Petr; Smucler, Roman

    2003-06-01

    The authors have verified the efficiency and safety of laser and high-frequency gingivectomy in non-periodontal indications. Within a prospective, non-selective study, they treated and monitored 357 dental areas in 139 teeth.Out of the total number, 248 areas were treated wtih a diode laser, 980nm; 109 areas with high-frequency electrocautery. The following parameters were monitored: a) regeneration of the marginal gingiva; b) generation of iatrogenic recessions or periodontal pockets; c) bleeding from gingival sulcus during probing; d) changes in tooth vitality; e) patient's subjective evaluation. The authors identified a high degree of safety in both laser and high-frequency gingivectomy, with no significant difference between these two methods. Laser gingivectomy appears to have a wider indication range, while high-frequency gingivectomy requires lower financial expenses.

  13. High Frequency Radar Locations in the United States as of February 2016.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset show the point locations of High Frequency (HF) radar systems across the US. HF radars measure the speed and direction of ocean surface currents in near...

  14. Effect of low-intensity extremely high frequency radiation on reproductive function in wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotina, T I; Tereshkina, O V; Khadartsev, A A; Yashin, A A

    2006-08-01

    The exposure to low-intensity extremely high frequency electromagnetic radiation during spermatogenesis was accompanied by pathological changes, which resulted in degeneration and polymorphism of spermatozoa. The number of newborn rats increased in the progeny of irradiated animals.

  15. Motion behavior of non-metallic particles under high frequency magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhong-tao; GUO Qing-tao; YU Feng-yun; LI Jie; ZHANG Jian; LI Ting-ju

    2009-01-01

    Non-metallic particles, especially alumina, are the main inclusions in aluminum and its alloys. Numerical simulation and the corresponding experiments were carried out to study the motion behavior of alumina particles in commercial pure aluminum under high frequency magnetic field. At the meantime, multi-pipe experiment was also done to discuss the prospect of continuous elimination of non-metallic particles under high frequency magnetic field. It is shown that: 1) results of numerical simulation are in good agreement with the experimental results, which certificates the rationality of the simulation model; 2) when the intensity of high frequency magnetic field is 0.06 T, the 30 μm alumina particles in melt inner could migrate to the edge and be removed within 2 s; 3) multi-pipe elimination of alumina particles under high frequency magnetic field is also effective and has a good prospect in industrial application.

  16. Stability Analysis of an Inverted Pendulum Subjected to Combined High Frequency Harmonics and Stochastic Excitations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-Long; JIN Xiao-Ling; ZHU Zi-Qi

    2008-01-01

    Stability of vertical upright position of an inverted pendulum with its suspension point subjected to high frequency harmonics and stochastic excitations is investigated. Two classes of excitations, i.e., combined high frequency harmonic excitation and Gaussian white noise excitation, and high frequency bounded noise excitation, respectively,are considered. Firstly, the terms of high frequency harmonic excitations in the equation of motion of the system can be set equivalent to nonlinear stiffness terms by using the method of direct separation of motions. Then the stochastic averaging method of energy envelope is used to derive the averaged It(o) stochastic differential equation for system energy. Finally, the stability with probability 1 of the system is studied by using the largest Lyapunov exponent obtained from the averaged It(o) stochastic differential equation. The effects of system parameters on the stability of the system are discussed, and some examples are given to illustrate the efficiency of the proposed procedure.

  17. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF SOLID INK DENSITY, PRINT CONTRAST AND PRINT GLOSS OF METALIZED BOARD PRINTED WITH SHEET FED OFFSET PRINTING PROCESS AND DRY TONER BASED DIGITAL PRINTING PROCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Aman Bhardwaj*, Vandana

    2016-01-01

    Metalized boards are frequently used in the packaging industry. In our study, we compare the Print properties of metalized board printed with the primer coat on sheet fed offset and dry toner based digital printing process. Metalized boards are give good print properties when printed with digital printing process for short run jobs. Comparatively high contrast is found in less solid ink density in digital printing.  

  18. Fully Awake Breast Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filson, Simon A; Yarhi, Danielle; Ramon, Yitzhak

    2016-11-01

    The authors present 25 cases and an in-depth 4-minute video of fully awake aesthetic breast reduction, which was made possible by thoracic epidural anesthesia. There are obvious and important advantages to this technique. Not only does this allow for intraoperative patient cooperation (i.e., patient self-positioning and opinion for comparison of breasts), meaning a shorter and more efficient intraoperative time, there also is a reduction in postoperative pain, complications, recovery, and discharge times. The authors have also enjoyed great success and no complications with this technique in over 150 awake abdominoplasty/total body lift patients. The authors feel that the elimination of the need for general anesthesia by thoracic epidural sensorial-only anesthesia is a highly effective and efficient technique, with very few disadvantages/complications, providing advantages to both patients and surgeons. Therapeutic, IV.

  19. Parkinsonian Rest Tremor Is Associated With Modulations of Subthalamic High-Frequency Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Jan; Butz, Markus; Hartmann, Christian J; Hoogenboom, Nienke; Özkurt, Tolga E; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2016-10-01

    High frequency oscillations (>200 Hz) have been observed in the basal ganglia of PD patients and were shown to be modulated by the administration of levodopa and voluntary movement. The objective of this study was to test whether the power of high-frequency oscillations in the STN is associated with spontaneous manifestation of parkinsonian rest tremor. The electromyogram of both forearms and local field potentials from the STN were recorded in 11 PD patients (10 men, age 58 [9.4] years, disease duration 9.2 [6.3] years). Patients were recorded at rest and while performing repetitive hand movements before and after levodopa intake. High-frequency oscillation power was compared across epochs containing rest tremor, tremor-free rest, or voluntary movement and related to the tremor cycle. We observed prominent slow (200-300 Hz) and fast (300-400 Hz) high-frequency oscillations. The ratio between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power increased when tremor became manifest. This increase was consistent across nuclei (94%) and occurred in medication ON and OFF. The ratio outperformed other potential markers of tremor, such as power at individual tremor frequency, beta power, or low gamma power. For voluntary movement, we did not observe a significant difference when compared with rest or rest tremor. Finally, rhythmic modulations of high-frequency oscillation power occurred within the tremor cycle. Subthalamic high-frequency oscillation power is closely linked to the occurrence of parkinsonian rest tremor. The balance between slow and fast high-frequency oscillation power combines information on motor and medication state. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  20. A High Voltage High Frequency Resonant Inverter for Supplying DBD Devices with Short Discharge Current Pulses

    OpenAIRE

    Bonnin, Xavier; Brandelero, Julio; Videau, Nicolas; Piquet, Hubert; Meynard, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; In this paper, the merits of a high-frequency resonant converter for supplying dielectric barrier discharges (DBD) devices are established. It is shown that, thanks to its high-frequency operating condition, such a converter allows to supply DBD devices with short discharge current pulses, a high repetition rate, and to control the injected power. In addition, such a topology eliminates the matter of connecting a high-voltage transformer directly across the DBD device ...

  1. Conventional Audiometry, Extended High-Frequency Audiometry, and DPOAE for Early Diagnosis of NIHL

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Mirmohammadi, Seyyed Jalil; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; MOSTAGHACI, Mehrdad; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl; Bahaloo, Maryam; Hashemi, Seyyed Hesam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Noise most frequently affects hearing system, as it may typically cause a bilateral, progressive sensorineural hearing loss at high frequencies. Objectives: This study was designed to compare three different methods to evaluate noise-induced hearing loss (conventional audiometry, high-frequency audiometry, and distortion product otoacoustic emission). Material and Methods: This was a cross-sectional study. Data was analyzed by SPSS (ver. 19) using chi square, T test and repeated m...

  2. High frequency system project implementation plan. [Diagnostic recording system for Nevada Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, L. L.

    1976-03-12

    The High Frequency System is a new mobile, digital diagnostic recording system for use at the Nevada Test Site. Many different kinds of event data will be digitized in real-time by this system, and these data will be recorded and stored for later read-out and transmission to NADCEN. The hardware and software requirements of the High Frequency System are examined, and the parameters of the system are proposed.

  3. The Impact of Very High Frequency Surface Reverberation on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    is to measure and model very high frequency underwater sound generated by processes at the sea surface, relevant to the high-frequency underwater...realizations generated from wave gauge data synchronized with the acoustic measurements. The curves are not generally smooth because of the limited...on Coherent Acoustic Propagation and Modeling Grant B. Deane Marine Physical Laboratory, Scripps Institution of Oceanography UCSD La Jolla, CA

  4. Design and Measurement of Planar Toroidal Transformers for Very High Frequency Power Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knott, Arnold; Pejtersen, Jens

    2012-01-01

    The quest for higher power density has led to research of very high frequency (30-300 MHz) power converters. Magnetic components based on ferrite cores have limited application within this frequency range due to increased core loss. Air-core magnetics is a viable alternative as they do not exhibi...... power converters for very high frequencies. The magnetic coupling factor of both transformers is approx. 60 % and the mutual coupling inductance is dominant up to a frequency of 50 MHz....

  5. 3D printed 20/30-GHz dual-band offset stepped-reflector antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Menendez, Laura G.; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Persson, Frank

    2015-01-01

    with a peak directivity of 36.7 dB and 40.4 dB at 20 and 30 GHz, respectively; this corresponds to an aperture efficiency of 61 % and 64 %, respectively. These results demonstrate that 3D printing is a viable manufacturing technology for medium-sized high-frequency antennas....

  6. Investigation, development and verification of printed circuit board embedded air-core solenoid transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Pedersen, Jeppe Arnsdorf

    2015-01-01

    A new printed circuit board embedded air-core transformer/coupled inductor is proposed and presented. The transformer is intended for use in power converter applications operating at very high frequency between 30 MHz to 300 MHz. The transformer is based on two or more solenoid structures...

  7. Study on the dynamic characteristics of a high frequency brake based on giant magnetostrictive material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ai Qun

    2016-06-01

    In order to meet the requirements of rapid and smooth braking, high-frequency braking using a giant magnetostrictive actuator is proposed, which can solve the problems in hydraulic braking, such as, it leaks easily, catches fire easily, is difficult to find failures, high cost on maintenance and repairing, etc. The main factors affecting the force of a high-frequency braking actuator are emphatically analyzed, the brakes dynamic model is established and a performance testing device for high frequency braking is constructed based on LabVIEW. The output force of the actuator increases with the excitation current of the driving coil increasing, and the increased multiple of the output force is greater than that of the excitation current; the range of the actuator force amplitude is 121.63 N ∼ 158.14 N, which changes little, while excitation frequency changes between 200 Hz ∼ 1000 Hz. In a minor range of pre-stress, the output force decreases with an increase in the axial pre-stress of the giant magnetostrictive rod, but is not obvious. It is known by finite element simulation analysis that high-frequency braking shortens the braking displacement and time effectively, which proves the feasibility and effectiveness of high frequency braking. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the output force of the actuator changes at the same frequency with excitation current; it is controllable and its mechanical properties meet the requirements of high frequency braking.

  8. High-Frequency Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation Enhances Perception of Facial Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanska, Aleksandra; Rezlescu, Constantin; Susilo, Tirta; Duchaine, Bradley; Banissy, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Recently, a number of studies have demonstrated the utility of transcranial current stimulation as a tool to facilitate a variety of cognitive and perceptual abilities. Few studies, though, have examined the utility of this approach for the processing of social information. Here, we conducted 2 experiments to explore whether a single session of high-frequency transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices would enhance facial identity perception. In Experiment 1, participants received 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS or sham stimulation prior to completing the tasks examining facial identity perception or trustworthiness perception. Active high-frequency tRNS facilitated facial identity perception, but not trustworthiness perception. Experiment 2 assessed the spatial specificity of this effect by delivering 20 min of active high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices or sensorimotor cortices prior to participants completing the same facial identity perception task used in Experiment 1. High-frequency tRNS targeted at lateral occipitotemporal cortices enhanced performance relative to motor cortex stimulation. These findings show that high-frequency tRNS to lateral occipitotemporal cortices produces task-specific and site-specific enhancements in face perception.

  9. Towards a fully printable battery : robocast deposition of separators.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atanassov, Plamen Borissov (University of New Mexico); Fenton, Kyle Ross (University of New Mexico); Apblett, Christopher Alan

    2010-04-01

    to keep the transport rates high within the cell during charge and discharge. In order to evaluate the effect of each layer being printed using the robocasting technique, coin cells using printed separator materials were assembled and cycled vs. Li/Li{sup +}. This allows for the standardization of a test procedure in order to evaluate each layer of a printed cell one layer at a time. A typical charge/discharge curve can be seen in Figure 2 using a printed LiFePO{sub 4} cathode and a printed separator with a commercial Celgard separator. This experiment was run to evaluate the loss in capacity and slowdown of transport within the cell due to the addition of the printed separator. This cell was cycled multiple times and showed a capacity of 75 mAh/g. The ability for this cell to cycle with good capacity indicates that a fully printable separator material is viable for use in a full lithium cell due to the retention of capacity. Most of the fully printed cathode and separator cells exhibit working capacities between 65 and 95 mAh/g up to this point. This capacity should increase as the efficiency of the printed separator increases. The ability to deposit each layer within the cell allows for intimate contact of each layer and ensures for a reduction of interfacial impedance of each layer within the cell. The overall effect of printing multiple layers within the cell will be an overall increase in the ionic conductivity during charge and discharge cycles. Several different polymer membranes have been investigated for use as a printed separator. The disadvantage of using polymer separators or solid electrolyte batteries is that they have relatively low conductivities at room temperature (10{sup -6} - 10{sup -8} S cm{sup -1}). This is orders of magnitude lower than the typically accepted 10{sup -3} S cm{sup -1} needed for proper ionic transport during battery discharge Because of their low conductivity, typical polymer separators such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) have a

  10. Fully electric waste collection

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2015-01-01

    Since 15 June, Transvoirie, which provides waste collection services throughout French-speaking Switzerland, has been using a fully electric lorry for its collections on the CERN site – a first for the region!   Featuring a motor powered by electric batteries that charge up when the brakes are used, the new lorry that roams the CERN site is as green as can be. And it’s not only the motor that’s electric: its waste compactor and lifting mechanism are also electrically powered*, making it the first 100% electric waste collection vehicle in French-speaking Switzerland. Considering that a total of 15.5 tonnes of household waste and paper/cardboard are collected each week from the Meyrin and Prévessin sites, the benefits for the environment are clear. This improvement comes as part of CERN’s contract with Transvoirie, which stipulates that the firm must propose ways of becoming more environmentally friendly (at no extra cost to CERN). *The was...

  11. Perception and coding of high-frequency spectral notches: potential implications for sound localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pinto, Ana; Palmer, Alan R; Lopez-Poveda, Enrique A

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of sound waves with the human pinna introduces high-frequency notches (5-10 kHz) in the stimulus spectrum that are thought to be useful for vertical sound localization. A common view is that these notches are encoded as rate profiles in the auditory nerve (AN). Here, we review previously published psychoacoustical evidence in humans and computer-model simulations of inner hair cell responses to noises with and without high-frequency spectral notches that dispute this view. We also present new recordings from guinea pig AN and "ideal observer" analyses of these recordings that suggest that discrimination between noises with and without high-frequency spectral notches is probably based on the information carried in the temporal pattern of AN discharges. The exact nature of the neural code involved remains nevertheless uncertain: computer model simulations suggest that high-frequency spectral notches are encoded in spike timing patterns that may be operant in the 4-7 kHz frequency regime, while "ideal observer" analysis of experimental neural responses suggest that an effective cue for high-frequency spectral discrimination may be based on sampling rates of spike arrivals of AN fibers using non-overlapping time binwidths of between 4 and 9 ms. Neural responses show that sensitivity to high-frequency notches is greatest for fibers with low and medium spontaneous rates than for fibers with high spontaneous rates. Based on this evidence, we conjecture that inter-subject variability at high-frequency spectral notch detection and, consequently, at vertical sound localization may partly reflect individual differences in the available number of functional medium- and low-spontaneous-rate fibers.

  12. Perception and coding of high-frequency spectral notches: Potential implications for sound localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eAlves-Pinto

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of sound waves with the human pinna introduces high-frequency notches (5-10 kHz in the stimulus spectrum that are thought to be useful for vertical sound localization. A common view is that these notches are encoded as rate profiles in the auditory nerve (AN. Here, we review previously published psychoacoustical evidence in humans and computer-model simulations of inner hair cell responses to noises with and without high-frequency spectral notches that dispute this view. We also present new recordings from guinea pig AN and ‘ideal observer’ analyses of these recordings that suggest that discrimination between noises with and without high-frequency spectral notches is probably based on the information carried in the temporal pattern of AN discharges. The exact nature of the neural code involved remains nevertheless uncertain: computer model simulations suggest that high-frequency spectral notches are encoded in spike timing patterns that may be operant in the 4-7 kHz frequency regime, while ‘ideal observer’ analysis of experimental neural responses suggest that an effective cue for high-frequency spectral discrimination may be based on sampling rates of spike arrivals of AN fibers using non-overlapping time binwidths of between 4 and 9 ms. Neural responses show that sensitivity to high-frequency notches is greatest for fibers with low and medium spontaneous rates than for fibers with high spontaneous rates. Based on this evidence, we conjecture that inter-subject variability at high-frequency spectral notch detection and, consequently, at vertical sound localization may partly reflect individual differences in the available number of functional medium- and low-spontaneous-rate fibers.

  13. The Digitalized Protection and Inheritance of the Woodblock Printing Called “Jinling Sutra Printing”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaidong Ge

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Jinling Sutra Publishing House, a protection site for Chinese woodblock printing, is the inheritance organization for Chinese woodblock engraving and ink printing of the Chinese Buddhism classics. This paper, taking “Jinling Sutra Printing” as study object, introduced its carving and printing skills, and proposed that, by means of digital acquisition and storage technology, this intangible cultural heritage could be fully documented and presented through characters, pictures, audio, video and other information.

  14. The Digitalized Protection and Inheritance of the Woodblock Printing Called “Jinling Sutra Printing”

    OpenAIRE

    Huaidong Ge; Shuyang Deng

    2014-01-01

    Jinling Sutra Publishing House, a protection site for Chinese woodblock printing, is the inheritance organization for Chinese woodblock engraving and ink printing of the Chinese Buddhism classics. This paper, taking “Jinling Sutra Printing” as study object, introduced its carving and printing skills, and proposed that, by means of digital acquisition and storage technology, this intangible cultural heritage could be fully documented and presented through characters, pictures, audio, video and...

  15. Laser printing of 3D metallic interconnects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniam, Iyoel; Mathews, Scott A.; Charipar, Nicholas A.; Auyeung, Raymond C. Y.; Piqué, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The use of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT) techniques for the printing of functional materials has been demonstrated for numerous applications. The printing gives rise to patterns, which can be used to fabricate planar interconnects. More recently, various groups have demonstrated electrical interconnects from laser-printed 3D structures. The laser printing of these interconnects takes place through aggregation of voxels of either molten metal or of pastes containing dispersed metallic particles. However, the generated 3D structures do not posses the same metallic conductivity as a bulk metal interconnect of the same cross-section and length as those formed by wire bonding or tab welding. An alternative is to laser transfer entire 3D structures using a technique known as lase-and-place. Lase-and-place is a LIFT process whereby whole components and parts can be transferred from a donor substrate onto a desired location with one single laser pulse. This paper will describe the use of LIFT to laser print freestanding, solid metal foils or beams precisely over the contact pads of discrete devices to interconnect them into fully functional circuits. Furthermore, this paper will also show how the same laser can be used to bend or fold the bulk metal foils prior to transfer, thus forming compliant 3D structures able to provide strain relief for the circuits under flexing or during motion from thermal mismatch. These interconnect "ridges" can span wide gaps (on the order of a millimeter) and accommodate height differences of tens of microns between adjacent devices. Examples of these laser printed 3D metallic bridges and their role in the development of next generation electronics by additive manufacturing will be presented.

  16. High-frequency oscillations in Parkinson's disease: spatial distribution and clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Hirschmann, Jan; Elben, Saskia; Hartmann, Christian J; Vesper, Jan; Wojtecki, Lars; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2014-09-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD) has been related to excessive beta band oscillations in the basal ganglia. Recent recordings from the subthalamic nucleus of PD patients showed that beta oscillations show strong cross-frequency coupling with high-frequency oscillations (>200 Hz). However, little is known about the characteristics and functional properties of these oscillations. We studied the spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations and their relation to PD motor symptoms. We included 10 PD patients in medication OFF who underwent implantation of deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. Intraoperative five-channel microelectrode recordings were performed at 9 to 10 recording sites within the subthalamic nucleus and its immediate surroundings. We found a focal spatial distribution of high-frequency oscillations with highest power 2 mm below the dorsolateral border of the subthalamic nucleus. Within the subthalamic nucleus, power peaked slightly anterior to the DBS target site. In addition, contralateral akinesia/rigidity scores were negatively correlated with high-frequency oscillation power. Our results demonstrate a focal origin of high-frequency oscillations within the subthalamic nucleus and provide further evidence for their functional association with motor state. © 2014 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  17. The high frequency characteristics of laser reflection and visible light during solid state disk laser welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiangdong; You, Deyong; Katayama, Seiji

    2015-07-01

    Optical properties are related to weld quality during laser welding. Visible light radiation generated from optical-induced plasma and laser reflection is considered a key element reflecting weld quality. An in-depth analysis of the high-frequency component of optical signals is conducted. A combination of a photoelectric sensor and an optical filter helped to obtain visible light reflection and laser reflection in the welding process. Two groups of optical signals were sampled at a high sampling rate (250 kHz) using an oscilloscope. Frequencies in the ranges 1-10 kHz and 10-125 kHz were investigated respectively. Experimental results showed that there was an obvious correlation between the high-frequency signal and the laser power, while the high-frequency signal was not sensitive to changes in welding speed. In particular, when the defocus position was changed, only a high frequency of the visible light signal was observed, while the high frequency of the laser reflection signal remained unchanged. The basic correlation between optical features and welding status during the laser welding process is specified, which helps to provide a new research focus for investigating the stability of welding status.

  18. High-frequency profile in adolescents and its relationship with the use of personal stereo devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Almeida Araújo Silvestre

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To analyze and correlate the audiometric findings of high frequencies (9–16 kHz in adolescents with their hearing habits and attitudes, in order to prevent noise-induced hearing loss. Method: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study, which included 125 adolescents in a sample of normal-hearing students, at a state school. The subjects performed high-frequency audiometry testing and answered a self-administered questionnaire addressing information on sound habits concerning the use of personal stereo devices. The sample was divided according to the exposure characteristics (time, duration, intensity, etc. and the results were compared with the observed thresholds, through the difference in proportions test, chi-squared, Student's t-test, and ANOVA, all at a significance level of 0.05. Results: Average high-frequency thresholds were registered below 15 dB HL and no significant correlation was found between high frequency audiometric findings and the degree of exposure. Conclusion: The prevalence of harmful sound habits due to the use of personal stereo devices is high in the adolescent population, but there was no correlation between exposure to high sound pressure levels through personal stereos and the high-frequency thresholds in this population.

  19. High-frequency gamblers show increased resistance to extinction following partial reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsley, Rachel R; Osborne, Matthew; Norman, Christine; Wells, Timothy

    2012-04-15

    Behaviours that have been rewarded intermittently persist for longer during periods of non-reward than behaviours that have been rewarded continuously. This classic phenomenon is known as the partial reinforcement extinction effect. For decades it has been generally understood that this phenomenon is fundamental to the persistence of gambling in the absence of winning. One obvious, yet untested hypothesis arising from this is that persistent (here, high-frequency) gamblers might be more sensitive to partial reinforcement contingencies. Therefore, our aim was to test the hypothesis that compared to low-frequency gamblers, high-frequency gamblers would show greater resistance to extinction following partial reinforcement in a computer based experiment. Participants were 19 high-frequency gamblers and 21 low-frequency gamblers, all healthy non-smokers aged between 18 and 52. Following partial or continuous reinforcement, persistence of responding in extinction was measured as the number of times a target response was made. After partial reinforcement, high-frequency gamblers made the target response a greater number of times in extinction (compared to low-frequency gamblers). Moreover, the partial reinforcement extinction effect was larger in high-frequency gamblers than in low-frequency gamblers. It remains to be seen whether increased sensitivity to partial reinforcement is a cause or effect of persistent gambling. Nevertheless, the present study represents an important first step in investigating the role of simple partial reinforcement contingencies in determining resistance to extinction in gamblers, the importance of which, whilst hitherto recognised, has never been demonstrated experimentally.

  20. Adaptive high-frequency information fusion algorithm of radar and optical images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiding; Qin, Shuai

    2011-12-01

    An adaptive High-frequency Information Fusion Algorithm of Radar and Optical Images is proposed in this paper, in order to improve the resolution of the radar image and reserve more radar information. Firstly, Hough Transform is adopted in the process of low-resolution radar image and high-resolution optical image registration. The implicit linear information is extracted from two different heterogeneous images for better result. Then NSCT transform is used for decomposition and fusion. In different decomposition layers or in the same layer with different directions, fusion rules are adaptive for the high-frequency information of images. The ratio values of high frequency information entropy, variance, gradient and edge strength are calculated after NSCT decomposition. High frequency information entropy, variance, gradient or edge strength, which has the smallest ratio value, is selected as an optimal rule for regional fusion. High-frequency information of radar image could be better retained, at the same time the low-frequency information of optical image also could be remained. Experimental results showed that our approach performs better than those methods with single fusion rule.

  1. High Frequency Tan Delta Measurement Method for 132kV Transmission Underground Cables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Avinash

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tangent Delta is a measurement technique to investigate cables insulation strength. Current techniques utilize Very Low Frequency (VLF at 0.1 Hz and power frequency at 50 Hz. However, high voltages are required, thus requiring larger space and cost. Proposed method of tangent delta testing utilizes High frequency Low voltage diagnoses. The phase between the current and the voltage is utilized to determine the tangent delta (tan δ. The aim of this study is to develop a low voltage high frequency tangent delta measurement method and test if it can discriminate manufactured 132 kV good conditioned cable sample from defect induced cables with void, scotched and contamination in its insulation. Impurities are clearly discriminated using this method. Comparison of Tangent Delta of cables manufactured simultaneously in good condition and defect induced is performed using High Frequency Tangent Delta method and in 50 Hz conventional method to validate the effectiveness of the measurement technique. The High Frequency AC setup utilizes a small testing environment which can sample small lengths with minimum 1 m length of cable. The small lengths will result in the reduction of total capacitance of the cable but using High Frequency induces high electric stress on XLPE layer thus resulting in measureable dielectric current.

  2. Printed circuit for ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    A printed circuit board made by scientists in the ATLAS collaboration for the transition radiaton tracker (TRT). This will read data produced when a high energy particle crosses the boundary between two materials with different electrical properties.

  3. Designing Printed Instructional Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbank, Lucille; Pett, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the importance of identifying the audience and determining specific objectives when designing printed instructional materials that will communicate effectively and provides detailed guidelines for dealing with such design factors as content, writing style, typography, illustrations, and page organization. (MBR)

  4. Testing fully depleted CCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Ricard; Cardiel-Sas, Laia; Castander, Francisco J.; Jiménez, Jorge; de Vicente, Juan

    2014-08-01

    The focal plane of the PAU camera is composed of eighteen 2K x 4K CCDs. These devices, plus four spares, were provided by the Japanese company Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. with type no. S10892-04(X). These detectors are 200 μm thick fully depleted and back illuminated with an n-type silicon base. They have been built with a specific coating to be sensitive in the range from 300 to 1,100 nm. Their square pixel size is 15 μm. The read-out system consists of a Monsoon controller (NOAO) and the panVIEW software package. The deafualt CCD read-out speed is 133 kpixel/s. This is the value used in the calibration process. Before installing these devices in the camera focal plane, they were characterized using the facilities of the ICE (CSIC- IEEC) and IFAE in the UAB Campus in Bellaterra (Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain). The basic tests performed for all CCDs were to obtain the photon transfer curve (PTC), the charge transfer efficiency (CTE) using X-rays and the EPER method, linearity, read-out noise, dark current, persistence, cosmetics and quantum efficiency. The X-rays images were also used for the analysis of the charge diffusion for different substrate voltages (VSUB). Regarding the cosmetics, and in addition to white and dark pixels, some patterns were also found. The first one, which appears in all devices, is the presence of half circles in the external edges. The origin of this pattern can be related to the assembly process. A second one appears in the dark images, and shows bright arcs connecting corners along the vertical axis of the CCD. This feature appears in all CCDs exactly in the same position so our guess is that the pattern is due to electrical fields. Finally, and just in two devices, there is a spot with wavelength dependence whose origin could be the result of a defectous coating process.

  5. Inkjet printing of UV-curable adhesive and dielectric inks for microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, E M; Bilatto, S E R; Adly, N Y; Correa, D S; Wolfrum, B; Schöning, M J; Offenhäusser, A; Yakushenko, A

    2016-01-01

    Bonding of polymer-based microfluidics to polymer substrates still poses a challenge for Lab-On-a-Chip applications. Especially, when sensing elements are incorporated, patterned deposition of adhesives with curing at ambient conditions is required. Here, we demonstrate a fabrication method for fully printed microfluidic systems with sensing elements using inkjet and stereolithographic 3D-printing.

  6. High Frequency Resonance Damping of DFIG based Wind Power System under Weak Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    When operating in a micro or weak grid which has a relatively large network impedance, the Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind power generation system is prone to suffer high frequency resonance due to the impedance interaction between DFIG system and the parallel compensated network...... (series RL + shunt C). In order to improve the performance of the DFIG system as well as other units and loads connected to the weak grid, the high frequency resonance needs to be effectively damped. In this paper, the proposed active damping control strategy is able to implement effective damping either...... in the Rotor Side Converter (RSC) or in the Grid Side Converter (GSC), through the introduction of virtual positive capacitor or virtual negative inductor to reshape the DFIG system impedance and mitigate the high frequency resonance. A detailed theoretical explanation on the virtual positive capacitor...

  7. A Method for Gray-Scale Imaging of Blood Flow Using High-Frequency Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Pang, Chao; Song, Xue-Dong; Gao, Xuan

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a new method that complements current techniques available in the high-frequency blood imaging field. A comprehensive scattering model was established to determine the feasibility and frequency range of the blood flow imaging of superficial organs and tissues using high-frequency ultrasound. The transmitting and receiving modes and an algorithm were designed to obtain blood flow information based on differentiation between tissues and blood flow. The system was created and tested first with a model that simulates blood flow and was then used on human tissue. A fine-scale image of a blood vessel could be obtained with this system. Moreover, this method can obtain weak blood flow signal using single pulse rather than the traditional pulse-code method and maintains a high resolution that can be matched to high-frequency structural imaging. This study provides a reliable method for further applications related to diagnoses of superficial organs.

  8. Extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz). Usefulness in audiological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Valiente, Antonio; Roldán Fidalgo, Amaya; Villarreal, Ithzel M; García Berrocal, José R

    2016-01-01

    Early detection and appropriate treatment of hearing loss are essential to minimise the consequences of hearing loss. In addition to conventional audiometry (125-8,000 Hz), extended high-frequency audiometry (9,000-20,000 Hz) is available. This type of audiometry may be useful in early diagnosis of hearing loss in certain conditions, such as the ototoxic effect of cisplatin-based treatment, noise exposure or oral misunderstanding, especially in noisy environments. Eleven examples are shown in which extended high-frequency audiometry has been useful in early detection of hearing loss, despite the subject having a normal conventional audiometry. The goal of the present paper was to highlight the importance of the extended high-frequency audiometry examination for it to become a standard tool in routine audiological examinations.

  9. Dynamic properties of ionospheric plasma turbulence driven by high-power high-frequency radiowaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grach, S. M.; Sergeev, E. N.; Mishin, E. V.; Shindin, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    A review is given of the current state-of-the-art of experimental studies and the theoretical understanding of nonlinear phenomena that occur in the ionospheric F-layer irradiated by high-power high-frequency ground-based transmitters. The main focus is on the dynamic features of high-frequency turbulence (plasma waves) and low-frequency turbulence (density irregularities of various scales) that have been studied in experiments at the Sura and HAARP heating facilities operated in temporal and frequency regimes specially designed with consideration of the characteristic properties of nonlinear processes in the perturbed ionosphere using modern radio receivers and optical instruments. Experimental results are compared with theoretical turbulence models for a magnetized collisional plasma in a high-frequency electromagnetic field, allowing the identification of the processes responsible for the observed features of artificial ionospheric turbulence.

  10. Influence of high frequency pulse on electrode wear in micro-EDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-peng Li

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available An electromagnetic coupling mathematical model is established by finite element method and is verified by the contrastive experiments of copper matrix Ni–TiN cylindrical coating electrode, copper electrode and Cu50W electrode. The wear mechanism of Ni–TiN/Cu composite electrode in the case of high-frequency pulse current is studied, and the influence of the fluctuation frequency of discharge current on electrode wear in micro-EDM is found out. Compared with the electrode made from homogeneous material, the high frequency electromagnetic properties of Ni–TiN composite layer can be used effectively to inhibit the effect of high frequency pulse on the electrode and improve the distribution trend of current density.

  11. Influence of high frequency pulse on electrode wear in micro-EDM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-peng LI; Yuan-gang WANG; Fu-ling ZHAO; Meng-hua WU; Yu LIU

    2014-01-01

    An electromagnetic coupling mathematical model is established by finite element method and is verified by the contrastive experiments of copper matrix NieTiN cylindrical coating electrode, copper electrode and Cu50W electrode. The wear mechanism of NieTiN/Cu composite electrode in the case of high-frequency pulse current is studied, and the influence of the fluctuation frequency of discharge current on electrode wear in micro-EDM is found out. Compared with the electrode made from homogeneous material, the high frequency electromagnetic properties of NieTiN composite layer can be used effectively to inhibit the effect of high frequency pulse on the electrode and improve the distribution trend of current density.

  12. High Frequency Resonance Damping of DFIG based Wind Power System under Weak Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Wang, Xiongfei; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    When operating in a micro or weak grid which has a relatively large network impedance, the Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) based wind power generation system is prone to suffer high frequency resonance due to the impedance interaction between DFIG system and the parallel compensated network...... (series RL + shunt C). In order to improve the performance of the DFIG system as well as other units and loads connected to the weak grid, the high frequency resonance needs to be effectively damped. In this paper, the proposed active damping control strategy is able to implement effective damping either...... in the Rotor Side Converter (RSC) or in the Grid Side Converter (GSC), through the introduction of virtual positive capacitor or virtual negative inductor to reshape the DFIG system impedance and mitigate the high frequency resonance. A detailed theoretical explanation on the virtual positive capacitor...

  13. Short-interval intracortical inhibition is modulated by high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takenobu; Sakuma, Kenji; Nomura, Takashi; Nakashima, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    Cortical excitability can be modulated by manipulation of afferent input. We investigated the influence of peripheral mixed nerve stimulation on the excitability of the motor cortex. Motor evoked potentials (MEPs), short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) and intracortical facilitation (ICF) in the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB), extensor carpi radialis (ECR) and first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscles were evaluated using paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation (150 Hz, 30 min) over the right median nerve at the wrist. The MEP amplitude and SICI of the APB muscle decreased transiently 0-10 min after the intervention, whereas the ICF did not change. High-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation reduced the excitability of the motor cortex. The decrement in the SICI, which reflects the function of GABA(A)ergic inhibitory interneurons, might compensate for the reduced motor cortical excitability after high-frequency peripheral mixed nerve stimulation.

  14. High-frequency homogenization of zero frequency stop band photonic and phononic crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakakis, Tryfon; Guenneau, Sebastien

    2013-01-01

    We present an accurate methodology for representing the physics of waves, for periodic structures, through effective properties for a replacement bulk medium: This is valid even for media with zero frequency stop-bands and where high frequency phenomena dominate. Since the work of Lord Rayleigh in 1892, low frequency (or quasi-static) behaviour has been neatly encapsulated in effective anisotropic media. However such classical homogenization theories break down in the high-frequency or stop band regime. Higher frequency phenomena are of significant importance in photonics (transverse magnetic waves propagating in infinite conducting parallel fibers), phononics (anti-plane shear waves propagating in isotropic elastic materials with inclusions), and platonics (flexural waves propagating in thin-elastic plates with holes). Fortunately, the recently proposed high-frequency homogenization (HFH) theory is only constrained by the knowledge of standing waves in order to asymptotically reconstruct dispersion curves an...

  15. Effect of ischemia and cooling on the response to high frequency stimulation in rat tail nerves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning; Feldbæk Nielsen, Jørgen; Sørensen, Bodil

    2000-01-01

    In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP-amp...... ischemia to the rat tail, an additional fall of the PP-amp was seen after 15-20 min of HFS at both low (20 Hz) and high (143 Hz) stimulation frequencies. In conclusion, ischemia and cooling result in an impaired ability to transmit high frequency impulses.......In normal rat tail nerves the effect of temperature and ischemia on the response to long-term high frequency stimulation (HFS) (143 Hz) was studied. The effect of temperature was studied in two consecutive tests at 14 degrees C and 35 degrees C. Prior to the HFS the peak-to-peak amplitude (PP...

  16. Advanced waveforms and frequency with spinal cord stimulation: burst and high-frequency energy delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Jason E; Falowski, Steven; Deer, Tim R

    2015-07-01

    In recent years, software development has been key to the next generation of neuromodulation devices. In this review, we will describe the new strategies for electrical waveform delivery for spinal cord stimulation. A systematic literature review was performed using bibliographic databases, limited to the English language and human data, between 2010 and 2014. The literature search yielded three articles on burst stimulation and four articles on high-frequency stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation may offer advantages over tonic stimulation, as data suggest improved patient tolerance, comparable increase in function and possible success with a subset of patients refractory to tonic spinal cord stimulation. High-frequency and burst stimulation are new ways to deliver energy to the spinal cord that may offer advantages over tonic stimulation. These may offer new salvage strategies to mitigate spinal cord stimulation failure and improve cost-effectiveness by reducing explant rate.

  17. Development of High-frequency Soft Magnetic Materials for Power Electronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Jun-chang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The new requirements of high-frequency magnetic properties are put forward for electronic components with the rapid development of power electronics industry and the use of new electromagnetic materials. The properties of magnetic core, which is the key unit of electronic components, determine the performance of electronic components directly. Therefore, it's necessary to study the high-frequency soft magnetic materials. In this paper, the development history of four types of soft magnetic materials was reviewed. The advantages and disadvantages of each kind of soft magnetic materials and future development trends were pointed out. The emphases were placed on the popular soft magnetic composite materials in recent years. The tendency is to develop high-frequency soft magnetic composite materials with the particle size controllable, uniform coating layer on the core and a mass production method from laboratory to industrialization.

  18. High-frequency radar observations of PMSE modulation by radio heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senior, Andrew; Rietveld, Michael; Mahmoudian, Alireza; La Hoz, Cesar; Kosch, Michael; Scales, Wayne; Pinedo, Henry

    The first observations using high-frequency (8 MHz) radar of modulation of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) by radio heating of the ionosphere are presented. The experiment was performed at the EISCAT facility near Tromsø, Norway. The observations are compared with simultaneous radar measurements at 224 MHz and with a model of the dusty plasma response to electron heating. Agreement between the model and observations is good considering technical limitations on the 8 MHz radar measurements. Predictions made about the response of high-frequency PMSE to heating where dust charging dominates over diffusion, opposite to the situation at very high-frequencies are confirmed. Suggestions are made about improving the 8 MHz observations to overcome the current limitations.

  19. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2-3 days and used 1-2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory.

  20. High frequency ultrasound features and pathological characteristics of medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Jianqiu; Song, Yimin

    2016-11-01

    To study high-frequency ultrasound features and pathological characteristics of medullary thyroid carcinoma (medullary thyroid carcinoma, MTC) with the purpose to improve the diagnostic accuracy of this disease. The clinical data of 20 cases of patients with MTC confirmed by the clinical surgery were retrospectively analyzed. And the high-frequency ultrasound features were analyzed and compared with the pathological characteristics. There were 16 cases with tumor invasion into one side of the thyroid gland; 17 cases with tumor in the middle-upper pole of the thyroid gland. And 8 cases were detected with uneven echo of high frequency ultrasound appearance and pathological manifestations of cystic degeneration to necrosis seen under the light microscope or normal thyroid tissue within part of the lump. 16 cases were tested with even echo of high frequency ultrasound appearance, and tumor cells were formed in the solid and block-like shape under the light microscope. And 18 cases were manifested with low echo, with proliferation of fibrous tissue within the intercellular substance under the light microscope. 18 cases could be seen the calcification points and often amyloid-like content deposited in the intercellular substance seen under the light microscope. In addition, the pathological manifestations of the 8 cases combined with lymph node metastasis were the "lash tumor" of the metastatic lymph nodes and primary tumor. MTC was commonly located in the middle-upper region of the thyroid gland and in one leaf of the thyroid gland, combined with lymph node metastasis. The high frequency ultrasound appearance was the even low-echo tumor in round or quasi-circular shape, with obscure boundary and often combined with rough calcification. High frequency ultrasound could be used as the prior physical diagnostic method for medullary thyroid carcinoma.

  1. High frequency hearing thresholds and product distortion otoacoustic emissions in cystic fibrosis patients,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Bencke Geyer

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: The treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis involves the use of ototoxic drugs, mainly aminoglycoside antibiotics. Due to the use of these drugs, fibrocystic patients are at risk of developing hearing loss. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hearing of patients with cystic fibrosis by High Frequency Audiometry and Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions. METHODS: Cross-sectional study. The study group consisted of 39 patients (7-20 years of age with cystic fibrosis and a control group of 36 individuals in the same age group without otologic complaints, with normal audiometric thresholds and type A tympanometric curves. High Frequency Audiometry and Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions tests were conducted. RESULTS: The study group had significantly higher thresholds at 250, 1000, 8000, 9000, 10,000, 12,500, and 16,000 Hz (p = 0.004 as well as higher prevalence of otoacoustic emission alterations at 1000 and 6000 Hz (p = 0.001, with significantly lower amplitudes at 1000, 1400, and 6000 Hz. There was a significant association between alterations in hearing thresholds in High Frequency Audiometry with the number of courses of aminoglycosides administered (p = 0.005. Eighty-three percent of patients who completed more than ten courses of aminoglycosides had hearing loss in High Frequency Audiometry. CONCLUSION: A significant number of patients with cystic fibrosis who received repeated courses of aminoglycosides showed alterations in High Frequency Audiometry and Distortion Product Otoacoustic Emissions. The implementation of ten or more aminoglycoside cycles was associated with alterations in High Frequency Audiometry.

  2. Adaptive Piezoelectric Circuitry Sensor Network with High-Frequency Harmonics Interrogation for Structural Damage Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-17

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2014-0255 ADAPTIVE PIEZOELECTRIC CIRCUITRY SENSOR NETWORK KON-WELL WANG MICHIGAN UNIV ANN ARBOR Final Report 09/17/2014 DISTRIBUTION A...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 09-09-2014 Final Performance Report 06-01-2011 - 05-31-2014 Adaptive Piezoelectric Circuitry Sensor Network with High-Frequency...approach. Specifically, we propose to create a new concept of adaptive high-frequency piezoelectric self-sensing interrogation by means of tunable

  3. A Markov Chain Estimator of Multivariate Volatility from High Frequency Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Horel, Guillaume; Lunde, Asger

    We introduce a multivariate estimator of financial volatility that is based on the theory of Markov chains. The Markov chain framework takes advantage of the discreteness of high-frequency returns. We study the finite sample properties of the estimation in a simulation study and apply it to highf......We introduce a multivariate estimator of financial volatility that is based on the theory of Markov chains. The Markov chain framework takes advantage of the discreteness of high-frequency returns. We study the finite sample properties of the estimation in a simulation study and apply...

  4. Efficient Estimation for Diffusions Sampled at High Frequency Over a Fixed Time Interval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Nina Munkholt; Sørensen, Michael

    Parametric estimation for diffusion processes is considered for high frequency observations over a fixed time interval. The processes solve stochastic differential equations with an unknown parameter in the diffusion coefficient. We find easily verified conditions on approximate martingale...... estimating functions under which estimators are consistent, rate optimal, and efficient under high frequency (in-fill) asymptotics. The asymptotic distributions of the estimators are shown to be normal variance-mixtures, where the mixing distribution generally depends on the full sample path of the diffusion...

  5. Determination of the High Frequency Inductance Profile of Surface Mounted Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Rasmussen, Peter Omand; Ritchie, Ewen

    2008-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the high frequency inductance profile plays an important role in many designs of sensorless controllers for Surface inductance. A special algorithm is used to decouple the cross-coupling effects between the d-axis and the q-axis, which allows Mounted Permanent Magnet (SMPM......) synchronous motors. This paper presents an AC+DC measurement method for determination of the d-axis and q-axis high frequency inductance profiles of SMPM synchronous motors. This method uses DC currents to set a desired magnetic working point on the motor laminations, and then superimpose balanced small AC...

  6. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tai-Wang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Fu, Pan-Ming; Chen, Shi-Gang

    2002-08-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω-2ω and 1ω-3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  7. Interference Dynamics of Hydrogen Atoms in High-Frequency Dichromatic Laser Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程太旺; 李晓峰; 傅盘铭; 陈式刚

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the ionization and high-order harmonic generation of a hydrogen atom in high-frequency (several atomic units) super strong (up to several tens of atomic units) dichromatic laser fields. An effective iterative method in the framework of high-frequency Floquet theory is used in the calculations. We have considered two kinds of dichromatic laser field, i.e. 1ω - 2ω and lω - 3ω. We find that, in both the cases, the ionization and high-order harmonic generation show evident dependence on the relative phase and strength of the additional harmonic field. The dynamical origin of these interference effects is also discussed.

  8. Designing All-Pole Filters for High-Frequency Phase-Locked Loops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Bressan Pinheiro

    2014-01-01

    signals exchanged between the nodes of the networks and detected by PLLs. The necessity to improve clock precision that follows the bandwidth increase provoked the improvement of the filter component of the PLLs, avoiding instability and high-frequency components in the reference signals. Here, a technique of designing this kind of filter is presented, considering second-order filters, implying third-order PLLs. Simulations show that following this technique produces very fast tracking processes, enabling precise operation even for very high frequencies.

  9. Effective market influence. An effect chain analysis of NUTEK`s high-frequency lighting campaign

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goeransson, C.; Faugert, S. [SIPU Utvaerdering, Stockholm (Sweden); Baeckman, B.; Arndt, J. [B2B AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1994-12-31

    This report is an evaluation of NUTEK`s `Better lighting and more energy-efficient high-frequency fluorescent tube luminaries` campaign. It is concerned with the ways in which NUTEK can influence the spread and use of high-frequency (HF) lighting devices. It also shows that NUTEK actually has affected (contributed to) development in the area. The report analyses and quantifies (as far as possible) how much NUTEK has influenced the various parties concerned in the sector, their attitudes and their actions. 14 figs, 5 tabs

  10. Effectiveness of treatment with high-frequency chest wall oscillation in patients with bronchiectasis

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolini, Antonello; Cardini, Federica; Landucci, Norma; Lanata, Sergio; Ferrari-Bravo, Maura; Barlascini, Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Background High-frequency airway clearance (HFCWC) assist devices generate either positive or negative trans-respiratory pressure excursions to produce high-frequency, small-volume oscillations in the airways. HFCWC can lead to changes in volume of 15–57 ml and in flow up to 1.6 L/s, which generate minimal coughing to mobilize secretions. The typical treatment lasts 20–30 minutes, and consists of short periods of compression at different frequencies, separated by coughing. The aim of this stu...

  11. A Realized Variance for the Whole Day Based on Intermittent High-Frequency Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Reinhard; Lunde, Asger

    2005-01-01

    We consider the problem of deriving an empirical measure of daily integrated variance (IV) in the situation where high-frequency price data are unavailable for part of the day. We study three estimators in this context and characterize the assumptions that justify their use. We show that the opti......We consider the problem of deriving an empirical measure of daily integrated variance (IV) in the situation where high-frequency price data are unavailable for part of the day. We study three estimators in this context and characterize the assumptions that justify their use. We show...

  12. A Pitch Extraction Method with High Frequency Resolution for Singing Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Hideyo; Hoguro, Masahiro; Umezaki, Taizo

    This paper proposes a pitch estimation method suitable for singing evaluation incorporable in KARAOKE machines. Professional singers and musicians have sharp hearing for music and singing voice. They recognize that singer's voice pitch is “a little off key” or “be in tune”. In the same way, the pitch estimation method that has high frequency resolution is necessary in order to evaluate singing. This paper proposes a pitch estimation method with high frequency resolution utilizing harmonic characteristic of autocorrelation function. The proposed method can estimate a fundamental frequency in the range 50 ∼ 1700[Hz] with resolution less than 3.6 cents in light processing.

  13. Adaptive control of linear multivariable systems with high frequency gain matrix hurwitz

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying ZHOU; Yuqiang WU; Shumin FEI

    2005-01-01

    A new adaptive control scheme is proposed for multivariable model reference adaptive control(MRAC) systems based on the nonlinear backstepping approach with vector form.The assumption on a priori knowledge of the high frequency gain matrix in existing results is relaxed and the new required condition for the high frequency gain matrix can be easily checked for certain plants so that the proposed method is widely applicable.This control scheme guarantees the global stability of the closed-loop systems and the tracking error can be arbitrary small.The simulation result for an application example shows the validity of the proposed nonlinear adaptive scheme.

  14. Casimir force between $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ mirrors transparent at high frequencies

    CERN Document Server

    Braga, Alessandra N; Alves, Danilo T

    2016-01-01

    We investigate, in the context of a real massless scalar field in $1+1$ dimensions, models of partially reflecting mirrors simulated by Dirac $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ point interactions. In the literature, these models do not exhibit full transparency at high frequencies. In order to provide a more realistic feature for these models, we propose a modified $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ point interaction that enables to achieve full transparency in the limit of high frequencies. Taking this modified $\\delta-\\delta^{\\prime}$ model into account, we investigate the Casimir force, comparing our results with those found in the literature.

  15. Required changes in emission standards for high-frequency noise in power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundmark, C.M.; Larsson, E.O.A. [Lulea Univ. of Technology, Skelleftea (Sweden); Bollen, M.H.J. [STRI AB, Ludvika (Sweden)

    2006-07-01

    This paper discusses some recent developments that make the existing standards on the emission of high-frequency noise in power systems due for reconsideration. It is shown that it is possible for an equipment to remain below the emission limits while at the same time the disturbance level increases beyond what was intended by the standard document. Further, the change from analog to digital communication and the use of communication via the power system, make that the permitted disturbance levels need to be reconsidered. This paper also contains an example of measured high-frequency noise and proposes a framework for re-coordination of emission and immunity levels. (Author)

  16. High-frequency impedance of small-angle tapers and collimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Stupakov

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Collimators and transitions in accelerator vacuum chambers often include small-angle tapering to lower the wakefields generated by the beam. While the low-frequency impedance is well described by Yokoya’s formula (for axisymmetric geometry, much less is known about the behavior of the impedance in the high-frequency limit. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to the high-frequency regime for round collimators and tapers. Our analytical results are compared with computer simulations using the code ECHO.

  17. Passive ultrasonics using sub-Nyquist sampling of high-frequency thermal-mechanical noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabra, Karim G; Romberg, Justin; Lani, Shane; Degertekin, F Levent

    2014-06-01

    Monolithic integration of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer arrays with low noise complementary metal oxide semiconductor electronics minimizes interconnect parasitics thus allowing the measurement of thermal-mechanical (TM) noise. This enables passive ultrasonics based on cross-correlations of diffuse TM noise to extract coherent ultrasonic waves propagating between receivers. However, synchronous recording of high-frequency TM noise puts stringent requirements on the analog to digital converter's sampling rate. To alleviate this restriction, high-frequency TM noise cross-correlations (12-25 MHz) were estimated instead using compressed measurements of TM noise which could be digitized at a sampling frequency lower than the Nyquist frequency.

  18. New considerations concerning the high-frequency focusing of relativistic particles and Panofsky-Wenzel theorem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melekhin, V. N.

    1997-02-01

    It is shown that the transverse momentum imparted to a relativistic particle, passing through an accelerating cavity near and parallel to its axis ( z-axis), may be presented as a trajectory integral with an integrand being proportional to z-component of high-frequency magnetic field. The x- and y-component of this momentum are equal in value but opposite in sign. The obtained result is compared with Panofsky-Wenzel theorem. This result gives one more procedure to check the accuracy of high-frequency focusing simulation.

  19. Rapid Laser Printing of Paper-Based Multilayer Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gui-Wen; Feng, Qing-Ping; Xiao, Hong-Mei; Li, Na; Fu, Shao-Yun

    2016-09-27

    Laser printing has been widely used in daily life, and the fabricating process is highly efficient and mask-free. Here we propose a laser printing process for the rapid fabrication of paper-based multilayer circuits. It does not require wetting of the paper, which is more competitive in manufacturing paper-based circuits compared to conventional liquid printing process. In the laser printed circuits, silver nanowires (Ag-NWs) are used as conducting material for their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. By repeating the printing process, multilayer three-dimensional (3D) structured circuits can be obtained, which is quite significant for complex circuit applications. In particular, the performance of the printed circuits can be exactly controlled by varying the process parameters including Ag-NW content and laminating temperature, which offers a great opportunity for rapid prototyping of customized products with designed properties. A paper-based high-frequency radio frequency identification (RFID) label with optimized performance is successfully demonstrated. By adjusting the laminating temperature to 180 °C and the top-layer Ag-NW areal density to 0.3 mg cm(-2), the printed RFID antenna can be conjugately matched with the chip, and a big reading range of ∼12.3 cm with about 2.0 cm over that of the commercial etched Al antenna is achieved. This work provides a promising approach for fast and quality-controlled fabrication of multilayer circuits on common paper and may be enlightening for development of paper-based devices.

  20. Emergence of 3D Printed Dosage Forms: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhnan, Mohamed A; Okwuosa, Tochukwu C; Sadia, Muzna; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Arafat, Basel

    2016-08-01

    The recent introduction of the first FDA approved 3D-printed drug has fuelled interest in 3D printing technology, which is set to revolutionize healthcare. Since its initial use, this rapid prototyping (RP) technology has evolved to such an extent that it is currently being used in a wide range of applications including in tissue engineering, dentistry, construction, automotive and aerospace. However, in the pharmaceutical industry this technology is still in its infancy and its potential yet to be fully explored. This paper presents various 3D printing technologies such as stereolithographic, powder based, selective laser sintering, fused deposition modelling and semi-solid extrusion 3D printing. It also provides a comprehensive review of previous attempts at using 3D printing technologies on the manufacturing dosage forms with a particular focus on oral tablets. Their advantages particularly with adaptability in the pharmaceutical field have been highlighted, which enables the preparation of dosage forms with complex designs and geometries, multiple actives and tailored release profiles. An insight into the technical challenges facing the different 3D printing technologies such as the formulation and processing parameters is provided. Light is also shed on the different regulatory challenges that need to be overcome for 3D printing to fulfil its real potential in the pharmaceutical industry.

  1. High frequency pulse anodising of magnetron sputtered Al–Zr and Al–Ti Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Bordo, Kirill; Engberg, Sara

    2016-01-01

    High frequency pulse anodising of Al–Zr and Al–Ti coatings is studied as a surface finishing technique and compared to conventional decorative DC anodising. The Al–Zr and Al–Ti coatings were deposited using DC magnetron sputtering and were heat treated after deposition to generate a multiphase mi...

  2. Single phase AC-DC power factor corrected converter with high frequency isolation using buck converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramesh,

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Single phase ac-dc converters having high frequency isolation are implemented in buck, boost, buck-boost configuration with improving the power quality in terms of reducing the harmonics of input current. The paperpropose the circuit configuration, control mechanism, and simulation result for the single phase ac-dc converter.

  3. Effectiveness of a prolonged incarceration and rehabilitation measure for high-frequency offenders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tollenaar, N.; van der Laan, A. M.; van der Heijden, P. G M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the incapacitation effect and the impact on post-release recidivism of a measure combining prolonged incarceration and rehabilitation, the ISD measure for high frequency offenders (HFOs) was compared to the standard practice of short-term imprisonment. Methods: We applied a q

  4. US Mains Stacked Very High Frequency Self-oscillating Resonant Power Converter with Unified Rectifier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jeppe Arnsdorf; Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Mønster, Jakob Døllner

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a Very High Frequency (VHF) converter made with three Class-E inverters and a single ClassDE rectifier. The converter is designed for the US mains (120 V, 60 Hz) and can deliver 9 W to a 60 V LED. The converter has a switching frequency of 37 MHz and achieves an efficiency...

  5. Analysis and Active Damping of Multiple High Frequency Resonances in DFIG System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Xiongfei

    2017-01-01

    , the DFIG system may be subject to the resonances due to the impedance interaction between the DFIG system and the weak network. Especially, when connected to a series π sections weak network, the Multiple High Frequency Resonances (MHFR) may occur and require careful studies. The impedance modeling...

  6. High-frequency field-deployable isotope analyzer for hydrological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena S.F. Berman; Manish Gupta; Chris Gabrielli; Tina Garland; Jeffrey J. McDonnell

    2009-01-01

    A high-frequency, field-deployable liquid water isotope analyzer was developed. The instrument was deployed for 4 contiguous weeks in the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest Long-term Ecological Research site in western Oregon, where it was used for real-time measurement of the isotope ratios of precipitation and stream water during three large storm events. We were able...

  7. High frequency oscillations after median nerve stimulations in healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanini, Sergio; Del Piero, Ivana; Martucci, Lucia; Restuccia, Domenico

    2017-10-01

    The aim of the present research was to address somatosensory high frequency oscillations (400-800Hz) in healthy children and adolescents in comparison with healthy adults. We recorded somatosensory evoked potentials following median nerve stimulation in nineteen resting healthy children/adolescents and in nineteen resting healthy adults with eyes closed. We administered six consecutive stimulation blocks (500 sweeps each). The presynaptic component of high frequency oscillations amplitudes was smaller in healthy children/adolescents than in healthy adults (no difference between groups was found as far as the postsynaptic component was concerned). Healthy children/adolescents had smaller presynaptic component than the postsynaptic one (the postsynaptic component amplitude was 145% of the presynaptic one), while healthy adults showed the opposite (reduction of the postsynaptic component to 80% of the presynaptic one). No habituation phenomena concerning high frequency oscillation amplitudes were registered in neither healthy children/adolescents nor healthy adults. These findings suggest that healthy children/adolescents present with significantly different pattern of somatosensory high frequency oscillations compared with healthy adults' ones. This different pattern is reasonably expression of higher cortical excitability of the developing brain cortex. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Surface roughness influence on the quality factor of high frequency nanoresonators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palasantzas, G.

    2008-01-01

    Surface roughness influences significantly the quality factor of high frequency nanoresonators for large frequency-relaxation times (omega tau > 1) within the non-Newtonian regime, where a purely elastic dynamics develops. It is shown that the influence of short wavelength roughness, which is

  9. Analysis and Comparison of High Frequency Resonance in Small and Large Scale DFIG System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Yipeng; Blaabjerg, Frede; Wang, Xiongfei

    2016-01-01

    When connected to a parallel compensated weak grid network, both the small and large power scale Doubly Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) system may suffer high frequency resonance (HFR) due to the impedance interaction between the DFIG system and the parallel compensated weak network. Since...

  10. Low power very high frequency resonant converter with high step down ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the design of a resonant converter with a switching frequency in the very high frequency range (30-300MHz), a large step down ratio and low output power. This gives the designed converters specifications which are far from previous results. The class E inverter and rectifier...

  11. Applying the Multisim Technology to Teach the Course of High Frequency Power Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Gang; Xue, Yuan-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    As one important professional base course in the electric information specialty, the course of "high frequency electronic circuit" has strong theoretical characteristic and abstract content. To enhance the teaching quality of this course, the computer simulation technology based on Multisim is introduced into the teaching of "high…

  12. Volume and Pressure Delivery During Pediatric High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Ronald; Deakers, Timothy; Hotz, Justin; Khemani, Robinder G; Ross, Patrick A; Newth, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    Identify variables independently associated with delivered tidal volume (VT) and measured mean airway pressure during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation across the range of pediatric endotracheal tube sizes. In vitro study. Research laboratory. An in vitro bench model of the intubated pediatric respiratory system during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation was used to obtain delivered VT and mean airway pressure (in the distal lung) for various endotracheal tube sizes. Measurements were taken at different combinations of ventilator set mean airway pressure (Paw), amplitude (ΔP), frequency, and test lung compliance. Multiple regression analysis was used to construct multivariable models predicting delivered VT and mean airway pressure. Variables independently associated with higher delivered VT for all endotracheal tube sizes include higher ΔP (p frequency (p frequency and ΔP magnifies the delivered VT when ΔP is high and frequency is low (p frequency increases (p frequency in delivered VT and the effect of ΔP and frequency on delivered mean airway pressure. These results demonstrate the need to measure or estimate VT and delivered pressures during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation and may be useful in determining optimal strategies for lung protective ventilation during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

  13. Sensors for High Frequency monitoring of cyanoHABs and cyanotoxin production

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of sensors in environmental monitoring is an area of constant evolution. As monitoring needs present themselves, technology development follows. Here, the use of high frequency data to monitor and predict HABs is presented illustrating the successful use of technology a...

  14. Planck 2015 results: VII. High Frequency Instrument data processing: Time-ordered information and beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) has observed the full sky at six frequencies (100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz) in intensity and at four frequencies in linear polarization (100, 143, 217, and 353 GHz). In order to obtain sky maps, the time-ordered information (TOI) containing...

  15. Very High Frequency Resonant DC/DC Converters for LED Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mickey Pierre; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a very high frequency DC/DC converter for LED lighting. Several resonant topologies are compared and their usability discussed. At the end the resonant SEPIC converter is chosen based on the achievable power density and total bill of material. Simulations of a 51 MHz converter...

  16. High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury: A Multicenter International Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rettig, Jordan S; Smallwood, Craig D; Walsh, Brian K; Rimensberger, Peter C; Bachman, Thomas E; Bollen, Casper W; Duval, Els L; Gebistorf, Fabienne; Markhorst, Dick G; Tinnevelt, Marcel; Todd, Mark; Zurakowski, David; Arnold, John H

    2015-12-01

    We aim to describe current clinical practice, the past decade of experience and factors related to improved outcomes for pediatric patients receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. We have also modeled predictive factors that could help stratify mortality risk and guide future high-frequency oscillatory ventilation practice. Multicenter retrospective, observational questionnaire study. Seven PICUs. Demographic, disease factor, and ventilatory and outcome data were collected, and 328 patients from 2009 to 2010 were included in this analysis. None. Patients were classified into six cohorts based on underlying diagnosis. We used univariate analysis to identify factors associated with mortality risk and multivariate logistic regression to identify independent predictors of mortality risk. An oxygenation index greater than 35 and immunocompromise exhibited the greatest predictive power (p highly dependent on primary underlying condition. A trend toward an increase in oscillator amplitude and frequency was observed when compared with historical data. Given the number of centers and subjects included in the database, these findings provide a robust description of current practice regarding the use of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation for pediatric hypoxic respiratory failure. Patients with severe hypoxic respiratory failure and immunocompromise had the highest mortality risk, and those with respiratory syncytial virus had the lowest. A means of identifying the risk of 30-day mortality for subjects can be obtained by identifying the underlying disease and oxygenation index on conventional ventilation preceding the initiation of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation.

  17. Novel High-Frequency Peripheral Nerve Stimulator Treatment of Refractory Postherpetic Neuralgia: A Brief Technical Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, Imanuel R; Chen, Jeffrey L; Hiller, David; Souzdalnitski, Dmitri; Sheean, Geoffrey; Wallace, Mark; Barba, David

    2015-08-01

    The study aims to describe an ultrasound (US)-guided peripheral nerve stimulation implant technique and describe the effect of high-frequency peripheral nerve stimulation on refractory postherpetic neuralgia. Following a cadaver pilot trial using US and confirmatory fluoroscopic guidance, a 52-year-old man with refractory left supraorbital neuralgia underwent combined US and fluoroscopic-guided supraorbital peripheral nerve stimulator trial. The patient was subsequently implanted with a percutaneous lead over the left supraorbital and supratrochlear nerve utilizing a high-frequency stimulation paradigm. At 9 months follow-up, the pain intensity had declined from a weekly average of 8/10 to 1/10 on the pain visual analog scale (VAS). After implant, both nerve conduction and blink reflex studies were performed, which demonstrated herpetic nerve damage and frequency-specific peripheral nerve stimulation effects. The patient preferred analgesia in the supraorbital nerve distribution accomplished with high-frequency paresthesia-free stimulation (HFS) at an amplitude of 6.2 mA, a frequency of 100-1200 Hz, and a pulse width of 130 μsec, to paresthesia-mediated pain relief associated with low-frequency stimulation. We report the implant of a supraorbital peripheral nerve stimulating electrode that utilizes a high-frequency program resulting in sustained suppression of intractable postherpetic neuralgia. © 2015 International Neuromodulation Society.

  18. High Frequency AC Inductor Analysis and Design for Dual Active Bridge (DAB) Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The dual active bridge (DAB) converter is an isolated bidirectional dc-dc topology which is the most critical part for the power conversion systems such as solid-state transformers (SST). This paper focuses on analysis and design of high frequency ac inductors which are the power interfacing...

  19. Fabrication of High-Frequency pMUT Arrays on Silicon Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas; Zawada, Tomasz; Hansen, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    A novel technique based on silicon micromachining for fabrication of linear arrays of high-frequency piezoelectric micromachined ultrasound transducers (pMUT) is presented. Piezoelectric elements are formed by deposition of lead zirconia titanate into etched features of a silicon substrate...

  20. Stray-insensitive sample-delay-hold buffers for high-frequency switched-capacitor filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijns, J.J.F.; Rijns, J.J.F.; Wallinga, Hans

    1991-01-01

    Two high-frequency switched-capacitor sample-delay-hold (SDH) buffers are presented. The circuits provide a correct transition from the continuous-time to the discrete-time domain or vice versa. Experimental results show an excellent frequency behavior for clock frequencies up to 25 MHz.

  1. Magnetic Field Generation and B-Dot Sensor Characterization in the High Frequency Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    date Dr. Andrew J, Terzuoli, PhD (Member) date Dr. Michael J. Havrilla , PhD (Member) date AFIT/GE/ENG/12-20 Abstract Designing a high frequency (HF... Havrilla for their help in my research. Also, despite being deployed during the majority of my time at AFIT, Major Gooodman played an important role which

  2. High-frequency acoustic charge transport in GaAs nanowires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Büyükköse, S.; Hernandez-Minguez, A.; Vratzov, B.; Somaschini, C.; Geelhaar, L.; Riechert, H.; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Santos, P.V.

    2014-01-01

    The oscillating piezoelectric fields accompanying surface acoustic waves are able to transport charge carriers in semiconductor heterostructures. Here, we demonstrate high-frequency (above 1 GHz) acoustic charge transport in GaAs-based nanowires deposited on a piezoelectric substrate. The short

  3. Planck early results. IV. First assessment of the High Frequency Instrument in-flight performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bréelle, E.; Bucher, M.; Cressiot, C.;

    2011-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) is designed to measure the temperature and polarization anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background and Galactic foregrounds in six ~30% bands centered at 100, 143, 217, 353, 545, and 857 GHz at an angular resolution of 10′ (100 GHz), 7′ (143 GHz), a...

  4. Distinct contributions of low- and high-frequency neural oscillations to speech comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kösem, A.V.M.; Wassenhove, V. van

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACTIn the last decade, the involvement of neural oscillatory mechanisms in speech comprehension has been increasingly investigated. Current evidence suggests that low-frequency and high-frequency neural entrainment to the acoustic dynamics of speech are linked to its analysis. One crucial

  5. Computing effective properties of nonlinear structures exposed to strong high-frequency loading at multiple frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2006-01-01

    Effects of strong high-frequency excitation at multiple frequencies (multi-HFE) are analyzed for a class of generally nonlinear systems. The effects are illustrated for a simple pendulum system with a vibrating support, and for a parametrically excited flexible beam. For the latter, theoretical...

  6. High Frequency Discharge Plasma Induced Grafting of Polystyrene onto Titanium Dioxide Powder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shaofeng; OU Qiongrong; MENG Yuedong

    2007-01-01

    Grafting of polystyrene (PS) onto titanium dioxide powder was investigated. The graft polymerization reaction was induced by high frequency discharge produced N2 plasma treatment of the surfaces of titanium dioxide. IR , XPS and TGA results show that PS was grafted on the titanium dioxide powder. And the crystal structure of the titanium dioxide powder observed by XRD was unchanged after plasma treatment.

  7. Reflections on Pediatric High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation From a Physiologic Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation using low tidal volumes has become universally accepted to prevent ventilator-induced lung injury. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) allows pulmonary gas exchange using very small tidal volume (1-2 mL/kg) with concomitant decreased risk of atelectrauma. However, it

  8. Effective properties of mechanical systems under high-frequency excitation at multiple frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2008-01-01

    Effects of strong high-frequency excitation at multiple frequencies (multi-HFE) are analyzed for a class of generally nonlinear systems. The effects are illustrated for a simple pendulum system with a vibrating support, and for a parametrically excited flexible beam. For the latter, theoretical p...

  9. Some general effects of strong high-frequency excitation: stiffening, biasing, and smoothening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jon Juel

    2002-01-01

    Mechanical high-frequency (HF) excitation provides a working principle behind many industrial and natural applications and phenomena. This paper concerns three particular effects of HF excitation, that may change the apparent characteristics of mechanical systems: 1) stiffening, by which the appa...

  10. Discovery of high-frequency iron K lags in Ark 564 and Mrk 335

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kara, E.; Fabian, A.C.; Cackett, E.M.; Uttley, P.; Wilkins, D.R.; Zoghbi, A.

    2013-01-01

    We use archival XMM-Newton observations of Ark 564 and Mrk 335 to calculate the frequency-dependent time lags for these two well-studied sources. We discover high-frequency Fe K lags in both sources, indicating that the red wing of the line precedes the rest-frame energy by roughly 100 and 150 s for

  11. Lab-chip HPLC with integrated droplet-based microfluidics for separation and high frequency compartmentalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Young; Cho, Soong-Won; Kang, Dong-Ku; Edel, Joshua B; Chang, Soo-Ik; deMello, Andrew J; O'Hare, Danny

    2012-09-21

    We demonstrate the integration of a droplet-based microfluidic device with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in a monolithic format. Sequential operations of separation, compartmentalisation and concentration counter were conducted on a monolithic chip. This describes the use of droplet-based microfluidics for the preservation of chromatographic separations, and its potential application as a high frequency fraction collector.

  12. A numerical and experimental investigation of the performance of sound intensity probes at high frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn; Cutanda, Vicente; Juhl, Peter Møller

    1998-01-01

    The high-frequency performance of a p-p intensity probe with a solid spacer between the two microphones is examined. It is shown theoretically and verified experimentally that with a spacer length that equals the diameter of the microphones, the finite difference error is almost perfectly cancelled...

  13. Using high-frequency sampling to detect effects of atmospheric pollutants on stream chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen D. Sebestyen; James B. Shanley; Elizabeth W. Boyer

    2009-01-01

    We combined information from long-term (weekly over many years) and short-term (high-frequency during rainfall and snowmelt events) stream water sampling efforts to understand how atmospheric deposition affects stream chemistry. Water samples were collected at the Sleepers River Research Watershed, VT, a temperate upland forest site that receives elevated atmospheric...

  14. High-frequency ultrasound for monitoring changes in liver tissue during preservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlad, Roxana M [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Czarnota, Gregory J [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giles, Anoja [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Sherar, Michael D [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hunt, John W [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kolios, Michael C [Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2005-01-21

    Currently the only method to assess liver preservation injury is based on liver appearance and donor medical history. Previous work has shown that high-frequency ultrasound could detect ischemic cell death due to changes in cell morphology. In this study, we use high-frequency ultrasound integrated backscatter to assess liver damage in experimental models of liver ischemia. Ultimately, our goal is to predict organ suitability for transplantation using high-frequency imaging and spectral analysis techniques. To examine the effects of liver ischemia at different temperatures, livers from Wistar rats were surgically excised, immersed in phosphate buffer saline and stored at 4 and 20 deg. C for 24 h. To mimic organ preservation, livers were excised, flushed with University of Wisconsin (UW) solution and stored at 4 deg. C for 24 h. Preservation injury was simulated by either not flushing livers with UW solution or, before scanning, allowing livers to reach room temperature. Ultrasound images and corresponding radiofrequency data were collected over the ischemic period. No significant increase in integrated backscatter ({approx}2.5 dBr) was measured for the livers prepared using standard preservation conditions. For all other ischemia models, the integrated backscatter increased by 4-9 dBr demonstrating kinetics dependent on storage conditions. The results provide a possible framework for using high-frequency imaging to non-invasively assess liver preservation injury.

  15. High-Frequency Oscillatory Ventilation in Pediatric Acute Lung Injury : A Multicenter International Experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rettig, Jordan S; Smallwood, Craig D; Walsh, Brian K; Rimensberger, Peter C; Bachman, Thomas E; Bollen, Casper W.; Duval, Els L; Gebistorf, Fabienne; Markhorst, Dick G; Tinnevelt, Marcel; Todd, Mark; Zurakowski, David; Arnold, John H

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aim to describe current clinical practice, the past decade of experience and factors related to improved outcomes for pediatric patients receiving high-frequency oscillatory ventilation. We have also modeled predictive factors that could help stratify mortality risk and guide future hi

  16. Neural correlates of heterotopic facilitation induced after high frequency electrical stimulation of nociceptive pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeke, E.N. van den; Heck, C.H. van; Rijn, C.M. van; Wilder-Smith, O.H.G.

    2011-01-01

    Background High frequency electrical stimulation (HFS) of primary nociceptive afferents in humans induce a heightened sensitivity in the surrounding non-stimulated skin area. Several studies suggest that this heterotopic effect is the result of central (spinal) plasticity. The aim of this study is t

  17. Mechanisms of high-frequency song generation in brachypterous crickets and the role of ghost frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Tony; Montealegre-Z, Fernando; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Grandcolas, Philippe; Robert, Daniel

    2013-06-01

    Sound production in crickets relies on stridulation, the well-understood rubbing together of a pair of specialised wings. As the file of one wing slides over the scraper of the other, a series of rhythmic impacts causes harmonic oscillations, usually resulting in the radiation of pure tones delivered at low frequencies (2-8 kHz). In the short-winged crickets of the Lebinthini tribe, acoustic communication relies on signals with remarkably high frequencies (>8 kHz) and rich harmonic content. Using several species of the subfamily Eneopterinae, we characterised the morphological and mechanical specialisations supporting the production of high frequencies, and demonstrated that higher harmonics are exploited as dominant frequencies. These specialisations affect the structure of the stridulatory file, the motor control of stridulation and the resonance of the sound radiator. We placed these specialisations in a phylogenetic framework and show that they serve to exploit high-frequency vibrational modes pre-existing in the phylogenetic ancestor. In Eneopterinae, the lower frequency components are harmonically related to the dominant peak, suggesting they are relicts of ancestral carrier frequencies. Yet, such ghost frequencies still occur in the wings' free resonances, highlighting the fundamental mechanical constraints of sound radiation. These results support the hypothesis that such high-frequency songs evolved stepwise, by a form of punctuated evolution that could be related to functional constraints, rather than by only the progressive increase of the ancestral fundamental frequency.

  18. Surfactant nebulization versus instillation during high frequency ventilation in surfactant-deficient rabbits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Peter H.; Heikamp, A; Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto

    1998-01-01

    Surfactant nebulization improves lung function at low alveolar doses of surfactant. However, efficiency of nebulization is low, and lung deposition seems to depend on lung aeration. High frequency ventilation (HFV) has been shown to improve lung aeration. We hypothesize that the combination of HFV a

  19. Investigation into high-frequency-vibration assisted micro-blanking of pure copper foils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chunju

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties encountered during the manufacture of microparts are often associated with size effects relating to material, process and tooling. Utilizing acoustoplastic softening, achieved through a high-frequency vibration assisted micro-blanking process, was introduced to improve the surface finish in micro-blanking. A frequency of 1.0 kHz was chosen to activate the longitudinal vibration mode of the horn tip, using a piezoelectric actuator. A square hole with dimensions of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm was made, successfully, from a commercial rolled T2 copper foil with 100 μm in thickness. It was found that the maximum blanking force could be reduced by 5% through utilizing the high-frequency vibration. Proportion of the smooth, burnished area in the cut cross-section increases with an increase of the plasticity to fracture, under the high-frequency vibration, which suggests that the vibration introduced is helpful for inhibiting evolution of the crack due to its acoustoplastic softening effect. During blanking, roughness of the burnished surface could be reduced by increasing the vibration amplitude of the punch, which played a role as surface polishing. The results obtained suggest that the high-frequency vibration can be adopted in micro-blanking in order to improve quality of the microparts.

  20. High-frequency oscillatory ventilation and pediatric cardiac surgery : Yes, we can!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    2011-01-01

    In the previous issue of Critical Care, Bojan and colleagues reported their experiences with high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) after pediatric cardiac surgery. A total of 120 patients were treated with HFOV on the day of surgery, thus excluding rescue HFOV use. The main finding of the